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Sample records for sintered cadmium sulfide

  1. Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using culture supernatants of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Lactobacillus ... The process of extracellular and fast biosynthesis may help in the development of an easy and eco-friendly route for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles.

  2. Reduction kinetics of zinc and cadmium sulfides with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgenev, I.S.; Kabisov, I.Kh.; Zviadadze, G.N.; Vasil'eva, O.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of reduction processes of zinc sulfide in the temperature range 800-1100 deg C and of cadmium sulfide 600-900 deg C has been stodied. Activation energies and reaction order in terms of hydrogen are calculated. Thermodynamic processes of reduction depend on aggregate state of the metal formed. For vaporous zinc in the temperature range 1050-950 deq C activation energy constitutes 174 kJ/mol, for liquid in the range 900-850 deg - 151 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 1.0. For vaporous cadmium in the temperature range 900-700 deg C activation energy constitutes 144 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 0.86, for liquid in the range 675-600 deg C 127 kJ/mol and 0.8 respectively. The processes of zinc and cadmium sulfide reduction proceed in kinetic regime and are limited by the rate of chemical reaction

  3. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  4. Cadmium sulfide thin films growth by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariech, S.; Aida, M. S.; Bougdira, J.; Belmahi, M.; Medjahdi, G.; Genève, D.; Attaf, N.; Rinnert, H.

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films have been prepared by a simple technique such as chemical bath deposition (CBD). A set of samples CdS were deposited on glass substrates by varying the bath temperature from 55 to 75 °C at fixed deposition time (25 min) in order to investigate the effect of deposition temperature on CdS films physical properties. The determination of growth activation energy suggests that at low temperature CdS film growth is governed by the release of Cd2+ ions in the solution. The structural characterization indicated that the CdS films structure is cubic or hexagonal with preferential orientation along the direction (111) or (002), respectively. The optical characterization indicated that the films have a fairly high transparency, which varies between 55% and 80% in the visible range of the optical spectrum, the refractive index varies from 1.85 to 2.5 and the optical gap value of which can reach 2.2 eV. It can be suggested that these properties make these films perfectly suitable for their use as window film in thin films based solar cells.

  5. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  6. Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Together with zinc and mercury, cadmium belongs to group IIb of the periodic table. It can be found in rocks, soil, water, coal, zinc ore, lead ore, and copper ore. In the environment, cadmium is present predominantly as the oxide or as the chloride, sulfide, or sulfate salt. It has no recognizable

  7. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  8. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by iron, cadmium and sulfide in granular sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Silva, Blanca M. [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Briones-Gallardo, Roberto [Facultad de Ingenieria-Instituto de Metalurgia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Sierra Leona 550, Lomas 2a. Seccion, 78210, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Razo-Flores, Elias [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B., E-mail: celis@ipicyt.edu.mx [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2009-12-15

    This study investigated the inhibition effect of iron, cadmium and sulfide on the substrate utilization rate of sulfate reducing granular sludge. A series of batch experiments in a UASB reactor were conducted with different concentrations of iron (Fe{sup 2+}, 4.0-8.5 mM), cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}, 0.53-3.0 mM) and sulfide (4.2-10.6 mM), the reactor was fed with ethanol at 1 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L and sulfate to yield a COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (g/g) ratio of 0.5. The addition of iron, up to a concentration of 8.1 mM, had a positive effect on the substrate utilization rate which increased 40% compared to the rate obtained without metal addition (0.25 g COD/g VSS-d). Nonetheless, iron concentration of 8.5 mM inhibited the specific substrate utilization rate by 57% compared to the substrate utilization rate obtained in the batch amended with 4.0 mM Fe{sup 2+} (0.44 g COD/g VSS-d). Cadmium had a negative effect on the specific substrate utilization rate at the concentrations tested; at 3.0 mM Cd{sup 2+} the substrate utilization rate was inhibited by 44% compared with the substrate utilization rate without metal addition. Cadmium precipitation with sulfide did not decrease the inhibition of cadmium on sulfate reduction. These results could have important practical implications mainly when considering the application of the sulfate reducing process to treat effluents with high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals such as iron and cadmium.

  9. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by iron, cadmium and sulfide in granular sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Silva, Blanca M.; Briones-Gallardo, Roberto; Razo-Flores, Elias; Celis, Lourdes B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibition effect of iron, cadmium and sulfide on the substrate utilization rate of sulfate reducing granular sludge. A series of batch experiments in a UASB reactor were conducted with different concentrations of iron (Fe 2+ , 4.0-8.5 mM), cadmium (Cd 2+ , 0.53-3.0 mM) and sulfide (4.2-10.6 mM), the reactor was fed with ethanol at 1 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L and sulfate to yield a COD/SO 4 2- (g/g) ratio of 0.5. The addition of iron, up to a concentration of 8.1 mM, had a positive effect on the substrate utilization rate which increased 40% compared to the rate obtained without metal addition (0.25 g COD/g VSS-d). Nonetheless, iron concentration of 8.5 mM inhibited the specific substrate utilization rate by 57% compared to the substrate utilization rate obtained in the batch amended with 4.0 mM Fe 2+ (0.44 g COD/g VSS-d). Cadmium had a negative effect on the specific substrate utilization rate at the concentrations tested; at 3.0 mM Cd 2+ the substrate utilization rate was inhibited by 44% compared with the substrate utilization rate without metal addition. Cadmium precipitation with sulfide did not decrease the inhibition of cadmium on sulfate reduction. These results could have important practical implications mainly when considering the application of the sulfate reducing process to treat effluents with high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals such as iron and cadmium.

  10. Preparation and characterization of polyaniline-cadmium sulfide nanocomposite for gas sensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.; Rafic, Sewench N.; Muhsen, Mustafa M.

    2017-09-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomers as emeraldine salt form. By the same method, polyaniline-cadmium sulfide nanocomposites were synthesized in the presence of different percentages (10-50 wt.%) of cadmium sulfide (CdS) which was prepared by using sol-gel method. The optical band gap was decrease with increasing of CdS concentration, that is obtained from UV-VIS measurements. From SEM and AFM, there is uniform distribution for cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in the PANI matrix. The electrical measurements of nanocomposites exhibit the effect of crystallite size and the high resistivity of CdS on the resistivity of nanocomposites. Emeraldine salt PANI, CdS and PANI-CdS nanocomposites were investigated as gas sensors. From this investigation, the sensitivity of PANI-CdS for NO2 gas increase with the increasing of operation temperature and the optimum sensitivity was obtained at 200∘C. The sensitivity of nanocomposites at best temperature (200∘C) was increased and faster response time with the increasing of CdS contents.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, R Aruna; Latha, M; Velumani, S; Oza, Goldie; Reyes-Figueroa, P; Rohini, M; Becerril-Juarez, I G; Lee, Jae-Hyeong; Yi, Junsin

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method using cadmium chloride (CdCl2), sodium sulfide (Na2S) and water as a solvent by varying temperatures from 20-80 degrees C. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. XRD pattern revealed cubic crystal structure for all the synthesized CdS nanoparticles. Raman spectra showed first and second order longitudinal optical (LO) phonon vibrational modes of CdS. The size of CdS nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 15-80 nm by FE-SEM analysis, in all cases. The atomic percentage of cadmium and sulfur was confirmed to be 1:1 from EDS analysis. TEM micrograph depicts the spherical shape of the particles and the size is in the range of 15-85 nm while HR-TEM images of CdS nanoparticles exhibit well-resolved lattice fringes of the cubic structure of CdS. The optical properties of CdS were examined by UV-Visible spectroscopy which showed variation in absorption band from 460-480 nm. The band gap was calculated from the absorption edge and found to be in the range of 3.2-3.5 eV which is greater than the bulk CdS.

  12. Fabrication and optical characterization of cadmium sulfide needles using nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, L.Q.; Wang, S.C.; Ju, X.; Xiao, H.; Chen, H.; He, Y.J.

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide needles with a diameter of 0.2 μm have been fabricated in nuclear track polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) membrane by electrochemically depositing from organic solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) containing CdCl 2 and elemental sulfur at the temperature 110 deg. C. The characterization of the sample of CdS needles was studied by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The optical experiments show that in the sample of CdS needles there is an absorption peak that could be assigned to the interface states of the CdS needles

  13. Fabrication and optical characterization of cadmium sulfide needles using nuclear track membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, L.Q.; Wang, S.C.; Ju, X.; Xiao, H.; Chen, H.; He, Y.J

    1999-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide needles with a diameter of 0.2 {mu}m have been fabricated in nuclear track polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) membrane by electrochemically depositing from organic solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) containing CdCl{sub 2} and elemental sulfur at the temperature 110 deg. C. The characterization of the sample of CdS needles was studied by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The optical experiments show that in the sample of CdS needles there is an absorption peak that could be assigned to the interface states of the CdS needles.

  14. Temperature dependence of thermal expansion of cadmium sulfide in the temperature range 20 - 820 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskotskij, V.S.; Kobyakov, I.B.; Solodukhin, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    The linear thermal expansion of cadmium sulfide is measured perpendicularly (α 1 ) and parallelly (α 2 ) to the hexagonal axis in the temperature range from 20 to 820 K. Anisotropy is low at up to 80 K; rises at higher temperatures; at 3OO K α 1 /α 3 ratio is 1.8; at 820 K, 2.4. Heat expansion is negative at temperatures lower than 104.5 K(α 1 ) and 126.0 K(α 2 ). It achieves the minimum at 43.6 K (α 1 ) and 52.5K (α 3 ). The theory of heat expansion is plotted in the Debue, approximation and cadmium sulfide is considered as an isotope crystal with average elastic constants. Two parameters of the theory are determined by the position and value of the minimum of volumetric thermal expansion of the model isotope crystal. The theoretic curve agrees well with the experimental one at temperatures up to 160 K, i.e in the range of applicability of the Debue approximation and the isotropic model

  15. Aerobic transformation of cadmium through metal sulfide biosynthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Chad D; Beatty, Joseph C; Loiselle, Jacqueline B R; Vlassov, Katya A; Lefebvre, Daniel D

    2013-07-15

    Cadmium is a non-essential metal that is toxic because of its interference with essential metals such as iron, calcium and zinc causing numerous detrimental metabolic and cellular effects. The amount of this metal in the environment has increased dramatically since the advent of the industrial age as a result of mining activities, the use of fertilizers and sewage sludge in farming, and discharges from manufacturing activities. The metal bioremediation utility of phototrophic microbes has been demonstrated through their ability to detoxify Hg(II) into HgS under aerobic conditions. Metal sulfides are generally very insoluble and therefore, biologically unavailable. When Cd(II) was exposed to cells it was bioconverted into CdS by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and the cyanobacterium, Synechoccocus leopoliensis. Supplementation of the two eukaryotic algae with extra sulfate, but not sulfite or cysteine, increased their cadmium tolerances as well as their abilities to produce CdS, indicating an involvement of sulfate assimilation in the detoxification process. However, the combined activities of extracted serine acetyl-transferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) used to monitor sulfate assimilation, was not significantly elevated during cell treatments that favored sulfide biosynthesis. It is possible that the prolonged incubation of the experiments occurring over two days could have compensated for the low rates of sulfate assimilation. This was also the case for S. leopoliensis where sulfite and cysteine as well as sulfate supplementation enhanced CdS synthesis. In general, conditions that increased cadmium sulfide production also resulted in elevated cysteine desulfhydrase activities, strongly suggesting that cysteine is the direct source of sulfur for CdS synthesis. Cadmium(II) tolerance and CdS formation were significantly enhanced by sulfate supplementation, thus indicating that algae and cyanobacteria

  16. Defect control in room temperature deposited cadmium sulfide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Como, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Martinez-Landeros, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Mejia, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Aguirre-Tostado, F.S. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Nascimento, C.D.; Azevedo, G. de M; Krug, C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 91509-900 (Brazil); Quevedo-Lopez, M.A., E-mail: mquevedo@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The control of defects in cadmium sulfide thin films and its impact on the resulting CdS optical and electrical characteristics are studied. Sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial concentrations in the CdS films are controlled using the ambient pressure during pulsed laser deposition. CdS film resistivities ranging from 10{sup −1} to 10{sup 4} Ω-cm are achieved. Hall Effect measurements show that the carrier concentration ranges from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and is responsible for the observed resistivity variation. Hall mobility varies from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V-s for the same pressure regime. Although the energy bandgap remains unaffected (∼ 2.42 eV), the optical transmittance is reduced due to the increase of defects in the CdS films. Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy shows the dependence of the CdS films stoichiometry with deposition pressure. The presence of CdS defects is attributed to more energetic species reaching the substrate, inducing surface damage in the CdS films during pulsed laser deposition. - Highlights: • CdS thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. • The optical, electrical and structural properties were evaluated. • Carrier concentration ranged from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. • The chemical composition was studied by Rutherford back scattering. • The density of sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial was varied.

  17. Defect control in room temperature deposited cadmium sulfide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Como, N.; Martinez-Landeros, V.; Mejia, I.; Aguirre-Tostado, F.S.; Nascimento, C.D.; Azevedo, G. de M; Krug, C.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The control of defects in cadmium sulfide thin films and its impact on the resulting CdS optical and electrical characteristics are studied. Sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial concentrations in the CdS films are controlled using the ambient pressure during pulsed laser deposition. CdS film resistivities ranging from 10 −1 to 10 4 Ω-cm are achieved. Hall Effect measurements show that the carrier concentration ranges from 10 19 to 10 13 cm −3 and is responsible for the observed resistivity variation. Hall mobility varies from 2 to 12 cm 2 /V-s for the same pressure regime. Although the energy bandgap remains unaffected (∼ 2.42 eV), the optical transmittance is reduced due to the increase of defects in the CdS films. Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy shows the dependence of the CdS films stoichiometry with deposition pressure. The presence of CdS defects is attributed to more energetic species reaching the substrate, inducing surface damage in the CdS films during pulsed laser deposition. - Highlights: • CdS thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. • The optical, electrical and structural properties were evaluated. • Carrier concentration ranged from 10 19 to 10 13 cm −3 . • The chemical composition was studied by Rutherford back scattering. • The density of sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial was varied

  18. Surface modification of cadmium sulfide thin film honey comb nanostructures: Effect of in situ tin doping using chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.C., E-mail: wilsonphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. Polytechnic College Kothamangalam, Chelad P O, Ernakulam, Kerala 686681 (India); Department of Physics, B. S. Abdur Rahman University, Vandaloor, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600048 (India); Basheer Ahamed, M. [Department of Physics, B. S. Abdur Rahman University, Vandaloor, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600048 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel honey comb like cadmium sulfide thin film nanostructures prepared using chemical bath deposition on glass substrates. • Honey comb nanostructure found in two layers: an ultra thin film at bottom and well inter connected with walls of < 25 nm thick on top; hence maximum surface area possible for CdS nanostructure. • Shell size of the nanostructures and energy band gaps were controlled also an enhanced persistent conductivity observed on Sn doping. - Abstract: Even though nanostructures possess large surface to volume ratio compared to their thin film counterpart, the complicated procedure that demands for the deposition on a substrate kept them back foot in device fabrication techniques. In this work, a honey comb like cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films nanostructure are deposited on glass substrates using simple chemical bath deposition technique at 65 °C. Energy band gaps, film thickness and shell size of the honey comb nanostructures are successfully controlled using tin (Sn) doping and number of shells per unit area is found to be maximum for 5% Sn doped (in the reaction mixture) sample. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption analysis showed that cadmium sulfide and cadmium hydroxide coexist in the samples. TEM measurements showed that CdS nanostructures are embedded in cadmium hydroxide just like “plum pudding”. Persistent photoconductivity measurements of the samples are also carried out. The decay constants found to be increased with increases in Sn doping.

  19. A Study on Dielectric Properties of Cadmium Sulfide-Zinc Sulfide Core-Shell Nanocomposites for Application as Nanoelectronic Filter Component in the Microwave Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Jutika; Datta, Pranayee

    2018-03-01

    Complex permittivities of cadmium sulfide (CdS), zinc sulfide (ZnS), and of cadmium sulfide-zinc sulfide (CdS/ZnS) core-shell nanoparticles embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix (PVA) were measured in liquid phase using a VectorNetwork Analyzer in the frequency range of 500 MHz-10 GHz. These nanocomposites are modeled as an embedded capacitor, and their electric field distribution and polarization have been studied using COMSOL Multiphysics software. By varying the thickness of the shell and the number of inclusions, the capacitance values were estimated. It was observed that CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix show capacitive behavior. There is a strong influence of the dielectric properties in the capacitive behavior of the embedded nanocapacitor. The capping matrix, position and filling factors of nanoinclusions all affect the capacitive behavior of the tested nanocomposites. Application of the CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core-shell nanocomposite as the passive low-pass filter circuit has also been investigated. From the present study, it has been found that CdS/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles embedded in PVA matrix are potential structures for application as nanoelectronic filter components in different areas of communication.

  20. Kinetics and Isotherm of Sunset Yellow Dye Adsorption on Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticle Loaded on Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mosallanejad, A. Arami

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdSN-AC for the removal of sunset yellow (SY dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdSN-AC dose. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdSN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdSN-AC is followed by these results. 

  1. Luminescent behavior of cadmium sulfide quantum dots for gallic acid estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman; Garg, Sourav; Chahal, Jitender; Raheja, Khushboo; Singh, Deepak; Singla, M. L.

    2013-03-01

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium sulfide (CdS/T) quantum dots have been synthesized using wet chemistry and their optical behavior has been investigated using UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The role of the capping agent, sulfide source concentration, pH and temperature has been studied and discussed. Studies showed that alkaline pH leads to a decrease in the size of quantum dots and reflux temperature above 70 °C resulted in red-shift of emission spectra which is due to narrowing of the bandgap. Further, to reduce the toxicity and photochemical instability of quantum dots, the quantum dots have been functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), which resulted in a 20% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. The application potential of CdS/T-PEG quantum dots was further studied using gallic acid as a model compound. The sensing is based on fluorescence quenching of quantum dots in the presence of gallic acid, and this study showed linearity in the range from 1.3 × 10-8 to 46.5 × 10-8 mM, with a detection limit of 3.6 × 10-8 mM.

  2. Luminescent behavior of cadmium sulfide quantum dots for gallic acid estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Suman; Garg, Sourav; Chahal, Jitender; Raheja, Khushboo; Singla, M L; Singh, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium sulfide (CdS/T) quantum dots have been synthesized using wet chemistry and their optical behavior has been investigated using UV–visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The role of the capping agent, sulfide source concentration, pH and temperature has been studied and discussed. Studies showed that alkaline pH leads to a decrease in the size of quantum dots and reflux temperature above 70 °C resulted in red-shift of emission spectra which is due to narrowing of the bandgap. Further, to reduce the toxicity and photochemical instability of quantum dots, the quantum dots have been functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), which resulted in a 20% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. The application potential of CdS/T-PEG quantum dots was further studied using gallic acid as a model compound. The sensing is based on fluorescence quenching of quantum dots in the presence of gallic acid, and this study showed linearity in the range from 1.3 × 10 −8 to 46.5 × 10 −8 mM, with a detection limit of 3.6 × 10 −8 mM. (paper)

  3. Nitric oxide-activated hydrogen sulfide is essential for cadmium stress response in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are important gaseous molecules, serving as important secondary messengers in plant response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the interaction between NO and H2S in plant stress response was largely unclear. In this study, endogenous NO and H2S were evidently induced by cadmium stress treatment in bermudagrass, and exogenous applications of NO donor (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) or H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) conferred improved cadmium stress tolerance. Additionally, SNP and NaHS treatments alleviated cadmium stress-triggered plant growth inhibition, cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, partly via modulating enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Moreover, SNP and NaHS treatments also induced the productions of both NO and H2S in the presence of Cd. Interestingly, combined treatments with inhibitors and scavengers of NO and H2S under cadmium stress condition showed that NO signal could be blocked by both NO and H2S inhibitors and scavengers, while H2S signal was specifically blocked by H2S inhibitors and scavengers, indicating that NO-activated H2S was essential for cadmium stress response. Taken together, we assigned the protective roles of endogenous and exogenous NO and H2S in bermudagrass response to cadmium stress, and speculated that NO-activated H2S might be essential for cadmium stress response in bermudagrass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils: Effects of soil oxidation, metal sulfides and competitive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livera, Jennifer de, E-mail: Jennifer.deLivera@adelaide.edu.au [Soil Science, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); McLaughlin, Mike J. [Soil Science, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Hettiarachchi, Ganga M. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Department of Agronomy, Kansas state University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Kirby, Jason K. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Beak, Douglas G. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2011-03-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) for human nutrition. To find ways of limiting this potential risk, we investigated factors influencing Cd solubility relative to Fe and Zn during pre-harvest drainage of paddy soils, in which soil oxidation is accompanied by the grain-filling stage of rice growth. This was simulated in temperature-controlled 'reaction cell' experiments by first excluding oxygen to incubate soil suspensions anaerobically, then inducing aerobic conditions. In treatments without sulfur addition, the ratios of Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn in solution increased during the aerobic phase while Cd concentrations were unaffected and the Fe and Zn concentrations decreased. However, in treatments with added sulfur (as sulfate), up to 34 % of sulfur (S) was precipitated as sulfide minerals during the anaerobic phase and the Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution during the aerobic phase were lower than for treatments without S addition. When S was added, Cd solubility decreased whereas Fe and Zn were unaffected. When soil was spiked with Zn the Cd:Zn ratio was lower in solution during the aerobic phase, due to higher Zn concentrations. Decreased Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios during the grain filling stage could potentially limit Cd enrichment in paddy rice grain due to competitive ion effects for root uptake. - Research Highlights: {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase in paddy soil solution during oxidation. {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase because Fe and Zn concentrations decrease. {yields} Cd concentrations do not change during oxidation. {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution decrease when Zn is added to soil. {yields} Metal sulfide precipitation lowers Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in soil solution.

  5. In situ-synthesized cadmium sulfide nanowire photosensor with a parylene passivation layer for chemiluminescent immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hong-Rae; An, Byoung-Gi; Chang, Young Wook; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Tae-Geol; Son, Jin Gyeng; Park, Jae-Gwan; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2017-06-15

    The direct in situ synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires (NWs) was presented by direct synthesis of CdS NWs on the gold surface of an interdigitated electrode (IDE). In this work, we investigated the effect of a strong oxidant on the surfaces of the CdS NWs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. We also fabricated a parylene-C film as a surface passivation layer for in situ-synthesized CdS NW photosensors and investigated the influence of the parylene-C passivation layer on the photoresponse during the coating of parylene-C under vacuum using a quartz crystal microbalance and a photoanalyzer. Finally, we used the in situ-synthesized CdS NW photosensor with the parylene-C passivation layer to detect the chemiluminescence of horseradish peroxidase and luminol and applied it to medical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave Heating for Hybrid Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Martínez-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-n are excellent electron acceptor for hybrid solar cell applications. However, the particle size and properties of the CdS-n products depend largely on the synthesis methodologies. In this work, CdS-n were synthetized by microwave heating using thioacetamide (TA or thiourea (TU as sulfur sources. The obtained CdS-n(TA showed a random distribution of hexagonal particles and contained TA residues. The latter could originate the charge carrier recombination process and cause a low photovoltage (Voc, 0.3 V in the hybrid solar cells formed by the inorganic particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT. Under similar synthesis conditions, in contrast, CdS-n synthesized with TU consisted of spherical particles with similar size and contained carbonyl groups at their surface. CdS-n(TU could be well dispersed in the nonpolar P3HT solution, leading to a Voc of about 0.6–0.8 V in the resulting CdS-n(TU : P3HT solar cells. The results of this work suggest that the reactant sources in microwave methods can affect the physicochemical properties of the obtained inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, which finally influenced the photovoltaic performance of related hybrid solar cells.

  7. Luminescent and photocatalytic properties of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles synthesized via microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Huaming; Huang Chenghuan; Li Xianwei; Shi Rongrong; Zhang Ke

    2005-01-01

    Uniform cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles of about 6 nm in crystal size have been successfully synthesized via microwave irradiation. The as-prepared sample has a uniform morphology and high purity. The red photoluminescence spectrum of the CdS nanoparticles displays a strong peak at 602 nm by using a 300 nm excitation wavelength. The photocatalytic oxidation of methyl orange (MeO) in CdS suspensions under ultraviolet illumination was investigated. The results indicate that a low pH value (pH 2.0) and low reaction temperatures (20-30 deg. C) will facilitate the decolorization of the MeO solution. The photodegradation degree decreases with increasing the pH value and temperature of solution. The efficiency of the recycled CdS semiconductor becomes lower due to the deposit of elemental Cd on the CdS surface, which weakens the photocatalytic activity. The luminescent and photocatalytic mechanisms of the as-prepared CdS nanoparticles were primarily discussed. Microwave irradiation is proved to be a convenient, efficient and environmental-friendly one-step route to synthesize nanoparticles

  8. Phase transition in cadmium sulfide single crystals shocked along the c axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Z.P.; Gupta, Y.M.

    1997-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide crystals were shocked along the crystal c axis to peak stresses ranging between 18 and 75 kbar. Stress-time profiles were measured both at the impact surface and after transmission through 1 to 2-mm-thick samples. Detailed analysis of the present data in combination with published static results makes a persuasive case for the completion of the wurtzite to rocksalt phase change in less than 0.2 μs under shock loading. The main findings are: the transition stress is measured to be 32.5±1kbar; transformation to the final state is a two step process with the first step being too rapid (less than 10 ns) to be observed in our experiments and the second step occurring in 0.1 to 0.2 μs; the transition occurs directly from the elastic state prior to any plastic deformation. The calculated mean stress for the transition is 22.9 kbar in good agreement with the 23 kbar pressure reported in static high pressure studies; the presence of large shear stress has no effect on the transition pressure. Our results suggest that the onset of the phase transition results in plastic deformation and, subsequently, the phase transition and plasticity are coupled under shock loading. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Defect-mediated photoluminescence up-conversion in cadmium sulfide nanobelts (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yurii; Kuno, Masaru K.

    2017-02-01

    The concept of optical cooling of solids has existed for nearly 90 years ever since Pringsheim proposed a way to cool solids through the annihilation of phonons via phonon-assisted photoluminescence (PL) up-conversion. In this process, energy is removed from the solid by the emission of photons with energies larger than those of incident photons. However, actually realizing optical cooling requires exacting parameters from the condensed phase medium such as near unity external quantum efficiencies as well as existence of a low background absorption. Until recently, laser cooling has only been successfully realized in rare earth doped solids. In semiconductors, optical cooling has very recently been demonstrated in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelts as well as in hybrid lead halide perovskites. For the former, large internal quantum efficiencies, sub-wavelength thicknesses, which decrease light trapping, and low background absorption, all make near unity external quantum yields possible. Net cooling by as much as 40 K has therefore been possible with CdS nanobelts. In this study, we describe a detailed investigation of the nature of efficient anti-Stokes photoluminescence (ASPL) in CdS nanobelts. Temperature-dependent PL up-conversion and optical absorption studies on individual NBs together with frequency-dependent up-converted PL intensity spectroscopies suggest that ASPL in CdS nanobelts is defect-mediated through involvement of defect levels below the band gap.

  10. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. A facile approach to anchor cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on graphene nanosheets as promising electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jia; Li, Jing; Yang, Xuyu [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, Xianbao, E-mail: wangxb68@yahoo.com.cn [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wan, Li; Yang, Yingkui [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A controllable preparation of novel graphene-based inorganic semi-conducting composites has aroused great attention in the optoelectronic device and powerful electronic anode materials. In this article, we demonstrate a simple two-step strategy for the synthesis of cadmium sulfide/reduced graphene oxide (CdS/RGO) nanocomposites, of which the preparing process includes modification of the exfoliated graphene oxide acylated with thionyl chloride, immobilization of the CdS nanoparticles on the graphene oxide (GO) surface by an amide reaction between the amino groups located on the CdS particles and the acyl chloride bound to the GO surface, and reduction by hydrazine and ammonia. Our results showed that the CdS nanoparticles with an average size of 20 nm were homogeneously dispersed on the surface of RGO sheets. The CdS/RGO nanocomposites can form a homogeneous and stable solution in dimethylformamide, and CV analysis indicated a remarkable increase for the CdS/RGO modified electrode in the electrochemical current relative to that at a glass carbon electrode. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdS/RGO nanocomposites were synthesized by a covalent bonding and electrostatic interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdS/RGO exhibits a homogeneous dispersion in dimethylformamide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdS/RGO was used as an anode electrode with good electrochemical activity.

  12. Temperature, Crystalline Phase and Influence of Substrate Properties in Intense Pulsed Light Sintering of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticle Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Michael; Gao, Zhongwei; Bansal, Shalu; Chang, Chih-Hung; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2018-02-02

    Intense Pulsed Light sintering (IPL) uses pulsed, visible light to sinter nanoparticles (NPs) into films used in functional devices. While IPL of chalcogenide NPs is demonstrated, there is limited work on prediction of crystalline phase of the film and the impact of optical properties of the substrate. Here we characterize and model the evolution of film temperature and crystalline phase during IPL of chalcogenide copper sulfide NP films on glass. Recrystallization of the film to crystalline covellite and digenite phases occurs at 126 °C and 155 °C respectively within 2-7 seconds. Post-IPL films exhibit p-type behavior, lower resistivity (~10 -3 -10 -4  Ω-cm), similar visible transmission and lower near-infrared transmission as compared to the as-deposited film. A thermal model is experimentally validated, and extended by combining it with a thermodynamic approach for crystal phase prediction and via incorporating the influence of film transmittivity and optical properties of the substrate on heating during IPL. The model is used to show the need to a-priori control IPL parameters to concurrently account for both the thermal and optical properties of the film and substrate in order to obtain a desired crystalline phase during IPL of such thin films on paper and polycarbonate substrates.

  13. Effects of different annealing atmospheres on the properties of cadmium sulfide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yücel, E., E-mail: dr.ersinyucel@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mustafa Kemal University, 31034 Hatay (Turkey); Kahraman, S. [Department of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Mustafa Kemal University, 31034 Hatay (Turkey); Güder, H.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mustafa Kemal University, 31034 Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effects of different annealing atmospheres (air and sulfur) on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS thin films were studied at three different pH values. - Highlights: • Compactness and smoothness of the films were enhanced after sulfur annealing. • Micro-strain values of some films were improved after sulfur annealing. • Dislocation density values of some films were improved after sulfur annealing. • Band gap values of the films were improved after sulfur annealing. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effects of different annealing atmospheres (air and sulfur) on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS thin films were studied at three different pH values. Compactness and smoothness of the films (especially for pH 10.5 and 11) enhanced after sulfur annealing. pH value of the precursor solution remarkably affected the roughness, uniformity and particle sizes of the films. Based on the analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the films, micro-strain and dislocation density values of the sulfur-annealed films (pH 10.5 and 11) were found to be lower than those of air-annealed films. Air-annealed films (pH 10.5, 11 and 11.5) exhibited higher transmittance than sulfur-annealed films in the wavelength region of 550–800 nm. Optical band gap values of the films were found between 2.31 eV and 2.36 eV.

  14. Aqueous synthesis and characterization of bovine hemoglobin-conjugated cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangrui [Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ganqing; Zhang, Qiuxia; Wu, Jiulin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by biomimetic method in bovine hemoglobin (BHb) solution. • The study of the interaction between Cd{sup 2+}/CdS and BHb. • The optical properties of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals. • The synthesis process of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. • The change of secondary structure of BHb after binding to CdS nanocrystals. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals with average diameter about 5.5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) via simple biomimetic method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations were used to determine the structure and morphology of CdS nanocrystals. It was revealed that amount of BHb, chelating of Cd{sup 2+} to BHb and reaction temperature were key factors in controlling shape and dispersion of CdS nanocrystals. The binding sites of BHb to CdS nanocrystals and the change of secondary structure of protein have been identified by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that conjugating of BHb with Cd{sup 2+} and CdS could protect nanocrystals from agglomerating. Moreover, the thermostability of BHb enhanced after conjugating with CdS nanocrystals. The interaction mechanism of BHb with Cd{sup 2+}/CdS was also proposed. The quantum-confined effect of CdS nanocrystals was confirmed by ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum. The nanocrystals exhibited a well-defined photoluminescence (PL) emission feature at about 510 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM)

  15. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized by castor oil and ricinoleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyobe, Joseph William; Mubofu, Egid Beatus; Makame, Yahya M. M.; Mlowe, Sixberth; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-02-01

    Castor oil and ricinoleic acid (an isolate of castor oil) are environmentally friendly bio-based organic surfactants that have been used as capping agents to prepare nearly spherical cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) at 230, 250 and 280 °C. The prepared quantum dots were characterized by Ultra violet-visible (UV-vis), Photoluminescence (PL), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) giving an overall CdS QDs average size of 5.14±0.39 nm. The broad XRD pattern and crystal lattice fringes in the HRTEM images showed a hexagonal phase composition of the CdS QDs. The calculated/estimated average size of the prepared castor oil capped CdS QDs for various techniques were 4.64 nm (TEM), 4.65 nm (EMA), 5.35 nm (UV-vis) and 6.46 nm (XRD). For ricinoleic acid capped CdS QDs, the average sizes were 5.56 nm (TEM), 4.78 nm (EMA), 5.52 nm (UV-vis) and 8.21 nm (XRD). Optical properties of CdS QDs showed a change of band gap energy from its bulk band gap of 2.42-2.82 eV due to quantum size confinement effect for temperature range of 230-280 °C. Similarly, a blue shift was observed in the photoluminescence spectra. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations show that the as-synthesized CdS QDs structures are spherical in shape. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) studies confirms the formation of castor oil and ricinoleic acid capped CdS QDs.

  16. Biofabrication of morphology improved cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells and ionic liquid: For toxicity against brain cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Siyuan; Ding, Yiming; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Nijia; Yu, Shuqing

    2018-01-01

    The present work determines the anticancer activity of bio-mediated synthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using the ionic liquid and bacterial cells (Shewanella oneidensis). Bacterial cells have been exposed to be important resources that hold huge potential as ecofriendly, cost-effective, evading toxic of dangerous chemicals and the alternative of conventional physiochemical synthesis. The Shewanella oneidensis is an important kind of metal reducing bacterium, known as its special anaerobic respiratory and sulfate reducing capacity. The crystalline nature, phase purity and surface morphology of biosynthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy. The use of imidazolium based ionic liquids as soft templating agent for controlling self-assembly and crystal growth direction of metal sulfide nanoparticles has also advanced as an important method. The microscopic techniques showed that the nanoparticles are designed on the nano form and have an excellent spherical morphology, due to the self-assembled mechanism of ionic liquid assistance. The antitumor efficiency of the cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was investigated against brain cancer cell lines using rat glioma cell lines. The effectively improved nano-crystalline and morphological structure of CdS nanoparticles in the presence of IL exhibit excellent cytotoxicity and dispersion ability on the cell shape is completely spread out showing a nice toxic environment against cancer cells. The cytotoxicity effect of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was discussed with a diagrammatic representation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. High temperature oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Cr-Al2O3 and Nb-Al2O3 composites densified by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucedo-Acuna, R.A.; Monreal-Romero, H.; Martinez-Villafane, A.; Chacon-Nava, J.G.; Arce-Colunga, U.; Gaona-Tiburcio, C.; De la Torre, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Cr-Al 2 O 3 and Nb-Al 2 O 3 composites prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been studied. These composite powders have a particular metal-ceramic interpenetrating network and excellent mechanical properties. Oxidation-sulfidation tests were carried out at 900 deg. C, in a 2.5%SO 2 + 3.6%O 2 + N 2 (balance) atmosphere for 48 h. The results revealed the influence of the sintering conditions on the specimens corrosion resistance, i.e. the Cr-Al 2 O 3 and Nb-Al 2 O 3 composite sintered at 1310 deg. C/4 min showed better corrosion resistance (lower weight gains) compared with those found for the 1440 deg. C/5 min conditions. For the former composite, a protective Cr 2 O 3 layer immediately forms upon heating, whereas for the later pest disintegration was noted. Thus, under the same sintering conditions the Nb-Al 2 O 3 composites showed the highest weight gains. The oxidation products were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy

  18. Design and characterization of sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron for cadmium(II) removal from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dan; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Zhou, Jiasheng; Liu, Yuanli; Li, Yizhou; Yang, Kunlun; Lou, Zimo; Baig, Shams Ali; Wu, Donglei; Xu, Xinhua

    2018-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has high removal efficiency and strong reductive ability to organic and inorganic contaminants, but concerns over its stability and dispersity limit its application. In this study, nZVI was modified with sulfide to enhance Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions. TEM and SEM analyses showed that sulfide-modified nZVI (S-nZVI) had a core-shell structure of nano-sized spherical particles, and BET results proved that sulfide modification doubled the specific surface area from 26.04 to 50.34 m2 g-1 and inhibited the aggregation of nZVI. Mechanism analysis indicated that Cd(II) was immobilized through complexation and precipitation. Cd(II) removal rate on nZVI was only 32% in 2 h, while complete immobilization could be achieved in 15 min on S-nZVI, and S-nZVI with an optimal S/Fe molar ratio of 0.3 offered a cadmium removal capacity of about 150 mg g-1 at pH 7 and 303 K. The process of Cd(II) immobilization on S-nZVI was fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the increase of temperature favored Cd(II) immobilization, suggesting an endothermic process. The presence of Mg2+ and Ca2+ hindered Cd(II) removal while Cu2+ did the opposite, which led to the order as Cu2+ > control > Mg2+ > Ca2+. The removal rate of 20 mg L-1 Cd(II) maintained a high level with the fluctuation of environmental conditions such as pH, ion strength and presence of HA. This study demonstrated that S-nZVI could be a promising adsorbent for Cd(II) immobilization from cadmium-contaminated water.

  19. CADMIUM SOLUBILITY IN PADDY SOILS: EFFECTS OF SOIL OXIDATION, METAL SULFIDES AND COMPETITIVE IONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) an...

  20. Photoelectrochemical performance of cadmium sulfide quantum dots modified titania nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    The cadmium sulfide quantum dots modified titania nanotube arrays (CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs) were prepared through a sequential sonication-assisted chemical bath deposition (CBD) process. The morphology and microstructure of CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical performance of CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs was investigated under solar light illumination. The affecting parameters were studied including the nanotube length of TiO{sub 2} NTAs, CBD cycles of CdS QDs and the annealing treatment of CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs. CdS QDs synthesized through 8 CBD cycles could uniformly cover on the tube walls of TiO{sub 2} NTAs to form unique CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs with an open pore mouth. The appropriate annealing treatment at 400 °C for 60 min in N{sub 2} atmosphere could improve the crystallinity of CdS QDs, and accordingly enhance the photovoltaic properties of CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs. Significantly, the nanotube length was the predominant factor affecting photoelectrochemical performance of CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs. The unannealed CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs with an optimal nanotube length of 12 μm achieved a short-circuit photocurrent density of 4.37 mA cm{sup −2}, an open circuit photovoltage of 1.10 V and a top photoconversion efficiency of 3.56%. Comparatively, the annealed CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs with an optimal nanotube length of 4 μm achieved a short-circuit photocurrent density of 6.31 mA cm{sup −2}, an open circuit photovoltage of 1.23 V and a top photoconversion efficiency of 4.18%. The suitable modification of crystalline CdS QDs could well improve the photoelectrochemical performance of TiO{sub 2} NTAs photoanode. - Highlights: • CdS QDs are uniformly loaded into short and long TiO{sub 2} NTAs to form CdS QDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs.

  1. Fluorescence kinetics and positron annihilation kinetics investigations in cadmium sulfide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillot, E; Bancie-Grillot, M; Egee, M [Reims Univ., 51 (France)

    1976-03-01

    Fluorescence kinetics and positrons annihilation kinetics investigations on CdS crystals, either very pure or with increasing contents of Ag-ions, led to similar and complementary results. Ag-ions mainly fill the cadmium vacancies of the lattice, building red emission luminogene centres, while green 'edge-emission' ones are destroyed. These latter, which involve an excited level active for high energy series fluorescence, seems actually related to cadmium vacancies.

  2. Lossless synthesis of graphene nanosheets decorated with tiny cadmium sulfide quantum dots with excellent nonlinear optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Miao; Zhan Hongbing; Sun Ruiqing; Chen Yu

    2010-01-01

    The implantation and growth of metal nanoparticles on graphene nanosheets (GNS) leads directly to severe damage to the regular structure of the graphene sheets, which disrupts the extended π conjugation, resulting in an impaired device performance. In this paper, we describe a facile approach for achieving the lossless formation of graphene composite decorated with tiny cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) with excellent nonlinear optical properties by using benzyl mercaptan (BM) as the interlinker. The mercapto substituent of BM binds to the CdS QDs during their nucleation and growth process, and then the phenyl comes into contact with the GNS via the π-π stacking interaction. Using this strategy, CdS QDs with an average diameter of 3 nm are uniformly dispersed over the surface of graphene, and the resulting QD-graphene composite exhibits excellent optical limiting properties, mainly contributed by nonlinear scattering and nonlinear absorption, upon both 532 and 1064 nm excitations, in the nanosecond laser pulse regime.

  3. A fluorescent sensor based on thioglycolic acid capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots for the determination of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchat, Sirinan; Boonta, Wissuta; Todee, Apinya; Sianglam, Pradthana; Ngeontae, Wittaya

    2018-05-01

    A fluorescent sensor based on thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots (TGA-CdS QDs) has been designed for the sensitive and selective detection of dopamine (DA). In the presence of dopamine (DA), the addition of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) activates the reaction between the carboxylic group of the TGA and the amino group of dopamine to form an amide bond, quenching the fluorescence of the QDs. The fluorescence intensity of TGA-CdS QDs can be used to sense the presence of dopamine with a limit of detection of 0.68 μM and a working linear range of 1.0-17.5 μM. This sensor system shows great potential application for dopamine detection in dopamine drug samples and for future easy-to-make analytical devices.

  4. Doped cadmium sulfide particles in polymer matrix: X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and photoconductivity study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franc, Jiří; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Makarova, Marina; Krtil, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2008), s. 520-527 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA2/018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : cadmium sulphide * doping * polymer binder * photoconductivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.577, year: 2008

  5. Electrical, optical and photoelectric properties of cadmium sulfide monocrystals doped by indium and irradiated by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Davidyuk, G E; Manzhara, V S

    2002-01-01

    One studied effect of irradiation by E = 1.2 MeV energy and PHI = 2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 dose fast electrons on electrical, optical and photoelectrical CdS single-crystals doped by In. On the basis of analysis of the experimental results one makes conclusions about decomposition and, in this case, indium atoms occurring in cation sublattice nodes are knocked out by cadmium atoms. In CdS:In irradiated specimens one detected new centres of slow recombination with occurrence of maximums of photoconductivity optical suppression within lambda sub M sub sub 1 = 0.75 mu m and lambda sub M sub sub 2 = 1.03 mu m range. It is assumed that complexes containing cadmium vacancies and indium atoms are responsible for recombination new centres

  6. Investigation of physicochemical and pigment properties of solid solutions of cadmium, manganese, zinc sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, L.I.; Ignat'eva, I.V.; Kalinskaya, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    Mixed sulfides (Cd, Mn)S and (Cd, Mn, Zn)S with manganese sulfide content upto 50 mol% are synthesized. The possibility of preparing solid solutions both on the basis of silfides (Cd, Mn)S and in the ternary system (Cd, Mn, Zn)S with the temperature of polymorphic transformation of a cubic structure into a hexagonal one, being lower (500 deg C) than in the absence of MnS, is shown by the X-ray diffraction method. The colour analysis of the pigment specimens obtained has shown that the quantity of oxidized manganese compounds, producing no effect of the system colour, should not exceed 0.05 mol% on conversion to MnS. Among the mixed specimens (Cd, Mn)S the brightest colour background is obtained for specimens calcinated at 500-550 deg C. The mixed sulfide of the composition 0.77CdSx0.15MnSx0.08ZnS, calcinated at 500 deg C, gives a pigment corresponding to a commercial one by colour

  7. Some specific features of interaction between light and dislocations in cadmium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, N.V.; Krasil'nikova, L.L.; Tabeev, Eh.F.

    1977-01-01

    The local spectroscopy of a plastically strained cadmium sulphide is used to study light focusing phenomenon caused by slip bands and light-guide effect of the bands. Such phenomena are strongly dependent on the wavelength and light polarization. The behaviour of the light in the vicinity of slip bands on polarization normal to the bands is adequately explained by photoelastic interaction of the light with dislocations entering into the bands. Explanation of the anomalous behaviour of the light being polarized parallel to the slip bands requires the use of a model taking into consideration the role of localized dislocation states excited by the light of this polarization

  8. A highly stable electrochemiluminescence sensing system of cadmium sulfide nanowires/graphene hybrid for supersensitive detection of pentachlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanan; Chang, Quanying; Yin, Kai; Liu, Chengbin; Wang, Ying

    2017-10-01

    A highly stable and effective electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensing system of cadmium sulfide nanowires/reduced graphene oxide (CdS NWS/rGO) hybrid is presented for supersensitive detection of pentachlorophenol (PCP). CdS nanowire is for the first time exploited in ECL sensing. The rGO served as both ECL signal amplifier and immobilization platform, can perfectly enhance the ECL intensity and stability of the sensing system. With S2O82- as coreactant, the ECL signal can be significantly quenched by the addition of PCP. The established ECL sensing system presents a wider linear range from 1.0 × 10-14 to 1.0 × 10-8 M and a much low detection limit of 2 × 10-15 M under the optimum test conditions (e.g., pH 7.0 and 100 mM S2O82-). Furthermore, the ECL sensing system displays a good selectivity for PCP detection. The practicability of the ECL sensing system in real water sample shows that this system could be promisingly applied in the analytical detection of PCP in real water environments.

  9. Enhanced phosphorescence and electroluminescence in triplet emitters by doping gold into cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.-W.; Laskar, Inamur R.; Huang, C.-P.; Cheng, J.-A.; Cheng, S.-S.; Luo, L.-Y.; Wang, H.-R.; Chen, T.-M.

    2005-01-01

    Gold-cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (Au-CdSe/ZnS) nanocomposites (NCs) were synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy. The PL intensity in the Au-CdSe/ZnS NCs system was found to be much greater than that of CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) alone, because of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering of Au NPs. Adding Au-CdSe/ZnS NCs to the cyclometalated iridium(III) complex (Ir-complex) greatly enhanced the PL intensity of a triplet emitter. Three double-layered electroluminescence (EL) devices were fabricated where the emitting zone contains the definite mixture of Ir-complex and the NCs [molar concentration of Ir-complex/NCs = 1:0 (Blank, D-1), 1:1 (D-2) and 1:3 (D-3)] and the device D-2 exhibited optimal EL performances

  10. Size-controlled one-pot synthesis of fluorescent cadmium sulfide semiconductor nanoparticles in an apoferritin cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwahori, K; Yamashita, I

    2008-01-01

    A simple size-controlled synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticle (NP) cores in the cavity of apoferritin from horse spleen (HsAFr) was performed by a slow chemical reaction synthesis and a two-step synthesis protocol. We found that the CdS NP core synthesis was slow and that premature CdS NP cores were formed in the apoferritin cavity when the concentration of ammonia water was low. It was proven that the control of the ammonia water concentration can govern the CdS NP core synthesis and successfully produce size-controlled CdS NP cores with diameters from 4.7 to 7.1 nm with narrow size dispersion. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) observation characterized the CdS NP cores obtained as cubic polycrystalline NPs, which showed photoluminescence with red shifts depending on their diameters. From the research of CdS NP core synthesis in the recombinant apoferritins, the zeta potential of apoferritin is important for the biomineralization of CdS NP cores in the apoferritin cavity. These synthesized CdS NPs with different photoluminescence properties will be applicable in a wide variety of nano-applications.

  11. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, April 1, 1980-August 25, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.

    1982-08-01

    The properties of polycrystalline, thin-film CuInSe/sub 2//CdS and CuInSe/sub 2//Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S solar cells prepared by vacuum-evaporation techniques onto metallized-alumina substrates are described. An efficiency of 10.6% for a 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell and 8.3% for an 8 cm/sup 2/ cell when tested under simulated AM1 illumination is reported. The mixed-sulfide cells are described as exhibiting increased open-circuit voltages, slightly higher short-circuit currents, and improved efficiencies. Mixed-sulfide film preparation by evaporation of CdS and ZnS powders from a single source and from two sources is discussed with preference given to the later technique. Selenide-film preparation in a planetary or rotating substrate vacuum-deposition apparatus is described. A 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell without AR-coating produced by the planetary approach is reported to demonstrate a 7.5% efficiency. The results of cell heat-treatment studies showing a strong environmental dependence are presented and indicate the desirability of an oxygen-containing atmosphere. An automatic, computer-controlled, cell-measurement system for I-V, C-V, and spectral-response analysis is described. The results of the cell-analysis and cell-modeling studies on both the plain CdS and mixed Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S thin-film devices are presented. Finally, data obtained from constant illumination and elevated temperature life-tests on the thin-film cells showing little degradation after 9300 hours is reported.

  12. Optoelectronic properties of cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by thermal evaporation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Iqbal, M.A.; Hussain, S.T.; Waris, M.; Munair, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    The substrate temperature in depositions of thin films plays a vital role in the characteristics of deposited films. We studied few characteristics of cadmium sulphide thin film deposited at different temperature (150 deg. C- 300 deg. C) on corning 7059 glass substrate. We measured transmittance, absorbance, band gap and reflectance via UV spectroscopy. It was found that the transmittance for 300 nm to 1100 nm was greater than 80%. The resistivity and mobility was calculated by Vander Pauw method which were 10-80 cm and 2-60 cm/sup 2/V/sup -1/S/sup -1/ respectively. The thermoelectric properties of the film were measured by hot and cold probe method which shows the N-type nature of the film. (author)

  13. Optical properties of cadmium sulfide nanocrystal film prepared by electrochemical synthesis at liquid-liquid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Yemei; An Maozhong; Lu Guoqi

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic nanocrystalline CdS film was deposited at liquid-liquid interface of surfactants and an electrolyte containing 4 mmol L -1 cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) and 16 mmol L -1 thioacetamide (CH 3 CSNH 2 ) with an initial pH value of 5 at 15 deg. C by electrochemical synthesis. The nanofilm was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The surface morphology and particle size of the nanofilm were investigated by AFM, SEM and TEM, and the crystalline size was 30-50 nm. The thickness of the nanofilm calculated by optical absorption spectrum was 80 nm. The microstructure and composition of the nanofilm was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), showing its polycrystalline structure consisting of CdS and Cd. Optical properties of the nanofilm were investigated systematically by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A λ onset blue shift compared with bulk CdS was observed in the absorption spectra. Fluorescence spectra of the nanofilm indicated that the CdS nanofilm emitted blue and green light. The nanocomposites film electrode will bring about anodic photocurrent during illumination, showing that the transfer of cavities produces photocurrent

  14. Study on concentration nonlinearity of interacting acoustic flows in cadmium sulfide and tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilisavskij, Yu.V.; Kulakova, L.A.; Yakhkind, Eh.Z.

    1976-01-01

    The ratio of an one-mode (self-action of an external monochromatic sound wave) and a many-mode (interaction of an external wave with crystal thermal phonons) concentration nonlinearity has been experimentally investigated on sound amplification in cadmium sulphide and tellurium. It has been shown that in a strong piezoelectric the main part in the nonlinear limitation of the sound amplification in a drift field is played by the wave interaction, i.e., the transfer of the sound wave energy into the crystal sound modes starts before the nonlinear self-action of a wave. In Te characterized by a large value of the electromechanical coupling constant value at the sound frequency of about 250 MHz the threshold of many-mode nonlinearity is achieved in fields much below the critical one, and corresponds to the sound intensity as low as 10 -7 W/cm 2 , as compared with 10 -2 W/cm 2 -the threshold of the one-mode nonlinearity

  15. Evolution of oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) during high-temperature CdTe solar cell fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meysing, Daniel M.; Reese, Matthew O.; Warren, Charles W.; Abbas, Ali; Burst, James M.; Mahabaduge, Hasitha P.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Walls, John M.; Lonergan, Mark C.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Wolden, Colin A.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) produced by reactive sputtering has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional CdS for use as the n-type window layer in CdTe solar cells. Here, complementary techniques are used to expose the window layer (CdS or CdS:O) in completed superstrate devices and combined with a suite of materials characterization to elucidate its evolution during high temperature device processing. During device fabrication amorphous CdS:O undergoes significant interdiffusion with CdTe and recrystallization, forming CdS1-yTey nanocrystals whose Te fraction approaches solubility limits. Significant oxygen remains after processing, concentrated in sulfate clusters dispersed among the CdS1-yTey alloy phase, accounting for ~30% of the post-processed window layer based on cross-sectional microscopy. Interdiffusion and recrystallization are observed in devices with un-oxygenated CdS, but to a much lesser extent. Etching experiments suggest that the CdS thickness is minimally changed during processing, but the CdS:O window layer is reduced from 100 nm to 60-80 nm, which is confirmed by microscopy. Alloying reduces the band gap of the CdS:O window layer to 2.15 eV, but reductions in thickness and areal density improve its transmission spectrum, which is well matched to device quantum efficiency. The changes to the window layer in the reactive environments of device fabrication are profoundly different than what occurs by thermal annealing in an inert environment, which produced films with a band gap of 2.4 eV for both CdS and CdS:O. These results illustrate for the first time the significant changes that occur to the window layer during processing that are critical to the performance of CdTe solar cells.

  16. Biosynthesis and characterization of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles – An emphasis of zeta potential behavior due to capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankhla, Aryan; Sharma, Rajeshwar; Yadav, Raghvendra Singh; Kashyap, Diwakar; Kothari, S.L.; Kachhwaha, S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological approaches have been amongst the most promising protocols for synthesis of nanomaterials. In this study, Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) were synthesized by incubating their precursor salts with Escherichia coli and zeta potential (ζ-potential) measurement with varying pH was carried out to evaluate stability of the colloidal dispersion. Formation of CdS NPs was studied in synchrony with microbial growth. TEM analysis confirmed the uniform distribution of NPs. Average size (5 ± 0.4 nm) and electron diffraction pattern revealed polycrystalline cubic crystal phase of these nanoparticles. X-ray diffractogram ascertained the formation of CdS nanoparticles with phase formation and particle size distribution in accordance with the particle size obtained from TEM. Absorption edge of biosynthesized CdS NPs showed a blue shift at ∼400 nm in comparison to their bulk counterpart. A hump at 279 nm indicated presence of biomolecules in the solution in addition to the particles. FT-IR spectrum of capped CdS NPs showed peaks of protein. This confirms adsorption of protein molecules on nanoparticle surface. They act as a capping agent hence responsible for the stability of NPs. The enhanced stability of the particles was confirmed by Zeta potential analysis. The presence of charge on the surface of capped CdS NPs gave a detail understanding of dispersion mechanism and colloidal stability at the NP interface. This stability study of biosynthesized semiconductor nanoparticles utilizing microbial cells had not been done in the past by any research group providing an impetus for the same. Surface area of capped CdS NPs and bare CdS NPs were found to be 298 ± 2.65 m 2 /g and 117 ± 2.41 m 2 /g respectively. A possible mechanism is also proposed for the biosynthesis of CdS NPs. - Highlights: • Synthesis of CdS NPs utilizing reproducible molecular machinery viz. Escherichia coli biomass. • Uniform and Polydispersed NPs with high surface area and

  17. Synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles capped with dextrin for in vivo and in vitro imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Martínez-Mena, Alberto; Gutiérrez-Sancha, Ivonne; Rodríguez-Fragoso, Patricia; de la Cruz, Gerardo Gonzalez; Mondragón, R; Rodríguez-Fragoso, Lourdes

    2015-11-17

    The safe use in biomedicine of semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), requires a detailed understanding of the biocompatibility and toxicity of QDs in human beings. The biological characteristics and physicochemical properties of QDs entail new challenges regarding the management of potential adverse health effects following exposure. At certain concentrations, the synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles of CdS using dextrin as capping agent, at certain concentration, to reduce their toxicity and improves their biocompatibility. This study successfully synthesized and characterized biocompatible dextrin-coated cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-Dx/QDs). The results show that CdS-Dx/QDs are cytotoxic at high concentrations (>2 μg/mL) in HepG2 and HEK293 cells. At low concentrations (nanoparticles only induced cell death by apoptosis in HEK293 cells at 1 μg/mL concentrations. The in vitro results showed that the cells efficiently took up the CdS-Dx/QDs and this resulted in strong fluorescence. The subcellular localization of CdS-Dx/QDs were usually small and apparently unique in the cytoplasm in HeLa cells but, in the case of HEK293 cells it were more abundant and found in cytoplasm and the nucleus. Animals treated with 100 μg/kg of CdS-Dx/QDs and sacrificed at 3, 7 and 18 h showed a differential distribution in their organs. Intense fluorescence was detected in lung and kidney, with moderate fluorescence detected in liver, spleen and brain. The biocompatibility and toxicity of CdS-Dx/QDs in animals treated daily with 100 μg/kg for 1 week showed the highest level of fluorescence in kidney, liver and brain. Less fluorescence was detected in lung and spleen. There was also evident presence of fluorescence in testis. The histopathological and biochemical analyses showed that CdS-Dx/QDs were non-toxic for rodents. The in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed the effective cellular uptake and even distribution pattern of CdS-Dx/QDs in tissues

  18. Biosynthesis and characterization of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles – An emphasis of zeta potential behavior due to capping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankhla, Aryan, E-mail: aaryansankhla@gmail.com [Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 302015 (India); Sharma, Rajeshwar; Yadav, Raghvendra Singh [Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 302015 (India); Kashyap, Diwakar [Department of Biological Chemistry, Ariel University, Ariel, 40700 (Israel); Kothari, S.L. [Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Jaipur, 303002 (India); Kachhwaha, S. [Department of Botany, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 302004 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Biological approaches have been amongst the most promising protocols for synthesis of nanomaterials. In this study, Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) were synthesized by incubating their precursor salts with Escherichia coli and zeta potential (ζ-potential) measurement with varying pH was carried out to evaluate stability of the colloidal dispersion. Formation of CdS NPs was studied in synchrony with microbial growth. TEM analysis confirmed the uniform distribution of NPs. Average size (5 ± 0.4 nm) and electron diffraction pattern revealed polycrystalline cubic crystal phase of these nanoparticles. X-ray diffractogram ascertained the formation of CdS nanoparticles with phase formation and particle size distribution in accordance with the particle size obtained from TEM. Absorption edge of biosynthesized CdS NPs showed a blue shift at ∼400 nm in comparison to their bulk counterpart. A hump at 279 nm indicated presence of biomolecules in the solution in addition to the particles. FT-IR spectrum of capped CdS NPs showed peaks of protein. This confirms adsorption of protein molecules on nanoparticle surface. They act as a capping agent hence responsible for the stability of NPs. The enhanced stability of the particles was confirmed by Zeta potential analysis. The presence of charge on the surface of capped CdS NPs gave a detail understanding of dispersion mechanism and colloidal stability at the NP interface. This stability study of biosynthesized semiconductor nanoparticles utilizing microbial cells had not been done in the past by any research group providing an impetus for the same. Surface area of capped CdS NPs and bare CdS NPs were found to be 298 ± 2.65 m{sup 2}/g and 117 ± 2.41 m{sup 2}/g respectively. A possible mechanism is also proposed for the biosynthesis of CdS NPs. - Highlights: • Synthesis of CdS NPs utilizing reproducible molecular machinery viz. Escherichia coli biomass. • Uniform and Polydispersed NPs with high surface area

  19. Enhanced Performance of Nanoporous Titanium Dioxide Solar Cells Using Cadmium Sulfide and Poly(3-hexylthiophene Co-Sensitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugathas Thanihaichelvan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effect of co-sensitization of nanoporous titanium dioxide using Cadmium Sulfide (CdS and poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT on the performance of hybrid solar cells. CdS nanolayer with different thicknesses was grown on Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles by chemical bath deposition technique with varying deposition times. Both atomic force microscopy (AFM and UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy measurements of TiO2 electrode sensitized with and without CdS layer confirm that the existence of CdS layer on TiO2 nanoparticles. AFM images of CdS-coated TiO2 nanoparticles show that the surface roughness of the TiO2 nanoparticle samples decreases with increasing CdS deposition times. Current density–voltage and external quantum efficiency (EQE measurements were carried out for corresponding solar cells. Both short circuit current density (JSC and fill factor were optimized at the CdS deposition time of 12 min. On the other hand, a steady and continuous increment in the open circuit voltage (VOC was observed with increasing CdS deposition time and increased up to 0.81 V when the deposition time was 24 min. This may be attributed to the increased gradual separation of P3HT and TiO2 phases and their isolation at the interfaces. The higher VOC of 0.81 V was due to the higher built-in voltage at the CdS–P3HT interface when compared to that at the TiO2–P3HT interface. Optimized nanoporous TiO2 solar cells with CdS and P3HT co-sensitizers showed external quantum efficiency (EQE of over 40% and 80% at the wavelengths corresponding to strong absorption of the polymer and CdS, respectively. The cells showed an overall average efficiency of over 2.4% under the illumination of 70 mW/cm2 at AM 1.5 condition.

  20. High temperature oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites densified by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucedo-Acuna, R.A. [Instituto e Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Cd. Juarez, Av. Del Charro 450 Norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32310, Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Monreal-Romero, H.; Martinez-Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Chacon-Nava, J.G. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico)], E-mail: jose.chacon@cimav.edu.mx; Arce-Colunga, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Matamoros 8 y 9 Col. Centro C.P. 87110, Cd. Victoria, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Gaona-Tiburcio, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); De la Torre, S.D. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica (CIITEC)-IPN, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    The high temperature oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been studied. These composite powders have a particular metal-ceramic interpenetrating network and excellent mechanical properties. Oxidation-sulfidation tests were carried out at 900 deg. C, in a 2.5%SO{sub 2} + 3.6%O{sub 2} + N{sub 2}(balance) atmosphere for 48 h. The results revealed the influence of the sintering conditions on the specimens corrosion resistance, i.e. the Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite sintered at 1310 deg. C/4 min showed better corrosion resistance (lower weight gains) compared with those found for the 1440 deg. C/5 min conditions. For the former composite, a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer immediately forms upon heating, whereas for the later pest disintegration was noted. Thus, under the same sintering conditions the Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites showed the highest weight gains. The oxidation products were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Studying the state of the surface and internal mass of powder-like zinc and cadmium sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundel', A.A.; Khozhainov, Yu.M.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation on the chemical and the phase composition of the surface and the bulk of powder zinc and cadmium sulphides as a function of the conditions of ignition and physico-chemical processing carried out using electron diffraction, X-ray phase and chemical analyses. The electron diffraction analysis has shown that ignition gives rise to zinc oxide on the surface of zinc sulphide particles and in the case of cadmium sulphide, to metallic cadmium. To obtain a pure zinc sulphide, free from its oxide both on the surface and in bulk, use should be made of a deoxidized preparation and all contact with oxidizing medium in subsequent ignition should be eliminated

  2. Determination of rare earth elements, hafnium and cadmium in sintered pellets of mixed thorium and uranium oxides by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, S.N.M.

    1987-01-01

    This work shows the development of a method for determination of the rare-earth elements (Eu, Sm, Dy and Gd), Hf and Cd contents in sinterized U and Th mixed oxides by neutron activation analysis. The sample is dissolved in nitric/fluoridric (0,1% HF) medium, to dryness and redissolved in 6N HCl solution. The Hf is extracted into organic phase (0,5 M TTA/benzene), irradiated and analysed through 181 Hf isotope energy peak. The aqueous phase is treated with NH 4 OH for the precipitation of hidroxides. Then, these are dissolved in 6N HNO 3 solution. The extraction of U and Th is made in two steps, one with TBP/CCl 4 and another with 0,5 M TTA/C 6 H 6 . Then the rare-earth elements and Cd are irradiated and determined by gamma spectrometry. (author) [pt

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  4. Improvement of the characteristics of chemical bath deposition-cadmium sulfide films deposited on an O{sub 2} plasma-treated polyethylene terephthalate substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Donggun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University 300, Cheoncheon-dong, Jangan-gu, Sunwon, Kyeonggi-do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Woochang, E-mail: wcsong@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kangwon National University, Samcheok-si, Gangwon-do 245-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    We prepared cadmium sulfide (CdS) films on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by a chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. To improve the adhesion between the CdS film and the PET substrate, the substrate was pre-treated with an O{sub 2} plasma by an inductively coupled plasma. The surface characterizations of the pre-treated PET substrate were analyzed by a contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that that O{sub 2} plasma-treated PET films had more hydrophilic surface. The hydrophilic property of the substrate is one of the important factors when a film is prepared by CBD. The structural and the optical properties of the CdS films, deposited on PET substrates, were analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and a UV–visible spectrophotometer. The CdS films were formed on a compact and granular structure. The optical transmittance was also improved. Therefore, the O{sub 2} plasma treatment of a PET surface is an effective method of preparing CdS films deposited on substrates by CBD. - Highlights: • Chemical bath deposition of CdS film for flexible solar cells • O{sub 2} plasma treatment improved adhesion between the CdS and polymer substrate • Identification of best fabrication condition of CdS window layers for flexible solar cells.

  5. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Cadmium Zinc Sulfide Nanocomposite with Controlled Band Gap for Large-Area Thin-Film Optoelectronic Device Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sk; Chakraborty, Koushik; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we report the one pot single step solvothermal synthesis of reduced grapheme oxide-cadmium zinc sulfide (RGO-Cd0.5Zn0.5S) composite. The reduction in graphene oxide (GO), synthesis of Cd0.5Zn0.5S (mentioned as CdZnS in the text) nanorod and decoration of CdZnS nanorods onto RGO sheet were done simultaneously. The structural, morphological and optical properties were studied thoroughly by different techniques, such as XRD, TEM, UV-Vis and PL. The PL intensity of CdZnS nanorods quenches significantly after the attachment of RGO, which confirms photoinduced charge transformation from CdZnS nanorods to RGO sheet through the interface of RGO-CdZnS. An excellent photocurrent generation in RGO-CdZnS thin-film device has been observed under simulated solar light irradiation. The photocurrent as well as photosensitivity increases linearly with the solar light intensity for all the composites. Our study establishes that the synergistic effect of RGO and CdZnS in the composite is capable of getting promising applications in the field of optoelectronic devising.

  6. Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot Particles (CdSQD Dispersed in Poly Methyl Methacrylate as an Effective Gamma Counter for the Scintillation Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askari Mohammad Bagher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic material, cadmium sulfide quantum dot particles (CdSQD, using a hydrothermal method was dispersed in poly methyl methacrylate (PMM polymer. In order to study the synthesized quantum dot particles, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR techniques were applied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM images were also used to study the surface morphology of synthetic quantum dot particles. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX test was done for identification of constituent percent of prepared material. Optical properties of CdSQD particles were evaluated by UV-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL. Finally the capability of CdSQD particles dispersed in poly methyl methacrylate (CdSQD@PMM as a scintillator material was investigated by photomultiplier tube (PMT test. The result of PMT test along with statistical studies showed that the CdSQD@PMM can be applied as a crystalline promising material in the field of inorganic scintillator detectors regarding to the efficiency and economic aspects.

  7. Photocatalytic Conversion of Nitrobenzene to Aniline through Sequential Proton-Coupled One-Electron Transfers from a Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Stephen C. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States; Bettis Homan, Stephanie [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States; Weiss, Emily A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States

    2016-01-28

    This paper describes the use of cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as visible-light photocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline through six sequential photoinduced, proton-coupled electron transfers. At pH 3.6–4.3, the internal quantum yield of photons-to-reducing electrons is 37.1% over 54 h of illumination, with no apparent decrease in catalyst activity. Monitoring of the QD exciton by transient absorption reveals that, for each step in the catalytic cycle, the sacrificial reductant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, scavenges the excitonic hole in ~5 ps to form QD•–; electron transfer to nitrobenzene or the intermediates nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine then occurs on the nanosecond time scale. The rate constants for the single-electron transfer reactions are correlated with the driving forces for the corresponding proton-coupled electron transfers. This result suggests, but does not prove, that electron transfer, not proton transfer, is rate-limiting for these reactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the QD–molecule systems shows that the photoproduct aniline, left unprotonated, serves as a poison for the QD catalyst by adsorbing to its surface. Performing the reaction at an acidic pH not only encourages aniline to desorb but also increases the probability of protonated intermediates; the latter effect probably ensures that recruitment of protons is not rate-limiting.

  8. Covalent attachment of thionine onto gold electrode modified with cadmium sulfide nanoparticles: Improvement of electrocatalytic and photelectrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Rahmatpanah, Rojzin; Hallaj, Rahman; Roushani, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    A newly developed strategy based on gold (Au) electrode modified with cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdSnp) and thionine (Th) was proposed toward electrocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) reduction. At first, a thin film of CdS nanoparticles was electrodeposited onto Au electrode. Then, the CdS/Au electrode was modified with mercaptoacetic acid (MAA), which not only acts as a stabilizing agent to prevent the chalcogenide CdS nanocrystals from aggregation but also as a linker for subsequent attachment of Th onto the CdS nanoparticles. The effective covalent immobilization of Th was achieved through amide bond formation reaction between -NH 2 groups of Th and -COOH groups of MAA, using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) as condensation agent. The Au/CdS/Th modified electrode showed a well-defined redox couple with surface confined characteristics at wide pH range (2–12). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and the surface coverage of immobilized Th on the modified electrode was obtained as 0.12 s −1 and 4.35 × 10 −9 mole cm −2 , respectively. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the modified electrode toward hydrogen peroxide reduction was investigated and it was found that the Au/CdS/Th electrode illustrates excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction at reduced overpotential. The detection limit, sensitivity and catalytic rate constant (k cat ) of the modified electrode toward H 2 O 2 were 55 nM, 3.4 μA μM −1 cm −2 and 3.75 (±0.1) × 10 3 M −1 s −1 , respectively, at linear concentration range up to 10 mM. Upon light irradiation, about two-fold improvements were attained in sensitivity and detection limit of the modified electrode toward H 2 O 2 electrocatalytic determination

  9. A circular dichroism sensor for Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} based on L-cysteine capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedsana, Wimonsiri [Materials Chemistry Research Center, Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Tuntulani, Thawatchai [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Ngeontae, Wittaya, E-mail: wittayange@kku.ac.th [Materials Chemistry Research Center, Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2015-03-31

    Highlights: • Demonstrated a new efficient sensor platform based quantum dots. • Used chiral quantum dots as CD sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions for the first time. • The proposed CD sensor showed highest selectivity towards Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. • Low detection limits of 7.33 μM and 1.13 μM for Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}, respectively. • Can be used in real water samples comparing with ICP-OES. - Abstract: A new circular dichroism sensor for detecting Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} was proposed for the first time using chiral chelating quantum dots. The detection principle was based on changing of circular dichroism signals of the chiral quantum dots when forming a chiral complex with Ni{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+}. L-Cysteine capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots (L-Cyst-CdS QDs) were proposed as a chiral probe. The CD spectrum of L-Cyst-CdS QDs was significantly changed in the presence of Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. On the other hand, other studied cations did not alter the original CD spectrum. Moreover, when increasing the concentration of Ni{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+}, the intensity of the CD spectrum linearly increased as a function of concentration and could be useful for the quantitative analysis. The proposed CD sensor showed linear working concentration ranges of 10–60 μM and 4–80 μM with low detection limits of 7.33 μM and 1.13 μM for the detection of Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}, respectively. Parameters possibly affected the detection sensitivity such as solution pH and incubation time were studied and optimized. The proposed sensor was applied to detect Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} in real water samples, and the results agreed well with the analysis using the standard ICP-OES.

  10. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  11. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  12. Chlorination leaching of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, E.; Pajak, I.; Bojanowska, A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the investigations on chlorination leaching of cadmium from dust coming from dry dust collector of sinter belt, that is leaching with water saturated with gaseous chlorine and leaching with solutions of ammonium chloride and sodium chloride were given. The optimum conditions for these processes were established. It was found, that the method of leaching in the presence of gaseous chlorine is more effective, as it allows to report into the solution over 90% cadmium contained in dust. Owing to technical difficulties, environmental protection and safety conditions more advantageous seems to be the use as leaching agent of the ammonium chloride solutions. When applying 20% NH 4 Cl and temperature of 60 0 C, the time of 2 hours and the ratio of solid to liquid of 1:5, 70% cadmium contained in the dust can be reported into the solution. (auth.)

  13. Critical review of animal carcinogenesis by cadmium and its inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximilien, R.; Dero, B.

    1990-01-01

    Animal carcinogenic biassays relative to 6 inorganic cadmium substances (cadmium metal, cadmium oxide, cadmium sulfide, cadmium sulfate, cadmium chloride and cadmium acetate) are reviewed (speciation). Critical evaluation of literature data on carcinogenicity has been performed by making reference to E.C. guidelines of good laboratory practice. There are few data on routes relevant for human risk assessment: experiments on inhalation demonstrate lung carcinogenicity of cadmium oxide, cadmium sulfide, cadmium sulfate and cadmium chloride in rats but not in mice nor in hamsters; no carcinogenic effects of cadmium compounds are observed following oral administration. For routes of less or no relevance for human risk assessment, some results are clearly positive: subcutaneous injection induces cancers in situ (various cadmium compounds), testicular tumours (cadmium sulfate and cadmium chloride) and prostatic tumours (cadmium chloride) but such effects are not observed using relevant malignancies in rats. With respect to other no relevant routes (intraperitoneal, intrarenal...) tumours are incidentally produced in situ, but not in remote organs. Numerous studies fail to demonstrate cadmium carcinogenicity, but methodologically acceptable negative ones are very limited in number. Accordingly strain dependent effects and dose effect relationship could not be thoroughly assessed

  14. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waalkes, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis

  15. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waalkes, Michael P

    2003-12-10

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis.

  16. Sintering and densification; new techniques: sinter forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnubst, A.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter pressure assisted sintering methods will be described. Attention will mainly be paid to sinter forging as a die-wall free uniaxial pressure sintering technique, where large creep strains are possible. Sinter forging is an effective tool to reduce sintering temperature and time and to obtain a nearly theoretically dense ceramic. In this way grain size in tetragonal zirconia ceramics can be reduced down to 100 nm. Another important phenomenon is the reduction of the number density and size of cracks and flaws resulting in higher strength and improved reliability, which is of utmost importance for engineering ceramics. The creep deformation during sinter forging causes a rearrangement of the grains resulting in a reduction of interatomic spaces between grains, while grain boundary (glassy) phases can be removed. The toughness and in some cases the wear resistance is enhanced after sinter forging as a result of the grain-boundary-morphology improvement. (orig.)

  17. Effects of cadmium electrode properties on nickel-cadmium cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Tests have been conducted on a number of nickel-cadmium cells that have exhibited a variety of performance problems, ranging from high voltages and pressures during overcharge to low capacity. The performance problems that have been specifically linked to the cadmium electrode are primarily related to two areas, poor sinter and the buildup of excessive pressure during overcharge. A number of specific nickel-cadmium cell and cadmium electrode characterists have been studied in this work to determine what the effects of poor sinter are, and to determine what factors are important in causing excessive pressures during overcharge in cells that otherwise appear normal. Several of the tests appear suitable for screening cells and electrodes for such problems

  18. Cathodoluminescence and ion implantation of cadmium sulphide/cuprous sulphide solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glew, R W; Bryant, F J

    1975-10-01

    By the use of implantation with copper ions or oxygen ions of 50 keV energy, changes in the cathodoluminescence emission spectrum from cadmium sulfide/cuprous sulfide thin film manufactured solar cells have been correlated with changes in the phases of the cuprous sulfide layer. Thus, monitoring the relative intensities of cathodoluminescence emission bands affords a method of assessing the cuprous sulfide layer and possibly predicting the performance of the cells.

  19. The Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Stack Gases, Iodometric Titration After Sulfite Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, E. G.

    The determination of hydrogen sulfide in effluents from coal-fired furnaces and incinerators is complicated by the presence of sulfur oxides (which form acids). Organic compounds also may interfere with or prevent the formation of the cadmium sulfide precipitate or give false positive results because of reaction with iodine. The report presents a…

  20. Liquid phase sintered superconducting cermet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method of making a superconducting cermet having superconducting properties with improved bulk density, low porosity and in situ stabilization. It comprises: forming a structure of a superconducting ceramic material having the formula RM 2 Cu 3 O (6.5 + x) wherein R is one or more rare earth elements capable of reacting to form a superconducting ceramic, M is one or more alkaline earth metal elements selected from barium and strontium capable of reacting to form a superconducting ceramic, x is greater than 0 and less than 0.5; and a precious metal compound in solid form selected from the class consisting of oxides, sulfides and halides of silver; and liquid phase sintering the mixture at a temperature wherein the precious metal of the precious metal compound is molten and below the melting point of the ceramic material. The liquid phase sintering is carried out for a time less than 36 hours but sufficient to improve the bulk density of the cermet

  1. Cadmium Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    carcinogenic, leachable Trivalent and non- chrome passivates generally struggle with conductivity Major Differences in Trivalent vs. Hexavalent Passivates...for Change Cadmium passivated with hexavalent chromium has been in use for many decades Cadmium is toxic, and is classified as a priority...Executive Orders 13514 & 13423 DoD initiatives – Young memo (April 2009) DFAR restricting use of hexavalent chromium Allows the use of hexavalent

  2. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  3. Sintering of nonstoichiometric UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, D.; Holc, J.

    1983-01-01

    Activated sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1100 deg C is described. In CO 2 atmosphere is UO 2 is nonstoichiometric and pellets from active UO 2 powders sinter at 900 deg C to high density. At 1100 deg C the final sintered density is practically achieved at heating on sintering temperature. After reduction and cooling in H 2 atmosphere which is followed sintering in CO 2 the structure is identical to the structured UO 2 pellets sintered at high temperature in H 2 . Density of activated sintered UO 2 pellets is stable, even after additional sintering at 1800 deg C. (author)

  4. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  5. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  6. Science of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczynski, G.

    1977-01-01

    Although the methods of integration of materials by sintering, have been used since the early history of humanity, the actual understanding of the process involved came only in the last three decades. As in the most human endeavors, the art preceded theory. The comprehension of the elementary processes occuring during sintering comes from the studies of model system. Although the elementary processes occuring during sintering are today quite well understood, the problem of shrinkage of a powder compact which was at the origin of Sintering Science is still far from solved. This is due to the complexity of the internal geometry of the compacts. The recent attempts to apply statistics to this problem, seem to offer some promise

  7. Uranium dioxide. Sintering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Description of a sintering method and of the equipment devoted to uranium dioxide powder caracterization and comparison between different samples. Determination of the curve giving specific volume versus pressure and micrographic examination of a pellet at medium pressure [fr

  8. Kinetics of UO2 sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-01-01

    Detailed conclusions related to the UO 2 sintering can be drawn from investigating the kinetics of the sintering process. This report gives an thorough analysis of the the data concerned with sintering available in the literature taking into account the Jander and Arrhenius laws. This analysis completes the study of influence of the O/U ratio and the atmosphere on the sintering. Results presented are fundamentals of future theoretical and experimental work related to characterisation of the UO 2 sintering process

  9. Direct examination of cadmium bonding in rat tissues dosed with mine wastes and cadmium-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    Direct examination by XANES and EXAFS of metal bonding in tissue can be demonstrated by examining cadmium uptake and bonding in animal tissue maintained at cryogenic temperatures. XANES at the K-edge of cadmium were collected at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Rats fed with 1g mine waste containing 8-400 mg/kg cadmium per 200g body weight (b.w.) or dosed by oral gavage with either cadmium chloride solution alone (at 6 mg/kg b.w.) or in combination with other salts (As, Cu or Zn), 5 days/week for 6 weeks, had 0.1-7.5 and 8-86 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney, respectively. Rats given intraperitoneally (ip) or intravenously (iv) 1-4 times with 1 mg/kg b.w. cadmium solution had 30-120 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney. Tissues from rats were kept and transferred at cryogenic temperature and XANES were recorded at 20 K. The spectra for rat liver samples suggested conjugation of cadmium with glutathione or association with the sulfide bond (Cd-S) of proteins and peptides. EXAFS of rat liver fed by Cd and Zn solutions showed that Cd was clearly bound to S ligands with an inter-atomic distance of 2.54 A ring for Cd-S that was similar to cadmium sulfide with an inter-atomic distance of 2.52 A ring for Cd-S. Liver or kidney of rats fed with mine wastes did not give an edge in the XANES spectra indicating little uptake of cadmium by the animals. Longer and higher dosing regimen may be required in order to observe the same Cd-S bond in the rat tissue from mine wastes, including confirmation by EXAFS.

  10. Sintering Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Randall M.

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal

  11. Morphological analysis and modelling of sintering and of sintered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernot, Jean-Paul

    1982-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of solid phase sintering of metallic powders, and aims at describing as precisely as possible the different involved matter transport mechanisms, first by using a thermodynamic approach to sintering. Sintering diagrams are also used to determine prevailing mechanisms. The microstructure of sintered materials has been studied by using image quantitative analysis, thus by using a morphological approach to sintering. Morphological parameters allow, on the one hand, the evolution of powders during sintering to be followed, and, on the other hand, sintered products to be correctly characterised. Moreover, the author reports the study of the evolution of some physical properties of sintered materials with respect to their microstructure parameters. This leads to the development of a modelling of the behaviour of these materials [fr

  12. Sintering of Synroc D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Sintering has been investigated as a method for the mineralization and densification of high-level nuclear defense waste powder. Studies have been conducted on Synroc D composite powder LS04. Optimal densification has been found to be highly dependent on the characteristics of the starting material. Powder subjected to milling, which was believed to reduce the level of agglomeration and possibly particle size, was found to densify better than powder not subjected to this milling. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical could be achieved for samples sintered at 1150 to 1200 0 C. Mineralogy was found to be as expected for Synroc D for samples sintered in a CO 2 /CO atmosphere where the Fe +2 /Fe +3 ratio was maintained at 1.0 to 5.75. In a more oxidizing, pure CO 2 atmosphere a new phase, not previously identified in Synroc D, was found

  13. Sintering of composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordia, R.K.; Scherer, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Several constitutive laws have been used in the literature to predict the response of sintering bodies under external and internal stress fields. These analyses are based on the assumptions of linear and isotropic behavior. The authors provide a critical examination of these equations and show that some of the available constitutive laws predict a negative Poisson's ratio. These laws have been used to analyze sintering of ceramic matrix composites with rigid inclusions and predict large values of the internal stresses and significant retardation of the densification of composites. Since a negative value of Poisson's ratio has never been observed in sinter - forging experiments, the authors conclude that either the stresses are small (as predicted by the constitutive laws with positive Poisson's ratio) or the basic assumption of linearity and isotropy used in all the analyses is incorrect. Finally, the authors discuss some phenomena that could be important in understanding the densification of ceramic matrix composites

  14. Cadmium and the kidney.

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, L

    1984-01-01

    The paper is a review of certain aspects of importance of cadmium and the kidney regarding the assessment of risks and understanding of mechanisms of action. The review discusses the following topics: history and etiology of cadmium-induced kidney dysfunction and related disorders; cadmium metabolism, metallothionein and kidney dysfunction; cadmium in urine as indicator of body burden, exposure and kidney dysfunction; cadmium levels in kidney and liver as indicators of kidney dysfunction; cha...

  15. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  16. Cadmium, an environmental poison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard, A K

    1974-04-15

    In recent years, industrial employment of cadmium has increased considerably. Cadmium is now present in the environment and has caused acute and chronic poisoning. Inhalation of cadmium vapor or dust causes pulmonary damage while the kidney is the critical organ in absorption of cadmium. The element accumulates in the kidney and causes tubular damage or 200 ppm in the renal cortex. In animal experiments, cadmium may cause raised blood pressure, sterility and malignant tumors. On account of the pronounced tendency of cadmium to accumulate and its toxicity, it is important to trace sources and to reduce exposure of the population. 62 references.

  17. Cuprous sulfide as a film insulation for superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.R.; Uphoff, J.H.; Vecchio, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    The LCP test coil utilizes a conductor of forced-flow design having 486 strands of multifilametary Nb 3 Sn compacted in a stainless steel sheath. The impetus for the work reported here stemmed from the need for some form of insulation for those strands to prevent sintering during reaction and to reduce ac losses. The work reported here experimented with cuprous sulfide coatings at various coating rates and thicknesses. Two solenoids that were wound with cuprous sulfide-coated wires and heat-treated at 700 degrees C were found to demonstrate that the film is effective in providing turn-to-turn insulation for less than about 0.5V between turns. The sulfide layer provided a metal-semiconductor junction which became conducting at roughly 0.5V. Repeated cycling of the coil voltage in excess of that value produced no damage to the sulfide layer. The junction provided self-protection for the coil as long as the upper allowable current density in the sulfide was not exceeded. No training was apparent up to 6.4 T

  18. Cadmium purification with a vibrating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, N.; Esna-Ashari, M.; Biallas, H.; Kangas, K.

    1986-01-01

    While electrolytically producing zinc from sulfide concentrates, purification is the most significant step. Impurities such as Co, Sn, Ge, Ni and Sb can cause extensive redissolution of the electrodeposited zinc, thus diminishing current efficiency. Other metals, particularly cadmium, lead and copper, can negatively affect zinc properties by deposition on the cathode. It is standard practice to use atomized zinc dust as a reducing agent in the purification process, either alone or combined with additives. In conventional operations, special facilities are necessary to produce zinc dust in an amount close to 8wt% of cathode production. This paper examines a technique which makes use of zinc granules instead of dust

  19. Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries

  20. Synthesis of zinc sulfide by chemical vapor deposition using an organometallic precursor: Di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasekar, Parag; Dhakal, Tara; Ganta, Lakshmikanth; Vanhart, Daniel; Desu, Seshu

    2012-01-01

    Zinc sulfide has gained popularity in the last few years as a cadmium-free heterojunction partner for thin film solar cells and is seen as a good replacement for cadmium sulfide due to better blue photon response and non-toxicity. In this work, zinc sulfide films are prepared using an organic sulfur source. We report a simple and repeatable process for development of zinc sulfide using a cost-effective and less hazardous organic sulfur source. The development of zinc sulfide has been studied on zinc oxide-coated glass where the zinc oxide is converted into zinc sulfide. Zinc oxide grown by atomic layer deposition as well as commercially available zinc oxide-coated glass was used. The zinc sulfide synthesis has been studied and the films are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and a UV–VIS spectrophotometer. XRD, XPS and optical characterization confirm the zinc sulfide phase formation. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of ZnS using a less-hazardous precursor, di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide. ► ZnS process optimized for two types of ZnO films. ► Preliminary results for a solar cell show an efficiency of 1.09%.

  1. Influence of sintering atmospheres on the aluminium sintering characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintzer, S.; Bermudez Belkys, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the aluminium powder (Al) cool compacted (at 95% from theoretical density) which was sintered at 903 K during 4 hours at different atmospheres; oxidizing (air), inert Argon (Ar), Nitrogen (N) and high vacuum. The results obtained show: a) porosity measurements; greater porosity when sintering in Ar and air. b) Metallographic and Scanning observations: many fine pores (< 1 μm) and pore lines distributed at random, at air sintering and greater pores distributed preferentially near the surface, in Ar and N atmospheres. c) Dimensional changes: tendency to contraction of the samples at N and vacuum sintering and expansion in Ar or air. d) Mechanical properties: greater strength and fluence stresses at air and N sintering. The analysis of the results is performed considering sintering modes in presence of an oxide layer and dropped inert gases. (Author)

  2. Calcium enhances cadmium tolerance and decreases cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed at characterizing mechanisms controlling cadmium accumulation in lettuce, which is a food crop showing one of the highest capacities to accumulate this toxic compound. In this study, plants from three lettuce varieties were grown for eight days on media supplemented or not with cadmium (15 μM CdCl2) and ...

  3. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  4. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  5. Characterization and mass balance of trace elements in an iron ore sinter plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Ladeira Lau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental legislation is becoming more restrictive in several industrial sectors, especially in the steel industry, which is well known for its large pollution potential. With the recent growth of interest in effects of trace elements on the environment and health, the inclusion of emission limits on these elements in this legislation has become increasingly popular. This article aims to describe the partitioning of trace elements between the products (sinter and plant emissions in an iron ore sinter plant, aiming to better understand the behavior of these elements in the sintering process to eventually support interventions to modify these partitions. Chemical characterization of several sintering inputs was initially performed, revealing that the steel-making residues contained large concentrations of trace elements, whereas low concentrations were observed in the flux. Based on the trace element concentrations, we analyzed the injection of trace elements in a sintering pilot using a sintering mixture. Mass balance was then used to determine the theoretical partitioning of trace elements in the sinter and emissions; cadmium, nickel, lead, mercury, and copper exhibited greater tendencies to concentrate in atmospheric emissions.

  6. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  7. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  8. Deep penetration of polonium implanted in cadmium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinmann, E.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of 25 keV 210 Po implanted into CdS platelets was determined by means of energy analysis of the α-particles emitted by the 210 Po. Two samples were implanted along an axial channeling direction, and one along a planar channeling direction. The resulting distributions did not conform to any of the existing range theories or, in the case of axial channeling, to existing diffusion theories. A new diffusion model was formulated and fitted to the experimental data. Good agreement was obtained between this model and experiment for both the axial and the planar channeling conditions. The stopping power of CdS for He ions was measured as a preliminary step to the Po distribution measurement. A new technique was used which consisted in measuring the energy spectrum of either He ions backscattered from Bi implanted in CdS or of α-particles emitted by 210 Po implanted in CdS. A thin layer was then etched off the surface of the sample and the energy spectrum was measured again. The stopping power was calculated from these two spectra and the known thickness of the removed layer. These measurements and calculations were made for energies ranging from 0.963 to 5.3 MeV with accuracies between 12 percent and 16 percent

  9. Peculiarities of luminescence of low-temperature-deformed cadmium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrij, V.D.; Osip' yan, Yu.A. (AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela)

    1982-02-01

    Spatially resolved photoluminescence of CdS crystals deformed at low temperatures is investigated. It is revealed that production and movement of certain dislocations, i. e. microplastic deformation take place in the crystal under the effect of uniaxial loading F >= 10 kG/mm/sup 3/ at 6 K. Dislocations during their movement in the sliding planes produce specific defects in the crystalline lattice which, being the effective centres of irradiation recombination with characteristic radiation spectrum are presented in the form of luminescent traces which passed through the dislocation crystal. A group of symmetry of these centers is determined by means of piesospectroscopic investigations of the obtained radiation spectrum.

  10. Cadmium and renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine

  11. Boric oxide or boric acid sintering aid for sintering ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to the use of liquid sintering aid in processes involving sintering of ceramic materials to produce dense, hard articles having industrial uses. Although the invention is specifically discussed in regard to compositions containing silicon carbide as the ceramic material, other sinterable carbides, for example, titanium carbide, may be utilized as the ceramic material. A liquid sintering aid for densifying ceramic material is selected from solutions of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 and mixtures of these solutions. In sintering ceramic articles, e.g. silicon carbide, a shaped green body is formed from a particulate ceramic material and a resin binder, and the green body is baked at a temperature of 500 to 1000 0 C to form a porous body. The liquid sintering aid of B 2 O 3 and/or H 3 BO 3 is then dispersed through the porous body and the treated body is sintered at a temperature of 1900 to 2200 0 C to produce the sintered ceramic article. (U.K.)

  12. Hydrothermal Cold Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu

    Solid state sintering transforms particle compact to a physically robust and dense polycrystalline monolith driven by reduction of surface energy and curvature. Since bulk diffusion is required for neck formation and pore elimination, sintering temperature about 2/3 of melting point is needed. It thus places limitations for materials synthesis and integration, and contributes to significant energy consumption in ceramic processing. Furthermore, since surface transport requires lower temperature than bulk processes, grain growth is often rapid and can be undesired for physical properties. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed including Liquid Phase Sintering (LPS), Hot Pressing (HP) and Field Assisted Sintering Technique (FAST), which introduce either viscous melt, external pressure or electric field to speed up densification rates at lower temperature. However, because of their inherent reliability on bulk diffusion, temperatures required are often too high for integrating polymers and non-noble metals. Reduction of sintering temperature below 400 °C would require a different densification mechanism that is based on surface transport with external forces to drive volume shrinkage. Densification method combining uniaxial pressure and solution under hydrothermal condition was first demonstrated by Kanahara's group at Kochi University in 1986 and was brought to our attention by the work of Kahari, etc, from University of Oulu on densification of Li2MoO 4 in 2015. This relatively new process showed promising ultra-low densification temperature below 300 °C, however little was known about its fundamental mechanism and scope of applications, which became the main focus of this dissertation. In this work, a uniaxial hydraulic press, a standard stainless steel 1/2 inch diameter die with heating band were utilized in densifying metal oxides. Applied pressure and sintering temperature were between 100 MPa and 700 MPa and from room temperature to 300

  13. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  14. Isolation, identification and cadmium adsorption of a high cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-27

    Sep 27, 2010 ... 1School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, ... Cadmium is a non-essential ... (1994) reported that cadmium might interact ... uptake of cadmium, lead and mercury (Svecova et al.,.

  15. Mechanisms of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Ashok; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    The basic mechanisms by which the material moves during sintering have not only held a strange fascination but are also very important in determining the properties of the end product. Kuczynski's exponent method has been subsequently refined by several schools to make it increasingly reliable. There is now a fairly good understanding of mechanisms in some of the materials. However in others the issue is complicated by their basic nature. The problems of ambiguity in criterion and that of more than one mechanism being simultaneously operative have been tackled with dexterity by Ashby for drawing sintering mechanism diagrams. The method has been modified to give Relative Contribution Diagrams (RCD). These yield additional information and have been used for analysis. The main criticism against this is that it uses a very large number of rate equations and material properties, which can communicate their inaccuracies to the diagram. A case study of UO 2 was undertaken and it has been shown quantitatively that inaccuracies in a smaller number of properties only affect the diagrams to any significant extent. (auth.)

  16. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  17. Production of pure sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da; Huebner, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    With the aim of optimizing the sintering parameters, the strength of a large number of alumina samples was determined which were produced under widely varying sintering conditions and with different amounts of MgO content. The strength as a function of sintering time or temperature was found to go through a maximum. With increasing time, this maximum is shifted to lower temperatures, and with decreasing temperature to longer times. Data pairs of sintering times and temperatures which yeld the strength maximum were determined. The value of the strength at the maximum remains unchanged. The strength is high (= 400 MN/m 2 , at a grain size of 3 um and a porosity of 2 per cent) and comparable to foreign aluminas produced for commercial purposes, or even higher. The increase in the sintering time from 1 h to 16 h permits a reduction of the sintering temperature from 1600 to 1450 0 C without losing strength. The practical importance of this fact for a production of sintered alumina on a large scale is emphasized. (Author) [pt

  18. The mechanism of electrodeposition of bismuth sulfide and cadmium sulfide from dimethylsulfoxide and diethylene glycol solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, C.M.; Baranski, A.S.; Fawcett, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of the electrodeposition of Bi 2 S 3 on an electrode covered with a coherent layer of Bi 2 S 3 was examined by analysis of the Tafel plots for different solution compositions and at different temperatures in two nonaqueous solvents, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and diethylene glycol (DEG). The results were compared with those obtained for the electrodeposition of CdS on CdS under similar conditions. In both cases, it was found that the rate-determining step was an irreversible electron transfer. The rate of the reaction was independent of the metal ion concentration, but electrochemical orders with respect to S 8 of 0.7 in DMSO and 1.0 in DEG were found. Several mechanisms explaining these results are proposed and discussed

  19. Sinterability and microstructure evolution during sintering of ferrous powder mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kétner Bendo Demétrio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on ferrous powder metallurgy and presents some results of a development of a suitable masteralloy for use as an additive to iron powder for the production of sintered steels. The masteralloy was produced by melting a powder mixture containing approximately Fe + 20% Ni + 20% Mn + 20% Si + 1% C (wt%, in order to obtain a cast billet that was converted into fine powder by crushing and milling. It was observed presence of SiC in the masteralloy after melting that is undesirable in the alloy. Si element should be introduced by using ferrosilicon. Sintered alloys with distinct contents of alloying elements were prepared by mixing the masteralloy powder to plain iron powder. Samples were produced by die compaction of the powder mixtures and sintering at 1200 °C in a differential dilatometer in order to record their linear dimensional behaviour during heating up and isothermal sintering, aiming at studying the sinterability of the compacts. Microstructure development during sintering was studied by SEM, XRD and microprobe analyses.

  20. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  1. Kinetic parameters and TL mechanism in cadmium tetra borate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annalakshmi, O.; Jose, M.T.; Sridevi, J.; Venkatraman, B.; Amarendra, G.; Mandal, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline powder samples of cadmium tetra borate were synthesized by a simple solid state sintering technique and gamma irradiated sample showed a simple Thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak around 460 K. The TL kinetic parameters of gamma irradiated phosphor were determined by initial rise (IR), isothermal decay (ID), peak shape (PS), variable heating rate (VHR) and glow curve de-convolution method. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics (b) were calculated by IR, ID, PS and VHR methods are in the order of ∼1.05 eV, 10 9 –10 12 s −1 and 1.58, respectively. From the results of TL and PL emission studies carried out on the phosphor revealed that the defect centers related to TL is different from that for PL. EPR measurements were carried out to identify the defect centers formed in cadmium tetra borate phosphor on gamma irradiation. Based on EPR studies the mechanism for TL process in cadmium tetra borate is proposed in this paper -- Highlights: • Polycrystalline powder samples of undoped cadmium tetra borate synthesized. • Cadmium tetra borate phosphor exhibits a dosimetric peak at 458 K. • Kinetic parameters of the trap responsible for TL evaluated. • TL mechanism is proposed from TL to EPR correlation studies

  2. Kinetic parameters and TL mechanism in cadmium tetra borate phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annalakshmi, O. [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Jose, M.T., E-mail: mtj@igcar.gov.in [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Sridevi, J. [Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600 020, Tamilnadhu (India); Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Mandal, A.B. [Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600 020, Tamilnadhu (India)

    2014-03-15

    Polycrystalline powder samples of cadmium tetra borate were synthesized by a simple solid state sintering technique and gamma irradiated sample showed a simple Thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak around 460 K. The TL kinetic parameters of gamma irradiated phosphor were determined by initial rise (IR), isothermal decay (ID), peak shape (PS), variable heating rate (VHR) and glow curve de-convolution method. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics (b) were calculated by IR, ID, PS and VHR methods are in the order of ∼1.05 eV, 10{sup 9}–10{sup 12} s{sup −1} and 1.58, respectively. From the results of TL and PL emission studies carried out on the phosphor revealed that the defect centers related to TL is different from that for PL. EPR measurements were carried out to identify the defect centers formed in cadmium tetra borate phosphor on gamma irradiation. Based on EPR studies the mechanism for TL process in cadmium tetra borate is proposed in this paper -- Highlights: • Polycrystalline powder samples of undoped cadmium tetra borate synthesized. • Cadmium tetra borate phosphor exhibits a dosimetric peak at 458 K. • Kinetic parameters of the trap responsible for TL evaluated. • TL mechanism is proposed from TL to EPR correlation studies.

  3. Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.; Tujebakhova, Z.K.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates of the composition MSal, where M-Zn or Cd, Sal - twice deprotonated residue of salicylic acid O-HOC 6 H 4 COOH (H 2 Sal), are singled out and characterized. When studying thermograms, thermogravigrams, IR absorption spectra, roentgenograms of cadmium salicylate compounds (Cd(OC 6 H 4 COO) and products of their thepmal transformations, the processes of thermal decomposition of the compounds have been characterized. The process of cadmium monosalicylate decomposition takes place in one stage. Complete loss of salicylate acido group occurs in the range of 320-460 deg. At this decomposition stage cadmium oxide is formed. A supposition is made that cadmium complex has tetrahedral configuration, at that, each salicylate group plays the role of tetradentate-bridge ligand. The compound evidently has a polymer structure

  4. Determination of cadmium selenide nonstoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezhnev, V.Yu.; Kharif, Ya.L.; Kovtunenko, P.V.

    1986-01-01

    Physicochemical method of determination of cadmium selenide nonstoichiometry is developed. The method nature consists in the fact, that under definite conditions dissolved cadmium is extracted from crystals to a vapor phase and then is determined in it using the photocolorimetric method. Cadmium solubility in CdSe crystal is calculated from known CdSe mass and amount of separated cadmium. The lower boundary of determined contents constitutes 1x10 -5 % mol at sample of cadmium selenide 10 g

  5. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems

  6. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems.

  7. Calcium enhances cadmium tolerance and decreases cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... concentrations alleviated the toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and water status of lettuce plants. The three lettuce varieties ... electroplating, in batteries, in electrical conductors, in the manufacture of alloys ..... Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals, Third edition, Salt Lake City, UT: Acad. Press. Österås ...

  8. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  9. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  10. Sintering diagrams of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, A.; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    Ashby's method (see Acta Met., vol. 22, p. 275, 1974) of constructing sintering diagrams has been modified to obtain contribution diagrams directly from the computer. The interplay of sintering variables and mechanisms are studied and the factors that affect the participation of mechanisms in UO 2 are determined. By studying the physical properties, it emerges that the order of inaccuracies is small in most cases and do not affect the diagrams. On the other hand, even a 10% error in activation energies, which is quite plausible, would make a significant difference to the diagram. The main criticism of Ashby's approach is that the numerous properties and equations used, communicate their inaccuracies to the diagrams and make them unreliable. The present study has considerably reduced the number of factors that need to be refined to make the sintering diagrams more meaningful. (Auth.)

  11. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  12. Kinetics of sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of sintering of UO 2 powders derived from ADU route and calcined at different temperatures was studied. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on the calcination temperature, the density chosen and the sintering temperature range. The motive force for sintering is the excess free energy in the particle system. This exists in the powder compact in the form of surface energy and the excess lattice energy due to defects. The defects which can be eliminated at the operating temperature are responsible for the mobility and hence sintering. This concept of the motive force for sintering has been used to explain the difference in the activation energies observed in the present study. This would also explain phenomena such as attainment of limiting density, presence of optimum sintering temperature and the influence of calcination treatments on the sintering behaviour of powders. (author)

  13. Recycling of mill scale in sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation deals with the effect of replacing some amount of Baharia high barite iron ore concentrate by mill scale waste which was characterized by high iron oxide content on the parameters of the sintering process., and investigation the effect of different amount of coke breeze added on sintering process parameters when using 5% mill scale waste with 95% iron ore concentrate. The results of this work show that, replacement of iron ore concentrate with mill scale increases the amount of ready made sinter, sinter strength and productivity of the sinter machine and productivity at blast furnace yard. Also, the increase of coke breeze leads to an increase the ready made sinter and productivity of the sintering machine at blast furnace yard. The productivity of the sintering machine after 5% decreased slightly due to the decrease of vertical velocity.

  14. Simultaneous determination of oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and cadmium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, K.; Kuriki, T.; Ohsawa, K.; Ishii, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Cadmium and its compounds were analysed for oxygen and cadmium by a modification of the Schutze-Unterzaucher method. Oxygen in some compounds such as cadmium oxide, nitrate and sulphate could not be determined by the usual method. The method of adding carbon was employed for the determination of total oxygen. Total oxygen could be determined by the addition of 5 mg of carbon to a sample boat and heating at 950 0 . The determination was also carried out by addition of naphthalene (2 mg). It was found that the cadmium powder and cadmium flake used contained ca. 1 and 0.15% oxygen, respectively. Oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and its compounds were simultaneously determined by the addition of 2 mg of naphthalene. Cadmium was determined colorimetrically by use of glyoxal-bis-(2-hydroxyanil). Oxygen and cadmium in the samples could be determined simultaneously with an average error of -0.02 and -0.22%, respectively. (author)

  15. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  16. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  17. Master Sintering Surface: A practical approach to its construction and utilization for Spark Plasma Sintering prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sintering is a complex thermally activated process, thus any prediction of sintering behaviour is very welcome not only for industrial purposes. Presented paper shows the possibility of densification prediction based on concept of Master Sintering Surface (MSS for pressure assisted Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS. User friendly software for evaluation of the MSS is presented. The concept was used for densification prediction of alumina ceramics sintered by SPS.

  18. SINTERING OF NASCENT CALCIUM OXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the measurement of the sintering rate of CaO in a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures of 700-1100 C. CaO prepared from ultrapure CaCO3 was compared with an impure CaO derived from limestone. Both materials yielded an initial surface area of 104 sq m/g. The rat...

  19. Flux of Cadmium through Euphausiids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benayoun, G.; Fowler, S.W.; Oregioni, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux of the heavy metal cadmium through the euphausiid Meganyctiphanes norvegica was examined. Radiotracer experiments showed that cadmium can be accumulated either directly from water or through the food chain. When comparing equilibrium cadmium concentration factors based on stable element measurements with those obtained from radiotracer experiments, it is evident that exchange between cadmium in the water and that in euphausiid tissue is a relatively slow process, indicating that, in the long term, ingestion of cadmium will probably be the more important route for the accumulation of this metal. Approximately 10% of cadmium ingested by euphausiids was incorporated into internal tissues when the food source was radioactive Artemia. After 1 month cadmium, accumulated directly from water, was found to be most concentrated in the viscera with lesser amounts in eyes, exoskeleton and muscle, respectively. Use of a simple model, based on the assumption that cadmium taken in by the organism must equal cadmium released plus that accumulated in tissue, allowed assessment of the relative importance of various metabolic parameters in controlling the cadmium flux through euphausiids. Fecal pellets, due to their relatively high rate of production and high cadmium content, accounted for 84% of the total cadmium flux through M. norvegica. Comparisons of stable cadmium concentrations in natural euphausiid food and the organism's resultant fecal pellets indicate that the cadmium concentration in ingested material was increased nearly 5-fold during its passage through the euphausiid. From comparisons of all routes by which cadmium can be released from M. norvegica to the water column, it is concluded that fecal pellet deposition represents the principal mechanism effecting the downward vertical transport of cadmium by this species. (author)

  20. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response...... to the stress field as well as the FE calculation of the stress field from the microstructural evolution is discussed. The sintering behavior of two powder compacts constrained by a rigid substrate is simulated and compared to free sintering of the same samples. Constrained sintering result in a larger number...

  1. Strain-enhanced sintering of iron powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, D.R.; Torralba, J.M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ciencias de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-02-01

    Sintering of ball-milled and un-milled Fe powders has been investigated using dilatometry, X-ray, density, and positron annihilation techniques. A considerable sintering enhancement is found in milled powders showing apparent activation energies that range between 0.44 and 0.80 eV/at. The positron annihilation results, combined with the evolution of the shrinkage rate with sintering temperature, indicate generation of lattice defects during the sintering process of milled and un-milled powders. The sintering enhancement is attributed to pipe diffusion along the core of moving dislocations in the presence of the vacancy excess produced by plastic deformation. Positron annihilation results do not reveal the presence of sintering-induced defects in un-milled powders sintered above 1200 K, the apparent activation energy being in good agreement with that for grain-boundary diffusion in {gamma}-Fe. (orig.)

  2. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  3. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  4. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  5. Cadmium plating replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  6. Cadmium: The deformed metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, R L [Cadmium Association, London (UK)

    1979-03-01

    The paper, which is a somewhat abridged version of the introductory paper of the 2nd International Cadmium Conference in Cannes on February 6 to 8, 1979, outlines the present trends in production, reserves, consumption, world trade, prices, and cost. Due to the lack of statistics on the USSR and other socialist countries, the review is limited to the non-socialist world.

  7. zinc, chromium, cadmium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... Cadmium also causes destruction of the immune system, thus, predisposes the consumer to infectious diseases like tuberculosis (Khan et al., 2008). ... years, sputum specimens positive for acid-fast bacilli by microscopy and clinical and radiographic abnormalities consistent with pulmonary tuberculosis.

  8. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  9. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  10. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  11. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  12. Modeling of sintering of functionally gradated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasik, M.; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01

    The functionally gradated materials (FGMs) are distinguished from isotropic materials by gradients of composition, phase distribution, porosity, and related properties. For FGMs made by powder metallurgy, sintering control is one of the most important factors. In this study sintering process of FGMs is modeled and simulated with a computer. A new modeling approach was used to formulate equation systems and the model for sintering of gradated hard metals, coupled with heat transfer and grain growth. A FEM module was developed to simulate FGM sintering in conventional, microwave and hybrid conditions, to calculate density, stress and temperature distribution. Behavior of gradated WC-Co hardmetal plate and cone specimens was simulated for various conditions, such as mean particle size, green density distribution and cobalt gradation parameter. The results show that the deformation behavior and stress history of graded powder compacts during heating, sintering and cooling could be predicted for optimization of sintering process. (author)

  13. Molecular basis of cadmium toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, R; Prasad, R; Palinal, V K; Chopra, R K

    1984-01-01

    Cadmium has been shown to manifest its toxicity in human and animals by mainly accumulating in almost all of the organs. The kidney is the main target organ where it is concentrated mainly in the cortex. Environmental exposure of cadmium occurs via food, occupational industries, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. At molecular level, cadmium interferes with the utilization of essential metals e.g. Ca, Zn, Se, Cr and Fe and deficiencies of these essential metals including protein and vitamins, exaggerate cadmium toxicity, due to its increased absorption through the gut and greater retention in different organs as metallothionein (Cd-Mt). Cadmium transport, across the intestinal and renal brush border membrane vesicles, is carrier mediated and it competes with zinc and calcium. It has been postulated that cadmium shares the same transport system. Cadmium inhibits protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and drug metabolizing enzymes in liver of animals. Chronic environmental exposure of cadmium produces hypertension in experimental animals. Functional changes accompanying cadmium nephropathy include low molecular weight proteinuria which is of tubular origin associated with excess excretion of proteins such as beta 2 microglobulin, metallothionein and high molecular weight proteinuria of glomerular origin (excretion of proteins such as albumin IgG, transferrin etc.). Recent data has shown that metallothionein is more nephrotoxic to animals. Cadmium is also toxic to central nervous system. It causes an alterations of cellular functions in lungs. Cadmium affects both humoral and cell mediated immune response in animals. Cadmium induces metallothionein in liver and kidney but under certain nutritional deficiencies like protein-calorie malnutrition and calcium deficiency, enhanced induction and greater accumulation of cadmium metallothionein has been observed.

  14. Production of sintered alumina from powder; optimization of the sinterized parameters for the maximum mechanical resistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da.

    1981-02-01

    Pure, sinterized alumina and the optimization of the parameters of sinterization in order to obtain the highest mechanical resistence are discussed. Test materials are sinterized from a fine powder of pure alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), α phase, at different temperatures and times, in air. The microstructures are analysed concerning porosity and grain size. Depending on the temperature or the time of sinterization, there is a maximum for the mechanical resistence. (A.R.H.) [pt

  15. Microwave sintering of hydroxyapatite-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Y.; Roy, D.M.; Cheng, J.; Roy, R.; Agrawal, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Composites of hydroxyapatite/partially stabilized zirconia (HAp/PSZ) and hydroxyapatite/silicon carbide whiskers (HAp/SiC) were sintered at 1100-1200 degrees C by microwave at 2.45 GHz. Characterization of the sintered composites was carried out by density, microstructure, phase composition, and fracture toughness measurements. The results show that although not yet fully densified, a much higher sintered density in the HAp/PSZ composite was achieved by microwave sintering than by conventional sintering at the same temperature. A relative density of 93% was achieved by 20 min. microwave processing at 1200 degrees C. Comparatively, 2 h conventional sintering of the same material at 1200 degrees C led to only 75.5% relative density. K IC of this microwave sintered HAp/PSZ of 93% density was found to be 3.88 MPa√m, which is 250% of the value for pure HAp of the same density. A further increase in K IC could be expected if full or nearly full densification was achieved. Sintering of PSZ particles in the HAp/PSZ composite was also observed in the microwave processed sample. Microwave sintering of HAp/SiC was not successful in the current study due to the oxidation of SiC in air at high temperature. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Sintering of a class F fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph J. Biernacki; Anil K. Vazrala; H. Wayne Leimer [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-05-15

    The sinterability of a class F fly ash was investigated as a function of processing conditions including sintering temperature (1050-1200{sup o}C) and sintering time (0-90 min). Density, shrinkage, splitting tensile strength, water absorption and residual loss on ignition (RLOI) were evaluated as measures of sintering efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction was used to examine microstructure and phase development due to processing. The results show that premature densification can inhibit complete carbon removal and that carbon combustion is influenced by both internal and external mass transfer conditions. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Alternative sintering methods compared to conventional thermal sintering for inkjet printed silver nanoparticle ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niittynen, J.; Abbel, R.; Mäntysalo, M.; Perelaer, J.; Schubert, U.S.; Lupo, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution several alternative sintering methods are compared to traditional thermal sintering as high temperature and long process time of thermal sintering are increasing the costs of inkjet-printing and preventing the use of this technology in large scale manufacturing. Alternative

  18. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  19. Er2S[SiO4]: An erbium sulfide ortho-oxosilicate with unusual sulfide anion coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartenbach, Ingo; Lauxmann, Petra; Schleid, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    During the reaction of cadmium sulfide with erbium and sulfur in evacuated silica ampoules pink lath-shaped crystals of Er 2 S[SiO 4 ] occur as by-product which were characterized by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. The title compound crystallizes orthorhombically in the space group Cmce (a = 1070.02(8), b = 1235.48(9), c = 683.64(6) pm) with eight formula units per unit cell. Besides isolated ortho-oxosilicate units [SiO 4 ] 4- , the crystal structure contains two crystallographically independent Er 3+ cations which are both eightfold coordinated by six oxygen and two sulfur atoms. The sulfide anions are surrounded by four erbium cations each in the shape of very distorted tetrahedra. These excentric [SEr 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra build up layers according to 2 ∞ [SEr 4/2 ] 4+ by vertex- and edge-connection. They are piled parallel to (010) and separated by the isolated ortho-oxosilicate tetrahedra. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  20. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    bonding) between the salt beads at all the temperatures in which sintering was performed. .... and the sintering of some covalent solids and low- stability ceramics. The entire sintering process is gen- erally considered to occur in ...

  1. Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H; Iverfeldt, Aa [Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden); Borg, H; Lithner, G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. for Applied Environmental Research

    1998-03-01

    This report aims at assessing possible effects of cadmium in the Swedish environment. Swedish soils and soft freshwater systems are, due to a generally poor buffering capacity, severely affected by acidification. In addition, the low salinity in the Baltic Sea imply a naturally poor organism structure, with some important organisms living close to their limit of physiological tolerance. Cadmium in soils is mobilized at low pH, and the availability and toxicity of cadmium in marine systems are enhanced at low salinity. The Swedish environment is therefore extra vulnerable to cadmium pollution. The average concentrations of cadmium in the forest mor layers, agricultural soils, and fresh-waters in Sweden are enhanced compared to `back-ground concentrations`, with a general increasing trend from the north to the south-west, indicating strong impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium originating from the central parts of Europe. In Swedish sea water, total cadmium concentrations, and the fraction of bio-available `free` cadmium, generally increases with decreasing salinity. Decreased emissions of cadmium to the environment have led to decreasing atmospheric deposition during the last decade. The net accumulation of cadmium in the forest mor layer has stopped, and even started to decrease. In northern Sweden, this is due to the decreased deposition, but in southern Sweden the main reason is increased leakage of cadmium from the topsoil as a consequence of acidification. As a result, cadmium in the Swedish environments is undergoing an extended redistribution between different soil compartments, and from the soils to the aquatic systems. 90 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs. With 3 page summary in Swedish

  2. A finite difference model of the iron ore sinter process

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, J.; de Vries, T.L.; Dippenaar, B.A.; Vreugdenburg, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Iron ore fines are agglomerated to produce sinter, which is an important feed material for blast furnaces worldwide. A model of the iron ore sintering process has been developed with the objective of being representative of the sinter pot test, the standard laboratory process in which the behaviour of specific sinter feed mixtures is evaluated. The model aims to predict sinter quality, including chemical quality and physical strength, as well as key sinter process performance parameters such ...

  3. Cadmium: The deformed metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper, which is a somewhat abridged version of the introductory paper of the 2nd International Cadmium Conference in Cannes on February 6 to 8, 1979, outlines the present trends in production, reserves, consumption, world trade, prices, and cost. Due to the lack of statistics on the USSR and other socialist countries, the review is limited to the non-socialist world. (orig./IHOE) [de

  4. Sintered-to-size FBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1984-04-01

    Fabrication of sintered-to-size PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel pellets was completed for testing of proposed FBR product specifications. Approximately 6000 pellets were fabricated to two nominal diameters and two densities by cold pressing and sintering to size. Process control and correlation between test and production batches are discussed

  5. Sintering characteristics of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Popma, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on sintering characteristics of nano-sized ceramic SiO2 particles. The sintering process is studied as a function of temperature using a conventional furnace and using a laser beam. The underlying idea is to combine the nanoceramic sol-gel concept with inkjet technology and

  6. Thermally stable sintered porous metal articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombach, A.L.; Thellmann, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    A sintered porous metal article is provided which is essentially thermally stable at elevated temperatures. In addition, a method for producing such an article is also provided which method comprises preparing a blend of base metal particles and active dispersoid particles, forming the mixture into an article of the desired shape, and heating the so-formed article at sintering temperatures

  7. Sintering of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a high performance polymer having low coefficient of friction, good abrasion resistance, good chemical ... In this study, we report our results on compaction and sintering behaviour of two grades of UHMWPE with reference to the powder morphology, sintering ...

  8. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  9. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  10. Master sintering curves of two different alumina powder compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Pouchly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Concept of Master Sintering Curve is a strong tool for optimizing sintering schedule. The sintering behaviour can be predicted, and sintering activation energy can be calculated with the help of few dilatometric measurements. In this paper an automatic procedure was used to calculate Master Sintering Curves of two different alumina compacts. The sintering activation energies were determined as 640 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 240 nm, respective 770 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 110 nm. The possibility to predict sintering behaviour with the help of Master Sintering Curve was verified.

  11. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  12. Two steps sintering alumina doped with niobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, L.B.; Hatzfeld, J.; Heck, M.; Pokorny, A.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, high surface area commercial alumina was doped with niobia and sintered in two steps in order to obtain dense materials with lower processing temperatures. The powders were milled and uniaxially pressed (200 MPa). The first step of sintering took place at 1100°C for 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours, followed by the second step at 1350°C for 3 hours. The relative density, porosity and water absorption of the samples were determined by the Archimedes method. The crystalline phases were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the morphology of the samples after sintering, evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the use of niobia combined with the two steps sintering promotes an increase in the density of the material, even at lower sintering temperatures. (author)

  13. Sintered ceramics having controlled density and porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassfield, H.C.; DeHollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed for sintering ceramic uranium dioxide powders, in which ammonium oxalate is admixed with the powder prior to being pressed into a cylindrical green body, so that the end-point density of the final nuclear-reactor fuel product can be controlled. When the green body is heated, the ammonium oxalate decomposes and leaves discrete porosity in the sintered body, which corresponds to the ammonium oxalate regions in the green body. Thus the end-point density of the sintered body is a function of the amount of ammonium oxalate added. The final density of the sintered product is about 90-97% of the theoretical. The addition of ammonium oxalate also allows control of the pore size and distribution throughout the fuel. The process leaves substantially no impurities in the sintered strucuture. (DN)

  14. On the sintering kinetics in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marajofsky, A.

    1998-01-01

    The fabrication process of UO 2 pellets from powders involve pressing and a sintering anneal at high temperature (1650 deg. C to 1750 deg. C) during two or more hours in a hydrogen atmosphere. An alternative method is the oxidative sintering, made at lower temperature (1000 deg. C to 1300 deg. C) in a CO 2 or CO/CO 2 atmosphere. The sintering phenomena consist in the densification of the material by a thermal treatment below the fusion point. For a compact made by pressing a powder, sintering is the process of annulation of the porosity present in the compact or pellet. Several theories describe the sintering phenomena dividing it in three stages, initial, intermediate and final: in all of them the densification is a continuous growing function of time. Nevertheless it has been experimentally reported that a reduction of the density occurs in the third step of the sintering. The phenomena has been called solarization. Solarization has been attributed to the effect of the evolved gases from additives or to the CO 2 atmosphere in oxidative sintering. Thus, it is convenient to distinguish between solarization in oxidative or reducing conditions. Reducing solarization is a consequence of the tendency towards equilibrium of intergranular pores. In oxidative sintering it occurs in the reducing anneal after the sintering and is due to the change in the lattice parameter. This work shows examples of both types of solarization and qualitative interpretation of this phenomena. Both situations show the need of strict control of the sintering and powder production conditions. (author)

  15. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  16. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  17. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun; Paek, Domyung

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 μg/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 μg/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population

  18. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Domyung [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: paekdm@snu.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 {mu}g/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 {mu}g/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population.

  19. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  20. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P. titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and studied the effects of common contaminants (C, O, N on sintering densification of titanium. It is found that on the surface of the as-sintered titanium, a severely contaminated porous scale was formed and identified as titanium oxycarbonitride. Despite the porous surface, the sintered density in the sample interiors increased with increasing sintering temperature and holding time. Tensile specimens cut from different positions within a large sintered cylinder reveal different tensile properties, strongly dependent on the impurity level mainly carbon and oxygen. Depending on where the specimen is taken from the sintered compact, ultimate tensile strength varied from 300 to 580 MPa. An average tensile elongation of 5% to 7% was observed. Largely depending on the interstitial contents, the fracture modes from typical brittle intergranular fracture to typical ductile fracture.

  1. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    -1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction......, the biggest deviations being found for salt rich (i.e. straw derived) ashes.A simple model assuming proportionality between fly ash fusion and deposit formation was found to be capable of ranking deposition rates for the different straw derived fly ashes, whereas for the fly ashes from coal/straw co-firing...

  2. Thermodynamics and mechanisms of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pask, J.A.

    1978-10-01

    A phenomenological overview and exploration of the thermodynamic and geometric factors play a role in the process of densification of model compact systems consisting of crystalline spheres of uniform size in regular and irregular packing that form grain boundaries at every contact point. A further assumption is the presence of isotropic surface and grain boundary energies. Although such systems are unrealistic in comparison with normal powder compacts, their potential sintering behavior can be analyzed and provided with a limiting set of behavior conditions which can be looked upon as one boundary condition. This approach is logically realistic since it is easier to understand and provide a basis for understanding the more complex real powder systems

  3. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  4. Cadmium contamination of agricultural soils and crops resulting from sphalerite weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, T.C.; Braungardt, C.B.; Rieuwerts, J.; Worsfold, P.

    2014-01-01

    The biogeochemistry and bioavailability of cadmium, released during sphalerite weathering in soils, were investigated under contrasting agricultural scenarios to assess health risks associated with sphalerite dust transport to productive soils from mining. Laboratory experiments (365 d) on temperate and sub-tropical soils amended with sphalerite ( −1 ). Wheat grown in spiked temperate soil accumulated ≈38% (29 μmol kg −1 ) of the liberated Cd, exceeding food safety limits. In contrast, rice grown in flooded sub-tropical soil accumulated far less Cd (0.60 μmol kg −1 ) due to neutral soil pH and Cd bioavailability was possibly also controlled by secondary sulfide formation. The results demonstrate long-term release of Cd to soil porewaters during sphalerite weathering. Under oxic conditions, Cd may be sufficiently bioavailable to contaminate crops destined for human consumption; however flooded rice production limits the impact of sphalerite contamination. -- Highlights: • Sphalerite containing cadmium presents a hazard when present in agricultural soils. • Sphalerite dissolution was slow (0.6–1.2% y −1 ) but constant in contrasting soils. • Cadmium was released during dissolution and was bioavailable to wheat and rice. • Wheat grains accumulated potentially harmful cadmium concentrations. • Flooded paddy (reducing) soils reduced cadmium bioavailability to rice. -- Sphalerite dissolves steadily in oxic agricultural soils and can release highly bioavailable Cd, which may contaminate food crops destined for human consumption

  5. Science of sintering and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Some new books published by M.Yu. Baljshin, V.A. Ivensen, V.V. Skorohod and others are characterized by the wish to give a complete approach to the problems of sintering theory. Bearing just this in mind while writing the book ''An Essay on the Generalization of Sintering Theory'' (G.V.Samsonov, M.M. Ristic with the collaborators) an idea was born: to ask the most eminent scientists in this field to present their own opinions on the theme ''The Science of Sintering and Modern Views on its Future''. There were formed 18 questions, given in the appendix to be answered. The received answers were presented in 10 chapters of this book. The fourth part of the book consists of papers of eminent scientists engaged in the field of sintering science (some of which were published here for the first time). This material is published in the book with the consent of the authors and these original contributions provide a more profound knowledge of sintering. The initial idea, that the book should have a monograph character and in which the answers would serve as some data on the latest notions of the science of sintering, was somewhat changed since the original opinions of individual scientists are given in the book and these, are sometimes very contradictory. This, in fact, gives the book a special charm because the unsolved problems in the science of sintering are most evidently stressed in this way

  6. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  7. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  8. Cadmium and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safaya, N.M.; McLean, J.E.; Halverson, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium and zinc are naturally occurring trace metals that are often considered together because of their close geochemical association and similarities in chemical reactivity. The loss of two electrons from an atom of Cd or Zn imparts to each an electron configuration with completely filled d orbitals; this results in a highly stable 2/sup +/ oxidation state. But Cd and Zn differ greatly in their significance to biological systems. Whereas Zn is an essential nutrient for plants, animals, and humans, Cd is best known for its toxicity to plants and as a causative agent of several disease syndromes in animals and humans

  9. Sintering and microstructure of ice: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackford, Jane R

    2007-01-01

    Sintering of ice is driven by the thermodynamic requirement to decrease surface energy. The structural morphology of ice in nature has many forms-from snowflakes to glaciers. These forms and their evolution depend critically on the balance between the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved. Ice is a crystalline material so scientific understanding and approaches from more conventional materials can be applied to ice. The early models of solid state ice sintering are based on power law models originally developed in metallurgy. For pressure sintering of ice, these are based on work on hot isostatic pressing of metals and ceramics. Recent advances in recognizing the grain boundary groove geometry between sintering ice particles require models that use new approaches in materials science. The newer models of sintering in materials science are beginning to incorporate more realistic processing conditions and microstructural complexity, and so there is much to be gained from applying these to ice in the future. The vapour pressure of ice is high, which causes it to sublime readily. The main mechanism for isothermal sintering of ice particles is by vapour diffusion; however other transport mechanisms certainly contribute. Plastic deformation with power law creep combined with recrystallization become important mechanisms in sintering with external pressure. Modern experimental techniques, low temperature scanning electron microscopy and x-ray tomography, are providing new insights into the evolution of microstructures in ice. Sintering in the presence of a small volume fraction of the liquid phase causes much higher bond growth rates. This may be important in natural snow which contains impurities that form a liquid phase. Knowledge of ice microstructure and sintering is beneficial in understanding mechanical behaviour in ice friction and the stability of snow slopes prone to avalanches. (topical review)

  10. Design of sintering-stable heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata

    One of the major issues in the use of metal nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis is sintering. Sintering occurs at elevated temperatures because of increased mobility of nanoparticles, leading to their agglomeration and, as a consequence, to the deactivation of the catalyst. It is an emerging...... problem especially for the noble metals-based catalysis. These metals being expensive and scarce, it is worth developing catalyst systems which preserve their activity over time. Encapsulation of nanoparticles inside zeolites is one of the ways to prevent sintering. Entrapment of nanoparticles inside...

  11. Solidification of HLLW into sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O-Oka, K.; Ohta, T.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated HLLW from the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai was solidified into sintered ceramics by normal sintering or hot-pressing with addition of some oxides. Among various ceramic products obtained so far, the most preferable was nepheline-type sintered solids formed with addition of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 to the simulated waste calcine. The solid shows advantageous properties in leach rate and mechanical strength, which suggest that the ceramic solids were prepared with additions of ZrO 2 or MnO 2 , and some of them showed good characteristics

  12. Effect of rigid inclusions on sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, M.N.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    The predictions of recent theoretical studies on the effect of inert, rigid inclusions on the sintering of ceramic powder matrices are examined and compared with experimental data. The densification of glass matrix composites with inclusion volume fractions of ≤0.15 can be adequately explained by Scherer's theory for viscous sintering with rigid inclusions. Inclusions cause a vast reduction in the densification rates of polycrystalline matrix composites even at low inclusion volume fractions. Models put forward to explain the sintering of polycrystalline matrix composites are discussed

  13. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  15. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  16. Cadmium colours: composition and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, J.; Knuutinen, U.

    2004-01-01

    The composition and the properties of cadmium aquarelle colours are discussed. The examined colours were 24 different aquarelle cadmium colours from six different manufacturers. The colours ranged from light, bright yellows to dark, deep-red tones. The aim of this research was to find out if the pigments contain cadmium salts: sulphides and/or selenides. This information will help in choosing watercolours in conservation processes. Today, aquarelle colours not containing cadmium pigments are being sold as cadmium colours; thus their properties might be different from actual cadmium colours. The aim of the research was to verify that the colour samples contained cadmium pigments and to estimate their compositions and ageing properties. Element analyses were performed from colour samples using micro-chemical tests and X-ray fluorescence measurements. Thin-layer chromatography was used for analysing gum Arabic as a possible binding medium in the chosen colour samples. Through ageing tests, the resistance of the colour samples to the exposure to light, heat and humidity was studied. Visible-light spectroscopy was used in determining the hues and hue changes of the aquarelle colour samples. The spectrophotometer used the CIE L * a * b * tone colour measuring system. From the colour measurements the changes in the lightness/darkness, the redness, the yellowness and the saturation of the samples were examined. (orig.)

  17. Cadmium in the biofuel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aabyhammar, T.; Fahlin, M.; Holmroos, S.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of biofuel depletes the soil of important nutrients. Investigations are being made of possibilities to return most of these nutrients by spreading the ashes remaining after combustion in the forest or on field. Return of ashes implies that both beneficial and harmful substances are returned. This study has been conducted to illustrate that the return of cadmium implies the greatest risk for negative influences. The occurrence, utilization, emissions and effects of cadmium are discussed. The behaviour of cadmium in soil is discussed in detail. Flows and quantities of cadmium in Swedish society are reviewed. Flows and quantities of both total and plant available cadmium in the entire forest and arable areas of Sweden are given. A scenario for a bioenergy system of max 100 TWh is discussed. The cadmium flow in different biofuels and forest raw products, and anticipated amounts of ashes and cadmium concentrations, are calculated. Power production from biofuels is surveyed. Possibilities to clean ashes have been examined in laboratory experiments. Ashes and trace elements occurring as a result of the gasification of biofuels are reviewed. Strategies for handling ashes are discussed. Proposals on continued inputs in both the biological and technical sciences are made. 146 refs, 23 figs, 38 tabs

  18. Two-dimensional simulation of sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Pinto, Lucio Carlos Martins; Vasconcelos, Wander L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of two-dimensional simulations are directly applied to systems in which one of the dimensions is much smaller than the others, and to sections of three dimensional models. Moreover, these simulations are the first step of the analysis of more complex three-dimensional systems. In this work, two basic features of the sintering process are studied: the types of particle size distributions related to the powder production processes and the evolution of geometric parameters of the resultant microstructures during the solid-state sintering. Random packing of equal spheres is considered in the sintering simulation. The packing algorithm does not take into account the interactive forces between the particles. The used sintering algorithm causes the densification of the particle set. (author)

  19. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  20. U3O8 microspheres sintering kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, A.L.E.

    1986-01-01

    U 3 O 8 microspheres sintering kinetics was determined using a hot-stage optical microscopy apparatus, able to reach temperature up to 1350 0 C in controlled atmospheres. The sintered material had its microstructure analysed by optical and electron microscopy. The microspheres were characterized initialy utilizing X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. The equation which describes the microspheres shrinkage in function of the time was obtained using finite difference analysis X-ray diffractometry indicated hexagonal structure for the microspheres main starting material, ammonium diuranate thermogravimetric analysis showed reduction of this material to U 3 O 8 at 600 0 C. Ceramography results showed 5 hours sintered microspheres grain sizes G vary with the temperature. Sintered U 3 O 8 micrographs compared with published results for UO 2 , indicate similar homogeneity microstructural characteristics and suggest the processed micorspheres to be potentially useful as nuclear fuels. (Author) [pt

  1. Pressureless sintering of whisker-toughened ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method.

  2. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered .... product, could be due to oxidation of SiC, e.g. 50% weight gain of a green SiC sample ... because, the charging current is 90° advanced in phase, ideally, with respect to the ...

  3. Techniques for ceramic sintering using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimrey, H.D.; Janney, M.A.; Becher, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of microwave energy for ceramic sintering offers exciting new possibilities for materials processing. Based on experience gathered in microwave processing associated with the heating of fusion plasmas, we have developed hardware and methods for uniformly heating ceramic parts of large volume and irregular shape to temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, in vacuum or pressurized atmosphere. Microwave processing at 28 GHz yields enhanced densification rates with a corresponding reduction in sintering temperatures. 6 refs

  4. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  5. Spark Plasma Sintering of Ultracapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Curtis W. [CK Technologies, Camirillo, CA (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tucker, Dennis [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheng, Zhongyang [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A solid-state ultracapacitor module to replace standard electrochemical batteries would achieve major performance gains and mass/volume reduction. This report summarizes a project to evaluate an alternative sintering process to produce a solid-state ultracapacitor to overcome the limitations of both the electrochemical batteries presently in use on spacecraft and of currently available electrochemical ultracapacitors. It will provide a robust energy storage device with higher reliability, wider working temperature range, longer lifetime, and less weight and volume than electrochemical batteries. As modern electronics decrease in size, more efficient and robust remote power is needed. Current state-of-the-art rechargeable batteries cannot be rapidly charged, contain harmful chemicals, and suffer from early wear-out mechanisms. Solid-state ultracapacitors are recyclable energy storage devices that offer the promise of higher power and a greater number of charge/discharge cycles than current rechargeable batteries. In addition, the theoretical energy density when compared to current electrochemical batteries indicates that a significant weight savings is possible. This is a project to develop a very high density solid-state ultracapacitor with giant permittivity and acceptable dielectric loss to overcome the energy-density barrier such that it will be a suitable replacement for batteries.

  6. Analysis of Laser Sintering Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Markovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The new, high-tech development and customization is one ofthe most important factors in promoting the country‘s economicgrowth indicators. The economic downturn in the industryrequires technology and equipment using a minimumof raw materials and providing maximum performance. Thisstatement perfectly describes the innovative, forward-looking,cost-effective laser powder sintering (SLS technology. Here,thanks to the latest engineering achievements, product surfacesare modified and improved, they gain new characteristics. SLSis viable in automobile, engineering, construction, aerospace,aircraft, printing, medical and other areas.In order to create a product which meets the standards andtechnical documentation it is necessary to use and ensure highquality of raw materials, high-end equipment, qualified personnel,the working environment with proper climatic conditions, ergonomics,etc. But all of these, the quality of the product becomesthe decisive indicators meaningless if know how to properly selectthe laser processing operation. Scanning speed, beam power,pulse frequency, protective gases, powder layer thickness – allof them are the physical and mechanical characteristics of thechange in a small range changes the quality of the product of thefuture, the field of application and performance characteristics.

  7. Cadmium-containing waste and recycling possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, V.; Rauhut, A.

    1981-01-01

    To begin with, the processes of cadmium production from zinc ores in smelting plants or from intermediates of other metal works are described. A considerable amount of the cadmium is obtained in the recycling process in zinc, lead, and copper works. The way of the cadmium-containing intermediaries, processing, enrichment, and disposal of cadmium waste are described. Uses of cadmium and its compounds are mentioned, and cadmium consumption in the years 1973-1977 in West Germany is presented in a table. Further chapters discuss the production and the way of waste during production and processing of cadmium-containing products, the problem of cadmium in household refuse and waste incineration plants, and the problem of cadmium emissions. (IHOE) [de

  8. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. A study on some properties of sintered stainless steel powder compacts with sintering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bang Sik; Kim, Kwan Hyu; Lee, Doh Jae; Choi, Dap Chun

    1986-01-01

    Sintered specimens for the mechanical and corrosion tests were prepared from 316L, 410L and 434L stainless steel powder compacts with green densities in the range of 6.2∼7.0g/cm 3 . The experimental variables studied were green density, sintering atmosphere, temperature and time, type of lubricant used and cooling rate after sintering operation. Mechanical properties of green compacts and sintered specimens were evaluated. The corrosion tests were performed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique. Mechanical properties were very sensitive to the sintering atmosphere; sintering in dissociated ammonia resulted in the strengthing but embrittlement of sintered 316L, 410L and 434L strainless steel powder compacts. Their corrosion resistance was also decreased. The tensile strength was increased with increases in sintering time and temperature while the decreases in the yield strength were observed. The tensile properties of green compacts were shown to closely related to the green density. Addition of 1% acrawax as a lubricant was appeared to be most effective for the improvement of green strength. (Author)

  10. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  11. Discrimination symbol applying method for sintered nuclear fuel product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Jin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a symbol applying method for applying discrimination information such as an enrichment degree on the end face of a sintered nuclear product. Namely, discrimination symbols of information of powders are applied by a sintering aid to the end face of a molded member formed by molding nuclear fuel powders under pressure. Then, the molded product is sintered. The sintering aid comprises aluminum oxide, a mixture of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide, aluminum hydride or aluminum stearate alone or in admixture. As an applying means of the sintering aid, discrimination symbols of information of powders are drawn by an isostearic acid on the end face of the molded product, and the sintering aid is sprayed thereto, or the sintering aid is applied directly, or the sintering aid is suspended in isostearic acid, and the suspension is applied with a brush. As a result, visible discrimination information can be applied to the sintered member easily. (N.H.)

  12. Biological indicators of cadmium exposure and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Z A; Smith, L M

    1986-01-01

    The increasing environmental and occupational exposure of populations to cadmium creates the need for biological indicators of cadmium exposure and toxicity. The advantages and disadvantages of monitoring blood cadmium, urinary, fecal, hair, and tissue cadmium, serum creatine, beta 2-microglobulin, alpha 1-anti-trypsin and other proteins, and urinary amino acids, enzymes, total proteins, glucose, beta 2-microglobulin, retinol-binding protein, lysozyme, and metallothionein are discussed. It is concluded that urinary cadmium, metallothionein and beta 2-microglubulin may be used together to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. 66 references.

  13. High power nickel - cadmium cells with fiber electrodes (FNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschka, F.; Schlieck, D.

    1986-01-01

    Nickel cadmium batteries differ greatly in their mechanical design and construction of the electrodes. Using available electrode constructions, batteries are designed which meet the requirements of specific applications and offer optimum performance. Pocket- and tubular cells are basically developed with the technology of the year 1895. Since then some improvements with todays technology have been made. The sintered cells use the technology of the 1930's and they are still limited to high power application. With this knowledge and the technology of today the fiber-structured nickel electrode (FNC) was developed at DAUG laboratory, a subsidiary company of Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen. After ten years of experience in light weight prototype batteries for electric vehicles (1-2), the system was brought into production by a new company, DAUG-HOPPECKE. Characteristics of fiber electrodes: thickness and size can be easily changed; pure active materials are used; high conductor density; high elasticity of the structure; high porosity. Since 1983 NiCd-batteries with fiber-structured nickel electrodes (FNC) have been in production. Starting with the highly demanded cell-types for low, medium and high performance called L, M and H according to IEC 623 for low, medium and high performance applications, the program was recently completed with the X-type cell for very high power, as an alternative to sintered cells

  14. Laser sintering of metal powders on top of sintered layers under multiple-line laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Bin; Zhang Yuwen

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model for multiple-line sintering of loose powders on top of multiple sintered layers under the irradiation of a moving Gaussian laser beam is carried out. The overlaps between vertically deposited layers and adjacent lines which strengthen bonding are taken into account. The energy equation is formulated using the temperature transforming model and solved by the finite volume method. The effects of the number of the existing sintered layers, porosity and initial temperature coupled with the optimal combination laser intensity and scanning velocity are presented. The results show that the liquid pool moves slightly towards the negative scanning direction and the shape of the liquid pool becomes shallower with higher scanning velocity. A higher laser intensity is needed to achieve the required overlaps when the number of the existing sintered layers increases. Increasing porosity or initial temperature enhances the sintering process and thus less intensity is needed for the overlap requirement

  15. Effects of sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on sintering of gadolinia-doped ceria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Rafael Morgado

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on the sintering of ceria containing 10 mol% gadolinia (GdO 1.5 ) were systematically investigated. The main physical parameter was the specific surface area of the initial powders. Nanometric powders with three different specific surface areas were utilized, 210 m 2 /g, 36,2 m 2 /g e 7,4 m 2 /g. The influence on the densification, and micro structural evolution were evaluated. The starting sintering temperature was verified to decrease with increasing on the specific surface area of raw powders. The densification was accelerated for the materials with smaller particle size. Sintering paths for crystallite growth were obtained. Master sintering curves for gadolinium-doped ceria were constructed for all initial powders. A computational program was developed for this purpose. The results for apparent activation energy showed noticeable dependence with specific surface area. In this work, the apparent activation energy for densification increased with the initial particle size of powders. The evolution of the particle size distributions on non isothermal sintering was investigated by WPPM method. It was verified that the grain growth controlling mechanism on gadolinia doped ceria is the pore drag for initial stage and beginning of intermediate stage. The effects of the sintering atmosphere on the stoichiometry deviation of ceria, densification, microstructure evolution, and electrical conductivity were analyzed. Inert, oxidizing, and reducing atmospheres were utilized on this work. Deviations on ceria stoichiometry were verified on the bulk materials. The deviation verified was dependent of the specific surface area and sintering atmosphere. Higher reduction potential atmospheres increase Ce 3+ bulk concentration after sintering. Accelerated grain growth and lower electrical conductivities were verified when reduction reactions are significantly present on sintering. (author)

  16. Temperature, pressure, and density of electron, atom and ion, in the breaking arc of silver-cadmium contacts used in medium current region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Teizo

    1979-01-01

    Wear of silver-cadmium contacts at the time of breaking was studied. The materials of the contacts were silver-cadmium alloy and silver-cadmium oxide sinter. The spectra of arc discharge generated at the time of breaking contact were analyzed with a monochromator photo multiplier. The ratio of the densities of cadmium and silver atoms in the arc can be estimated from the observed intensities of spectrum lines. The electron density is obtained from the arc current density. The proportion of the cadmium atoms in the arc was about 30 percent. The densities of silver atoms and cadmium atoms can be estimated by the principle of thermal ionization equilibrium. The ion densities were also estimated. The partial pressures of silver and cadmium atoms in the arc can be obtained from the Boyle-Charles' law. A formula which gives the number of atoms liberated from the surfaces of contacts at the time of breaking was given by Boddy et al. (Kato, T.)

  17. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  18. Master sintering curve: A practical approach to its construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a Master Sintering Curve (MSC is a strong tool for optimizing the sintering process. However, constructing the MSC from sintering data involves complicated and time-consuming calculations. A practical method for the construction of a MSC is presented in the paper. With the help of a few dilatometric sintering experiments the newly developed software calculates the MSC and finds the optimal activation energy of a given material. The software, which also enables sintering prediction, was verified by sintering tetragonal and cubic zirconia, and alumina of two different particle sizes.

  19. Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide as a new stable n-type oxide thermoelectric material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Bhowmik, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide (Sc-doped ZnCdO) is proposed as a new n-type oxide thermoelectric material. The material is sintered in air to maintain the oxygen stoichiometry and avoid instability issues. The successful alloying of CdO with ZnO at a molar ratio of 1 : 9 significantly reduced...... is a good candidate for improving the overall conversion efficiencies in oxide thermoelectric modules. Meanwhile, Sc-doped ZnCdO is robust in air at high temperatures, whereas other n-type materials, such as Al-doped ZnO, will experience rapid degradation of their electrical conductivity and ZT....

  20. Integrated analysis of oxide nuclear fuel sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Kuzmin, R.; Tenishev, A.; Timoshin, I.; Khlunov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Petrov, I.

    2011-01-01

    Dilatometric and thermal-gravimetric investigations have been carried out for the sintering process of oxide nuclear fuel in gaseous Ar - 8% H 2 atmosphere at temperatures up to 1600 0 C. The pressed compacts were fabricated under real production conditions of the OAO MSZ with application of two different technologies, so called 'dry' and 'wet' technologies. Effects of the grain size growth after the heating to different temperatures were observed. In order to investigate the effects produced by rate of heating on properties of sintered fuel pellets, the heating rates were varied from 1 to 8 0 C per minute. Time of isothermal overexposure at maximal temperature (1600 0 C) was about 8 hours. Real production conditions were imitated. The results showed that the sintering process of the fuel pellets produced by two technologies differs. The samples sintered under different heating rates were studied with application of scanning electronic microscopy analysis for determination of mean grain size. A simulation of heating profile for industrial furnaces was performed to reduce the beam cycles and estimate the effects of variation of the isothermal overexposure temperatures. Based on this data, an optimization of the sintering conditions was performed in operations terms of OAO MSZ. (authors)

  1. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing novel sintered cobalt--rare earth intermetallic products which can be magnetized to form permanent magnets having stable improved magnetic properties. A cobalt--rare earth metal alloy is formed having a composition which at sintering temperature falls outside the composition covered by the single Co 5 R intermetallic phase on the rare earth richer side. The alloy contains a major amount of the Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a second solid CoR phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase. The specific cobalt and rare earth metal content of the alloy is substantially the same as that desired in the sintered product. The alloy, in particulate form, is pressed into compacts and sintered to the desired density. The sintered product is comprised of a major amount of the Co 5 R solid intermetallic phase and up to about 35 percent of the product of the second solid CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase

  2. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  3. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  4. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments....

  5. New materials through a variety of sintering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, L.; Cyboroń, J.; Cygan, S.; Laszkiewicz-Łukasik, J.; Podsiadło, M.; Novak, P.; Holovenko, Y.

    2018-03-01

    New sintering techniques make it possible to obtain materials with special properties that are impossible to obtain by conventional sintering techniques. This issue is especially important for ceramic materials for application under extreme conditions. Following the tendency to limit critical materials in manufacturing processes, the use of W, Si, B, Co, Cr should be limited, also. One of the cheapest and widely available materials is aluminum oxide, which shows differences in phase composition, grain size, hardness, strain and fracture toughness of the same type of powder, sintered via various methods. In this paper the alumina was sintered using the conventional free sintering process, microwave sintering, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), high pressure-high temperature method (HP-HT) and High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HP SPS). Phase composition analysis, by X-ray diffraction of the alumina materials sintered using various methods, was carried out. For the conventional sintering method, compacts are composed of α-Al2O3 and θ-Al2O3. For compacts sintered using SPS, microwave and HP-HT methods, χ-Al2O3 and γ-Al2O3 phases were additionally present. Mechanical and physical properties of the obtained materials were compared between the methods of sintering. On the basis of images from scanning electron microscope quantitative analysis was performed to determine the degree of grain growth of alumina after sintering.

  6. Influence of sintering temperature on mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered pre-alloyed Ti-6Al-4 V powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthuchamy, A.; Patel, Paridh; Rajadurai, M. [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Chaurisiya, Jitendar K. [NIT, Suratkal (India); Annamalai, A. Raja [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India). Centre for Innovative Manufacturing Research

    2018-04-01

    Spark plasma sintering provides faster heating that can create fully, or near fully, dense samples without significant grain growth. In this study, pre-alloyed Ti-6Al-4 V powder compact samples produced through field assisted sintering in a spark plasma sintering machine are compared as a function of consolidation temperature. The effect of sintering temperature on the densification mechanism, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered Ti-6Al-4 V alloy compacts was investigated in detail. The compact, sintered at 1100 C, exhibited near net density, highest hardness and strength as compared to the other compacts processed at a temperature lower than 1100 C.

  7. Uptake and distribution of cadmium in corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, J.W.; Vetter, R.J.; Christian, J.E.; Kessler, W.V.; McFee, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of cadmium in corn (Zea mays) treated at various time intervals after planting and sampled at various times after treatment were measured. Cadmium was found to accumulate in all parts sampled. As shown in field studies, stems and leaves generally concentrated more cadmium than did husks, cobs, kernels, silks, or tassels. Samples of stems and leaves from corn treated 23 days after planting and sampled 5 days later exhibited higher concentrations of cadmium than samples taken 25, 45, 65, or 85 days after treatment. Concentrations generally decreased with time. Greenhouse studies showed that corn exposed to cadmium for the longest period of time accumulated the greatest total cadmium. The highest cadmium concentrations were found in the base or lowest leaves sampled 45 days after planting; this suggests a useful technique for quick screening corn crops for cadmium pollution

  8. Zinc-induced protection against cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, J.L.; Schnell, R.C.

    1978-02-01

    Pretreatment of male rats with cadmium acetate potentiates the duration of hexobarbital hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal drug metabolism. Pretreatment of rats with zinc acetate protects against these alterations in drug action elicited by cadmium.

  9. Sintering method for nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omuta, Hirofumi; Nakabayashi, Shigetoshi.

    1997-01-01

    When sintering a compressed nuclear fuel powder in an atmosphere of a mixed gas comprising hydrogen and nitrogen, steams are added to the mixed gas to suppress the nitrogen content in sintered nuclear fuel pellets. In addition, the content of nitrogen impurities in the nuclear fuel pellets can be controlled by controlling the amount of steams to be added to the mixed gas, namely, by controlling the dew point as an index thereof. If the addition amount of steams to the mixed gas is determined by controlling the dew point as an index, the content of nitrogen impurities in the sintered nuclear fuel pellets can be controlled reliably to a specified value of 0.0075% or less. If ammonolyzed gas is used as the mixed gas, a more economical mixed gas can be obtained than in the case of forming mixed gas by mixing the hydrogen gas and the nitrogen gas. (N.H.)

  10. Electro sinter forging of titanium disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    by measuring the electrical resistance during the sintering process [5], since low electrical resistance corresponds to high density. It is, however, necessary to be aware that increased temperature, on the other hand, increases the resistance. SEM micrographs and Computed Tomography (CT) are carried out......Electro sinter forging (ESF) is a new sintering process based on the principle of electrical Joule heating. In the present work, middle frequency direct current (MFDC) was flowing through the powder compact, which was under mechanical pressure. The main parameters are the high electrical current......, up to 10 kA, and the low voltage, 1-2 V, resulting in heat generation in the powder. Figure 1 shows the experimental setup. The punches were made of a conductive material; namely a copper alloy. The die, which has to be electrically insulating, was made of alumina. The ESF process takes 3-4s...

  11. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.

    1975-01-01

    This patent describes a sintered product having substantially stable permanent magnet properties in air at room temperature. It comprises compacted particulate cobalt--rare earth alloy consisting essentially of a Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase, where R is a rare earth metal. The Co 5 R intermetallic phase is present in an amount of at least 65 percent by weight of the sintered product and the CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase is present in a positive amount having a value ranging up to about 35 percent by weight of the product. The sintered product has a density of at least 87 percent and has pores which are substantially noninterconnecting and wherein the component grains have an average size less than 30 microns

  12. Method of manufacturing sintered nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain composite pellets with an improved strength. Method: A core mainly composed of fuel materials is previously prepared, embedded into the central portion of a pellet, silted therearound with cladding material, and then pressmolded and sintered. For instance, a rugby-ball like core body with the maximum outer diameter of 6 mm and the height of 6 mm is made by compressive molding with uranium dioxide powder, then coating material comprising the same powder incorporated with 0.1 % by weight of SiC fibers is filled around the core body, which is molded into a composite pellet by means of pressing and then sintered at 1600 0 C, to obtain a sintered pellet of 93.5 % theoretical density. As the result of the compression test for the pellet, it showed a strength greater by 15 % than that of the similar mono-layer pellet. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  14. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  15. Combustion of fuels with low sintering temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, D

    1950-08-16

    A furnace for the combustion of low sintering temperature fuel consists of a vertical fuel shaft arranged to be charged from above and supplied with combustion air from below and containing a system of tube coils extending through the fuel bed and serving the circulation of a heat-absorbing fluid, such as water or steam. The tube-coil system has portions of different heat-absorbing capacity which are so related to the intensity of combustion in the zones of the fuel shaft in which they are located as to keep all parts of the fuel charge below sintering temperature.

  16. Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

    2012-03-15

    The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

  17. Bioavailability of cadmium from linseed and cocoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Rasmussen, Rie Romme

    In Denmark and EU the exposure of cadmium from food is at a level that is relatively close to the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI). This report describes an investigation of the bioavailability of cadmium in selected food items known to contain high levels of cadmium. The purpose was to provide data...

  18. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  19. Current state of the Uranium dioxide sintering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Devyatko, Y.; Tenishev, A.; Khlunov, A.; Khomyakov, O.

    2011-01-01

    The basic approaches to the description of the ceramics sintering phenomenon are considered. It is established that diffusive sintering models incorrectly describe an intermediate stage of this process. The physical model of sintering, considering the substance plastic flow of pressing under the influence of internal stress forces and capillary forces, as the basic mechanism defining the shrinkage of sintering oxide nuclear fuel, is offered. (authors)

  20. Peculiarities of formation and sintering of fine dispersed molybdenum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalamazov, R.U.; Pak, V.I.; Tsvetkov, Yu.V.; Lem, I.N.

    1989-01-01

    Pressing of fine dispersed Mo powders sintering of compacts in H 2 and vacuum is studied. It is shown that powder preannealing at 600 deg C in H 2 for 2 hours is necessary for formation of dense sintered compacts. Qualitatively choice of pressing conditions is possible when using electron-positron annihilation method. Peculiarities of compacting and sintering of fine- and coarse-dispersed powder mixtures are considered. The obtained results are discussed from the view point of sintering recrystallization mechanism

  1. Coprecipitation of cadmium with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Osamu; Kumagai, Tetsu; Shigematsu, Tsunenobu; Matsui, Masakazu

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of cadmium between precipitates of calcite and saturated aqueous solution was measured at 25 0 C to understand the distribution of cadmium in the bivalves. Calcite was precipitated from calcium bicarbonate solution by the gradual release of carbon dioxide. The cadmium ions were coprecipitated in calcite, obeying the logarithmic distribution law. The apparent distribution coefficient was decreased as α, α'-dipyridyl increased, but the true distribution coefficient was found to be an almost constant value, 560. This value is fairly close to the ratio of solubility product constants K sub(calcite)/K sub(CdCO 3 ), 890. This suggests that the deviation of the present solid solution from ideality is not very large. (auth.)

  2. Sintering of dioxide pellets in an oxidizing atmosphere (CO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists in the study of the sintering process of U O 2 pellets in an oxidizing atmosphere. Sintering tests were performed in an CO 2 atmosphere and the influence of temperature and time on the pellets density and microstructure were verified. The results obtained were compared to those from the conventional sintering process and its efficiency was confirmed. (author)

  3. Improving NASICON Sinterability through Crystallization under High Frequency Electrical Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eLisenker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high frequency (HF electric fields on the crystallization and sintering rates of a lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP ion conducting ceramic was investigated. LAGP with the nominal composition Li1.5Al0.5Ge1.5(PO43 was crystallized and sintered, both conventionally and under effect of electrical field. Electrical field application, of 300V/cm at 1MHz, produced up to a 40% improvement in sintering rate of LAGP that was crystallized and sintered under the HF field. Heat sink effect of the electrodes appears to arrest thermal runaway and subsequent flash behavior. Sintered pellets were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM and EIS to compare conventionally and field sintered processes. The as-sintered structure appears largely unaffected by the field as the sintering curves tend to converge beyond initial stages of sintering. Differences in densities and microstructure after 1 hour of sintering were minor with measured sintering strains of 31% vs. 26% with and without field, respectively . Ionic conductivity of the sintered pellets was evaluated and no deterioration due to the use of HF field was noted, though capacitance of grain boundaries due to secondary phases was significantly increased.

  4. Effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.P.; Liu, W.Q.; Huang, Y.L.; Ma, S.C.; Zhong, Z.C.

    2014-01-01

    Sintered NdFeB-based permanent magnets were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and a conventional method to investigate the mechanical and magnetic properties. The experimental results showed that sintered NdFeB magnet prepared by the spark plasma sintering (SPS NdFeB) possesses a better mechanical properties compared to the conventionally sintered one, of which the maximum value of bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively. The effects of sintering temperature on bending strength and Vickers hardness were investigated. It was shown that the bending strength firstly increases to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of sintering temperature in a certain range. The investigations of microstructures and mechanical properties indicated that the unique sintering mechanism in the SPS process is responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of SPS NdFeB. Furthermore, the relations between the mechanical properties and relevant microstructure have been analyzed based on the experimental fact. - Highlights: • Studied the sintering temperature effect on strengthening mechanism of NdFeB magnet firstly. • It showed that sintering temperature may effectively affect the mechanical properties. • The maximum bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively

  5. Effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.P., E-mail: wgp@jxnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Communication Electronics, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); Liu, W.Q. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Huang, Y.L.; Ma, S.C.; Zhong, Z.C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Sintered NdFeB-based permanent magnets were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and a conventional method to investigate the mechanical and magnetic properties. The experimental results showed that sintered NdFeB magnet prepared by the spark plasma sintering (SPS NdFeB) possesses a better mechanical properties compared to the conventionally sintered one, of which the maximum value of bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively. The effects of sintering temperature on bending strength and Vickers hardness were investigated. It was shown that the bending strength firstly increases to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of sintering temperature in a certain range. The investigations of microstructures and mechanical properties indicated that the unique sintering mechanism in the SPS process is responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of SPS NdFeB. Furthermore, the relations between the mechanical properties and relevant microstructure have been analyzed based on the experimental fact. - Highlights: • Studied the sintering temperature effect on strengthening mechanism of NdFeB magnet firstly. • It showed that sintering temperature may effectively affect the mechanical properties. • The maximum bending strength and Vickers hardness was 402.3 MPa and 778.1 MPa, respectively.

  6. Blast furnace sinter performance improvement; Melhoria do rendimento de sinter de alto forno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ricardo Baeta; Ferreira, Antonio Marcos M.; Perez, Jose Antonio; Nobrega, Carlos A.; Madeira Filho, Nelson Santos; Silva, Jose Coutinho da; Sampaio, Silvio; Larcher, Marcos A.; Silva Filho, Jose Maximo da; Nogueira, Carlos Alberto; Ramalho Filho, Wilson; Costa, Jose Luiz Lage da; Silva, Mauro Correa da [Companhia Siderurgica de Tubarao (CST), Serra, ES (Brazil)

    1995-07-01

    The article discusses the following issues of methodology maid and the accomplished actions aiming at the blast furnace sinter performance improvement: performance concept; performance historical evolution; problem boarding; influence factors; interpretation of the results; actions implementation; and economic benefit.

  7. Health hazards of environmental cadmium pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, G F

    1974-01-01

    Cadmium, a metal widely used in industrial processes, has been recognized to be a highly toxic and dangerous environmental pollutant. In this study the author describes the sources and occurrence of cadmium, and the intake by human beings. He states that present standards for daily intake do not allow sufficient safety margins. The fate and known effects of cadmium in human beings are summarized; some effects associated with cadmium are renal (kidney) damage, anemia, hypertension, and liver damage. Cadmium was identified as the main cause of the Itai-Itai disease in Japan, and epidemiological studies from various areas of Japan are presented. 64 references, 9 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Sintering behavior of LZSA glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The LZSA glass-ceramic system (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O 3 shows interesting properties, such as good chemical resistance, low thermal expansion, high abrasion resistance, and a low dielectric constant. However, in order to obtain a high performance material for specific applications, the sintering behavior must be better understood so that the porosity may be reduced and other properties improved. In this context, a sintering investigation for a specific LZSA glass-ceramic system composition was carried out. A 18.8Li2O-8.3ZrO2-64.2SiO2-8.7Al 2O3 glass was prepared by melting the solids, quenching the melt in water, and grinding the resulting solid in order to obtain a powder (3.68 μm average particle diameter. Subsequently, the glass powder was characterized (chemical analysis and determination of thermal properties and the sintering behavior was investigated using optical non-contact dilatometry measurements. The results showed that the crystallization process strongly reduced the sintering in the temperature interval from 785 to 940 °C, and a maximum thermal shrinkage of 15.4% was obtained with operating conditions of 1020 °C and 180 minutes.

  9. Study of ceramics sintering under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunrath Neto, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study was made on high pressure sintering of ceramics in order to obtain materials with controlled microstructure, which are not accessible by conventional methods. Some aspects with particular interest were: to achieve very low porosity, with fine grains; to produce dispersed metastable and denser phases which can act as toughening agents; the study of new possibilities for toughening enhancement. (author)

  10. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  11. Deformation behavior of sintered nanocrystalline silver layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabihzadeh, S.; Van Petegem, S.; Duarte, L.I.; Mokso, R.; Cervellino, A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of porous silver layers produced under different low temperature pressure-assisted sintering conditions is characterized and linked with the mechanical behavior studied in situ during X-ray diffraction. Peak profile analysis reveals important strain recovery and hardening mechanism during cyclic deformation. The competition between both mechanisms is discussed in terms of porosity and grain size

  12. Sintering of magnesia: effect of additives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of different additives, namely Cr2O3, Fe2O3 and TiO2, up to 2 wt% was studied on the sinter- ing and .... mental distribution of the components is shown in figure 7. It shows ... Chiang Y M, Birniand D and Kingery W 1996 Physical ceram-.

  13. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  15. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  16. Reduction of surface erosion caused by helium blistering in sintered beryllium and sintered aluminum powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to find materials with microstructures which minimize the formation of blisters. A promising class of materials appears to be sintered metal powder with small average grain sizes and low atomic number Z. Studies of the surface erosion of sintered aluminum powder (SAP 895) and of aluminum held at 400 0 C due to blistering by 100 keV helium ions have been conducted and the results are compared to those obtained earlier for room temperature irradiation. A significant reduction of the erosion rate in SAP 895 in comparison to annealed aluminum and SAP 930 is observed. In addition results on the blistering of sintered beryllium powder (type I) irradiated at room temperature and 600 0 C by 100 keV helium ions are given. These results will be compared with those reported recently for vacuum cast beryllium foil and a foil of sintered beryllium powder (type II) which was fabricated differently, than type I. For room temperature irradiation only a few blisters could be observed in sintered beryllium powder type I and type II and they are smaller in size and in number than in vacuum cast beryllium. For irradiation at 600 0 C large scale exfoliation of blisters was observed for vacuum cast beryllium but much less exfoliation was seen for sintered beryllium powder, type I, and type II. The results show a reduction in erosion rate cast beryllium, for both room temperature and 600 0 C

  17. Sintering uranium oxide using a preheating step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, N.J.; Nivas, Y.; Packard, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide or uranium oxide with one or more additives are heated in a kiln in a process having a preheating step, a sintering step, a reduction step, and a cooling step in a controlled atmosphere. The process is practiced to give a range of temperature and atmosphere conditions for obtaining optimum fluoride removal from the compacted pellets along with optimum sintering in a single process. The preheating step of this process is conducted in a temperature range of about 600 0 to about 900 0 C and the pellets are held for at least twenty min, and preferably about 60 min, in an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 10 to about 75 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The sintering step is conducted at a temperature in the range of about 900 0 C to 1500 0 C in the presence of an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 0.5 to about 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The reduction step reduces the oxygen to metal ratio of the pellets to a range of about 1.98 to 2.10:1 and this is accomplished by gradually cooling the pellets for about 30 to about 120 min from the temperature of the sintering step to about 1100 0 C in an atmosphere of about 10 to 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. Thereafter the pellets are cooled to about 100 0 C under a protective atmosphere, and in one preferred practice the same atmosphere used in the reduction step is used in the cooling step. The preheating, sintering and reduction steps may also be conducted with their respective atmospheres having an initial additional component of water vapor and the water vapor can comprise up to about 20 vol %

  18. The quantitative characterization of sintering of urania powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.; Kulkarni, U.D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a unified approach towards characterization of the sintering behaviour of UO 2 powders in terms of their extrinsic properties. Empirical equations connecting the sintering index with various powder parameters have been set up. The influence of various powder parameters, either individually or as dimensionless/dimensional groups, on the sintering behaviour has been studied. The relative importance of these factors has also been analysed. A good polynomial fit has been obtained for variation of sintering index with some of the powder parameters and dimensionless/dimensional groups. The equations are expected to provide a good basis for assessing the sinterability of UO 2 powders. (Auth.)

  19. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  20. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  1. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  3. Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films grown by PLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoulakis, S.; Suchea, M; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E

    2007-01-01

    Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films (CaS:Eu,Sm) with different thickness were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique using sintered targets. A typical homemade deposition chamber and XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) were employed and the films were deposited in helium atmosphere onto silicon and corning glass substrates. Structural investigations carried out by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy showed a strong influence of the deposition parameters on the film properties. The films grown had an amorphous or polycrystalline structure depending on growth temperature and the number of pulses used, the same parameters affecting the film roughness, the grain shape and dimensions, the film thickness and the optical transmittance. This work indicates that pulsed laser deposition can be a suitable technique for the preparation of CaS:Eu,Sm thin films, the film characteristics being controlled by the growth conditions

  4. [Investigation of urinary cadmium reference of general population in two rural high background areas of soil cadmium and non-cadmium-polluted in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingxiu; Li, Qiujuan; Yao, Dancheng; Zheng, Jiangang; Zhang, Wenli; Shang, Qi

    2014-09-01

    To study the reference of urinary. cadmium of the general population in rural high background areas of soil cadmium and non-cadmium contaminated in China. In rural high background areas of soil cadmium and non-cadmium contaminated, randomly selected non-occupational-cadmium exposed population 1134 people (male 519, female 615) with each gender and age groups, questionnaire surveyed and collected random urine. Urinary cadmium and urinary creatinine (Cr) concentration were tested, excluding urinary Cr 3 g/L. Analyze the impact factors of urinary cadmium and calculated 95% quantile (P,95 ) of urinary cadmium after correction by urinary Cr. Female median urinary cadmium was significantly higher than men, male smokers median urinary cadmium was significantly higher than male non-smokers (P 30 year-old. According to gender, and 15 -30, 30 years old, analysis the upper limit of cadmium in urine. The 95% upper limit of urinary cadmium of 30 year-old female (12.24 microg/gCr) was significantly higher than other populations ( population exceeded the upper limit (5 microg/gCr) of the occupational cadmium poisoning diagnostic criteria in China (GBZ 17-2002). In the two rural high background areas of soil cadmium and non-cadmium polluted , urinary cadmium reference of non-cadmium-occupational-exposed male is <9.0 microg/gCr, and female <13.0 microg/gCr.

  5. Studies on the sintering of copper powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmasry, M.A.A.; Abadir, M.F.; Mahdy, A.N.; Elkinawy, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Solid state sintering behavior of cylindrical compacts, (1 cm diameter and 1 cm height), made of copper powder was studied within a range of compacting pressure of 75 up to 300 MPa, sintering temperature of 600 up to to 900 degree C, and sintering time of 5 up to 60 min in a reducing atmosphere composed of H2 and N 2 gases with a volumetric ratio 3:1. The green and the sintered densities were found to to increase with the compacting pressure. Higher sintering temperature, and time favour increased sintered density. probable mechanisms during the initial stage of sintering were disclosed. It was found that low pressures cause dilation of closed pores, and vice versa. At low pressures and temperatures the surface diffusion mechanism is favoured, While high temperatures favour lattice diffusion mechanism. at high pressures, the lattice diffusion mechanism is suppressed while surface diffusion predominates. Density and hence shrinkage were also found to increase with the increase of sintering time, While its rate increases with the increase of sintering temperature. the influence of sintering conditions on the hardness of the compacts was studied. An increase in hardness, When higher compacting pressures and higher sintering temperatures were adopted, has bee obtained. 11 figs

  6. Factors Affecting the Sintering of UO2 Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hakim, E.; Afifi, Y.K.

    1999-01-01

    Sintering of UO 2 pellets is affected by many parameters such as; UO 2 powder parameters, the conditions followed for preparing the green UO 2 pellets and the sintering scheme(heating and cooling rate, soaking time and temperature). The aim of this work is to study the effect of some these parameters on the characteristics of the sintered UO 2 pellets were qualified according to the technical specifications of Candu fuel. Pressed green pellets at different pressing force (15 to 50 k N) were sintered at 1650 ±20 degree for two hours to study the effect of pressing force on the sintered pellets characteristics; visual inspection, pellet dimensions, density and shrinkage ratio. Compacted green pellets at a pressing force of 48 k N were sintered at different sintering temperature (1600± 20 degree, 1650 ±20 degree, 1700± 20 degree) for two hours to study the effect of sintering temperature on the sintered pellets characteristics. The effect of the heating rate (200,300 and 400 degree per hour) on the sintered pellets characteristics was also investigated. It was found that the pressing force used to compact the green pellets had an effect on the density of the sintered pellets. Pellets pressed at 15 k N have a density of 10.3 g/cm 3 while, those pressed at 50 k N have a density of 10.6 g/cm 3. It was observed that increasing the heating rate to 400 degree /h lead to cracked pellets

  7. Inversion defects in MgAl2O4 elaborated by pressureless sintering, pressureless sintering plus hot isostatic pressing, and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussi, A.; Granger, G. Bernard; Addad, A.; Benameur, N.; Beclin, F.; Bataille, A.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of inversion defects of Al was investigated in dense magnesium-aluminate spinel elaborated by pressureless sintering, pressureless sintering plus hot isostatic pressing, and spark plasma sintering. This study was conducted by energy electron loss spectroscopy analyses and more particularly by energy loss near edge structure investigations of the Al-L 2,3 edge. Several aspects are discussed with the purpose of understanding why charged defects dispersal reveals a special configuration.

  8. Sintering studies on iron-carbon-copper compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perianayagam Philomen-D-Anand Raj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintered Iron-Carbon-Copper parts are among the most widely used powder metallurgy product in automobile. In this paper, studies have been carried out to find out the sintering characteristics of iron-carbon-copper compacts when sintered in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of various processing parameters on the sintering characteristics were studied. The various processing parameters considered were compaction pressure, green density and sintering temperature. The sintering characteristics determined were sintered density, porosity, dimensional change, micro hardness and radial crush strength. The results obtained have been discussed on the basis of micro structural observations. The characteristics of SEM fractography were also used to determine the mechanism of fracture. The fracture energy is strongly dependent on density of the compact.

  9. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows that this i......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio...

  10. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipic, Metka, E-mail: metka.filipic@nib.si [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  11. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  12. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  13. Production and Preservation of Sulfide Layering in Mercury's Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukare, C.-E.; Parman, S. W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Anzures, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    Mercury's magma ocean (MMO) would have been sulfur-rich. At some point during MMO solidification, it likely became sulfide saturated. Here we present physiochemical models exploring sulfide layer formation and stability.

  14. Fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles for selective and sensitive detection of toxic pesticides in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha

    2014-01-01

    The detection of pesticide residues in ground water, food, or soil samples is extremely important. The currently available laboratory techniques have several drawbacks and needs to be replaced. Fluorescent chemosensors for pesticide detection were reported in the literature, with few reports published on quantum dot-based pesticide sensors, but none of these were focused toward differentiating organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides specifically. In this respect, glutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The TEM studies of the nanoparticles suggested mostly monodispersed spherical particles, with size in the range of 11.5±1 nm. The prepared fluorescent nanoparticles were found to selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles ∼ 2.5 times. Similar studies carried out with organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. Further studies carried out with commercially available pesticide solutions, also confirmed similar results. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol. Control experiments suggested possible role of both amine and carboxylic acid functional groups of glutathione in the recognition of dicofol. The limit of detection of dicofol was found to be ∼ 55±11 ppb.Graphical AbstractGlutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol

  15. Nucleo-mitochondrial interaction of yeast in response to cadmium sulfide quantum dot exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, Francesco; Agrimonti, Caterina; Pagano, Luca; Zappettini, Andrea; Villani, Marco; Marmiroli, Marta; White, Jason C.; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CdS QDs induce oxidative stress in yeast. • CdS QDs disrupt mitochondrial membrane potentials and morphology. • CdS QDs do not affect mtDNA content. • CdS QDs modify the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial organization and function. • Deletion of some of these genes induces either tolerant or sensitive phenotypes to CdS QDs. - Abstract: Cell sensitivity to quantum dots (QDs) has been attributed to a cascade triggered by oxidative stress leading to apoptosis. The role and function of mitochondria in animal cells are well understood but little information is available on the complex genetic networks that regulate nucleo-mitochondrial interaction. The effect of CdS QD exposure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed under conditions of limited lethality (<10%), using cell physiological and morphological endpoints. Whole-genomic array analysis and the screening of a deletion mutant library were also carried out. The results showed that QDs: increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of reduced vs oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); reduced oxygen consumption and the abundance of respiratory cytochromes; disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials and affected mitochondrial morphology. Exposure affected the capacity of cells to grow on galactose, which requires nucleo-mitochondrial involvement. However, QDs exposure did not materially induce respiratory deficient (RD) mutants but only RD phenocopies. All of these cellular changes were correlated with several key nuclear genes, including TOM5 and FKS1, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial organization and function. The consequences of these cellular effects are discussed in terms of dysregulation of cell function in response to these “pathological mitochondria”.

  16. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Toxic effect of CdS NPs on the growth and cell division in E. coli was studied. • CdS NPs affected cell surface topology and cell division. • Downregulation of both FtsZ and FtsQ was observed due to NPs exposure. • CdS NPs affected HeLa cell morphology with fragmented nuclei. • All such effects might be due to elevated oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC 50 value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells

  17. Fluorescence and Cytotoxicity of Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots Stabilized on Clay Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Stavitskaya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QD are widely used for cellular labeling due to enhanced brightness, resistance to photobleaching, and multicolor light emissions. CdS and CdxZn1−xS nanoparticles with sizes of 6–8 nm were synthesized via a ligand assisted technique inside and outside of 50 nm diameter halloysite clay nanotubes (QD were immobilized on the tube’s surface. The halloysite–QD composites were tested by labeling human skin fibroblasts and prostate cancer cells. In human cell cultures, halloysite–QD systems were internalized by living cells, and demonstrated intense and stable fluorescence combined with pronounced nanotube light scattering. The best signal stability was observed for QD that were synthesized externally on the amino-grafted halloysite. The best cell viability was observed for CdxZn1−xS QD immobilized onto the azine-grafted halloysite. The possibility to use QD clay nanotube core-shell nanoarchitectures for the intracellular labeling was demonstrated. A pronounced scattering and fluorescence by halloysite–QD systems allows for their promising usage as markers for biomedical applications.

  18. A bifacial quantum dot-sensitized solar cell with all-cadmium sulfide photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunqing; Tang, Qunwei; Liu, Danyang; Zhao, Zhiyuan; He, Benlin; Chen, Haiyan; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-02-01

    Pursuit of a high power conversion efficiency and reduction of electricity-generation cost has been a persistent objective for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). We present here the fabrication of a QDSSC comprising a nanoflower-structured CdS anode, a liquid electrolyte having S2-/Sn2- redox couples, and a transparent CoSe counter electrode. Nanoflower-structured CdS anodes are prepared by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and subsequently hydrothermal strategy free of any surfactant or template. The CdS nanoparticles synthesized by a SILAR method act as "seed crystal" for growth of CdS nanoflowers. The average electron lifetime is markedly elevated in nanoflower-structured CdS anode in comparison with CdS nanoparticle or nanoporous CdS microsphere anode. Herein, we study the effect of synthesis method on CdS morphology and solar cell's photovoltaic performance, showing a power conversion efficiency of 1.67% and 1.17% for nanoflower-structured CdS QDSSC under front and rear irradiations, respectively.

  19. Biomolecule-assisted construction of cadmium sulfide hollow spheres with structure-dependent photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengzhen; Zang, Wenzhe; Yin, Jingzhou; Lu, Qingyi; Chen, Qun; Liu, Rongmei; Gao, Feng

    2013-02-25

    In this study, we report the synthesis of monodispersive solid and hollow CdS spheres with structure-dependent photocatalytic abilities for dye photodegradation. The monodispersive CdS nanospheres were constructed with the assistance of the soulcarboxymthyi chitosan biopolymer under hydrothermal conditions. The solid CdS spheres were corroded by ammonia to form hollow CdS nanospheres through a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Their visible-light photocatalytic activities were investigated, and the results show that both the solid and the hollow CdS spheres have visible-light photocatalytic abilities for the photodegradation of dyes. The photocatalytic properties of the CdS spheres were demonstrated to be structure dependent. Although the nanoparticles comprising the hollow spheres have larger sizes than those comprising the solid spheres, the hollow CdS spheres have better photocatalytic performances than the solid CdS spheres, which can be attributed to the special hollow structure. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  1. Shape-Dependent Photocatalytic Activity of Hydrothermally Synthesized Cadmium Sulfide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joyjit; Khilari, Santimoy; Pradhan, Debabrata

    2017-03-22

    The effective surface area of the nanostructured materials is known to play a prime role in catalysis. Here we demonstrate that the shape of the nanostructured materials plays an equally important role in their catalytic activity. Hierarchical CdS microstructures with different morphologies such as microspheres assembled of nanoplates, nanorods, nanoparticles, and nanobelts are synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method by tuning the volume ratio of solvents, i.e., water or ethylenediamine (en). With an optimum solvent ratio of 3:1 water:en, the roles of other synthesis parameters such as precursor's ratio, temperature, and precursor combinations are also explored and reported here. Four selected CdS microstructures are used as photocatalysts for the degradation of methylene blue and photoelectrochemical water splitting for hydrogen generation. In spite of smaller effective surface area of CdS nanoneedles/nanorods than that of CdS nanowires network, the former exhibits higher catalytic activity under visible light irradiation which is ascribed to the reduced charge recombination as confirmed from the photoluminescence study.

  2. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characte...

  3. A comprehensive study on the photocatalytic activity of coupled copper oxide-cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senobari, Samaneh; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2018-05-01

    Coupled CdS-CuO nanoparticles (NPs) subjected in the photocatalytic degradation of Methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution. The calcination temperature and the crystallite phase of CuO had a significant role on the photocatalytic activity of the coupled system and CuO200/2h-CdS catalyst (containing CuO calcined at 200 °C for 2 h) showed the best photocatalytic activity. The coupled system showed increased activity with respect to the monocomponent semiconductors. The prepared catalysts characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyzer, x-ray mapping, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The best degradation extent of MB was obtained at: CMB: 1 mg L-1, pH 5, 80 min irradiation time and 0.8 g L-1 of the CuO200/2h-CdS catalyst. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) confirmed about 83% of MB molecules can be mineralized at the optimum conditions.

  4. Preparation of manganese doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in zincblende phase and their magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Masafumi; Tanaka, Itaru; Muramatsu, Atsushi

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the random dope of Mn into CdS nanoparticles in zincblende phase has been carried out under the mild reaction condition. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), UV-Vis spectrometer, PL spectrometer, and SQUID. EDX showed that the compositions of Mn doped CdS nanoparticles were readily controlled. TEM showed the particle sizes were not significantly affected by the compositions, retaining to be ca. 3 nm with a narrow size distribution. UV-Vis and PL spectra of the resulting nanoparticles showed the intra-Mn level may be affected by the quantum size effect. SQUID measurement showed that the resulting nanoparticles showed diamagnetism, paramagnetism and superparamagnetism dependent on Mn content.

  5. Improvement of the luminescent properties of cadmium sulfide quantum dots by a post-synthesis modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Israel; Gómez, Idalia, E-mail: maria.gomezd@uanl.edu.mx

    2014-11-15

    Here the improvement of the luminescent properties of CdS quantum dots by a post-synthesis modification with aqueous solutions of NaOH at different concentrations is presented. The CdS quantum dots were synthesized by a microwave-assisted method using citrate ions as stabilizer. The addition of the hydroxide ions increased the intensity of the orange-red emission by about 80%. Besides, a violet-blue emission was achieved by means of this post-synthesis modification. The hydroxide ions control the precipitation equilibria of the CdS and Cd(OH){sub 2}, dissolving and precipitating the surface of the quantum dots. The NaOH treatment increases the number of traps, which produces less band-edge and more deep-trap emission, which explains the decrease and increase in the intensity of the violet-blue and orange-red emissions, respectively.

  6. Improvement of the luminescent properties of cadmium sulfide quantum dots by a post-synthesis modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, Israel; Gómez, Idalia

    2014-01-01

    Here the improvement of the luminescent properties of CdS quantum dots by a post-synthesis modification with aqueous solutions of NaOH at different concentrations is presented. The CdS quantum dots were synthesized by a microwave-assisted method using citrate ions as stabilizer. The addition of the hydroxide ions increased the intensity of the orange-red emission by about 80%. Besides, a violet-blue emission was achieved by means of this post-synthesis modification. The hydroxide ions control the precipitation equilibria of the CdS and Cd(OH) 2 , dissolving and precipitating the surface of the quantum dots. The NaOH treatment increases the number of traps, which produces less band-edge and more deep-trap emission, which explains the decrease and increase in the intensity of the violet-blue and orange-red emissions, respectively

  7. Growth analysis of cadmium sulfide thin films by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    CdS films have been deposited by solution growth on SnO{sub 2} and glass substrates. Nucleation on SnO{sub 2} occurs at early deposition times, and complete conformal coverage is observed at low thickness values. The average grain size of the CdS films is established at these early times. In films deposited on glass substrates, nucleation is slower and occurs through 3-dimensional islands that increase in size and number as deposition proceeds. Optical measurements show that the bandgap values of CdS films deposited on SnO{sub 2} depend mainly on substrate structure. Hydrogen heat treatment does not affect the surface morphology of the samples, but decreases bandgap values.

  8. Fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles for selective and sensitive detection of toxic pesticides in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha, E-mail: amitabhachem@gmail.com [CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Biotechnology Division (India)

    2014-12-15

    The detection of pesticide residues in ground water, food, or soil samples is extremely important. The currently available laboratory techniques have several drawbacks and needs to be replaced. Fluorescent chemosensors for pesticide detection were reported in the literature, with few reports published on quantum dot-based pesticide sensors, but none of these were focused toward differentiating organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides specifically. In this respect, glutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The TEM studies of the nanoparticles suggested mostly monodispersed spherical particles, with size in the range of 11.5±1 nm. The prepared fluorescent nanoparticles were found to selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles ∼ 2.5 times. Similar studies carried out with organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. Further studies carried out with commercially available pesticide solutions, also confirmed similar results. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol. Control experiments suggested possible role of both amine and carboxylic acid functional groups of glutathione in the recognition of dicofol. The limit of detection of dicofol was found to be ∼ 55±11 ppb.Graphical AbstractGlutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol.

  9. Investigations of the thermal treatment effect on the generation of cadmium sulfide clusters in polymeric films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, Anca; Socol, M.; Stanculescu, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the last years a special interest has been paid to the field of nanometer-sized semiconductor compound crystalline clusters synthesized in different matrix (inorganic or organic), due to their special physical and chemical properties intermediate between the molecular and bulk limits. To obtain the thin film samples of CdS particles embedded in a polymeric transparent matrix, as bisphenol A polycarbonate, we followed a process containing three important steps: preparation of the so-called 'mother solution', film deposition and thermal treatment. The samples obtained after the first two steps were heat treated at different temperatures (90 deg. C and 150 deg. C) for 0.5 h, 1 h and 1.5 h, and we have analyzed the influence of these parameters on the film quality using UV-VIS spectrophotometric methods. This paper presents a study of the influence of the thermal treatment on the CdS clusters' generation process and film quality and homogeneity. The parameters of the processing procedure of the polymeric film, as the cooling rate, have a great influence on the rate of germination and development of the crystalline phase. A slow cooling rate is a more favorable process for CdS clusters' formation, indicated .by structured features of the fundamental absorption situated between 350-450 nm. When the temperature for thermal treatment increases to 90 deg. C a sharp rise and a shift to shorter wavelengths of the absorption onset edge was observed. This shift proves the existence of a weak quantum confinement effects. We concluded that these two parameters have some equivalent effects on the CdS clusters' generation in polymeric matrix. Varying the treatment duration with a fixed temperature produces similar results as the fixed duration, varied temperature treatment. (authors)

  10. Determination of the band alignment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with cadmium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.F.O., E-mail: mangos@ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Paniago, R.M., E-mail: paniago@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miquita, D.R., E-mail: douglas.miquita@gmail.com [Centro de Microscopia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Pinheiro, C.B., E-mail: basilio@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Ladeira, L.O., E-mail: ladeira@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Ferlauto, A.S., E-mail: ferlauto@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Rodrigues, W.N., E-mail: wagner@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Centro de Microscopia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • MWCNTs and CdS composite were grown by the solvothermal method. • Photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze energy levels at the interface. • The interface shows zero value for the Schottky barrier between MWCNTs and CdS. • MWCNTs act as ohmic contacts for CdS nanoparticles. • MWCNTs may act as charge collector in CdS-based devices.

  11. Superluminescence of cadmium sulfide crystals under pulse X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskaya, N.G.; Tarasov, M.D.; Balakin, V.A.; Varava, V.P.; Lobov, S.I.; Surskij, O.K.; Tsukerman, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were made to elucidate luminescence properties of CdS crystal radiated by short pulses of braking x-ray radiation. Such a radiation causes the appearance of superluminescence. The radiation was carried out at 295 and 170 K, the radiation dose being changed from 3600 to 1600 r/pulse. At the temperature of 295 K light luminescence was registered at the wave length of 528 nm and half-width of 15 nm. While the temperature lowers, the radiation shifts to the range of shorter wave lengths, and a decrease of the spectrum half-width is observed. With the increase of radiation dose the decrease of radiation spectrum half-width is observed. Approximate calculations show that to achieve the spectrum narrowing to 1 nm at room temperature it is necessary to increase radiation dose per pulse 5-6 times

  12. A novel method for iodate determination using cadmium sulfide quantum dots as fluorescence probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chunran; Su Zhonghua; Lin Baogang; Huang Haowen; Zeng Yunlong; Li Shuang; Huang He; Wang Yajing; Li Chunxiang; Shen Guoli; Yu Ruqin

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for the determination of iodate based on the carboxymethyl cellulose-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). Factors affecting the iodate detection were investigated, and the optimum conditions were determined. Under the optimum conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of CdS quantum dots was linearly proportional to IO 3 - over a concentration range from 1.0 x 10 -8 to 1.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9987 and a detection limit of 6.0 nmol L -1 . Iodide, being oxidized by bromine to form iodate, was detected indirectly. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iodate and total amount of iodine in table salt samples. The related mechanism was also discussed.

  13. Nucleo-mitochondrial interaction of yeast in response to cadmium sulfide quantum dot exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, Francesco; Agrimonti, Caterina [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Pagano, Luca [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Stockbridge school of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT (United States); Zappettini, Andrea; Villani, Marco [IMEM-CNR - Istituto dei Materiali per l' Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Parma (Italy); Marmiroli, Marta [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); White, Jason C. [The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT (United States); Marmiroli, Nelson, E-mail: nelson.marmiroli@unipr.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); CINSA - Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per le Scienze Ambientali, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • CdS QDs induce oxidative stress in yeast. • CdS QDs disrupt mitochondrial membrane potentials and morphology. • CdS QDs do not affect mtDNA content. • CdS QDs modify the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial organization and function. • Deletion of some of these genes induces either tolerant or sensitive phenotypes to CdS QDs. - Abstract: Cell sensitivity to quantum dots (QDs) has been attributed to a cascade triggered by oxidative stress leading to apoptosis. The role and function of mitochondria in animal cells are well understood but little information is available on the complex genetic networks that regulate nucleo-mitochondrial interaction. The effect of CdS QD exposure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed under conditions of limited lethality (<10%), using cell physiological and morphological endpoints. Whole-genomic array analysis and the screening of a deletion mutant library were also carried out. The results showed that QDs: increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of reduced vs oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); reduced oxygen consumption and the abundance of respiratory cytochromes; disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials and affected mitochondrial morphology. Exposure affected the capacity of cells to grow on galactose, which requires nucleo-mitochondrial involvement. However, QDs exposure did not materially induce respiratory deficient (RD) mutants but only RD phenocopies. All of these cellular changes were correlated with several key nuclear genes, including TOM5 and FKS1, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial organization and function. The consequences of these cellular effects are discussed in terms of dysregulation of cell function in response to these “pathological mitochondria”.

  14. Reaction sintering of ceramic-metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Rodrigues, J.A.; Tomasi, R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.; Passos, J.F.S.S.; Folgueras, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction sintering experiments have been carried out in the system Al 2 O 3 -ZrAl 2 -Nb 2 O 5 with the objective of producing ceramic-metal composites of improved toughness. The sintering treatments have been done in the temperature range of 700 0 C to 1400 0 C under different conditions of vacuum and in air and argon atmospheres. The treated samples have been analysed by X-ray diffraction and analytical electron microscopy. The results are discussed in function of the degree of reaction, the development of microstructure and the densification. These results have shown that although an exchange reaction can occur to produce a composite, the control of the reaction to obtain a dense microstructure has not been possible yet. (author) [pt

  15. Production of sintered porous metal fluoride pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1973-12-25

    Porous pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. Porous pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)

  16. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...

  17. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  18. Girdler-sulfide process physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburg, H.J.; Atherley, J.F.; Walker, L.G.

    1977-05-01

    Physical properties of pure hydrogen sulfide and of gaseous and liquid solutions of the H 2 S-H 2 O system have been formulated. Tables for forty-nine different properties in the pressure and temperature range of interest to the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) process for heavy water production are given. All properties are presented in SI units. A computer program capable of calculating properties of the pure components as well as gaseous mixtures and liquid solutions at saturated and non-saturated conditions is included. (author)

  19. The dimensional accuracy of the sintered billets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Чингиз Ариф оглы Алиев

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of assessing the impact of the behaviour stability of the components included in the compositions and process parameters of their production, on the dimensional accuracy of workpieces. It was found that by increasing the amount of oxide in the composition is greater compaction of the sintered billet in the process of heat treatment. This also increases the density of all components of the composition

  20. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, Evan; Lin, Yen-Shan; Meyers, Marc A.; Olevsky, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A tantalum carbide powder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The specimens were processed under various temperature and pressure conditions and characterized in terms of relative density, grain size, rupture strength and hardness. The results are compared to hot pressing conducted under similar settings. It is shown that high densification is accompanied by substantial grain growth. Carbon nanotubes were added to mitigate grain growth; however, while increasing specimens' rupture strength and final density, they had little effect on grain growth.

  1. Cadmium resistance in Drosophila: a small cadmium binding substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Williams, M.W.; Richter, L.J.; Holt, S.E.; Hook, G.J.; Knoop, S.M.; Sloop, F.V.; Faust, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A small cadmium-binding substance (CdBS) has been observed in adult Drosophila melanogaster that were raised for their entire growth cycle on a diet that contained 0.15 mM CdCl 2 . Induction of CdBS was observed in strains that differed widely in their sensitivity of CdCl 2 . This report describes the induction of CdBS and some of its characteristics. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia; Faroon, Obaid; Pappas, R. Steven

    2017-01-01

    Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs. PMID:28961214

  3. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia; Faroon, Obaid; Pappas, R Steven

    2017-09-29

    Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs.

  4. Thermoelectric Coolers with Sintered Silver Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Julian; Stranz, Andrej; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication and performance of a sintered Peltier cooler (SPC) based on bismuth telluride with sintered silver interconnects are described. Miniature SPC modules with a footprint of 20 mm2 were assembled using pick-and-place pressure-assisted silver sintering at low pressure (5.5 N/mm2) and moderate temperature (250°C to 270°C). A modified flip-chip bonder combined with screen/stencil printing for paste transfer was used for the pick-and-place process, enabling high positioning accuracy, easy handling of the tiny bismuth telluride pellets, and immediate visual process control. A specific contact resistance of (1.4 ± 0.1) × 10-5 Ω cm2 was found, which is in the range of values reported for high-temperature solder interconnects of bismuth telluride pellets. The realized SPCs were evaluated from room temperature to 300°C, considerably outperforming the operating temperature range of standard commercial Peltier coolers. Temperature cycling capability was investigated from 100°C to 235°C over more than 200 h, i.e., 850 cycles, during which no degradation of module resistance or cooling performance occurred.

  5. Sintered stabilized zirconia microstructure and conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Herve.

    1981-04-01

    The elaboration of a stabilized zirconia powder which sinters at 1300 0 C and the influence of the sintered polycristal microstructure on its ionic conductivity have been studied. Among three investigated powder preparation processes, coprecipitation in an ammoniacal solution was chosen. After sintering at 1300 0 C, the pellet density was higher than 93% of the theoretical density. It even approached up to 98% TD with addition of less than 0,5 mole % Al 2 O 3 to the initial powder. The overall electrolyte conductivity and the inter and intragranular contributions have been determined by complex impedance spectroscopy. ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 solid solution conductivity was scarcely improved by Y 2 O 3 exchange with Yb 2 O 3 or Gd 2 O 3 . This conductivity greatly increases with grain size, its improvement with decreasing porosity, which has been quantified, is less sensible. Moreover, two original properties were noticed: small amounts of Al 2 O 3 and quenching greatly enhanced the overall conductivity. At temperatures below 500 0 C, grain boundaries only insured a partial migration of conductive ions. A parallel type electrical equivalent circuit suited well with this blocking effect [fr

  6. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  7. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  8. Distribution of cadmium between calcium carbonate and solution, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Yasushi; Kanamori, Nobuko; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko

    1978-01-01

    The distribution coefficient of cadmium between calcite and solution has been measured in the calcium bicarbonate solution containing cadmium and chloride ions, which forms complexes with cadmium ions. It has been confirmed experimentally that cadmium carbonate is present as a solid solution between calcitic calcium carbonate and cadmium carbonate in the carbonate precipitate formed in the solution system. However, the constant value of the thermodynamic distribution coefficient of cadmium between calcite and solution has not been obtained experimentally in the calcium bicarbonate solution containing cadmium and chloride ions. It may have been caused by the very specific behavior of cadmium ions, but the exact reason remains unsolved and must be studied. (Kobatake, H.)

  9. Historical perspectives on cadmium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.

    2009-01-01

    The first health effects of cadmium (Cd) were reported already in 1858. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred among persons using Cd-containing polishing agent. The first experimental toxicological studies are from 1919. Bone effects and proteinuria in humans were reported in the 1940's. After World War II, a bone disease with fractures and severe pain, the itai-itai disease, a form of Cd-induced renal osteomalacia, was identified in Japan. Subsequently, the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of Cd were described including its binding to the protein metallothionein. International warnings of health risks from Cd-pollution were issued in the 1970's. Reproductive and carcinogenic effects were studied at an early stage, but a quantitative assessment of these effects in humans is still subject to considerable uncertainty. The World Health Organization in its International Program on Chemical Safety, WHO/IPCS (1992) (Cadmium. Environmental Health Criteria Document 134, IPCS. WHO, Geneva, 1-280.) identified renal dysfunction as the critical effect and a crude quantitative evaluation was presented. In the 1990's and 2000 several epidemiological studies have reported adverse health effects, sometimes at low environmental exposures to Cd, in population groups in Japan, China, Europe and USA (reviewed in other contributions to the present volume). The early identification of an important role of metallothionein in cadmium toxicology formed the basis for recent studies using biomarkers of susceptibility to development of Cd-related renal dysfunction such as gene expression of metallothionein in peripheral lymphocytes and autoantibodies against metallothionein in blood plasma. Findings in these studies indicate that very low exposure levels to cadmium may give rise to renal dysfunction among sensitive subgroups of human populations such as persons with diabetes.

  10. Lead and cadmium in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliesmann, S.; Kruse, H.; Kriews, M.; Mangels, H.

    1992-08-01

    The amounts of lead and cadmium produced and processed in these days are considerable. As a result, our environment is increasingly polluted by heavy metals and industrial installations, motor vehicles or incinerating plants appear to be among the main culprits here. Air and water are the media permitting the entry of heavy metals into our natural environment where they accumulate in the soil and then gradually migrate into the plants. Their further transport in the food constitutes the third step in the environmental spread of heavy metals. The consumption of muscle and organ meats, of vegetables, fruits, canned food and drinking water is unavoidably associated with some ingestion of lead and cadmium. The degree to which they are taken up and stored in different tissues is determined by absorption properties and the nutritional state of the organism. Cadmium tends to accumulate in the kidneys, lead is mainly stored in the bones. A continuously increasing uptake finally results in health injuries that range from unspecific complaints to damaged kidneys or bones and disorders of liver function. Children and elderly people are at a particular risk here. The level of food contamination is such that screening for heavy metals must be rigorously carried out once appropriate legal thresholds have been set, which ought to be based on proven detrimental effects of lead and cadmium on our health and also take account of infants and children or any other risk groups, where particular caution must be exercised. It should be pointed out that such thresholds have so far not been determined. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  12. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  13. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  14. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  15. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  16. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  17. Concurrent reduction and distillation: an improved technique for the recovery and chemical refinement of the isotopes of cadmium and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudill, H.H.; McBride, L.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Isotope Separations Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been involved in the separation, chemical recovery, and refinement of the stable isotopes of cadmium and zinc since 1946. Traditionally, the chemical refinement procedures for these elements consisted of ion exchange separations using anion exchange resins followed by pH-controlled hydrogen sulfide precipitations. The procedures were quite time-consuming and made it difficult to remove trace quantities of sulfur which interferes in subsequent attempts to prepare rolled metal foils. As demands for 113 Cd and 68 Zn (a precursor for the production of the radiopharmaceutical 67 Ga) increased, it became evident that a quicker, more efficient refinement procedure was needed. Details of an improved method, which employs concurrent hydrogen reduction and distillation in the recovery and refinement of isotopically enriched zinc, are described. Modifications of the procedure suitable for the refinement of cadmium isotopes are also described. 3 figures, 1 table

  18. Uranium dioxide sintering Kinetics and mechanisms under controlled oxygen potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1980-06-01

    The initial, intermediate, and final sintering stages of uranium dioxide were investigated as a function of stoichiometry and temperature by following the kinetics of the sintering reaction. Stoichiometry was controlled by means of the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere, which was measured continuously by solid-state oxygen sensors. Included in the kinetic study were microspheres originated from UO 2 gels and UO 2 pellets produced by isostatic pressing ceramic grade powders. The microspheres sintering behavior was examined using hot-stage microscopy and a specially designed high-temperature, controlled atmosphere furnace. This same furnace was employed as part of an optical dilatometer, which was utilized in the UO 2 pellet sintering investigations. For controlling the deviations from stoichiometry during heat treatment, the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was varied by passing the gas through a Cu-Ti-Cu oxygen trap. The trap temperature determined the oxygen partial pressure of the outflowing mixture. Dry hydrogen was also used in some of the UO sub(2+x) sintering experiments. The determination of diametrial shrinkages and sintering indices was made utilizing high-speed microcinematography and ultra-microbalance techniques. It was observed that the oxygen potential has a substantial influence on the kinetics of the three sintering stages. The control of the sintering atmosphere oxygen partial pressure led to very fast densification of UO sub(2+x). Values in the interval 95.0 to 99.5% of theoretical density were reached in less than one minute. Uranium volume diffusion is the dominant mechanism in the initial and intermediate sintering stages. For the final stage, uranium grain boundary diffusion was found to be the main sintering mechanism. (Author) [pt

  19. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH IEP of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C S in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH IEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C S in the solution declined from 1000 × 10 −6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10 −6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S 2− and CO 3 2− ions

  20. Microwave sintering of nano size powder β-TCP bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirhadi B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nano sized beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powder was conventional sintered (CS and microwave sintered (MW, in order to obtain dense β-TCP ceramics. In this work the effect of microwave sintering conditions on the microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties of materials based on tricalcium phosphate (TCP was investigated by SEM (scanning electron microscopyand XRD(X-ray diffraction and then compared with conventional sintered samples. Nano-size β-TCP powders with average grain size of 80 nm were prepared by the wet chemical precipitation method with calcium nitrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively. The precipitation process employed was also found to be suitable for the production of submicrometre β-TCP powder in situ. The β-TCP samples microwave (MW sintered for 15 min at 1100°C, with average grain size of 3μm, showed better densification, higher density and certainly higher hardness than samples conventionally sintered for 2 h at the same temperature. By comparing sintered and MW sintered β-TCP samples, it was concluded that MW sintered β-TCP samples have superior mechanical properties.

  1. Microwave sintering of zirconia toughened alumina at 28GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samandi, M.; Ji, H.; Miyake, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave radiation from a 10 kW, CW gyrotron operating at 28 GHz was employed to sinter 10% zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) ceramic samples. It has been established that the use of millimetre wave radiation circumvents the difficulties encountered during the sintering of ceramics, i e. formation of hot spot, by radiation at industrially permissible frequency of 2.45GHz. Further, careful density measurement and microstructural characterisation of mm- wave and conventionally sintered samples by XRD, SEM and TEM has unequivocally demonstrated the effectiveness of mm-wave radiation for obtaining high density ceramics at lower sintering temperatures. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  2. HAp physical investigation - the effect of sintering temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Idris Besar; Rusnah Mustaffa; Cik Rohaida Che Hak

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the effect of sintering temperature on the physical properties of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp). In this study, the HAp was prepared using polymeric sponge techniques with different binder concentration. The sintering process was carried out in air for temperature ranging from 1200 degree C to 1600 degree C. Different physical properties namely density and porosity were observed at different sintering temperatures. The HAp prepared with higher PVP binder showed a slightly decreased in apparent density with increasing sintering temperature, while those HAp prepared with lower PVP showed a slightly increase in apparent density with increasing sintering temperature. The total porosity was found to be approximately constant in the whole sintering temperature range. However, closed porosity decreases with increasing sintering temperature for HAp prepared by lower binder concentration. On the other hand, the HAp prepared by higher binder concentration HAp showed increasing closed porosity with increasing sintering temperature. Other features such as the influence of sintering temperatures on grain and strut also be presented in this paper. (Author)

  3. Sintering, microstructural and dilatometric studies of combustion synthesized Synroc phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuraman, M.; Patil, K.C.; Senbagaraman, S.; Umarji, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Sintering, microstructure, and linear thermal expansion properties of Synroc-B and constituent phases, viz. perovskite CaTiO 3 , zirconolite ZrTi 2 O 7 , hollandite (ideal formula BaAl2Ti 6 O 16 ) have been investigated. Synroc-B powder when pelletized and sintered at 1250 C for 2 h achieved >95% theoretical density. Sintered Synroc-B has a linear thermal expansion coefficient α of 8.72 x 10 -6 K -1 and Vicker's microhardness 9.88 GPa. The linear thermal expansion curves did not show any hysteresis indicating the absence of microcracking in the sintered bodies

  4. The electric conductivity of some forms of sintered synthetic zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susic, M.; Petrovic, V.; Ristic, M.; Petranovic, N.

    1978-01-01

    Some forms of synthetic zeolites were sintered and their electric conductivity was measured. The conductivity was observed in correlation with the conductivity of non-sintered pressed samples. Also the change in microstructural constituents in the course of the process of sintering was observed with an optical microscope. It has been found that there is a considerable change in conductivity due to sintering as well as a change in the activation energy for conduction. Also the porosity is noticeably changed. A marked affect of the nature of counter ions on the electric conductivity is shown

  5. Properties, structure and machnining capabilities sintered corundum abrasives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz.J. Niżankowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of sintered corundum abrasives used in both bonded and in the embankment of abrasive tools currently poses substantialproblems for their choice of technology to specific tasks. Therefore performed a comparative study of ownership structures and capacitiesof elected representatives machnining sintered corundum abrasives of different generations, and this is normal sintered alumina,submicrocrystalline alumina sintered and nanocrystalline alumina sintered. Were studied some properties of a set of abrasive particles,physicochemical properties and structural and mechanical and technological properties. The studies used the method of microscopicmeasurement to determine the shape of abrasive particles, the pycnometer to determine the density of abrasive, a spectrometer todetermine the chemical composition of the magnetic analyzer for determining the magnetic fraction, scanning electron microscope toanalysis of abrasive grains and a special position to designate the machining capacity abrasive grains. The results showed a significantincrease in machining capacity sintered corundum abrasives with increasing degree of fragmentation of the crystallites sintered corundum abrasives and distinctive bands in the emerging microchip. The originality of the development provides a comparative summary ofproperties of sintered corundum abrasives of different generations and functions obtained by the author making the change in value indexof machininhcapacity grit from cutting speeds for different generations of sintered corundum.

  6. Rapid laser sintering of metal nano-particles inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermak, Oleg; Zenou, Michael; Toker, Gil Bernstein; Ankri, Jonathan; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-09-23

    Fast sintering is of importance in additive metallization processes and especially on sensitive substrates. This work explores the mechanisms which set limits to the laser sintering rate of metal nano-particle inks. A comparison of sintering behavior of three different ink compositions with laser exposure times from micro-seconds to seconds reveals the dominant factor to be the organic content (OC) in the ink. With a low OC silver ink, of 2% only, sintering time falls below 100 μs with resistivity <×4 bulk silver. Still shorter exposure times result in line delamination and deformation with a similar outcome when the OC is increased.

  7. Cadmium accumulation by Axonopus compressus (Sw.) P. Beauv and Cyperus rotundas Linn growing in cadmium solution and cadmium-zinc contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Paitip Thiravetyan; Vibol Sao; Woranan Nakbanpote

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the phyto-remediation potentials of Cyperus rotundas Linn (Nutgrass) and Axonopus compressus (Sw.) P. Beauv (Carpetgrass) for cadmium removal from cadmium solution andcadmium-zinc contaminated soil. Plants growth in the solution showed that cadmium decreased the relative growth rate of both grasses. However, the amount of cadmium accumulated in shoot and root was increasedwith the increase in cadmium concentration and exposure time. Growth in fertile soil mixed with...

  8. Interpretation of Frenkel’s theory of sintering considering evolution of activated pores: III. Determination of equilibrium sintering time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the Frenkel’s theory of liquid-phase sintering was interpreted regarding pores as the activated volume. The mathematical model established by Nikolić et al. was used to infer the equilibrium sintering time at varied sintering temperatures during the isothermal sintering of codierite glass by Giess et al. Through the calculation, the equilibrium time at 800ºC, 820ºC, 840ºC and 860ºC is inferred to be 7014.42mins, 1569.65mins, 368.92mins and 114.61mins, respectively. The equilibrium time decreases as the temperature increases. And the theoretical value is in good accordance with the experimental results. Thus, the model established by Nikolić et al. can be applied successfully to predict the equilibrium sintering time of the cordierite glass at varied temperatures during isothermal sintering.

  9. Improvement of cadmium phytoremediation after soil inoculation with a cadmium-resistant Micrococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangthong, Chirawee; Setkit, Kunchaya; Prapagdee, Benjaphorn

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium-resistant Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221, a plant growth-promoting bacterium, has stimulatory effects on the root lengths of Zea mays L. seedlings under toxic cadmium conditions compared to uninoculated seedlings. The performance of Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 on promoting growth and cadmium accumulation in Z. mays L. was investigated in a pot experiment. The results indicated that Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221significantly promoted the root length, shoot length, and dry biomass of Z. mays L. transplanted in both uncontaminated and cadmium-contaminated soils. Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 significantly increased cadmium accumulation in the roots and shoots of Z. mays L. compared to uninoculated plants. At the beginning of the planting period, cadmium accumulated mainly in the shoots. With a prolonged duration of cultivation, cadmium content increased in the roots. As expected, little cadmium was found in maize grains. Soil cadmium was significantly reduced with time, and the highest percentage of cadmium removal was found in the bacterial-inoculated Z. mays L. after transplantation for 6 weeks. We conclude that Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 is a potent bioaugmenting agent, facilitating cadmium phytoextraction in Z. mays L.

  10. [Investigation of urinary cadmium characteristics of the general population in three non-cadmium-polluted rural areas in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingxiu; Hu, Ji; Sun, Hong; Jing, Qiqing; Wang, Xiaofeng; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wenli; Shang, Qi

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the characteristics of urinary cadmium of the non-occupational-cadmium-exposed population in non-cadmium contaminated rural area in China. Randomly selected non-occupational cadmium exposed population 2548 people (male 1290, female 1258) with each gender and age groups, questionnaire surveyed and collected random urine. Urinary cadmium and urinary creatinine (Cr) concentration were tested, excluding urinary Cr 3 g/L. Analyze the impact factors of urinary cadmium and calculated 95% quantile (P95) of urinary cadmium after correction by urinary Cr. Urinary cadmium increased with age and showed an upward trend. The urinary cadmium of the population of ≥ 30 years old was significantly higher than that of populations (China (GB Z17-2002). The urinary cadmium reference value of non-occupational-cadmium-exposed populations is China, but for smoking women over 30 year-old it needs more research to explore.

  11. Cadmium stress in wheat seedlings: growth, cadmium accumulation and photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ci, Dunwei; Jiang, Dong; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    parameters were generally depressed by Cd stress, especially under the high Cd concentrations. Cd concentration and accumulation in both shoots and roots increased with increasing external Cd concentrations. Relationships between corrected parameters of growth, photosynthesis and fluorescence and corrected......Seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Jing 411, Jinmai 30 and Yangmai 10 were exposed to 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 or 50 μM of CdCl2 in a solution culture experiment. The effects of cadmium (Cd) stress on wheat growth, leaf photon energy conversion, gas exchange, and Cd accumulation in wheat...

  12. Cadmium in the bioenergy system - a synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlfont, K.

    1997-12-01

    Cadmium is a toxic metal without any known positive biological effects. Both emissions and atmospheric deposition of cadmium have decreased radically in Sweden during recent years. In Sweden, about 150 tonnes of cadmium was supplied to the technosphere in 1990, mostly originating from NiCd batteries. More than 100 tonnes of cadmium accumulated in the technosphere. Mankind takes up cadmium from water, food and particulate atmospheric pollution. Even small amounts may be injurious in the long-term since the half-life in the kidneys is 30 years. Cadmium in biofuel and ashes are generally a cause of discussion. Ashes from biofuel constitute a nutrient resource that should be returned to the soil. A possible risk with spreading ashes is the spreading of heavy metals, and then foremost cadmium, which is among the heavy metals that forest soils are considered to tolerate the least. Several studies on cadmium in the bioenergy system have been made, both within the Research Programme for Recycling of Wood-ash, and within Vattenfall's Bioenergy Project. The present report is intended to provide a picture of the current state of knowledge and to review plans for the future With a 3 page summary in English. 51 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1127 - Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... occupational exposure to cadmium as follows: (1) Reassess the employee's work practices and personal hygiene... employee's work practices and personal hygiene; the employee's respirator use, if any; the employee's...; assuring that all employees exposed to air cadmium levels above the PEL wear appropriate personal...

  14. Cadmium and children: Exposure and health effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeters, G.; Hond, E. Den; Zuurbier, M.; Naginiene, R.; Hazel, P.J. van den; Stilianakis, N.; Ronchetti, R.; Koppe, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis

  15. Immunochromatographic assay of cadmium levels in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kosuke; Kim, In-Hae; Itai, Takaaki; Sugahara, Takuya; Takeyama, Haruko; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-08-15

    Oysters are one of foodstuffs containing a relatively high amount of cadmium. Here we report on establishment of an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) method of cadmium levels in oysters. Cadmium was extracted with 0.l mol L(-1) HCl from oysters and cleaned up from other metals by the use of an anion-exchange column. The behavior of five metals Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd was monitored at each step of extraction and clean-up procedure for the ICA method in an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. The results revealed that a simple extraction method with the HCl solution was efficient enough to extract almost all of cadmium from oysters. Clean-up with an anion-exchange column presented almost no loss of cadmium adsorbed on the column and an efficient removal of metals other than cadmium. When a spiked recovery test was performed in the ICA method, the recovery ranged from 98% to 112% with relative standard deviations between 5.9% and 9.2%. The measured values of cadmium in various oyster samples in the ICA method were favorably correlated with those in ICP-MS analysis (r(2)=0.97). Overall results indicate that the ICA method established in the present study is an adequate and reliable detection method for cadmium levels in oysters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of urinary cadmium and myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, Charles J.; Frithsen, Ivar L.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals 45-79 years old in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) (NHANES III). Myocardial infarction was determined by electrocardiogram (ECG). Our sample included 4912 participants, which when weighted represented 52,234,055 Americans. We performed adjusted logistic regressions with the Framingham risk score, pack-years of smoking, race-ethnicity, and family history of heart attack, and diabetes as covariates. Urinary cadmium ≥0.88 μg/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.86 (95% CI 1.26-2.75) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 μg/g creatinine. This result supports the hypothesis that cadmium is associated with coronary heart disease. When logistic regressions were done by gender, women, but not men, showed a significant association of urinary cadmium with myocardial infarction. Women with urinary cadmium ≥0.88 μg/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.80 (95% CI 1.06-3.04) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 μg/g creatinine. When the analysis was restricted to never smokers (N=2187) urinary cadmium ≥0.88 μg/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.85 (95% CI 1.10-3.14) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 μg/g creatinine

  17. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect...

  18. Electro-spark machining of cadmium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskij, V.N.; Stepakhina, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental data on electrical erosion of the semiconductor material (cadmium antimonide) alloyed with tellurium are given. The potentialisies and expediency of using the electric-spark method of cutting cadmium antimonide ingots with the resistivity of 1 ohm is discussed. Cutting has been carried out in distilled water and in the air

  19. Cadmium toxcity in the pregnant rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.G.; Hitchcock, B.B.; King, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Iron-deficient and normal pregnant rats were assigned to groups that either received a dose of cadmium (0.025, 0.050, or 0.100 mmole) plus 8 μCi of /sup 115m/Cd on day 18 of gestation or served as a nondosed group. Animals were either sacrificed 3 days after the dosing or allowed to litter (nondosed and 0.100 mmole cadmium groups only); pups and dams were sacrificed at 14 days of age. Viability of iron-deficient dams and fetuses and pups from iron-deficient dams was affected by the 0.100 mmole cadmium dose to a greater degree than was that in comparable normal animals. Although calculated amounts of cadmium deposited in the dam's liver, kidney, blood, tibia, and fetuses were greater in iron-deficient than in normal animals at all doses, differences were not significant except in the amount of cadmium accumulated in the placenta at the highest cadmium doses. Total deposition in the placentas/litter was similar for normal and iron-deficient groups at each dose level. The decreased viability may have been due to the dam's decreased food intake; blockage of nutrients, especially minerals, by cadmium--protein complexes in the placenta; or hormonal interruptions of pregnancy by steroid--cadmium complexes

  20. Laser Surface Treatment of Sintered Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, R.; Noelke, C.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.

    Sintered alumina ceramics are used as refractory materials for industrial aluminum furnaces. In this environment the ceramic surface is in permanent contact with molten aluminum resulting in deposition of oxidic material on its surface. Consequently, a lower volume capacity as well as thermal efficiency of the furnaces follows. To reduce oxidic adherence of the ceramic material, two laser-based surface treatment processes were investigated: a powder- based single-step laser cladding and a laser surface remelting. Main objective is to achieve an improved surface quality of the ceramic material considering the industrial requirements as a high process speed.

  1. Computer Modeling of Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing process is presented. The primary application of the model is for determining the temperature history of parts fabricated using DMLS to evaluate residual stresses found in finished pieces and to assess manufacturing process strategies to reduce part slumping. The model utilizes MSC SINDA as a heat transfer solver with imbedded FORTRAN computer code to direct laser motion, apply laser heating as a boundary condition, and simulate the addition of metal powder layers during part fabrication. Model results are compared to available data collected during in situ DMLS part manufacture.

  2. SEM hot stage sintering of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.

    1976-06-01

    The sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide powder compacts, in the hot stage of a scanning electron microscope, was continuously monitored using 16 mm time lapse movies. From alumina microspheres placed on the surface of the compacts, shrinkage measurements were obtained. Converting shrinkage measurements into densification profiles indicates that a maximum densification rate is reached at a critical density, independent of the constant heating rates. At temperatures above 1350 0 C, the movement of the reference microspheres made shrinkage measurements impossible. It is believed the evolution of UO 3 gas from hyperstoichiometric UO 2 is the cause of this limitation

  3. Selective laser sintering in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Alida

    2013-03-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is a solid freeform fabrication technique, developed by Carl Deckard for his master's thesis at the University of Texas, patented in 1989. SLS manufacturing is a technique that produces physical models through a selective solidification of a variety of fine powders. SLS technology is getting a great amount of attention in the clinical field. In this paper the characteristics features of SLS and the materials that have been developed for are reviewed together with a discussion on the principles of the above-mentioned manufacturing technique. The applications of SLS in tissue engineering, and at-large in the biomedical field, are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Powder densification maps in Selective Laser Sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourell, D.; Wohlert, M.; Harlan, N.; Beaman, J.; Das, S.

    2002-01-01

    Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is a manufacturing process in which a part is produced without the need for part-specific tooling. It competes effectively with other manufacturing processes when part geometry is complex and the production run is not large. Traditionally, this was limited to prototype production, although tooling applications are now appearing. This paper describes several applications of powder densification maps to advance solutions in direct SLS of metallic and ceramic powders. Time-dependent plasticity issues arise in pre-processing of powder to make it suitable for SLS and in post-processing of SLS parts to obtain desired density. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Novel Cadmium Resistance Determinant in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cameron; Lee, Sangmi; Jayeola, Victor; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause severe disease (listeriosis) in susceptible individuals. It is ubiquitous in the environment and often exhibits resistance to heavy metals. One of the determinants that enables Listeria to tolerate exposure to cadmium is the cadAC efflux system, with CadA being a P-type ATPase. Three different cadA genes (designated cadA1 to cadA3 ) were previously characterized in L. monocytogenes A novel putative cadmium resistance gene ( cadA4 ) was recently identified through whole-genome sequencing, but experimental confirmation for its involvement in cadmium resistance is lacking. In this study, we characterized cadA4 in L. monocytogenes strain F8027, a cadmium-resistant strain of serotype 4b. By screening a mariner-based transposon library of this strain, we identified a mutant with reduced tolerance to cadmium and that harbored a single transposon insertion in cadA4 The tolerance to cadmium was restored by genetic complementation with the cadmium resistance cassette ( cadA4C ), and enhanced cadmium tolerance was conferred to two unrelated cadmium-sensitive strains via heterologous complementation with cadA4C Cadmium exposure induced cadA4 expression, even at noninhibitory levels. Virulence assessments in the Galleria mellonella model suggested that a functional cadA4 suppressed virulence, potentially promoting commensal colonization of the insect larvae. Biofilm assays suggested that cadA4 inactivation reduced biofilm formation. These data not only confirm cadA4 as a novel cadmium resistance determinant in L. monocytogenes but also provide evidence for roles in virulence and biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular foodborne pathogen causing the disease listeriosis, which is responsible for numerous hospitalizations and deaths every year. Among the adaptations that enable the survival of Listeria in the environment are the abilities to persist in biofilms, grow in the cold, and

  6. Liquid scintillation counting analysis of cadmium-109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.K.; Barfuss, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recently the authors have used radiolabled cadmium-109 to measure the transport of inorganic cadmium in renal proximal tubules. An anomaly discovered in the liquid scintillation counting analysis of Cd-109 which is not attributable to normal decay; it consists of a significant decrease in the measured count rate of small amounts of sample. The objective is to determine whether the buffer solution used in the membrane transport studies is causing precipitation of the cadmium or whether cadmium is being adsorbed by the glass. It was important to determine whether the procedure could be modified to correct this problem. The problem does not appear to be related to the use of the buffer or to adsorption of Cd onto glass. Correction based on using triated L-glucose in all of these experiments and calculating a correction factor for the concentration of cadmium

  7. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waisberg, Michael; Joseph, Pius; Hale, Beverley; Beyersmann, Detmar

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd 2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  8. Cadmium Diagenesis in Polluted Sediments of a Tropical Estuary of SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchineelam, S. R.; Metzger, E.; Jézéquel, D.; Sarazin, G.; Smoak, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Sepetiba bay is a shallow semi enclosed water body located about 70km on the west side of the city of Rio de Janeiro with an area of 450km² separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sand spit. Fishing, shrimp and tourism are important economic activities. During 35 years a Zinc/Cadmium smelter has polluted the bay. The objective of this investigation is to demonstrate how diagenetic processes are responsible for the cadmium remobilization out or fixation into the sediment column.. Two contrasting sites were selected to compare the diagenetic process. P1 located near to the smelter and P2 is about 20km away from the smelter next to a domestic effluents discharge into the bay. Peeper samplers with 25 cells with a resolution of 2,5cm were introduced into the sediment at both sites. After a period of 3 weeks equilibrium, the pore waters were separated from each cell and analyzed within 24 hours for alkalinity, H2S, NH3 and soluble phosphate by conventional methods An ICP-AES spectrometer was used to analyze Na, Mg, Li, Ba, Sr, Si, Fe and Mn. The total and labile Cd in pore waters were determined by differential-pulse stripping voltammetry. The solute profiles have revealed that the sediments at both sites were anoxic. The slopes of the ferrous and sulfide profile constituents permitted characterization the area at P1 as ferrous dominant with oxic conditions in the overlying water and P2 as a sulfidic rich environment with suboxic conditions in the water column. At P1 total dissolved Cd in the overlying water was about 450pM and labile fraction varied from 85 to 177pM. Just below the sediment water interface 695pM of total dissolved Cd was observed. Probably diagenetic processes are responsible for release of cadmium at the sediment interface. Below this maxima Cd concentrations decreased to 30pM. At P2 a concentration o of 150pM of total dissolved Cd was detected in the overlying water and samples in the pore waters at the sediment interface had an average concentration

  9. Cadmium safety rod thermal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Peacock, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal testing of cadmium safety rods was conducted as part of a program to define the response of Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA leading to a drained reactor tank. The safety rods are present in the reactor core only during shutdown and are not used as a control mechanism during operation; thus, their response to the conditions predicted for the LOCA is only of interest to the extent that it could impact the progression of the accident. This document provides a description of this testing

  10. Testing Cadmium-Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    Secretary of Defense Directive • “Approve the use of alternatives [to hexavalent chromium (Cr6+)] where they can perform adequately for the intended...Effect of corrosion on breakaway torque 12 OPSEC approved for public release Fastener Finish Study FINISH POST-TREATMENT LUBRICANT Cadmium Hexavalent ...Past Testing Electrical Connectors Coatings Al / TCP ZnNi / TCP ZnNi / Non- Chrome Passivation (NCP) Ni-PTFE 1 Ni-PTFE 2 Note: SnZn tested on flat

  11. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  12. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  14. Effects of Sintering Temperature on the Density And Porosity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of sodium chloride preforms for alu- minium foam manufacturing have been investigated. Cold pressed salt preforms were sintered at 30, 760 and 790 and di erent times ranging between 6- 18 hours in a carbolite furnace at a heating rate of 5/minute. The Results of ...

  15. Sintering of Multilayered Porous Structures: Part I-Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olevsky, Eugene; Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical analyses of shrinkage and distortion kinetics during sintering of bilayered porous structures are carried out. The developed modeling framework is based on the continuum theory of sintering; it enables the direct assessment of the cofiring process outcomes and of the impact of process...

  16. Direct metal laser sintering: a digitised metal casting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nandini, V Vidyashree

    2013-12-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  17. Direct Metal Laser Sintering: A Digitised Metal Casting Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, K. Vijay; Nandini, V. Vidyashree

    2013-01-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  18. Monitoring Sintering Burn-Through Point Using Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco G. Bulnes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sintering is a complex industrial process that applies heat to fine particles of iron ore and other materials to produce sinter, a solidified porous material used in blast furnaces. The sintering process needs to be carefully adjusted, so that the combustion zone reaches the bottom of the material just before the discharge end. This is known as the burnthrough point. Many different parameters need to be finely tuned, including the speed and the quantities of the materials mixed. However, in order to achieve good results, sintering control requires precise feedback to adjust these parameters. This work presents a sensor to monitor the sintering burn-through point based on infrared thermography. The proposed procedure is based on the acquisition of infrared images at the end of the sintering process. At this position, infrared images contain the cross-section temperatures of the mixture. The objective of this work is to process this information to extract relevant features about the sintering process. The proposed procedure is based on four steps: key frame detection, region of interest detection, segmentation and feature extraction. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is very robust and reliable, providing features that can be used effectively to control the sintering process.

  19. Sintering of uranium dioxide obtained by continuous precipitation of AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya, C.D.; Sterba, M.E.; Russo, D.O.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Division in Bariloche Atomic Center evaluates the ceramic behaviour of UO 2 powders obtained from continuously precipitated and reduced AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Tri Carbonate). An analysis is made of powder characteristics (particle morphology and size distribution and specific area) on behaviour of UO 2 during sintering (compaction, sintering, pore and grain microstructure, etc.). 1 ref

  20. CALCIUM OXIDE SINTERING IN ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of measurements of the effects of water vapor and CO2 on the sintering rate of nascent CaO, as a function of partial pressure and temperature using CaO prepared by rapid decomposition of CaCO3 and CA(OH)2. Each gas strongly catalyzed the sintering process ...

  1. Effect of sintering temperature and heating mode on consolidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ratures ranging from 570–630 ◦C. Microwave sintering at a heating rate of as high as 22◦. C/min resulted in ... The effect of heating mode and sintering temperature are discussed .... the compacts. This is attributed to the Zn evaporated from the.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  3. Microstructure evolution during pressureless sintering of bulk oxide ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Maca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The author’s experience concerning the infl uence of the choice of different pressureless heating schedules on the fi nal microstructure of oxide ceramic materials is summarized in the paper. Alumina, ceria, strontium titanate, as well as tetragonal (3 mol% Y2O3 and cubic (8 mol% Y2O3 zirconia were cold isostatically pressed or injection moulded and pressureless sintered with different heating schedules – namely with Constant-Rate of Heating with different dwell temperatures (CRH, with Rate-Controlled Sintering (RCS and with Two-Step Sintering (TSS. It was examined whether some of these three sintering schedules, with the same fi nal density achieved, can lead to a decrease of the grain size of sintered ceramics. The results showed that only TSS (and only for selected materials brought significant decrease of the grain size.

  4. Densification of LSGM electrolytes using activated microwave sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesapragada, S. V.; Bhaduri, S. B.; Bhaduri, S.; Singh, P.

    Lanthanum gallate doped with alkaline rare earths (LSGM) powders were densified using an activated microwave sintering process for developing a dense stable electrolyte layer for applications in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). Due to heat generation in situ, the process of sintering gets activated with faster kinetics compared to a conventional sintering process. The effect of various microwave process parameters on the microstructure and phase formation was studied. The sintered pellets were characterized using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive analysis (SEM-EDAX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density of LSGM pellets microwave sintered at 1350 °C for 20 min is greater than 95% theoretical density with a fine grained microstructure (˜2-3 μm) and without the presence of other phase(s).

  5. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M; Skrifvars, B J; Backman, R; Lauren, T; Uusikartano, T; Malm, H; Stenstroem, P; Vesterkvist, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). During 1996 the work has focused on identifying bed agglomeration mechanisms and analysing bed agglomerates in both full scale and lab scale FB reactors, as well as comparing how well the compression strength based sintering test can predict bed agglomeration in an FB furnace. (orig.)

  6. Sintering unalloyed titanium in DC electrical abnormal glow discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Seeber

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy is widely used in the manufacture of components that have complex geometry. The good dimensional control, reduction in manufacturing steps and operating costs which has favored the use of this technique for manufacturing of titanium alloys components. However, the high affinity of this material with oxygen hinders strongly the sintering process. For this, the sintering associated with plasma technology can be considered an alternative technique for the processing of this material. The strict control of sintering atmosphere performed at low pressures and the reactive species present in the plasma environment can help to improve the sintering of this material. The results presented in this paper show a good correlation between the parameters used for the compaction of the samples and the microstructure develop during the plasma sintering of samples. The microstructure of the plasma assisted samples is also affected by the particular configuration used in the plasma reactor.

  7. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  8. Preliminary investigation of liquid phase sintering in ferrous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.

    1975-04-01

    Liquid phase sintering was utilized to achieve, by a simple compaction and sintering procedure involving short times and moderate temperatures, a virtually full dense high carbon Fe:C alloy and high boron Fe:B alloy. Parameters such as powder characteristics and mixing, compacting pressure, heating program and the liquid phase fraction were found to influence the sintered density. The response of the Fe:C alloy to a heat treatment is reported along with preliminary experiments in the iron base ternary system Fe:W:C. Residual porosities observed in microstructures of certain liquid phase sintered compacts were accounted for by a proposed capillary flow of the liquid phase and a local densification competing against an overall densification. Some general recommendations are made for liquid phase sintering of powder aggregates. 15 fig., 7 tables

  9. Effect of particle size distribution on sintering of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.R.; Griffin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    To date, very little is known about the effect of the nature of the particle size distribution on sintering. It is reasonable that there should be an effect of size distribution, and theory and prior experimental work examining the effects of variations in bimodal and continuous distributions have shown marked effects on sintering. Most importantly, even with constant mean particle size, variations in distribution width, or standard deviation, have been shown to produce marked variations in microstructure and sintering rate. In the latter work, in which spherical copper powders were blended to produce lognormal distributions of constant geometric mean particle size by weight frequency, blends with larger values of geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, sintered more rapidly. The goals of the present study were to examine in more detail the effects of variations in the width of lognormal particle size distributions of tungsten powder and determine the effects of 1nσ on the microstructural evolution during sintering

  10. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  11. Relation between dietary cadmium intake and biomarkers of cadmium exposure in premenopausal women accounting for body iron stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julin Bettina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant with adverse effects on kidneys and bone, but with insufficiently elucidated public health consequences such as risk of end-stage renal diseases, fractures and cancer. Urinary cadmium is considered a valid biomarker of lifetime kidney accumulation from overall cadmium exposure and thus used in the assessment of cadmium-induced health effects. We aimed to assess the relationship between dietary cadmium intake assessed by analyses of duplicate food portions and cadmium concentrations in urine and blood, taking the toxicokinetics of cadmium into consideration. Methods In a sample of 57 non-smoking Swedish women aged 20-50 years, we assessed Pearson's correlation coefficients between: 1 Dietary intake of cadmium assessed by analyses of cadmium in duplicate food portions collected during four consecutive days and cadmium concentrations in urine, 2 Partial correlations between the duplicate food portions and urinary and blood cadmium concentrations, respectively, and 3 Model-predicted urinary cadmium concentration predicted from the dietary intake using a one-compartment toxicokinetic model (with individual data on age, weight and gastrointestinal cadmium absorption and urinary cadmium concentration. Results The mean concentration of cadmium in urine was 0.18 (+/- s.d.0.12 μg/g creatinine and the model-predicted urinary cadmium concentration was 0.19 (+/- s.d.0.15 μg/g creatinine. The partial Pearson correlations between analyzed dietary cadmium intake and urinary cadmium or blood concentrations were r = 0.43 and 0.42, respectively. The correlation between diet and urinary cadmium increased to r = 0.54 when using a one-compartment model with individual gastrointestinal cadmium absorption coefficients based on the women's iron status. Conclusions Our results indicate that measured dietary cadmium intake can reasonably well predict biomarkers of both long-term kidney accumulation

  12. Three-dimensional simulation of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, M J; Schmid, H -J; Peukert, W

    2009-08-01

    The viscous-flow sintering of different agglomerate particle morphologies is studied by three-dimensional computer simulations based on the concept of fractional volume of fluid. For a fundamental understanding of particle sintering characteristics, the neck growth kinetics in agglomerate chains and in doublets consisting of differently sized primary particles is investigated. Results show that different sintering contacts in agglomerates even during the first stages are not completely independent from each other, even though differences are small. The neck growth kinetics of differently sized primary particles is determined by the smaller one up to a size difference by a factor of approximately 2, whereas for larger size differences, the kinetics becomes faster. In particular, the agglomerate sintering kinetics is investigated for particle chains of different lengths and for different particle morphologies each having ten primary particles and nine initial sintering contacts. For agglomerate chains, the kinetics approximately can be normalized by using the radius of the fully coalesced sphere. In general, different agglomerate morphologies show equal kinetics during the first sintering stages, whereas during advanced stages, compact morphologies show significantly faster sintering progress than more open morphologies. Hence, the overall kinetics cannot be described by simply using constant morphology correction factors such as fractal dimension or mean coordination number which are used in common sintering models. However, for the first stages of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering, which are the most important for many particle processes, a sintering equation is presented. Although we use agglomerates consisting of spherical primary particles, our methodology can be applied to other aggregate geometries as well.

  13. Influence of protein deficiency on cadmium toxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, P C; Jain, V K; Ashquin, M; Tandon, S K

    1986-07-01

    The effects of a low protein diet on the body uptake and retention of cadmium, levels of essential trace elements, and cadmium-induced biochemical alterations in liver and kidneys of the rat were investigated. Low dietary protein disturbs cadmium induced alterations in carbohydrate metabolism, essential trace elements metabolism and offsets the hepatic and renal process of cadmium detoxification. Protein malnutrition enhances the susceptibility to cadmium intoxication.

  14. Cadmium Exposure is Associated with the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Lu, Yong-Hui; Pi, Hui-Feng; Gao, Peng; Li, Min; Zhang, Lei; Pei, Li-Ping; Mei, Xiang; Liu, Lin; Zhao, Qi; Qin, Qi-Zhong; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Yu, Zheng-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental and occupational pollutant that accumulates in human body with a biological half-life exceeding 10 years. Cadmium exposure has been demonstrated to increase rates of cardiovascular diseases. Whether occupational cadmium exposure is associated with the increase in the prevalence of dyslipidemia and hence contributes to the risk of cardiovascular diseases is still equivocal. To test the hypothesis that exposure to cadmium is related to the prevalence of dyslipidemia, we examined the associations between blood cadmium concentration and the prevalence of dyslipidemia in workers occupationally exposed to cadmium in China. A cross-sectional survey on demographic data, blood cadmium level and lipid profile in cadmium exposed workers from seven cadmium smelting factories in central and southwestern China was conducted. We measured blood cadmium concentration and lipid components of 1489 cadmium exposed workers. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was compared across blood cadmium quartiles. Associations between the blood cadmium concentrations and the prevalence of dyslipidemia were assessed using confounder adjusted linear and logistic regressions. The blood cadmium concentration was 3.61±0.84µg/L ( mean ±SD). The prevalence of dyslipidemia in this occupational population was 66.3%. Mean blood cadmium concentration of workers with dyslipedemia was significantly higher than that of workers without dyslipidemia (p dyslipidemia increased dose-dependently with elevations in blood cadmium concentrations (p for trend dyslipidemia across the increasing blood cadmium quartiles were 1.21(1.16-1.55), 1.56(1.11-1.87), 1.79(1.26-2.25) respectively (referencing to 1.00; p for trend dyslipidemia remained unchanged (all p for trend dyslipidemia. Cadmium exposure could alter lipid metabolism in humans. It is imperative to control cadmium exposure of occupational population in cadmium related industries and reduce adverse health effects. © 2016 The

  15. Radiochemical separation of cadmium-109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egamediev, S.; Mukhtarov, A.; Nurbaeva, D.; Rakhmanov, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Cadmium-109 has a half-life of 461.9 days and decays by electron capture to 109 Ag with the emission of 88 keV γ-ray (3.79%) along with the characteristic X-ray from the K level of Ag, with energy of 22.5 keV. This radionuclide has found widespread use as a photon source in x-ray fluorescence analysis devices employed in industry for numerous applications such as the direct determination of gold in ores, the analysis of metals and identification of steels. Other applications range from its use as an electron source for measurement of densities of air-pollution samples, to tracer studies in mushrooms and mice and rats. In the nuclear medicine field there is growing interest in employing 109 Cd in a 109 Cd/ 109mA g generator, as an alternative to other biomedical generators of ultra short-lived gamma emitters. There are several methods for the production of 109 Cd in literature: 1. Bombardment of silver cyclotron target via 109 Ag(d,2n) 109 Cd reaction with 16 MeV deuterons. 2. Bombardment of natural silver target via 109 Ag(p,n) 109 Cd reaction with 14 MeV protons. 3. Proton bombardment of natural indium target with 96 MeV protons. 4. Irradiation of enriched 107 Ag target in high-flux nuclear reactor at neutron flux 2x10 15 n·cm -2 ·s -1 via 107 Ag(n,γ) 108 Ag → 108 Cd (n,γ) 109 Cd reaction. 5. Irradiation of enriched 108 Cd target in nuclear reactor at neutron flux 1x10 14 n·cm -2 ·s -1 via 108 Cd (n,γ) 109 Cd reaction. The production of 109 Cd with proton beam via 109 Ag(p,n) 109 Cd reaction is ideal for the cyclotron U-150, since it is not required the change of the regime for the machine functioning. Because of its relatively long half-life the time required for separation is also not an important factor, but its use as an X-ray source requires a very high radiochemical purity. In the present work we studied two methods for separation of 109 Cd from model solution of silver targets. First method is based on precipitation of silver as

  16. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijie; Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun; Lee Duujong

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S 0 ), N 2 , and CO 2 , or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  17. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  19. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  20. Cadmium action in synapses in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Akira; Takeda, Atsushi; Nishibaba, Daisuke; Tekefuta, Sachiyo; Oku, Naoto [Department of Radiobiochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium causes central nervous system disorders, e.g., olfactory dysfunction. To clarify cadmium toxicity in synaptic neurotransmission in the brain, the movement and action of cadmium in the synapses was examined using in vivo microdialysis. One and 24 h after injection of {sup 109}CdCl{sub 2} into the amygdala of rats, {sup 109}Cd release into the extracellular space was facilitated by stimulation with high K{sup +}, suggesting that cadmium taken up in amygdalar neurons is released into the synaptic clefts in a calcium- and impulse-dependent manner. To examine the action of cadmium in the synapses, the amygdala was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 10-30 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. The release of excitatory neurotransmitters, i.e., glutamate and aspartate, into the extracellular space was decreased during perfusion with cadmium, while the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters, i.e., glycine and {gamma}-amino butyric acid (GABA), into the extracellular space was increased during the period. These results suggest that cadmium released from the amygdalar neuron terminals affects the degree and balance of excitation-inhibition in synaptic neurotransmission. (author)

  1. Cadmium action in synapses in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira; Takeda, Atsushi; Nishibaba, Daisuke; Tekefuta, Sachiyo; Oku, Naoto

    2001-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium causes central nervous system disorders, e.g., olfactory dysfunction. To clarify cadmium toxicity in synaptic neurotransmission in the brain, the movement and action of cadmium in the synapses was examined using in vivo microdialysis. One and 24 h after injection of 109 CdCl 2 into the amygdala of rats, 109 Cd release into the extracellular space was facilitated by stimulation with high K + , suggesting that cadmium taken up in amygdalar neurons is released into the synaptic clefts in a calcium- and impulse-dependent manner. To examine the action of cadmium in the synapses, the amygdala was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 10-30 μM CdCl 2 . The release of excitatory neurotransmitters, i.e., glutamate and aspartate, into the extracellular space was decreased during perfusion with cadmium, while the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters, i.e., glycine and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), into the extracellular space was increased during the period. These results suggest that cadmium released from the amygdalar neuron terminals affects the degree and balance of excitation-inhibition in synaptic neurotransmission. (author)

  2. Cadmium - a case of mistaken identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D

    1984-05-01

    New evidence is presented which describes the impact of cadmium in the environment. Cadmium is a persistent material, although its compounds may undergo a range of chemical changes in the environment. In soluble form cadmium and its compounds are toxic at relatively low concentrations to aquatic animals although their bioconcentrations in such animals is in general low, and there is no evidence of biomagnification. In insoluble form cadmium and its compounds are relatively non-toxic to aquatic animals and are unlikely to be bioconcentrated. As such, cadmium is similar to most other heavy metals. Recent studies indicate that cadmium is not implicated in Itai-Itai disease and does not appear to cause hypertension or cancer. In addition, the accepted critical level in the kidney may have been underestimated. Thus, the hazard to man appears to be considerably less than the original estimates. In view of these data, there seems little justification in treating cadmium in any way differently from the other metals and hence no reason for retaining it on the Black List of the international conventions. 19 references.

  3. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C.; Rosa, Carlos Augusto

    2009-01-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K + and Na + ) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  4. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  5. Epidemiological approach to cadmium pollution in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigematsu, I.

    1984-04-01

    The study of health problems due to cadmium pollution in Japan originated from an endemic episode of Itai-itai disease in a rural area in north-central Japan after World War II. The disease was defined as osteomalacia with tubular changes in the kidney and considered to be associated with excess intake of cadmium. This episode motivated the Japanese Government to conduct health examinations on the general population in cadmium-polluted and non-polluted areas throughout the country since 1969. Although Itai-itai disease-like bone changes were rarely found, these studies revealed a higher prevalence of renal tubular dysfunction among elderly people in the cadmium-polluted areas. No significant difference was noted in cancer mortality, but mortality from cardiovascular diseases and all causes tended to be lower in cadmium-polluted areas. Clinical and pathological studies in man as well as experiments on primates have recently been made to elucidate the pathogenesis of Itai-itai disease and the health effects of cadmium. The lack of knowledge on the ecological and biological complex of cadmium resulted in the impediment of studies on this problem. The lesson from this experience is that basic research is essential for promoting the study of pollutants such as heavy metals, though pollution problems usually require urgent solutions.

  6. The influence of green microstructure and sintering parameters on precipitation process during copper-nickel-zinc ferrites sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barba, A.; Clausell, C.; Jarque, J. C.; Monzo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructural changes that occur during heat treatment of copper-nickel-zinc ferrites have been studied. The process of precipitation of the two types of crystals that occur during the sintering process has been analyzed. It is found that this process depends on dry relative density of the press specimens and on the following sintering parameters: sintering temperature, sintering time and cooling rate of the thermal cycle. Crystal precipitates characterization have been done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These techniques have allowed to determine the nature of these crystals, which in this case correspond to zinc and copper oxides. It has been used two chemical reactions to explain the bulk precipitation and subsequent re-dissolution of these crystal precipitates during sintering. (Author)

  7. Nanostructured silver sulfide: synthesis of various forms and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Rempel, A. A.; Gusev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental studies on nanostructured silver sulfide are analyzed and generalized. The influence of small particle size on nonstoichiometry of silver sulfide is discussed. Methods for the synthesis of various forms of nanostructured Ag2S including nanopowders, stable colloidal solutions, quantum dots, core–shell nanoparticles and heteronanostructures are described. The advantages and drawbacks of different synthetic procedures are analyzed. Main fields of application of nanostructured silver sulfide are considered. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  8. Comparison of Ti(C,N)-based cermets processed by hot-pressing sintering and conventional pressureless sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingzhong; Ai, Xing; Zhao, Jun; Qin, Weizhen; Wang, Yintao; Gong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The HP sintered Ti(C,N)-based cermets exhibit high hardness with fine grain size. • The PLS sintered cermets possess high mechanical properties with low porosity. • The applied pressure can rearrange particles and contribute to grain refinement. • The heating rate can greatly affect the solid and liquid phase sintering of cermets. - Abstract: A suitable sintering method is important to obtain the Ti(C,N)-based cermets with superior properties. In this paper, Ti(C,N)-based cermets were fabricated by hot-pressing sintering (HP) and conventional pressureless sintering (PLS) technology, respectively, to investigate the influence of different sintering methods on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cermets materials. The microstructure, fracture morphology, indention cracks and phase composition were observed and detected using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The transverse rupture strength (TRS), Vickers hardness (HV) and fracture toughness (K IC ) were also measured. The results reveal that all of the Ti(C,N)-based cermets exhibit core–rim microstructures with black cores, white cores and grey rims embedded into metal binder phases. The grain size of the samples fabricated by HP is much finer and the structure is more compact than those fabricated by PLS, while there exist pores in the HP sintered samples. The sintering process has no influence on the phase composition of cermets, but affects the phase content and crystallinity. The samples fabricated by PLS present higher transverse rupture strength, fracture toughness and density than samples fabricated by HP. However, the HP sintered samples possess a higher hardness

  9. Cadmium decontamination using in-house resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sangita; Thalor, K.L; Prabhakar, S.; Srivastava, V.K.; Goswami, J.L.; Tewari, P.K.; Dhanpal, Pranav; Goswami, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    A selective and strong in-house chelator has been studied w.r.t. basic parameters like concentration, time, and elution. De-contamination of cadmium, mercury, chromium, lead etc by using high uptake values fro cadmium ions proves its selectivity with high elution ratio ensures further decontamination of run-off water during natural calamities. In three step cascade use the concentration of original cadmium solution (500 ppm) decocted to safe disposable attribute. This polymeric ligand exchanger displayed outlet effluent concentration to 1 ppm and less than 200 ppb when treated for inlet feed concentration of 50 ppm and 500 ppm respectively. (author)

  10. Lead and cadmium content of spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielig, H J; Dreyer, H; Askar, A

    1977-02-02

    The lead and cadmium content of various spices was determined by flameless atomic absorption (AAS). With the exception of one sample, the lead content was lower than 5 ppm, averaging a value of 2,2 ppm Pb. Thus, the maximum permissible level of 5 ppm Pb as recommended by different DIN standards, is not exceeded. The cadmium content was - except for one sample - lower than 0,5 ppm averaging a value of 0,23 ppm Cd. It can be assumed, that by spicing our dishes, the ingestion of lead and cadmium stays at a low level.

  11. Influence of sintering temperature on the properties of pulsed electric current sintered hybrid coreshell powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mahmed, N.; Larismaa, J.; Heczko, Oleg; Cura, M.E.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 12 (2013), s. 2233-2239 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : sintering * silver * iron oxide * SiO 2 * phase transformation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.307, year: 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2012.12.023

  12. Cadmium induced radioadaptive response via an ATM-independent H2S/cystathionine γ-lyase modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yan; Yuan Dexiao; Zhang Jianghong; Shao Chunlin

    2011-01-01

    The combined exposure to environmental toxicants such as heavy metals and radiation is an important research area in health protection. Here we explored cadmium induced radioadaptive response (RAR) and investigated the role of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and ATM kinase in this response. Our data showed that the cadmium ions with a sub-lethal concentration could induce RAR in Chang liver cells towards subsequent γ-irradiation and this response could be abrogated by DL-propargylglycine (PPG), the endogenous H 2 S synthetase inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), but not by aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), the inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS). Moreover, the pretreatment of cells with NaHS also stimulated cellular adaptive response to radiation. Both cadmium treatment and irradiation up-regulated the expression of CSE protein in a time-dependent manner but had no influence on the expression of CBS protein. In the primed cells, the time course of CBS expression showed no significant difference with the cells treated with 2Gy irradiation alone, however, the CSE expression was easier to reach the maximum level, indicating a more efficient H 2 S production by CSE. Moreover, the cadmium-induced RAR was totally suppressed by KU-55933, a specific ATM inhibitor that did not change the CSE expression after radiation. However, exogenous H 2 S decreased the phosphorylation level of radiation-induced ATM. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate firstly that H 2 S is involved in the cadmium induced cross-adaptive response to challenging radiation. CSE, rather than CBS, may mainly responsible for the H 2 S production during this RAR which may also be mediated by ATM pathway. However, the activation of CSE is independent of ATM but could negatively regulate the phosphorylation of ATM.

  13. Cadmium Exposure is Associated with the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cadmium is a widespread environmental and occupational pollutant that accumulates in human body with a biological half-life exceeding 10 years. Cadmium exposure has been demonstrated to increase rates of cardiovascular diseases. Whether occupational cadmium exposure is associated with the increase in the prevalence of dyslipidemia and hence contributes to the risk of cardiovascular diseases is still equivocal. To test the hypothesis that exposure to cadmium is related to the prevalence of dyslipidemia, we examined the associations between blood cadmium concentration and the prevalence of dyslipidemia in workers occupationally exposed to cadmium in China. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on demographic data, blood cadmium level and lipid profile in cadmium exposed workers from seven cadmium smelting factories in central and southwestern China was conducted. We measured blood cadmium concentration and lipid components of 1489 cadmium exposed workers. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was compared across blood cadmium quartiles. Associations between the blood cadmium concentrations and the prevalence of dyslipidemia were assessed using confounder adjusted linear and logistic regressions. Results: The blood cadmium concentration was 3.61±0.84µg/L ( mean ±SD. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in this occupational population was 66.3%. Mean blood cadmium concentration of workers with dyslipedemia was significantly higher than that of workers without dyslipidemia (p Conclusion: Elevated blood cadmium concentration is associated with prevalence of dyslipidemia. Cadmium exposure could alter lipid metabolism in humans. It is imperative to control cadmium exposure of occupational population in cadmium related industries and reduce adverse health effects.

  14. Sintering and microstructure evolution in columnar thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramanathan; Srolovitz, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sintering of thermal barrier coatings changes their key properties, such as thermal conductivity and thermal shock resistance, thus adversely impacting their reliability. We present a novel modeling approach to study the evolution of coating structure during sintering. We model the sintering of individual columns using a thermodynamic principle, and incorporate the center-to-center approach rates for the columns calculated using this principle in a larger scale discrete dynamics model for the evolution of a large number of columns. Surface energies, grain boundary energies and strain energies associated with the deformation of the columns are all included in this framework, while sintering is assumed to occur by the concerted action of surface and grain boundary diffusion. Two sets of initial conditions corresponding to different extents of pre-sintering among neighboring columns are considered. When the extent of pre-sintering is small, we observe that small clusters containing 5-20 columns are formed. In contrast, where a larger amount of pre-sintering exists, we observe, especially at large column densities, that clusters containing 50-100 columns separated by large inter-cluster pores/channels that appear to organize themselves into a network are formed. These observations are in good agreement with recently published experimental observations. We also explain how these results can explain the development of a 'mud-crack'-like pattern

  15. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  16. Studies on the sintering behaviour of uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets are normally made from their precursor ammonium diuranate, followed by calcination, subsequent reduction to sinterable grade powders and a post operation treatment of pressing and sintering. The low temperature calcined powders, usually exhibiting non-crystalline behaviour (under X-ray diffraction studies) progressively transforms into a crystalline variety on subsequent heat treatment at higher temperature. It is observed however that powders calcined between 800 to 900 0 C exhibit enhanced densification behaviour when sintered at higher temperatures. The isothermal shrinkage versus time plot of the sintered compacts are well described by a hyperbolic relationship which takes care of the observed shrinkage (λ) as caused due to a cumulative effect from the initial sintering of the powder compacts at zero time (α) and that caused due to the structural transformation from a non-crystalline modification with increased thermal treatment (β). The derived equation is a modification of the sintering mechanism of the viscous flow type proposed by Frenkel, involving sintering of an amorphous phase, the viscosity of the latter is presumed to increase with increasing thermal treatment to assume the final modified form as λ=t/(α+βt), where t = time, λ = shrinkage and α and β are the unknown parameters. (orig.)

  17. Removable partial denture alloys processed by laser-sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alageel, Omar; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Alsheghri, Ammar; Song, Jun; Caron, Eric; Tamimi, Faleh

    2018-04-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are traditionally made using a casting technique. New additive manufacturing processes based on laser sintering has been developed for quick fabrication of RPDs metal frameworks at low cost. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanical, physical, and biocompatibility properties of RPD cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys produced by two laser-sintering systems and compare them to those prepared using traditional casting methods. The laser-sintered Co-Cr alloys were processed by the selective laser-sintering method (SLS) and the direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) method using the Phenix system (L-1) and EOS system (L-2), respectively. L-1 and L-2 techniques were 8 and 3.5 times more precise than the casting (CC) technique (p laser-sintered and cast alloys were biocompatible. In conclusion, laser-sintered alloys are more precise and present better mechanical and fatigue properties than cast alloys for RPDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1174-1185, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  19. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE SINTERING OF ALUMINA BIOCERAMIC UNDER NORMAL PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Superfine alumina powder with high purity (mean particle size is less than 0. 35μm) were used as main starting material for sintering alumina ceramic. A multiple additive MgO-ZrO2 (Y2O3) was homogeneously added into the batch by the chemical coprecipitation method. Sintering of alumina bioceramic at low tempera ture (<1600C) was achieved resulting in a dense and high strength alumina ceramic with the bending strength up to 382 MPa and an improved fracture toughness. Mechanism that the multiple additives promote the sintering of alumina ceramic is discussed on the base of XRD and SEM analysis.

  1. The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2012-01-01

    The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres is investigated using a numerical model. The investigated systems are the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close-packed spheres (hcp). The sintering behavior is found to be ideal, with no grain growth until full dens...... density is reached for all systems. During sintering, the grains change shape from spherical to tetrakaidecahedron, similar to the geometry analyzed by Coble [R.L. Coble, J. Appl. Phys. 32 (1961) 787]....

  2. Modeling sintering of multilayers under influence of gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Olevsky, Eugene; Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye

    2013-01-01

    , which describes the combined effect of sintering and gravity of thin multilayers, is derived and later compared with experimental results. It allows for consideration of both uniaxial and biaxial stress states. The model is based on the Skorohod-Olevsky viscous sintering framework, the classical...... laminate theory and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. The modeling approach is then applied to illustrate the effect of gravity during sintering of thin layers of cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO), and it is found to be significant. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society....

  3. Low temperature spark plasma sintering of YIG powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Garcia, L.; Suarez, M.; Menendez, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    A transition from a low to a high spin state in the magnetization saturation between 1000 and 1100 o C calcination temperature is observed in YIG powders prepared by oxides mixture. Spark plasma sintering of these powders between 900 and 950 o C leads to dense samples with minimal formation of YFeO 3 , opening the way to co-sintering of YIG with metals or metallic alloys. The optical properties depend on the sintering stage: low (high) density samples show poor (bulk) optical absorption.

  4. Selective laser sintering: A qualitative and objective approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay

    2003-10-01

    This article presents an overview of selective laser sintering (SLS) work as reported in various journals and proceedings. Selective laser sintering was first done mainly on polymers and nylon to create prototypes for audio-visual help and fit-to-form tests. Gradually it was expanded to include metals and alloys to manufacture functional prototypes and develop rapid tooling. The growth gained momentum with the entry of commercial entities such as DTM Corporation and EOS GmbH Electro Optical Systems. Computational modeling has been used to understand the SLS process, optimize the process parameters, and enhance the efficiency of the sintering machine.

  5. Cleanable sintered metal filters in hot off-gas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Filters with sintered metal elements, arranged as tube bundles with backflush air cleaning, are the equivalent of bag filters for high-temperature, harsh environments. They are virtually the only alternative for high-temperature off-gas systems where a renewable, highly efficient particle trap is required. Tests were conducted which show that the sintered metal elements installed in a filter system provide effective powder collection in high-temperature atmospheres over thousands of cleaning cycles. Such a sintered metal filter system is now installed on the experimental defense waste calciner at the Savannah River Laboratory. The experimental results included in this paper were used as the basis for its design

  6. Sintering prevention and phase transformation of FePt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Y.; Majetich, S.A.; Kim, J.; Barmak, K.; Rollins, H.; Sides, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two approaches attempted to overcome FePt nanoparticle sintering during the transformation to the high coercivity L1 0 phase, which currently limits the use of these nanoparticles in data storage media. High-pressure treatment of dilute nanoparticle solutions failed to prevent sintering due to surfactant decomposition above 360 deg. C. By pre-annealing nanoparticle monolayers to decompose the surfactant, and then coating with an immiscible SiO 2 matrix, sintering was prevented with annealing temperatures up to 700 deg. C

  7. Rising environmental cadmium levels in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non essential heavy metal belonging to group ... Cd from a contaminated environment leads to various pathological ..... interact with genes that are involved in human ..... Tolonen, M. (1990) Vitamins and minerals in Health.

  8. Large silver-cadmium technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlip, S.; Lerner, S.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of varying cell design on operation factors on the electrochemical performance of sealed, silver-cadmium cells were determined. A factorial experiment was conducted for all test cells constructed with organic separators. Three operating factors were evaluated: temperature, depth of discharge, and charge rate. The six construction factors considered were separator, absorber, electrolyte quantity, cadmium electrode type, cadmium-to-silver ratio, and auxiliary electrode. Test cells of 4 ampere-hour capacity were fabricated and cycled. The best performing cells, on a 94 minute orbit, at 40% depth of discharge, were those containing silver-treated fibrous sausage casings as the separator, and Teflon-ated, pressed cadmium electrodes. Cycling data of cells with inorganic separators (Astroset) are given. Best performance was shown by cells with nonwoven nylon absorbers. Rigid inorganic separators provided the best barrier to silver migration.

  9. Integrated process using non-stoichiometric sulfides or oxides of potassium for making less active metals and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a combinative integrated chemical process using inorganic reactants and yielding, if desired, organic products. The process involves first the production of elemental potassium by the thermal or thermal-reduced pressure decomposition of potassium oxide or potassium sulfide and distillation of the potassium. This elemental potassium is then used to reduce ores or ore concentrates of copper, zinc, lead, magnesium, cadmium, iron, arsenic, antimony or silver to yield one or more of these less active metals in elemental form. Process potassium can also be used to produce hydrogen by reaction with water or potassium hydroxide. This hydrogen is reacted with potassium to produce potassium hydride. Heating the latter with carbon produces potassium acetylide which forms acetylene when treated with water. Acetylene is hydrogenated to ethene or ethane with process hydrogen. Using Wurtz-Fittig reaction conditions, the ethane can be upgraded to a mixture of hydrocarbons boiling in the fuel range

  10. Chemical bath deposited zinc sulfide buffer layers for copper indium gallium sulfur-selenide solar cells and device analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Sambhu; Olsen, Larry C.

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium-free copper indium gallium sulfur-selenide (CIGSS) thin film solar cells have been fabricated using chemical bath deposited (CBD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) buffer layers. Shell Solar Industries provided high quality CIGSS absorber layers. The use of CBD-ZnS, which is a higher band gap material than CdS, improved the quantum efficiency of fabricated cells at lower wavelengths, leading to an increase in short circuit current. The best cell to date yielded an active area (0.43 cm 2 ) efficiency of 13.3%. The effect of the ZnS buffer layer thickness on device performance was studied carefully. This paper also presents a discussion of issues relevant to the use of the CBD-ZnS buffer material for improving device performance

  11. Cadmium poisoning. Knowledge of the risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, A.; Demange, M.; Carton, M.B.

    1979-01-01

    This data sheet provides an up-to-date summary of information on cadmium poisoning. The following points are examined: - the problem of increasing pollution of soil, water and the food chain; - physical and chemical properties, manufacture, industrial applications; - the toxic action of cadmium and its derivatives; - methods and apparatus for taking and analysis samples from the atmosphere and from body fluids; - existing French regulations; - technical control and medical surveillance [fr

  12. Iron sulfide crystal growth: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, E.J.

    1977-04-01

    Iron pyrite (FeS 2 ) is often found on trays and in heat exchangers in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) plants used to extract D 2 O from fresh water. A critical review of the literature was made to find: (i) what is known about FeS 2 crystal growth; (ii) which techniques could be used to study FeS 2 crystal growth experimentally; (iii) potential chemical additives that could be used in trace amounts to poison FeS 2 crystals and reduce their growth rate in G.S. plants. (author)

  13. Sulfide geochronlogy along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Liang, J.; Liao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dragon Flag and Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Ten subsamples from active and inactive vents of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field and twenty-eight subsamples from Duanqiao hydrothermal field were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. And sulfide samples from the nearby Dragon Flag filed at the same time and the results show that the ages of most sulfides from Dragon Flag field range from 1.496(±0.176) to 5.416 (±0.116) kyrs with the oldest age estimated at 15.997 (±0.155) kyrs Münch et al. (2001) reconstructed the evolution history of Mt. Jourdanne hydrothermal field. The age dating results indicate activity in two episodes, at 70-40 and 27-13 kyrs. The hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. All these results suggest that hydrothermal activity of Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. Mt. Jourdanne is situated on an axial volcanic ridge which has both volcanic and tectonic activity. This is necessary to develop the heat source and pathways for the fluid convection, which enables the hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag Field is located next to the detachment fault termination. The detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection. Such style of heat source can contribute to continuous hydrothermal activity for over 1000 years. Duanqiao field is located near the central volcano and there is a hot

  14. Sintering equation: determination of its coefficients by experiments - using multiple regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windelberg, D.

    1999-01-01

    Sintering is a method for volume-compression (or volume-contraction) of powdered or grained material applying high temperature (less than the melting point of the material). Maekipirtti tried to find an equation which describes the process of sintering by its main parameters sintering time, sintering temperature and volume contracting. Such equation is called a sintering equation. It also contains some coefficients which characterise the behaviour of the material during the process of sintering. These coefficients have to be determined by experiments. Here we show that some linear regressions will produce wrong coefficients, but multiple regression results in an useful sintering equation. (orig.)

  15. Improvement of mechanical strength of sintered Mo alloyed steel by optimization of sintering and cold-forging processes with densification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoshi, Y.; Shohji, I.; Inoue, Y.; Fukuda, S.

    2017-10-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) materials have been expected to be spread in automotive industry. Generally, since sintered materials using P/M ones contain many pores and voids, mechanical properties of them are inferior to those of conventional wrought materials. To improve mechanical properties of the sintered materials, densification is effective. The aim of this study is to improve mechanical strength of sintered Mo-alloyed steel by optimizing conditions in sintering and cold-forging processes. Mo-alloyed steel powder was compacted. Then, pre-sintering (PS) using a vacuum sintering furnace was conducted. Subsequently, coldforging (CF) by a backward extrusion method was conducted to the pre-sintered specimen. Moreover, the cold-forged specimen was heat treated by carburizing, tempering and quenching (CQT). Afterwards, mechanical properties were investigated. As a result, it was found that the density of the PS specimen is required to be more than 7.4 Mg/m3 to strengthen the specimen by heat treatment after CF. Furthermore, density and the microstructure of the PS specimen are most important factors to make the high density and strength material by CF. At the CF load of 1200 kN, the maximum density ratio reached approximately 99% by the use of the PS specimen with proper density and microstructure. At the CF load of 900 kN, although density ratio was high like more than 97.8%, transverse rupture strength decreased sharply. Since densification caused high shear stress and stress concentration in the surface layer, microcracks occurred by the damages of inter-particle sintered connection of the surface layer. On the contrary, in case of the CF load of 1200 kN, ultra-densification of the surface layer occurred by a sufficient plastic flow. Such sufficient compressed specimens regenerated the sintered connections by high temperature heat treatment and thus the high strength densified material was obtained. These processes can be applicable to near net shape manufacturing

  16. Biological monitoring results for cadmium exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, M A; Freeman, C S; Grossman, E A; Martonik, J

    1996-11-01

    As part of a settlement agreement with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) involving exposure to cadmium (Cd), a battery production facility provided medical surveillance data to OSHA for review. Measurements of cadmium in blood, cadmium in urine, and beta 2-microglobulin in urine were obtained for more than 100 workers over an 18-month period. Some airborne Cd exposure data were also made available. Two subpopulations of this cohort were of primary interest in evaluating compliance with the medical surveillance provisions of the Cadmium Standard. These were a group of 16 workers medically removed from cadmium exposure due to elevations in some biological parameter, and a group of platemakers. Platemaking had presented a particularly high exposure opportunity and had recently undergone engineering interventions to minimize exposure. The effect on three biological monitoring parameters of medical removal protection in the first group and engineering controls in platemakers is reported. Results reveal that both medical removal from cadmium exposures and exposure abatement through the use of engineering and work practice controls generally result in declines in biological monitoring parameters of exposed workers. Implications for the success of interventions are discussed.

  17. Cadmium affects retinogenesis during zebrafish embryonic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hen Chow, Elly Suk; Yu Hui, Michelle Nga; Cheng, Chi Wa; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    Ocular malformations are commonly observed in embryos of aquatic species after exposure to toxicants. Using zebrafish embryos as the model organism, we showed that cadmium exposure from sphere stage (4 hpf) to end of segmentation stage (24 hpf) induced microphthalmia in cadmium-treated embryos. Embryos with eye defects were then assessed for visual abilities. Cadmium-exposed embryos were behaviorally blind, showing hyperpigmentation and loss of camouflage response to light. We investigated the cellular basis of the formation of the small eyes phenotype and the induction of blindness by studying retina development and retinotectal projections. Retinal progenitors were found in cadmium-treated embryos albeit in smaller numbers. The number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), the first class of retinal cells to differentiate during retinogenesis, was reduced, while photoreceptor cells, the last batch of retinal neurons to differentiate, were absent. Cadmium also affected the propagation of neurons in neurogenic waves. The neurons remained in the ventronasal area and failed to spread across the retina. Drastically reduced RGC axons and disrupted optic stalk showed that the optic nerves did not extend from the retina beyond the chiasm into the tectum. Our data suggested that impairment in neuronal differentiation of the retina, disruption in RGC axon formation and absence of cone photoreceptors were the causes of microphthalmia and visual impairment in cadmium-treated embryos

  18. Human health effects of exposure to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The health effects of human exposure to cadmium are discussed with emphases on intake, absorption, body burden, and excretion; osteomalacia in Japan; hypertension; and proteinuria, emphysema, osteomalacia, and cancer in workers. Elevated blood pressure has not been observed as a result of excessive exposures to cadmium in Japan or the workplace. Renal tubular dysfunction and consequent proteinuria is generally accepted as the main effect following long-term, low-level exposure to cadmium. Studies of workers show that proteinuria may develop after the first year of exposure or many years after the last exposure. Proteinuria and deterioration of renal function may continue even after cessation of exposure. The immediate health significance of low-level proteinuria is still under debate. However, there is evidence that long-term renal tubular dysfunction may lead to abnormalities of calcium metabolism and osteomalacia. The few autopsy and cross-sectional studies of workers do not permit conclusions to be drawn regarding the relationship between cadmium exposure and emphysema. Retrospective and historical-prospective studies are needed to settle this important question. No conclusive evidence has been published regarding cadmium-induced cancer in humans. However, there is sufficient evidence to regard cadmium as a suspect renal and prostate carcinogen. Because of equivocal results and the absence of dose-response relationships, the studies reviewed should be used with caution in making regulatory decisions and low-dose risk assessments. 62 references.

  19. Human health effects of exposure to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, W.H.

    1984-02-15

    The health effects of human exposure to cadmium are discussed with emphasis on intake, absorption, body burden, and excretion; osteomalacia in Japan; hypertension; and proteinuria, emphysema, osteomalacia, and cancer in workers. Elevated blood pressure has not been observed as a result of excessive exposures to cadmium in Japan or the workplace. Renal tubular dysfunction and consequent proteinuria is generally accepted as the main effect following long-term, low-level exposure to cadmium. Studies of workers show that proteinuria may develop after the first year of exposure or many years after the last exposure. Proteinuria and deterioration of renal function may continue even after cessation of exposure. The immediate health significance of low-level proteinuria is still under debate. However, there is evidence that long-term renal tubular dysfunction may lead to abnormalities of calcium metabolism and osteomalacia. The few autopsy and cross-sectional studies of workers do not permit conclusions to be drawn regarding the relationship between cadmium exposure and emphysema. Retrospective and historical-prospective studies are needed to settle this important question. No conclusive evidence has been published regarding cadmium-induced cancer in humans. However, there is sufficient evidence to regard cadmium as a suspect renal and prostate carcinogen. Because of equivocal results and the absence of dose-response relationships, the studies reviewed should be used with caution in making regulatory decisions and low-dose risk assessments.

  20. Annealing of wet treated Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} solar cells with an indium sulfide buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hönes, C., E-mail: christian.hoenes.001@student.uni.lu; Siebentritt, S., E-mail: susanne.siebentritt@uni.lu

    2015-05-01

    Compound evaporated indium sulfide is one commonly utilized cadmium free buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} solar cells. However, cells with such a buffer layer usually need a post-deposition annealing step to reach the maximum short circuit current, fill factor and open circuit voltage. In this work wet chemical treatments, partly containing cadmium ions, are applied to commercially available absorber material prior to indium sulfide evaporation in order to enhance the initial solar cell parameters. Cells built on treated absorbers show maximum open circuit voltage directly after window layer deposition and a drop in open circuit voltage is observed upon annealing. All samples, however, show an increased collection length and higher fill factor after annealing. A one diode model fit to the current-voltage curves gives ideality factors of 1.7 before annealing which are reduced to values around 1.5 after annealing. Supporting calculations show that the changes upon annealing can be explained within a model including a highly p-doped absorber surface layer. During annealing the acceptor density at the absorber surface might be reduced thus leading to a larger space charge region and thereby increasing the collection length and fill factor while reducing the open circuit voltage. - Highlights: • Wet treatments raise initial voltage of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} buffered Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} solar cells. • Collection length increase after annealing of treated cells is observed. • Voltage decay is explained within a model including a highly p-doped surface layer. • Supporting simulations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  1. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  2. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  3. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  4. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  5. Sintering-alkaline processing of borosilicate ores of Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, F.A.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the work is to study the processes of decomposition of boron-containing ore by sintering with NaOH, finding the optimal parameters of the decomposition process, studying the kinetics of processes and developing the technological foundations for ore processing. The processes of borosilicate ore processing were studied by sintering with NaOH. Possible mechanisms of chemical reactions of the process of sintering-alkaline decomposition of boron-containing ore are established, the results of which are substantiated by physicochemical methods of analysis. A principal technological scheme for processing of borosilicate ores by a sintering-alkaline method has been developed. In the first chapter, data on alkaline and caking processes for processing boron-containing and aluminium comprising raw materials are available in the literature. Based on this, the directions of our own research are outlined. The second chapter is devoted to the study of the chemical and mineralogical compositions of borosilicate ores and their concentrates with the help of X-ray phase and chemical analysis methods, the stoichiometric calculation of the formation of aluminum, iron, and boron salts has been carried out, and a thermodynamic analysis of the processes of sintering borosilicate ores with alkali has been considered. The third chapter presents the results of a study of sintering-alkaline method of processing of initial borosilicate ore of the Ak-Arkhar Deposit and its concentrate without calcination and after calcination. The kinetics of sintering of borosilicate ores with sodium hydroxide was studied. The optimal conditions of borosilicate ore sintering before and after the preliminary calcination with alkali were determined. Optimal parameters of the sintering process have been found: sintering temperature 800-8500 deg C, duration of the process - 60 minutes, mass ratio of NaOH to raw materials 2: 1. The conditions for sintering of borosilicate concentrate with alkali have been

  6. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...... along with our recent in situ TEM studies on the sintering of Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts. These results suggest that the rapid loss of catalyst activity in the earliest stages of catalyst sintering could result from Ostwald ripening rather than through particle migration and coalescence. The smallest...

  7. Zone refining of sintered, microwave-derived YBCO superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, K.G.K.; Varma, H.K.; Mani, T.V.; Damodaran, A.D.; Balachandran, U.

    1993-07-01

    Post-sintering treatments such as zone melting under thermal gradient has been conducted on sintered YBCO tape cast films. YBCO precursor powder was derived through decomposition of a mixture of nitrates of cations in a microwave oven for ∼4 min. The resulting powder was characterized and made into thin sheets by tape casting and then sintered at 945 C for 5 h. The sintered tapes were subjected to repeated zone refining operations at relatively high speeds of ∼30 mm/h. A microstructure having uniformly oriented grains in the a-b plane throughout the bulk of the sample was obtained by three repeated zone refining operations. Details of precursor preparation, microwave processing and its advantages, zone refining conditions, and microstructural features are presented in this paper

  8. Efficient Radiation Shielding Through Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a method for efficient component-level radiation shielding that can be printed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) from files generated by the...

  9. Effect of increasing lanthanum substitution and the sintering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    University of Hyderabad, P.O. Central University, Hyderabad 500 046, India. MS received 27 ... sintering can cause problems in the stoichiometry of the final product owing to ..... Rambabu greatfully acknowledges the financial support from the ...

  10. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  11. Microstructure and properties of sintered mullite developed from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructure and properties of sintered mullite developed from Indian bauxite ... ductivity, high-temperature stability, good chemical inertia, ... refractory applications. Normally .... using sputtered gold coating on the polished surface after.

  12. The behaviour of doped elements in tungsten sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiner, L.

    1975-01-01

    The lecture deals with the occurrence of bubbles in the sintering of doped tungsten. The doping of tungsten normally takes place by the addition of K, Al and Si compounds. A part of the doping substances disappears with sintering which can easily be proved by chemical analyses. In the process described here, the evaporation is non-destructively observed during sintering with an absorption spectrometer. Temperature, absorption slope and sintering resistance are recorded. The evaluation of the absorption curves gives a diffusion equation. The discussion of the curves resulted so far in that a doped substance compound sets free the single elements of the compound at high temperature. Aluminium and silicon diffuse out. In the case of aluminium, the activation energy can be determined. (GSC/LH) [de

  13. Quartz crystal reinforced quartz glass by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, D.; Barazani, B.; Ono, E.; Santos, M.F.M.; Suzuki, C.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Spark Plasma Sintering presents fast processing time when compared to conventional sintering techniques. This allows to control the grain growth during sintering as well as the diffusion rate of a multi-material compounds, and make possible obtainment of functionally graded materials and nanostructured compounds. Powders of high purity silica glass and crystalline silica were sintered in a SPS equipment at temperatures around 1350° C, i.e., above the softening temperature of silica glass and below the melting temperature of quartz crystal. As a result, glass ceramics with pure silica glass matrix reinforced with crystalline alpha-quartz grains were fabricated at almost any desired range of composition, as well as controlled size of the crystalline reinforcement. X-ray diffraction and density measurements showed the possibility to manufacture a well controlled density and crystallinity glass-ceramic materials. (author)

  14. Non-pressurized sintered silicon carbide with titanium carbide reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.

    1992-01-01

    A non-pressurized compression of SiC-TiC composite materials can be achieved via liquid phase sintering by the application of oxidic additives. Materials with TiC proportions up to 40% by volume of TiC and densities of 97 to 98% TD were produced at sintering temperatures around 1875 C. With SiC sintered in the liquid phase an increase of toughness at fracture of 80% compared with conventionally non-pressurized sintered SiC was achieved with B/C additive. No further increase could be achieved by the addition of TiC particles. However, the oxidation resistance at 1200 C was worsened. (orig.) [de

  15. Grain-growth law during Stage 1 sintering of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zeming; Ma, J.

    2002-01-01

    This work investigates the grain-growth behaviour of powder compact during Stage 1 sintering (<90{%} theoretical density). It is widely accepted that grain size is an important state variable in the constitutive modelling in material sintering. However, it is noted that all the existing grain-growth laws proposed in the literature do not incorporate the effect of externally applied stress independently. In this work, a grain-growth law with externally applied stress as a variable was proposed. Alumina powders were forge-sintered at different applied stresses to examine the proposed grain-growth relationship. The proposed grain-growth law was then applied to model the grain-growth process on the sinter forging of tool steel. It is shown that the present proposed grain-growth law provides a good description on the experimental results. (author)

  16. Pressureless sintering behavior of injection molded alumina ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressureless sintering behaviors of two widely used submicron alumina (MgOdoped and undoped with different solid loadings produced by injection molding have been studied systematically. Regardless of the sinterability of different powders depending on their inherent properties, solid loading plays a critical role on the sintering behavior of injection molded alumina, which greatly determines the densification and grain size, and leads to its full densification at low temperatures. As compared to the MgO-doped alumina powder, the undoped specimens exhibit a higher sinterability for its smaller particle size and larger surface area. While full densification could be achieved for MgO-doped powders with only a lower solid loading, due to the fact that MgO addition can reduce the detrimental effect of the large pore space on the pore-boundary separation.

  17. Verification of the Skorohod-Olevsky Viscous Sintering (SOVS) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, Brian T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Sintering refers to a manufacturing process through which mechanically pressed bodies of ceramic (and sometimes metal) powders are heated to drive densification thereby removing the inherit porosity of green bodies. As the body densifies through the sintering process, the ensuing material flow leads to macroscopic deformations of the specimen and as such the final configuration differs form the initial. Therefore, as with any manufacturing step, there is substantial interest in understanding and being able to model the sintering process to predict deformation and residual stress. Efforts in this regard have been pursued for face seals, gear wheels, and consumer products like wash-basins. To understand the sintering process, a variety of modeling approaches have been pursued at different scales.

  18. Sintering and electrical properties of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrago, Diego Pereira; Sousa, Vania Caldas de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LABIOMAT/PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia de Minas, Metalurgica e de Materiais. Lab. de Biomateriais], Email: dptarrago@gmail.com; Moreno Buriel, Berta; Chinarro Martini, Eva; Jurado Egea, Jose Ramon [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICV/CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LAPEC/PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia de Minas, Metalurgica e de Materiais. Lab. de Pesquisa em Corrosao

    2010-07-01

    Lanthanum strontium manganites (LSM) are potential materials for cathode applications in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their good catalytic activity, chemical stability and compatibility with electrolyte materials in high temperatures. The sinterability of single phase La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Mn{sub O3} (x=0.18) perovskite powders and the electrical properties of the resulting samples are analyzed in this study. Using a heating microscope, the powders were pressed and sintered at different pressures and temperatures, resulting in an open porosity of 33.36% when compacted at 125 MPa and sintered at 1200 degree C. Top and cross-section s canning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed interconnected pores in the sintered body and, hence, a suitable microstructure for the application. The activation energy for conductance was 0.04 eV and the tested LSM bulk started to exhibit adequate electrical properties at about 500 degree C. (author)

  19. Foam glass obtained through high-pressure sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    Foam glasses are usually prepared through a chemical approach, that is, by mixing glass powder with foaming agents, and heating the mixture to a temperature above the softening point (106.6 Pa s) of the glass. The foaming agents release gas, enabling expansion of the sintered glass. Here, we use...... a physical foaming approach to prepare foam glass. First, closed pores filled with inert gases (He, Ar, or N2) are physically introduced into a glass body by sintering cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass powder at high gas pressure (5‐25 MPa) at 640°C and, then cooled to room temperature. The sintered bodies...... are subjected to a second heat treatment above the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure. This heat treatment causes expansion of the pores due to high internal gas pressure. We found that the foaming ability strongly depends on the gas pressure applied during sintering, and on the kinetic...

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Project Binder Burnout and Sintering Studies (Milestone 6.6a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Team has developed an integrated test program to understand and optimize the controlling variables for the sintering step of the plutonium immobilization process. Sintering is the key process step that controls the product mineralogy. It is expected that the sintering will be the limiting process step that controls the throughput of the production line. The goal of the current sintering test program is to better understand factors that affect the sintering process

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Project Binder Burnout and Sintering Studies (Milestone 6.6a)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.

    1999-10-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Team has developed an integrated test program to understand and optimize the controlling variables for the sintering step of the plutonium immobilization process. Sintering is the key process step that controls the product minerology. It is expected that the sintering will be the limiting process step that controls the throughput of the production line. The goal of the current sintering test program is to better understand factors that affect the sintering process.

  2. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  3. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  4. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  5. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzegar, Mohsen [Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, Ali [K. N. Toosi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Majid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples.

  6. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, Mohsen; Jabbari, Ali; Esmaeili, Majid

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples

  7. Process for preparing sintered uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is prepared for use as fuel in nuclear reactors by sintering it to the desired density at a temperature less than 1300 0 C in a chemically controlled gas atmosphere comprised of at least two gases which in equilibrium provide an oxygen partial pressure sufficient to maintain the uranium dioxide composition at an oxygen/uranium ratio of at least 2.005 at the sintering temperature. 7 Claims, No Drawings

  8. Modeling constrained sintering of bi-layered tubular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Ni, De Wei

    2015-01-01

    Constrained sintering of tubular bi-layered structures is being used in the development of various technologies. Densification mismatch between the layers making the tubular bi-layer can generate stresses, which may create processing defects. An analytical model is presented to describe the densi...... and thermo-mechanical analysis. Results from the analytical model are found to agree well with finite element simulations as well as measurements from sintering experiment....

  9. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disc-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter. PMID:24252652

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopy investigation of sintered zinc-tin-oxide ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivetić Tamara B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the changes that occurred in differently activated ZnO-SnO2 and sintered samples were investigated using photoacoustic spectroscopy. ZnO and SnO2 powders, mixed in the molar ratio 2:1, were mechanically activated in a planetary ball mill for 10-160 min. The mixtures were pres­sed and isothermally sintered at 1300°C for two hours. X-ray diffraction analysis of the obtained sintered samples was performed in order to investigate changes of the phase composition and confirmed only the presence of a pure zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 phase in all the sintered samples as a result of the solid state reaction and reaction sintering between the starting ZnO and SnO2 powders. The microstructure of the sintered sam­ples was examined by scanning electron microscopy and showed that mechanical activation leads to the formation of a structure with reduced particle size which accelerates spinel formation. Grain growth of the spinel phase slows down the densification process and together with the agglomerates formed during mechanical activation causes the appearance of a porous microstructure. The photoacoustic (PA phase and amplitude spectra of the sintered samples were recorded as a function of the chopped frequency of the laser beam used (red laser with a power of 25 mW, λ=632 nm in a thermal-transmission detection configuration. PA experimental data were analyzed using the Rosenzweig-Gersho thermal-piston model, which enabled determination of the thermal diffusivity, ZT (m2s-1, diffusion coefficient of the minority free carriers D (m2s-1 and the optical absorption coefficient (m-1. The detected differences of the measured thermal-electrical properties of the obtained Zn2SnO4 ceramics indicate changes in the material induced by the different preparation procedure of the starting powders before the sintering process.

  11. Critical issues and future directions in sintering science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, R.J.; Tuan, W.H.; Xue, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The quality of available powders and the emphasis on direct microstructural observation have continued to improve the value of sintering studies for the processing of ceramics. Future concerns will relate to mechanisms for the correction of microstructural inhomogeneity so that pressureless processing of composites can be reliably achieved and to more systematic exploitation of dopants (sintering additives). These themes are illustrated using examples from the processing of alumina composites and doped barium titanate compositions

  12. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A

    2014-02-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Objective, our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Methods, glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. Results and Significance XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahar, Kerry N., E-mail: KerryAllahar@boisestate.edu [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Burns, Jatuporn [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Jaques, Brian [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Wu, Y.Q. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, McClure Hall Room 405D, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Cole, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used to consolidate a Fe–16Cr–3Al (wt.%) powder that was mechanically alloyed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ti powders to produce 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1Ti powders. The effects of mechanical alloying and sintering conditions on the microstructure, relative density and hardness of the sintered oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are presented. Scanning electron microscopy indicated a mixed fine-grain and coarse-grain microstructure that was attributed to recrystallization and grain growth during sintering. Analysis of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) data identified Y–O and Y–O–Ti nanoclusters. Elemental ratios of these nanoclusters were consistent with that observed in hot-extruded ODS alloys. The influence of Ti was to refine the grains as well as the nanoclusters with there being greater number density and smaller sizes of the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters as compared to the Y–O nanoclusters. This resulted in the Ti-containing samples being harder than the Ti-free alloys. The hardness of the alloys with the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters was insensitive to sintering time while smaller hardness values were associated with longer sintering times for the alloys with the Y–O nanoclusters. Pressures greater than 80 MPa are recommended for improved densification as higher sintering temperatures and longer sintering times at 80 MPa did not improve the relative density beyond 97.5%.

  14. Properties of Mo-alloyed sintered manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanski, A.; Cias, A.

    1998-01-01

    Sintered alloy steels are needed for mostly PM structural parts. Powder metallurgy techniques provide a means of fabricating high quality steel parts with tailored mechanical properties. It is now possible to produce sintered steel parts with properties equal to an even superior to those of parts made by more traditional routes. Challenges arise both with the material selection and component fabrication. This work outlines the processing for high performance structural application. (author)

  15. Impact strength of sintered astaloy CrM powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazior, J.; Ploszczak, J.; Nykiel, M.; Pieczonka, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper results of a series of impact tests on sintered Astaloy CrM powders alloys modified by boron are presented and discussed. Boron in different forms, i.e. as elemental boron powder, boron carbide B 4 C powder or mixture of boron and carbon elemental powders, was used in different weight percentage to activate sintering of Astaloy CrM powder and to increase hardenability, with aim of increasing impact strength in view of structural applications. (author)

  16. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). In one part of study the melting behavior was calculated for ten biomass ashes and compared with lab measurements of sintering tendencies. The comparison showed that the T{sub 15} temperatures, i.e. those temperatures at which the ashes contained 15 % molten phase, correlated fairly well with the temperature at which the sintering measurements detected sintering. This suggests that partial melting can be predicted fairly accurate for some ashes already with the today existing thermodynamic calculation routines. In some cases, however the melting calculations did not correlate with the detected sintering temperatures. In a second part detailed measurements on ash behavior was conducted both in a semi full scale CFB and a lab scale FBC. Ashes and deposits were collected and analyzed in several different ways. These analyses show that the ash chemistry shifts radically when the fuel is shifted. Fuels with silicate based ashes behaved totally different than those with an oxide or salt based ash. The chemistry was also affected by fuel blending. The ultimate goal has been to be able to predict the ash thermal behavior during biomass thermal conversion, using the fuel and ash elemental analyses and a few operational key parameters as the only input data. This goal has not yet today been achieved. (author)

  17. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity

  18. Sintered nuclear fuel and method of preparing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abate-Daga, G.; Amato, I.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method of preparing a nuclear fuel containing a consumable nuclear poison uniformly distributed therein in the form of coated micro-spheres of between 10 and 2,000 microns diameter, consisting in preparing sintered micro-spheres of the consumable poison, covering those micro-spheres with a protective coating and incorporating the coated micro-spheres into uranium dioxide powder, followed by sintering

  19. Reviews of the environmental effects of pollutants: IV. Cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, A.S.; Huff, J.E.; Braunstein, H.M.; Drury, J.S.; Shriner, C.R.; Lewis, E.B.; Whitfield, B.L.; Towill, L.E.

    1978-06-01

    This report is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of the health and environmental effects of cadmium and specific cadmium derivatives. More than 500 references are cited. The cadmium body burden in animals and humans results mainly from the diet. In the United States, the normal intake of cadmium for adult humans is estimated at about 50 ..mu..g per day. Tobacco smoke is a significant additional source of cadmium exposure. The kidneys and liver together contain about 50% of the total cadmium body burden. Acute cadmium poisoning is primarily an occupational problem, generally from inhalation of cadmium fumes or dusts. In the general population, incidents of acute poisoning by inhaled or ingested cadmium or its compounds are relatively rare. The kidney is the primary target organ for toxicity from prolonged low-level exposure to cadmium. No causal relationship has been established between cadmium exposure and human cancer, although a possible link between cadmium and prostate cancer has been indicated. Cadmium has been shown to be teratogenic in rats, hamsters, and mice, but no such effects have been proven in humans. Cadmium has been reported to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells and in human peripheral leukocytes. The major concern about environmental cadmium is the potential effects on the general population. There is no substantial evidence of hazard from current levels of cadmium in air, water, or food. However, because cadmium is a cumulative poison and because present intake provides a relatively small safety margin, there are adequate reasons for concern over possible future increases in background levels.

  20. Reviews of the environmental effects of pollutants: IV. Cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammons, A.S.; Huff, J.E.; Braunstein, H.M.; Drury, J.S.; Shriner, C.R.; Lewis, E.B.; Whitfield, B.L.; Towill, L.E.

    1978-06-01

    This report is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of the health and environmental effects of cadmium and specific cadmium derivatives. More than 500 references are cited. The cadmium body burden in animals and humans results mainly from the diet. In the United States, the normal intake of cadmium for adult humans is estimated at about 50 μg per day. Tobacco smoke is a significant additional source of cadmium exposure. The kidneys and liver together contain about 50% of the total cadmium body burden. Acute cadmium poisoning is primarily an occupational problem, generally from inhalation of cadmium fumes or dusts. In the general population, incidents of acute poisoning by inhaled or ingested cadmium or its compounds are relatively rare. The kidney is the primary target organ for toxicity from prolonged low-level exposure to cadmium. No causal relationship has been established between cadmium exposure and human cancer, although a possible link between cadmium and prostate cancer has been indicated. Cadmium has been shown to be teratogenic in rats, hamsters, and mice, but no such effects have been proven in humans. Cadmium has been reported to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells and in human peripheral leukocytes. The major concern about environmental cadmium is the potential effects on the general population. There is no substantial evidence of hazard from current levels of cadmium in air, water, or food. However, because cadmium is a cumulative poison and because present intake provides a relatively small safety margin, there are adequate reasons for concern over possible future increases in background levels

  1. Cadmium removal by Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Devaleena; Majumder, Arunabha; Misra, Amal K; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the ability of two genus of duckweed (Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza) to phytoremediate cadmium from aqueous solution. Duckweed was exposed to six different cadmium concentrations, such as, 0.5,1.0,1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 mg/L and the experiment was continued for 22 days. Water samples were collected periodically for estimation of residual cadmium content in aqueous solution. At the end of treatment period plant samples were collected and accumulated cadmium content was measured. Cadmium toxicity was observed through relative growth factor and changes in chlorophyll content Experimental results showed that Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza were capable of removing 42-78% and 52-75% cadmium from media depending upon initial cadmium concentrations. Cadmium was removed following pseudo second order kinetic model Maximum cadmium accumulation in Lemna minor was 4734.56 mg/kg at 2 mg/L initial cadmium concentration and 7711.00 mg/kg in Spirodela polyrhiza at 3 mg/L initial cadmium concentration at the end of treatment period. Conversely in both cases maximum bioconcentration factor obtained at lowest initial cadmium concentrations, i.e., 0.5 mg/L, were 3295.61 and 4752.00 for Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza respectively. The present study revealed that both Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza was potential cadmium accumulator.

  2. Anoxic sulfide biooxidation using nitrite as electron acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng Ping; Cai Jing; Wu Donglei; Hu, Baolan; Li Jinye

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can be used to assess the well being of ecosystems, transform pollutants into benign substances, generate biodegradable materials from renewable sources, and develop environmentally safe manufacturing and disposal processes. Simultaneous elimination of sulfide and nitrite from synthetic wastewaters was investigated using a bioreactor. A laboratory scale anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor was operated for 135 days to evaluate the potential for volumetric loading rates, effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentration on the process performance. The maximal sulfide and nitrite removal rates were achieved to be 13.82 and 16.311 kg/(m 3 day), respectively, at 0.10 day HRT. The process can endure high sulfide concentrations, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained higher than 88.97% with influent concentration up to 1920 mg/L. Incomplete sulfide oxidation took place due to lower consumed nitrite to sulfide ratios of 0.93. It also tolerated high nitrite concentration up to 2265.25 mg/L. The potential achieved by decreasing HRT at fixed substrate concentration is higher than that by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The process can bear short HRT of 0.10 day but careful operation is needed. Nitrite conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion when HRT was decreased from 1.50 to 0.08 day. Stoichiometric analyses and results of batch experiments show that major part of sulfide (89-90%) was reduced by nitrite while some autooxidation (10-11%) was resulted from presence of small quantities of dissolved oxygen in the influent wastewater. There was ammonia amassing in considerably high amounts in the bioreactor when the influent nitrite concentration reached above 2265.25 mg/L. High ammonia concentrations (200-550 mg/L) in the bioreactor contributed towards the overall inhibition of the process. Present biotechnology exhibits practical value with a high potential for simultaneous removal of nitrite

  3. SINTERING EFFECTS ON THE DENSIFICATION OF NANOCRYSTALLINE HYDROXYAPATITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amiriyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sintering profiles on the densification behaviour of synthesized nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA powder were investigated in terms of phase stability and mechanical properties. A wet chemical precipitation method was successfully employed to synthesize a high purity and single phase HA powder. Green HA compacts were prepared and subjected to sintering in air atmosphere over a temperature range of 700° C to 1300° C. In this study two different holding times were compared, i.e. 1 minute versus the standard 120 minutes. The results revealed that the 1 minute holding time sintering profile was indeed effective in producing a HA body with high density of 98% theoretical when sintered at 1200° C. High mechanical properties such as fracture toughness of 1.41 MPa.m1/2 and hardness of 9.5 GPa were also measured for HA samples sintered under this profile. Additionally, XRD analysis indicated that decomposition of the HA phase during sintering at high temperatures was suppressed.

  4. Manufacture of sintered bricks of high density from beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointud, R.; Rispal, Ch.; Le Garec, M.

    1959-01-01

    Beryllium oxide bricks of nuclear purity 100 x 100 x 50 and 100 x 100 x 100 mm of very high density (between 2.85 and 3.00) are manufactured by sintering under pressure in graphite moulds at temperatures between 1,750 and 1,850 deg. C, and under a pressure of 150 kg/cm 2 . The physico-chemical state of the saw material is of considerable importance with regard to the success of the sintering operation. In addition, a study of the sintering of a BeO mixture with 3 to 5 per cent of boron introduced in the form of boric acid, boron carbide or elementary boron shows that high densities can only be obtained by sintering under pressure. For technical reasons of manufacture, only the mixture based on boron carbide is used. The sintering is carried out in graphite moulds at 1500 deg. C under 150 kg/cm 2 pressure, and bricks can be obtained with density between 2,85 and 2,90. Laboratory studies and the industrial manufacture of various sinters are described in detail. (author) [fr

  5. Coarsening-densification transition temperature in sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Narasimha Murty, B.; Chakraborthy, K.P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of coarsening-densification transition temperature (CDTT) has been proposed to explain the experimental observations of the study of sintering undoped uranium dioxide and niobia-doped uranium dioxide powder compacts in argon atmosphere in a laboratory tubular furnace. The general method for deducing CDTT for a given material under the prevailing conditions of sintering and the likely variables that influence the CDTT are described. Though the present work is specific in nature for uranium dioxide sintering in argon atmosphere, the concept of CDTT is fairly general and must be applicable to sintering of any material and has immense potential to offer advantages in designing and/or optimizing the profile of a sintering furnace, in the diagnosis of the fault in the process conditions of sintering, and so on. The problems of viewing the effect of heating rate only in terms of densification are brought out in the light of observing the undesirable phenomena of coring and bloating and causes were identified and remedial measures suggested

  6. Hexagonal OsB2: Sintering, microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Zhilin; Lugovy, Mykola; Orlovskaya, Nina; Graule, Thomas; Kuebler, Jakob; Mueller, Martin; Gao, Huili; Radovic, Miladin; Cullen, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ReB 2 -type hexagonal OsB 2 powder has been densified by spark plasma sintering. • The sintered OsB 2 contains ∼80 wt.% hexagonal and ∼20 wt.% orthorhombic phases. • The average grain size of the sintered OsB 2 sample was 0.56 ± 0.26 μm. • H = 31 ± 9 GPa and E = 574 ± 112 GPa measured by nanoindentation. - Abstract: The metastable high pressure ReB 2 -type hexagonal OsB 2 bulk ceramics was produced by spark plasma sintering. The phase composition, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of the sintered OsB 2 were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, EDS, and nanoindentation. The produced ceramics was rather porous and contained a mixture of hexagonal (∼80 wt.%) and orthorhombic (∼20 wt.%) phases as identified by X-ray diffraction and EBSD analysis. Two boron-rich phases, which do not contain Os, were also identified by TEM and SEM/EDS analysis. Nanoindentation measurements yielded a hardness of 31 ± 9 GPa and Young’s modulus of 574 ± 112 GPa, indicating that the material is rather hard and very stiff; however, it is very prone to crack formation and propagation, which is indicative of a very brittle nature of this material. Improvements in the sintering regime are required in order to produce dense, homogeneous and single phase hexagonal OsB 2 bulk ceramics

  7. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior of sintered nanosilver joint for electronic packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Gang; Yu, Lin; Mei, Yunhui; Li, Xin; Chen, Xu; Lu, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Uniaxial ratcheting behavior and the fatigue life of sintered nanosilver joint were investigated at room temperature. All tests were carried out under stress-controlled mode. Force–displacement data were recorded during the entire fatigue lifespan by a non-contact displacement detecting system. Effects of stress amplitude, mean stress, stress rate, and stress ratio on the uniaxial ratcheting behavior of the sintered nanosilver joint were discussed. Stress-life (S–N) curves of the sintered joints were also obtained. The Smith–Watson–Topper (SWT) model, the Gerber model and the modified Goodman model, all of which took effect of mean stress into consideration, were compared for predicting the fatigue life of the sintered joint. Both the ratcheting strain and its rate increased with increasing stress amplitude or mean stress. The increase in stress amplitude and mean stress both reduced the fatigue life of the sintered joint, while the fatigue life prolonged with the increase in stress rate and stress ratio. The modified Goodman model predicted the fatigue life of the sintered joints well

  8. Effect Of Compaction Pressure And Sintering Temperature On The Liquid Phase Sintering Behavior Of Al-Cu-Zn Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee S.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase sintering characteristics of Al-Cu-Zn alloy were investigated with respect to various powder metallurgy processing conditions. Powders of each alloying elements were blended to form Al-6Cu-5Zn composition and compacted with pressures of 200, 400, and 600 MPa. The sintering process was performed at various temperatures of 410, 560, and 615°C in N2 gas atmosphere. Density and micro-Vickers hardness measurements were conducted at different processing stages, and transverse rupture strength of sintered materials was examined for each condition, respectively. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of Zn addition on the liquid phase sintering behavior during P/M process of the Al-Cu-Zn alloy was also discussed in detail.

  9. Dynamic of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of rats after exposure to cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticules of various sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apykhtina O.L.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of Wistar rats after prolonged intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticles of 4-6 nm and 9-11 nm in size in a dose of 0.08 mg /kg/day calculated as cadmium. Toxic effects were evaluated after 30 injections (1.5 months, 60 injections (3 months, and 1.5 months after the exposure has been ceased. The results of the study showed that the most intensive accumulation of cadmium was observed in the kidneys and liver of experimental animals, which is due to the peculiarities of the toxicokinetics and the route of administration of cadmium compounds. In the kidneys, spleen and thymus of animals exposed to cadmium sulphide nanoparticles, a greater concentration of cadmium than in the organs of animals exposed to cadmium chloride was found. Cadmium accumulated more intensively in the spleen after exposure to larger nanoparticles, than in the kidneys and thymus. In the liver, heart, aorta and brain significant accumulation was observed after cadmium chloride exposure.

  10. Cadmium exposure induces hematuria in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Seok [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myounghee, E-mail: dkkim73@gmail.com [Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Eulji University, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Mi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sejoong [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kwon Wook [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Dong Ki [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Introduction: Toxic heavy metals have adverse effects on human health. However, the risk of hematuria caused by heavy metal exposure has not been evaluated. Methods: Data from 4701 Korean adults were obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2008–2010). Blood levels of the toxic heavy metals cadmium, lead, and mercury were measured. Hematuria was defined as a result of ≥+1 on a urine dipstick test. The odds ratios (ORs) for hematuria were measured according to the blood heavy metal levels after adjusting for multiple variables. Results: Individuals with blood cadmium levels in the 3rd and 4th quartiles had a greater OR for hematuria than those in the 1st quartile group: 3rd quartile, 1.35 (1.019–1.777; P=0.037); 4th quartile, 1.52 (1.140–2.017; P=0.004). When blood cadmium was considered as a log-transformed continuous variable, the correlation between blood cadmium and hematuria was significant: OR, 1.97 (1.224–3.160; P{sub trend}=0.005). In contrast, no significant correlations between hematuria and blood lead or mercury were found in the multivariate analyses. Discussion: The present study shows that high cadmium exposure is associated with a risk of hematuria. -- Highlights: • A high level of blood cadmium is associated with a high risk of hematuria. • This correlation is independent of several confounding factors. • Blood levels of lead and mercury are not associated with risk of hematuria. • This is the first study on the correlation between cadmium exposure and hematuria risk.

  11. Damage Behavior of Sintered Fiber Felts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lippitz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of aircraft noise is important due to a rising number of flights and the growth of urban centers close to airports. During landing, a significant part of the noise is generated by flow around the airframe. To reduce that noise porous trailing edges are investigated. Ideally, the porous materials should to be structural materials as well. Therefore, the mechanical properties and damage behavior are of major interest. The aim of this study is to show the change of structure and the damage behavior of sintered fiber felts, which are promising materials for porous trailing edges, under tensile loading using a combination of tensile tests and three dimensional computed tomography scans. By stopping the tensile test after a defined stress or strain and scanning the sample, it is possible to correlate structural changes and the development of damage to certain features in the stress-strain curve and follow the damage process with a high spatial resolution. Finally, the correlation between material structure and mechanical behavior is demonstrated.

  12. Thermal Analysis of Sintered Silver Nanoparticles Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keikhaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin bonded films have many applications in antireflection and reflection coating, insulating and conducting films and semiconductor industries. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important parameter for power packaging since the thermal resistance of the interconnections is directly related to the heat removal capability and thermal management of the power package. The defects in materials play very important role on the effective thermal conductivity. In this paper, finite element method (FEM was utilized to simulate the effect of pores on the effective thermal conductivity of sintered silver nanoparticles film. The simulation results indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of film is different at different directions and would be enhanced when the pore angle is 90. The simulation results will help us to further understand the heat transfer process across highly porous structures and will provide us a powerful guide to design coating with high thermal insulation or conductor property. Because of there is no similar experimental data for this simulation results, this paper is a comparative work among three different models.

  13. Microwave combustion and sintering without isostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years interest has grown rapidly in the application of microwave energy to the processing of ceramics, composites, polymers, and other materials. Advances in the understanding of microwave/materials interactions will facilitate the production of new ceramic materials with superior mechanical properties. One application of particular interest is the use of microwave energy for the mobilization of uranium for subsequent redeposition. Phase III (FY98) will focus on the microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration tests for mobilization and redeposition of radioactive species in the mixed sludge waste. Uranium hexachloride and uranium (IV) borohydride are volatile compounds for which the chemical vapor infiltration procedure might be developed for the separation of uranium. Microwave heating characterized by an inverse temperature profile within a preformed ceramic matrix will be utilized for CVI using a carrier gas. Matrix deposition is expected to commence from the inside of the sample where the highest temperature is present. The preform matrix materials, which include aluminosilicate based ceramics and silicon carbide based ceramics, are all amenable to extreme volume reduction, densification, and vitrification. Important parameters of microwave sintering such as frequency, power requirement, soaking temperature, and holding time will be investigated to optimize process conditions for the volatilization of uranyl species using a reactive carrier gas in a microwave chamber

  14. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  15. Uptake of cadmium from hydroponic solutions by willows ( Salix spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salix integra 'Weishanhu') and Yizhibi (S. integra 'Yizhibi') were chosen as model plants to evaluate their potential for uptake of cadmium from hydroponic culture and relative uptake mechanism. Cadmium uptake showed a linear increase in the ...

  16. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  17. Cadmium Exposure is Associated with the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Zhou; Yong-hui Lu; Hui-feng Pi; Peng Gao; Min Li; Lei Zhang; Li-ping Pei; Xiang Mei; Lin Liu; Qi Zhao; Qi-Zhong Qin; Yu Chen; Yue-ming Jiang; Zhao-hui Zhang; Zheng-ping Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cadmium is a widespread environmental and occupational pollutant that accumulates in human body with a biological half-life exceeding 10 years. Cadmium exposure has been demonstrated to increase rates of cardiovascular diseases. Whether occupational cadmium exposure is associated with the increase in the prevalence of dyslipidemia and hence contributes to the risk of cardiovascular diseases is still equivocal. To test the hypothesis that exposure to cadmium is related to the preva...

  18. An assessment of the effects of a cadmium discharge ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, J.H.; Schultz, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The problem facing the MMSD was high levels of cadmium in Milorganite fertilizer. The cause was determined to be discharges from industry, primarily electroplaters. The solution was the cooperative development of an ordinance to limit the discharge of cadmium. Because the dischargers acted responsibly to comply with the ordinance, the ordinance succeeded in achieving its objective of significantly reducing the cadmium loading to the municipal sewerage system and subsequently reducing the cadmium concentration in Milorganite fertilizer

  19. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide: management of hydrogen sulfide exposure victims (Preprint No. SA-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1989-04-01

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, U.S.A. has listed 73 industries with potential exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Though the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is known to mankind since the beginning of seventeenth century the exact mode of its toxicity and effective therapeutic regimen remains unclear as yet. This paper presents current thoughts on the toxicity of this substance and a discussion on the role of various antidotes used in H 2 S poisoning. (autho r)

  20. Cadmium exposure and health risks: Recent findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elinder, C.G. [Huddinge Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Renal Medicine; Jaerup, L. [Stockholm City Council (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1996-08-01

    Environmental and/or occupational exposure to cadmium give rise to a tubular kidney dysfunction which may proceed to more generalized renal damage and bone disease if exposure has been high and prolonged. Recent scientific work shows that early renal effects develop at lower levels of exposure than previously anticipated. Previous risk assessments for cadmium were mainly based on studies on healthy male workers. The general population, however, also include particularly susceptible groups such as elderly and individuals with illnesses (e.g. diabetes) that may predispose to cadmium-induced health effects. A significant proportion of the general population displays early signs of toxicity already at urinary cadmium concentrations around 3 nmol mmol{sup -1} creatinine. In addition to early tubular effects, cadmium may exert direct or indirect effects on mineral metabolism and the mineralization of the skeleton at relatively low levels of exposure. This may have important health implications, as poor and easily fractured bone is a major problem among the elderly in all industrialized countries. 41 refs, 4 figs

  1. Recent Advances and Research Status in Energy Conservation of Iron Ore Sintering in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zu; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Liu, Zheng-Jian; Du, Cheng-Bo

    2017-11-01

    For the ferrous burden of blast furnaces in China, sinter generally accounts for more than 70% and the sintering process accounts for approximately 6-10% of the total energy consumption of the iron and steel enterprise. Therefore, saving energy during the sintering process is important to reduce the energy consumption in the iron and steel industry. This paper aims to illustrate recent advances and the research status of energy conservation of iron ore sintering in China. It focuses on the development and application of energy-saving technologies such as the composite agglomeration process, sintering with high-proportion flue gas recirculation sintering, recovery of sensible heat from the sinter cooling process, homogeneous deep-bed sintering technology, and comprehensive treatment technology of leakage of sintering. Moreover, some suggestions for the future development of energy-saving technologies are put forward.

  2. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  3. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Aijie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Lee Duujong [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S{sup 0}), N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 < C/S < 3.0 with influent sulfide concentration of 400-1000 mg/L. At >1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  4. Uptake of cadmium from hydroponic solutions by willows (Salix spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2011-11-16

    Nov 16, 2011 ... which indicated that cadmium uptake across the plasma membrane was ... to cadmium pollution in water-soil-plant systems because .... plants were separated into roots and shoots, blotted dry with paper tissue .... Analysis of the kinetic constants for cadmium uptake ..... proteins (Welch and Norvell, 1999).

  5. Cadmium affects the social behaviour of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloman, Katherine A.; Scott, Graham R.; Diao Zhongyu; Rouleau, Claude; Wood, Chris M.; McDonald, D. Gord

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated both the effects of cadmium on the social interactions of rainbow trout and the differential accumulation of waterborne cadmium among social ranks of fish. Fish exposed to waterborne cadmium concentrations of 2 μg l -1 for 24 h, followed by a 1, 2 or 3 day depuration period in clean water, had a decreased ability to compete with non-exposed fish. However, the competitive ability of exposed fish given a 5 day depuration period was not significantly impaired. Cadmium accumulated in the olfactory apparatus of fish exposed to waterborne cadmium for 24 h and decreased significantly only after 5 days depuration in clean water. Among groups of ten fish held in stream tanks, where all fish were exposed to cadmium, there were significant effects on social behaviour and growth rate. Dominance hierarchies formed faster among fish exposed to cadmium than among control fish, and overall growth rates were higher in the cadmium treatment. In groups of ten fish, social status also affected tissue accumulation of cadmium during waterborne exposure, with dominant fish accumulating more cadmium at the gill. In conclusion, exposure to low levels of cadmium, affects the social behaviour of fish, in part due to accumulation in the olfactory apparatus, and dominant fish accumulate more gill cadmium than subordinates during chronic waterborne exposure

  6. Modeling cadmium in the feed chain and cattle organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.; Franz, E.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate cadmium contamination levels in different scenarios related to soil characteristics and assumptions regarding cadmium accumulation in the animal tissues, using quantitative supply chain modeling. The model takes into account soil cadmium levels, soil pH,

  7. Cadmium induces cadmium-tolerant gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciola, Santa O; Puglisi, Ivana; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzaro, Vincenzo; Pane, Antonella; Lo Piero, Angela R; Evoli, Maria; Petrone, Goffredo

    2015-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum, strain IMI 393899, was able to grow in the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury. The main objective of this research was to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of the fungus T. harzianum to cadmium. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used for the characterization of the genes of T. harzianum implicated in cadmium tolerance compared with those expressed in the response to the stress induced by mercury. Finally, the effects of cadmium exposure were also validated by measuring the expression levels of the putative genes coding for a glucose transporter, a plasma membrane ATPase, a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and a two-component system sensor histidine kinase YcbA, by real-time-PCR. By using the aforementioned SSH strategy, it was possible to identify 108 differentially expressed genes of the strain IMI 393899 of T. harzianum grown in a mineral substrate with the addition of cadmium. The expressed sequence tags identified by SSH technique were encoding different genes that may be involved in different biological processes, including those associated to primary and secondary metabolism, intracellular transport, transcription factors, cell defence, signal transduction, DNA metabolism, cell growth and protein synthesis. Finally, the results show that in the mechanism of tolerance to cadmium a possible signal transduction pathway could activate a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and/or a plasma membrane ATPase that could be involved in the compartmentalization of cadmium inside the cell.

  8. A membrane electrode assembled photoelectrochemical cell with a solar-responsive cadmium sulfide-zinc sulfide-titanium dioxide/mesoporous silica photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; An, Liang; Ye, Dingding; Zhou, Yuan; He, Xuefeng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a membrane electrode assembled photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) is developed for the electricity generation by degrading the organic compounds. The photocatalyst is prepared by the incorporation of mesoporous silica SBA-15 into TiO2 and the photosensitization of CdS-ZnS to enhance the photoanode performance, while the cathode employs the air-breathing mode to enhance the oxygen transport. The experimental results show that the developed PEC exhibits good photoresponse to the illumination and the appropriate SBA-15 mass ratio in the photoanode enables the enhancement of the performance. It is also shown that the developed PEC yields better performance in the alkaline environment than that in the neutral environment. Increasing the KOH concentration can improve the cell performance. There exist optimal liquid flow rate and organics concentration leading to the best performance. Besides, it is found that increasing the light intensity can generate more electron-hole pairs and thus enhance the cell performance. These results are helpful for optimizing the design.

  9. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  10. Eelgrass fairy rings: sulfide as inhibiting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, Jens; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    specifically, for the apparent die- off of eelgrass shoots on the inner side of the rings. The fairy rings were up to 15 m in diameter consisting of 0.3- to 1-m-wide zones of sea grass shoots at densities of up to 1,200 shoots m−2 and rooted in an up to 10-cm-thick sediment layer. On the outer side, shoots...... expanded over the bare chalk plates. On the inner side, shoots were smaller, had lower absolute and specific leaf growth, shoot density was lower and the sediment eroded leaving the bare chalk with scattered boulders behind. Sediment organic matter and nutrients and tissue nutrient contents were...... substantial invasion of sulfide from the sediment. neither the clonal growth pattern of eelgrass, sediment burial of shoots, hydrodynamic forcing nor nutrient limitation could explain the ring-shaped pattern. We conclude that the most likely explanation must be found in invasion of eelgrass shoots by toxic...

  11. On the pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palant, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation results are discussed on the process of pelletizing with the use of various binders (water, syrup, sulfite-alcoholic residue and bentonite) for flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (∼84 % MoS 2 ) of the Mongolian deposit. It is established that with the use of syrup rather strong pellets (>300 g/p) of desired size (2-3 mm) can be obtained at a binder flowrate of 1 kg per 100 kg of concentrate. The main advantage of using syrup instead of bentonite lies in the fact that in this instance no depletion of a molybdenum calcine obtained by oxidizing roasting of raw ore takes place due to syrup complete burning out. This affects positively subsequent hydrometallurgical conversion because of decreasing molybdenum losses with waste cakes [ru

  12. Modulated structure calculated for superconducting hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Tse, John S.; Yao, Yansun [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-11

    Compression of hydrogen sulfide using first principles metadynamics and molecular dynamics calculations revealed a modulated structure with high proton mobility which exhibits a diffraction pattern matching well with experiment. The structure consists of a sublattice of rectangular meandering SH{sup -} chains and molecular-like H{sub 3}S{sup +} stacked alternately in tetragonal and cubic slabs forming a long-period modulation. The novel structure offers a new perspective on the possible origin of the superconductivity at very high temperatures in which the conducting electrons in the SH chains are perturbed by the fluxional motions of the H{sub 3}S resulting in strong electron-phonon coupling. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  14. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I 2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  15. Microstructure and properties of TiC-high manganese steel cermet prepared by different sintering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi; Lin, Tao, E-mail: lintao@ustb.edu.cn; He, Xinbo; Shao, Huiping; Zheng, Jianshu; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-11-25

    In the paper, the TiC −50 wt.% high manganese steel cermet was made with different sintering processes including vacuum sintering, hot pressing, microwave sintering and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure, porosity and fracture morphology of the samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density, hardness, transverse rupture strength (TRS) and wear resistance were investigated for the effect of the sintering processes. The results showed that the core–shell structure was not clearly observed for the TiC particles in microstructures and the high manganese steel matrix is BCC structure. Hot pressing, microwave sintering and SPS are useful processes for densification of the cermet. Nearly full density and higher hardness can be reached by these three processes at a lower sintering temperature and in a shorter sintering time. However, higher TRS can be reached by means of alloying completely in a longer sintering time, for example vacuum sintering. Pre-sintering in a long sintering time at a lower sintering temperature is also useful for improving the TRS. Finally, vacuum sintering is an effective process for producing this composite with the lowest cost in the mass production. - Highlights: • TiC-high manganese steel cermets were prepared by four sintering processes. • The core–shell structure was not clearly observed for the TiC particles in microstructures. • Th high manganese steel matrix is BCC structure instead of FCC structure. • Pre-sintering before microwave sintering is also useful for improving the TRS. • Vacuum sintering can be effective way for prepare this cermet in mass production.

  16. Dry Sintered Metal Coating of Halloysite Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Nicholson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs are a naturally-occurring aluminosilicate whose dimensions measure microns in length and tens of nanometers in diameter. Bonding defects between the alumina and silica lead to net negative and positive charges on the exterior and interior lumen, respectively. HNTs have been shown to enhance the material properties of polymer matrices and enable the sustained release of loaded chemicals, drugs, and growth factors. Due to the net charges, these nanotubes can also be readily coated in layered-depositions using the HNT exterior lumen’s net negative charge as the basis for assembly. These coatings are primarily done through wet chemical processes, the majority of which are limited in their use of desired chemicals, due to the polarity of the halloysite. Furthermore, this restriction in the type of chemicals used often requires the use of more toxic chemicals in place of greener options, and typically necessitates the use of a significantly longer chemical process to achieve the desired coating. In this study, we show that HNTs can be coated with metal acetylacetonates—compounds primarily employed in the synthesis of nanoparticles, as metal catalysts, and as NMR shift reagents—through a dry sintering process. This method was capable of thermally decaying the metal acetylacetonate, resulting in a free positively-charged metal ion that readily bonded to the negatively-charged HNT exterior, resulting in metallic coatings forming on the HNT surface. Our coating method may enable greater deposition of coated material onto these nanotubes as required for a desired application. Furthermore, the use of chemical processes using toxic chemicals is not required, thus eliminating exposure to toxic chemicals and costs associated with the disposal of the resultant chemical waste.

  17. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH3 phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH2, are calculated for the pressure interval 100-225 GPa. It is found that the I4/ mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH3 phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH2 phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH2 and SH3) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  18. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-01

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe 2 O 3 containing a crystalline phase of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected

  19. Sulfidization of an aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst using the 35S radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Greish, A.A.; Kogan, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    It has been established that in aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst sulfidized with elemental sulfur there are two types of sulfur, free and bound. The maximum amount of bound sulfur in ACM catalyst is 6.6 wt. %, which corresponds to practically complete sulfidation of the ACM catalyst. In the presence of hydrogen an equilibrium distribution of bound sulfur is achieved in a granule of ACM catalyst irrespective of the temperature of sulfidation. In a nitrogen atmosphere it is primarily the surface layers of the catalyst that are sulfured

  20. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....