WorldWideScience

Sample records for sintered uranium dioxide

  1. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  2. Process for preparing sintered uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is prepared for use as fuel in nuclear reactors by sintering it to the desired density at a temperature less than 1300 0 C in a chemically controlled gas atmosphere comprised of at least two gases which in equilibrium provide an oxygen partial pressure sufficient to maintain the uranium dioxide composition at an oxygen/uranium ratio of at least 2.005 at the sintering temperature. 7 Claims, No Drawings

  3. Method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, T.A.; Holaday, V.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an improved method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder for the preparation of nuclear fuel, using microwave radiation in a microwave induction furnace. The starting compound may be uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, ammonium diuranate or ammonium uranyl carbonate. The starting compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace for a period of time sufficient for compound decomposition. The decomposed compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace in a reducing atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to reduce the decomposed compound to uranium dioxide powder

  4. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  5. Standard specification for sintered (Uranium-Plutonium) dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers finished sintered and ground (uranium-plutonium) dioxide pellets for use in thermal reactors. It applies to uranium-plutonium dioxide pellets containing plutonium additions up to 15 % weight. This specification may not completely cover the requirements for pellets fabricated from weapons-derived plutonium. 1.2 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all applicable international, federal, state, and local regulations pertaining to possessing, processing, shipping, or using source or special nuclear material. Examples of U.S. government documents are Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 50Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities; Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 71Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material; and Code of Federal Regulations Tit...

  6. The production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fane, A.G.; Le Page, A.H.

    1975-02-01

    The development of a 0.13 m diameter pulsed fluidised bed reactor for the continuous production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate is described. Calcination-reduction at 670 to 680 0 C produced powders with surface areas of 4 to 6 m 2 g -1 giving pellet densities in excess of 10.6 g cm -3 . Sinterability was relatively insensitive to changes in operating conditions, provided the availability of hydrogen was adequate, for gas flow rates in the range 0.95 to 1.4 l S -1 , pulse frequencies of 0.5 and 0.75 Hz and mean residence times of the solids from 0.6 to 1.4 hours. Sinterability was shown to be improved either by use of higher input concentrations, or by use of a secondary flow of hydrogen (about 5 per cent of input) fed into the powder collection system and flowing countercurrent to the UO 2 product. The maximum throughput of 17 kg UO 2 h -1 (0.6 hours mean residence time) required only 120 per cent of the stoichiometric requirement at an input concentration of 50 vol.per cent with secondary hydrogen flow. Results are given for studies of the kinetics of reduction of calcined ammonia diuranate in hydrogen and the residence time distribution of solids in a pulsed fluidised bed. Estimates based on these data suggested that the overall conversion of ammonium diuranate to uranium dioxide in the continuously operated pulsed fluidised bed reactor was in excess of 99 per cent. Continuous stabilisation of the UO 2 product was demonstrated at 12 kg h -1 or UO 2 , in a 0.15 m diameter glass stabiliser, using 10 vol.per cent air in nitrogen and a temperature of about 50 0 C. (author)

  7. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  8. Nuclear energy - Determination of chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  9. Sintering uranium oxide in the reaction product of hydrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide alone or containing one or more additives such as plutonium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, titanium dioxide, silica, and alumina are heated to 900 to 1599 0 C in the presence of a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, either alone or with an inert carrier gas and held at the desired temperature in this atmosphere to sinter the pellets. The sintered pellets are then cooled in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -4 to 10 -18 atm of oxygen such as dry hydrogen, wet hydrogen, dry carbon monoxide, wet carbon monoxide, inert gases such as nitrogen, argon, helium, and neon and mixtures of ayny of the foregoing including a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The ratio of hydrogen to carbon dioxide in the gas mixture fed to the furnace is controlled to give a ratio of oxygen to uranium atoms in the sintered particles within the range of 1.98:1 to about 2.10:1. The water vapor present in the reaction products in the furnace atmosphere acts as a hydrolysis agent to aid removal of fluoride should such impurity be present in the uranium oxide. (U.S.)

  10. Effect of additives on enhanced sintering and grain growth in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.

    1992-06-01

    The use of sintering additives has been the most effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. We have established a same mechanism for additives which belongs to corundum structure: chromium, aluminium, vanadium and titanium sesquioxides. Study of thermodynamical stabilities of dopants has lead to define suitable sintering atmospheres in order to enhance grain growth. Low solubility limits have been defined at T=1700 deg C for four additives, from variations of final grain size versus initial dopant concentration Identification of second phase after cooling has been done from electronic diffraction patterns. It appears that these solubilities decrease sharply as positive deviation from stoichiometry of uranium dioxide increases. Dilatometric analysis of sintering of doped uranium dioxide has shown in certain cases some enhancement in densification rates, at the point of onset of abnormal grain growth, which is believed to be the source. Nevertheless, the following growth is accompanied with pores coalescence mechanisms and pores entrapment inside grains. Increased thermal stability, during standard annealing, is expected, limiting thereby redensification of nuclear fuel in reactors. Finally, from investigations of additives vaporizations, Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 , oxygen exchanges between additives and matrix are believed to occur, which should lead to enhance pore mobility. (Author)., refs., figs., tabs

  11. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  12. Report on in-situ studies of flash sintering of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, Alicia Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Flash sintering is a novel type of field assisted sintering that uses an electric field and current to provide densification of materials on very short time scales. The potential for field assisted sintering techniques to be used in producing nuclear fuel is gaining recognition due to the potential economic benefits and improvements in material properties. The flash sintering behavior has so far been linked to applied and material parameters, but the underlying mechanisms active during flash sintering have yet to be identified. This report summarizes the efforts to investigate flash sintering of uranium dioxide using dilatometer studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory and two separate sets of in-situ studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s NSLS-II XPD-1 beamline. The purpose of the dilatometer studies was to understand individual parameter (applied and material) effects on the flash behavior and the purpose of the in-situ studies was to better understand the mechanisms active during flash sintering. As far as applied parameters, it was found that stoichiometry, or oxygen-to-metal ratio, has a significant effect on the flash behavior (time to flash and speed of flash). Composite systems were found to have degraded sintering behavior relative to pure UO2. The critical field studies are complete for UO2.00 and will be analyzed against an existing model for comparison. The in-situ studies showed that the strength of the field and current are directly related to the sample temperature, with temperature-driven phase changes occurring at high values. The existence of an ‘incubation time’ has been questioned, due to a continuous change in lattice parameter values from the moment that the field is applied. Some results from the in-situ experiments, which should provide evidence regarding ion migration, are still being analyzed. Some preliminary conclusions can be made from these results with regard to using field assisted sintering to

  13. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets - Determination of oxygen/uranium atomic ratio by the amperometric method. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for the determination of the oxygen/uranium atomic ratio in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets. The method is applicable to reactor grade samples of hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The presence of reducing agents or residual organic additives invalidates the procedure. The test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid, which does not oxidize the uranium(IV) from UO 2 molecules. Thus, the uranium(VI) that is present in the dissolved solution is from UO 3 and/or U 3 O 8 molecules only, and is proportional to the excess oxygen in these molecules. The uranium(VI) content of the solution is determined by titration with a previously standardized solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate hexahydrate in orthophosphoric acid. The end-point of the titration is determined amperometrically using a pair of polarized platinum electrodes. The oxygen/uranium ratio is calculated from the uranium(VI) content. A portion, weighing about 1 g, of the test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid. The dissolution is performed in an atmosphere of nitrogen or carbon dioxide when sintered material is being analysed. When highly sintered material is being analysed, the dissolution is performed at a higher temperature in purified phosphoric acid from which the water has been partly removed. The cooled solution is titrated with an orthophosphoric acid solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate, which has previously been standardized against potassium dichromate. The end-point of the titration is detected by the sudden increase of current between a pair of polarized platinum electrodes on the addition of an excess of ammonium iron(II) sulfate solution. The paper provides information about scope, principle, reactions, reagents, apparatus, preparation of test sample, procedure (uranium dioxide powder, sintered pellets of uranium dioxide, highly sintered pellets of uranium dioxide and determination

  14. Implications on the sintering process by using zinc stearate as an additive in uranium dioxide green pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeoni, P.; Deju, R.; Gordes, P.; Turcanu, C.; Dobos, I.

    1980-01-01

    The mode of decomposition and removing of zinc stearate from uranium dioxide matrix into hydrogen atmosphere, as well as zinc stearate quantity and green density influence on residual carbon removing are described. The work emphasizes the influence that inhomogeneous atmosphere from a sintering furnace may have, sometimes, on the removal kinetics of residual carbon. (author)

  15. Laboratory sol-gel preparation of fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Tympl, M.

    1984-01-01

    The results are summed up of the laboratory investigation of preparing the fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide particles from uranyl gel using the method of the mixed reactor and the method of the dual-liquid nozzle, processed by leaching, drying, calcination and sintering. None of the two methods provides monodispersion particles under the given conditions but better control of the throughflow of the liquid media may improve results. Leaching of the fine fraction is very quick and the leaching of most components takes no longer than 5 minutes. In view of the fact that leaching of all components does not proceed at the same rate it is recommended that leaching time be doubled, or that leaching take place in two stages. Azeotropic distillation with chlorinated hydrocarbons is a favourable procedure for obtaining quality material; it is, however, necessary to prevent dried particles from comino. into contact with the water phase condensing on the walls of the distillation vessel and running down onto the surface of the distilling mixture. Calcination at a temperature of 500 degC in a thin layer and sintering at temperatures between 1350 and 1550 degC at an adequate rate of inflow of gaseous media and adequate rate of outflow of reaction wastes results in the production of high quality material whose density exceeds 97 to 98% theoretical density. (author)

  16. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  17. The reaction of sintered aluminium products with uranium dioxide and monocarbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, T.; Knudsen, Per

    1965-01-01

    The compatibility of SAP 930 with uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide was investigated in the temperature range 450–600° C. The results indicate that a severe reaction occurs between SAP 930 and UO2 within 8000 hours at 600° C, a slight reaction at 600° C for 1000 hours and after 11 900 hours...... between SAP 930 and the other carbides at this temperature. All SAP−UC combinations are incompatible at 600° C for as little as 100 hours of heat treatment. Tests designed to study the effect of a diffusion barrier on the SAP−UC reaction have shown that anodized SAP 930 and the three uranium carbides...

  18. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  19. Sintering of uranium dioxide pellets (UO2) in an oxidizing atmosphere (C O2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists in the study of the sintering process of U O 2 pellets in an oxidizing atmosphere. Sintering tests were performed in an CO 2 atmosphere and the influence of temperature and time on the pellets density and microstructure were verified. The results obtained were compared to those from the conventional sintering process and its efficiency was confirmed. (author)

  20. Low density, variation in sintered density and high nitrogen in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Murty, B.N.; Anuradha, M.; Nageshwara Rao, P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2000-01-01

    Low sintered density and density variation in sintered UO 2 were found to have been caused by non uniformity in the granule feed characteristics to the compacting press. The nitrogen impurity content of sintered UO 2 was found to be sintering furnace related and associated with low sintered density pellets. The problems of low density, variation in sintered density and high nitrogen could be solved by the replacement of the prevailing four punch precompaction by a single punch process; by the introduction of a vibro-sieve for the separation of fine particles from the press feed granules; by innovation in the powder feed shoe design for simultaneous and uniform dispensing of powder in all the die holes; by increasing the final compaction pressure and by modifying the gas flows and preheat temperature in the sintering furnace. (author)

  1. Sintering uranium oxide using a preheating step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, N.J.; Nivas, Y.; Packard, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide or uranium oxide with one or more additives are heated in a kiln in a process having a preheating step, a sintering step, a reduction step, and a cooling step in a controlled atmosphere. The process is practiced to give a range of temperature and atmosphere conditions for obtaining optimum fluoride removal from the compacted pellets along with optimum sintering in a single process. The preheating step of this process is conducted in a temperature range of about 600 0 to about 900 0 C and the pellets are held for at least twenty min, and preferably about 60 min, in an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 10 to about 75 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The sintering step is conducted at a temperature in the range of about 900 0 C to 1500 0 C in the presence of an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 0.5 to about 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The reduction step reduces the oxygen to metal ratio of the pellets to a range of about 1.98 to 2.10:1 and this is accomplished by gradually cooling the pellets for about 30 to about 120 min from the temperature of the sintering step to about 1100 0 C in an atmosphere of about 10 to 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. Thereafter the pellets are cooled to about 100 0 C under a protective atmosphere, and in one preferred practice the same atmosphere used in the reduction step is used in the cooling step. The preheating, sintering and reduction steps may also be conducted with their respective atmospheres having an initial additional component of water vapor and the water vapor can comprise up to about 20 vol %

  2. Uranium Dioxide Powder Flow ability Improvement Using Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanda, D.; Sambodo Daru, G.

    1998-01-01

    The improvement of flow ability characteristics of uranium dioxide powder has been done using sol-gel process. To anticipate a pellet mass production with uniform pellet dimension, the uranium dioxide powder must be have a spherical form. Uranium dioxide spherical powder has been diluted in acid transformed into sol colloidal solution. To obtain uranium dioxide spherical form, the uranium sol-colloidal solution has been dropped in a hot paraffin ( at the temperature of 90 0 C) to form gelatinous colloid and then dried at 800 0 C, and sintered at the temperature of 1700 0 C. The flow ability of spherical uranium dioxide powder has been examined by using Flowmeter Hall (ASTM. B. 213-46T). The measurement result reveals that the spherical uranium dioxide powder has a flow ability twice than that of unprocessed uranium dioxide powder

  3. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  4. Uranium dioxide preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.W.; Baugh, D.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An actinide dioxide, e.g., uranium dioxide, is prepared by reacting an actinide nitrate or hydrate or tetrahydrofuranate thereof, e.g., uranyl nitrate, a hydrate of uranyl nitrate, or a tetrahydrofuranate of uranyl nitrate with an alkali or alkaline earth metal adduct of a monocyclic or polycyclic hydrocarbon in the presence of an inert organic solvent. Typically, the starting material may be uranyl nitrate dihydrate or uranyl nitrate ditetrahydrofuranate (the latter material is a novel composition of matter) with a reactant such as the sodium adduct of naphthalene in the presence of a solvent such as tetrahydrofuran. The resultant uranium dioxide may be further purified by heating it in the presence of hydrogen. 15 claims

  5. Study of the oxidation risks during the sintering of uranium dioxide, and characterization of the excess oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.; Brandela, M.

    1966-05-01

    During sintering in reducing atmospheres, UO 2 pellets can be oxidized by gaseous impurities. The effects of temperature cycles, the partial pressure of O 2 and the flow rate of the gas over the pellets were investigated. In these atmospheres, the O 2 partial pressure during sintering is low at high temperatures, as a consequence of the dissociation rate of the combined water, but below 1000 deg C, it can be high enough to result in a noticeable oxidation of the surface of the pellets during cooling. The crystalline phases which can occur have been identified and two methods of detection have been proposed: a micrographic examination after chemical etching and radiocrystallography. (authors) [fr

  6. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.

    1977-01-01

    A three stage fluidized bed process is described for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to a ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder by first, reacting hydrogen and steam with UF 6 in a first fluidized bed in a temperature range of from about 475 to 600 0 C to form solid intermediate products UO 2 F 2 and U 3 O 8 ; second, reacting hydrogen and steam with the intermediate products in a second fluidized bed at a temperature ranging from about 575 to about 675 0 C to produce a second group of intermediate products including UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 , and UO 2 ; and, third, reacting hydrogen and steam with the second group of intermediate products in a third fluidized bed as a temperature of 575 to 675 0 C to produce ceramic grade UO 2 powder having low residual content of fluorides and other foreign materials. 9 claims, 1 figure

  7. Electrodeposition of uranium dioxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, L.; Gonzalez, B.D.; Lance, M.J.; Holcomb, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium dioxide films in a hydrated form are electrodeposited unto nickel plates starting with a uranyl nitrate solution in ammonium sulfate. The process is incidental to water splitting which is the dominant electrochemical pathway and as a consequence, the uranium deposition is highly dependent on experimental parameters that require close control such as the pH and concentration of the supporting electrolyte as well as current density, and the cell design. (author)

  8. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH 4 OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  9. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  10. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  11. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porneuf, A.

    1960-05-01

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [fr

  12. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  13. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  14. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1983-01-01

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO 2 are described

  15. Industrial Sintering of Uranium Oxide in a Continuous Furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, R.; Porneuf, A.

    1963-01-01

    Under a USAEC-EURATOM research contract, CICAF (Compagnie industrielle de combustibles atomiques frittes) was asked by the French Atomic Energy Commission to design and construct a continuous furnace sintering under a reducing atmosphere at high temperature. The characteristic features of the furnace are automatic operation, rigorous control of presintering and sintering atmospheres, flexibility of temperature regulation so that the thermal cycle can be adjusted to the product to be sintered and high output (5 t of uranium oxide per month). It can operate continuously up to 1700 deg. C, the presintering taking place at a lower temperature (800 deg. C) in a preliminary furnace which forms an integral part of the whole. The sintering atmosphere is cracked ammonia or pure hydrogen; the presintering atmosphere is a mixture o f about 10% hydrogen and 90% nitrogen. The sintered pellets densify to above 97% of theoretical density, with a total dispersion of less than 1%. Structurally, they are equi-axed grains of about 10μm. It was established that the stoichiometric variation of the uranium oxide sintered in a continuous furnace was less than 0.005. (author) [fr

  16. Predictor of regulation of uranium dioxide powder pressing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Eduardo Souza; Araujo, Victor Hugo Leal de; Bernardelli, Sergio Henrique

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important steps of the uranium dioxide pellets fabrication used in the nuclear fuel elements is the green pellets pressing. The target density of the pellets after the sintering process determines the density of the green pellet. To meet the same sintered target density the green density may vary according to the powder characteristics. These variations implies in changing the regulation of the press for different powder's patches. The regulation done empirically imply in productivity loss and necessity of reprocessing the pellets pressed during the press regulation and also depends on the operator experience. At this work, was developed an artificial neural network feed forward back propagation to predict the press regulation, depending on the powder characteristics and the green pellet's target density. The results obtained at INB - Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S. A. during the fabrication of the fifth recharge of Angra II nuclear power plant are presented. (author)

  17. Uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide enhanced thermal conductivity nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antonio Santos; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2007-01-01

    The uranium dioxide is the most used substance as nuclear reactor fuel for presenting many advantages such as: high stability even when it is in contact with water in high temperatures, high fusion point, and high capacity to retain fission products. The conventional fuel is made with ceramic sintered pellets of uranium dioxide stacked inside fuel rods, and presents disadvantages because its low thermal conductivity causes large and dangerous temperature gradients. Besides, the thermal conductivity decreases further as the fuel burns, what limits a pellet operational lifetime. This research developed a new kind of fuel pellets fabricated with uranium dioxide kernels and beryllium oxide filling the empty spaces between them. This fuel has a great advantage because of its higher thermal conductivity in relation to the conventional fuel. Pellets of this kind were produced, and had their thermophysical properties measured by the flash laser method, to compare with the thermal conductivity of the conventional uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. (author) (author)

  18. Synthesis, sintering properties and thermal conductivity of uranium carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, R.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    An introduction to the applications and chemistry of uranium carbonitrides is given including the potential use as a nuclear fuel. The powder synthesis of UC, UN and mixtures of UC and UN by a cyclic process is described. The correlation between the composition ratio UN/(UC+UN) in the final product and the parameters of the process is only determined qualitatively. Batch synthesis of a powder does not lead to an increase of the content of metallic impurities and oxygen. The impurity level is determined by that of the starting uranium metal and the thermal conductivity of the sintered compacts of uranium carbonitrides are determined via the measurement of the thermal diffusivity at 1100-1700 K. (Auth.)

  19. Piezomagnetism and magnetoelastic memory in uranium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, M; Saul, A; Salamon, M; Zapf, V S; Harrison, N; Durakiewicz, T; Lashley, J C; Andersson, D A; Stanek, C R; Smith, J L; Gofryk, K

    2017-07-24

    The thermal and magnetic properties of uranium dioxide, a prime nuclear fuel and thoroughly studied actinide material, remain a long standing puzzle, a result of strong coupling between magnetism and lattice vibrations. The magnetic state of this cubic material is characterized by a 3-k non-collinear antiferromagnetic structure and multidomain Jahn-Teller distortions, likely related to its anisotropic thermal properties. Here we show that single crystals of uranium dioxide subjected to strong magnetic fields along threefold axes in the magnetic state exhibit the abrupt appearance of positive linear magnetostriction, leading to a trigonal distortion. Upon reversal of the field the linear term also reverses sign, a hallmark of piezomagnetism. A switching phenomenon occurs at ±18 T, which persists during subsequent field reversals, demonstrating a robust magneto-elastic memory that makes uranium dioxide the hardest piezomagnet known. A model including a strong magnetic anisotropy, elastic, Zeeman, Heisenberg exchange, and magnetoelastic contributions to the total energy is proposed.The nuclear fuel uranium dioxide is of intrinsic interest due to its industrial applications but it also exhibits intriguing electronic and magnetic properties. Here, the authors demonstrate how its complex magnetic structure and interactions give rise to a strong piezomagnetic effect.

  20. Improved ionic model of liquid uranium dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryaznov, [No Value; Iosilevski, [No Value; Yakub, E; Fortov, [No Value; Hyland, GJ; Ronchi, C

    The paper presents a model for liquid uranium dioxide, obtained by improving a simplified ionic model, previously adopted to describe the equation of state of this substance [1]. A "chemical picture" is used for liquid UO2 of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric composition. Several ionic species

  1. Thermal properties of nonstoichiometry uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazauri, R.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Tenishev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, was developed a method of oxidation pure uranium dioxide to a predetermined deviation from the stoichiometry. Oxidation was carried out using the thermogravimetric method on NETZSCH STA 409 CD with a solid electrolyte galvanic cell for controlling the oxygen potential of the environment. 4 samples uranium oxide were obtained with a different ratio of oxygen-to-metal: O / U = 2.002, O / U = 2.005, O / U = 2.015, O / U = 2.033. For the obtained samples were determined basic thermal characteristics of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity. The error of heat capacity determination is equal to 5%. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing deviation from stoichiometry. For the sample with O / M = 2.033, difference of both values with those of stoichiometric uranium dioxide is close to 50%.

  2. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamaury Dubois, S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 et Cs 2 O-ZrO 2 -SO 2 . The compounds CsAISi 2 O 6 and Cs 2 ZrSi 6 O 15 were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ) or (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H 2 . It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO 2+x . We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs

  3. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide pellets - Determination of density and volume fraction of open and closed porosity. 2. ed. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  4. Method and device to produce pourable, directly pressable uranium dioxide powder. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von rieselfaehigem, direkt verpressbarem Urandioxid-Pulver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, P.; Isensee, H.J.; Vietzke, H.

    1978-08-17

    The uranium dioxide powder is produced from uranium peroxide which is obtained by continuous precipitation of uranyl nitrate solutions. By varying the precipitation conditions, one can exactly adjust the desired properties of the UO/sub 2/ powder, there is no 'post sintering'. The individual process steps are shown in detail.

  5. Method of producing powder uranium oxide and sinterable uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecak, V.; Matous, V.; Baran, V.

    1978-01-01

    The extract of a uranyl compound (e.g. nitrate, sulfate) dissolved as a solvate in the organic phase is precipitated with a saturated ammonium carbonate solution as tetraammonium uranyl tricarbonate. This crystalline salt is further calcined to UO 3 or is converted to UO 2 in a reduction medium. (J.P.)

  6. Fluorination reaction uranium dioxide by fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Shinji; Homma, Shunji; Koga, Jiro; Matsumoto, Shiro; Sasahira, Akira; Kawamura, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Kinetics of the fluorination reaction of uranium dioxide is studied using un-reacted core model with shrinking particles. The model includes the film mass transfer of fluorine gas and its diffusion in the particle. The rate constants of the model are determined by fitting the experimental data for 370-450degC. The model successfully represents the fluorination in this temperature range. The rate control step is identified by examining the rate constants of the model for 300-1,800degC. For temperature range up to 900degC, the fluorination reaction is rate controlling. For over 900degC, both mechanisms of the mass transfer of fluorine and the fluorination reaction control the rate of the fluorination. With further increase of the temperature, however, the fluorination reaction becomes so fast that the mass transfer of fluorine eventually controls the rate of the fluorination. (author)

  7. Sintering of dioxide pellets in an oxidizing atmosphere (CO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists in the study of the sintering process of U O 2 pellets in an oxidizing atmosphere. Sintering tests were performed in an CO 2 atmosphere and the influence of temperature and time on the pellets density and microstructure were verified. The results obtained were compared to those from the conventional sintering process and its efficiency was confirmed. (author)

  8. The preparation of uranium tetrafluoride from dioxide by aqueous way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, A.R. de; Abrao, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the study for the wet way obtention of uranium tetrafluoride by the reaction of hydrofluoric acid and powder uranium dioxide. With the results obtained at laboratory scale a pilot plant was planned and erected. It is presently in operation for experimental data aquisition. Time of reaction, temperature, excess of reagents and the hydrofluoric acid / uranium dioxide ratio were the main parameters studied to obtain a product with the following characteristics: - density greater than 1 g/cm 3 , - conversion rate greater than 96%, -water content equal to 0,2%, that allows its application to hexafluoride convertion or to magnesiothermic process. (authOr) [pt

  9. Uranium tetrafluoride production via dioxide by wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, A.R. de.

    1988-01-01

    The study for the wet way obtention of uranium tetrafluoride by the reaction of hydrofluoric acid and powder uranium dioxide, is presented. From the results obtained at laboratory scale a pilot plant was planned and erected. It is presently in operation for experimental data aquisition. Time of reaction, temperature, excess of reagents and the hydrofluoric acid / uranium dioxide ratio were the main parameters studied to obtain a product with the following characteristics: - density greater than 1 g/cm 3 , conversion rate greater than 96%, and water content equal to 0,2% that allows its application to heaxafluoride convertion or to magnesiothermic process. (author) [pt

  10. Studies on O/M ratio determination in uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, S.; Chawla, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Thermogravimetric studies were carried out in unsintered and sintered samples of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide under different atmospheric conditions (air, argon and moist argon/hydrogen). Moisture loss was found to occur below 200 0 C for uranium dioxide samples, upto 700 0 C for sintered plutonium dioxide and negligible for sintered samples. The O/M ratios for non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (sintered and unsintered), plutonium dioxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxides (sintered) could be obtained with a precision of +- 0.002. Two reference states UOsub(2.000) and UOsub(2.656) were obtained for uranium dioxide and the reference state MOsub(2.000) was used for other cases. For unsintered plutonium dioxide samples, accurate O/M ratios could not be obtained of overlap of moisture loss with oxygen loss/gain. (author)

  11. Impact of sintering method on certain properties of titanium dioxide nanopowder materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porozova Svetlana E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanopowder samples consolidated by method of cold uniaxial compaction at 200 MPa and conventionally sintered in air at 1300°С with isothermal tempering during 60 minutes or spark-plasma sintering at 1300°С and 30 MPа were studied using the method of light combination scattering spectroscopy (Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The samples were found to differ significantly in terms of color, density, phase composition and microstructure.

  12. Standard specification for blended uranium oxides with 235U content of less than 5 % for direct hydrogen reduction to nuclear grade uranium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  13. Synthesis of uranium fluorides from uranium dioxide with ammonium bifluoride and ammonolysis of uranium fluorides to uranium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, Charles Burnett

    This work presents the chemical conversion of uranium oxides to uranium fluorides, and their subsequent conversion to uranium nitrides. Uranium dioxide reacts with ammonium bifluoride at 20°C to form compound in the ammonium-uranium fluoride chemical system. This reaction occurs between solid uranium dioxide at the surface of the particles and ammonium fluoride vapor. A shrinking-sphere model demonstrated surface reaction kinetics, not mass transport by diffusion through the product layer, limit the reaction rate when the starting material consists of 100 mum uranium dioxide particles. Powder x-ray diffraction showed the reaction to be complete within 8 hours, with (NH4) 4UF8 the reaction product. High-resolution electron microcopy revealed the product is largely amorphous on a micrometer-scale, but contains well-formed crystal domains on the order of 10x10 nm. X-ray diffraction showed the reaction progresses though beta-NH4UF5, delta-(NH 4)2UF6, and gamma-(NH4)2UF6 intermediate phases before finally forming (NH4)4UF 8. Modeling the system as a series of first-order reaction suggested a fourth intermediate, possibly UF4, is likely to occur. The reaction of (NH4)4UF8 with ammonia gas at 800°C forms alpha-U2N3/UN2 solid solution products with a composition of UN1.83. The x-ray powder diffraction pattern of this product is the fcc pattern commonly referenced as that of UN2 and the lattice parameter was 0.53050 nm. Surface area increased by a factor of ten during ammonolysis, consistent with the action of a hydriding agent. The alpha-U2N 3/UN2 solid solution system formed contained 1 wt% UO 2 as an impurity. Upon subsequent heating to 1150°C for 4.5 hours under argon, the nitride sample formed UN with a UO2 impurity of 9 wt%. Based on the HRTEM images, oxidation in the UN product appears to be limited to within 20 nm of particle surfaces and grain boundaries.

  14. Evaluation of Hydrothermally Synthesized Uranium Dioxide for Novel Semiconductor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy ...Senanayake, G. Waterhouse, A. Chan, T. Madey, D. Mullins and H. Idriss, "Probing Surface Oxidation of Reduced Uranium Dioxide Thin Film Using

  15. Fluorophotometric determination of uranium: an automated sintering furnace and factors affecting precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, J.E.

    1978-07-01

    The fusion furnace consists of four individually controlled, slotted-tube furnaces that automatically dry, sinter and anneal the fluoride or carbonate pellet used in the fluorometric determination of uranium. The furnace operates in air and prepares approximately 90 pellets per hour for fluorometric measurement. The factors that were thought to affect the precision of the method were investigated. The two factors that seem to be the most influential are (1) the manner in which the sample is loaded onto the pellet; and (2) the surface characteristics of the platinum dish in which the pellet is sintered and measured fluorometrically

  16. Spark plasma sintering and porosity studies of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Wallenius, Janne; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Claisse, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a number of samples of UN sintered by the SPS method have been fabricated, and highly pure samples ranging in density from 68% to 99.8%TD - corresponding to an absolute density of 14.25 g/cm3 out of a theoretical density of 14.28 g/cm3 - have been fabricated. By careful adjustment of the sintering parameters of temperature and applied pressure, the production of pellets of specific porosity may now be achieved between these ranges. The pore closure behaviour of the material has also been documented and compared to previous studies of similar materials, which demonstrates that full pore closure using these methods occurs near 97.5% of relative density.

  17. Immobilization of chlorine dioxide modified cells for uranium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Shengbin; Ruan, Binbiao; Zheng, Yueping; Zhou, Xiaobin; Xu, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    There has been a trend towards the use of microorganisms to recover metals from industrial wastewater, for which various methods have been reported to be used to improve microorganism adsorption characteristics such as absorption capacity, tolerance and reusability. In present study, chlorine dioxide(ClO 2 ), a high-efficiency, low toxicity and environment-benign disinfectant, was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. FTIR analysis indicated that several cell surface groups are involved in the uranium adsorption and cell surface modification. The modified cells were further immobilized on a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) matrix to improve their reusability. The cell-immobilized adsorbent could be employed either in a high concentration system to move vast UO 2 2+ ions or in a low concentration system to purify UO 2 2+ contaminated water thoroughly, and could be repeatedly used in multiple adsorption-desorption cycles with about 90% adsorption capacity maintained after seven cycles. - Highlights: • Chlorine dioxide was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells were further immobilized by carboxymethylcellulose to improve their reusability

  18. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  19. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingant, N.

    2008-12-01

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th 1-x U x (C 2 O 4 ) 2 .2H 2 O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the cations distribution, allowed to limit the

  20. The influence of alkali metal impurities on the uranium dioxide hydrofluorination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponelis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect alkali metal impurities (sodium and potassium) in the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) feed material have on the conversion to uraniumtetrafluoride (UF 4 ) was examined. A direct correlation exists between impurity level and sintering with concomitant reduced conversion. The sintering mechanism is attributable to decreased specific surface area. The typical 'die-off' of reaction or conversion can be explained in terms of increased particle growth rather than an arbitray zero porosity function. Hydrofluorination temperatures varied from 250 to 650 degrees C using pellets varying in size from 0.42 mm to 10 mm. Scanning electron microscope photographs show clearly the particle or grain growth in the pellet as well as the increased size with impurity level. A new dimensionless constant, N KP , is defined to facilitate explanation of the reaction as a function of pellet radius. N KP is defined as the ratio of pellet diffusion resistance to particle diffusion resistance of the reacting HF gas. At high values of this number (N KP >40) the conversion is limited to the outer periphery of the pellet while at low values (N KP KP at higher reaction temperatures which means that the particle diffusion resistance increases with increasing impurity level and results in easier sintering of these materials. 53 refs., 206 figs., 94 tabs

  1. Study of process parameters for reducing ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in fluidized bed furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao Junior, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists of studying the process parameters of AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) to U O 2 (uranium dioxide) reduction, with good physical and chemical characteristics, in fluidized bed. Initially, it was performed U O 2 cold fluidization experiments with an acrylic column. Afterward, it was done AUC to U O 2 reduction experiments, in which the process parameters influence in the granulometry, specific surface area, porosity and fluoride amount on the U O 2 powder produced were studied. As a last step, it was done compacting and sintering tests of U O 2 pellets in order to appreciate the U O 2 powder performance, obtained by fluidized bed, in the fuel pellets fabrication. (author)

  2. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used

  3. Contribution to the study of second phases particles dispersion in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, V.

    1994-06-01

    To reduce fission gas release of irradiated polycrystalline uranium dioxide, the dispersion of intragranular nanometric particles of second phase necessary to pin gas bubbles may complete the advantage of a large-grained fuel microstructure. Moreover, intergranular glass films may improve high temperatures mechanical properties of UO 2 . In this study, mixtures of additives composed of ''corindon'' structure oxides that enhance the fuel grain growth and composed of different oxides with variable solid solubilities in the UO 2 matrix were achieved. Additives with a negligible solubility inhibit grain boundaries motion except those, such as silica, that involve a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. Rare earth oxides that form stable solid solutions with UO 2 cannot lead to precipitation, but have no effect on the fuel grain growth doped with ''corindon'' type oxides. A chromium oxide excess allows the creation of a fuel microstructure described by large grains and intragranular spherical Cr 2 O 3 inclusions observed by scanning electron microscopy. Values for the bulk lattice diffusion coefficient of Cr 3+ cations in UO 2 can be deduced from the experimental growth of those dispersed particles by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of small precipitated metal particles inside the uranium dioxide matrix induced by the internal reduction of a solid solution has not been performed. However, direct reduction of insoluble chromium oxide particles is easy and produces metallic intragranular precipitates. (author). 119 refs., 112 figs., 33 tabs., 5 annexes

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of trace nitrate ion in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhidong; Bai Hongbin; Xu Junzheng; Wu Wangsuo; Yang Zhangzhong; Wang Nanjie

    2008-01-01

    A simple, fast and selective spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace nitrate ion in uranium dioxide was developed, based on the fade of indigo carmine(IC) with nitrate ion in sulfuric acid medium. The visible absorbance is detected at a wavelenth of 610 nm. The linear calibration range is 0.20-1.00 mg/L. The linear equation and the correlation coefficient are y=0.297 5x+0.0205 and 0.999 39 respectively. The relative standard deviation is less than 10%, and the standard addition recovery of nitrate ion is 93%-106%. The method is applied to the determination of nitrate ion in uranium dioxide sample with satisfactory results. (authors)

  5. Compactation pressure influence on the thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide fuel pellets produced with kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Migliorini, Fabricio Lima; Silva, Egonn Hendrigo Carvalho; Andrade, Roberto Marcio de

    2009-01-01

    Under compaction pressures ranging from 300 MPa up to 500 MPa, fuel pellets of uranium dioxide were manufactured by the pressing of kernels. These were produced by the sol-gel process developed in Germany by NUKEM for using in high temperature gas cooled reactors, which were absorbed, transferred and implanted at CDTN-Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear. The sintering was performed at 1700 deg C for two hours under argon with 4% hydrogen atmosphere, resulting sintered densities ranging from 9.33 g·cm -3 up to 10.08 g·cm -3 , determined by the xylol penetration-immersion method. Using the flash laser method, the thermophysical properties of the pellets were determined and thermal diffusivity ranging from 2.58 x 10 -6 m 2 ·s -1 up to 2.78 x 10 -6 m 2 ·s -1 and thermal conductivity from 6.22 m -1 ·K -1 up to 7.24 W·m -1 ·K -1 , corresponding to a decreasing of the porosity from 14.88% to 8.05%. The methodology is described and the influence of the compaction pressure on the pellet properties is also analyzed. The thermal conductivity results of this study will be very valuable to a project in development at CDTN, in which uranium dioxide pellets will be produced by the pressing of kernels, with beryllium oxide filling the voids between the kernels in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel and consequently, the thermal performance of the fuel rod, as required in extended burnup conditions. They will be used as reference to compare and calculate the favorable increase of the thermal conductivity, caused by the addition of beryllium oxide. (author)

  6. Thermal conductivity measurement of liquid uranium dioxide by transient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiovanni, A.; Remy, B.

    2006-01-01

    This work deals with a new measurement method of the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide in liquid phase. The sample, initially in the solid form, is heated above the melting point by a laser pulse. The temperature variation of the heated zone is measured with a fast pyrometer and allows to recover the thermal conductivity of the liquid using an inverse method. The uncertainty obtained by this method is significantly lower to the one encountered in the literature. (J.S.)

  7. Determination of carbon chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijko, N.I.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of chlorine and fluorine determination and simultaneous determination of carbon and chlorine in electrolytic uranium dioxide are described. The method of chlorine and fluorine determination is based on their separation during oxide pyrohydrolysis with subsequent spectrophotometric analysis of condensate. Lower determination limits constitute 1 μg for chlorine, 0.5 μg for fluorine. Relative standard deviation when the content of impurities analyzed is 10 -3 % constitutes 0.05-0.07

  8. Determination of gas residues in uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riella, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement of low amounts of residual gases, excluding water, in ceramic grade uranium dioxide pellets, using high temperature vacuum extraction technique, is dealt with. The high temperature extraction gas analysis apparatus was designed and assembled for sequential analysis of up to eight uranium dioxide pellets by run. The system consists of three major units, namely outgassing unit, transfer unit and analytical unit. The whole system is evacuated to a final pressure of less then 10 -5 torr. A weighed pellet is transfered into the outgassing unit for subsequent dropping into a Platinum-Rhodium crucible which is heated inductively up to 1600 0 C during 30 minutes. The released gases are imediately transfered from the outgassing to analytical unit passing through a cold trap at -95 0 C to remove water vapor. The gases are transfered to previously calibrated volumetric bulb where the total pressure and temperature are determined. An estimate of the gas content in the pellets at STP condition is obtained from the measured volume, pressure and temperature of the gas mixture by applying ideal gases equation. Analysis to two lots (fourteen samples) of uranium dioxide pellets by the method described here indicated a mean gas content of 0,060cm 3 /g UO 2 . The lower limit of this technique is 0,03cm 3 /g UO 2 (STP). The time required for the analysis of eight pellets is about 9 hours [pt

  9. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962); Contribution a l'etude de la microstructure du dioxyde d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porneuf, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-05-15

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [French] La microstructure de frittes d'oxyde d'uranium est etudiee en fonction de divers parametres, en particulier de la temperature et de l'atmosphere de frittage, par examen de la surface externe des frittes, puis de leur microstructure interne (fractographie, ceramographie). Differentes techniques de preparation des surfaces (polissage mecanique ou electrolytique) et de revelation de la structure (attaque chimique ou anodique, bombardement ionique, oxydation preferentielle) ont ete experimentees et comparees. Des figures comparables a celles revelees dans les metaux et liees probablement a des interactions entre dislocations et lacunes ont ete observees. (auteur)

  10. Determination of the O/U ratio in uranium dioxide by gravimetric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.; Riella, H.G.

    1986-04-01

    In the presente work, the stoichiometric oxygen/metal ratio of uranium dioxide samples was determined by gravimetric method. The method is discussed in detail and the influence of various parameters like humidity and diferent forms of uranium dioxides materials, like pellets and powders, was investigated. For uranium dioxide pellets of same lot of fabrication the precision was 0.2%. The results obtained compare well with other methods. (Author) [pt

  11. New method for conversion of uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Suzuki, M.; Tanaka, H.

    1987-01-01

    Five different methods for conversion of UF 6 to ceramic-grade UO 2 powder have been developed to industrial scale. Two of them, the ammonium diuranate (ADU) and AUC processes, are based on precipitation of uranium compounds from aqueous solutions. The other three follow a dry route in which UF 6 is hydrolyzed and reduced by steam and hydrogen using fluidized bed techniques, rotating kilns, or flame chemistry methods. The ADU process has the advantage of flexible product powder characteristics, while disadvantages include a large quantity of waste, low powder fluidity, and a complicated process. On the other hand, the dry process using fluidized-bed techniques has the advantages of hydrofluoric acid recovery, a free-flowing powder, and process simplicity, but the disadvantages of poorer ceramic properties for the product. The new method developed at Mitsubishi Metal Corp. is a semidry process, which has well-balanced merits over the ADU process and the dry process using fluidized-bed techniques. This process is very attractive from powder characteristics, process simplicity, and waste reduction

  12. Lattice constant in nonstoichiometric uranium dioxide from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneval, Fabien; Freyss, Michel; Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2018-02-01

    Nonstoichiometric uranium dioxide experiences a shrinkage of its lattice constant with increasing oxygen content, in both the hypostoichiometric and the hyperstoichiometric regimes. Based on first-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT)+U approximation, we have developed a point defect model that accounts for the volume of relaxation of the most significant intrinsic defects of UO2. Our point defect model takes special care of the treatment of the charged defects in the equilibration of the model and in the determination of reliable defect volumes of formation. In the hypostoichiometric regime, the oxygen vacancies are dominant and explain the lattice constant variation with their surprisingly positive volume of relaxation. In the hyperstoichiometric regime, the uranium vacancies are predicted to be the dominating defect,in contradiction with experimental observations. However, disregarding uranium vacancies allows us to recover a good match for the lattice-constant variation as a function of stoichiometry. This can be considered a clue that the uranium vacancies are indeed absent in UO2 +x, possibly due to the very slow diffusion of uranium.

  13. Characterization of Uranium Oxide and Ln-bearing Uranium Oxide during Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.B. [Netzsch Instruments, Inc., Estes Park, CO (United States); Byler, D.D.; Stanek, C.R.; Dunwoody, J.T.; Luther, E.P.; Volz, H.M.; Vogel, S.C.; McClellan, K.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-06-15

    In support of the transmutation fuel development as part of the effort to close the fuel cycle, research has been carried out to gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution of material properties during sintering as well as the properties of post-sintered oxide fuels. Of course the effects of material and test parameters such as starting powder O/M, green density, particle size distribution, heating rate and atmosphere on the densification of oxide and mixed oxide fuels have been widely studied, sometimes with conflicting results. However, the evolution of thermophysical properties such as specific heat and thermal conductivity during densification is not well known. Further, the effects of lanthanides on densification as well as on other thermodynamic and transport properties during sintering have not been widely studied. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of key material and test parameters on the thermophysical properties during sintering (both surface and volume transport) and on post-sintered UO{sub 2+x} and UO{sub 2+x} + lanthanide samples. Mixtures of UO{sub 2+x} and lanthanide component powder as well as pre-synthesized solid solutions have been studied. In addition to the standard bulk characterization methods such as dilatometry (thermal expansion / densification), laser flash (thermal diffusivity / thermal conductivity), differential scanning calorimetry (specific heat and transformation energetics) and thermogravimetric analysis (mass change), we have employed ancillary techniques such as neutron scattering, laboratory X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to help evaluate phases, lattice parameters and microstructure during sintering. The experimental data from the methods mentioned above have been cross-correlated to help explain the physics which govern the sintering process as well as those which govern the development of the thermophysical properties of these materials. The results of this work will be

  14. Influence of various manufacturing parameters on some characteristics of UO2 powders and their sintering behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, M.H.; Vaknin, Sh.; Kremener, A.; Hadari, Z.

    1977-02-01

    Various parameters in the process of manufacturing uranium dioxide are examined and their influence on the characteristics and sintering behaviour of the powders obtained established. In addition some correlations between the powder aggregates microstructure and their adhesion properties and sintering behaviour are indicated. Shrinkage during the sintering process is also discussed

  15. Determination of Oxygen - to - Uranium Ratio in Hyperstoichio - Metric Uranium Dioxide. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolk, A.; Lingerak, W.A.

    1970-09-01

    For the determination of the O/U ratio in hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide we prefer the following chemical procedure. The sample is dissolved in concentrated phosphoric acid without change in valence of the uranium. Then the amount of U (VI) present in the solution is titrated with a Fe (II) - standard solution in phosphoric acid. The titrimetric end-point is detected following the ''dead-stop-end-point'' procedure. When special precautions are made the O/U value can be determined with an accuracy and precision of + 0.0001 0/U units when 500 mg sample aliquots are used. (author)

  16. Surface characterization of uranium metal and uranium dioxide using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Trickle, I.R.; Tucker, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra of pure uranium metal and stoichiometric uranium dioxide have been obtained using an AEI ES300 spectrometer. Binding energy values for core and valence electrons have been determined using an internally calibrated energy scale and monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Satellite peaks observed accompanying certain principal core ionizations are discussed in relation to the mechanisms by which they arise. Confirmation is obtained that for stoichiometric UOsub(2.00) a single shake-up satellite is observed accompanying the U 4fsub(7/2,5/2) principal core lines, separated by 6.8 eV to higher binding energy. (author)

  17. Alternative Anodes for the Electrolytic Reduction of Uranium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, Augustus

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is an essential step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. In order to consume current stockpiles, ceramic uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel will be subjected to an electrolytic reduction process. The current reduction process employs a platinum anode and a stainless steel alloy 316 cathode in a molten salt bath consisting of LiCl-2wt% Li 2O and occurs at 700°C. A major shortcoming of the existing process is the degradation of the platinum anode under the severely oxidizing conditions encountered during electrolytic reduction. This work investigates alternative anode materials for the electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide. The high temperature and extreme oxidizing conditions encountered in these studies necessitated a unique set of design constraints on the system. Thus, a customized experimental apparatus was designed and constructed. The electrochemical experiments were performed in an electrochemical reactor placed inside a furnace. This entire setup was housed inside a glove box, in order to maintain an inert atmosphere. This study investigates alternative anode materials through accelerated corrosion testing. Surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Electrochemical behavior of candidate materials was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization characteristics. After narrowing the number of candidate electrode materials, ferrous stainless steel alloy 316, nickel based Inconel 718 and elemental tungsten were chosen for further investigation. Of these materials only tungsten was found to be sufficiently stable at the anodic potential required for electrolysis of uranium dioxide in molten salt. The tungsten anode and stainless steel alloy 316 cathode electrode system was studied at the required reduction potential for UO2 with varying lithium oxide concentrations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

  18. Swelling and gas release of grain-boundary pores in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrire, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    The swelling and gas release of overpressured grain boundary pores is sintered unirradiated uranium dioxide were investigated under isothermal conditions. The pores became overpressured when the ambient pressure was reduced, and the excess pressure driving force caused growth and interconnection of the pores, leading to eventual gas release. Swelling was measured continuously by a linear variable differential transformer, and open and closed porosity fractions were determined after the tests by immersion density and quantitative microscopy measurements. The sinter porosity consisted of pores situated on grain faces, grain edges, and grain corners. Isolated pores maintained their equilibrium shape while growing, without any measurable change in dihedral angle. Interconnection occurred predominantly along grain edges, without any evidence of pore sharpening or crack propagation at low driving forces. Extensive open porosity occurred at a threshold density of about 85% TD. There was an almost linear dependence of the initial swelling rate on the driving force, with an activation energy of 200+- 8 kJ/mole, in good agreement with published values of the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion

  19. Uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets - Determination of nitrogen content - Method using ammonia-sensing electrode. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for determining the nitrogen content in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. It is applicable to the determination of nitrogen, present as nitride, in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The concentration range within which the method can be used is between 9 μg and 600 μg of nitrogen per gram. Interference can occur from metals which form complex ammines, but these are not normally present in significant amounts

  20. Onset conditions for flash sintering of UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Alicia M.; Pereira da Silva, João Gustavo; Byler, Darrin D.; Andersson, David A.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.; McClellan, Kenneth J.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, flash sintering was demonstrated on stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide pellets at temperatures ranging from room temperature (26 °C) up to 600 °C . The onset conditions for flash sintering were determined for three stoichiometries (UO2.00, UO2.08, and UO2.16) and analyzed against an established thermal runaway model. The presence of excess oxygen was found to enhance the flash sintering onset behavior of uranium dioxide, lowering the field required to flash and shortening the time required for a flash to occur. The results from this study highlight the effect of stoichiometry on the flash sintering behavior of uranium dioxide and will serve as the foundation for future studies on this material.

  1. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl–KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, L.D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V.J.; Atwood, R.C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L.D.; Simons, S.J.R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D.J.L.; Shearing, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form α-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs ...

  2. Study of Physical modifications induced by chromium doping of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances requires reducing fission gas release. Doping uranium dioxide with chromium is the improvement axis considered in this work. Indeed, chromium fastens crystal growth in UO 2 , and thus enables a significant increase of the grain size. This work aims at the identification of defects produced by chromium addition in UO 2 , and their impact on properties of interest of the material. First, defects existing in doped fuel directly after sintering have been studied. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy allowed the identification of the environment of solubilised chromium in UO 2 . Chromium atoms are roughly substituting for uranium atoms, but generate a complete reorganisation of neighbouring oxygen atoms, and distortion of uranium sublattice. Characterisation of transport properties (electrical conductivity and oxygen self-diffusion) have shown that because of charge balance, chromium plays a leading role on such properties. A model of point defects in UO 2 has been proposed, showing how complex the involved phenomena are. Observations by Transmission Electron Microscopy of ion-irradiated thin foils have shown that chromium makes the coalescence of irradiation defects easier. This behaviour can be explained by a stabilisation of defect clusters due to precipitation of chromium. Finally, study of thermal diffusion of helium in doped UO 2 , performed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis, has confirmed this interaction between chromium atoms and irradiation defects. Indeed, μ-NRA measures have shown no fast gas diffusion close to grain boundaries, in contrast with standard UO 2 behaviour, which is associated with defects recovery in grain boundaries. (author) [fr

  3. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, T.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de Grenoble, 38

    1996-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author)

  4. Preparation and analysis of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jichang; Song Dianwu; Yang Youqing; Guo Yibai; Cao Yenan

    1988-03-01

    The preparation process of uranium carbides is investigated by using the carbothermic reduction method of uranium dioxide in vacuum. The carbonisation reaction in the mixture of uranium dioxide with graphite begins to take place at the temperature of 1100 deg C. The temperature is measured by a W-Re thermocouple. Then the quantity of carbon, density, porosities and microstructure of the sintered pellets are examined. At the same time, in order to measure the content of uranium monocarbide, those sintered pellets are also indentified by means of X-ray diffraction

  5. XAS characterisation of xenon bubbles in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: martinp@drncad.cea.fr; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Valot, C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Nassif, V. [CEA Grenoble, DSM/DRFMC/SP2M/NRS, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proux, O. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38400 Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France); Hazemann, J.-L. [Institut Neel, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were performed on a set of uranium dioxide samples implanted with 10{sup 17} xenon cm{sup -2} at 800 keV (8 at.% at 140 nm). EXAFS measurements performed at 12 K showed that during implantation the gas forms highly pressurised nanometre size inclusions. Bubble pressures were estimated at 2.8 {+-} 0.3 GPa at low temperature. Following the low energy xenon implantation, samples were annealed between 1073 and 1773 K for several hours. Stability of nanometre size highly pressurized xenon aggregates in UO{sub 2} is demonstrated up to 1073 K as for this temperature almost no modification of the xenon environment was observed. Above this temperature, bubbles will trap migrating vacancies and their inner pressure is seen to decrease substantially.

  6. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  7. A kinetic study of the reaction of water vapor and carbon dioxide on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santon, J.P.

    1964-09-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction of water vapour and carbon dioxide with uranium has been performed by thermogravimetric methods at temperatures between 160 and 410 deg G in the first case, 350 and 1050 deg C in the second: Three sorts of uranium specimens were used: uranium powder, thin evaporated films, and small spheres obtained from a plasma furnace. The experimental results led in the case of water vapour, to a linear rate of reaction controlled by diffusion at the lower temperatures, and by a surface reaction at the upper ones. In the case of carbon dioxide, a parabolic law has been found, controlled by diffusional processes. (author) [fr

  8. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  9. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Devynck, F.; Krack, M.; Maillard, S.

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO2. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO2. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  10. Micromechanical approach of behavior of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulacroix, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is the reference fuel for pressurized water nuclear reactors. Our study deals with understanding and modeling of mechanical behavior at the microstructure scale at low temperatures (brittle fracture) and high temperature (viscoplastic strain). We have first studied the geometrical properties of polycrystals at large and of UO 2 polycrystal more specifically. As of now, knowledge of this behavior in the brittle fracture range is limited. Consequently, we developed an experimental method which allows better understanding of brittle fracture phenomenon at grain scale. We show that fracture is fully intra-granular and {100} planes seem to be the most preferential cleavage planes. Experimental results are directly used to deduce constitutive equations of intra-granular brittle fracture at crystal scale. This behavior is then used in 3D polycrystal simulation of brittle fracture. The full field calculation gives access to the initiation of fracture and propagation of the crack through the grains. Finally, we developed a mechanical behavior model of UO 2 in the viscoplastic range. We first present constitutive equations at macroscopic scale which accounts for an ageing process caused by migration of defects towards dislocations. Secondly, we have developed a crystal plasticity model which was fitted to UO 2 . This model includes the rotation of the crystal lattice. We present examples of polycrystalline simulations. (author) [fr

  11. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; El-Absy, M.A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous nitrate solutions on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide (CRYMO) was studied. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemical reaction at the exchange sites. Sorption of uranium and thorium by CRYMO has been also studied as a function of metal concentrations and temperature. The sorption of both cations is found to be an endothermic process and increases markedly with temperature between 30 and 60 degree C. The sorption results have been analysed by the langmuir adsorption isotherm over the entire range of uranium and thorium concentrations investigated. 35 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Study of uranium dioxide pellets by micro-acoustic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, V.

    1999-01-01

    In order to reduce the volume of spent fuel to reprocess and to improve the productivity and the safety of the nuclear reactor, 'Electricite De France' aim to increase the average fuel discharge burn-up. To elaborate the safety reports, EDF develops codes to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the nuclear fuel element. These numeric simulations need to evaluate accurately and locally the evolution of the material and of its properties. One of the major concern today is the local characterisation of the intrinsic volume fraction porosity and the mechanical properties of the irradiated fuel. The fuel pellet fragmentation, the steep radial gradient in its physical properties evolution and the chemical evolution of the irradiated material make difficult nay the use of the conventional techniques. This leads EDF to pay interest for the use of two complementary techniques: micro-indentation on the one hand and acoustic methods on the other hand (acoustic microscopy and micro-echography), with an additional constrain to perform on active materials. The objective of this work has been to adapt the acoustic methods for an application on uranium dioxide pellets, used as nuclear fuel in Water Pressurised Reactor. Acquisitions protocols have been set to measure accurately the Rayleigh velocity and the longitudinal velocity of the UO 2 . Using these protocols, we have calibrated these acoustic methods by analysing non irradiated nuclear pellet which properties were well known. This process enable to quantify the effects of different physico-chemical parameters of the UO 2 on the ultrasonic velocities measured. Particularly, the large influence of the porosity has been demonstrated and empirical laws to express the evolution of the acoustic velocities as a function of the volume fraction porosity were established. Moreover, we have established a methodology to characterise the intrinsic elastic constants and the volume fraction porosity on irradiated UO 2 fuel pellets

  13. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl-KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V. J.; Atwood, R. C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L. D.; Simons, S. J. R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D. J. L.; Shearing, P. R.

    2015-09-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form α-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs via a single, 4-electron-step, process. The rate of formation of α-uranium is seen to decrease during electrolysis and could be a result of a build-up of oxygen anions in the molten salt. Slow transport of O2- ions away from the UO2 working electrode could impede the electrochemical reduction.

  14. Sintered ceramics having controlled density and porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassfield, H.C.; DeHollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed for sintering ceramic uranium dioxide powders, in which ammonium oxalate is admixed with the powder prior to being pressed into a cylindrical green body, so that the end-point density of the final nuclear-reactor fuel product can be controlled. When the green body is heated, the ammonium oxalate decomposes and leaves discrete porosity in the sintered body, which corresponds to the ammonium oxalate regions in the green body. Thus the end-point density of the sintered body is a function of the amount of ammonium oxalate added. The final density of the sintered product is about 90-97% of the theoretical. The addition of ammonium oxalate also allows control of the pore size and distribution throughout the fuel. The process leaves substantially no impurities in the sintered strucuture. (DN)

  15. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases; Amelioration de la retention du cesium dans le dioxyde d`uranium au moyen de phases exogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamaury Dubois, S.

    1995-09-19

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} et Cs{sub 2}O-ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}. The compounds CsAISi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}ZrSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}) or (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H{sub 2}. It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO{sub 2+x}. We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. The sintering of dioxide pellets (UO2) in an oxidizing atmosphere (CO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R.T.; Riella, H.G.

    1993-06-01

    In this study the process of sintering of U O 2 pellets in oxidative atmosphere has been evaluated. Temperature and time of study have been varied in order to determine the influence of these parameters on final density and microstructure of the material. The NIKUSI process, allows to work in a temperature range below to those that have been employed in the conventional process, lowering in up to 50% the sintering cycle because it is possible to decrease the time of sintering. (author)

  17. Fabrication of uranium dioxide ceramic pellets with controlled porosity from oxide microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, E.; Picart, S.; Delahaye, T.; Jobelin, I.; Dugne, O.; Bisel, I.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.

    2014-05-01

    This study concerns the fabrication of uranium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Details are given about oxide microsphere synthesis and particularly about loading operation and heat treatments. The fabrication of ceramic pellets is also described and discussed. Results showed that this process allows the preparation of either dense or porous pellets by mixing U3O8 and UO2-like microspheres before pressing and sintering.

  18. Fabrication of uranium dioxide ceramic pellets with controlled porosity from oxide microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, E. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Picart, S., E-mail: sebastien.picart@cea.fr [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, T. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Jobelin, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Dugne, O. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bisel, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Blanchart, P. [Heterogeneous Materials Research Group, Centre Européen de la Céramique, F-87068 Limoges (France); Ayral, A. [Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, University of Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2014-05-01

    This study concerns the fabrication of uranium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Details are given about oxide microsphere synthesis and particularly about loading operation and heat treatments. The fabrication of ceramic pellets is also described and discussed. Results showed that this process allows the preparation of either dense or porous pellets by mixing U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and UO{sub 2}-like microspheres before pressing and sintering.

  19. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  20. Calculation of the energy of stacking faults in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, J.-M.; Soullard, J.

    1976-01-01

    Energy computations of some (100), (110) and (111), planar defects were performed using an ionic bond model for stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. The repulsive contribution to the fault was estimated in two different ways, i.e. using the Born-Mayer classical treatment, or potentials derived from shell model calculations. The stability of the various defect configurations has been studied; on the basis of the numerical values, it may be concluded that dislocation dissociation is unlikely in stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. (Auth.)

  1. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  2. Study of reducing pyrohydrolysis of uranyl fluoride into uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, P.

    1977-06-01

    The dry process studied in this paper for the preparation of UO 2 (for sintering) from UF 6 presents the following advantages on other wet or dry processes (fluidized beds or discontinuous processes): it is completely continuous, one chemical reactor only is required for the successive reactions hydrolysis, pyrolysis and reduction, it is possible to obtain various densities after sintering and particularly high densities. Safety, environmental, economical and technical aspects are also improved. Pyrohydrolysis and reduction reactions of UO 2 F 2 into UO 2 are studied because kinetics are not well known although they have been used for several years. Reaction temperature and pressure are examined for optimization. Influence of the gaseous mixture hydrogen and inert gas on reaction inhibition could lead to rate, in particular nitrogen flow should be reduced. Operation and product quality should be both improved. 68 refs [fr

  3. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlovic, Lj.

    1962-12-01

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives

  4. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopic study of the adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been investigated at 25 0 C. Clean surfaces were prepared in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopies (AES). Adsorption of I 2 was studied for exposures up to 100 langmuirs (1 langmuir = 10 -6 torr s) on uranium metal and to 75 langmuirs on uranium dioxide. Above about 2-langmuir I 2 exposure on uranium, spectroscopic evidence is obtained to indicate the beginning of UI 3 formation. Saturation coverage for I 2 adsorption on uranium dioxide occurs at approximately 10-15 langmuirs. Analysis of the XPS and AES results as well as studies of spectra as a function of temperature lead to the conclusions that a dissociative chemisorption/reaction process occurs on uranium metal while nondissociative adsorption occurs on uranium dioxide. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extra-atomic relaxation processes. 42 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  5. Simulation of the interaction between uranium dioxide and zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Garcia, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The code solves the oxygen diffusion equations of the five phases formed during the UO 2 /Zircaloy interaction, using an implicit finite difference method with parabolic interpolation at the interfaces. Uranium and Zirconium mass conservation are considered. The code gives a good simulation of the experimental results for isothermal conditions. (orig.)

  6. Determination of laser-evaporated uranium dioxide by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, R.

    1987-05-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require information about the loss of fuel which may occur at high temperatures. In this study, the surface of a uranium dioxide target was heated rapidly by a laser. The uranium surface was vaporized into a vacuum. The uranium bearing species condensed on a graphite disk placed in the pathway of the expanding uranium vapor. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis showed very little droplet ejection directly from the laser target surface. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the amount of uranium deposited. The surface temperature was measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperature ranged from 2400 to 3700 0 K. The Hertz-Langmuir formula, in conjunction with the measured surface temperature transient, was used to calculate the theoretical amount of uranium deposited. There was good agreement between theory and experiment above the melting point of 3120 0 K. Below the melting point much more uranium was collected than was expected theoretically. This was attributed to oxidation of the surface. 29 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Standard test method for the determination of uranium by ignition and the oxygen to uranium (O/U) atomic ratio of nuclear grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.2 This test method does not include provisions for preventing criticality accidents or requirements for health and safety. Observance of this test method does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all international, national, or federal, state and local regulations pertaining to possessing, shipping, processing, or using source or special nuclear material. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 This test method also is applicable to UO3 and U3O8 powder.

  8. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl–KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V.J. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Atwood, R.C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L.D. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Simons, S.J.R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D.J.L. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Shearing, P.R., E-mail: p.shearing@ucl.ac.uk [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the electroreduction of UO{sub 2} to U in LiCl/KCL eutectic molten salt. • Combined electrochemical measurement and in situ XRD is utilised. • The electroreduction appears to occur in a single, 4-electron-step, process. • No intermediate compounds were observed. - Abstract: The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form α-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs via a single, 4-electron-step, process. The rate of formation of α-uranium is seen to decrease during electrolysis and could be a result of a build-up of oxygen anions in the molten salt. Slow transport of O{sup 2−} ions away from the UO{sub 2} working electrode could impede the electrochemical reduction.

  9. Development of ammonium uranyl carbonate reduction to uranium dioxide using fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory development of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amounts of fluoride ( - 500μgF - /gTCAU) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentrations is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical proterties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  10. The production, characterization, and neutronic performance of boron nitride coated uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Colak, U.; Tombakoglu, M.; Gunduz, G.

    1995-01-01

    The fuel pellets produced by sol-gel technique were coated with boron nitride (BN). This was achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. Mixing and chemical reaction take place at a temperature around 875 K. The coated samples were then sintered at 1600 K. Thermal reactor physics lattice-cell code WIMS-D/4 was used in the neutronic analysis of CANDU fuel bundle to observe the neutronic performance of the coated fuel. Three types of fuel were considered; fuel made of natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium (SEU, enrichment: 0.82 % U-235), and SEU with various BN coatings. The burnup calculations showed that feasible coating thickness is between 1 to 2 μm. (author)

  11. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  12. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  13. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  14. Certification of a uranium-238 dioxide reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 501)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, J.; Lievens, F.; Ingelbrecht, C.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium-238 oxide of 99.999% isotopic and 99.98% chemical purity was transformed into dioxide spheres of nominal 0.5 and 1.0 mm diameter by gel precipitation and subsequent calcination under carbon dioxide and under argon containing 5% hydrogen at 1 125 K. The spheres were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, including isotope dilution, by gravimetry and by potentiometric titration. On the basis of these analyses, the uranium mass fraction was certified at 879.4 ± 2.8 g.kg -1 , and the 235 U/U - and 238 U/U abundances at 10.4 ± 0.5 mg.kg -1 and 999.9896 ± 0.0005 g.kg -1 , respectively. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron metrology

  15. Modeling of the non-monotonous viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, F.; Leclercq, S.

    2003-10-01

    In order to evaluate the stress level during pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), Electricité de France is involved in a large program of investigation of the mechanical properties of both fuel pellets and claddings. In this paper, we focus on the mechanical behavior of uranium dioxide. These pellets exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and sigmoı̈dal creep curves, that is inflection points characteristic of a non-monotonous viscoplastic flow in the first stages of the tests. Inspired by Alexander and Haasen's work upon single crystal silicon, we develop a dislocation-based model that is able to describe the viscoplasticity of uranium dioxide in the range of temperature and stress of the PCMI. After developing this model, we introduce it into the Pilvin's polycrystalline approach. The self-consistency of the polycrystalline approach in the case of a non-monotonous viscoplastic flow is demonstrated in an independent article.

  16. The industrial application of a uranium dioxide electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needes, C.R.S.; Nicol, M.J.; Finkelstein, N.P.; Ormrod, G.T.W.

    1975-01-01

    A correlation between the potential of a UO 2 electrode and the rate of recovery of uranium has been proved in laboratory and plant trials. When the recovery rates change because of variation in the concentrations of Fe(III), Fe(II), SO 2- 4 , and H + , a positive correlation is observed. However, an increase in the concentration of phosphate in solution produces an increase in the UO 2 electrode potential but a decrease in the rate of leaching of UO 2 . The correlation between the UO 2 electrode potential and the rate of leaching of UO 2 is then negative. It is concluded that, as a control device, the electrode cannot compete with the platinum electrode for use on certain plants. Nevertheless, the UO 2 electrode will act as a useful warning device if the total concentration of iron in solution decreases to below a level concomitant with the economic recovery of uranium. Furthermore, because of the positive correlation between the UO 2 electrode potential and the phosphate concentration, the electrode will also be of value in the detection of an increase in the phosphate level in solution. When it was incorporated in a suitable industrial probe, the electrode was found to be able to withstand the rigours of the leaching conditions in a large pilot-plant pachuca, and only failed after six weeks operation [af

  17. Determination of microquantities of zirconium and thorium in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber de D'Alessio, Ana; Zucal, Raquel.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of 10 to 50 ppm of zirconium and thorium in uranium IV oxide of nuclear purity is established. Zirconium and thorium are retained in a strong cation-exchange resin Dowex 50 WX8 in 1 M HCl. Zirconium is eluted with 0,5% oxalic acid solution and thorium with 4% ammonium oxalate. The colorimetric determination of zirconium with xilenol orange is done in perchloric acid after destructtion of oxalic acid and thorium is determined with arsenazo III in 5 M HCl. 10 μg of each element were determined with a standard deviation of 2,1% for thorium and 3,4% for zirconium. (author) [es

  18. Penetrate-leach dissolution of zirconium-clad uranium and uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    A new decladding-dissolution process was developed for zirconium-clad uranium metal and UO 2 fuels. The proposed penetrate-leach process consists of penetrating the zirconium cladding with Alniflex solution (2M HF--1M HNO 3 --1M Al(NO 3 ) 3 --0.1M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) and of leaching the exposed core with 10M HNO 3 . Undissolved cladding pieces are discarded as solid waste. Periodic HF and HNO 3 additions, efficient agitation, and in-line zirconium analyses are required for successful control of ZrF 4 and/or AlF 3 precipitation during the cladding-penetration step. Preliminary solvent extraction studies indicated complete recovery of uranium with 30 vol. percent tributyl phosphate (TBP) from both Alniflex solution and blended Alniflex-HNO 3 leach solutions. With 7.5 vol. percent TBP, high extractant/feed flow ratios and low scrub flows are required for satisfactory uranium recovery from Alniflex solution. Modified waste-handling procedures may be required for Alniflex waste, because it cannot be evaporated before neutralization and large quantities of solids are generated on neutralization. The effect of unstable UZr 3 (epsilon phase of uranium-zirconium system) on the safety of penetrate-leach dissolution was investigated

  19. Comparative study of the oxidation of various qualities of uranium in carbon dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrues, R.; Paidassi, J.

    1965-01-01

    Uranium samples of six different qualities were subjected, in the temperature range 400 - 1000 C, to the action of carbon dioxide carefully purified to eliminate oxygen and water vapour; the resulting oxidation was followed micro-graphically and also (but only in the range 400 - 700 C) gravimetrically using an Ugine-Eyraud microbalance. A comparison of the results leads to the following 3 observations. First, the oxidation of the six uraniums studied obeys a linear law, (followed at 700 C by an accelerating law). The rates of reaction differ by a maximum of 100 per cent, the higher purity grades being oxidized more slowly except at 700 C when the reverse is true. Secondly, simultaneously with the growth, of an approximately uniform film of uranium dioxide on the metal, there occurs a localized attack in the form of blisters in the immediate neighbourhood of the monocarbide inclusions in the uranium. The relative importance of this attack is greater for lower oxidation temperatures and for a larger size, number and inequality of distribution of the inclusions, that is to say for higher carbon concentrations in the uranium (which have values from 7 to 1000 ppm in our tests). Thirdly, for oxidation temperatures above 600 C blistering is much less pronounced, but at 700 C the beginning of a general deformation of the sample occurs, which, above 750 C, becomes much greater; this leads to an acceleration of the reaction rate with respect to the linear law. In view of the over-heating, the sample must already be in the γ-phase which is particularly easily deformed; furthermore this expansion phenomenon is more pronounced when the sample is more plastic and therefore purer. (authors) [fr

  20. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  1. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  2. Determination of trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders CRMs by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Husheng; Li Jun

    1997-01-01

    The 237-quaternary ammonium extraction resin chromatography is used to the separation of 6 trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders, which are used as certified reference materials (CRMs). The sample is dissolved in 6.5 mol/L HNO 3 and uranium is separated by chromatographic column. the 6 trace elements Al, Ba, Co, Ta, Ti and V contained in the elutriant are determined by using ICP directly reading spectrometer. For a 300 mg sample, the lowest determinable concentration of impurities in ceramic UO 2 pellets powders CRMs is (0.016-0.250) x 10 -6 . The relative standard deviation is less than 7.5%. The proposed method provides excellent and accurate analytical data for the ceramic UO 2 pellets powders samples (CRMs)

  3. Method of manufacturing sintered nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain composite pellets with an improved strength. Method: A core mainly composed of fuel materials is previously prepared, embedded into the central portion of a pellet, silted therearound with cladding material, and then pressmolded and sintered. For instance, a rugby-ball like core body with the maximum outer diameter of 6 mm and the height of 6 mm is made by compressive molding with uranium dioxide powder, then coating material comprising the same powder incorporated with 0.1 % by weight of SiC fibers is filled around the core body, which is molded into a composite pellet by means of pressing and then sintered at 1600 0 C, to obtain a sintered pellet of 93.5 % theoretical density. As the result of the compression test for the pellet, it showed a strength greater by 15 % than that of the similar mono-layer pellet. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% C0 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (author)

  5. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  6. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P.; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-01-01

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m 2 /g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm 2 , total pore volume of 0.415 cm 3 /g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site

  7. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  8. Observations concerning the particle-size of the oxidation products of uranium formed in air or in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Leclercq, D.

    1964-01-01

    This report brings together the particle-size analysis results obtained on products formed by the oxidation or the ignition of uranium in moist air or dry carbon dioxide. The results bring out the importance of the nature of the oxidising atmosphere, the combustion in moist air giving rise to the formation of a larger proportion of fine particles than combustion in carbon dioxide under pressure. (authors) [fr

  9. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-01

    Uranium dioxide UO 2 is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO 2 , we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO 2 and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  10. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Zoigner, A.; Delle-Site, A.

    1983-09-01

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-30, were distributed to 38 laboratories in December 1980 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 16 laboratories reported their results. 12 laboratories applied titration procedures, 11 of them methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure, 1 laboratory used controlled potential coulometry, 1 laboratory used fluorimetry, 1 laboratory U-232 spiking/alpha-spectrometry. One laboratory did not indicate the method applied. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 3.41% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -5.29% and +6.49% uranium, but 13 laboratories agree within +/-1% uranium with the reference value. The mean bias of these 13 laboratories is equal to +0.201% U. The standard deviation of the biases of these 13 laboratories is equal to 0.361% U. (author)

  11. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation; Synthese, frittage et caracterisation de solutions solides d'oxydes mixtes de thorium et d'uranium (IV): influence de la methode de preparation du precurseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingant, N

    2008-12-15

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th{sub 1-x}U{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the

  12. Uranium dioxide oxidation/dissolution mechanism; Mecanisme d'oxydation / dissolution du dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larabit-Gruet, N.; Poulesquen, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Meserque, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN//DPC/SCP/LRSI), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the case of deep geological storage of spent fuels, the environment waters will arrive at the surface of the fuel after some thousand years. It is then necessary to understand the leaching mechanisms of the UO{sub 2} matrix in contact with the interstitial waters of the potential storage site. At first, the characterization of the intrinsic properties of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2} system is carried out by an electrochemical way on a uranium dioxide electrode (semi conductor material). The electrochemical parameters of this system such as anodic charge transfer coefficient and standard velocity constant of the electrochemical reaction are determined in the speciation conditions adapted to the study of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2} redox couple study. The second part deals with the dependence of pH and carbonate ions on the dissolution of UO{sub 2}. On the other hand, the solid is characterized by ex-situ methods as XPS to reveal the eventual secondary phases precipitated at the surface of the UO{sub 2}. The aim of this work is to verify that the limiting step to the dissolution of the nuclear ceramics in presence of complexing agents is the progression of the oxidation front. (O.M.)

  13. Determination of trace metals in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.; Imakuma, K.

    1988-04-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of low concentrations of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the use of chemical treatment. The lower limits of detection range from 2 μg g -1 for nickel and manganese to 5 μg g -1 for copper. Samples are prepared in the form of double-layer pellets with boric acid as a binding agent. Standards are prepared in a U 3 O 8 matrix, which is more chemically stable than UO 2 and has similar matrix behaviour. The correlation coefficients for calibration curves are better than 0.999. Erros range from 2.4 % for chromium to 6.8 % for nickel. (author) [pt

  14. The exploration on the new process of hydrofluorination of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Zhao Siyuan; Shen Guohong

    1990-04-01

    The optimum treatment of the reaction conditions were achieved based on the kinetic data of the hydrofluorination of uranium dioxide (material obtained from uranyl nitrate by one step denitration-reduction process) and the flow characteristic of reactor. A new process is proposed that is the stirred bed (exhaust gas section) in series with fluidized bed (production section). The optimum design and experimental study of operation conditions of the stirred bed reactor have been completed. The results of hot modelling test of the stirred bed reactor showed that the conversion of UO 2 to UF 4 in the exit stream was 47∼50% and the hydrogen fluoride remaining in the exhaust gas was less than 5%. Comparision with the circuit of two fluidized beds in series showed that the conversion of stirred bed was nearly same as the first fluidized bed but the hydrogen fluoride remaining in the exhaust gas was considerably decreased

  15. Fluorine and chlorine determination in mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elinson, S.V.; Zemlyanukhina, N.A.; Pavlova, I.V.; Filatkina, V.P.; Tsvetkova, V.T.

    1981-01-01

    A technique of fluorine and chlorine determination in the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide, based on their simultaneous separation by means of pyrohydrolysis, is developed. Subsequently, fluorine is determined by photometry with alizarincomplexonate of lanthanum or according to the weakening of zirconium colouring with zylenol orange. Chlorine is determined using the photonephelometric method according to the reaction of chloride-ion interaction with silver nitrate or by spectrophotometric method according to the reaction with mercury rhodanide. The lower limit of fluorine determination is -6x10 -5 %, of chlorine- 1x10 -4 % in the sample of 1g. The relative mean quadratic deviation of the determination result (Ssub(r)), depends on the character of the material analyzed and at the content of nx10 -4 - nx10 -3 mass % is equal to from 0.05 to 0.32 for fluorine and from 0.11 to 0.35 for chlorine [ru

  16. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  17. Helium behavior and damage induced by fission products in the uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhabib, Tayeb

    2012-01-01

    In the new fourth generation nuclear plants, as in the old ones, uranium dioxide must operate in hostile environments of temperature and irradiation with the presence of fission products (FP) and alpha particles (a). Operation in these extreme conditions will induce atoms displacements and degrade the thermal and mechanical properties of UO 2 fuel. Understanding the behavior of induced vacancy defects, FP and helium is crucial to predict the uranium dioxide behavior in the future nuclear reactors. The first part of this thesis is dedicated to the study of vacancy defects induced by krypton and iodine implantation (a few MeV) in the UO 2 polycrystalline and of their evolution under annealing. Analysis by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has highlighted the creation of Schottky defects VU-2VO in the case of iodine implantations and formation of vacancy clusters containing the gas for krypton implantation. The temperature evolution of these defects depends on the implantation parameters (nature of the ion energy, fluence). This study showed the important roles that can play vacancy defects and the presence of fission gases in the evolution of UO 2 material. Then we were interested in the study of the helium behavior in UO 2 its location and migration, agglomeration and interaction with vacancy defects by using PAS and ion beam analysis (NRA/C and RBS/C). The NRA/C and RBS/C characterizations showed a localization of a large helium fraction in the octahedral interstitial sites of the UO 2 matrix. The helium location in these sites remains stable for T ≤ 600 C, changing slightly between 600 and 700 C and becomes random at 800 C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy reveals three stages of vacancy defects evolution: The recombination with oxygen interstitial migration, defects agglomeration between 600 and 800 C and their dissociation and elimination when the temperature increases. These results suggest that the He transport is assisted by the vacancy defects

  18. Theoretical study using electronic structure calculations of uranium and cerium dioxides containing defects and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is the most widely used nuclear fuel in existing nuclear reactors around the world. While in service for energy supply, UO 2 is submitted to the neutron flux and undergoes nuclear fission chain reactions, which create large number of fission products and point defects. The study of the behavior of the fission products and point defects is important to understand the fuel properties under irradiation. We conduct electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) to model this radiation damage at the atomic scale. The DFT+U method is used to describe the strong correlation of the 4f electrons of cerium and 5f electrons of uranium in the materials studied (UO 2 , CeO 2 and (U, Ce)O 2 ). (U, Ce)O 2 is studied because it is considered as a low radioactive model material of mixed actinide oxides such as the MOX fuel (U, Pu)O 2 used in light water reactors and fast neutron reactors. Cerium dioxide (CeO 2 ) is studied to provide reference data of (U, Ce)O 2 . We perform a DFT+U study of point defects and gaseous fission products (Xe and Kr) in CeO 2 and compare our results to the existing ones of UO 2 . We study the bulk properties as well as the behavior of defects for (U, Ce)O 2 , and compare our results to the ones of (U, Pu)O 2 . Furthermore, for the study of defects in UO 2 , methodological improvements are explored considering the spin-orbit coupling effect and the finite-size effect of the simulation supercell. (author) [fr

  19. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO 2 -BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO 2 - BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO 2 pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  20. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T., E-mail: romuniz@usp.br, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: danieldesouza@gmail.com, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco; Aguiar, Amanda A., E-mail: amanda.abati.aguiar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2}- BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO{sub 2} pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  1. Investigation of high burnup structures in uranium dioxide applying cellular automata: algorithms and codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Kostenko, B.F.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A new method of research in spatial structures that result from uranium dioxide burning in nuclear reactors of modern atomic plants is suggested. The method is based on the presentation of images of the mentioned structures in the form of the working field of a cellular automaton (CA). First, it has allowed one to extract some important quantitative characteristics of the structures directly from the micrographs of the uranium fuel surface. Secondly, the CA has been found out to allow one to formulate easily the dynamics of the evolution of the studied structures in terms of such micrograph elements as spots, spots' boundaries, cracks, etc. Relation has been found between the dynamics and some exactly solvable models of the theory of cellular automata, in particular, the Ising model and the vote model. This investigation gives a detailed description of some CA algorithms which allow one to perform the fuel surface image processing and to model its evolution caused by burnup or chemical etching. (author)

  2. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Ronesch, K.; Zoigner, A.

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-20, were distributed to 32 laboratories in January 1980 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 11 laboratories reported their results (ANNEX 1). 5 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), 2 laboratories used controlled potential coulometry, 2 laboratories used precipitation procedures, 1 laboratory used fluorimetry and 1 laboratory used activation analysis. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 1.7% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -9.1% and +0.92% uranium, but 9 laboratories agree within +-1%U with the reference value. The mean bias of these 9 laboratories is equal to +0.04%U. The standard deviation of the biases of these 9 laboratories is equal to 0.36%.U

  3. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Zoigner, A.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-10, were distributed to 27 laboratories in February 1979 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 7 laboratories reported their results. 6 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), and one laboratory used controlled potential coulometry. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 0.10% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -0.48% and +0.87% uranium, but 5 laboratories agree within +-0.25% U with the reference value. The biases of 5 laboratories are greater than expected from their random errors. The mean bias of the 7 laboratories is equal to +0.03% U. The standard deviation of the laboratory biases is equal to 0.43% U. (author)

  4. SEM hot stage sintering of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.

    1976-06-01

    The sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide powder compacts, in the hot stage of a scanning electron microscope, was continuously monitored using 16 mm time lapse movies. From alumina microspheres placed on the surface of the compacts, shrinkage measurements were obtained. Converting shrinkage measurements into densification profiles indicates that a maximum densification rate is reached at a critical density, independent of the constant heating rates. At temperatures above 1350 0 C, the movement of the reference microspheres made shrinkage measurements impossible. It is believed the evolution of UO 3 gas from hyperstoichiometric UO 2 is the cause of this limitation

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the the uranium industry in Australia that took place during the quarter ended 30 June 1980 are reviewed. These include uranium mine production and uranium exploration. Prices for uranium oxide and uranium hexafluoride as at the end of June 1980 and figures for U 3 O 8 production and export from 1978 to March 1980 are listed

  6. Viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide at high temperature; Comportement viscoplastique du dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, F

    2001-02-01

    This work is a part of a project led by EDF the purpose of which is the development of more predictive models to describe the thermomechanical behavior of fuel assembly. First, we recall the baselines of the Power Water Reactors then we deal with the viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This knowledge enables an accurate description of the stress relaxation during Pellet Cladding Interactions. The pellets we have used in the last part are similar to the industrial ones. They exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and a sigma creep curve. In order to describe these characteristics, we have adapted different kind of approaches: thermodynamical - the Distribution of Non Linear Relaxations, approaches based on dislocation glide inspired by Alexander and Haasen and introduced in the Pilvin polycrystalline model. We recall the purpose of internal variables in the thermodynamics of system far from equilibrium then in case of a viscoplastic flow controlled by dislocation glide, we establish a link between densities of dislocations and internal variables in the D.N.L.R. approach. As vacancy diffusion in the grain boundary has a contribution to the viscoplastic strain, a similar is presented in appendix. These models are able to reproduce the behavior of UO{sub 2} pellets in strain hardening, stress relaxation and creep tests. Much possible progress has been revealed by the analysis of the tests. Further more, we propose a model for yield point and sigma creep curve. We also have extended these results to the behavior of irradiated pellets and stressed the influence of damage. (author)

  7. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  8. First-principles study on oxidation effects in uranium oxides and high-pressure high-temperature behavior of point defects in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Song, Hong X.; Jin, K.; Xiang, S. K.; Wu, Q.

    2011-11-01

    Formation Gibbs free energy of point defects and oxygen clusters in uranium dioxide at high-pressure high-temperature conditions are calculated from first principles, using the LSDA+U approach for the electronic structure and the Debye model for the lattice vibrations. The phonon contribution on Frenkel pairs is found to be notable, whereas it is negligible for the Schottky defect. Hydrostatic compression changes the formation energies drastically, making defect concentrations depend more sensitively on pressure. Calculations show that, if no oxygen clusters are considered, uranium vacancy becomes predominant in overstoichiometric UO2 with the aid of the contribution from lattice vibrations, while compression favors oxygen defects and suppresses uranium vacancy greatly. At ambient pressure, however, the experimental observation of predominant oxygen defects in this regime can be reproduced only in a form of cuboctahedral clusters, underlining the importance of defect clustering in UO2+x. Making use of the point defect model, an equation of state for nonstoichiometric oxides is established, which is then applied to describe the shock Hugoniot of UO2+x. Furthermore, the oxidization and compression behavior of uranium monoxide, triuranium octoxide, uranium trioxide, and a series of defective UO2 at 0 K are investigated. The evolution of mechanical properties and electronic structures with an increase of the oxidation degree are analyzed, revealing the transition of the ground state of uranium oxides from metallic to Mott insulator and then to charge-transfer insulator due to the interplay of strongly correlated effects of 5f orbitals and the shift of electrons from uranium to oxygen atoms.

  9. Investigation on preparation of uranium tetrachloride from chlorinating uranium dioxide by carbon tetrachloride and its mixing reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Lufu; Xu Heqing; Zhao Jun

    1987-09-01

    By studying the change of the temperature for gaseous space and solid layer within the reactor and improving structure of reactor and types of feed material stocked in the boat pan, it is possible to reduce the volatilization loss of uranium, allowing the uranium yield to rise above 97%. A further study found that chlorination of UO 2 by using a mixture of CHCl 3 + CCl 4 can markedly reduce the volatilization loss of uranium chlorides, and the uranium yield is above 99%. The content of free carbon is less than 100 ppm in the product. A new chlorination process has been developed

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  11. Detection of carbon dioxide in the gases evolved during the hot extraction determination of hydrogen in uranium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, M.L.; Pope, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The hot extraction method was used at the National Lead Company of Ohio to determine hydrogen in uranium metal at the 2 ppM level. The volume of gas evolved from the heated sample was assumed to be hydrogen. When a liquid nitrogen trap was placed into the system the hydrogen values were reduced 5 to 10%. The gas retained by the nitrogen trap was identified by mass spectrometry as predominantly carbon dioxide. Low hydrogen values were observed only when the nitrogen trap was used in the analysis of high-carbon (300 to 600 ppM) uranium from NLO production ingots. However, hydrogen values for low-carbon (30 to 50 ppM) uranium were unaffected by the nitrogen trap. The formation of carbon dioxide appears to be associated with the carbon content of the uranium metal. Comparisons of hydrogen values obtained with the hot extraction method and with an inert fusion--thermal conductivity method are also presented. 3 tables, 4 figures

  12. The uranium dioxide-uranium system at high temperature; Le systeme uranium-dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinet, Ph.; Vaugoyeau, H.; Blum, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The liquidus curve has been determined by a saturation method in which the thermal gradient was cancelled upon cooling, and the solidus curve by analyzing the deposits in equilibrium with the liquid at each temperature. The diagram, of a displaced eutectic type, presents a liquid immiscibility domain between 47 and 59 mol per cent of dioxide and a substoichiometry range UO{sub 2x}, the minimum O/U ratio being 1,6 at 3470 {+-} 30 C. The monotectic composition was found by chemical analysis to be 59 mol per cent of dioxide and the reaction temperature 2470 {+-} 30 C. (author) [French] La courbe liquidus a ete determinee par une methode de saturation en annulant le gradient thermique au cours du refroidissement, la courbe solidus par analyse des depots en equilibre avec le liquide a chaque temperature. Le diagramme du type a eutectique deporte comporte un domaine d'immiscibilite liquide entre 47 et 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde, ainsi qu'un domaine d'existence du compose sous stoechiometrique UO{sub 2x}, le rapport O/U minimum etant egal a 1,6 a 2470 {+-} 30 C. La composition du monotectique, obtenue par analyse chimique, est de 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde et la temperature de la reaction a ete trouvee egale a 2470 {+-} 30 C. (auteur)

  13. Study of rare gases behavior in uranium dioxide: diffusion and bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.

    2011-01-01

    During in-reactor irradiation of the nuclear fuel, fission gases, mainly xenon and krypton, are generated that are subject to several phenomena: diffusion and precipitation. These phenomena can have adverse consequences on the fuel physical and chemical properties and its in-reactor behavior. The purpose of this work is to better understand the behavior of fission gases by identifying diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms. To do this, studies involving separate effects have been established coupling ion irradiations/implantations with fine characterizations on Large Scale Facilities. The influence of several parameters such as gas type, concentration and temperature has been identified separately. Interpretation of the Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) measurements has enabled us to determine xenon and krypton diffusion coefficients in uranium dioxide. A heterogeneous nucleation mechanism on defects was determined by means of experiments on the JANNuS platform in Orsay that consists of a coupling of an implantor, an accelerator and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Finally, TEM and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy characterizations of implanted and annealed samples put in relieve a bubble growth mechanism by atoms and vacancies capture. (author) [fr

  14. Ab initio calculation of oxygen self-diffusion coefficient in uranium dioxide UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Boris; Garcia, Philippe; Torrent, Marc

    Uranium dioxide UO2 is the most widely used nuclear fuel worldwide and its atomic transport properties are relevant to practically all engineering aspects of the material. Although transport properties have already been studied in UO2 by means of first-principles calculations, the ab initio determination of self-diffusion coefficients has up to now remained unreachable because the relevant computational tools were neither available or adapted. The present work reports our results related to the ab initio calculation of the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient in UO2. We first determine the Gibbs free energies of formation of oxygen charged defects by calculating both the electronic and vibrational (hence entropic) contributions. Then, we use the transition state theory in order to compute the effective jump frequency of the defects, which in turn provides us with the value of the pre-exponential factor. The results are compared to self-diffusion data obtained experimentally with a careful monitoring of the relevant thermodynamic conditions (oxygen partial pressure, temperature, impurity content).

  15. Cask size and weight reduction through the use of depleted uranium dioxide-concrete material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, S.Yu.; Haire, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Newly developed depleted uranium (DU) composite materials enable fabrication of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport and storage casks that are smaller and lighter in weight than casks made with conventional materials. One such material is DU dioxide (DUO2)-concrete, so-called DUCRETE TM . This paper examines the radiation shielding efficiency of DUCRETE as compared with that of a conventional concrete cask that holds 32 pressurized-water-reactor SNF assemblies. In this analysis, conventional concrete shielding material is replaced with DUCRETE. The thickness of the DUCRETE shielding is adjusted to give the same radiation surface dose, 200 mrem/h (2 mSv/hr), as the conventional concrete cask. It was found that the concrete shielding thickness decreased from 71 to 20 cm and that the cask radial cross-section shielding area was reduced approx 50 %. The weight was reduced approx 21 %, from 154 to approx 127 tons. Should one choose to add an extra outer ring of SNF assemblies, the number of such assemblies would increase from 32 to 52. In this case, the outside cask diameter would still decrease, from 169 to 137 cm. However, the weight would increase somewhat from 156 to 177 tons. Neutron cask surface dose is only approx 10 % of the gamma dose. These reduced sizes and weights will significantly influence the design of next-generation SNF casks

  16. Measurement of uranium dioxide thermophysical properties by the laser flash method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Andrade, Roberto Marcio de

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), including a reliable uncertainty assessment, are required by the nuclear reactor design. These important information are used by thermohydraulic codes to define operational aspects and to assure the safety, when analyzing various potential situations of accident. The laser flash method had become the most popular method to measure the thermophysical properties of materials. Despite its several advantages, some experimental obstacles have been found due to the difficulty to obtain experimentally the ideals initial and boundary conditions required by the original method. An experimental apparatus and a methodology for estimating uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements based on the laser flash method are presented. A stochastic thermal diffusion modeling has been developed and validated by standard samples. Inverse heat conduction problems (IHCPs) solved by finite volumes technique were applied to the measurement process with real initial and boundary conditions, and Monte Carlo Method was used for propagating the uncertainties. The main sources of uncertainty were due to: pulse time, laser power, thermal exchanges, absorptivity, emissivity, sample thickness, specific mass and dynamic influence of temperature measurement system. As results, mean values and uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of UO 2 are presented. (author)

  17. Boron nitride - boron hybrid coating on uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuel. Final report for the period 1 November 1996 - 1 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, G.

    1997-11-01

    The report describes work to develop laboratory-scale technology of the deposition of hybrid boron nitrate-metallic boron coating onto the surface of uranium dioxide ore uranium dioxide - gadolinia dioxide fuel pellets. Methods of chemical vapour deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were used in the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. An excellent adherence of boron onto the boron nitrate layer and boron nitrate layer onto the fuel pellet surface was demonstrated. Fine grain-type structure of boron coating and its excellent adherence are good indices for integrated fuel burnable absorber fuels

  18. Etching of uranium dioxide in nitrogen trifluoride RF plasma glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, John Mark

    1999-10-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Results demonstrated that UO2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mum/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, ˜23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure. A computer simulation, CHEMKIN, was applied to predict the NF3 plasma species in the experiments. The code was validated first by comparing its predictions of the NF3 plasma species with mass spectroscopy etching experiments of silicon. The code predictions were within +/-5% of the measured species concentrations. The F atom radicals were identified as the primary etchant species, diffusing from the bulk plasma to the UO2 surface and reacting to form a volatile UF6, which desorbed into the gas phase to be pumped away. Ions created in the plasma were too low in concentration to have a major effect on etching, but can enhance the etch rate by removing non-volatile reaction products blocking the reaction of F with UO2. The composition of these non-volatile products were determined based on thermodynamic analysis and the electronic structure of uranium. Analysis identified possible non-volatile products as the uranium fluorides, UF2-5, and certain uranium oxyfluorides UO2F, UO2F2, UOF3, and UOF 4 which form over the

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  3. Homogeneity study of enriched uranium dioxide to be used in intercomparison programs in the brazilian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, Barbara F.G.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2013-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear facilities must dispose of measurement systems that allow the determination of their nuclear material inventories. The main goal of this work is the characterization of enriched uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) pellets to use as test sample to evaluate and verify these systems through the participation of the involved laboratories in interlaboratorial comparison programs. The programs are formed by a network of specialized laboratories in determining materials of the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, before being sent to laboratories, the materials must have their homogeneity confirmed. The homogeneity study of the UO 2 pellets has being carried out in the Safeguards Laboratory (LASAL) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) through Destructives Analysis technique. The technique used was Davies and Gray/NBL titrimetric method. For this purpose, 25 pellets of enriched uranium dioxide from two different batches were randomly chosen. The model for homogeneity study between-unit variation (between-bottle homogeneity study) and minimum sample intake (within-bottle homogeneity study) adopted is a one-way ANOVA. No statistical significant differences were observed in the results of total uranium concentration for both batches. Thus, the UO 2 pellets are considered homogeneous and can be used in a Brazilian measurement systems evaluation program.(author)

  4. The recovery of 99Mo from solutions of irradiated Uranium using a column with nanoparticles of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, G. E.; Petre, M.; Lazar, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Molyibdenum-99 (T½ = 66.02 h) decays by beta emission to 99 Tcm (T½ = 6.02 h). The latter nuclide is used in many nuclear medicine applications. The 99 Mo is produced from irradiated high (HEU) or low (LEU) enriched uranium. In this work a sensitive and selective method for recovering Mo from uranium solution, using a column with titanium dioxide nanoparticles, is developed. The titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method using titanium tetra-chloride as starting material and urea as a reacting medium. A 40 ml uranium solution containing 450 g/L uranyl nitrate, 1 M HNO 3 , and 4 mg Mo was loaded on a column containing 6 g of TiO 2 sorbent at 75°C. After loading, the column was washed with 1 M HNO 3 and H 2 O. Mo was stripped from the column with 0.1 M NaOH at 25°C. The ICP-MS results indicate that 80-95% of the initial mass of Mo was loaded on the column, and 90-94% of this quantity was recovered in the strip fraction. (authors)

  5. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  6. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic study of hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide was performed between 375 and 475 C under partial pressures of HF between 42 and 720 mbar. The reaction was followed by thermogravimetry in isothermal and isobaric conditions. The kinetic data obtained coupled with a characterization of the powder before, during and after reaction by SEM, EDS, BET and XRD showed that the powder grains of UO 2 are transformed according a model of instantaneous germination, anisotropic growth and internal development. The rate limiting step of the growth process is the diffusion of HF in the UF 4 layer. A mechanism of growth of the UF 4 layer has been proposed. In the temperature and pressure range studied, the reaction is of first order with respect to HF and follows an Arrhenius law. A rate equation was determined and used to perform kinetic simulations which have shown a very good correlation with experience. Coupling of this rate equation with heat and mass transport phenomena allowed to perform simulations at the scale of a powder's agglomerate. They have shown that some structures of agglomerates influence the rate of diffusion of the gases in the porous medium and thereby influence the reaction rate. Finally kinetic simulations on powder's beds and pellets were carried out and compared with experimental rates. The experimental and simulated kinetic curves have the same paces, but improvements in the simulations are needed to accurately predict rates: the coupling between the three scales (grain, agglomerate, oven) would be a good example. (author) [fr

  7. Decontamination of uranium contained wastes of intricate structure using supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, Osamu; Imai, Tomoki; Fujimoto, Shigeyuki; Meguro, Yoshihiro; Nakashima, Mikio; Wada, Ryutaro; Fukuzato, Ryuichi

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical CO 2 fluid leaching (SFL) method using supercritical CO 2 fluid containing a nitric acid-tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) complex as a reactant was applied to removal of uranium from radioactive solid wastes. A part of a commercial HEPA filter, in which 500 ppm using uranium oxide powder was added, was compressed and then employed as a sample of intricate structure. It was found that 99.5% uranium was removed from the sample by the SFL method. The removal efficiency was improved by using an ultrasonic equipment. The removal efficiency was not changed in the range of uranium concentration examined but was affected by the shape of the sample. (author)

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  9. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide; Etude de la structure electronique des actinides et de leurs dioxydes. Application aux defauts ponctuels et aux gaz de fission dans le dioxyde d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique

    1996-09-28

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author). 256 refs.

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Production of uranium oxide in Australia for 1983 was 3786 t(3211 t U). Uranium exports for 1983 were 3273 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. value of $41.02/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1982-83 fiscal year was $36.5 million, 35% less than in 1981-82. In November 1983, the Government decided that uranium mining would be allowed only at the existing Ranger and Nabarlek mines and at the proposed Olympic Dam mine. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U as at December 1983, totalled 474 000 t U. Australia's total now represents 30% of the Western world's low-cost RAR. In addition Australia has 235 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category 1, which represents 31% of the Western world's resources in this category

  11. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  12. Determination of rare earth elements, hafnium and cadmium in sintered pellets of mixed thorium and uranium oxides by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, S.N.M.

    1987-01-01

    This work shows the development of a method for determination of the rare-earth elements (Eu, Sm, Dy and Gd), Hf and Cd contents in sinterized U and Th mixed oxides by neutron activation analysis. The sample is dissolved in nitric/fluoridric (0,1% HF) medium, to dryness and redissolved in 6N HCl solution. The Hf is extracted into organic phase (0,5 M TTA/benzene), irradiated and analysed through 181 Hf isotope energy peak. The aqueous phase is treated with NH 4 OH for the precipitation of hidroxides. Then, these are dissolved in 6N HNO 3 solution. The extraction of U and Th is made in two steps, one with TBP/CCl 4 and another with 0,5 M TTA/C 6 H 6 . Then the rare-earth elements and Cd are irradiated and determined by gamma spectrometry. (author) [pt

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, E.

    1986-01-01

    After the increase in oil prices in 1973, several European countries increased their power programs. As a result some uranium mining companies from the FRG, Spain and France invested in exploration of radioactive minerals in Colombia hoping to find uranium resources needed to fuel European reactors. In the article a historic review of foreign investment in uranium in Colombia is made; some recommendations about joint-venture contracts used to regulate the work of the foreign companies are included. The four companies involved in exploration left the country in the early eighties, due to the difficulties in finding a large deposit and the difficult world situation of nuclear power

  14. Nondestructive analysis of uranium mass in MTR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, P.R.P.; Holland, L.

    1982-01-01

    Results of uranium mass non destructive analysis by the pulsed source technique, are presented. The method used is that of relate measurement, being that the uranium mass is determined by the measurement of the delayed neutron production, emited after fissions, produced by sample irradiated with pulses of 14 MeV neutrons. Three types of samples were analysed: metallic uranium disks, sintered pellets of uranium dioxide and plates of uranium-alluminium alloys, surrounded by an alluminium coat. Those plates simules the fuel elements for MTR type reactor. The result of the measurements are reproducible in the range of 1.6 to 3.9%. The errors in a specified measure depends on the form, size and mass of the sample. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Performance comparison of plane and cylindrical forms of sintered uranium dioxide for use in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.E.R. da.

    1989-01-01

    A study on the UO sub(2) performance and utilization in PWR's as plate and rod type fuel element is made. A comparative evaluation covering aspects of neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, thermal-mechanics and fuel performance is presented. The results to the plate type fuel, when comparing to the rod type fuel, show the following characteristics: larger reactivities and power densities; smaller quantities of fuel material are needed; pressure drop along the fuel channels are lower; fuel densification, swelling and fission gas release are minimized as a result of lower fuel temperatures. The results obtained for both fuels confirm the potential good performance of UO sub(2) in PWR's. Burnups up to 30.000 MWD/tonU can be achieved. (author)

  16. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  18. Uranium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenthe, Ingmar; Drożdżyński, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

    Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

  19. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  20. Uranium dioxide in Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids with DMSO: Dissolution, separation, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Aining; Chu, Taiwei, E-mail: twchu@pku.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in imidazolium-based Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids (ILs) with the help of DMSO. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction show that UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−} is the principal product. The dissolved uranyl species can be easily separated from the ILs via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction. Moreover, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd, compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. The solvents of acetone and acetonitrile could be used to separate the rare-earth elements from uranium in the IL with the help of imidazolium chloride. Considering the complete process from the dissolution of UO{sub 2} and some rare-earth oxides to the separation of uranium and rare-earth elements in the IL, the facile approach is promising for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. - Graphical abstract: UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO to form UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The rare earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd can be separated from uranium in the IL, and meanwhile, the recovery of dissolved uranyl species and Fe-containing IL can also be achieved. - Highlights: • Dissolution of UO{sub 2} can be successfully achieved in imidazolium-based Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO without additional oxidants. • Compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. • The separation of the rare-earth elements from uranium has also been achieved via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction.

  1. Uranium dioxide behaviour in gaseous dissociating system N2O4 reversible 2NO2 reversible 2NO + O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Klavsut', G.N.; Dolgov, V.M.; Umrejko, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Behaviour of uranium dioxide in gaseous dissociating system N 2 O 4 reversible 2NO 2 reversible 2NO+O 2 in the temperature range 25-800 deg C and under pressures 0.1-10.0 MPa is investigated. It is shown, that at atmospheric pressure and temperatures 25-150 deg C nitrosonium trinitratouranylate NO(UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ) (NTNU) is the final product. Influence of UO 2 sample dispersion on the kinetics of the compound formation is studied, and suppositions are made on the process mechanism. It is ascertained, that NTNU formation is realized via intermediate stage of epsilon-UO 3 formation. It is detected, that with an increase in pressure the process accelerates and the range of NTNU formation and stability is expanded. At temperatures above 150 deg C uranium oxides with oxidation states more than four are the main products of the interaction. In the temperature range 150-450 deg C and at atmospheric pressure oxides of the composition UOsub(2+x)(x=0.3-1.0) are formed, and at higher temperatures - onlyU 3 O 8 . An increase in pressure in the system shifts theexistence boundaries of the oxides formed to the side of higher temperatures

  2. Crystallographic and oxidation kinetic study of uranium dioxide by high temperature X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, S.R.

    The structural transformation of UO 2 sintered plates is studied as a function of temperature using X-ray diffractometry. The thermal expansion coefficient of UO sub(2.05) is determined and the structural transformation during isothermal oxidation is observed. The results favored a oxidation mechanism in which the rate-controling process is the diffusion of oxigen through the product layer of the new phase. Activation energies for the oxidation of UO 2 to UO sub(2.25) are found for different crystallographic planes (h,k,l). From this one can conclude that there is a preferential occupation of interstitial oxygen atoms within the UO 2 structure. (Author) [pt

  3. Preparation of uranium dioxide by thermal decomposition and direct reduction of ammonium uranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez R, R.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium uranate has been studied by infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It has been show that ammonia remains in the solid until substantially 350 Centigrade degrees, when gaseous nitrogen is released. It is concluded that compounds derived from the calcination of ammonium uranate at atmospheric pressure, produced amorphous U O 3 at about 350-400 Centigrade degrees and transform to U 3 O 8 via α - U O 3 and/or α - U O 3 . The object of this study was to obtain reliable fundamental information regarding the character of the pure carbon monoxide-ammonium uranate-uranium trioxide-uranium octaoxide reaction, in the range of temperatures that has been used in commercial reduction processes. Through the use of high-purity samples and by the proper control of incidental variable, this object was realized. (Author)

  4. AES study of growth process of al thin films on uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Liu Kezhao; Yang Jiangrong; Xiao Hong

    2009-01-01

    Metallic uranium was exposed to 40 languirs of oxygen at room temperature in order to form UO 2 on the surface of metallic U. And thin layers of aluminum on UO 2 were prepared by sputter deposition under ultra high vacuum conditions. Process of Al thin film growth and its interaction with UO 2 were investigated by auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was shown that the Al thin film growth underwent via the Volmer-Weber (VW) mode. At room temperature, Al and UO 2 interact with each other, electrons transfer occurres from Al atoms to uranium ions, and a few of Al 2 O 3 exist in the region of UO 2 /Al interface due to O 2 adsorption to the surface. Inter-diffusion between UO 2 and Al is observable. Aluminum diffuses into interface region of UO 2 and U. It results in the formation of a coexistence regime containing uranium oxide, metallic U and Al. (authors)

  5. Crystallographic and oxidation kinetic study of uranium dioxide by high temperature X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural behavior of UO 2 sintered plates was studied as a function of temperature by X-ray diffractometry. All the experiments were carried out under an inert atmosphere with low oxygen content (approximated 140 ppm). The thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 05 was found to be 10,5 x 10 - 6 0 C - 1 for temperatures above 165 0 C. Structural transformations during oxidation were observed at 170,235 and 275 0 C. The isothermal oxidation of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 follows a parabolic form and the diffusion of oxygen through the product layer U 4 O 9 is the mechanism controlling the oxidation rate. The phases observed were UO 2 (cubic) - U 4 O 9 (cubic) - U 3 O 7 (tetragonal). Activation energies of oxidation were found for different crystallographic planes (hkl). From this one can conclude that there is a preferential occupation of interstitial oxygen within the UO 2 structure. (Author) [pt

  6. Study of the behaviour of cesium fission product in uranium dioxide by the ab initio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Florence

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of the behaviour of fission products in the nuclear fuel is very important for safety considerations and for understanding the evolution of the fuel properties under irradiation. In this work, we focussed mainly on the behaviour of caesium in UO 2 through ab initio studies of its solubility at point defects in the matrix, its diffusion and its contribution to the formation of solid phases in the fuel. The role of electronic correlation effects of the f electrons of uranium on these properties and on the description of the defect free crystal, is assessed. The formation energies of the main point defects are calculated and their concentration as a function of fuel stoichiometry and temperature is estimated. The migration barriers and migration paths for the self-diffusion of oxygen and uranium vacancies and oxygen interstitials in UO 2 are discussed. The solubility of Cs is found to be very low in UO 2 in agreement with experimental findings. The most favourable trapping sites are determined as a function of oxygen concentration in the fuel. Our results show that in the hyper-stoichiometric regime, the diffusion of Cs from its most favourable trapping site is limited by the uranium vacancy diffusion mechanism. We also considered the formation of the main solid phases of caesium resulting from its oxidation (Cs 2 O, Cs 2 O 2 , CsO 2 ) and from its interaction with the fuel (Cs 2 UO 4 ), with molybdenum (Cs 2 MoO 4 ) and with the zirconium of the clad (Cs 2 ZrO 3 ), since the formation of such phases, their solubility and their interdependence will affect the release of caesium. (author)

  7. Creep of uranium dioxide: bending test and mechanical behaviour; Etude du fluage du dioxyde d'uranium: caracterisation par essais de flexion et modelisation mecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, Ch

    2003-09-01

    These PhD work in the frame of Pellet-Cladding Interactions studies, in the fuel assemblies of nuclear plants. Electricite de France (EDF) must well demonstrate and insure the integrity of the cladding. For that purpose, the viscoplastic behaviour of the nuclear fuel has to be known and, if possible, controlled. This PhD work aimed to characterize the creep of uranium dioxide, in conditions of transient power regime. First, a literature survey on mechanical behaviour of UO{sub 2} revealed that the ceramic was essentially studied with compressive tests, and that its creep behaviour is characterized by two domains, depending on the stress level. To estimate the loadings in a fuel pellet, EDF and CEA developed specific global codes. A simulation during a power ramp allowed the order of magnitude of the loadings in the pellet to be determined (temperature, thermal gradients, strains, strain rate...). The stress calculation using a finite element simulation requires the identification of behaviour laws, able to describe the behaviour under small strains, low strain rates, and under tensile stresses. Starting from this observation, three point bending method has been chosen to test the uranium dioxide. As, for representativeness reasons, testing specimens cut in actual fuel pads was required in our study; a ten millimeters span has been used. For this study, a specific three-point testing device has been developed, that can tests specimens up to 2 000 C in a controlled atmosphere (Ar + 5% H{sub 2}). A special care has been taken for the measurement of the deflexion of the sample, which is measured using a laser beam, that allow an accuracy of {+-}2{mu}m to be reached at high temperature. Specimens with 0,5 to 1 mm thickness have been tested using this jig. A Norton's law describe, with respective stress exponent and activation energy values of 1.73 and 540 kJ.mole-1, provided a good description of the stationary creep rate. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the fuel

  8. Sinterable powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanghi, J.S.; Kasprzyk, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of sinterable powders and methods of producing sintered products using such powders. The powders consist of (a) a particulate ceramic material, e.g. SiC, having specified particle size and surface area; (b) a carbon source material, e.g. sugar or a phenol-formaldehyde resin; and (c) a residue from a solution of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 , or mixtures of these as sintering aid. (U.K.)

  9. Microstructural evolution of uranium dioxide following compression creep tests: An EBSD and image analysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iltis, X., E-mail: xaviere.iltis@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Gey, N. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Cagna, C. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Hazotte, A. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Sornay, Ph. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Image analysis and EBSD are performed on creep tested UO{sub 2} pellets. • Development of intergranular voids, with increasing strain, is quantified. • EBSD evidences a sub-structuration process within the grains and quantifies it. • Creep mechanisms are discussed on the basis of these results. - Abstract: Sintered UO{sub 2} pellets with relatively large grains (∼25 μm) are tested at 1500 °C under a compressive stress of 50 MPa, at different deformation levels up to 12%. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) is used to follow the evolution, with deformation, of grains (size, shape, orientation) and sub-grains. Image analyses of SEM images are performed to characterize emergence of a population of micron size voids. For the considered microstructure and test conditions, the results show that the deformation process of UO{sub 2} globally corresponds to grain boundary sliding, partly accommodated by a dislocational creep within the grains, leading to a highly sub-structured state.

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  11. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  12. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H.B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of temperature, laser energy, and detection rate on the evaporation of UO 2 was investigated. • Laser energy can significantly affect the evaporation behavior of UO 2 . • Proper experimental conditions allows for an accurate investigation of UO 2 with APT. - Abstract: Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO 2 . Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO 2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate

  13. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  14. Chlorine Diffusion in Uranium Dioxide: Thermal Effects versus Radiation Enhanced Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Yves; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Bererd, Nicolas; Jaffrezic, Henri; Toulhoat, Nelly; Barthe, Marie France; Desgardin, Pierre; Raimbault, Louis; Scheidegger, Andre M.; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-01-01

    Chlorine is present as an impurity in the UO 2 nuclear fuel. 35 Cl is activated into 36 Cl by thermal neutron capture. In case of interim storage or deep geological disposal of the spent fuel, this isotope is known to be able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction because of its mobile behavior and its long half life (around 300000 years). It is therefore important to understand its migration behavior within the fuel rod. During reactor operation, chlorine diffusion can be due to thermally activated processes or can be favoured by irradiation defects induced by fission fragments or alpha decay. In order to decouple both phenomena, we performed two distinct experiments to study the effects of thermal annealing on the behaviour of chlorine on one hand and the effects of the irradiation with fission products on the other hand. During in reactor processes, part of the 36 Cl may be displaced from its original position, due to recoil or to collisions with fission products. In order to study the behavior of the displaced chlorine, 37 Cl has been implanted into sintered depleted UO 2 pellets (mean grain size around 18 μm). The spatial distribution of the implanted and pristine chlorine has been analyzed by SIMS before and after treatment. Thermal annealing of 37 Cl implanted UO 2 pellets (implantation fluence of 10 13 ions.cm -2 ) show that it is mobile from temperatures as low as 1273 K (E a =4.3 eV). The irradiation with fission products (Iodine, E=63.5 MeV) performed at 300 and 510 K, shows that the diffusion of chlorine is enhanced and that a thermally activated contribution is preserved (E a =0.1 eV). The diffusion coefficients measured at 1473 K and under fission product irradiation at 510 K are similar (D = 3.10 -14 cm 2 .s -1 ). Considering in first approximation that the diffusion length L can be expressed as a function of the diffusion coefficient D and time t by : L=(Dt)1/2, the diffusion distance after 3 years is L=17 μm. It results that

  15. Increase of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel pellets with beryllium oxide addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarano, D.M.; Mansur, F.A.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferraz, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    The UO 2 fuel is one of the most used nuclear fuel in thermal reactors and has many advantages such as high melting point, chemical compatibility with cladding, etc. However, its thermal conductivity is relatively low, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel pellets due to a high radial temperature gradient during reactor operation. An alternative to avoid this problem is to increase the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets, by adding beryllium oxide (BeO). Pellets of UO 2 and UO 2 -BeO were obtained from a homogenized mixture of powders of UO 2 and BeO, containing 2% and 3% by weight of BeO and sintering at 1750 °C for 3 h under H 2 atmosphere after uniaxial pressing at 400 MPa. The pellet densities were obtained by xylol penetration-immersion method and the thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity were determined according to ASTM E-1461 at room temperature (25 deg C) and 100 deg C. The thermal diffusivity measurements were carried out employing the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity obtained at 25 deg C showed an increase with the addition of 2% and 3% of BeO corresponding to 19% and 28%, respectively. As for the measurements carried out at 100 deg C, there was an increase in the thermal conductivity for the same BeO contents of 20% and 31%. These values as a percentage of increased conductivity were obtained in relation to the UO 2 pellets. (author)

  16. The creation of a uranium oxide industry, from the laboratory stage to a pilot plant (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Delange, M.; Sauteron, J.

    1961-01-01

    The qualities of uranium oxide, in particular its good in-pile characteristics and its resistance to corrosion by the usual heat-exchange fluids, have led to this material being chose at the present time as a nuclear fuel in many power reactors, either planned or under construction. A great effort has been made these last few years in France in studying processes for transforming powdered uranium oxide into a dense material with satisfactory behaviour in a neutron flux. The laboratories at Saclay have studied the physico-chemical features of the phenomena accompanying the calcination of uranium peroxide or ammonium uranate to give uranium trioxide, and the subsequent reduction of the latter to dioxide as well as the sintering of the powders obtained. This work has made it possible on one hand to prepare powder of known specific surface area, and on the other to show the overriding influence of this factor, all other things being equal, on the behaviour of powders during sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere. The work has led to defining two methods for sintering stoichiometric uranium oxide of high density. The technological study of the preparation of the powder and its industrial production are carried out at the plant of Le Bouchet which produces at the moment powders of known characteristics suitable for sintering in hydrogen at 1650 deg. C without prior grinding. The industrial sintering is carried out by the Compagnie industrielle des Combustibles Atomiques Frittes who has set up a pilot plant having a capacity of 25 metric tons/year, for the Commissariat l'Energie Atomique and has been operating this plant since May 1958. This plant is presented by a film entitled 'uranium oxide'. (author) [fr

  17. Application of Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge to Removal of Uranium Dioxide from Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Saber, Hamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that radio-frequency (rf) plasma glow discharge using NF 3 gas is an effective technique for the removal of uranium oxide from metal surfaces. The results of these experiments are analyzed to explain the measured dependence of the UO 2 removal or etch rate on the NF 3 gas pressure and the absorbed power in the plasma. The NF 3 gas pressure in the experiments was varied from 10.8 to 40 Pa, and the deposited power in the plasma was varied from 25 to 210 W. The UO 2 etch rate was strongly dependent on the absorbed power and, to a lesser extent, on the NF 3 pressure and decreased exponentially with immersion time. At 210 W and 17 Pa, all detectable UO 2 in the samples (∼10.6 mg each) was removed at the endpoint, whereas the initial etch rate was ∼3.11 μm/min. When the absorbed power was ≤50 W, however, the etch rate was initially ∼0.5 μg/min and almost zero at the endpoint, with UO 2 only partially etched. This self-limiting etching of UO 2 at low power is attributed to the formation of nonvolatile intermediates UF 2 , UF 3 , UF 4 , UF 5 , UO 2 F, and UO 2 F 2 on the surface. Analysis indicated that the accumulation of UF 6 and, to a lesser extent, O 2 near the surface partially contributed to the exponential decrease in the UO 2 etch rate with immersion time. Unlike fluorination with F 2 gas, etching of UO 2 using rf glow discharge is possible below 663 K. The average etch rates of the amorphous UO 2 in the NF 3 experiments are comparable to the peak values reported in other studies for crystalline UO 2 using CF 4 /O 2 glow discharge performed at ∼150 to 250 K higher sample temperatures

  18. Study of the adsorption of methyl iodide and molecular iodine on clean uranium and uranium dioxide surfaces by means of X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-03-01

    The adsorption of methyl iodide as well as of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been studied at 25 0 C. Surfaces of the substrates were cleaned and characterized before and after exposure using X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron induced Auger electron (AES) spectroscopy. Exposures amounted up to 1500 L CH 3 I on uranium metal, 1000 L CH 3 I on UO 2 , 100 L I 2 on uranium metal, and 75 L I 2 on UO 2 (1 L = 1 Langmuir = 10 -6 torr x sec). From the measured binding energies, Auger parameters, and intensity ratios for substrate and adsorbate constituents we deduced that for both CH 3 I and I 2 on uranium metal a uranium iodide, UI 3 , is formed. The adsorption of CH 3 I on U-metal is in addition accompanied by the formation of a carbide-type carbon, UC. Thus, in both cases a dissociative (adsorption/reaction) process is observed. For adsorption of CH 3 I on UO 2 the experimental findings indicate a dissociative process, too, though the species formed could not be identified. In contrast, I 2 adsorption on UO 2 appears to have non-dissociative character. Saturation coverages for CH 3 I were found to be approx.= 2 L on U-metal and approx.= 5 L on UO 2 , for I 2 approx.= 40 L on U-metal and 10-15 L on UO 2 . Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extraatomic relaxation processes. (orig.) [de

  19. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  20. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  1. Radiation enhanced thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide; Diffusion thermique et sous irradiation du chlore dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Yves [Ecole doctorale de physique et d' astrophysique, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, Lyon (France)

    2006-12-15

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of {sup 36}Cl in uranium dioxide. It is a contribution to PRECCI programme (research programme on the long-term behaviour of the spent nuclear fuel). {sup 36}Cl is a long lived volatile activation product (T = 300 000 years) able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction in geological disposal conditions. We simulated the presence of {sup 36}Cl by implanting a quantity of {sup 37}Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO{sub 2}. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 deg. C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 deg. C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D{sub 1000} {sub deg.} {sub C} around 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and deduced an activation energy of 4.3 eV. This value is one of lowest compared to that of volatile fission products such as iodine or the xenon. These parameters reflect the very mobile behaviour of chlorine; - the irradiation effects induced by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with {sup 127}I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We showed that the implanted chlorine diffusion in the temperature range 30 - 250 deg. C is not purely athermal. In these conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub 250} {sub deg.} {sub C} for the implanted chlorine is around 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and the activation energy is calculated to be 0.1 eV. Moreover, at 250 deg. C, we observed an important transport of the pristine chlorine from the bulk towards the surface. This chlorine comes from a zone where the defects are mainly produced by the nuclear energy loss process at the end of iodine range. We showed the importance of the

  2. Study and simulation of the behaviour under irradiation of helium in uranium dioxide; Etude et modelisation du comportement sous irradiation de l'helium dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G

    2007-06-15

    Large quantities of helium are produced from {alpha}-decay of actinides in nuclear fuels during its in-pile operating and its storage. It is important to understand the behaviour of helium in these matrix in order to well simulate the evolution and the resistance of the fuel element. During this thesis, we have used nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) to follow the evolution of the helium implanted in polycrystalline and monocrystalline uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). An experimental rig was developed to follow the on-line helium release in UO{sub 2} and the evolution of {sup 3}He profiles as a function of annealing temperature. An automated procedure taking into account the evolution of the depth resolution was developed. Analyses performed with a nuclear microprobe allowed to characterise the spatial distribution of helium at the grain scale and to study the influence of the sample microstructure on the helium migration. This work put into evidence the particular role of grain boundaries and irradiation defects in the helium release process. The analyse of experimental results with a diffusion model corroborates these interpretations. It allowed to determine quantitatively physical properties that characterise the helium behaviour in uranium dioxide (diffusion coefficient, activation energy..). (author)

  3. Discrimination symbol applying method for sintered nuclear fuel product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Jin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a symbol applying method for applying discrimination information such as an enrichment degree on the end face of a sintered nuclear product. Namely, discrimination symbols of information of powders are applied by a sintering aid to the end face of a molded member formed by molding nuclear fuel powders under pressure. Then, the molded product is sintered. The sintering aid comprises aluminum oxide, a mixture of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide, aluminum hydride or aluminum stearate alone or in admixture. As an applying means of the sintering aid, discrimination symbols of information of powders are drawn by an isostearic acid on the end face of the molded product, and the sintering aid is sprayed thereto, or the sintering aid is applied directly, or the sintering aid is suspended in isostearic acid, and the suspension is applied with a brush. As a result, visible discrimination information can be applied to the sintered member easily. (N.H.)

  4. Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

  5. Uranium dioxide Caramel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    The work performed in France on Caramel fuels for research reactors reflects the reality of a program based on non proliferation criteria, as they have already appeared several years ago. This work actually includes the following different aspects: identification of the non proliferation criterion defining this action; determination of the economical and technical goals to be reached; realization of research and development studies finalized in a full scale demonstration; transposition to an industrial and commercial level

  6. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO 2 /Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented

  7. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  8. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  9. Accurate determination of U(IV), U(VI) and total uranium in uranium dioxide pellet by coulometry at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guohua; Zhou Yongzhong

    1999-04-01

    The accurate determination is studied of U(IV), U(VI), total U and ratio of Oxygen to Uranium (O/U) by Coulometry at a constant current. The sample is dissolved rapidly and thoroughly in thermostatic phosphoric acid solution (adding a little of hydrofluoric acid) by a new method of stirring reflux at 270 +- 5 degree C, and the U (VI) in the solution is reduced to U(IV) by ferrous iron. Weigh a little of excess reference bichrome material precisely, then add it into the solution to oxide the U(IV). And the excess bichrome is titrated by electrolytic iron ion (II) under a constant current. With the bichrome amount consumed by uranium oxide, the total U thus can be calculated. The U(IV) is also measured with the same method and principle of dissolving the sample as that of the total U measurement except the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by adding ferrous iron. The U(VI) and the O/U ratio can be calculated with the results of total U and U(IV). So the uncertainty by the method is better than 0.035% for total U, 0.025% for U(IV), 9.03% for U(VI) and ).0001 O/U unit for O/U ratio. This method is applicable to the accurate determinations of U(IV), U(VI), total U and O/U ratio in UO 2 and U 3 O 8 powders and UO 2 pellet

  10. Factors governing microstructure development of Cr2O3-doped UO2 during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.; Dehaudt, Ph.; Lemaignan, C.; Hammou, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sintering and grain growth of compacted uranium dioxide powder pellets doped with Cr 2 O 3 were investigated at constant heating rates ranging from 75 to 500 K h -1 . The influence of parameters such as the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere and pellet green density on the final microstructure was studied. Dilatometric analysis and monitoring of microstructural development revealed a phenomenon of abnormal grain growth promoting densification. The existence of a eutectic between Cr and Cr 2 O 3 is also discussed. Grain growth does not appear to be widely affected by small differences in residual porosity, which is a function of green density, so that it is possible to propose a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in stoichiometric UO 2 at 1700 deg. C. Examination of microstructural changes during annealing, with or without pore formers, showed the existence of limiting grain sizes for doped samples above the solubility limit. Lastly, experimental sintering conditions need to be checked in order to obtain reproducible results [fr

  11. UO2 fuel pellets fabrication via Spark Plasma Sintering using non-standard molybdenum die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papynov, E. K.; Shichalin, O. O.; Mironenko, A. Yu; Tananaev, I. G.; Avramenko, V. A.; Sergienko, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    The article investigates spark plasma sintering (SPS) of commercial uranium dioxide (UO2) powder of ceramic origin into highly dense fuel pellets using non-standard die instead of usual graphite die. An alternative and formerly unknown method has been suggested to fabricate UO2 fuel pellets by SPS for excluding of typical problems related to undesirable carbon diffusion. Influence of SPS parameters on chemical composition and quality of UO2 pellets has been studied. Also main advantages and drawbacks have been revealed for SPS consolidation of UO2 in non-standard molybdenum die. The method is very promising due to high quality of the final product (density 97.5-98.4% from theoretical, absence of carbon traces, mean grain size below 3 μm) and mild sintering conditions (temperature 1100 ºC, pressure 141.5 MPa, sintering time 25 min). The results are interesting for development and probable application of SPS in large-scale production of nuclear ceramic fuel.

  12. Sintering and densification; new techniques: sinter forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnubst, A.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter pressure assisted sintering methods will be described. Attention will mainly be paid to sinter forging as a die-wall free uniaxial pressure sintering technique, where large creep strains are possible. Sinter forging is an effective tool to reduce sintering temperature and time and to obtain a nearly theoretically dense ceramic. In this way grain size in tetragonal zirconia ceramics can be reduced down to 100 nm. Another important phenomenon is the reduction of the number density and size of cracks and flaws resulting in higher strength and improved reliability, which is of utmost importance for engineering ceramics. The creep deformation during sinter forging causes a rearrangement of the grains resulting in a reduction of interatomic spaces between grains, while grain boundary (glassy) phases can be removed. The toughness and in some cases the wear resistance is enhanced after sinter forging as a result of the grain-boundary-morphology improvement. (orig.)

  13. Preparation of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirths, G.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is converted to uranium tetrafluoride under stoichiometric excess of hydrogen fluoride. The water formed in the process and the unreacted hydrogen fluoride are cooled and the condensate fractionally distilled into water and approx. 40% hydrofluoric acid. The hydrofluoric acid and water-free hydrogen fluoride are fed back into the process. (WI) [de

  14. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  15. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  16. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs; Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically; Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards; Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste; and Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements

  17. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO2. For this purpose, sintered UO2 pellets were implanted with 37Cl at an ion fluence of 1013 cm-2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475 K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275 K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3 eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO2 at relatively low temperatures, the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing, the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I, the comparison between an U2O2Cl5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U2O2Cl5 to the pristine chlorine.

  18. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35 Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO 2 . For this purpose, sintered UO 2 pellets were implanted with 37 Cl at an ion fluence of 10 13 cm -2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: (1) the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures; (2) the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing; (3) the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I; (4) the comparison between an U 2 O 2 Cl 5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U 2 O 2 Cl 5 to the pristine chlorine

  19. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.; Randall, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  20. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

  1. About the elaboration of pure uranium dicarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.; Blum, P.; Guinet, Ph.; Spitz, J.

    1963-01-01

    In order to develop methods for the elaboration of as pure as possible uranium dicarbide, the authors report the study of different elaboration processes based on the reaction between uranium and carbon, or between uranium and hydrocarbon, or between uranium oxide and carbon. They finally choose a method which comprises an arc-induced fusion of a mixture of uranium dioxide and carbon. The fusion process is described. The influence of thermal treatments is discussed as well as the graphite electrode carburization

  2. Experimental study and model development for 'uranium dioxide-epoxy resin' heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairat, Aziza

    2015-01-01

    kinetic model to the partial differential equations (mass, energy and momentum balance) to obtain a representative model of the oven in terms of temperature and chemical species composition. The Modeling of the oven is carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The results showed a good agreement with experimental measurements. After pyrolysis, char still contains significant amount of hydrogen. To minimize this quantity, the oxidation of the char is a necessary step. Two treatment types are proposed: An oxidation under a controlled oxygen atmosphere and carbon dioxide gasification. These methods are efficient to eliminate the residual of hydrogen content while keeping the fuel integrity. (author) [fr

  3. Process for producing uranium oxide rich compositions from uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHollander, W.R.; Fenimore, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of gaseous uranium hexafluoride to a uranium dioxide rich composition in the presence of an active flame in a reactor defining a reaction zone is achieved by separately introducing a first gaseous reactant comprising a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and a reducing carrier gas, and a second gaseous reactant comprising an oxygen-containing gas. The reactants are separated by a shielding gas as they are introduced to the reaction zone. The shielding gas temporarily separates the gaseous reactants and temporarily prevents substantial mixing and reacting of the gaseous reactants. The flame occurring in the reaction zone is maintained away from contact with the inlet introducing the mixture to the reaction zone. After suitable treatment, the uranium dioxide rich composition is capable of being fabricated into bodies of desired configuration for loading into nuclear fuel rods. Alternatively, an oxygen-containing gas as a third gaseous reactant is introduced when the uranium hexafluoride conversion to the uranium dioxide rich composition is substantially complete. This results in oxidizing the uranium dioxide rich composition to a higher oxide of uranium with conversion of any residual reducing gas to its oxidized form

  4. Micromechanical simulation of Uranium dioxide polycrystalline aggregate behaviour under irradiation; Modele numerique micro-mecanique d'agregat polycristallin pour le comportement des combustibles oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacull, J.

    2011-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear power reactor (PWR), the fuel rod is made of dioxide of uranium (UO{sub 2}) pellet stacked in a metallic cladding. A multi scale and multi-physic approaches are needed for the simulation of fuel behavior under irradiation. The main phenomena to take into account are thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod and chemical-physic behavior of the fission products. These last years one of the scientific issue to improve the simulation is to take into account the multi-physic coupling problem at the microscopic scale. The objective of this ph-D study is to contribute to this multi-scale approach. The present work concerns the micro-mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate of UO{sub 2}. Mean field and full field approaches are considered. For the former and the later a self consistent homogenization technique and a periodic Finite Element model base on the 3D Voronoi pattern are respectively used. Fuel visco-plasticity is introduced in the model at the scale of a single grain by taking into account specific dislocation slip systems of UO{sub 2}. A cohesive zone model has also been developed and implemented to simulate grain boundary sliding and intergranular crack opening. The effective homogenous behaviour of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) is fitted with experimental data coming from mechanical tests on a single pellet. Local behavior is also analyzed in order to evaluate the model capacity to assess micro-mechanical state. In particular, intra and inter granular stress gradient are discussed. A first validation of the local behavior assessment is proposed through the simulation of intergranular crack opening measured in a compressive creep test of a single fuel pellet. Concerning the impact of the microstructure on the fuel behavior under irradiation, a RVE simulation with a representative transient loading of a fuel rod during a power ramp test is achieved. The impact of local stress and strain heterogeneities on the multi

  5. The creation of a uranium oxide industry, from the laboratory stage to a pilot plant (1961); Creation d'une industrie de l'oxyde d'uranium du laboratoire a l'usine pilote (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, R.; Delange, M.; Sauteron, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Hauser, R. [Compagnie Industrielle des Combustibles atomiques frittes (France)

    1961-07-01

    The qualities of uranium oxide, in particular its good in-pile characteristics and its resistance to corrosion by the usual heat-exchange fluids, have led to this material being chose at the present time as a nuclear fuel in many power reactors, either planned or under construction. A great effort has been made these last few years in France in studying processes for transforming powdered uranium oxide into a dense material with satisfactory behaviour in a neutron flux. The laboratories at Saclay have studied the physico-chemical features of the phenomena accompanying the calcination of uranium peroxide or ammonium uranate to give uranium trioxide, and the subsequent reduction of the latter to dioxide as well as the sintering of the powders obtained. This work has made it possible on one hand to prepare powder of known specific surface area, and on the other to show the overriding influence of this factor, all other things being equal, on the behaviour of powders during sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere. The work has led to defining two methods for sintering stoichiometric uranium oxide of high density. The technological study of the preparation of the powder and its industrial production are carried out at the plant of Le Bouchet which produces at the moment powders of known characteristics suitable for sintering in hydrogen at 1650 deg. C without prior grinding. The industrial sintering is carried out by the Compagnie industrielle des Combustibles Atomiques Frittes who has set up a pilot plant having a capacity of 25 metric tons/year, for the Commissariat l'Energie Atomique and has been operating this plant since May 1958. This plant is presented by a film entitled 'uranium oxide'. (author) [French] Les qualites de l'oxyde d'uranium, en particulier son bon comportement en pile et sa resistance a la corrosion par les fluides caloporteurs habituels, font choisir aujourd'hui ce materiau comme combustible de nombreux reacteurs de

  6. Sintering of nonstoichiometric UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, D.; Holc, J.

    1983-01-01

    Activated sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1100 deg C is described. In CO 2 atmosphere is UO 2 is nonstoichiometric and pellets from active UO 2 powders sinter at 900 deg C to high density. At 1100 deg C the final sintered density is practically achieved at heating on sintering temperature. After reduction and cooling in H 2 atmosphere which is followed sintering in CO 2 the structure is identical to the structured UO 2 pellets sintered at high temperature in H 2 . Density of activated sintered UO 2 pellets is stable, even after additional sintering at 1800 deg C. (author)

  7. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  8. A method for sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for sintering, comprising in the following order the steps of: providing a body in the green state or in the pre-sintered state on a support; providing a load on at least one spacer on the support such that the load is located above said body in the green...

  9. Process for in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenscheid, W.F.; Yan, F.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to the recovery of uranium from subterranean ore deposits, and more particularly to an in-situ leaching operation employing an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide as the lixiviant. Uranium is solubilized in the lixiviant as it traverses the subterranean uranium deposit. The lixiviant is subsequently recovered and treated to remove the uranium

  10. Thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on thermodynamic and transport properties of solid and liquid UO 2 have been reviewed and analyzed to obtain consistent equations for the thermophysical properties. Thermodynamic properties that have been assessed include enthalpy, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion, density, surface tension and vapor pressure. Transport properties that have been assessed are thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, viscosity, emissivity and optical constants. The assessments include a review of the experiments and data, review of previous recommendations, analysis of data to obtain new recommendations, determination of uncertainties in the recommended values, and comparisons of new recommendations with data and previous recommendations

  11. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  12. Contribution to the study of sputtering and damage of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions; Contribution a l'etude de la pulverisation et de l'endommagement du dioxyde d'uranium par les ions lourds rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlutig, S

    2001-03-01

    Swift heavy ion-solid interaction leads in volume to track creation and on the surface to the ejection of particles into the vacuum. To learn more about initial mechanisms of track formation, we are focused on the sputtering of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions. This present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power on the emission of neutral particles and especially on their angular distribution. These measurements are completed by those of the ions emitted from UO{sub 2} targets bombarded with swift heavy ions. The whole experimental results give access to: i) the nature of the sputtered particles; ii) the charge state of the emitted particles; iii) the direction of ejection of the sputtered particles ; iv) the sputtering yields deduced from the angular distributions. These results are compared to the prediction of the sputtering models proposed in the literature and it seems that the supersonic gas flow model is well suited to describe our results. Finally, the sputtering yields are compared with a set of earlier experimental data on uranium dioxide damage obtained by T. Wiss and we observe that only a small fraction of UO{sub 2} monolayers are sputtered. (author)

  13. Fuel electrode containing pre-sintered nickel/zirconia for a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Vora, Shailesh D.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell structure (2) is provided, having a pre-sintered nickel-zirconia fuel electrode (6) and an air electrode (4), with a ceramic electrolyte (5) disposed between the electrodes, where the pre-sintered fuel electrode (6) contains particles selected from the group consisting of nickel oxide, cobalt and cerium dioxide particles and mixtures thereof, and titanium dioxide particles, within a matrix of yttria-stabilized zirconia and spaced-apart filamentary nickel strings having a chain structure, and where the fuel electrode can be sintered to provide an active solid oxide fuel cell.

  14. Applications of fluorescence techniques to the study of uranium in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments: hydrolysis and photo-reduction reactions on titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliet, Veronique

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to characterise the spectroscopy of hydroxo-complexes of hexavalent Uranium, and to study photochemical reactions involving these species at mineral/water interfaces. The instrumentation used comprised of either an excimer laser coupled to an optical multichannel analyser OMA or a Nd-YAG laser coupled to a stroboscopic photomultiplier. The hydrolysis of Uranium at a constant temperature of 25 deg. C, has been studied in the pH ranges 0-5 and 9-12. Deconvolution of spectra and fluorescence decay curves for Uranium yielded individual fluorescence spectra and decay times for uranyl UO 2 2+ and its hydroxo-complexes UO 2 OH + , (UO 2 )2(OH) 2 2+ , (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + et UO 2 (OH) 3 - . The comparison of fluorescence efficiencies for the various species showed that the complex (UO 2 )2(OH) 2 2+ is up to 85 times more fluorescent than uranyl, depending on the emission wavelength. Further, investigations of fluorescence decays as a function of temperature in the pH range 0-6, yielded activation energies for the various Uranium hydroxo species. The knowledge gained in homogeneous media served in the study of the photochemical behaviour of Uranium in suspensions of the semi-conductor mineral, TiO 2 . After UV-light absorption, charge carriers formed at the mineral surface were found to reduce hexavalent Uranium to the tetravalent oxidation state. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy has been used to monitor the kinetics of the oxidation state change. A reaction mechanism is proposed on the basis of results obtained by studying the kinetics of the process at different values of pH The role of humic substances on the heterogeneous redox reaction has also been examined. (author) [fr

  15. Microwave combustion and sintering without isostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years interest has grown rapidly in the application of microwave energy to the processing of ceramics, composites, polymers, and other materials. Advances in the understanding of microwave/materials interactions will facilitate the production of new ceramic materials with superior mechanical properties. One application of particular interest is the use of microwave energy for the mobilization of uranium for subsequent redeposition. Phase III (FY98) will focus on the microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration tests for mobilization and redeposition of radioactive species in the mixed sludge waste. Uranium hexachloride and uranium (IV) borohydride are volatile compounds for which the chemical vapor infiltration procedure might be developed for the separation of uranium. Microwave heating characterized by an inverse temperature profile within a preformed ceramic matrix will be utilized for CVI using a carrier gas. Matrix deposition is expected to commence from the inside of the sample where the highest temperature is present. The preform matrix materials, which include aluminosilicate based ceramics and silicon carbide based ceramics, are all amenable to extreme volume reduction, densification, and vitrification. Important parameters of microwave sintering such as frequency, power requirement, soaking temperature, and holding time will be investigated to optimize process conditions for the volatilization of uranyl species using a reactive carrier gas in a microwave chamber

  16. Method and apparatus for recovering uranium from a carbonate solution containing uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunin, R.; Laterra, T.

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for recovering uranium from a carbonate solution containing uranium ions whereby the carbonate solution containing uranium ions is brought in contact with a cation exchanger so that a uranium cation is removed from solution and absorbed by the cation exchanger, and the uranium cation is then removed from the cation exchanger. The treated carbonate solution from which uranium ions have been removed by cation exchange is then further processed by removing carbon dioxide from the treated carbonate solution to produce a decarbonated solution, and passing the decarbonated solution through a membrane process to remove some remaining impurities

  17. Morphological analysis and modelling of sintering and of sintered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernot, Jean-Paul

    1982-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of solid phase sintering of metallic powders, and aims at describing as precisely as possible the different involved matter transport mechanisms, first by using a thermodynamic approach to sintering. Sintering diagrams are also used to determine prevailing mechanisms. The microstructure of sintered materials has been studied by using image quantitative analysis, thus by using a morphological approach to sintering. Morphological parameters allow, on the one hand, the evolution of powders during sintering to be followed, and, on the other hand, sintered products to be correctly characterised. Moreover, the author reports the study of the evolution of some physical properties of sintered materials with respect to their microstructure parameters. This leads to the development of a modelling of the behaviour of these materials [fr

  18. Terminal uranium(V/VI) nitride activation of carbon dioxide and carbon disulfide. Factors governing diverse and well-defined cleavage and redox reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaves, Peter A.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent [LPCNO, CNRS and INSA, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Lewis, William [School of Chemistry, The University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-24

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE{sub 2} (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (1, Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiiPr{sub 3}){sub 3}; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)] (2) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give isolable [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N{sub 2} and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(κ{sup 2}-CS{sub 3})][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5){sub 2}][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(NCS)] (8) and ''S'', with the latter trapped as Ph{sub 3}PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE{sub 2} follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS{sub 2} as a reactivity surrogate for CO{sub 2}. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  20. Uranium demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The estimated world resources of uranium as well as the estimated consumption of uranium over the next 25 years are briefly discussed. Attention is given to the prospecting of uranium in South Africa and elsewhere in the world

  1. Sintering of Synroc D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Sintering has been investigated as a method for the mineralization and densification of high-level nuclear defense waste powder. Studies have been conducted on Synroc D composite powder LS04. Optimal densification has been found to be highly dependent on the characteristics of the starting material. Powder subjected to milling, which was believed to reduce the level of agglomeration and possibly particle size, was found to densify better than powder not subjected to this milling. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical could be achieved for samples sintered at 1150 to 1200 0 C. Mineralogy was found to be as expected for Synroc D for samples sintered in a CO 2 /CO atmosphere where the Fe +2 /Fe +3 ratio was maintained at 1.0 to 5.75. In a more oxidizing, pure CO 2 atmosphere a new phase, not previously identified in Synroc D, was found

  2. SinterHab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousek, Tomáš; Eriksson, Katarina; Doule, Ondřej

    2012-05-01

    This project describes a design study for a core module on a Lunar South Pole outpost, constructed by 3D printing technology with the use of in-situ resources and equipped with a bio-regenerative life support system. The module would be a hybrid of deployable (CLASS II) and in-situ built (CLASS III) structures. It would combine deployable membrane structures and pre-integrated rigid elements with a sintered regolith shell for enhanced radiation and micrometeorite shielding. The closed loop ecological system would support a sustainable presence on the Moon with particular focus on research activities. The core module accommodates from four to eight people, and provides laboratories as a test bed for development of new lunar technologies directly in the environment where they will be used. SinterHab also includes an experimental garden for development of new bio-regenerative life support system elements. The project explores these various concepts from an architectural point-of-view particularly, as they constitute the building, construction and interior elements. The construction method for SinterHab is based on 3D printing by sintering of the lunar regolith. Sinterator robotics 3D printing technology proposed by NASA JPL enables construction of future generations of large lunar settlements with little imported material and the use of solar energy. The regolith is processed, placed and sintered by the Sinterator robotics system which combines the NASA ATHLETE and the Chariot remotely controlled rovers. Microwave sintering creates a rigid structure in the form of walls, vaults and other architectural elements. The interior is coated with a layer of inflatable membranes inspired by the TransHab project. The life-support system is mainly bio-regenerative and several parts of the system are intrinsically multifunctional and serve more than one purpose. The plants for food production are also an efficient part of atmosphere revitalization and water treatment. Moreover

  3. Automated fluorometer for uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElhaney, R.J.; Caylor, J.D.; Cole, S.H.; Futrell, T.L.; Giles, V.M.

    1978-03-01

    An utomated fluorometer has proven to be a valuable analytical tool for analyzing natural waters for the Uranium Resource Evaluation (URE) project. Uranium is isolated from potential quenching ions and concentrated by extraction with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in Varsol. A portion of the extract is placed on a sodium fluoride pellet which is then dried, sintered, and cooled. Sixteen samples can be analyzed in about 1.5 hours. The lower reporting limit has been set at 0.20 micrograms per liter

  4. Technological aspects of UO2 sintering at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thern, Gerardo G.; Dominguez, Carlos A.; Benitez, Ana M.; Marajofsky, Adolfo

    1999-01-01

    Within the Fuel Cycle Program of CNEA, the knowledge that plant personnel has on sintering at low temperature was evaluated, because this process could decrease costs for UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 pellets production, simplify the furnace maintenance and facilitate the automation of the production process, specially convenient for uranium recovery. By applying this technology, some companies have achieved production at pilot-scale and irradiated a significant number of pellets. (author)

  5. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  6. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-09-28

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared.

  7. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-01-01

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared

  8. Studies on sintering kinetics of ThO2-UO2 pellets using master sintering curve approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Joydipta; Ray, Aditi; Kumar, Arun; Banerjee, Srikumar

    2013-11-01

    Three different compositions of thoria-urania pellets, namely, ThO2-4%UO2, ThO2-10%UO2 and ThO2-20%UO2 (all compositions are in wt% containing natural uranium) were fabricated by Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) process. The compositions studied in the current paper are the proposed fuels for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy water Reactor (AHWR) and its variant based on low enriched uranium. Sintering kinetics of ThO2-x%UO2 (x = 4, 10, 20) green pellets, thus fabricated, were evaluated using constant heating rate experiments in a vertical dilatometer. Activation energies of sintering (Q) were estimated using Arrhenius plot as proposed by Wang and Raj. Master Sintering Curves (MSC) for the above three compositions were constructed using shrinkage data. A FORTRAN program, employing optimization based numerical algorithm for fitting relative density vs. work of sintering data with sigmoid function, was used for this purpose. The apparent activation energies, evaluated using MSC principle, appear to be consistent with the values obtained by Arrhenius plot.

  9. Uranium-bearing wastes and their radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Imamura, Mitsutaka; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are no data available with regard to radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes; such data are needed for the assessment of radiation exposure from radon that will be generated in the distant future as one uranium progeny at shallow land disposal sites for uranium-bearing wastes. There are many kinds of uranium-bearing wastes. However, it is not necessary to measure the radon emanation coefficients for all of them for two reasons. First, the radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium are determined by the uranium chemical form, the manner of uranium deposition on the waste matrix, and the size of the particles which constitute the waste matrix. Therefore, only a few representative measurements are sufficient for such uranium-bearing wastes. Second, it is possible to make theoretical calculations of radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. In the present study, simulated uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium were prepared, their radon emanation coefficients were measured and radon emanation coefficients were calculated theoretically for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. The obtained radon emanation coefficients are distributed at higher values than those for ubiquitous soils and rocks in the natural environment. Therefore, it is not correct to just compare uranium concentrations among uranium-bearing wastes, ubiquitous soils and rocks in terms of radiation exposure. The radon emanation coefficients obtained in the present study have to be employed together with the uranium concentration in uranium-bearing wastes in order to achieve proper assessment of radiation exposure. (author)

  10. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  11. Spectroscopy and DFT studies of uranyl carbonate, rutherfordine, UO2CO3: a model for uranium transport, carbon dioxide sequestration, and seawater species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnyk, N.; Perry, D. L.; Massuyeau, F.; Faulques, E.

    2017-12-01

    Several optical microprobe experiments of the anhydrous uranium carbonate—rutherfordine—are presented in this work and compared to periodic density functional theory results. Rutherfordine is the simplest uranyl carbonate and constitutes an ideal model system for the study of the rich uranium carbonate family relevant for environmental sustainability. Micro-Raman, micro-reflectance, and micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies have been carried out in situ on native, micrometer-sized crystals. The sensitivity of these techniques is sufficient to analyze minute amounts of samples in natural environments without using x-ray analysis. In addition, very intense micro-PL and micro-reflectance spectra that were not reported before add new results on the ground and excited states of this mineral. The optical gap value determined experimentally is found at about 2.6-2.8 eV. Optimized geometry, band structure, and phonon spectra have been calculated. The main vibrational lines are identified and predicted by this theoretical study. This work is pertinent for optical spectroscopy, for identification of uranyl species in various environmental settings, and for nuclear forensic analysis.

  12. Radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide induced by He{sup 2+} localized irradiation of water: Role of the produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traboulsi, Ali [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Vandenborre, Johan, E-mail: johan.vandenborre@subatech.in2p3.fr [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Blain, Guillaume [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Humbert, Bernard [Institut de Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, Université de Nantes – CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinnière, BP 32229, 44340 Nantes (France); Haddad, Ferid [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Cyclotron Arronax, 1 rue Arronax, CS 10112, 44817 Saint Herblain Cedex (France); Fattahi, Massoud [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, La Chantrerie BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-12-15

    The short-range (few μm in water) of the α-emitting from the spent fuel involves that the radiolytic corrosion of this kind of sample occurs at the solid/solution interface. In order to establish the role of localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} species produced by the He{sup 2+} particle beam in water from the surface, we perform UO{sub 2} radiolytic corrosion experiment with different distance between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production area and UO{sub 2} surface. Then, in this work, the radiolytic corrosion of UO{sub 2} particles by oxidative species produced by {sup 4}He{sup 2+} radiolysis of water was investigated in open to air atmosphere. The dose rate, the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and the grain boundaries present on the surface of the particles were investigated. UO{sub 2} corrosion was investigated by in situ (during irradiation) characterization of the solid surface, analysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and quantification of the uranium species released into the solution during irradiation. Characterization of the UO{sub 2} particles, surface and volume, was realized by Raman spectroscopy. UV–vis spectrophotometry was used to monitor H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by water radiolysis and in parallel the soluble uranium species released into the solution were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. During the He{sup 2+} irradiation of ultra-pure water in contact with the UO{sub 2} particles, metastudtite phase was formed on the solid surface indicating an oxidation process of the particles by the oxidative species produced by water radiolysis. This oxidation occurred essentially on the grain boundaries and was accompanied by migration of soluble uranium species (U(VI)) into the irradiated solution. Closer to the surface the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation, higher the UO{sub 2} oxidation process occurs, whereas the dose rate had no effect on it. Simultaneously, closer to the surface

  13. Uranium dioxide thermal characterization by the flash laser method from 23 Celsius to 175 Celsius; Caraterizacao termica de dioxido de uranio pelo metodo flash laser de 23 Celsius a 175 Celsius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeda, K.C.M.; Lameiras, F.S.; Carneiro, L.S.S.; Camarano, D.M.; Ferreira, R.A.N. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Laser Flash Method has become one of the most common techniques for measuring thermal diffusivity and conductivity in solids and liquids. This method is recognized by INMETRO as standard to be used in Brazil for measuring thermophysical properties of materials, such as metals, carbon composites, ceramics, and also nuclear materials. This article describes the experimental bench of the LMPT-Laboratorio de Medicao de Propriedades Termofisicas de Combustiveis Nucleares e Materiais of the CDTN-Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, (LMPT), as well as the mathematical model developed based on this method. The obtained results for the thermal diffusivity and for the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (U0{sub 2}) pellets in the temperature range from 25 deg to 175 deg C, are discussed and compared with the literature data. The estimative of the input quantities uncertainty of the mathematical model was determined according to ISO - BIPM-Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and the Monte Carlo Method was used to estimate of the output quantities uncertainty (thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity). Additionally the results of the x-rays of these pellets are presented. (author)

  14. Sintering of B4C by pressureless liquid phase sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Rosa Maria da; Melo, Francisco Cristovao Lourenco de

    2009-01-01

    The effect of three different sintering additive systems on densification of boron carbide powder was investigated. The sintering additives were Al 2 O 3 :Y 2 O 3 , AlN:Y 2 O 3 and BN:Y 2 O 3 compositions. Powder mixtures were prepared with 10 vol% of sintering aids following conventional powder technology processes. Samples were sintered by pressureless sintering at 2050 deg C/30min in argon atmosphere. Sintered samples were compared to a sintered B 4 C without sintering additive. Samples were characterized by XRD to analyze the crystalline phases after sintering and SEM to observe the microstructure and the second phase distribution. YB 4 and YB 2 C 2 were identified in all samples, indicating a reaction between Y 2 O 3 , B 4 C and B 2 O 3 present at the B 4 C particle surface. The best densification result was achieved with Al 2 O 3 :Y 2 O 3 additive system, showing 92.0 % of theoretical density, low porosity and 15.2 % of linear shrinkage. But this sample showed the highest weight loss. (author)

  15. Fracture toughness of yttria-stabilized zirconia sintered in conventional and microwave ovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinis, Aristotelis; Aquilino, Steven A; Lund, Peter S; Gratton, David G; Stanford, Clark M; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Qian, Fang

    2013-03-01

    The fabrication of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) dental prosthetic substructures requires an extended sintering process (8 to 10 hours) in a conventional oven. Microwave sintering is a shorter process (2 hours) than conventional sintering. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture toughness of 3 mol % Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 sintered in a conventional or microwave oven. Partially sintered ZrO2 specimens from 3 manufacturers, KaVo, Lava 3M, and Crystal HS were milled (KaVo Everest engine) and randomly divided into 2 groups: conventional sintering and microwave sintering (n=16 per group). The specimens were sintered according to the manufacturers' recommendations and stored in artificial saliva for 10 days. Fracture toughness was determined by using a 4-point bend test, and load to fracture was recorded. Mean fracture toughness for each material was calculated. A 2-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HDS post hoc test was used to assess the significance of sintering and material effects on fracture toughness, including an interaction between the 2 factors (α=.05). The 2-way ANOVA suggested a significant main effect for ZrO2 manufacturer (P.05). The main effect of the sintering process (Conventional [5.30 MPa·m(1/2) ±1.00] or Microwave [5.36 MPa·m(1/2) ±0.92]) was not significant (P=.76), and there was no interaction between sintering and ZrO2 manufacturer (P=.91). Based on the results of this study, no statistically significant difference was observed in the fracture toughness of ZrO2 sintered in microwave or conventional ovens. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  17. Boric oxide or boric acid sintering aid for sintering ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to the use of liquid sintering aid in processes involving sintering of ceramic materials to produce dense, hard articles having industrial uses. Although the invention is specifically discussed in regard to compositions containing silicon carbide as the ceramic material, other sinterable carbides, for example, titanium carbide, may be utilized as the ceramic material. A liquid sintering aid for densifying ceramic material is selected from solutions of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 and mixtures of these solutions. In sintering ceramic articles, e.g. silicon carbide, a shaped green body is formed from a particulate ceramic material and a resin binder, and the green body is baked at a temperature of 500 to 1000 0 C to form a porous body. The liquid sintering aid of B 2 O 3 and/or H 3 BO 3 is then dispersed through the porous body and the treated body is sintered at a temperature of 1900 to 2200 0 C to produce the sintered ceramic article. (U.K.)

  18. Sintering of magnesia: effect of additives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    % was studied on the sinter- ing and microstructural developments of the chemically pure magnesia using the pressureless sintering technique between 1500 and 1600◦C. Sintering was evaluated by per cent densification and microstructural ...

  19. Method of precipitating uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The uranium dissolved as uranyl tricarbonate ion in an aqueous alkaline solution is precipitated out as uranium peroxide. The precipitation is carried out by acidifying a portion of the aqueous alkaline solution with excess sulfuric acid to convert the uranyl tricarbonate ion to the uranyl ion and carbon dioxide. This is followed by the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the acidified solution to convert the uranyl ion to uranium peroxide precipitate, producing additional acid. Concurrently, a different portion of the aqueous alkaline uranyl tricarbonate solution is added to the precipitating solution to elevate the pH to an acidic range which is optimum for effective reaction to uranium peroxide and for its precipitation

  20. Australia's uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampson, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: structure of the uranium industry in Australia (export policies; development of mining programme; table of export contracts approved by Australian government, 1972; government policy towards the industry 1972-75 and since 1975); reserves (table of Australia's major uranium deposits; estimated world resources of uranium, excluding USSR, Eastern Europe and China; comparison of exploration expenditures and discovery of uranium in Australia and the USA); enrichment; resource potential; future demand (table of nuclear power reactors above 30 MW in operation or under construction, mid-1979; projection of Australian uranium production to 1990); government and union action. (U.K.)

  1. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  2. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O 2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO 2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr 2 O 3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author) [fr

  3. Electrochemical preparation of new uranium oxide phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Lyalyushkin, N.V.; Bove, A.L.; Komarov, V.K.; Kapshukov, I.I.

    1992-01-01

    Behaviour of uranium ions in oxidation states 3+ and 4+ in molten chlorides of alkali metals in the temperature range of 700-900 degC in the atmosphere of an inert gas was studied by the method of cyclic voltametry. It is shown that as a result of introduction of crystal uranium dioxide into the salt melt formation of uranium oxide ions of the composition UO + and UO 2+ occurs, the ions participating in electrode reactions and bringing about formation of the following uranium oxides on the cathode: UO and, presumably, U 3 O 4 . Oxides UO and U 3 O 4 are thermodynamically unstable at low temperatures and decompose into uranium oxide of the composition UO 2-x , where x varies from 0 to 0.05, and metal uranium

  4. Models of current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Sebastian; Engelke, Lukas; Winterer, Markus; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2017-06-01

    Densification of (semi-)conducting particle agglomerates with the help of an electrical current is much faster and more energy efficient than traditional thermal sintering or powder compression. Therefore, this method becomes more and more common among experimentalists, engineers, and in industry. The mechanisms at work at the particle scale are highly complex because of the mutual feedback between current and pore structure. This paper extends previous modelling approaches in order to study mixtures of particles of two different materials. In addition to the delivery of Joule heat throughout the sample, especially in current bottlenecks, thermoelectric effects must be taken into account. They lead to segregation or spatial correlations in the particle arrangement. Various model extensions are possible and will be discussed.

  5. Production of pure sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da; Huebner, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    With the aim of optimizing the sintering parameters, the strength of a large number of alumina samples was determined which were produced under widely varying sintering conditions and with different amounts of MgO content. The strength as a function of sintering time or temperature was found to go through a maximum. With increasing time, this maximum is shifted to lower temperatures, and with decreasing temperature to longer times. Data pairs of sintering times and temperatures which yeld the strength maximum were determined. The value of the strength at the maximum remains unchanged. The strength is high (= 400 MN/m 2 , at a grain size of 3 um and a porosity of 2 per cent) and comparable to foreign aluminas produced for commercial purposes, or even higher. The increase in the sintering time from 1 h to 16 h permits a reduction of the sintering temperature from 1600 to 1450 0 C without losing strength. The practical importance of this fact for a production of sintered alumina on a large scale is emphasized. (Author) [pt

  6. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, Kenneth G. (Charleston, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  7. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  8. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, Drryl P.; Jaques, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (U x , Dy 1-x )N (0.7 (le) X (le) 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  9. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  10. The behaviour of uranium metal in hydrogen atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Stevens, J.C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal leads to the formation of UO 2 due to traces of water vapour or oxygen. When extremely pure H 2 is used uranium hydride may be formed but, even with 99.9999% H 2 , uranium dioxide forms preferentially. The present work identifies the presence of UH 3 in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum of a uranium sample which has been exposed to ca. 10 10 L† H 2 at ca. 200 0 C. This spectrum indicates that the hydride possesses a high degree of covalency, since the oxidation state of uranium in UH 3 appears to be ca. 1.4. (author)

  11. The sintering of nitrogen ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampshire, S.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of densification with oxide additives and the role of the ..cap alpha..-BETA phase transformation is investigated in a detailed kinetic study. Selected compositions in the Si-Al-O-N system are detailed, with and without additives. Although the work is mainly concerned with the identification of the mechanisms of sintering, some property measurements on a sintered BETA-sialon are reported and the feasibility of preparing pure ..cap alpha..-sialon phases is explored.

  12. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  13. Uranium prospecting and uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, K.E.

    1975-01-01

    Following of short historical survey, estimations of the uranium resources of the western world made in the middle of 1975 are presented and interpreted. The most common methods of prospecting and exploration of the mines and of production and processing of the uranium eres are described. A short survey of the situation of supply and demand is supplemented by a description of the activities of the two German companies in the field of uranium supply. (UA/AK) [de

  14. Adsorption of uranium in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobuke, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    Among the metal resources dissolved in seawater, elements which are considered to bring the additional value by extraction are listed. At present, the industrialization of the extraction of rare components is not expected except sodium and magnesium. In order to make it feasible, the scientific principle for solving extremely low concentration and the competition of coexisting ions, and the establishment of the peculiar molecule resognition of respective metal ions are necessary first of all. Based on these, the support of the engineering technique for handling enormous quantity of seawater is necessary. In this report, the recent research and development of the extraction of uranium in seawater are described, and the problems to be solved are pointed out. In the oxidizing atmosphere on the earth, uranium exists in the form of uranium dioxide, but under the existence of carbonic acid, stable carbonic acid complex is formed, and it was confirmed that this is uniformly dissolved in the sea worldwide. The concentration is as very low as 3.3 ppb, but the total amount is about 4 billion tons. The general problems in the extraction of uranium in seawater, the molecular design of the adsorbent for extracting uranium in seawater, amidoxime resin and the fibers, the search for the engineering techniques of extracting uranium in seawater, desorbing process and the adsorption system of fiber adsorbent are described. (Kako, I.)

  15. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  17. The analysis of natural uranium decay based on gamma-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. W.; Kim, D. G.; No, W. S.; Park, P. W.; Yang, S. W.; Park, G. H.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of gamma-radiations from natural uranium dioxide were performed to analyze the decay chain of natural uranium. 10.1g of natural uranium dioxide was used as a specimen and the measurement was done for 24 hours. Genie-2000 was used for the analysis of gamma ray energy from uranium. Theoretical estimation of gamma rays from the decay chain and data from the measurement were compared quantitatively. Based on these comparisons, the gamma rays from the decay chain of natural uranium were analyzed

  18. Studies on sintering kinetics of ThO{sub 2}–UO{sub 2} pellets using master sintering curve approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Joydipta, E-mail: joydipta@barc.gov.in [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ray, Aditi [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Arun [Nuclear Fuels Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Banerjee, Srikumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-11-15

    Three different compositions of thoria–urania pellets, namely, ThO{sub 2}–4%UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}–10%UO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2}–20%UO{sub 2} (all compositions are in wt% containing natural uranium) were fabricated by Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) process. The compositions studied in the current paper are the proposed fuels for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy water Reactor (AHWR) and its variant based on low enriched uranium. Sintering kinetics of ThO{sub 2}–x%UO{sub 2} (x = 4, 10, 20) green pellets, thus fabricated, were evaluated using constant heating rate experiments in a vertical dilatometer. Activation energies of sintering (Q) were estimated using Arrhenius plot as proposed by Wang and Raj. Master Sintering Curves (MSC) for the above three compositions were constructed using shrinkage data. A FORTRAN program, employing optimization based numerical algorithm for fitting relative density vs. work of sintering data with sigmoid function, was used for this purpose. The apparent activation energies, evaluated using MSC principle, appear to be consistent with the values obtained by Arrhenius plot.

  19. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core

  20. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

  1. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  2. Advances in uranium refining and conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    One of the most important steps in the nuclear fuel cycle is the uranium refining and conversion which goes from the yellow cake to three different products: uranium dioxide, natural metallic uranium and uranium hexafluoride. The total volume of this industry, at the present time, is nearly of 40,000 t U per year and at the end of the present century it would have reached the 60,000 t U per year. The refining and conversion of reprocessed uranium that can be extracted by treating irradiated fuel become equally important for recycling recovered fuel. In response to the growing interest in these topics, the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting with the attendance of 37 experts from 21 countries. This technical document contains the 20 papers presented during the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  3. Methods for the accountability of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.B.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Ernst, K.; Harrar, J.E.; Turel, S.P.

    1975-06-01

    Procedures for the determination of the total U and the amount of 235 U isotope in UO 2 powder and pellets are given. Methods for U determination include coulometry, titration, and gravimetry. Surface-ionization mass spectroscopy is described for 235 U measurement. Spectrometric procedures are described for determining the impurity content in the UO 2 . (U.S.)

  4. Fission products stability in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Gupta, F.; Pasturel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fission product stability in nuclear fuels is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, incorporation and solution energies of He, Kr, Xe, I, Te, Ru, Sr and Ce in pre-existing trap sites of UO 2 (vacancies, interstitials, U-O divacancy, and Schottky trio defects) are calculated using the projector-augmented-wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package. Correlation effects are taken into account within the DFT+U approach. The stability of many binary and ternary compounds in comparison to soluted atoms is also explored. Finally the involvement of FP in the formation of metallic and oxide precipitates in oxide fuels is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  5. Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.F.

    1987-08-01

    The ceramic samples (UO 2 ) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D 2 ) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO 2 . Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600 0 C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D 2 ), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H 2 in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO 2 was determined to be: 3.0 x 10 7 exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm and for polycrystalline UO 2 : 5.5 x 10 4 exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO 2 depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO 2 lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200 0 C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800 0 C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO 2 could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO 2 specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Uranium dioxide restructuration under irradiation. Furet program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, J.P.; Hueber, C.

    1975-01-01

    A complete model of fuel restructuration under irradiation was built on the basis of many short irradiation experiments carried out in Siloe at Grenoble between 1970 and 1973. From the experiments, carefully temperature and power controlled, a precise relationship was established between the microstructure and temperature conditions. The main points studied were: the type of recrystallization as a function of density; restructuration and displacements of matter tending to central hole formation; healing of cracks and thermal take-up of clearance and efficiency of thermal cycles and mechanical take-up of clearance [fr

  7. Helium solubility and behaviour in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugeri, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: emilio.maugeri@ec.europa.eu; Wiss, T.; Hiernaut, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Desai, K. [Dept. of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thiriet, C.; Rondinella, V.V.; Colle, J.-Y.; Konings, R.J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    A set of devices was developed in order to infuse UO{sub 2} disks with helium, at high temperature and pressure, to measure the helium infused quantity and from these data to calculate the helium solubility in the UO{sub 2} matrix. Samples of UO{sub 2} single crystal and UO{sub 2} polycrystal were infused at a temperature of 1473 and 1743 K in a helium atmosphere ranging between 50 and 100 MPa. These samples were then annealed and the helium released was measured with a mass spectrometer. From the obtained spectra it was possible to give an interpretation of the helium release mechanism and to calculate its solubility in the UO{sub 2} lattice in these specific thermodynamic conditions. Additionally to the helium solubility measurement from infused samples, a 37 years old sample of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}, retrieved from an old {sup 242}Cm radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), containing radiogenic helium, was also measured to widen perspectives of this kind of measurements to damaged sample more representative of spent fuel.

  8. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, isotopes such as 35 Cl present as impurities in the nuclear fuel are activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, the activation products such as 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute to the ''instant release fraction'' as they are likely to migrate in defects and grain boundaries. In order to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to ''athermal'' processes during irradiation from thermally activated diffusion, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This work concerns the measurement of the thermal diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO 2 . 37 Cl was implanted at a 10 13 at/cm 2 fluence in depleted UO 2 samples which were then annealed in the 900-1200 C temperature range and finally analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to obtain 37 Cl depth profiles. The migration process appears to be rather complex, involving mechanisms such as atomic, grain boundary, directed diffusion along preferential patterns as well as trapping into sinks before successive effusion. However, using a diffusion model based on general equation of transport, apparent diffusion coefficients could be calculated for 1000 and 1100 C and a mean activation energy of 4.3 eV is proposed. This value is one of the lowest values compared to those found in literature for other radionuclides pointing out a great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures. In order to unequivocally determine the diffusion behaviour of both implanted and pristine chlorine before and after thermal annealing, the structural environment of chlorine in UO 2 was examined using micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS). (orig.)

  9. Sintering diagrams of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, A.; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    Ashby's method (see Acta Met., vol. 22, p. 275, 1974) of constructing sintering diagrams has been modified to obtain contribution diagrams directly from the computer. The interplay of sintering variables and mechanisms are studied and the factors that affect the participation of mechanisms in UO 2 are determined. By studying the physical properties, it emerges that the order of inaccuracies is small in most cases and do not affect the diagrams. On the other hand, even a 10% error in activation energies, which is quite plausible, would make a significant difference to the diagram. The main criticism of Ashby's approach is that the numerous properties and equations used, communicate their inaccuracies to the diagrams and make them unreliable. The present study has considerably reduced the number of factors that need to be refined to make the sintering diagrams more meaningful. (Auth.)

  10. Recycling of mill scale in sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation deals with the effect of replacing some amount of Baharia high barite iron ore concentrate by mill scale waste which was characterized by high iron oxide content on the parameters of the sintering process., and investigation the effect of different amount of coke breeze added on sintering process parameters when using 5% mill scale waste with 95% iron ore concentrate. The results of this work show that, replacement of iron ore concentrate with mill scale increases the amount of ready made sinter, sinter strength and productivity of the sinter machine and productivity at blast furnace yard. Also, the increase of coke breeze leads to an increase the ready made sinter and productivity of the sintering machine at blast furnace yard. The productivity of the sintering machine after 5% decreased slightly due to the decrease of vertical velocity.

  11. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  12. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  13. Development of a high temperature unicam camera and application to X-ray diffraction on powdered uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laugier, J.; Blum, P.L.; Debrenne, P.

    1964-01-01

    A high temperature commercial X-ray camera (UNICAM S150), modified in order to improve some of its performances, is adapted to the uranium powder problem. The strong uranium reactivity for oxygen and silica, the sintering and the grain growth in β-phase are avoided. X-ray photographs are thus possible even in the γ-phase. (authors) [fr

  14. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  15. Sintering of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... involves compaction of polymeric powder under pressure and sintering of the preforms at temperature above its melting point. In this study, we report our results on compaction and sintering behaviour of two grades of UHMWPE with reference to the powder morphology, sintering temperatures and strength development.

  16. Development of uranium industry in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iuhas, Tiberiu

    2000-01-01

    The management of the uranium resources is performed in Romania by the National Uranium Company. The tasks to be done are: 1. management and protection of rare and radioactive metal ores in the exploitation areas; 2. mining, preparation, refining and trading the radioactive ores, as well as reprocessing the uranium stock from the uranium concentrate in the national reserve; 3. performing geologic and technologic studies in the exploitation areas; 4. performing studies and projects concerning the maintenance of the present facilities and unearthing new ores; 5. building industrial facilities; 6. carrying out technological transport; 7. importation-exportation operations; 8. performing micro-production activity in experimental research units; 9. personnel training; 10. medical assistance for the personnel; 11. environment protection. The company is organized as follows: 1.three branches for uranium ore mining, located at Suceava, Bihor and Banat; 2. one branch for geologic survey, located at Magurele; 3. one branch for uranium ore preparation and concentration and for refining uranium concentrates, located at Feldioara; 4. One group for mine conservation, closure and ecology, located at Bucuresti. The final product, sintered powder of UO 2 produced at Feldioara plant, was tested in 1994 by the Canadian partner and met successfully the required standards. The Feldioara plant was certified as supplier of raw material for CANDU nuclear fuel production and as such, Romania is the only authorized producer of CANDU nuclear fuel in Europe and the second in the world, after Canada. Maintaining the uranium production in Romania is justified by the existence of uranium ore resources, the declining of natural gas resources, lower costs per kWh for electric nuclear power as compared to fossil-fuel power production, the possibility for Romania to become an important supplier of CANDU nuclear fuel, the low environmental impact and high costs for total shutdown of activity, high

  17. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  18. Master Sintering Surface: A practical approach to its construction and utilization for Spark Plasma Sintering prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sintering is a complex thermally activated process, thus any prediction of sintering behaviour is very welcome not only for industrial purposes. Presented paper shows the possibility of densification prediction based on concept of Master Sintering Surface (MSS for pressure assisted Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS. User friendly software for evaluation of the MSS is presented. The concept was used for densification prediction of alumina ceramics sintered by SPS.

  19. Sintering additives for zirconia ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an overview of sintering science and its application to zirconia materials including CaO, MgO, and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-CeO/sub 2/ doped materials. This book is a reference for first-time exposure to zirconia materials technology, particularly densification

  20. Sintering additives for zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an overview of sintering science and its application to zirconia materials including CaO, MgO, and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-CeO/sub 2/ doped materials. This book is a reference for first-time exposure to zirconia materials technology, particularly densification.

  1. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  2. Development of empirical relation for isotope of uranium in enriched uranium matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.K.; Vidyasagar, D.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Uranium enriched in 235 U is required in commercial light water reactors to produce a controlled nuclear reaction. Enrichment allows the 235 U isotopes to be increased from 0.71% to a range between 2% to 5% depending upon requirement. The enriched uranium in the form of sintered UO 2 pellet is used for any commercially operating boiling light water reactors. The enriched uranium fuel bundle surface swipes sample is being analysed to assess the tramp uranium as a quality control parameter. It is known that the 234 U isotope also enriched along with 235 U isotope in conventional gaseous diffusion enrichment process. The information about enrichment percentage of 234 U helps to characterize isotopic properties of enriched uranium. A few reports provide the empirical equation and graphs for finding out the specific activity, activity percentage, activity ratio of 234 U isotopes for enriched uranium. Most of them have not provided the reference for the data used and their source. An attempt has been made to model the relationship between 234 U and 235 U as a function of uranium enrichment at low level

  3. Effects of uranium compounds on skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, B.M. de

    1982-12-01

    The following uranium compounds were topically applied to the dorsal skin of 35 day-old Wistar rats (60 g, male): uranium dioxide, uranyl nitrate, uranyl acetate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium diuranate. Percutaneous absorption was mediated with the aid of a vehicle and known quantities of various particle-sized batches of uranium compounds were directly implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals were sacrificed 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours after implantation. Subcutaneous tissue and muscle underneath the implantation site were anlaysed by light and electron microscopy. A Cameca 322 X-ray microanalyzer was used to analyze uranium traces in calcified tissue (bones and teeth) and kidneys. A steady loss in body weight was observed in animals given high concentration of uranyl nitrate and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. All animals died five days after the onset of the experiment due to renal failure. Slightly soluble compounds, ammonium diuranate and uranyl acetate, caused only a slight decrease in body weight. Uranium dioxide, the most insoluble compound used, induced only a transitory slight body weight decrease. Histopathological study revealed damages to the tissues of topicated skin, hair follicles and adnexal glands. High concentration of uranium was indicated in bone, teeth and kidneys by X-ray scanning

  4. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Frajndlich, E.U. de.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F 6 ) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F 6 to uranium dioxide (U O 2 ) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  5. Production and analysis of ultradispersed uranium oxide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajogin, A. P.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.; Umreiko, S. D.

    2010-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies are made of the laser plasma formed near the surface of a porous body containing nanoquantities of uranium compounds which is irradiated by two successive laser pulses. The feasibility of using laser chemical methods for obtaining nanoclusters of uranium oxide particles in the volume of a porous body and the simultaneous possibility of determining the uranium content with good sensitivity are demonstrated. The thermochemical and spectral characteristics of the analogs of their compounds with chlorine are determined and studied. The possibility of producing uranium dioxides under ordinary conditions and their analysis in the reaction products is demonstrated.

  6. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I 2 ) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF 4 , spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area

  7. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  8. Strain-enhanced sintering of iron powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, D.R.; Torralba, J.M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ciencias de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-02-01

    Sintering of ball-milled and un-milled Fe powders has been investigated using dilatometry, X-ray, density, and positron annihilation techniques. A considerable sintering enhancement is found in milled powders showing apparent activation energies that range between 0.44 and 0.80 eV/at. The positron annihilation results, combined with the evolution of the shrinkage rate with sintering temperature, indicate generation of lattice defects during the sintering process of milled and un-milled powders. The sintering enhancement is attributed to pipe diffusion along the core of moving dislocations in the presence of the vacancy excess produced by plastic deformation. Positron annihilation results do not reveal the presence of sintering-induced defects in un-milled powders sintered above 1200 K, the apparent activation energy being in good agreement with that for grain-boundary diffusion in {gamma}-Fe. (orig.)

  9. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  10. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  11. Nuclear tracks in sinterized gemstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Rodriguez, L.V.; Golzarri, J.I.; Castano, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The responses of sinterized gemstones to alpha particles attempt analyzed with the objective of finding new materials for SSNTD, and also to understand their interaction with radiation and the formation of tracks. In this work we present the results of the characterization of these materials as SSNTD. The micro structural changes observed by electron microscopy. The preparation, etching solution concentration, etching time and effects of temperature are discussed. (Author)

  12. Alumina-zirconium ceramics synthesis by selective laser sintering/melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkovsky, I.; Yadroitsev, I.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, porous refractory ceramics synthesized by selective laser sintering/melting from a mixture of zirconium dioxide, aluminum and/or alumina powders are subjected to optical metallography and X-ray analysis to study their microstructure and phase composition depending on the laser processing parameters. It is shown that high-speed laser sintering in air yields ceramics with dense structure and a uniform distribution of the stabilizing phases. The obtained ceramic-matrix composites may be used as thermal and electrical insulators and wear resistant coating in solid oxide fuel cells, crucibles, heating elements, medical tools. The possibility to reinforce refractory ceramics by laser synthesis is shown on the example of tetragonal dioxide of zirconium with hardened micro-inclusion of Al 2 O 3 . By applying finely dispersed Y 2 O 3 powder inclusions, the type of the ceramic structure is significantly changed

  13. Uranium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutonnet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication processes and main characteristics of the yellow coke are described. Choice of acidic or alkaline process, chemical reactions reagents, installation and efficiency are examined. Investment, cost and production are given. Extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid is briefly described [fr

  14. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  16. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  17. A spectroscopic study of uranium species formed in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Bhatt, Anand I.; May, Iain; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    The chlorination of uranium metal or uranium oxides in chloride melts offers an acceptable process for the head-end of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The reactions of uranium metal and ceramic uranium dioxide with chlorine and with hydrogen chloride were studied in the alkali metal chloride melts, NaCl-KCl at 973K, NaCl-CsCl between 873 and 923K and LiCl-KCl at 873K. The uranium species formed therein were characterized from their electronic absorption spectra measured in situ. The kinetic parameters of the reactions depend on melt composition, temperature and chlorinating agent used. The reaction of uranium dioxide with oxygen in the presence of alkali metal chlorides results in the formation of alkali metal uranates. A spectroscopic study, between 723 and 973K, on their formation and their solutions was undertaken in LiCl, LiCl-KCl eutectic and NaCl-CsCl eutectic melts. The dissolution of uranium dioxide in LiCl-KCl eutectic at 923K containing added aluminium trichloride in the presence of oxygen has also been investigated. In this case, the reaction leads to the formation of uranyl chloride species. (author)

  18. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  19. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  20. Dry uranium tetrafluoride process preparation using the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, Joao Batista da

    2008-01-01

    It is a well known fact that the use of uranium tetrafluoride allows flexibility in the production of uranium suicide and uranium oxide fuel. To its obtention there are two conventional routes, the one which reduces uranium from the UF 6 hydrolysis solution with stannous chloride, and the hydro fluorination of a solid uranium dioxide. In this work we are introducing a third and a dry way route, mainly utilized to the recovery of uranium from the liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process, at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recuperation of ammonium fluoride by NH 4 HF 2 precipitation. Working with the solid residues, the crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO 2 , which comes from the U mini plates recovery, also to its conversion in a solid state reaction, to obtain UF 4 . That returns to the process of metallic uranium production unity to the U 3 Si 2 obtention. This fuel is considered in IPEN CNEN/SP as the high density fuel phase for IEA-R1m reactor, which will replace the former low density U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel. (author)

  1. Evolution of microstructure of U-Mo alloys in as cast and sintered forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Hegde, P.V.; Prasad, G.J.; Kamath, H.S.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    Over the years U 3 Si 2 compound dispersed in aluminium matrix has been successfully used as potential Low Enriched Uranium (LEU 235 ) base dispersion fuel in new research and test reactors and also for converting High Enriched Uranium (HEU > 85% U 235 ) cores to LEU in most of the existing research and test reactors. The maximum density achievable with U 3 Si 2 -AI dispersion fuel is around 4.8 g U cm -3 . To achieve a uranium density of 8.0 to 9.0 g U cm -3 in dispersion fuel with aluminium as matrix material, it is required to use γ-stabilized uranium metal powders. At Metallic Fuels Division, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium alloys. Molybdenum plays a crucial role in metastabilising the γ-phase of uranium at room temperature which is very much evident when we see the microstructures of different U-Mo alloys with varying molybdenum concentration as solute atom. The paper describes the role of molybdenum in imparting metastability in U-Mo alloys from their microstructures in as cast and sintered forms. The paper also covers the role of tailored microstructure in U-Mo alloy for the purpose of hydriding and dehydriding treatment to generate alloy powders. (author)

  2. Chemical reactions during sintering of Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Ni-Mo-C-steels with special reference to processing in semi-closed containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cias A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering of Cr, Mn and Si bearing steels has recently attracted both experimental and theoretical attention and processing in semiclosed containers has been reproposed. This paper brings together relevant thermodynamic data and considers the kinetics of some relevant chemical reactions. These involve iron and carbon, water vapour, carbon monoxide and dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen of the sintering atmospheres and the alloying elements Cr, Mn, Mo and Si. The paper concludes by presenting mechanical properties data for three steels sintered in local microatmosphere with nitrogen, hydrogen, nitrogen-5% hydrogen and air as the furnace gas.

  3. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  4. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Changzhou Yu; Peng Cao; Mark Ian Jones

    2017-01-01

    Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P.) titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and stu...

  5. Production of sintered alumina from powder; optimization of the sinterized parameters for the maximum mechanical resistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da.

    1981-02-01

    Pure, sinterized alumina and the optimization of the parameters of sinterization in order to obtain the highest mechanical resistence are discussed. Test materials are sinterized from a fine powder of pure alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), α phase, at different temperatures and times, in air. The microstructures are analysed concerning porosity and grain size. Depending on the temperature or the time of sinterization, there is a maximum for the mechanical resistence. (A.R.H.) [pt

  6. PREPARATION OF URANIUM MONOSULFIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.

    1964-01-28

    A process is given for preparing uranium monosulfide from uranium tetrafluoride dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride. A hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide gas mixture passed through the solution precipitates uranium monosulfide. (AEC)

  7. Recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, D.H.; Walker, R.W.; Hurwitz, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from an uranium bearing liquid which comprises contacting the liquid with a crosslinkedvinyl benzyl chloride polymer, thereafter eluting from the resin the uranium in salt form

  8. Alternative sintering methods compared to conventional thermal sintering for inkjet printed silver nanoparticle ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niittynen, J.; Abbel, R.; Mäntysalo, M.; Perelaer, J.; Schubert, U.S.; Lupo, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution several alternative sintering methods are compared to traditional thermal sintering as high temperature and long process time of thermal sintering are increasing the costs of inkjet-printing and preventing the use of this technology in large scale manufacturing. Alternative

  9. Protocol for Ultralow-Temperature Ceramic Sintering: An Integration of Nanotechnology and the Cold Sintering Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanzheng; Baker, Amanda; Guo, Jing; Randall, Clive A

    2016-11-22

    The sintering process is an essential step in taking particulate materials into dense ceramic materials. Although a number of sintering techniques have emerged over the past few years, the sintering process is still performed at high temperatures. Here we establish a protocol to achieve dense ceramic solids at extremely low temperatures (sustainable manufacturing practices.

  10. Uranium mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; U 4+ minerals (uraninite; coffinite; brannerite; ningyoite; lermontovite; U 4+ molybdates; U 4+ pyrochlores; U 4+ columbites; petscheckite and liandratite) minerals (uranyl oxide hydrates; uranyl silicates; uranyl phosphates and arsenates; uranyl vanadates; uranyl molybdates; uranyl sulphates; uranyl carbonates; uranyl selenates and tellurates). Appendices contain X-ray data and optical data for uranium minerals. (U.K.)

  11. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  12. The development of the production process for the thorium/uranium dicarbide fuel kernels for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, R.C.; Hankart, L.J.; Horsley, G.W.

    1965-05-01

    The development of methods of producing spheroidal sintered porous kernels of hyperstoichiometric thorium/uranium dicarbide solid solution from thorium/uranium monocarbide/carbon and thoria/urania/carbon powder mixes is described. The work has involved study of (i) Methods of preparing green kernels from UC/Th/C powder mixes using the rotary sieve technique. (ii) Methods of producing green kernels from UO2/Th02/C powder mixes using the planetary mill technique. (iii) The conversion by appropriate heat treatment of green kernels produced by both routes to sintered porous kernels of thorium/uranium carbide. (iv) The efficiency of the processes. (author)

  13. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  14. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF URANIUM METAL CORROSION MECHANISM AND KINETICS IN WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudanova, Natalya; Maslennikov, Alexander; Peretroukhine, Vladimir F.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2006-01-01

    During long-term underwater storage of low burn-up uranium metal fuel, a corrosion product sludge forms containing uranium metal grains, uranium dioxide, uranates and, in some cases, uranium peroxide. Literature data on the corrosion of non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys do not allow unequivocal prediction of the paragenesis of irradiated uranium in water. The goal of the present work conducted under the program 'CORROSION OF IRRADIATED URANIUM ALLOYS FUEL IN WATER' is to study the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys and the paragenesis of the corrosion products during long-term underwater storage of uranium alloy fuel irradiated at the Hanford Site. The elucidation of the physico-chemical nature of the corrosion of irradiated uranium alloys in comparison with non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys is one of the most important aspects of this work. Electrochemical methods are being used to study uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics. The present part of work aims to examine and revise, where appropriate, the understanding of uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics in water

  16. Master sintering curves of two different alumina powder compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Pouchly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Concept of Master Sintering Curve is a strong tool for optimizing sintering schedule. The sintering behaviour can be predicted, and sintering activation energy can be calculated with the help of few dilatometric measurements. In this paper an automatic procedure was used to calculate Master Sintering Curves of two different alumina compacts. The sintering activation energies were determined as 640 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 240 nm, respective 770 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 110 nm. The possibility to predict sintering behaviour with the help of Master Sintering Curve was verified.

  17. Sintering characteristics of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Popma, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on sintering characteristics of nano-sized ceramic SiO2 particles. The sintering process is studied as a function of temperature using a conventional furnace and using a laser beam. The underlying idea is to combine the nanoceramic sol-gel concept with inkjet technology and

  18. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  19. Kinetic analysis of boron carbide sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, W.; Kerler, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the sintering of boron carbide were investigated by shrinkage measurements with a high-temperature dilatometer under argon atmosphere in dependence on temperature, grain size, and pressure. The activation energies and the reaction mechanisms of the different stages of sintering were determined. (orig.) [de

  20. Electro sinter forging of titanium disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    Electro sinter forging (ESF) is a new sintering process based on the principle of electrical Joule heating. In the present work, middle frequency direct current (MFDC) was flowing through the powder compact, which was under mechanical pressure. The main parameters are the high electrical current,...

  1. Sintering of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a high performance polymer having low coefficient of friction, good abrasion resistance, good chemical ... In this study, we report our results on compaction and sintering behaviour of two grades of UHMWPE with reference to the powder morphology, sintering ...

  2. Sintered-to-size FBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1984-04-01

    Fabrication of sintered-to-size PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel pellets was completed for testing of proposed FBR product specifications. Approximately 6000 pellets were fabricated to two nominal diameters and two densities by cold pressing and sintering to size. Process control and correlation between test and production batches are discussed

  3. Sintering of zirconia in high-pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunrath, A.O.; Strohaecker, T.R.; Pereira, A.S.; Jornada, J.A.H. da; Piermarini, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study about the sintering of zirconia hyperfines powders in high-pressure is presented. The differents conditions effect of sintering in microstructure and in hardness and tenacity properties of zirconia samples with a very fine grain is also studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  4. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural respon...

  5. Modeling the Microstructural Evolution During Constrained Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model able to simulate solid-state constrained sintering is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo model for free sintering with a finite element model (FEM) for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response to the local stress as ...

  6. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. The present work deals with the sintering of ... recently become an attractive area of research and deve- lopment. The major advantages of ... without the usage of sintering aids (Lee and Case 1999;. Goldstein et al 1999). Several studies have ...

  7. THE POLARIZING EFFECTS IN SINTERED KAOLIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compacted and sintered density of the ceramic have been studied, and a density — pressure relationship for before- and after-sintering conditions obtained. INTRODUCTION. Ceramics have been known to mankind for thousands of years, and have been used in construction materials. In many applications, ceramics have.

  8. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  9. The uranium industry of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper was originally published in 1954 and is reproduced in this centenary issue of the journal of the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. South Africa's economy was (and is) based on mining. The early history of the uranium mining industry (until 1954) is discussed in detail, together with its status and economy. The first quantitative assessment of the uranium potential of the Witwatersrand goldfield was made in 1945 when it was reported that South Africa had one of the largest low-grade uranium fields in the world. The first metallurgical plants brought considerable benefit to the area. The process of uranium extraction was basically similar to that employed in the recovery of gold. It could be divided into the same three main headings: agitation, filtration and precipitation. It was predicted that the program, in full swing, would possibly consume as much as 20,000 tons of manganese ore a month, as the extraction process requires dioxide. It was for this reason that manganese recovery plants have been incorporated in the process. Other materials that were to be used in large quantities were lime, limestone, animal glue and water. Considering the increasing importance of uranium in the economy of the country, the question of secrecy was becoming a problem. At that time the demand for South African uranium was guaranteed by a ten-year agreement with the British and American authorities. 3 figs

  10. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  11. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  12. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package fill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Depleted uranium dioxide fill inside the waste package creates the potential for significant improvements in package performance based on uranium geochemistry, reduces the potential for criticality in a repository, and consumes DU inventory. As a new concept, significant uncertainties exist: fill properties, impacts on package design, post- closure performance

  13. Influence of Chemical Composition Variations on Densification During the Sintering of MOX Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudez, S.; Marlot, C.; Lechelle, J.

    2016-06-01

    The mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fabrication process is based on the preparation of UO2 and PuO2 powders. The mixture is pelletized before being sintered at 1973 K (1700 °C) in a reducing atmosphere of Ar/4pctH2/H2O. This paper shows how the densification of MOX fuel is affected during sintering by the moisture content of the gas, the plutonium content of the fuel, and the carbon impurity content in the raw materials. MOX densification can be monitored through dilatometric measurements and gas releases can be continuously analyzed during sintering in terms of their quantity and quality. Variations in the oxygen content in the fuel can be continuously recorded by coupling the dilatometer furnace with an oxygen measurement at the gas outlet. Any carbon-bearing species released, such as CO, can be also linked to densification phenomena when a gas chromatograph is installed at the outlet of the dilatometer. Recommendations on the choice of sintering atmosphere that best optimizes the fuel characteristics have been given on the basis of the results reported in this paper.

  14. Disk shaped radiation sources fabricated by compression and formation of sinter powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2008-01-01

    Sinters are deposits found at the bottom of hot springs, some of which contain naturally occurring radioisotopes of the uranium and thorium series. A disk-shaped radiation source was developed by compressing sinter powder. Ten disk-shaped radiation sources were fabricated by this method and their weight, thickness, mass density, and radioactivity were determined. The results indicated that special skills or techniques are not required for production of a radiation source with this method, and the production method is robust. Thus, the method is suitable for the simultaneous fabrication of multiple uniform radiation sources. To evaluate the ability of this fabrication method to produce sinter radiation sources applicable to courses involving radiation protection or similar investigations, the dependence of the radiation count rate on distance, shielding thickness, and shielding materials was examined using a conventional GM survey meter. The results showed that the sinter radiation source is suitable to comprehend characteristics of radiation and principle of radiation protection related to distance and shielding. (author)

  15. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  16. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  17. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  18. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  19. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  20. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  1. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM AND PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, W.K.R.

    1959-06-30

    This patent relates to the separation of uranium from thorium and protactinium; such mixtures of elements usually being obtained by neutron irradiation of thorium. The method of separating the constituents has been first to dissolve the mixture of elements in concertrated nitric acid and then to remove the protactinium by absorption on manganese dioxide and the uranium by solvent extraction with ether. Prior to now, comparatively large amounts of thorium were extracted with the uranium. According to the invention this is completely prevented by adding sodium diethyldithiocarbamate to the mixture of soluble nitrate salts. The organic salt has the effect of reacting only with the uranyl nitrate to form the corresponding uranyl salt which can then be selectively extracted from the mixture with amyl acetate.

  2. Elaboration of thorium uranium phosphate-diphosphate({beta}-TUPD) and {beta}-TUPD/monazite composite materials from crystallized precursors: sintering and study of the long term behavior of the ceramics; Elaboration de phosphate-diphosphate de thorium et d'uranium ({beta}-PDTU) et de materiaux composites {beta}-PDTU/Monazite a partir de precurseurs cristallises. Etudes du frittage et de la durabilite chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, N

    2004-11-01

    Thorium Phosphate-Diphosphate ({beta}-TPD) is actually considered as potential host matrix for the immobilization of radionuclides, and especially actinides, in the field of an underground repository. The studies reported in this work are based on the precipitation of the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen-Phosphate Hydrate (TPHPH) as a precursor of {beta}-TPD. The crystal structure of TPHPH was solved then the reactions involved during its transformation into {beta}-TPD were established. It allows us to put in evidence a new monoclinic variety of TPD, called {alpha}-TPD, acting as intermediate of reaction. Moreover, the existence of a complete solid solution between TPHPH and UPHPH was demonstrated.The experimental conditions of sintering leading to an optimal densification of the pellets were determined. The relative density of the samples was always between 95 and 100% of the calculated value while a significant improvement of the homogeneity of the samples was noted. By this way, the process based on the precipitation of low-temperature crystallized precursors followed by their heat treatment at high temperature was applied to the preparation of {beta}-TUPD/Monazite based composites in the aim to incorporate simultaneously tri- and tetravalent actinides. The chemical durability of {beta}-TUPD sintered samples was evaluated. The normalized leaching rates determined in several experimental conditions revealed the good resistance of the solids to aqueous alteration. Moreover, the normalized dissolution rates exhibited a low dependence to temperature, pH as well as to several ions present in the leachate. For all the samples, thorium was quickly precipitated as a neo-formed phosphate phase identified to TPHPH. (author)

  3. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P. titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and studied the effects of common contaminants (C, O, N on sintering densification of titanium. It is found that on the surface of the as-sintered titanium, a severely contaminated porous scale was formed and identified as titanium oxycarbonitride. Despite the porous surface, the sintered density in the sample interiors increased with increasing sintering temperature and holding time. Tensile specimens cut from different positions within a large sintered cylinder reveal different tensile properties, strongly dependent on the impurity level mainly carbon and oxygen. Depending on where the specimen is taken from the sintered compact, ultimate tensile strength varied from 300 to 580 MPa. An average tensile elongation of 5% to 7% was observed. Largely depending on the interstitial contents, the fracture modes from typical brittle intergranular fracture to typical ductile fracture.

  4. Present state and problems of uranium fuel fabrication businesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuki, Akio

    1981-01-01

    The businesses of uranium fuel fabrication converting uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide powder and forming fuel assemblies are the field of most advanced industrialization among nuclear fuel cycle industries in Japan. At present, five plants of four companies engage in this business, and their yearly sales exceeded 20 billion yen. All companies are planning the augmentation of installation capacity to meet the growth of nuclear power generation. The companies of uranium fuel fabrication make the nuclear fuel of the specifications specified by reactor manufacturers as the subcontractors. In addition to initially loaded fuel, the fuel for replacement is required, therefore the demand of uranium fuel is relatively stable. As for the safety of enriched uranium flowing through the farbicating processes, the prevention of inhaling uranium powder by workers and the precaution against criticality are necessary. Also the safeguard measures are imposed so as not to convert enriched uranium to other purposes than peacefull ones. The strict quality control and many times of inspections are carried out to insure the soundness of nuclear fuel. The growth of the business of uranium fuel fabrication and the regulation of the businesses by laws are described. As the problems for the future, the reduction of fabrication cost, the promotion of research and development and others are pointed out. (Kako, I.)

  5. Protection of uranium by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Koch, P.; Dominget, R.; Darras, R.

    1968-01-01

    A study is made of the possibilities of inhibiting or limiting, by means of protective metallic coatings, the oxidation of uranium by carbon dioxide at high temperature. In general, surface films containing intermetallic compounds or solid solutions of uranium with aluminium, zirconium, copper, niobium, nickel or chromium are formed, according to the techniques employed which are described here. The processes most to be recommended are those of direct diffusion starting from a thin sheet or tube, of vacuum deposition, or of immersion in a molten bath of suitable composition. The conditions for preparing these coatings have been optimized as a function of the protective effect obtained in carbon dioxide at 450 or at 500 C. Only the aluminium and zirconium based coatings are really satisfactory since they can lead to a reduction by a factor of 5 to 10 in the oxidation rate of uranium in the conditions considered; they make it possible in particular to avoid or to reduce to a very large extent the liberation of powdered oxide. Furthermore, the coatings produced generally give the uranium good protection against atmospheric corrosion. (author) [fr

  6. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  7. Thermodynamics and mechanisms of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pask, J.A.

    1978-10-01

    A phenomenological overview and exploration of the thermodynamic and geometric factors play a role in the process of densification of model compact systems consisting of crystalline spheres of uniform size in regular and irregular packing that form grain boundaries at every contact point. A further assumption is the presence of isotropic surface and grain boundary energies. Although such systems are unrealistic in comparison with normal powder compacts, their potential sintering behavior can be analyzed and provided with a limiting set of behavior conditions which can be looked upon as one boundary condition. This approach is logically realistic since it is easier to understand and provide a basis for understanding the more complex real powder systems

  8. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    , the biggest deviations being found for salt rich (i.e. straw derived) ashes.A simple model assuming proportionality between fly ash fusion and deposit formation was found to be capable of ranking deposition rates for the different straw derived fly ashes, whereas for the fly ashes from coal/straw co......-firing, the model only had a qualitative agreement with the measured ash deposit formation rates.Sintering measurements were carried out by means of compression strength testing of ash pellets. This method showed to not be applicable for the salt rich fly ash derived from straw combustion. For the fly ashes...... have been employed in a simple model for prediction of ash deposit formation, the results of which have been compared to ash deposition formation rates measured at the respective boilers.The ash fusion results were found to directly reflect the ash compositional data:a) Fly ashes and deposits from...

  9. Science of sintering and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Some new books published by M.Yu. Baljshin, V.A. Ivensen, V.V. Skorohod and others are characterized by the wish to give a complete approach to the problems of sintering theory. Bearing just this in mind while writing the book ''An Essay on the Generalization of Sintering Theory'' (G.V.Samsonov, M.M. Ristic with the collaborators) an idea was born: to ask the most eminent scientists in this field to present their own opinions on the theme ''The Science of Sintering and Modern Views on its Future''. There were formed 18 questions, given in the appendix to be answered. The received answers were presented in 10 chapters of this book. The fourth part of the book consists of papers of eminent scientists engaged in the field of sintering science (some of which were published here for the first time). This material is published in the book with the consent of the authors and these original contributions provide a more profound knowledge of sintering. The initial idea, that the book should have a monograph character and in which the answers would serve as some data on the latest notions of the science of sintering, was somewhat changed since the original opinions of individual scientists are given in the book and these, are sometimes very contradictory. This, in fact, gives the book a special charm because the unsolved problems in the science of sintering are most evidently stressed in this way

  10. Solidification of HLLW into sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O-Oka, K.; Ohta, T.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated HLLW from the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai was solidified into sintered ceramics by normal sintering or hot-pressing with addition of some oxides. Among various ceramic products obtained so far, the most preferable was nepheline-type sintered solids formed with addition of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 to the simulated waste calcine. The solid shows advantageous properties in leach rate and mechanical strength, which suggest that the ceramic solids were prepared with additions of ZrO 2 or MnO 2 , and some of them showed good characteristics

  11. Effect of sintering temperature and heating mode on consolidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave sintering was performed in 2.45 GHz multimode microwave furnace at temperatures ranging from 570–630 °C. Microwave sintering at a heating rate of as high as 22°C/min resulted in ∼55% reduction of processing time as compared to conventional sintering. A lower sintered density observed in the case of ...

  12. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  13. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  14. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  15. Low temperature sintering of thin film polymer/TiO2 solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrenson, Christoph; Paul, Sylvia; Neher, Dieter [Universitaet Potsdam (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Janietz, Silvia [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Polymerforschung, Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Hybrid solar cells combine an organic semiconductor with a suitable inorganic semiconductor. In addition to studies on the well-known Graetzel cell, combinations of a dense or nanostructured TMO layer with soluble conjugated polymers have been subject to recent investigations. One of the problems in the development of efficient polymer/TiO{sub 2} cell is the sintering of TiO{sub 2}-layer. In most cases, the TiO{sub 2} layer is prepared via the sol-gel technique and annealing at high temperatures is needed to transform the amorphous layer morphology into a crystalline nanoporous structure. We present a new method to prepare thin layers from crystalline titania nanoparticles while keeping the processing temperature below 100 C. Interlinkage between the individual TiO{sub 2} particle is enforced by illumination with UVC-light. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to image the morphology of the thin nanoporous layers. Solar cells were built with the Titanium dioxide layers sintered at moderate temperatures or after UVC sintering, using different donor polymers. Initial experiments show that cells with UVC-sintered layers show comparable solar cell performances than devices using conventional titania layers.

  16. Microwave Combustion and Sintering Without Isostatic Pressure. Topical Report August 1, 1995 - October 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Monroe, N.D.H.

    1998-01-01

    This investigation involves a study of the influence of key processing parameters on the heating of materials using microwave energy. Selective and localized heating characteristics of microwaves will be utilized in the sintering of ceramics without hydrostatic pressure. In addition, combustion synthesis will be studied for the production of powders, carbides, and nitrides by combining two or more solids or a solid and a gas to form new materials. The insight gained from the interaction of microwaves with various materials will be utilized in the mobilization and subsequent redeposition of uranium

  17. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  18. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  19. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  20. U3O8 microspheres sintering kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, A.L.E.

    1986-01-01

    U 3 O 8 microspheres sintering kinetics was determined using a hot-stage optical microscopy apparatus, able to reach temperature up to 1350 0 C in controlled atmospheres. The sintered material had its microstructure analysed by optical and electron microscopy. The microspheres were characterized initialy utilizing X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. The equation which describes the microspheres shrinkage in function of the time was obtained using finite difference analysis X-ray diffractometry indicated hexagonal structure for the microspheres main starting material, ammonium diuranate thermogravimetric analysis showed reduction of this material to U 3 O 8 at 600 0 C. Ceramography results showed 5 hours sintered microspheres grain sizes G vary with the temperature. Sintered U 3 O 8 micrographs compared with published results for UO 2 , indicate similar homogeneity microstructural characteristics and suggest the processed micorspheres to be potentially useful as nuclear fuels. (Author) [pt

  1. Magnesium bicarbonate as an in situ uranium lixiviant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibert, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    In the subsurface solution mining of mineral values, especially uranium, in situ, magnesium bicarbonate leaching solution is used instead of sodium, potassium and ammonium carbonate and bicarbonates. The magnesium bicarbonate solution is formed by combining carbon dioxide with magnesium oxide and water. The magnesium bicarbonate lixivant has four major advantages over prior art sodium, potassium and ammonium bicarbonates

  2. Plutonium oxides and uranium and plutonium mixed oxides. Carbon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of carbon in plutonium oxides and uranium plutonium mixed oxides, suitable for a carbon content between 20 to 3000 ppm. The sample is roasted in oxygen at 1200 0 C, the carbon dioxide produced by combustion is neutralized by barium hydroxide generated automatically by coulometry [fr

  3. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  4. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  5. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  6. Heap leaching process of high-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Sirong; Gao Xizheng; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1994-08-01

    A heap leaching process for high-grade primary uranium ore has been studied. The minerals mainly are uraninite. In the process the manganese dioxide is used as oxidant and ferric sulphate solution as leaching agent. The two-stage counter current heap leach method is used in the process. The leached liquor which contains dissolved uranium and iron returns to the neutralizing stage and the iron in the leached liquor is precipitated in the stage. The acid is added to the main stage and the precipitated iron is dissolved as Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 in the stage. Comparing with conventional agitation acid leaching method, this process decreases the consumption of acid by 21% and manganese dioxide by 29%. The extraction rate of uranium reduces 1.86%. (3 figs., 12 tabs.)

  7. Analysis of Laser Sintering Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Markovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The new, high-tech development and customization is one ofthe most important factors in promoting the country‘s economicgrowth indicators. The economic downturn in the industryrequires technology and equipment using a minimumof raw materials and providing maximum performance. Thisstatement perfectly describes the innovative, forward-looking,cost-effective laser powder sintering (SLS technology. Here,thanks to the latest engineering achievements, product surfacesare modified and improved, they gain new characteristics. SLSis viable in automobile, engineering, construction, aerospace,aircraft, printing, medical and other areas.In order to create a product which meets the standards andtechnical documentation it is necessary to use and ensure highquality of raw materials, high-end equipment, qualified personnel,the working environment with proper climatic conditions, ergonomics,etc. But all of these, the quality of the product becomesthe decisive indicators meaningless if know how to properly selectthe laser processing operation. Scanning speed, beam power,pulse frequency, protective gases, powder layer thickness – allof them are the physical and mechanical characteristics of thechange in a small range changes the quality of the product of thefuture, the field of application and performance characteristics.

  8. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: fabrication of light-water reactor fuel from enriched uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechin, W.H.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Finney, B.C.; Lindauer, R.B.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model enriched-uranium, light-water reactor (LWR) fuel fabrication plant, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of LWR fuel. Additional radwaste treatment equipment is added to the base case plants in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Some of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs and the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in Appendix A and ORNL-4992. (U.S.)

  9. A novel method for the preparation of uranium metal, oxide and carbide via electrolytic amalgamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.C.; Lee, H.C.; Lee, T.S.; Lai, W.C.; Chang, C.T.

    1978-01-01

    A solid uranium amalgam was prepared electrolytically using a two-compartment cell separated with an ion exchange membrane for the purpose of regulating pH value within a narrowly restricted region of 2 to 3. The mercury cathode was kept at -1.8V vs SCE during electrolysis. The thereby obtained amalgam containing as high as 1.9gm U/ml Hg is easily converted into uranium metal by heating in vacuo above 1300 0 C. Uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide could be easily obtained at relatively low temperature by reacting the amalgam with water vapor and methane. (author)

  10. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  11. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  12. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  13. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  14. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  15. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  16. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  17. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  18. Uranium: the recalcitrant commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowson, P.C.F.

    1989-01-01

    During the past year dollar prices of virtually every mineral commodity have risen considerably on the back of strong demand, falling stocks and rising capacity utilization. Uranium has experienced the same economic influences, but measures of conditions in uranium spot markets display drift and even further decline. Does this mean that uranium is not really a commodity after all, or have special factors been at work? Some of the economic features of the uranium market are re-examined in this context. (author)

  19. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  20. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  1. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  2. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  3. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  4. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures...

  5. Australian uranium today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: Australia's resources; Northern Territory uranium in perspective; the government's decision [on August 25, 1977, that there should be further development of uranium under strictly controlled conditions]; Government legislation; outlook [for the Australian uranium mining industry]. (U.K.)

  6. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  7. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  8. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  9. Effects of sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on sintering of gadolinia-doped ceria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Rafael Morgado

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on the sintering of ceria containing 10 mol% gadolinia (GdO 1.5 ) were systematically investigated. The main physical parameter was the specific surface area of the initial powders. Nanometric powders with three different specific surface areas were utilized, 210 m 2 /g, 36,2 m 2 /g e 7,4 m 2 /g. The influence on the densification, and micro structural evolution were evaluated. The starting sintering temperature was verified to decrease with increasing on the specific surface area of raw powders. The densification was accelerated for the materials with smaller particle size. Sintering paths for crystallite growth were obtained. Master sintering curves for gadolinium-doped ceria were constructed for all initial powders. A computational program was developed for this purpose. The results for apparent activation energy showed noticeable dependence with specific surface area. In this work, the apparent activation energy for densification increased with the initial particle size of powders. The evolution of the particle size distributions on non isothermal sintering was investigated by WPPM method. It was verified that the grain growth controlling mechanism on gadolinia doped ceria is the pore drag for initial stage and beginning of intermediate stage. The effects of the sintering atmosphere on the stoichiometry deviation of ceria, densification, microstructure evolution, and electrical conductivity were analyzed. Inert, oxidizing, and reducing atmospheres were utilized on this work. Deviations on ceria stoichiometry were verified on the bulk materials. The deviation verified was dependent of the specific surface area and sintering atmosphere. Higher reduction potential atmospheres increase Ce 3+ bulk concentration after sintering. Accelerated grain growth and lower electrical conductivities were verified when reduction reactions are significantly present on sintering. (author)

  10. Master sintering curve: A practical approach to its construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a Master Sintering Curve (MSC is a strong tool for optimizing the sintering process. However, constructing the MSC from sintering data involves complicated and time-consuming calculations. A practical method for the construction of a MSC is presented in the paper. With the help of a few dilatometric sintering experiments the newly developed software calculates the MSC and finds the optimal activation energy of a given material. The software, which also enables sintering prediction, was verified by sintering tetragonal and cubic zirconia, and alumina of two different particle sizes.

  11. Calcium Hex aluminate reaction sintering by Spark Plasma Sintering; Sinterizacion reactiva de Hexaluminato de Calcio mediante Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesia, P. G. de la; Garcia-Moreno, O.; Torrecillas, R.; Menendez, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    Calcium hex aluminate (CaAl{sub 1}2O{sub 1}9) is the most alumina-rich intermediate compound of the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The formation of this aluminate is produced by the reaction between calcium oxide and alumina with the consequent formation of intermediates compounds with lower alumina content with increasing temperature (CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CaAl4O{sub 7}). In this study we studied the variation of sintering parameters for obtaining dense and pure calcium hex aluminate by reaction sintering by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). A mixing of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} were used as reactive. Final densities close to the theoretical and phase transformation over 93% were achieved by this method. (Author) 22 refs.

  12. Integrated analysis of oxide nuclear fuel sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Kuzmin, R.; Tenishev, A.; Timoshin, I.; Khlunov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Petrov, I.

    2011-01-01

    Dilatometric and thermal-gravimetric investigations have been carried out for the sintering process of oxide nuclear fuel in gaseous Ar - 8% H 2 atmosphere at temperatures up to 1600 0 C. The pressed compacts were fabricated under real production conditions of the OAO MSZ with application of two different technologies, so called 'dry' and 'wet' technologies. Effects of the grain size growth after the heating to different temperatures were observed. In order to investigate the effects produced by rate of heating on properties of sintered fuel pellets, the heating rates were varied from 1 to 8 0 C per minute. Time of isothermal overexposure at maximal temperature (1600 0 C) was about 8 hours. Real production conditions were imitated. The results showed that the sintering process of the fuel pellets produced by two technologies differs. The samples sintered under different heating rates were studied with application of scanning electronic microscopy analysis for determination of mean grain size. A simulation of heating profile for industrial furnaces was performed to reduce the beam cycles and estimate the effects of variation of the isothermal overexposure temperatures. Based on this data, an optimization of the sintering conditions was performed in operations terms of OAO MSZ. (authors)

  13. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  14. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  15. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  16. New materials through a variety of sintering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, L.; Cyboroń, J.; Cygan, S.; Laszkiewicz-Łukasik, J.; Podsiadło, M.; Novak, P.; Holovenko, Y.

    2018-03-01

    New sintering techniques make it possible to obtain materials with special properties that are impossible to obtain by conventional sintering techniques. This issue is especially important for ceramic materials for application under extreme conditions. Following the tendency to limit critical materials in manufacturing processes, the use of W, Si, B, Co, Cr should be limited, also. One of the cheapest and widely available materials is aluminum oxide, which shows differences in phase composition, grain size, hardness, strain and fracture toughness of the same type of powder, sintered via various methods. In this paper the alumina was sintered using the conventional free sintering process, microwave sintering, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), high pressure-high temperature method (HP-HT) and High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HP SPS). Phase composition analysis, by X-ray diffraction of the alumina materials sintered using various methods, was carried out. For the conventional sintering method, compacts are composed of α-Al2O3 and θ-Al2O3. For compacts sintered using SPS, microwave and HP-HT methods, χ-Al2O3 and γ-Al2O3 phases were additionally present. Mechanical and physical properties of the obtained materials were compared between the methods of sintering. On the basis of images from scanning electron microscope quantitative analysis was performed to determine the degree of grain growth of alumina after sintering.

  17. Uranium uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper highlights the transport of uranium present in the soil to plants. An increase in the uranium content in soil enhances its transport in various parts of plants. The transport of uranium from the soil to the grain follows the order: black gram>maize>lentil>chick-pea>rice>wheat. In certain vegetables and fruits, this order is: spinach>carrot>radish> brinjal>banana>tomato>beet. In vegetables and fruits, the stem reflects minimum percentage of uranium present in the soil. The uranium transport is appreciably high in arecanut plant. The chances of uranium transport to the human organs, are expected to be more through consumption of crops grown in uranium-rich soil. (author)

  18. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.

    1975-01-01

    This patent describes a sintered product having substantially stable permanent magnet properties in air at room temperature. It comprises compacted particulate cobalt--rare earth alloy consisting essentially of a Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase, where R is a rare earth metal. The Co 5 R intermetallic phase is present in an amount of at least 65 percent by weight of the sintered product and the CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase is present in a positive amount having a value ranging up to about 35 percent by weight of the product. The sintered product has a density of at least 87 percent and has pores which are substantially noninterconnecting and wherein the component grains have an average size less than 30 microns

  19. Sintering of nickel steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Niels Wessel; Falsig, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    The lifetimes of heterogeneous catalysts in many widely used industrial processes are determined by the loss of active surface area. In this context, the underlying physical sintering mechanism and quantitative information about the rate of sintering at industrial conditions are relevant....... In this paper, particle migration and coalescence in nickel steam reforming catalysts is studied. Density functional theory calculations indicate that Ni-OH dominate nickel transport at nickel surfaces in the presence of steam and hydrogen as Ni-OH has the lowest combined energies of formation and diffusion...... compared to other potential nickel transport species. The relation between experimental catalyst sintering data and the effective mass diffusion constant for Ni-OH is established by numerical modelling of the particle migration and coalescence process. Using this relation, the effective mass diffusion...

  20. Design of sintering-stable heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata

    the crystalline framework of a zeolite creates a steric hindrance against agglomeration into larger clusters. In the present study, experimental protocols for encapsulation of metal nanoparticles inside zeolites were developed. Two different methodologies were proposed to encapsulate gold, palladium and platinum......One of the major issues in the use of metal nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis is sintering. Sintering occurs at elevated temperatures because of increased mobility of nanoparticles, leading to their agglomeration and, as a consequence, to the deactivation of the catalyst. It is an emerging...... problem especially for the noble metals-based catalysis. These metals being expensive and scarce, it is worth developing catalyst systems which preserve their activity over time. Encapsulation of nanoparticles inside zeolites is one of the ways to prevent sintering. Entrapment of nanoparticles inside...

  1. Fabrication of 200 mm Diameter Sintering Body of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Material by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, T.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Nie, G.; Ochi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kikuchi, M.; Mukaiyama, K.; Guo, J. Q.

    2017-05-01

    Filled skutterudite is a promising material for thermoelectric power generation because its ZT value is relatively high. However, mass production of high-performance thermoelectric materials remains a challenge. This study focused on the sintering process of thermoelectric materials. Large-diameter n-type (Yb or La, Ca, Al, Ga, In)0.8(Co, Fe)4Sb12 skutterudite sintering bodies with a small thickness were successfully produced by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. When direct current flows through the thermoelectric sintering body during the SPS pulse, the Peltier effect causes a temperature difference within the sintering body. To eliminate the Peltier effect, an electrical insulating material was inserted between the punch (electrode) and the sintering body. In this way, an n-type La-filled skutterudite sample with a diameter of 200 mm, thickness of 21 mm, and weight of 5 kg was successfully produced. The thermoelectric properties and microstructures of the sample were almost the same throughout the whole sintering body, and the dimensionless figure of merit reached 1.0 at 773 K.

  2. Redox behaviour of uranium with iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ithurbide, A.

    2009-10-01

    An option investigated for the management of long-term nuclear waste is a repository in deep geological formations. It is generally admitted that the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel in the geosphere could occur several thousand years after the beginning of the storage. Therefore, to assess the safety of the long-term disposal, it is important to consider the phenomena that can reduce the migration, and in particular the migration of uranium. The aim of this work is to study if siderite, an iron compound present both in the near - and far -field, can limit this migration as well as the role played by the redox process. Siderite thin layers have been obtained by electrochemistry. The layers are adherent and homogeneous. Their thickness is about 1 μm and they are composed of spherical grains. Analytical characterizations performed show that siderite is free of any impurity and does not exhibit any trace of oxidation. The interactions between siderite and uranium (VI) have been carried out in solutions considered as representative of environmental waters, in terms of pH and carbonate concentration. The retention of uranium on the thin layer is important since, after 24 hours of interaction, it corresponds to retention capacities of several hundreds of uranium micro-moles per gram of siderite. XPS analysis show that, in any studied condition, part of uranium present on the thin layer is reduced into an over stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The process of interaction differs depending on the considered environment, specially on the stability of siderite. (author)

  3. PRODUCTION OF WELDMENTS FROM SINTERED TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. YE. Kapustyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Limited application of details from powder titanium alloys is connected with the difficulties in obtaining of long-length blanks, details of complex shape and large size. We can solve these problems by applying the welding production technology. For this it is necessary to conduct a research of the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints of sintered titanium alloys produced by flash welding. Methodology. Titanium industrial powders, type PT5-1 were used as original substance. Forming of blanks, whose chemical composition corresponded to BT1-0 alloy, was carried out using the powder metallurgy method. Compounds were obtained by flash welding without preheating. Microstructural investigations and mechanical tests were carried out. To compare the results investigations of BT1-0 cast alloy were conducted. Findings. Samples of welded joints of sintered titanium blanks from VT1-0 alloy using the flash butt welding method were obtained. During welding the microstructure of basic metal consisting of grains of an a-phase, with sizes 40...70 mkm, is transformed for the seam weld and HAZ into the lamellar structure of an a-phase. The remaining pores in seam weld were practically absent; in the HAZ their size was up to 2 mkm, with 30 mkm in the basic metal. Attainable level of mechanical properties of the welded joint in sintered titanium alloys is comparable to the basic metal. Originality. Structure qualitative changes and attainable property complex of compounds of sintered titanium alloys, formed as a result of flash butt welding were found out. Practical value. The principal possibility of high-quality compounds obtaining of sintered titanium alloys by flash welding is shown. This gives a basis for wider application of sintered titanium alloys due to long-length blanks production that are correspond to deformable strand semi finished product.

  4. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Chien [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Tian, Guoxin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Janke, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-29

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium

  5. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium

  6. Phase characterisation in spark plasma sintered TiPt alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions drawn from this presentation are that Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of equiatomic BE TiPt powder produces fully sintered specimens, with incomplete homogenisation. There is a need for improved furnace atmosphere control so...

  7. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  8. Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ots, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R B/A of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R B/A is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

  9. Determination of the oxygen-metal-ratio of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartscher, W.

    1982-01-01

    During the dissolution of uranium-americium mixed oxides in phosphoric acid under nitrogen tetravalent uranium is oxidized by tetravalent americium. The obtained hexavalent uranium is determined by constant potential coulometry. The coulombs measured are equivalent to the oxygen in excess of the minimum composition of UO 2 x AmO 1 . 5 . The total uranium content of the sample is determined in a subsequent coulometric titration. The oxygen-metal ratio of the sample can be calculated for a given uranium-americium ratio. An excess of uranium dioxide is necessary in order to suppress the oxidation of water by tetravalent americium. The standard deviation of the method is 0.0017 O/M units. (orig.) [de

  10. Recovery of valuable products in liquid effluents from uranium and thorium pilot units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, E.A.; Abrao, A.

    1988-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellowcake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra- and hexafluoride in a sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the refinate from the solvent extraction column where uranium and thorium are purified via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid and ammonium nitrate. Distilled nitric acid and the final sulfuric acid as residue are recycle. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximise the recycle and reuse of the abovementioned chemicals. (author) [pt

  11. Recovery of valuable products from the raffinate of uranium and thorium pilot-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, E.A.J.

    1990-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellow cake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra-and hexa-fluoride in sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the raffinate from purification via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, uranium, thorium and rare earth elements. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximize the recycle and reuse of the above mentioned chemicals. (author)

  12. Geology of hydrothermal uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, K.G.; Belov, V.K.; Putilov, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    Geological characteristics of hydrothermal phosphorus-uranium deposits placed in sedimentary, igneous-sedimentary, metamorphic and intrusion formations are presented. Attention is paid to mineral composition, texture and structure of ores, their genesis, tectonics. Geochemical peculiarities of ores and age of molybdenum-uranium and uranium deposits are described. Geological criteria and prospecting features of uranium and uranium-molybdenum deposits are given

  13. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  14. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, R.; Martin, A.; Schickel, R.

    1966-03-01

    Uranium and plutonium carbides react with nitrogen during the grinding process preceding the final sintering. The reaction occurs even in argon atmospheres containing a few percent of residual nitrogen. The resulting contamination is responsible for the appearance of an equivalent quantity of higher carbide in the sintered products; nitrogen remains quantitatively in the monocarbide phase. UC can be transformed completely into nitride under a nitrogen pressure, at a temperature as low as 400 C. The reaction is more sluggish with PuC. The following reactions take places: UC + 0,8 N 2 →> UN 1.60 + C and PuC + 0,5 N 2 → PuN + C. (authors) [fr

  15. Uranium of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsalyuk, Yu.; Gurevich, D.

    2000-01-01

    Over 25 % of the world's uranium reserves are concentrated in Kazakhstan. So, the world's largest Shu-Sarysu uranium province is situated on southern Kazakhstan, with resources exceeding 1 billion tonnes of uranium. No less, than 3 unique deposits with resources exceeding 100,000 tonnes are situated here. From the economic point of view the most important thing is that these deposits are suitable for in-situ leaching, which is the cheapest, environmentally friendly and most efficient method available for uranium extracting. In 1997 the Kazatomprom National Joint-Stock Company united all Kazakhstan's uranium enterprises (3 mine and concentrating plants, Volkovgeologiya Joint-Stock Company and the Ulbinskij Metallurgical plant). In 1998 uranium production came to 1,500 tonnes (860 kg in 1997). In 1999 investment to the industry were about $ 30 million. Plans for development of Kazakhstan's uranium industry provide a significant role for foreign partners. At present, 2 large companies (Comeco (Canada), Cogema (France) working in Kazakhstan. Kazakatomprom continues to attract foreign investors. The company's administration announced that in that in next year they have plan to make a radical step: to sell 67 % of stocks to strategic investors (at present 100 % of stocks belongs to state). Authors of the article regard, that the Kazakhstan's uranium industry still has significant reserves to develop. Even if the scenario for the uranium industry could be unfavorable, uranium production in Kazakhstan may triple within the next three to four years. The processing of uranium by the Ulbinskij Metallurgical Plant and the production of some by-products, such as rhenium, vanadium and rare-earth elements, may provide more profits. Obviously, the sale of uranium (as well as of any other reserves) cannot make Kazakhstan a prosperous country. However, country's uranium industry has a god chance to become one of the most important and advanced sectors of national economy

  16. Development of AUC-based process at BARC for production of free-flowing and sinterable UO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keni, V.S.; Ghosh, S.K.; Ganguly, C.; Majumdar, S.

    1994-01-01

    Ammonium uranium carbonate (AUC) process has been developed and industrially used in Germany for preparation of free-flowing and sinterable UO 2 powder for fabrication of UO 2 fuel pellets for light water reactors (LWR). Efforts are underway at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for developing AUC-based process which would yield free-flowing UO 2 powder suitable for direct pelletisation and sintering to very high density (> 96% T.D.) UO 2 fuel pellets for pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs) in India. The first phase of this work has been completed jointly by Chemical Engineering Division (ChED) and Radiometallurgy Division (RMD) in batches of 1.5 kg. It was possible to fabricate UO 2 pellets of density 93-95% T.D. on a reproducible basis. At ChED, process parameters have been optimised for fabrication of AUC with suitable physical properties in batches of 1.5 kg (U), starting with nuclear pure uranyl nitrate solution. At RMD calcination parameters of AUC was optimised in batches of 500 g for obtaining free-flowing UO 2 powder, suitable for direct pelletisation and sintering. The pelletisation and sintering have been carried out at Radiometallurgy Division in batches of 1-1.5 kg. The maximum achievable density of UO 2 pellets has been in the range of 95.5-96% T.D. (author). 11 refs

  17. Effect of increasing lanthanum substitution and the sintering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Young's modulus of the microwave sintered samples (8.8–12.5 and 160–180 GPa) are higher than that for conventional sintered (8–10 and 135–155 GPa) samples. Keywords. Microwave sintering; La-substituted SBTi ceramics; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction. In recent years, bismuth layer-structured ferroelectrics.

  18. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  19. Kinetic study of uranium carburization by different carbonated gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, Guy

    1963-01-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction U + CO 2 and U + CO has been performed by a thermogravimetric method on a spherical uranium powder, in temperature ranges respectively from 460 to 690 deg. C and from 570 to 850 deg. C. The reaction with carbon dioxide leads to uranium dioxide. A carbon deposition takes place at the same time. The global reactions is the result of two reactions: U + 2 CO 2 → UO 2 + 2 CO U + CO 2 → UO 2 + C The reaction with carbon monoxide leads to a mixture of dioxide UO 2 , dicarbide UC 2 and free carbon. The main reaction can be written. U + CO → 1/2 UO 2 + 1/2 UC 2 The free carbon results of the disproportionation of the carbon monoxide. A remarkable separation of the two phases UO 2 and UC 2 can be observed. A mechanism accounting for the phenomenon has been proposed. The two reactions U + CO 2 and U + CO begin with a long germination period, after which, the reaction velocity seems to be limited in both cases by the ionic diffusion of oxygen through the uranium dioxide. (author) [fr

  20. Reaction of nickel with uranium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.; Calais, D.; Lorenzelli, N.; Passefort, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    UN-Ni system has been investigated in solid phase by diffusion couples UN-Ni or by mixed powders pressed and sintered. Studies have been carried out by micrography, X-rays and microanalysis with a CASTAING microprobe. UN-Ni compatibility is quite good up to 600 C; beyond this temperature diffusion zones corresponding to UNi 5 and U 2 N 3 appear in the couples either reaction : 3 U N + 5 Ni → U 2 N 3 + UNi 5 ; UN + 5 Ni → UNi 5 + 1/2 N 2 takes place from 700 C according to nitrogen pressure involved. For temperatures between 800 and 1000 C nickel solubility in uranium nitride is 1500 ± 500 wt ppm. (authors) [fr

  1. Effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.P.; Liu, W.Q.; Huang, Y.L.; Ma, S.C.; Zhong, Z.C.

    2014-01-01

    Sintered NdFeB-based permanent magnets were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and a conventional method to investigate the mechanical and magnetic properties. The experimental results showed that sintered NdFeB magnet prepared by the spark plasma sintering (SPS NdFeB) possesses a better mechanical properties compared to the conventionally sintered one, of which the maximum value of bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively. The effects of sintering temperature on bending strength and Vickers hardness were investigated. It was shown that the bending strength firstly increases to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of sintering temperature in a certain range. The investigations of microstructures and mechanical properties indicated that the unique sintering mechanism in the SPS process is responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of SPS NdFeB. Furthermore, the relations between the mechanical properties and relevant microstructure have been analyzed based on the experimental fact. - Highlights: • Studied the sintering temperature effect on strengthening mechanism of NdFeB magnet firstly. • It showed that sintering temperature may effectively affect the mechanical properties. • The maximum bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively

  2. Effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.P., E-mail: wgp@jxnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Communication Electronics, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); Liu, W.Q. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Huang, Y.L.; Ma, S.C.; Zhong, Z.C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Sintered NdFeB-based permanent magnets were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and a conventional method to investigate the mechanical and magnetic properties. The experimental results showed that sintered NdFeB magnet prepared by the spark plasma sintering (SPS NdFeB) possesses a better mechanical properties compared to the conventionally sintered one, of which the maximum value of bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively. The effects of sintering temperature on bending strength and Vickers hardness were investigated. It was shown that the bending strength firstly increases to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of sintering temperature in a certain range. The investigations of microstructures and mechanical properties indicated that the unique sintering mechanism in the SPS process is responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of SPS NdFeB. Furthermore, the relations between the mechanical properties and relevant microstructure have been analyzed based on the experimental fact. - Highlights: • Studied the sintering temperature effect on strengthening mechanism of NdFeB magnet firstly. • It showed that sintering temperature may effectively affect the mechanical properties. • The maximum bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively.

  3. Construction of an apparatus for measuring the low-temperature thermal conductivity before and after neutron irradiation. Application to uranium dioxide (1963); Realisation d'un appareil pour la mesure de la conductibilite thermique a basse temperature avant et apres irradiation neutronique. Application au dioxyde d'uranium (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethoux, O. [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-09-15

    An apparatus has been studied and built which makes it possible to alternatively irradiate a sample at room temperature in the reactor 'Melusine' at the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, and to measure its thermal conductivity between 20 and 100 deg. K in perfect safety. The results obtained on UO{sub 2} have made it possible on the one hand to check experimentally that the spin-phonon diffusion leads to a thermal resistance independent of temperature above 30 deg. K, and on the other hand to propose a simple theory which takes into count the role played by the damage due to U-235 fission products in the decrease of thermal conductivity after irradiation. (author) [French] Un appareil permettant alternativement d'irradier un echantillon a temperature ambiante dans le reacteur ''Melusine'' du C.E.N.G., et de mesurer sa conductibilite thermique entre 20 et 100 deg. K en toute securite, a ete etudie et construit Les resultats obtenus sur UO{sub 2} ont permis, d'une part, de verifier experimentalement que la diffusion spin-phonon conduit a une resistance thermique independante de la temperature au-dessus de 30 deg. K, et, d'autre part, de proposer une theorie simple tenant compte du role joue par les degats dus aux produits de fission de l'uranium 235, dans la deterioration de la conductibilite thermique apres irradiation. (auteur)

  4. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material. Keywords. Microwave sintering; biaxial flexure; silicon carbide. 1. Introduction. Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics is a very well known candidate material for a structural application. However, due to (i) poor densification due to highly directional bonding, (ii) susceptibility of ...

  5. Sintering behavior of LZSA glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The LZSA glass-ceramic system (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O 3 shows interesting properties, such as good chemical resistance, low thermal expansion, high abrasion resistance, and a low dielectric constant. However, in order to obtain a high performance material for specific applications, the sintering behavior must be better understood so that the porosity may be reduced and other properties improved. In this context, a sintering investigation for a specific LZSA glass-ceramic system composition was carried out. A 18.8Li2O-8.3ZrO2-64.2SiO2-8.7Al 2O3 glass was prepared by melting the solids, quenching the melt in water, and grinding the resulting solid in order to obtain a powder (3.68 μm average particle diameter. Subsequently, the glass powder was characterized (chemical analysis and determination of thermal properties and the sintering behavior was investigated using optical non-contact dilatometry measurements. The results showed that the crystallization process strongly reduced the sintering in the temperature interval from 785 to 940 °C, and a maximum thermal shrinkage of 15.4% was obtained with operating conditions of 1020 °C and 180 minutes.

  6. Study of ceramics sintering under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunrath Neto, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study was made on high pressure sintering of ceramics in order to obtain materials with controlled microstructure, which are not accessible by conventional methods. Some aspects with particular interest were: to achieve very low porosity, with fine grains; to produce dispersed metastable and denser phases which can act as toughening agents; the study of new possibilities for toughening enhancement. (author)

  7. Deformation behavior of sintered nanocrystalline silver layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabihzadeh, S.; Van Petegem, S.; Duarte, L.I.; Mokso, R.; Cervellino, A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of porous silver layers produced under different low temperature pressure-assisted sintering conditions is characterized and linked with the mechanical behavior studied in situ during X-ray diffraction. Peak profile analysis reveals important strain recovery and hardening mechanism during cyclic deformation. The competition between both mechanisms is discussed in terms of porosity and grain size

  8. Air-sintering mechanisms of chromites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, L.A.; Bates, J.L.; Maupin, G.D.

    1991-07-01

    The sintering behaviors of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} and Y{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}CrO{sub 3} in air at 1550{degrees}C are described as functions of alkaline earth concentration and chromium enrichment or depletion. Vapor-, liquid-, and solid-phase mass transport mechanisms appear to be operative in both systems. Liquid-phase sintering appears dominant an Y{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}CrO{sub 3} with x = 0.15 to 0.40, especially with Cr enrichment. Either vapor- or solid-phase transport may dominate in the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} system. Slight depletion or enrichment of Cr in both systems has dramatic effects on air-sintered density and microstructure, probably due to modulation of vapor-phase transport and liquid-phase formation. Substantial Cr depletion enhances sintering. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Mechanical characterization of microwave sintered zinc oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Zinc oxide; microwave sintering; microhardness. 1. Introduction. The application of microwave energy for the processing of ceramics has become an attractive area of research and innovation recently. The major advantages of the micro- wave processing of ceramic materials are accelerated densification rate as a ...

  10. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  11. Sintering of silicon nitride ceramics with magnesium silicon nitride and yttrium oxide as sintering aids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J; Xu, J Y [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Peng, G H [Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004, Guangxi (China); Zhuang, H R; Li, W L; Xu, S Y [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Mao, Y J, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics had been produced through pressureless sintering and hot-pressing sintering with MgSiN{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} or only MgSiN{sub 2} as sintering aids. The influences of the amount of MgSiN{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sintering methods on the properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics were investigated. The results show that the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic fabricated through pressureless sintering at 1820 deg. C for 4 h with 5.6 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2}-15.8 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additive could achieve 839 MPa. However, the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic produced by hot-pressing sintering at 1750 deg. C for 1 h under uniaxial pressure of 20 MPa with 4.76 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2} was 1149 MPa. The thermal conductivity of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic 2 3 4 could reach to 129 W{center_dot}m{sup -1{center_dot}}K{sup 1}. The present work demonstrated that MgSiN{sub 2} aids and hot-pressing sintering were effective to improve the thermal conductivity of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic.

  12. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  13. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  14. Politics of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is the most political of all the elements, the material for the production of both the large amounts of electricity and the most destructive weapons in the world. The problems that its dual potential creates are only now beginning to become evident. Author Norman Moss looks at this situation and sheds light on many of the questions that emerge. The nuclear issue always comes back to how much uranium there is, what can be done with it, and which countries have it. Starting with a concise history of uranium and explaining its technology in terms the nonspecialist can understand, The Politics of Uranium considers the political issues that technical arguments obscure. It tells the little-known story of the international uranium cartel, explains the entanglements of governments with the uranium trade, and describes the consequences of wrong decisions and blunders-especially the problems of nuclear waste. It also examines the intellectual and emotional roots of the anti-nuclear movement

  15. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  16. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  17. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  18. Yttrium oxide transparent ceramics by low-temperature microwave sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Junming; Zhong, Zhenchen; Xu, Jilin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The figure shows the SEM photos of the surfaces of the Y 2 O 3 transparent ceramic samples obtained by microwave sintering and vacuum sintering. It is clearly demonstrated that the grain distribution of the vacuum sintering sample is not uniform with the smallest and the largest particle size at about 2 μm and 15 μm respectively, while the grain distribution of microwave sintering sample is uniform with the average diameter at about 2–4 μm (the smallest reported so far) and with no abnormal growth-up or coarsening phenomenon. We have further found out that the smaller the grain size, the higher the mechanical and optical properties. Display Omitted Highlights: ► The microwave sintering temperature of the sample is lower compared with vacuum. ► The microwave sintering time of the sample is shorter compared with vacuum. ► The mechanical properties of the microwave sintering sample is improved greatly. ► The Y 2 O 3 grain of microwave sintering sample is the smallest reported so far. -- Abstract: Yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ) transparent ceramics samples have been successfully fabricated by microwave sintering processing at relatively low temperatures. In comparison with the vacuum sintering processing, Y 2 O 3 transparent ceramics can be obtained by microwave sintering at lower sintering temperature and shorter sintering time, and they possess higher transmittances and mechanical properties. The technologies of low-temperature microwave sintering and the relationships of the microstructures and properties of the specified samples have been investigated in detail. We have found out that the low-temperature microwave sintering technique has its obvious advantages over the conventional methods in manufacturing yttrium oxide transparent ceramics.

  19. Magnesium and uranium ignition in different gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.; Baque, P.; Leclercq, D.

    1960-01-01

    Magnesium, uranium and some of their alloys burning temperatures have been systematically determined in an air or carbon dioxide atmosphere, either dry or wet. Two different ways of heating have been used: either continuously rising up the temperature, or heating to and then maintaining a constant temperature. The results are clearly different in the two cases. Besides, if moisture has little effect on the magnesium burning temperatures in air, it does lower them by about 130-140 deg. C in CO 2 . The differences of sight between the burning of magnesium and uranium have been noticed; this leads to distinguish between an 'ignition' and an 'inflammation'. (author) [fr

  20. Gas chromatographic method fr determination of carbon in metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikol'skij, V.A.; Markov, V.K.; Evseeva, T.I.; Cherstvenkova, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Gas chromatographic device to determine carbon in metal uranium is developed. Burnout unite, permitting to load in the burnout tube simultaneously quite a few (up to 20) weight amounts of materials to be burned is a characteristic feature of the device. As a result amendments for control experiment and determination limit are decreased. The time of a single determination is also reduced. Conditions of carbon burn out from metal uranium are studied and temperature and time of complete extraction of carbon in the form of dioxide from weight amount into gaseous phase are established

  1. TiO2 doped UO2 fuels sintered by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tiankai; Scott, Spencer M.; Xin, Guoqing; Lian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    UO2 fuels doped with oxide additives Cr2O3 and TiO2 display larger grain size, improving fission product retention capability and thus accident tolerance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was applied to consolidate TiO2-doped UO2 fuel pellets with 0.5 wt % dopant concentration, above its solubility, in order to induce eutectic phase formation and promote sintering kinetics. The grain size can reach 80 μm by sintering at 1700 °C for 20 min, and liquid U-Ti-O eutectic phase occurs at the triple junction of grain boundaries and significantly improves grain growth during sintering. The oxide additive also impedes the reduction of the initial hyperstoichiometric fuel powders to more stoichiometric fuel pellets upon SPS process. Thermal-mechanical properties of the sintered doped fuel pellets including thermal conductivity and hardness are measured and compared with undoped fuel pellets. The enlarged grain size (80 μm) and densification within short sintering duration highlight the immense possibility of SPS in fabricating large grained UO2 fuel pellets to improve fuel performance.

  2. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  3. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  4. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  5. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  6. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  7. Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O' Brien

    2013-02-01

    Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

  8. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  9. Uranium concentration in fossils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, J.; Uyeda, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it is known that fossil bones tend to accumulate uranium. The uranium concentration, C u in fossils has been measured so far by γ ray spectroscopy or by fission track method. The authors applied secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, to detect the uranium in fossil samples. The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of semi-quantitative analyses of uranium in fossils, and to study the correlation between C u and the age of fossil bones. The further purpose of this work is to apply SIMS to measure the distribution of C u in fossil teeth

  10. analysis methods of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekdemir, N.; Acarkan, S.

    1997-01-01

    There are various methods for the determination of uranium. The most often used methods are spectrophotometric (PAR, DBM and Arsenazo III) and potentiometric titration methods. For uranium contents between 1-300 g/LU potentiometric titration method based on oxidation-reduction reactions gives reliable results. PAR (1-pyridiyl-2-azo resorcinol) is a sensitive reagent for uranium, forming complexes in aqueous solutions. It is a suitable method for determination of uranium at concentrations between 2-400microgram U. In this study, the spectrophotometric and potentiometric analysis methods, used in the Nuclear Fuel Department will be discussed in detail and other methods and their principles will be briefly mentioned

  11. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzinel, Z.; Folkman, Y.

    1979-05-01

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P 2 O 5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  12. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  13. Uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use as catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Soraya Maria Rizzo da

    1996-01-01

    The preoccupation to have a secure destination for metallic uranium scraps and wastes and to search new non-nuclear uses for the huge amount of depleted metal uranium accumulated at the nuclear industry encouraged the study of the uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use. The use of uranium sesqui nitride as a catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia for the hydrogen production has enormous significance. One of the most important nuclear cycle step is the reduction of the higher uranium oxides for the production of uranium dioxide and its conversion to uranium tetrafluoride. The reduction of the UO 3 and U 3 O 8 oxides is accomplished by the gas-solid reaction with elementary hydrogen. For economical purposes and for the safety concern the nuclear industry prefers to manufacture the hydrogen gas at the local and at the moment of use, exploring the catalytic decomposition of ammonia vapor. Using metallic uranium scraps as the raw material the obtention of its nitride was achieved by the reaction with ammonia. The results of the chemical and physical characterization of the prepared uranium sesqui nitride and its behavior as a catalyst for the cracking of ammonia are commented. A lower ammonia cracking temperature (550 deg C) using the uranium sesqui nitride compared with recommended industrial catalysts iron nitride (650 deg C) and manganese nitride (700 deg C) sounds reliable and economically advantageous. (author)

  14. Obtention of uranium tetrafluoride from effluents generated in the hexafluoride conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Urano de Carvalho, E.F.; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel is produced from uranium hexafluoride (UF6) as the primary raw material. The uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) and metallic uranium are the two subsequent steps. There are two conventional routes for UF4 production: the first one reduces the uranium from the UF6 hydrolysis solution by adding stannous chloride (SnCl2). The second one is based on the hydrofluorination of solid uranium dioxide (UO2) produced from the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This work introduces a third route, a dry way route which utilizes the recovering of uranium from liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process adopted at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recovery of ammonium fluoride by NH4HF2 precipitation. The crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO2 to get UF4, which returns to the metallic uranium production process and, finally, to the U3Si2 powder production. The UF4 produced by this new route was chemically and physically characterized and will be able to be used as raw material for metallic uranium production by magnesiothermic reduction. (author)

  15. Decontamination of radioactive clothing using microemulsion in carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jaeryong; Jang, Jina; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Hongdoo; Kim, Hakwon [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Sanghak; Yoon, Weonseob [Ulchin Nuclear Power Site, Ulchin (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear power is intrinsically a clean energy source due to its high energy density and low generation of waste. However, as the nuclear industry grows, a variety of radioactive wastes are increased gradually. Major subjects include contaminated components, tools, equipment, containers and facilities as well as nuclear waste such as uranium scrap and radioactive clothing. The radioactive waste can be classified by its creation. There are Trans-Uranium Nuclides (TRU), Fission Products (FP) and corrosion products. Nuclear decontamination has become an important issue in the nuclear industry. The conventional methods have some problems such as the production of secondary wastes and the use of toxic solvents. We need to develop a new method of decontamination and suggest a use of microemulsion in carbon dioxide to overcome these disadvantages. The microemulsion is the clear solution that contains the water, surfactant and carbon dioxide. The surfactant surrounded the droplet into carbon dioxide and this state is thermodynamically stable. That is, the microemulsion has a structure similar to that of a conventional water-based surfactant system. Generally, the size of droplet is about 5 {approx} 10nm. The microemulsion is able to decontaminate radioactive waste so that the polar substance is removed by water and the non-polar substance is removed by carbon dioxide. After the decontamination process, the microemulsion is separated easily to surfactant and water by decreasing the pressure under the cloud point. This way, only radioactive wastes are left in the system. Cleaned carbon dioxide is then collected and reused. Thus, there are no secondary wastes. Carbon dioxide is considered an alternative process medium. This is because it is non-toxic, non-flammable, inexpensive and easy to handle. Additionally, the tunable properties of carbon dioxide through pressure and temperature control are versatile for use in extracting organic materials. In this paper, we examine the

  16. Decontamination of radioactive clothing using microemulsion in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jaeryong; Jang, Jina; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Hongdoo; Kim, Hakwon; Yim, Sanghak; Yoon, Weonseob

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power is intrinsically a clean energy source due to its high energy density and low generation of waste. However, as the nuclear industry grows, a variety of radioactive wastes are increased gradually. Major subjects include contaminated components, tools, equipment, containers and facilities as well as nuclear waste such as uranium scrap and radioactive clothing. The radioactive waste can be classified by its creation. There are Trans-Uranium Nuclides (TRU), Fission Products (FP) and corrosion products. Nuclear decontamination has become an important issue in the nuclear industry. The conventional methods have some problems such as the production of secondary wastes and the use of toxic solvents. We need to develop a new method of decontamination and suggest a use of microemulsion in carbon dioxide to overcome these disadvantages. The microemulsion is the clear solution that contains the water, surfactant and carbon dioxide. The surfactant surrounded the droplet into carbon dioxide and this state is thermodynamically stable. That is, the microemulsion has a structure similar to that of a conventional water-based surfactant system. Generally, the size of droplet is about 5 ∼ 10nm. The microemulsion is able to decontaminate radioactive waste so that the polar substance is removed by water and the non-polar substance is removed by carbon dioxide. After the decontamination process, the microemulsion is separated easily to surfactant and water by decreasing the pressure under the cloud point. This way, only radioactive wastes are left in the system. Cleaned carbon dioxide is then collected and reused. Thus, there are no secondary wastes. Carbon dioxide is considered an alternative process medium. This is because it is non-toxic, non-flammable, inexpensive and easy to handle. Additionally, the tunable properties of carbon dioxide through pressure and temperature control are versatile for use in extracting organic materials. In this paper, we examine the

  17. Phase transformation of NiTi alloys during vacuum sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Kuang

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain the Phase transformation of NiTi alloys during vacuum sintering. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) of atomic ratio 1:1 were prepared through press forming and vacuum sintering with the mixture of Ni and Ti powders. Different samples were prepared by changing the sintering time and the sintering temperature. Phase and porosity of the samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that in the process of sintering NiTi2 and Ni3Ti phases are formed firstly and then transform into NiTi phase. The quantity of NiTi2 and Ni3Ti phases gradually decreased but not eliminate completely with increase of sintering time. The porosity of specimen sintering at 900°C decreases slightly with increase of sintering time. With increase of sintering time the porosity of specimen sintering at 1050°C decreased firstly and then increased because of generation rich titanium liquid in the process of sintering.

  18. Spark plasma sintering of hydrothermally synthesized bismuth ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Branković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth ferrite, BiFeO3 (BFO, powder was synthesized by hydrothermal method from Bi(NO33·5 H2O and Fe(NO33·9 H2O as precursors. The synthesized powder was further sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS. The sintering conditions were optimized in order to achieve high density, minimal amount of secondary phases and improved ferroelectric and magnetic properties. The optimal structure and properties were achieved after spark plasma sintering at 630 °C for 20 min, under uniaxial pressure of 90 MPa. The composition, microstructure, ferroelectric and magnetic properties of the SPS samples were characterized and compared to those of conventionally sintered ceramics obtained from the same powder. Although the samples sintered using conventional method showed slightly lower amount of secondary phases, the spark plasma sintered samples exhibited favourable microstructure and better ferroelectric properties.

  19. Effects of Laser Treatment on the Bond Strength of Differently Sintered Zirconia Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Yenisey, Murat; Rona, Nergiz; Öngöz Dede, Figen

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) and Erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiations on the shear bond strength (SBS) of differently sintered zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Eighty zirconia specimens were prepared, sintered in two different periods (short = Ss, long = Ls), and divided into four treatment groups (n = 10 each). These groups were (a) untreated (control), (b) Er:YAG laser irradiated with 6 W power for 5 sec, (c) CO2 laser with 2 W power for 10 sec, (d) CO2 laser with 4 W power for 10 sec. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were recorded for each of the eight groups. Eighty composite resin discs (3 × 3 mm) were fabricated and cemented with an adhesive resin cement to ceramic specimens. The SBS test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24 h by an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). According to the ANOVA, the sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (p  0.05). Variation in sintering time from 2.5 to 5.0 h may have influenced the SBS of Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics. Although CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation techniques may increase the SBS values of both tested zirconia ceramics, they are recommended for clinicians as an alternative pretreatment method.

  20. Uranium extraction from sea water with a granulated titanium-containing sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, Yu.P.; Komarewsky, V.M.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Sharyigin, L.M.; Gonchar, V.F.; Malyich, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    A specially synthesized granulated titanium dioxide based sorbent of high mechanical strength was used for the extraction of uranium from sea water in a fluidized bed. The sorption process proceeds in an external diffusion kinetic area and depends only slightly on temperature. The kinetic behaviour of any sorbent during uranium extraction from natural sea water is assumed to be the same up to the moment of the process transition from the external to the internal kinetic area. (author)

  1. A review of the rates of reaction of unirradiated uranium in gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, R.J.

    1989-10-01

    The review collates available quantitative rate data for the reaction of unirradiated uranium in dry and moist air, steam and carbon dioxide based atmospheres at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above the melting point of uranium. Reactions in nitrogen and carbon monoxide are also considered. The aim of the review is to provide a compilation of base data for the hazard analysis of fault conditions relating to Magnox fuel. (author)

  2. Preparation and characterization of manganese dioxide impregnated resin for radionuclide pre-concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Zsolt [Radiation Safety Department, Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege utca 29-33, H-1121, Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: varga@iki.kfki.hu

    2007-10-15

    An easy and reproducible preparation of manganese dioxide impregnated resin of homogeneous particles has been described. The characteristics of radium, thorium, uranium and plutonium uptake (pH dependency, kinetic studies and matrix dependency) have been determined in batch mode. The resin due to its high efficiency for radium, uranium and thorium at neutral pH values can be an effective tool for radionuclide pre-concentration from liquid samples even with high dissolved solid content.

  3. Trends in uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  4. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  5. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  6. Selection of lixiviants for in situ uranium leaching. Information circular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweeton, D.R.; Peterson, K.A.

    1981-10-01

    This Bureau of Mines publication provides information to assist in selecting a lixiviant (leach solution) for in situ uranium leaching. The cost, advantages, and disadvantages of lixiviants currently used and proposed are presented. Laboratory and field tests are described, and applications of geochemical models are discussed. Environmental, economic, and technical factors should all be considered. Satisfying environmental regulations on restoring groundwater quality is becoming an overriding factor, favoring sodium bicarbonate or dissolved carbon dioxide over ammonium carbonate. The cheapest lixiviant is dissolved carbon dioxide, but it is not effective in all deposits. Technical factors include clay swelling by sodium, acid consumption by calcite, and the low solubility of oxygen in shallow deposits

  7. Numerical simulation of electric field assisted sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Brandon A.

    A fully coupled thermal-electric-sintering finite element model was developed and implemented to explore electric field assisted sintering techniques (FAST). FAST is a single step processing operation for producing bulk materials from powders, in which the powder is heated by the application of electric current under pressure. This process differs from other powder processing techniques such as hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and traditional press and sinter operations where the powder or compact is heated externally, in that the powder is heated directly as a result of internal Joule heating (for conductive powders) and/or by direct conduction from the die and punches. The overall result is much more efficient heating which allows heating rates of >1000°C/min to be achieved which is desirable for sintering bulk nanocrystalline and other novel high performance materials. Previous modeling efforts on FAST have only considered the thermal-electric aspect of the problem and have neglected densification. In addition to the introduction of a sintering model, a detailed thermal-electric study of process parameters was carried out in order to identify key system variables and quantify their effect on the overall system response and subsequent thermal history of a consolidated sample. This analysis was compared to empirical data from a parallel experimental study and shown to satisfactorily predict the observed trends. This model was then integrated with a phenomenologically based sintering model to capture the densification of the sample. This fully coupled model was used to predict densification kinetics under FAST like conditions and examine the evolution of material properties as the sample transitions from a loose powder to a fully dense compact and the resulting effect on the electrical and thermal fields within the compact. This model was also used to explore the effect of non-uniform thermal, electrical, stress and density fields on the final geometry and local

  8. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  9. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Environmental monitoring program design for uranium refining and conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the design of environmental monitoring programs at Canadian uranium refining and conversion operations. In order to develop monitoring priorities, chemical and radioactive releases to the air and water were developed for reference uranium refining and conversion facilities. The relative significance of the radioactive releases was evaluated through a pathways analysis which estimated dose to individual members of the critical receptor group. The effects of chemical releases to the environment were assessed by comparing predicted air and water contaminant levels to appropriate standards or guidelines. For the reference facilities studied, the analysis suggested that environmental effects are likely to be dominated by airborne release of both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Uranium was found to be the most important radioactive species released to the air and can serve as an overall indicator of radiological impacts for any of the plants considered. The most important nonradioactive air emission was found to be fluoride (as hydrogen fluoride) from the uranium hexafluoride plant. For the uranium trioxide and uranium dioxide plants, air emissions of oxides of nitrogen were considered to be most important. The study recommendations for the design of an environmental monitoring program are based on consideration of those factors most likely to affect local air and water quality, and human radiation exposure. Site- and facility-specific factors will affect monitoring program design and the selection of components such as sampling media, locations and frequency, and analytical methods

  11. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  12. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  13. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Details are given of an agreement between Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and Ranger Uranium Mines Pty. Ltd. regarding the management of the joint Ranger uranium project in the Northern Territory of Australia

  14. Rheinbraun's Australian uranium business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, S.

    1989-01-01

    The leaflet argues against the mining activities of the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG in Germany and especially against uranium mining in Australia. The ethno-ecological impact on flora and fauna, aborigines and miners are pointed out. Uranium mining and lignite mining are compared. (HSCH) [de

  15. Nuclear and uranium policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNabb, G.M.; Uranium Canada Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario)

    The background of the uranium industry in Canada is described. Government policies with respect to ownership of the uranium mining industry, price stabilization, and especially reservation of sufficient supplies of nuclear fuels for domestic utilities, are explained. Canadian policy re nuclear exports and safeguards is outlined. (E.C.B.)

  16. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion replaces calcium in the hydroxyapatite complex of the bone crystal. Although in North India, there is a risk of radiological toxicity from orally ingested natural uranium, the principal health effects are chemical toxicity. The skeleton and kidney are the primary sites of uranium accumulation. Acute high dose of uranyl nitrate delays tooth eruption, and mandibular growth and development, probably due to its effect on target cells. Based on all previous research and recommendations, the role of a dentist is to educate the masses about the adverse effects of uranium on the overall as well as the dental health. The authors recommended that apart from the discontinuation of the addition of uranium to porcelain, the Public community water supplies must also comply with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards of uranium levels being not more than 30 ppb (parts per billion). PMID:24478959

  17. Uranium and transuranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical chemistry of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium is reviewed. Uranium and neptunium are mainly treated and curium is only briefly evoked. Analysis methods include coulometry, titration, mass spectrometry, absorption spectrometry, spectrofluorometry, X-ray spectrometry, nuclear methods and radiation spectrometry [fr

  18. Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of thorium- uranium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoudi, M.; Staicu, D.; Mouris, J.; Bergeron, A.; Hamilton, H.; Naji, M.; Freis, D.; Cologna, M.

    2018-03-01

    Thorium-uranium oxide pellets with high densities were prepared at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) by co-milling, pressing, and sintering at 2023 K, with UO2 mass contents of 0, 1.5, 3, 8, 13, 30, 60 and 100%. At the Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (JRC-Karlsruhe), thorium-uranium oxide pellets were prepared using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique with 79 and 93 wt. % UO2. The thermal diffusivity of (Th1-xUx)O2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was measured at CNL and at JRC-Karlsruhe using the laser flash technique. ThO2 and (Th,U)O2 with 1.5, 3, 8 and 13 wt. % UO2 were found to be semi-transparent to the infrared wavelength of the laser and were coated with graphite for the thermal diffusivity measurements. This semi-transparency decreased with the addition of UO2 and was lost at about 30 wt. % of UO2 in ThO2. The thermal conductivity was deduced using the measured density and literature data for the specific heat capacity. The thermal conductivity for ThO2 is significantly higher than for UO2. The thermal conductivity of (Th,U)O2 decreases rapidly with increasing UO2 content, and for UO2 contents of 60% and higher, the conductivity of the thorium-uranium oxide fuel is close to UO2. As the mass difference between the Th and U atoms is small, the thermal conductivity decrease is attributed to the phonon scattering enhanced by lattice strain due to the introduction of uranium in ThO2 lattice. The new results were compared to the data available in the literature and were evaluated using the classical phonon transport model for oxide systems.

  19. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, C.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U 3 O 8 (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO 2 phase appear at the surface of the U 3 O 8 grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.)

  20. In situ leach method for recovering uranium and related values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, T.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for in-situ leaching of uranium from a calcium-containing clay which does not result in contamination of the clay formation by any cations not already present. A lixiviant is prepared by dissolving carbon dioxide into water having essentially the same cationic composition as that of the formation connate water. The solution is injected along with an oxidant, for example oxygen, into the formation. Calcium that has become dissolved in the lixiviant must be removed to control the pH, preferably by the addition of lime in a calcium precipitator. After calcium removal the lixiviant is filtered to remove suspended solids and is passed through an ion exchange resin or other uranium extraction means. The barren solution goes to a mix tank where carbon dioxide is added, and the fresh lixiviant is injected along with additional oxidant into the formation