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Sample records for sinorhizobium meliloti requires

  1. Malic enzyme cofactor and domain requirements for symbiotic N2 fixation by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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    Mitsch, Michael J; Cowie, Alison; Finan, Turlough M

    2007-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme (DME) and the NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme (TME) of Sinorhizobium meliloti are representatives of a distinct class of malic enzymes that contain a 440-amino-acid N-terminal region homologous to other malic enzymes and a 330-amino-acid C-terminal region with similarity to phosphotransacetylase enzymes (PTA). We have shown previously that dme mutants of S. meliloti fail to fix N(2) (Fix(-)) in alfalfa root nodules, whereas tme mutants are unimpaired in their N(2)-fixing ability (Fix(+)). Here we report that the amount of DME protein in bacteroids is 10 times greater than that of TME. We therefore investigated whether increased TME activity in nodules would allow TME to function in place of DME. The tme gene was placed under the control of the dme promoter, and despite elevated levels of TME within bacteroids, no symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurred in dme mutant strains. Conversely, expression of dme from the tme promoter resulted in a large reduction in DME activity and symbiotic N(2) fixation. Hence, TME cannot replace the symbiotic requirement for DME. In further experiments we investigated the DME PTA-like domain and showed that it is not required for N(2) fixation. Thus, expression of a DME C-terminal deletion derivative or the Escherichia coli NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme (sfcA), both of which lack the PTA-like region, restored wild-type N(2) fixation to a dme mutant. Our results have defined the symbiotic requirements for malic enzyme and raise the possibility that a constant high ratio of NADPH + H(+) to NADP in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids prevents TME from functioning in N(2)-fixing bacteroids.

  2. Genotypic characterization of indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rhizobia, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium sullae, which fix nitrogen in root nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and sulla (Hedysarum sp.) forage legumes, respectively, were isolated from root nodules and soils from Morocco. We used three PCR-based techniques namely, rep-PCR, RAPD and ARDRA ...

  3. The succinoglycan endoglycanase encoded by exoK is required for efficient symbiosis of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 with the host plants Medicago truncatula and Medicago sativa (Alfalfa).

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    Mendis, Hajeewaka C; Queiroux, Clothilde; Brewer, Tess E; Davis, Olivia M; Washburn, Brian K; Jones, Kathryn M

    2013-09-01

    The acidic polysaccharide succinoglycan produced by the nitrogen-fixing rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 is required for this bacterium to invade the host plant Medicago truncatula and to efficiently invade the host plant M. sativa (alfalfa). The β-glucanase enzyme encoded by exoK has previously been demonstrated to cleave succinoglycan and participate in producing the low molecular weight form of this polysaccharide. Here, we show that exoK is required for efficient S. meliloti invasion of both M. truncatula and alfalfa. Deletion mutants of exoK have a substantial reduction in symbiotic productivity on both of these plant hosts. Insertion mutants of exoK have an even less productive symbiosis than the deletion mutants with the host M. truncatula that is caused by a secondary effect of the insertion itself, and may be due to a polar effect on the expression of the downstream exoLAMON genes.

  4. Large-scale genetic variation of the symbiosis-required megaplasmid pSymA revealed by comparative genomic analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti natural strains

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    Landry Christian R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa. This species occupies different ecological niches, being present as a free-living soil bacterium and as a symbiont of plant root nodules. The genome of the type strain Rm 1021 contains one chromosome and two megaplasmids for a total genome size of 6 Mb. We applied comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH on an oligonucleotide microarrays to estimate genetic variation at the genomic level in four natural strains, two isolated from Italian agricultural soil and two from desert soil in the Aral Sea region. Results From 4.6 to 5.7 percent of the genes showed a pattern of hybridisation concordant with deletion, nucleotide divergence or ORF duplication when compared to the type strain Rm 1021. A large number of these polymorphisms were confirmed by sequencing and Southern blot. A statistically significant fraction of these variable genes was found on the pSymA megaplasmid and grouped in clusters. These variable genes were found to be mainly transposases or genes with unknown function. Conclusion The obtained results allow to conclude that the symbiosis-required megaplasmid pSymA can be considered the major hot-spot for intra-specific differentiation in S. meliloti.

  5. Sinorhizobium meliloti can protect Medicago truncatula against Phoma medicaginis attack

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    Moncef MRABET

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sinorhizobium meliloti microsymbiont of Medicago spp. was used in an antibiosis test against Phoma medicaginis and in bioprotection assays of Medicago truncatula JA17 from the pathogen. Among 17 S. meliloti strains isolated from root nodules of M. truncatula and Medicago laciniata grown in Tunisian soils, six showed up to 60% growth inhibition of five P. medicaginis strains isolated from infected field-grown M. truncatula. Two S. meliloti strains with differing in vitro effects on P. medicaginis, 10.16/R6 antagonist and 5M6 non antagonist, were used in a bioprotection assay of M. truncatula JA17 from the pathogen. The inoculation of P. medicaginis caused complete root and stem rotting, and the mortality of all treated plantlets. Inoculation of the antagonist S. meliloti strain 10.16/R6 to M. truncatula JA17 infected with P. medicaginis was associated with a significant 65% decrease of vegetative rotting length, an 80% decrease of plant mortality, an increase of root length, and enhancement of root and shoot biomass comparatively to control plantlets treated with P. medicaginis. The inoculation of the non antagonistic S. meliloti strain 5M6 slightly decreased disease and slightly increased plant growth parameters.

  6. Biogeography of Sinorhizobium meliloti nodulating alfalfa in different Croatian regions.

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    Donnarumma, Francesca; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Blažinkov, Mihaela; Mengoni, Alessio; Sikora, Sanjia; Babić, Katarina Huić

    2014-09-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a nitrogen-fixing rhizobium symbiont of legumes, widespread in many temperate environments the high genetic diversity of which enables it to thrive as a symbiont of host legumes and free-living in soil. Soil type, together with geographic differences and host plant genotype, seem to be prominent factors in shaping rhizobial genetic diversity. While a large body of research supports the idea that the genetic structure of free-living microbial taxa exhibits a clear biogeographic pattern, few investigations have been performed on the biogeographic pattern of S. meliloti genotypes in a restricted geographic range. In the present study, a collection of 128 S. meliloti isolates from three different regions in Croatia was investigated to analyze the relationship between genetic diversity, geographic distribution, soil features and isolate phenotypes by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) as a genome-wide scanning method. Results obtained led to the conclusion that the genotypes of isolates cluster according to the region of origin and that the differentiation of S. meliloti populations can be mainly ascribed to geographic isolation following an isolation-by-distance model, with a strong distance-decay relationship of genetic similarity with distance, in which local soil conditions are not the major component influencing the isolate phenotypes or their genomic differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. In silico insights into the symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti via metabolic reconstruction.

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    Zhao, Hansheng; Li, Mao; Fang, Kechi; Chen, Wenfeng; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium, known for its capability to establish symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) with leguminous plants such as alfalfa. S. meliloti 1021 is the most extensively studied strain to understand the mechanism of SNF and further to study the legume-microbe interaction. In order to provide insight into the metabolic characteristics underlying the SNF mechanism of S. meliloti 1021, there is an increasing demand to reconstruct a metabolic network for the stage of SNF in S. meliloti 1021. Through an iterative reconstruction process, a metabolic network during the stage of SNF in S. meliloti 1021 was presented, named as iHZ565, which accounts for 565 genes, 503 internal reactions, and 522 metabolites. Subjected to a novelly defined objective function, the in silico predicted flux distribution was highly consistent with the in vivo evidences reported previously, which proves the robustness of the model. Based on the model, refinement of genome annotation of S. meliloti 1021 was performed and 15 genes were re-annotated properly. There were 19.8% (112) of the 565 metabolic genes included in iHZ565 predicted to be essential for efficient SNF in bacteroids under the in silico microaerobic and nutrient sharing condition. As the first metabolic network during the stage of SNF in S. meliloti 1021, the manually curated model iHZ565 provides an overview of the major metabolic properties of the SNF bioprocess in S. meliloti 1021. The predicted SNF-required essential genes will facilitate understanding of the key functions in SNF and help identify key genes and design experiments for further validation. The model iHZ565 can be used as a knowledge-based framework for better understanding the symbiotic relationship between rhizobia and legumes, ultimately, uncovering the mechanism of nitrogen fixation in bacteroids and providing new strategies to efficiently improve biological nitrogen fixation.

  8. PCR Analysis of "expR" Gene Regulating Biosynthesis of Exopolysaccharides in "Sinorhizobium Meliloti"

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    Sorroche, Fernando G.; Giordano, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by the rhizobacterium "Sinorhizobium meliloti" is essential for root nodule formation on its legume host (alfalfa), and for establishment of a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between the two partners. Production of EPS II (galactoglucan) by certain "S. meliloti" strains results in a mucoid colony…

  9. Two-component regulatory system ActS/ActR is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti adaptation to oxidative stress.

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    Tang, Guirong; Wang, Sunjun; Lu, Dawei; Huang, Leqi; Li, Ningning; Luo, Li

    2017-05-01

    The two-component system ActS/ActR plays important roles in bacterial adaptation to abiotic stress, including acid tolerance and oxidant resistance. However, the underlying regulatory mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that the ActS/ActR system is required for adaptation to oxidative stress by regulating the transcription of the genes actR, katB, gshA and gshB1. The actS and actR mutants were sensitive to low pH and oxidants such as H 2 O 2 , oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). The expression of actR by using a plasmid rescued the defect of SNP sensitivity for all actS and actR mutants. The expression of actS and actR were suppressed by treatment with H 2 O 2 . The expression of actS, actR, oxyR, katA and katB was required for ActS and ActR under normal conditions. The induction of katB, gshA and gshB1 depended on ActS and ActR during treatment with H 2 O 2 and SNP. Our findings revealed that the ActS/ActR system is a key redox regulator in S. meliltoi and provides a new cue to understanding Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Kelly Lynn Hagberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the Nitrogen Stress Response (NSR and Phosphate Stress Response (PSR have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a PII deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti PII proteins may also regulate the PSR. PII double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. To understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB, the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB::Tn5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a PII deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. Our results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators of NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. We conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.

  11. [Occurrence of islands in genomes of Sinorhizobium meliloti native isolates].

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    Muntyan, V S; Cherkasova, M E; Andronov, E E; Simarov, B V; Roumiantseva, M L

    2016-10-01

    Genomes of 184 Sinorhizobium meliloti native isolates were studied to test the occurence of islands Sme21T, Sme19T, and Sme80S previously described in the model strain Rm1021. This analysis was conducted using PCR methodology involving specific primers. It was demonstrated that, in the examined geographically distinct populations of S. meliloti from the Northern Caucasus (NCG) and the Aral Sea region (PAG), the strains containing genomic islands were observed with similar frequency (0.55 and 0.57, respectively). Island Sme80S, denoted as an island of “environmental adaptivity,” was identified predominantly (frequency of 0.38) in genomes of strains which exhibited a lower level of salt tolerance and was isolated in PAG, a modern center of introgressive hybridization of alfalfa subjected to salinity. Island Sme21T designated as “ancestral” was observed in genomes of strains isolated in NCG, the primary center of host-plant biodiversity, 10-fold more often than in strains from PAG. An island Sme19T, which predominantly carries genes encoding transposases, was observed in genomes of strains in both populations with average frequency of 0.10. The analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on the assessment of probability for detection of different islands combinations in genomes revealed an independent inheritance of islands in salt-sensitive strains of various geographic origin. In contrast, the absence of this trend was noted in the majority of the examined combinations of salt-tolerant strains. It was concluded that the structure of chromosome in PAG strains which predominantly possessed a salt-sensitive phenotype was subjected to active recombinant processes, which could predetermine the intensity of microevolutionary processes in bacterial populations and facilitate an adaptation of bacteria in adverse environmental effect.

  12. Role of quorum sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Alfalfa symbiosis.

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    Gurich, Nataliya; González, Juan E

    2009-07-01

    The ExpR/Sin quorum-sensing system of the gram-negative soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an important role in the establishment of symbiosis with its host plant Medicago sativa. A mutant unable to produce autoinducer signal molecules (sinI) is deficient in its ability to invade the host, but paradoxically, a strain lacking the quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator ExpR is as efficient as the wild type. We compared the whole-genome expression profile of the wild-type strain with strains missing one of the quorum-sensing regulatory components to identify genes controlled by the ExpR/Sin system throughout the different phases of the bacterial growth cycle, as well as in planta. Our analyses revealed that ExpR is a highly versatile regulator with a unique ability to show different regulatory capabilities in the presence or absence of an autoinducer. In addition, this study provided us with insight into the plant invasion defect displayed by the autoinducer mutant. We also discovered that the ExpR/Sin quorum-sensing system is repressed after plant invasion. Therefore, quorum sensing plays a crucial role in the regulation of many cell functions that ensures the successful invasion of the host and is inactivated once symbiosis is established.

  13. Genetic Identification and Symbiotic Efficiency of an Indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti Field Population

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    Sanja Sikora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti are of enormous agricultural value, because of their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with an important forage crop legume – alfalfa. The main aim of this study was (i to isolate indigenous S. meliloti strains from different field sites in Croatia, (ii to assess genetic diversity and genetic relationships amongst strains of natural populations and (iii to provide information about nodulation and symbiotic efficiency of indigenous S. meliloti strains. The nine strains isolated from alfalfa nodules collected from different field sites and three reference strains were analysed. Genetic characterisation by PCR-RFLP of the 16S rDNA, rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR was applied to study the status of Sinorhizobium meliloti populations inhabiting nodules of alfalfa. The results of PCR-RFLP of the 16S rDNA revealed that all isolates belong to the S. meliloti species. Cluster analysis of rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR profiles showed significant differences among S. meliloti isolates. Both methods resulted in identical grouping of strains. Among indigenous strains two divergent groups could be determined. The biggest differences were detected among two reference strains and all field isolates. Greenhouse studies were performed for evaluation of symbiotic efficiency and compatibility of S. meliloti strains with two alfalfa cultivars. Quantitative expression of symbiotic efficiency was evaluated by measurement of nodule dry weight, content of proteins and total nitrogen in plants, dry matter and green mass yield of plants. All strains nodulated both alfalfa cultivars but with different efficiency. Significant differences in dry matter and green mass yield of alfalfa as well as protein content were determined depending on the strain used. The results indicate that three indigenous S. meliloti strains can be characterised as the most efficient of all strains used in this study.

  14. Sinorhizobium meliloti putA Gene Regulation: a New Model within the Family Rhizobiaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, María José; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; van Dillewijn, Pieter; Toro, Nicolás

    2000-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, as in other microorganisms, the putA gene is transcriptionally activated in response to proline. In Rhodobacter capsulatus, Agrobacterium, and most probably in Bradyrhizobium, this activation is dependent on an Lrp-like protein encoded by the putR gene, located immediately upstream of putA. Interestingly, sequence and genetic analysis of the region upstream of...

  15. The effect of phosphate deficiency on quorum sensing signaling pathway of Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Pakdaman; akbar mostajeran

    2015-01-01

      Introduction : Phosphorus is one of the most essential macroelements for bacterial cells. Since phosphate (PO4-3) limitation is frequently encountered in soils, bacteria developed some mechanisms in response to this sever condition. Phosphate transporter (PstS) and proteins involved in quorum sensing (QS) signaling pathway are affected by mediating PhoB, response regulator, following phosphate starvation. QS system of Sinorhizobium meliloti composed of at least three genes of sinI (autoindu...

  16. Three way interactions between Thymus vulgaris, Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Grøndahl, Eva; Ehlers, Bodil Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Thymus vulgaris is a dominating component of the Mediterranean garrigue vegetation. It produces aromatic oil, containing monoterpenes, which affects the performance (growth, survival) of other plants, and microorganisms. Annual plant species of the genus Medicago are commonly found in Mediterranean thyme communities; in fact they often grow very close to thyme plants (within 1 square meter). Medicago has a symbiosis with the nitrogen fixing bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti – which is essential...

  17. Biodegradable plastics from Sinorhizobium meliloti as plastics compatible with the environment and human health

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    Mehrdad Hashemi Beidokhti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are natural polyesters and biodegradable plastics that are stored as intracellular inclusion bodies by a great variety of bacteria. The aim of this study was to extract polyhydroxyalkanoate from native Sinorhizobium meliloti in Iran. Materials and methods: Sinorhizobium meliloti isolates were collected from roots of alfalfa plants and were identified by Gram staining, biochemical experiments and amplification of 1500 bp fragment of 16Sr DNA gene. PHA granules were detected by microscopic examination. PHA production was evaluated in nutrient deficient medium and its amount was determined by conversion of PHA into crotonic acid by sulphuric acid treatment. The effect of various temperatures, agitation rate and carbon source (sucrose, mannitol, and maltose were evaluated on dry cell weight and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB production. Results: The maximum amount of polymer production (43.10% was seen in basal mineral medium at 29°C, pH~7 and 215 revolutions per minute (rpm. The results of this research showed that the S5 isolate was capable to produce maximum poly3- hydroxybutyrate. The produced polymer was analyzed for its purity by GC- mass (gas chromatography- mass spectroscopy and confirmed to be PHB compared with the standard polymer. Discussion and conclusion: Native strains of Sinorhizobium can be used in the production of biodegradable plastics and the results of present study showed that S. meliloti S5 was capable to produce maximum PHB at 29°C, agitation rate of 215 rpm, and pH~7. 

  18. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galardini, Marco [University of Florence; Mengoni, Alessio [University of Florence; Brilli, Matteo [Universite de Lyon, France; Pini, Francesco [University of Florence; Fioravanti, Antonella [University of Florence; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mocali, Stefano [Agrobiol & Pedol Ctr ABP, Agr Res Council, I-50121 Florence, Italy; Bazzicalupo, Marco [University of Florence; Biondi, Emanuele [University of Florence

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results: With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB), AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains.

  19. Sinorhizobium meliloti putA gene regulation: a new model within the family Rhizobiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M J; Jiménez-Zurdo, J I; van Dillewijn, P; Toro, N

    2000-04-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, as in other microorganisms, the putA gene is transcriptionally activated in response to proline. In Rhodobacter capsulatus, Agrobacterium, and most probably in Bradyrhizobium, this activation is dependent on an Lrp-like protein encoded by the putR gene, located immediately upstream of putA. Interestingly, sequence and genetic analysis of the region upstream of the S. meliloti putA gene did not reveal such a putR locus or any other encoded transcriptional activator of putA. Furthermore, results obtained with an S. meliloti putA null mutation indicate the absence of any proline-responsive transcriptional activator and that PutA serves as an autogenous repressor. Therefore, the model of S. meliloti putA regulation completely diverges from that of its Rhizobiaceae relatives and resembles more that of enteric bacteria. However, some differences have been found with the latter model: (i) S. meliloti putA gene is not catabolite repressed, and (ii) the gene encoding for the major proline permease (putP) does not form part of an operon with the putA gene.

  20. Cultural conditions required for the induction of an adaptive acid-tolerance response (ATR) in Sinorhizobium meliloti and the question as to whether or not the ATR helps rhizobia improve their symbiosis with alfalfa at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio; de Los Angeles Giusti, María; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo A; Jofré, Edgardo; Boiardi, José Luis; Lagares, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti associates with Medicago and Melilotus species to develop nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The agricultural relevance of these associations, the worldwide distribution of acid soils, and the remarkable acid sensitivity of the microsymbiont have all stimulated research on the responses of the symbionts to acid environments. We show here that an adaptive acid-tolerance response (ATR) can be induced in S. meliloti, as shown previously for Sinorhizobium medicae, when the bacteria are grown in batch cultures at the slightly acid pH of 6.1. In marked contrast, no increased tolerance to hydrogen ions is obtained if rhizobia are grown in a chemostat under continuous cultivation at the same pH. The adaptive ATR appears as a complex process triggered by an increased hydrogen-ion concentration, but operative only if other--as yet unknown--concomitant factors that depend on the culture conditions are present (although not provided under continuous cultivation). Although the stability of the ATR and its influence on acid tolerance has been characterized in rhizobia, no data have been available on the effect of the adapted state on symbiosis. Coinoculation experiments showed that acid-adapted indicator rhizobia (ATR+) were present in >90% of the nodules when nodulation was performed at pH 5.6, representing a >30% increase in occupancy compared with a control test. We show that the ATR represents a clear advantage in competing for nodulation at low pH. It is not yet clear whether such an effect results from an improved performance in the acid environment during preinfection, an enhanced ability to initiate infections, or both conditions. The practical use of ATR+ rhizobia will depend on validation experiments with soil microcosms and on field testing, as well as on the possibility of preserving the physiology of ATR+ bacteria in inoculant formulations.

  1. Comprehensive metabolite profiling of Sinorhizobium meliloti using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

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    Barsch, Aiko; Patschkowski, Thomas; Niehaus, Karsten

    2004-10-01

    A metabolite analysis of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti was established as a first step towards a better understanding of the symbiosis with its host plant Medicago truncatula. A crucial step was the development of fast harvesting and extraction methods for the bacterial metabolites because of rapid changes in their composition. S. meliloti 1021 cell cultures grown in minimal medium were harvested by centrifugation, filtration or immediate freezing in liquid nitrogen followed by a lyophilisation step. Bacteria were lysed mechanically in methanol and hydrophilic compounds were analysed after methoxymation and silylisation via GC-MS. The different compounds were identified by comparison with the NIST 98 database and available standards. From about 200 peaks in each chromatogram 65 compounds have been identified so far. A comparison of the different extraction methods giving the metabolite composition revealed clear changes in several amino acids and amino acid precursor pools. A principal component analysis (PCA) was able to distinguish S. meliloti cells grown on different carbon sources based on their metabolite profile. A comparison of the metabolite composition of a S. meliloti leucine auxotrophic mutant with the wild type revealed a marked accumulation of 2-isopropylmalate in the mutant. Interestingly, the accumulated metabolite is not the direct substrate of the mutated enzyme, 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, but the substrate of isopropylmalate isomerase, which acts one step further upstream in the biosynthetic pathway of leucine. This finding further emphasises the importance of integrating metabolic data into post-genomic research.

  2. pSymA-Dependent Mobilization of the Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymB Megaplasmid ▿ †

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    Blanca-Ordóñez, Helena; Oliva-García, Juan J.; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Soto, María J.; Olivares, José; Sanjuán, Juan; Nogales, Joaquina

    2010-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 carries two megaplasmids, pSymA of 1,354 kb and pSymB of 1,683 kb, which are essential in establishing symbiosis with its legume hosts and important for bacterial fitness in the rhizosphere. We have previously shown that pSymA is self-transmissible and that its conjugal functions are regulated by the transcriptional repressor RctA. Here, we show conjugal transfer of pSymB as an in trans mobilization event that requires the type IV secretion system encoded by pSymA. pSymB carries a functional oriT and an adjacent relaxase gene, traA2, that is also transcriptionally repressed by rctA. Both symbiotic megaplasmids would require the relaxase genes in cis with their respective oriTs to achieve the highest transfer efficiencies. PMID:20889746

  3. Cloning-free genome engineering in Sinorhizobium meliloti advances applications of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

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    Döhlemann, Johannes; Brennecke, Meike; Becker, Anke

    2016-09-10

    The soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti serves as model for studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a highly important process in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report advancements of the genetic toolbox accelerating genome editing in S. meliloti. The hsdMSR operon encodes a type-I restriction-modification (R-M) system. Transformation of S. meliloti is counteracted by the restriction endonuclease HsdR degrading DNA which lacks the appropriate methylation pattern. We provide a stable S. meliloti hsdR deletion mutant showing enhanced transformation with Escherichia coli-derived plasmid DNA and demonstrate that using an E. coli plasmid donor, expressing S. meliloti methyl transferase genes, is an alternative strategy of increasing the transformation efficiency of S. meliloti. Furthermore, we devise a novel cloning-free genome editing (CFGE) method for S. meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthomonas campestris, and demonstrate the applicability of this method for intricate applications of the Cre/lox recombination system in S. meliloti. An enhanced Cre/lox system, allowing for serial deletions of large genomic regions, was established. An assay of lox spacer mutants identified a set of lox sites mediating specific recombination. The availability of several non-promiscuous Cre recognition sites enables simultaneous specific Cre/lox recombination events. CFGE combined with Cre/lox recombination is put forward as powerful approach for targeted genome editing, involving serial steps of manipulation to expedite the genetic accessibility of S. meliloti as chassis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Hfq-Regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with 15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  5. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Daligault Hajnalka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB, AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains. Conclusions In conclusions, the extended comparative genomics approach revealed a

  6. Site-Specific Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphoproteome of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Stationary Phase.

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    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultative microsymbiont of alfalfa, should fine-tune its cellular processes to live saprophytically in soils characterized with limited nutrients and diverse stresses. In this study, TiO2 enrichment and LC-MS/MS were used to uncover the site-specific Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of S. meliloti in minimum medium at stationary phase. There are a total of 96 unique phosphorylated sites, with a Ser/Thr/Tyr distribution of 63:28:5, in 77 proteins. Phosphoproteins identified in S. meliloti showed a wide distribution pattern regarding to functional categories, such as replication, transcription, translation, posttranslational modification, transport and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrate, inorganic ion, succinoglycan etc. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified within the conserved motif in proteins of key cellular function indicate a crucial role of phosphorylation in modulating cellular physiology. Moreover, phosphorylation in proteins involved in processes related to rhizobial adaptation was also discussed, such as those identified in SMa0114 and PhaP2 (polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, ActR (pH stress and microaerobic adaption, SupA (potassium stress, chaperonin GroEL2 (viability and potentially symbiosis, and ExoP (succinoglycan synthesis and secretion. These Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified herein would be helpful for our further investigation and understanding of the role of phosphorylation in rhizobial physiology.

  7. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

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    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  8. Three way interactions between Thymus vulgaris, Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Eva; Ehlers, Bodil Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    thyme communities; in fact they often grow very close to thyme plants (within 1 square meter). Medicago has a symbiosis with the nitrogen fixing bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti – which is essential for nitrogen uptake in the nutrient poor garrigue. The aim of this study was to examine 1) if Medicago...... experienced ones, irrespective of whether the soil was amended with thyme oil or not. Furthermore, there was a small, but significant difference in Medicago fitness between naive and experienced plant genotypes on soil amended with thyme oil. Thyme experienced Medicago genotypes performed better on thyme soil......Thymus vulgaris is a dominating component of the Mediterranean garrigue vegetation. It produces aromatic oil, containing monoterpenes, which affects the performance (growth, survival) of other plants, and microorganisms. Annual plant species of the genus Medicago are commonly found in Mediterranean...

  9. The Symbiosis Interactome: a computational approach reveals novel components, functional interactions and modules in Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Rodriguez-Llorente Ignacio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhizobium-Legume symbiosis is an attractive biological process that has been studied for decades because of its importance in agriculture. However, this system has undergone extensive study and although many of the major factors underpinning the process have been discovered using traditional methods, much remains to be discovered. Results Here we present an analysis of the 'Symbiosis Interactome' using novel computational methods in order to address the complex dynamic interactions between proteins involved in the symbiosis of the model bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti with its plant hosts. Our study constitutes the first large-scale analysis attempting to reconstruct this complex biological process, and to identify novel proteins involved in establishing symbiosis. We identified 263 novel proteins potentially associated with the Symbiosis Interactome. The topology of the Symbiosis Interactome was used to guide experimental techniques attempting to validate novel proteins involved in different stages of symbiosis. The contribution of a set of novel proteins was tested analyzing the symbiotic properties of several S. meliloti mutants. We found mutants with altered symbiotic phenotypes suggesting novel proteins that provide key complementary roles for symbiosis. Conclusion Our 'systems-based model' represents a novel framework for studying host-microbe interactions, provides a theoretical basis for further experimental validations, and can also be applied to the study of other complex processes such as diseases.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose A.; García-Ruíz, Juan Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The dihydropyrimidinase from S. meliloti CECT4114, with activity towards both hydantoin and dihydrouracil substrates, was crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution. Dihydropyrimidinases are involved in the reductive pathway of pyrimidine degradation, catalysing the hydrolysis of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine to the corresponding N-carbamoyl β-amino acids. This enzyme has often been referred to as hydantoinase owing to its industrial application in the production of optically pure amino acids starting from racemic mixtures of 5-monosubstituted hydantoins. Recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114 (SmelDhp) has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.3 mm inner diameter. Crystals of SmelDhp suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to ensure mass transport controlled by diffusion. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.85 Å. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 124.89, b = 126.28, c = 196.10 Å and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been determined and refinement is in progress

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio [Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain); González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos-IACT, CSIC-UGRA, P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier [Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain); Gavira, Jose A.; García-Ruíz, Juan Manuel, E-mail: jmgruiz@ugr.es [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos-IACT, CSIC-UGRA, P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edificio CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain)

    2006-12-01

    The dihydropyrimidinase from S. meliloti CECT4114, with activity towards both hydantoin and dihydrouracil substrates, was crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution. Dihydropyrimidinases are involved in the reductive pathway of pyrimidine degradation, catalysing the hydrolysis of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine to the corresponding N-carbamoyl β-amino acids. This enzyme has often been referred to as hydantoinase owing to its industrial application in the production of optically pure amino acids starting from racemic mixtures of 5-monosubstituted hydantoins. Recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114 (SmelDhp) has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.3 mm inner diameter. Crystals of SmelDhp suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to ensure mass transport controlled by diffusion. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.85 Å. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.89, b = 126.28, c = 196.10 Å and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been determined and refinement is in progress.

  12. Role of specific quorum-sensing signals in the regulation of exopolysaccharide II production within Sinorhizobium meliloti spreading colonies.

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    Mengsheng Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quorum sensing (QS in Sinorhizobium meliloti involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL signals. These signals are produced by SinI, the sole AHL synthase in S. meliloti Rm8530. The sinI gene is regulated by two LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, SinR and ExpR. Mutations in sinI, sinR and expR abolish the production of exopolysaccharide II (EPS II. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigated a new type of coordinated surface spreading of Rm8530 that can be categorized as swarming. Motility assays on semi-solid surfaces revealed that both flagella and EPS II are required for this type of motility. The production of EPS II depends on AHLs produced by SinI. Of these AHLs, only C(16:1- and 3-oxo-C(16:1-homoserine lactones (HSLs stimulated swarming in an ExpR-dependent manner. These two AHLs induced the strongest response in the wggR reporter fusions. WggR is a positive regulator of the EPS II biosynthesis gene expression. The levels of the wggR activation correlated with the extent of swarming. Furthermore, swarming of S. meliloti required the presence of the high molecular weight (HMW fraction of EPS II. Within swarming colonies, a recombinase-based RIVET reporter in the wggR gene was resolved in 30% of the cells, indicating an enhanced regulation of EPS II production in the subpopulation of cells, which was sufficient to support swarming of the entire colony. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Swarming behavior of S. meliloti Rm8530 on semi-solid surfaces is found to be dependent on the functional QS regulatory cascades. Even though multiple AHL signals are produced by the bacterium, only two AHLs species, C(16:1- and 3-oxo-C(16:1-HSLs, affected swarming by up-regulating the expression of wggR. While EPS II is produced by Rm8530 as high and low molecular weight fractions, only the HMW EPS II facilitated initial stages of swarming, thus, suggesting a function for this polymer.

  13. Loss of malic enzymes leads to metabolic imbalance and altered levels of trehalose and putrescine in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Smallbone, Laura Anne; diCenzo, George C; Morton, Richard; Finan, Turlough M

    2016-07-26

    Malic enzymes decarboxylate the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate malate to the glycolytic end-product pyruvate and are well positioned to regulate metabolic flux in central carbon metabolism. Despite the wide distribution of these enzymes, their biological roles are unclear in part because the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes can be by-passed by other pathways. The N2-fixing alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti contains both a NAD(P)-malic enzyme (DME) and a separate NADP-malic enzyme (TME) and to help understand the role of these enzymes, we investigated growth, metabolomic, and transcriptional consequences resulting from loss of these enzymes in free-living cells. Loss of DME, TME, or both enzymes had no effect on growth with the glycolytic substrate, glucose. In contrast, the dme mutants, but not tme, grew slowly on the gluconeogenic substrate succinate and this slow growth was further reduced upon the addition of glucose. The dme mutant strains incubated with succinate accumulated trehalose and hexose sugar phosphates, secreted malate, and relative to wild-type, these cells had moderately increased transcription of genes involved in gluconeogenesis and pathways that divert metabolites away from the TCA cycle. While tme mutant cells grew at the same rate as wild-type on succinate, they accumulated the compatible solute putrescine. NAD(P)-malic enzyme (DME) of S. meliloti is required for efficient metabolism of succinate via the TCA cycle. In dme mutants utilizing succinate, malate accumulates and is excreted and these cells appear to increase metabolite flow via gluconeogenesis with a resulting increase in the levels of hexose-6-phosphates and trehalose. For cells utilizing succinate, TME activity alone appeared to be insufficient to produce the levels of pyruvate required for efficient TCA cycle metabolism. Putrescine was found to accumulate in tme cells growing with succinate, and whether this is related to altered levels of NADPH requires

  14. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses inSinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Kelly L; Yurgel, Svetlana N; Mulder, Monika; Kahn, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the nitrogen stress response (NSR) and phosphate stress response (PSR) have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti , a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The P II proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a P II deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti P II proteins may also regulate the PSR. P II double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. To understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB , the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB ::Tn 5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a P II deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. Our results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators of NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. We conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.

  15. Alfalfa forage digestibility, quality and yield under future climate change scenarios vary with Sinorhizobium meliloti strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Sáez, Álvaro; Erice, Gorka; Aguirreolea, Jone; Muñoz, Fernando; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Irigoyen, Juan José

    2012-05-15

    Elevated CO(2) may decrease alfalfa forage quality and in vitro digestibility through a drop in crude protein and an enhancement of fibre content. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effect of elevated CO(2), elevated temperature and Sinorhizobium meliloti strains (102F78, 102F34 and 1032 GMI) on alfalfa yield, forage quality and in vitro dry matter digestibility. This objective is in line with the selection of S. meliloti strains in order to maintain high forage yield and quality under future climate conditions. Plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain showed more DM production than those inoculated with 1032GMI; however, these strains did not show significant differences with 102F78 plants. Neutral or acid detergent fibres were not enhanced in plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain under elevated CO(2) or temperature and hence, in vitro dry matter digestibility was unaffected. Crude protein content, an indicator of forage quality, was negatively related to shoot yield. Plants inoculated with 102F78 showed a similar shoot yield to those inoculated with 102F34, but had higher crude protein content at elevated CO(2) and temperature. Under these climate change conditions, 102F78 inoculated plants produced higher quality forage. However, the higher digestibility of plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain under any CO(2) or temperature conditions makes them more suitable for growing under climate change conditions. In general, elevated CO(2) in combination with high temperature (Climate Change scenario) reduced IVDMD and CP content and enhanced fibre content, which means that animal production will be negatively affected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of phosphate deficiency on quorum sensing signaling pathway of Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Najmeh Pakdaman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Phosphorus is one of the most essential macroelements for bacterial cells. Since phosphate (PO4-3 limitation is frequently encountered in soils, bacteria developed some mechanisms in response to this sever condition. Phosphate transporter (PstS and proteins involved in quorum sensing (QS signaling pathway are affected by mediating PhoB, response regulator, following phosphate starvation. QS system of Sinorhizobium meliloti composed of at least three genes of sinI (autoinducer synthase, sinR and expR (autoinducer activated receptor which involved in its free living and symbiotic functions .   Materials and method s: The optical density (OD600 of different S. meliloti transformed strains carrying pLK004 (a pstS promoter-egfp fusion, pLK64 (a sinI promoter-egfp fusion, pLK65 (a sinR promoter-egfp fusion, pLK66 (an expR promoter-egfp fusion and control (promoterless-egfp fusion plasmids were read under different phosphate concentrations of 0.1 (phosphate deficiency, 0.5 and 2 mM (sufficient phosphate at several time points of 16, 24 and 40h. The promoter activity of different genes of pstS, sinI, sinR and expR were measured as emitted fluorescence per bacterial cell density (OD600 under different phosphate concentrations .   Results : By reducing phosphate concentration in the medium, the growth rate of transformed bacteria decreased, especially at 40h. The promoter activity of pstS, sinI and sinR, but not expR, genes was activated following phosphate starvation .   Discussion and conclusion : S. meliloti can upregulate PstS to partly compensate phosphate deficiency in the environment. The gene of sinR is also activated in a PhoB dependent manner as phosphate starvation is encountered. SinR is the activator of sinI, so the upregulation of QS pathway under phosphate deficiency may be facilitate free living and symbiotic bacterial functions .

  17. Inability To Catabolize Galactose Leads to Increased Ability To Compete for Nodule Occupancy in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    A mutant unable to utilize galactose was isolated in Sinorhizobium meliloti strain Rm1021. The mutation was found to be in a gene annotated dgoK1, a putative 2-keto-3-deoxygalactonokinase. The genetic region was isolated on a complementing cosmid and subsequently characterized. Based on genetic and bioinformatic evidence, the locus encodes all five enzymes (galD, dgoK, dgoA, SMc00883, and ilvD1) involved in the De Ley-Doudoroff pathway for galactose catabolism. Although all five genes are present, genetic analysis suggests that the galactonase (SMc00883) and the dehydratase (ilvD1) are dispensable with respect to the ability to catabolize galactose. In addition, we show that the transport of galactose is partially facilitated by the arabinose transporter (AraABC) and that both glucose and galactose compete with arabinose for transport. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) data show that in a dgoK background, the galactose locus is constitutively expressed, and the induction of the ara locus seems to be enhanced. Assays of competition for nodule occupancy show that the inability to catabolize galactose is correlated with an increased ability to compete for nodule occupancy. PMID:22797764

  18. [Factor analysis of interactions between alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) genes that regulate symbiotic nitrogen fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Chuklina, E; Vorob'ev, N I; Onishchuk, O P; Simarov, B V

    2013-04-01

    Factor analysis has been conducted for the data on the interaction between the genes of the root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), which influence the efficiency of symbiosis with leguminous plants, including dctA (encoding succinate permease), dctBD (activating the dctA gene due to binding its enhancer in the presence of succinate), rpoN (activating the promoters of dctA and nitrogenase genes nifHDK), and nifA (activating the nitrogenase genes due to binding their enhancers). The analysis of the alfalfa rhizobia (Sinorhizobium meliloti) recombinants that contain additional copies ofthese genes suggested the antagonistic (epistatic) interaction between nifA and rpoN. It may be associated either with the competition for C compounds imported into the nodules between the energy production and nitrogen assimilation processes or with the competition for redox potentials between the oxidative phosphorylation and nitrogen fixation processes. Since the phenotypic effects of the studied genes depend on the activity of nitrogen export into the aerial parts of plants, we suppose that its accumulation in bacteroids impairs the activation of the nifHDK genes by the NifA protein due to its interaction with the GlnB protein (the nitrogen metabolism regulator) or with the FixLJ and ActSR proteins (the redox potential regulators).

  19. Role of extracellular compounds in Cd-sequestration relative to Cd uptake by bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@epfl.c [Environmental Biophysical Chemistry, IIE-ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Parthasarathy, Nalini [Department of Inorganic, Analytic and Applied Chemistry, University of Geneva, Sciences II, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dedieu, Karine; Toescher, Denis [Environmental Biophysical Chemistry, IIE-ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    The role of bacterially derived compounds in Cd(II) complexation and uptake by bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti wild type (WT) and genetically modified ExoY-mutant, deficient in exopolysaccharide production, was explored combining chemical speciation measurements and assays with living bacteria. Obtained results demonstrated that WT- and ExoY-strains excreted siderophores in comparable amounts, while WT-strain produced much higher amount of exopolysaccharides and less exoproteins. An evaluation of Cd(II) distribution in bacterial suspensions under short term exposure conditions, showed that most of the Cd is bound to bacterial surface envelope, including Cd bound to the cell wall and to the attached extracellular polymeric substances. However, the amount of Cd bound to the dissolved extracellular compounds increases at high Cd(II) concentrations. The implications of these findings to more general understanding of the Cd(II) fate and cycling in the environment is discussed. - Bacterial excreted extracellular compounds play minor role in Cd(II) sequestration relative to bacteria.

  20. Sinorhizobium meliloti YbeY is an endoribonuclease with unprecedented catalytic features, acting as silencing enzyme in riboregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Saramago, Margarida; Peregrina, Alexandra; Robledo, Marta; Matos, Rute G.; Hilker, Rolf; Serrania, Javier; Becker, Anke; Arraiano, Cecilia M.; Jim?nez-Zurdo, Jos? I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Structural and biochemical features suggest that the almost ubiquitous bacterial YbeY protein may serve catalytic and/or Hfq-like protective functions central to small RNA (sRNA)-mediated regulation and RNA metabolism. We have biochemically and genetically characterized the YbeY ortholog of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti (SmYbeY). Co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) with a FLAG-tagged SmYbeY yielded a poor enrichment in RNA species, compared to Hfq CoIP-RNA uncovered previously...

  1. An integrated approach to functional genomics: construction of a novel reporter gene fusion library for Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Alison; Cheng, Jiujun; Sibley, Christopher D; Fong, Ying; Zaheer, Rahat; Patten, Cheryl L; Morton, Richard M; Golding, G Brian; Finan, Turlough M

    2006-11-01

    As a means of investigating gene function, we developed a robust transcription fusion reporter vector to measure gene expression in bacteria. The vector, pTH1522, was used to construct a random insert library for the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome. pTH1522 replicates in Escherichia coli and can be transferred to, but cannot replicate in, S. meliloti. Homologous recombination of the DNA fragments cloned in pTH1522 into the S. meliloti genome generates transcriptional fusions to either the reporter genes gfp(+) and lacZ or gusA and rfp, depending on the orientation of the cloned fragment. Over 12,000 fusion junctions in 6,298 clones were identified by DNA sequence analysis, and the plasmid clones were recombined into S. meliloti. Reporter enzyme activities following growth of these recombinants in complex medium (LBmc) and in minimal medium with glucose or succinate as the sole carbon source allowed the identification of genes highly expressed under one or more growth condition and those expressed at very low to background levels. In addition to generating reporter gene fusions, the vector allows Flp recombinase-directed deletion formation and gene disruption, depending on the nature of the cloned fragment. We report the identification of genes essential for growth on complex medium as deduced from an inability to recover recombinants from pTH1522 clones that carried fragments internal to gene or operon transcripts. A database containing all the gene expression activities together with a web interface showing the precise locations of reporter fusion junctions has been constructed (www.sinorhizobium.org).

  2. Mining the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to develop FRET biosensors for sugars, dicarboxylates and cyclic polyols.

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    Alexandre Bourdès

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensors are powerful tools to detect biologically important ligands in real time. Currently FRET bisosensors are available for twenty-two compounds distributed in eight classes of chemicals (two pentoses, two hexoses, two disaccharides, four amino acids, one nucleobase, two nucleotides, six ions and three phytoestrogens. To expand the number of available FRET biosensors we used the induction profile of the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to systematically screen for new FRET biosensors.Two new vectors were developed for cloning genes for solute-binding proteins (SBPs between those encoding FRET partner fluorescent proteins. In addition to a vector with the widely used cyan and yellow fluorescent protein FRET partners, we developed a vector using orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 FRET partners. From the sixty-nine SBPs tested, seven gave a detectable FRET signal change on binding substrate, resulting in biosensors for D-quinic acid, myo-inositol, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, β-diglucosides (cellobiose and gentiobiose, D-galactose and C4-dicarboxylates (malate, succinate, oxaloacetate and fumarate. To our knowledge, we describe the first two FRET biosensor constructs based on SBPs from Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP transport systems.FRET based on orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 partners allows the use of longer wavelength light, enabling deeper penetration of samples at lower energy and increased resolution with reduced back-ground auto-fluorescence. The FRET biosensors described in this paper for four new classes of compounds; (i cyclic polyols, (ii L-deoxy sugars, (iii β-linked disaccharides and (iv C4-dicarboxylates could be developed to study metabolism in vivo.

  3. Genome-Wide Sensitivity Analysis of the Microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti to Symbiotically Important, Defensin-Like Host Peptides

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    Markus F. F. Arnold

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The model legume species Medicago truncatula expresses more than 700 nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR signaling peptides that mediate the differentiation of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteria into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. NCR peptides are essential for a successful symbiosis in legume plants of the inverted-repeat-lacking clade (IRLC and show similarity to mammalian defensins. In addition to signaling functions, many NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo. Bacterial resistance to these antimicrobial activities is likely to be important for symbiosis. However, the mechanisms used by S. meliloti to resist antimicrobial activity of plant peptides are poorly understood. To address this, we applied a global genetic approach using transposon mutagenesis followed by high-throughput sequencing (Tn-seq to identify S. meliloti genes and pathways that increase or decrease bacterial competitiveness during exposure to the well-studied cationic NCR247 peptide and also to the unrelated model antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. We identified 78 genes and several diverse pathways whose interruption alters S. meliloti resistance to NCR247. These genes encode the following: (i cell envelope polysaccharide biosynthesis and modification proteins, (ii inner and outer membrane proteins, (iii peptidoglycan (PG effector proteins, and (iv non-membrane-associated factors such as transcriptional regulators and ribosome-associated factors. We describe a previously uncharacterized yet highly conserved peptidase, which protects S. meliloti from NCR247 and increases competitiveness during symbiosis. Additionally, we highlight a considerable number of uncharacterized genes that provide the basis for future studies to investigate the molecular basis of symbiotic development as well as chronic pathogenic interactions.

  4. Sinorhizobium meliloti YbeY is an endoribonuclease with unprecedented catalytic features, acting as silencing enzyme in riboregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Peregrina, Alexandra; Robledo, Marta; Matos, Rute G; Hilker, Rolf; Serrania, Javier; Becker, Anke; Arraiano, Cecilia M; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I

    2017-02-17

    Structural and biochemical features suggest that the almost ubiquitous bacterial YbeY protein may serve catalytic and/or Hfq-like protective functions central to small RNA (sRNA)-mediated regulation and RNA metabolism. We have biochemically and genetically characterized the YbeY ortholog of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti (SmYbeY). Co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) with a FLAG-tagged SmYbeY yielded a poor enrichment in RNA species, compared to Hfq CoIP-RNA uncovered previously by a similar experimental setup. Purified SmYbeY behaved as a monomer that indistinctly cleaved single- and double-stranded RNA substrates, a unique ability among bacterial endoribonucleases. SmYbeY-mediated catalysis was supported by the divalent metal ions Mg2+, Mn2+ and Ca2+, which influenced in a different manner cleavage efficiency and reactivity patterns, with Ca2+ specifically blocking activity on double-stranded and some structured RNA molecules. SmYbeY loss-of-function compromised expression of core energy and RNA metabolism genes, whilst promoting accumulation of motility, late symbiotic and transport mRNAs. Some of the latter transcripts are known Hfq-binding sRNA targets and might be SmYbeY substrates. Genetic reporter and in vitro assays confirmed that SmYbeY is required for sRNA-mediated down-regulation of the amino acid ABC transporter prbA mRNA. We have thus discovered a bacterial endoribonuclease with unprecedented catalytic features, acting also as gene silencing enzyme.

  5. Phenotypic and genetic diversity in Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae from drought and salt affected regions of Morocco

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    Udupa Sripada M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae are symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria in root nodules of forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.. In Morocco, alfalfa is usually grown in marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions frequently affected by drought, extremes of temperature and soil pH, soil salinity and heavy metals, which affect biological nitrogen fixing ability of rhizobia and productivity of the host. This study examines phenotypic diversity for tolerance to the above stresses and genotypic diversity at Repetitive Extragenic Pallindromic DNA regions of Sinorhizobium nodulating alfalfa, sampled from marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions of Morocco. Results RsaI digestion of PCR amplified 16S rDNA of the 157 sampled isolates, assigned 136 isolates as S. meliloti and the rest as S. medicae. Further phenotyping of these alfalfa rhizobia for tolerance to the environmental stresses revealed a large degree of variation: 55.41%, 82.16%, 57.96% and 3.18% of the total isolates were tolerant to NaCl (>513 mM, water stress (-1.5 MPa, high temperature (40°C and low pH (3.5, respectively. Sixty-seven isolates of S. meliloti and thirteen isolates of S. medicae that were tolerant to salinity were also tolerant to water stress. Most of the isolates of the two species showed tolerance to heavy metals (Cd, Mn and Zn and antibiotics (chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. The phenotypic clusters observed by the cluster analysis clearly showed adaptations of the S. meliloti and S. medicae strains to the multiple stresses. Genotyping with rep-PCR revealed higher genetic diversity within these phenotypic clusters and classified all the 157 isolates into 148 genotypes. No relationship between genotypic profiles and the phenotypes was observed. The Analysis of Molecular Variance revealed that largest proportion of significant (P Conclusion High degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity is present in S

  6. Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 loss-of-function deletion mutation in chvI and its phenotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxia; Kemp, Jocelyn; Da Fonseca, Isabel O; Equi, Raymie C; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Charles, Trevor C; Sobral, Bruno W S

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCS) are common components of complex regulatory networks and cascades. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, the TCS ExoS/ChvI controls exopolysaccharide succinoglycan production and flagellum biosynthesis. Although this system plays a crucial role in establishing the symbiosis between S. meliloti and its host plant, it is not well characterized. Attempts to generate complete loss-of-function mutations in either exoS or chvI in S. meliloti have been unsuccessful; thus, it was previously suggested that exoS or chvI are essential genes for bacterial cell growth. We constructed a chvI mutant by completely deleting the open reading frame encoding this gene. The mutant strain failed to grow on complex medium, exhibited lower tolerance to acidic condition, produced significantly less poly-3-hydroxybutyrate than the wild type, was hypermotile, and exhibited an altered lipopolysaccharide profile. In addition, this mutant was defective in symbiosis with Medicago truncatula and M. sativa (alfalfa), although it induced root hair deformation as efficiently as the wild type. Together, our results demonstrate that ChvI is intimately involved in regulatory networks involving the cell envelope and metabolism; however, its precise role within the regulatory network remains to be determined.

  7. Global mapping of transcription start sites and promoter motifs in the symbiotic α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium that possesses a large, tripartite genome and engages in a nitrogen fixing symbiosis with its plant hosts. Although much is known about this important model organism, global characterization of genetic regulatory circuits has been hampered by a lack of information about transcription and promoters. Results Using an RNAseq approach and RNA populations representing 16 different growth and stress conditions, we comprehensively mapped S. meliloti transcription start sites (TSS). Our work identified 17,001 TSS that we grouped into six categories based on the genomic context of their transcripts: mRNA (4,430 TSS assigned to 2,657 protein-coding genes), leaderless mRNAs (171), putative mRNAs (425), internal sense transcripts (7,650), antisense RNA (3,720), and trans-encoded sRNAs (605). We used this TSS information to identify transcription factor binding sites and putative promoter sequences recognized by seven of the 15 known S. meliloti σ factors σ70, σ54, σH1, σH2, σE1, σE2, and σE9). Altogether, we predicted 2,770 new promoter sequences, including 1,302 located upstream of protein coding genes and 722 located upstream of antisense RNA or trans-encoded sRNA genes. To validate promoter predictions for targets of the general stress response σ factor, RpoE2 (σE2), we identified rpoE2-dependent genes using microarrays and confirmed TSS for a subset of these by 5′ RACE mapping. Conclusions By identifying TSS and promoters on a global scale, our work provides a firm foundation for the continued study of S. meliloti gene expression with relation to gene organization, σ factors and other transcription factors, and regulatory RNAs. PMID:23497287

  8. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L.) by Sinorhizobium Meliloti at Al-Qassim Regions, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Barakah, F. N.; Mridha, M. A. U.

    2016-01-01

    The nodulation status in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants by Sinorhizobium meliloti under Saudi field condition was assessed in some selected farms in four seasons for two years. In the present study, we also monitored the introduced S. meliloti strains activity under Saudi soil conditions. The samples were collected at regular seasonal intervals from the selected farms. The total number of nodules, morphology of the nodules and the effectiveness of N/sub 2/-fixation was assessed. In general, it was revealed that soils in the selected areas in Saudi Arabia have sufficient bacteria of the proper types to nodulate the alfalfa plants. These nodules are high in number, small in size and white in color. The nodules obtained from most of the selected farms are ineffective for nitrogen fixation. Inoculation of alfalfa seeds with imported S. meliloti strains failed to fix the atmospheric nitrogen sufficiently and also the growth improvement of alfalfa plants. There was a wide variation in the occurrence of number of nodules among the four seasons in two years. It was also observed that summer season severely affected the nodulation making it nearly zero. This low number of nodules exerts a very slow recovery of nodule formation in the next year. The introduced strains were always over competing with the native strains but they did not survive because of hot and dry summer. Nitrogenase activity of the nodules collected from both the inoculated and non-inoculated farms were always very low in all the collected samples, which indicates that the ability of fixing nitrogen by S. meliloti strains in alfalfa under Saudi soils conditions is very low. (author)

  9. Altered susceptibility to infection by Sinorhizobium meliloti and Nectria haematococca in alfalfa roots with altered cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, H-H; Hirsch, A M; Hawes, M C

    2004-07-01

    Most infections of plant roots are initiated in the region of elongation; the mechanism for this tissue-specific localization pattern is unknown. In alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the cell cycle in roots is completed in 48 h instead of 24 h, and border cell number is decreased by more than 99%. These plants were found to exhibit increased root-tip infection by a fungal pathogen and reduced nodule formation by a bacterial symbiont. Thus, the frequency of infection in the region of elongation by Nectria haematocca was unaffected, but infection of the root tip was increased by more than 90%; early stages of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection and nodule morphology were normal, but the frequency of nodulation was fourfold lower than in wild-type roots.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of an active-site mutated hydantoin racemase from S. meliloti have been obtained in the presence and absence of d,l-5-isopropyl-hydantoin and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V M ) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å 3 Da −1 and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio [Department of Cellular and Molecular Interactions, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ultrastructure Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos, IACT (CSIC-U. Granada), P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier [Departamento de Química Física, Bioquímica y Química Inorgánica, Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Edf. CITE I, Universidad de Almería (Spain); Gavira, Jose Antonio, E-mail: jgavira@ugr.es; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma. [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos, IACT (CSIC-U. Granada), P. T. Ciencias de la Salud, Granada 18100 (Spain); Department of Cellular and Molecular Interactions, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-01-01

    Crystals of an active-site mutated hydantoin racemase from S. meliloti have been obtained in the presence and absence of d,l-5-isopropyl-hydantoin and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively.

  12. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti by theTrans-Encoded Small RNA MmgR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Antonio; Ceizel Borella, Germán; Linne, Uwe; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2017-04-15

    Riboregulation has a major role in the fine-tuning of multiple bacterial processes. Among the RNA players, trans -encoded untranslated small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate complex metabolic networks by tuning expression from multiple target genes in response to numerous signals. In Sinorhizobium meliloti , over 400 sRNAs are expressed under different stimuli. The sRNA MmgR (standing for M akes m ore g ranules R egulator) has been of particular interest to us since its sequence and structure are highly conserved among the alphaproteobacteria and its expression is regulated by the amount and quality of the bacterium's available nitrogen source. In this work, we explored the biological role of MmgR in S. meliloti 2011 by characterizing the effect of a deletion of the internal conserved core of mmgR ( mmgR Δ33-51 ). This mutation resulted in larger amounts of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) distributed into more intracellular granules than are found in the wild-type strain. This phenotype was expressed upon cessation of balanced growth owing to nitrogen depletion in the presence of surplus carbon (i.e., at a carbon/nitrogen molar ratio greater than 10). The normal PHB accumulation was complemented with a wild-type mmgR copy but not with unrelated sRNA genes. Furthermore, the expression of mmgR limited PHB accumulation in the wild type, regardless of the magnitude of the C surplus. Quantitative proteomic profiling and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the absence of MmgR results in a posttranscriptional overexpression of both PHB phasin proteins (PhaP1 and PhaP2). Together, our results indicate that the widely conserved alphaproteobacterial MmgR sRNA fine-tunes the regulation of PHB storage in S. meliloti IMPORTANCE High-throughput RNA sequencing has recently uncovered an overwhelming number of trans -encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) in diverse prokaryotes. In the nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterial symbiont of alfalfa root nodules Sinorhizobium meliloti

  13. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  14. Sinorhizobium meliloti sigma factors RpoE1 and RpoE4 are activated in stationary phase in response to sulfite.

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    Bénédicte Bastiat

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are soil bacteria able to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legume plants. Both in soil and in planta, rhizobia spend non-growing periods resembling the stationary phase of in vitro-cultured bacteria. The primary objective of this work was to better characterize gene regulation in this biologically relevant growth stage in Sinorhizobium meliloti. By a tap-tag/mass spectrometry approach, we identified five sigma factors co-purifying with the RNA polymerase in stationary phase: the general stress response regulator RpoE2, the heat shock sigma factor RpoH2, and three extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factors (RpoE1, RpoE3 and RpoE4 belonging to the poorly characterized ECF26 subgroup. We then showed that RpoE1 and RpoE4 i are activated upon metabolism of sulfite-generating compounds (thiosulfate and taurine, ii display overlapping regulatory activities, iii govern a dedicated sulfite response by controlling expression of the sulfite dehydrogenase SorT, iv are activated in stationary phase, likely as a result of endogenous sulfite generation during bacterial growth. We showed that SorT is required for optimal growth of S. meliloti in the presence of sulfite, suggesting that the response governed by RpoE1 and RpoE4 may be advantageous for bacteria in stationary phase either by providing a sulfite detoxification function or by contributing to energy production through sulfite respiration. This paper therefore reports the first characterization of ECF26 sigma factors, the first description of sigma factors involved in control of sulphur metabolism, and the first indication that endogenous sulfite may act as a signal for regulation of gene expression upon entry of bacteria in stationary phase.

  15. Contribution of NFP LysM domains to the recognition of Nod factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection.

  16. Contribution of NFP LysM domains to the recognition of Nod factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bensmihen

    Full Text Available The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs, produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions, we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection.

  17. Effect of a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain with a modified putA gene on the rhizosphere microbial community of alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Villadas, Pablo J; Toro, Nicolás

    2002-09-01

    The success of a rhizobial inoculant in the soil depends to a large extent on its capacity to compete against indigenous strains. M403, a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain with enhanced competitiveness for nodule occupancy, was recently constructed by introducing a plasmid containing an extra copy of a modified putA (proline dehydrogenase) gene. This strain and M401, a control strain carrying the same plasmid without the modified gene, were used as soil inoculants for alfalfa in a contained field release experiment at León, Spain. In this study, we determined the effects of these two strains on the indigenous microbial community. 16S rRNA genes were obtained from the rhizosphere of alfalfa inoculated with strain M403 or strain M401 or from noninoculated plants by amplification of DNA from soil with bacterial group-specific primers. These genes were analyzed and compared by restriction fragment length polymorphism and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis. The results allowed us to differentiate between alterations in the microbial community apparently caused by inoculation and by the rhizosphere effect and seasonal fluctuations induced by the alfalfa plants and by the environment. Only moderate inoculation-dependent effects could be detected, while the alfalfa plants appeared to have a much stronger influence on the microbial community.

  18. MALDI mass spectrometry-assisted molecular imaging of metabolites during nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Gemperline, Erin; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Chen, Ruibing; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Howes-Podoll, Maegen; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2013-07-01

    Symbiotic associations between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia culminate in the formation of specialized organs called root nodules, in which the rhizobia fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer it to the plant. Efficient biological nitrogen fixation depends on metabolites produced by and exchanged between both partners. The Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for dissecting this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis because of the availability of genetic information for both symbiotic partners. Here, we employed a powerful imaging technique - matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)/mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) - to study metabolite distribution in roots and root nodules of M. truncatula during nitrogen fixation. The combination of an efficient, novel MALDI matrix [1,8-bis(dimethyl-amino) naphthalene, DMAN] with a conventional matrix 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) allowed detection of a large array of organic acids, amino acids, sugars, lipids, flavonoids and their conjugates with improved coverage. Ion density maps of representative metabolites are presented and correlated with the nitrogen fixation process. We demonstrate differences in metabolite distribution between roots and nodules, and also between fixing and non-fixing nodules produced by plant and bacterial mutants. Our study highlights the benefits of using MSI for detecting differences in metabolite distributions in plant biology. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and structure solution of MosA, a dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Sinorhizobium meliloti L5-30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, Yvonne A.; Phenix, Christopher P.; Puttick, Jennifer; Nienaber, Kurt; Palmer, David R. J.; Delbaere, Louis T. J.

    2005-01-01

    MosA from S. meliloti L5-30 has been crystallized in solution with pyruvate and the 2.3 Å resolution structure has been solved by molecular replacement using E. coli dihydrodipicolinate synthase as the model. The structure of MosA, a dihydrodipicolinate synthase and reported methyltransferase from Sinorhizobium meliloti, has been solved using molecular replacement with Escherichia coli dihydrodipicolinate synthase as the model. A crystal grown in the presence of pyruvate diffracted X-rays to 2.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 69.14, b = 138.87, c = 124.13 Å

  20. PhoU Allows Rapid Adaptation to High Phosphate Concentrations by Modulating PstSCAB Transport Rate in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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    diCenzo, George C; Sharthiya, Harsh; Nanda, Anish; Zamani, Maryam; Finan, Turlough M

    2017-09-15

    Maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is essential for cellular life. The PhoU protein has emerged as a key regulator of this process in bacteria, and it is suggested to modulate phosphate import by PstSCAB and control activation of the phosphate limitation response by the PhoR-PhoB two-component system. However, a proper understanding of PhoU has remained elusive due to numerous complications of mutating phoU , including loss of viability and the genetic instability of the mutants. Here, we developed two sets of strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti that overcame these limitations and allowed a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of the biological and molecular activities of PhoU. The data showed that phoU cannot be deleted in the presence of phosphate unless PstSCAB is inactivated also. However, phoU deletions were readily recovered in phosphate-free media, and characterization of these mutants revealed that addition of phosphate to the environment resulted in toxic levels of PstSCAB-mediated phosphate accumulation. Phosphate uptake experiments indicated that PhoU significantly decreased the PstSCAB transport rate specifically in phosphate-replete cells but not in phosphate-starved cells and that PhoU could rapidly respond to elevated environmental phosphate concentrations and decrease the PstSCAB transport rate. Site-directed mutagenesis results suggested that the ability of PhoU to respond to phosphate levels was independent of the conformation of the PstSCAB transporter. Additionally, PhoU-PhoU and PhoU-PhoR interactions were detected using a bacterial two-hybrid screen. We propose that PhoU modulates PstSCAB and PhoR-PhoB in response to local, internal fluctuations in phosphate concentrations resulting from PstSCAB-mediated phosphate import. IMPORTANCE Correct maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is critical in all kingdoms of life and in bacteria involves the PhoU protein. This work provides novel insights into the role of the Sinorhizobium

  1. Nitrate reduction associated with respiration in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 is performed by a membrane-bound molybdoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Felix M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Lucca, María E; Perotti, Nora I; Brondino, Carlos D

    2011-10-01

    The purification and biochemical characterization of the respiratory membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (Sm NR) is reported together with the optimal conditions for cell growth and enzyme production. The best biomass yield was obtained under aerobic conditions in a fed-batch system using Luria-Bertani medium with glucose as carbon source. The highest level of Sm NR production was achieved using microaerobic conditions with the medium supplemented with both nitrate and nitrite. Sm NR is a mononuclear Mo-protein belonging to the DMSO reductase family isolated as a heterodimeric enzyme containing two subunits of 118 and 45 kDa. Protein characterization by mass spectrometry showed homology with respiratory nitrate reductases. UV-Vis spectra of as-isolated and dithionite reduced Sm NR showed characteristic absorption bands of iron-sulfur and heme centers. Kinetic studies indicate that Sm NR follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism (K (m) = 97 ± 11 μM, V = 9.4 ± 0.5 μM min(-1), and k (cat) = 12.1 ± 0.6 s(-1)) and is inhibited by azide, chlorate, and cyanide with mixed inhibition patterns. Physiological and kinetic studies indicate that molybdenum is essential for NR activity and that replacement of this metal for tungsten inhibits the enzyme. Although no narGHI gene cluster has been annotated in the genome of rhizobia, the biochemical characterization indicates that Sm NR is a Mo-containing NR enzyme with molecular organization similar to NarGHI.

  2. [Subcloning and sequencing of DNA fragment related to salt tolerance in Sinorhizobium meliloti 042B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, S; Fan, Z; Chen, X; Yang, S

    2001-02-01

    A 4 kb ClaI DNA fragment related to salt tolerance from S. meliloti 042B was digested by HindIII down 2.4 kb fragment, and a 1.6 kb ClaII-HindIII fragment was retained on plasmid pML122. Then, the 2.4 kb DNA fragment was ligated with plasmid pBBR1-MCS2, and the recombinant plasmid was transformed to E. coli DH5 alpha, and transformant GS2 was obtained. Three-parental mating experiments were carried out with transformant GS2 as donor, salt sensitive strains GZ17 as recipient and pRK2013 as helper plasmid, then the transconjugant GG2 was selected on FY plates containing kanamycin and 0.4 mol/L NaCl. The remaining DNA fragment was self ligated with pML122 and then transformed into E. coli S17-1 and transformat GS0 was obtained. Two-parental mating experiment was carried out with transformant GS0 as donor and salt sensitive strain GZ17 as recipient, but no transconjugant was obtained on the FY plates. Then, the 2.4 kb HindIII DNA fragment was ligated into sequencing vector pGEM-7Zf(+) for sequencing. The result of sequencing and analysis showed that the 2.4 kb DNA fragment contained three ORFs. According to the result of sequencing, further subcloning was conducted and 1.9 kb HindIII-Sac II DNA fragment related to salt tolerance was obtained.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Polyhydroxybutyrate Cycle Mutants Reveals Discrete Loci Connecting Nitrogen Utilization and Carbon Storage in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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    D'Alessio, Maya; Nordeste, Ricardo; Doxey, Andrew C; Charles, Trevor C

    2017-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and glycogen polymers are produced by bacteria as carbon storage compounds under unbalanced growth conditions. To gain insights into the transcriptional mechanisms controlling carbon storage in Sinorhizobium meliloti , we investigated the global transcriptomic response to the genetic disruption of key genes in PHB synthesis and degradation and in glycogen synthesis. Under both nitrogen-limited and balanced growth conditions, transcriptomic analysis was performed with genetic mutants deficient in PHB synthesis ( phbA , phbB , phbAB , and phbC ), PHB degradation ( bdhA , phaZ , and acsA2 ), and glycogen synthesis ( glgA1 ). Three distinct genomic regions of the pSymA megaplasmid exhibited altered expression in the wild type and the PHB cycle mutants that was not seen in the glycogen synthesis mutant. An Fnr family transcriptional motif was identified in the upstream regions of a cluster of genes showing similar transcriptional patterns across the mutants. This motif was found at the highest density in the genomic regions with the strongest transcriptional effect, and the presence of this motif upstream of genes in these regions was significantly correlated with decreased transcript abundance. Analysis of the genes in the pSymA regions revealed that they contain a genomic overrepresentation of Fnr family transcription factor-encoding genes. We hypothesize that these loci, containing mostly nitrogen utilization, denitrification, and nitrogen fixation genes, are regulated in response to the intracellular carbon/nitrogen balance. These results indicate a transcriptional regulatory association between intracellular carbon levels (mediated through the functionality of the PHB cycle) and the expression of nitrogen metabolism genes. IMPORTANCE The ability of bacteria to store carbon and energy as intracellular polymers uncouples cell growth and replication from nutrient uptake and provides flexibility in the use of resources as they are available to

  4. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

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    Debora Fabiola Veliz Vallejos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4. However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa and Trifolium repens (white clover showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation

  5. The tep1 gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti coding for a putative transmembrane efflux protein and N-acetyl glucosamine affect nod gene expression and nodulation of alfalfa plants

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    Soto María

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil bacteria collectively known as Rhizobium, characterized by their ability to establish beneficial symbiosis with legumes, share several common characteristics with pathogenic bacteria when infecting the host plant. Recently, it was demonstrated that a fadD mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti is altered in the control of swarming, a type of co-ordinated movement previously associated with pathogenicity, and is also impaired in nodulation efficiency on alfalfa roots. In the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris, a fadD homolog (rpfB forms part of a cluster of genes involved in the regulation of pathogenicity factors. In this work, we have investigated the role in swarming and symbiosis of SMc02161, a S. meliloti fadD-linked gene. Results The SMc02161 locus in S. meliloti shows similarities with members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS of transporters. A S. meliloti null-mutant shows increased sensitivity to chloramphenicol. This indication led us to rename the locus tep1 for transmembrane efflux protein. The lack of tep1 does not affect the appearance of swarming motility. Interestingly, nodule formation efficiency on alfalfa plants is improved in the tep1 mutant during the first days of the interaction though nod gene expression is lower than in the wild type strain. Curiously, a nodC mutation or the addition of N-acetyl glucosamine to the wild type strain lead to similar reductions in nod gene expression as in the tep1 mutant. Moreover, aminosugar precursors of Nod factors inhibit nodulation. Conclusion tep1 putatively encodes a transmembrane protein which can confer chloramphenicol resistance in S. meliloti by expelling the antibiotic outside the bacteria. The improved nodulation of alfalfa but reduced nod gene expression observed in the tep1 mutant suggests that Tep1 transports compounds which influence nodulation. In contrast to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, we show that in S. meliloti there is no feedback regulation

  6. The genome, proteome and phylogenetic analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti phage ΦM12, the founder of a new group of T4-superfamily phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Tess E; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Jones, Kathryn M

    2014-02-01

    Phage ΦM12 is an important transducing phage of the nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Here we report the genome, phylogenetic analysis, and proteome of ΦM12, the first report of the genome and proteome of a rhizobium-infecting T4-superfamily phage. The structural genes of ΦM12 are most similar to T4-superfamily phages of cyanobacteria. ΦM12 is the first reported T4-superfamily phage to lack genes encoding class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and exonuclease dexA, and to possess a class II coenzyme B12-dependent RNR. ΦM12's novel collection of genes establishes it as the founder of a new group of T4-superfamily phages, fusing features of cyanophages and phages of enteric bacteria. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of a partner switching system regulating c-di-GMP levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti. Implication in the synthesis of a novel exopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Baena Ropero, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Biología. Fecha de lectura: 04-02-2016 Esta tesis tiene embargado el acceso al texto completo hasta el 04-08-2017 Sinorhizobium meliloti produce un β-D-glucano de enlaces alternos (1→3) (1→4) (ML β-glucano) en respuesta a altos niveles de diguanilato cíclico (di-GMP-c). Dos proteínas, BgsB y BgsA, son las responsables de la síntesis, siendo BgsA la glucano sintasa que sensa dichos ni...

  8. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Tatum, Kelsey B; Lynn, Jason S; Brewer, Tess E; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Jones, Kathryn M

    2015-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long, contractile tail

  9. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interaction.

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    L David Kuykendall

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential 'accessory' genes for nitrogen fixation (nif, nodulation and host specificity (nod. A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,' is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' genome. Only two 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na(+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (≤ E-10 with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies mutational

  10. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-07-11

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia.

  11. [The effect of combined and separate inoculation of alfalfa plants with Azospirillum lipoferum and Sinorhizobium meliloti on denitrification and nitrogen-fixing activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furina, E K; Bonartseva, G A

    2007-01-01

    The effects of associative nitrogen fixer Azospirillum lipoferum strain 137 and root nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti after combined and separate inoculation of alfalfa seedlings on the background of mineral nitrogen applied at various times were studied. It was demonstrated that exudates of the alfalfa seedlings with the first pair of cotyledonary leaves already provide a high activity of these bacteria in the rhizosphere. To 74.6% of the introduced nitrate was transformed into N2O when the binary preparation of these bacteria was used. In an extended experiment (30 days), an active reduction of nitrates to N2O (11 micromol N2O/pot x 24 h) with inhibition of nitrogen fixation was observed in all of the experimental variants during the formation of legume-rhizobial and associative symbioses and simultaneous introduction of nitrates and bacteria. The most active enzyme fixation was observed in the case of a late (after 14 days) application of nitrates in the variants with both separate inoculations and inoculation with the binary preparation of A. lipoferum and S. meliloti. Separation in time of the application of bacterial preparations and mineral nitrogen assisted its preservation in all of the experimental variants. The variant of alfalfa inoculation with the binary preparation of A. lipoferum and S. meliloti and application of nitrates 2 weeks after inoculation was optimal for active nitrogen fixation (224.7 C2H4 nmol/flask x 24 h) and low denitrification activity (1.8 x micromol N2O/flask x 24 h). These results are useful in applied developments aimed at the use of bacterial and mineral fertilizers for leguminous plants.

  12. Malic Enzyme Cofactor and Domain Requirements for Symbiotic N2 Fixation by Sinorhizobium meliloti▿ †

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    Mitsch, Michael J.; Cowie, Alison; Finan, Turlough M.

    2007-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent malic enzyme (DME) and the NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (TME) of Sinorhizobium meliloti are representatives of a distinct class of malic enzymes that contain a 440-amino-acid N-terminal region homologous to other malic enzymes and a 330-amino-acid C-terminal region with similarity to phosphotransacetylase enzymes (PTA). We have shown previously that dme mutants of S. meliloti fail to fix N2 (Fix−) in alfalfa root nodules, whereas tme mutants are unimpaired in their N2-fixing ability (Fix+). Here we report that the amount of DME protein in bacteroids is 10 times greater than that of TME. We therefore investigated whether increased TME activity in nodules would allow TME to function in place of DME. The tme gene was placed under the control of the dme promoter, and despite elevated levels of TME within bacteroids, no symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurred in dme mutant strains. Conversely, expression of dme from the tme promoter resulted in a large reduction in DME activity and symbiotic N2 fixation. Hence, TME cannot replace the symbiotic requirement for DME. In further experiments we investigated the DME PTA-like domain and showed that it is not required for N2 fixation. Thus, expression of a DME C-terminal deletion derivative or the Escherichia coli NAD+-dependent malic enzyme (sfcA), both of which lack the PTA-like region, restored wild-type N2 fixation to a dme mutant. Our results have defined the symbiotic requirements for malic enzyme and raise the possibility that a constant high ratio of NADPH + H+ to NADP in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids prevents TME from functioning in N2-fixing bacteroids. PMID:17071765

  13. Identification and characterization of the intracellular poly-3-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase enzyme PhaZ of Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Zachertowska Alicja

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. meliloti forms indeterminate nodules on the roots of its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa. Bacteroids of indeterminate nodules are terminally differentiated and, unlike their non-terminally differentiated counterparts in determinate nodules, do not accumulate large quantities of Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB during symbiosis. PhaZ is in intracellular PHB depolymerase; it represents the first enzyme in the degradative arm of the PHB cycle in S. meliloti and is the only enzyme in this half of the PHB cycle that remains uncharacterized. Results The S. meliloti phaZ gene was identified by in silico analysis, the ORF was cloned, and a S. meliloti phaZ mutant was constructed. This mutant exhibited increased PHB accumulation during free-living growth, even when grown under non-PHB-inducing conditions. The phaZ mutant demonstrated no reduction in symbiotic capacity; interestingly, analysis of the bacteroids showed that this mutant also accumulated PHB during symbiosis. This mutant also exhibited a decreased capacity to tolerate long-term carbon starvation, comparable to that of other PHB cycle mutants. In contrast to other PHB cycle mutants, the S. meliloti phaZ mutant did not exhibit any decrease in rhizosphere competitiveness; however, this mutant did exhibit a significant increase in succinoglycan biosynthesis. Conclusions S. meliloti bacteroids retain the capacity to synthesize PHB during symbiosis; interestingly, accumulation does not occur at the expense of symbiotic performance. phaZ mutants are not compromised in their capacity to compete for nodulation in the rhizosphere, perhaps due to increased succinoglycan production resulting from upregulation of the succinoglycan biosynthetic pathway. The reduced survival capacity of free-living cells unable to access their accumulated stores of PHB suggests that PHB is a crucial metabolite under adverse conditions.

  14. Pseudoazurin from Sinorhizobium meliloti as an electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase: influence of the redox partner on the reduction potentials of the enzyme copper centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Félix M; Marangon, Jacopo; Neuman, Nicolás I; Cristaldi, Julio C; Brambilla, Silvina M; Guerrero, Sergio A; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2014-08-01

    Pseudoazurin (Paz) is the physiological electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase (Nir), which catalyzes the reduction of NO2 (-) to NO. The Nir reaction mechanism involves the reduction of the type 1 (T1) copper electron transfer center by the external physiological electron donor, intramolecular electron transfer from the T1 copper center to the T2 copper center, and nitrite reduction at the type 2 (T2) copper catalytic center. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of Paz from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (SmPaz), the ability of SmPaz to act as an electron donor partner of S. meliloti 2011 Nir (SmNir), and the redox properties of the metal centers involved in the electron transfer chain. Gel filtration chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis together with UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies revealed that as-purified SmPaz is a mononuclear copper-containing protein that has a T1 copper site in a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry. The SmPaz/SmNir interaction investigated electrochemically showed that SmPaz serves as an efficient electron donor to SmNir. The formal reduction potentials of the T1 copper center in SmPaz and the T1 and T2 copper centers in SmNir, evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and by UV-vis- and EPR-mediated potentiometric titrations, are against an efficient Paz T1 center to Nir T1 center to Nir T2 center electron transfer. EPR experiments proved that as a result of the SmPaz/SmNir interaction in the presence of nitrite, the order of the reduction potentials of SmNir reversed, in line with T1 center to T2 center electron transfer being thermodynamically more favorable.

  15. Transcriptome Response to Heavy Metals in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 Reveals New Metal Resistance Determinants That Also Promote Bioremediation by Medicago lupulina in Metal-Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingmei; Jiao, Shuo; Gao, Enting; Song, Xiuyong; Li, Zhefei; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2017-10-15

    The symbiosis of the highly metal-resistant Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 and Medicago lupulina has been considered an efficient tool for bioremediation of heavy metal-polluted soils. However, the metal resistance mechanisms of S. meliloti CCNWSX00200 have not been elucidated in detail. Here we employed a comparative transcriptome approach to analyze the defense mechanisms of S. meliloti CCNWSX00200 against Cu or Zn exposure. Six highly upregulated transcripts involved in Cu and Zn resistance were identified through deletion mutagenesis, including genes encoding a multicopper oxidase (CueO), an outer membrane protein (Omp), sulfite oxidoreductases (YedYZ), and three hypothetical proteins (a CusA-like protein, a FixH-like protein, and an unknown protein), and the corresponding mutant strains showed various degrees of sensitivity to multiple metals. The Cu-sensitive mutant (Δ cueO ) and three mutants that were both Cu and Zn sensitive (Δ yedYZ , Δ cusA -like, and Δ fixH -like) were selected for further study of the effects of these metal resistance determinants on bioremediation. The results showed that inoculation with the Δ cueO mutant severely inhibited infection establishment and nodulation of M. lupulina under Cu stress, while inoculation with the Δ yedYZ and Δ fixH -like mutants decreased just the early infection frequency and nodulation under Cu and Zn stresses. In contrast, inoculation with the Δ cusA -like mutant almost led to loss of the symbiotic capacity of M. lupulina to even grow in uncontaminated soil. Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme activity and metal accumulation in roots of M. lupulina inoculated with all mutants were lower than those with the wild-type strain. These results suggest that heavy metal resistance determinants may promote bioremediation by directly or indirectly influencing formation of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. IMPORTANCE Rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been promoted as an appropriate tool for bioremediation of heavy

  16. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Chiara Santi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5 LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  17. Influence of different Sinorhizobium meliloti inocula on abundance of genes involved in nitrogen transformations in the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Katarina Huić; Schauss, Kristina; Hai, Brigitte; Sikora, Sanja; Redzepović, Sulejman; Radl, Viviane; Schloter, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Inoculation of leguminous seeds with selected rhizobial strains is practised in agriculture to ameliorate the plant yield by enhanced root nodulation and nitrogen uptake of the plant. However, effective symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia does not only depend on the capacity of nitrogen fixation but also on the entire nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere. We investigated the influence of seed inoculation with two indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti strains exhibiting different efficiency concerning plant growth promotion on nitrogen turnover processes in the rhizosphere during the growth of alfalfa. Quantification of six target genes (bacterial amoA, nirK, nirS, nosZ, nifH and archaeal amoA) within the nitrogen cycle was performed in rhizosphere samples before nodule formation, at bud development and at the late flowering stage. The results clearly demonstrated that effectiveness of rhizobial inocula is related to abundance of nifH genes in the late flowering phase of alfalfa. Moreover, other genes involved in nitrogen turnover had been affected by the inocula, e.g. higher numbers of amoA copies were observed during flowering when the more effective strain had been inoculated. However, the respective gene abundances differed overall to a greater extent between the three plant development stages than between the inoculation variants.

  18. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Chiara; Molesini, Barbara; Guzzo, Flavia; Pii, Youry; Vitulo, Nicola; Pandolfini, Tiziana

    2017-12-19

    Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5) LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT) and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  19. Structure, proteome and genome of Sinorhizobium meliloti phage ΦM5: A virus with LUZ24-like morphology and a highly mosaic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Sena-Velez, Marta; Washburn, Brian K; Platt, Georgia N; Lu, Stephen; Brewer, Tess E; Lynn, Jason S; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Jones, Kathryn M

    2017-12-01

    Bacteriophages of nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria are revealing a wealth of novel structures, diverse enzyme combinations and genomic features. Here we report the cryo-EM structure of the phage capsid at 4.9-5.7Å-resolution, the phage particle proteome, and the genome of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting Podovirus ΦM5. This is the first structure of a phage with a capsid and capsid-associated structural proteins related to those of the LUZ24-like viruses that infect Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Like many other Podoviruses, ΦM5 is a T=7 icosahedron with a smooth capsid and short, relatively featureless tail. Nonetheless, this group is phylogenetically quite distinct from Podoviruses of the well-characterized T7, P22, and epsilon 15 supergroups. Structurally, a distinct bridge of density that appears unique to ΦM5 reaches down the body of the coat protein to the extended loop that interacts with the next monomer in a hexamer, perhaps stabilizing the mature capsid. Further, the predicted tail fibers of ΦM5 are quite different from those of enteric bacteria phages, but have domains in common with other rhizophages. Genomically, ΦM5 is highly mosaic. The ΦM5 genome is 44,005bp with 357bp direct terminal repeats (DTRs) and 58 unique ORFs. Surprisingly, the capsid structural module, the tail module, the DNA-packaging terminase, the DNA replication module and the integrase each appear to be from a different lineage. One of the most unusual features of ΦM5 is its terminase whose large subunit is quite different from previously-described short-DTR-generating packaging machines and does not fit into any of the established phylogenetic groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Sinorhizobium meliloti strains isolated from the roots of Medicago sativa in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Nakhaei Moghaddam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Rhizobium-legume interaction leads to biological nitrogen-fixation and increases nitrogen of soil. The aim of this study was to characterize the properties of Sinorhizobium isolates from the roots of alfalfa plantsin Iran. Materials and methods: Bacteria were isolated in yeast extract mannitol Agar and confirmed by plant infection test. After evaluation from the point of morphological and biochemical properties, a fragment of 16S rDNA gene with a size of approximately 1500 base pair was amplified using fD1 and rD1 primers. PCR (polymerase chain reaction products were analyzed for digestion pattern by Taq1 endonuclease. Results: 63 bacteria were isolated from homogenized nodules. 42 isolates generated nodules in three replicates in infection test. Of the 42 isolates 8, were resistant to salinity. Seven isolates had better growth than others at pH 4. All isolates were resistant to CuCl2 (0.5 mmol, CdCl2 (0.65 mmol, MnSO4 (0.75 and 1.5 mmol and ZnSO4 (0.125 mmol. Isolates S3Q and S22K were more resistant to salinity, acidity, temperature and heavy metals stresses. PCR products of all bacteria had the same restricted profile after digestion by Taq1 nuclease. Discussion and conclusion: The results showed that among isolated bacteria, there were some differences in the resistance to salinity, acidity, temperature and heavy metals stresses.  Identification of native strains of rhizobia, especially strains resistant to salinity, temperature, heavy metals and acidity could be valuable due to their potentiality for using biological fertilizers in harsh conditions.

  1. A comparative genomics screen identifies a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 sodM-like gene strongly expressed within host plant nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queiroux Clothilde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used the genomic data in the Integrated Microbial Genomes system of the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute to make predictions about rhizobial open reading frames that play a role in nodulation of host plants. The genomic data was screened by searching for ORFs conserved in α-proteobacterial rhizobia, but not conserved in closely-related non-nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacteria. Results Using this approach, we identified many genes known to be involved in nodulation or nitrogen fixation, as well as several new candidate genes. We knocked out selected new genes and assayed for the presence of nodulation phenotypes and/or nodule-specific expression. One of these genes, SMc00911, is strongly expressed by bacterial cells within host plant nodules, but is expressed minimally by free-living bacterial cells. A strain carrying an insertion mutation in SMc00911 is not defective in the symbiosis with host plants, but in contrast to expectations, this mutant strain is able to out-compete the S. meliloti 1021 wild type strain for nodule occupancy in co-inoculation experiments. The SMc00911 ORF is predicted to encode a “SodM-like” (superoxide dismutase-like protein containing a rhodanese sulfurtransferase domain at the N-terminus and a chromate-resistance superfamily domain at the C-terminus. Several other ORFs (SMb20360, SMc01562, SMc01266, SMc03964, and the SMc01424-22 operon identified in the screen are expressed at a moderate level by bacteria within nodules, but not by free-living bacteria. Conclusions Based on the analysis of ORFs identified in this study, we conclude that this comparative genomics approach can identify rhizobial genes involved in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with host plants, although none of the newly identified genes were found to be essential for this process.

  2. Overexpression, purification, and biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of copper-containing nitrite reductase from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011. Study of the interaction of the catalytic copper center with nitrite and NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Félix M; Guerrero, Sergio A; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2012-09-01

    The entire nirK gene coding for a putative copper-nitrite reductase (Nir) from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (Sm) was cloned and overexpressed heterologously in Escherichia coli for the first time. The spectroscopic and molecular properties of the enzyme indicate that SmNir is a green Nir with homotrimeric structure (42.5 kDa/subunit) containing two copper atoms per monomer, one of type 1 and the other of type 2. SmNir follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism and is inhibited by cyanide. EPR spectra of the as-purified enzyme exhibit two magnetically different components associated with type 1 and type 2 copper centers in a 1:1 ratio. EPR characterization of the copper species obtained upon interaction of SmNir with nitrite, and catalytically-generated and exogenous NO reveals the formation of a Cu-NO EPR active species not detected before in closely related Nirs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. La simbiosis fijadora de nitrógeno Sinorhizobium meliloti-alfalfa: aproximaciones ómicas aplicadas a la identificación y caracterización de determinantes genéticos del rizobio asociados a la colonización temprana de la raíz de alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    OpenAIRE

    Salas, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti es una α-proteobacteria capaz de establecer asociaciones simbióticas con plantas de los géneros Medicago, Melilotus y Trigonella. Esta asociación es el resultado de un complejo diálogo molecular entre los simbiontes, que se diferencian a lo largo de la interacción para dar lugar a un nuevo órgano en las raíces de las plantas, el nódulo fijador de nitrógeno. El nicho simbiótico accesible a los rizobios está naturalmente limitado, y resulta ocupado por aquellas cepas que ...

  4. Estudio del efecto de la interacción entre aumento de CO₂, temperatura y simbiosis con diferentes cepas de Sinorhizobium meliloti en la fotosíntesis, fijación de N₂ y calidad de la alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv Aragón)

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, A. (Álvaro); Irigoyen, J.J. (Juan José); Erice, G. (Gorka)

    2012-01-01

    El objetivo general del estudio realizado, fue investigar la respuesta de plantas de alfalfa inoculadas con diferentes cepas de Sinorhizobium meliloti (102F78, 102F34 y 1032GMI) frente al aumento de CO₂ y temperatura. Los objetivos parciales planteados y desarrollados en los distintos capítulos de la memoria han sido: - Capítulo 1: Comprobar si plantas de alfalfa exclusivamente fijadoras de N₂ inoculadas con la cepa 102F78 tienen un aporte deficiente de N desde el nódulo que limita la res...

  5. Genotypic characterization of indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    . E-mail: S.Udupa@cgiar. ... estimate biological diversity exists in the native rhizobia populations, in order to understand the ..... be considered a standard method for the identification of bacteria at the family, genus and species ...

  6. NAD(P)+-malic enzyme mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234, but not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, maintain symbiotic N2 fixation capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip; Finan, Turlough M

    2012-04-01

    C(4)-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N(2)-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD(+)-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N(2) fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N(2) fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N(2) at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N(2)-fixing activity (Fix(-)). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix(-) phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix(-) nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)(+)-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N(2) fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s).

  7. Denitrification by Rhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, A.

    1996-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains were investigated for their denitrification activity as free-living cells and in nodules on lucerne (Medicago sativa) roots. They were also investigated for presence of nitrous oxide reductase (nos) activity and for genes using a nosZ probe derived from the Pseudomonas stutzeri. To decide whether R. meliloti strains used as inoculants contribute to the total denitrification activity in a lucerne ley, strains with different denitrifying capacities were used in field and laboratory experiments. The nitrate reduction activity of R. meliloti during anaerobic respiration was compared with that of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A great diversity in the denitrification activity was found within strains of R. meliloti, and four of thirteen investigated strains showed an obvious denitrification activity. Two denitrifying bacteria were used as references, one strain each of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and P. aeruginosa. All but one of the R. meliloti strains hybridized to the PstI-fragment of the nosZ-gene from P. stutzeri. Two sizes of the hybridizing fragment, 5 and 7 kb, were noticed. Nos activity was only shown in three R. meliloti strains, and these were all characterized by a high denitrification activity. The potential denitrification activity was about 20, 40, and 80 times higher than the actual denitrification activity for lucerne, fallow, and grass, respectively. The potential denitrification activity was almost the same in lucerne and grass planted soils. Compared with the unplanted soil, the presence of lucerne roots in the soil increased the actual denitrification activity, while roots of both plant species, grass and lucerne, increased the potential denitrification activity in the soil. 32 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  8. The RpiR-Like Repressor IolR Regulates Inositol Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Petra R. A.; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and d-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5′-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3′) in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-d-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA. PMID:21784930

  9. NADP+ -dependent malic enzyme of Rhizobium meliloti.

    OpenAIRE

    Driscoll, B T; Finan, T M

    1996-01-01

    The bacterium Rhizobium meliloti, which forms N2-fixing root nodules on alfalfa, has two distinct malic enzymes; one is NADP+ dependent, while a second has maximal activity when NAD+ is the coenzyme. The diphosphopyridine nucleotide (NAD+)-dependent malic enzyme (DME) is required for symbiotic N2 fixation, likely as part of a pathway for the conversion of C4-dicarboxylic acids to acetyl coenzyme A in N2-fixing bacteroids. Here, we report the cloning and localization of the tme gene (encoding ...

  10. The symbiotic biofilm of Sinorhizobium fredii SMH12, necessary for successful colonization and symbiosis of Glycine max cv Osumi, is regulated by Quorum Sensing systems and inducing flavonoids via NodD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pérez-Montaño

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface components, especially exopolysaccharides, in combination with bacterial Quorum Sensing signals are crucial for the formation of biofilms in most species studied so far. Biofilm formation allows soil bacteria to colonize their surrounding habitat and survive common environmental stresses such as desiccation and nutrient limitation. This mode of life is often essential for survival in bacteria of the genera Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium. The role of biofilm formation in symbiosis has been investigated in detail for Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. However, for S. fredii this process has not been studied. In this work we have demonstrated that biofilm formation is crucial for an optimal root colonization and symbiosis between S. fredii SMH12 and Glycine max cv Osumi. In this bacterium, nod-gene inducing flavonoids and the NodD1 protein are required for the transition of the biofilm structure from monolayer to microcolony. Quorum Sensing systems are also required for the full development of both types of biofilms. In fact, both the nodD1 mutant and the lactonase strain (the lactonase enzyme prevents AHL accumulation are defective in soybean root colonization. The impairment of the lactonase strain in its colonization ability leads to a decrease in the symbiotic parameters. Interestingly, NodD1 together with flavonoids activates certain quorum sensing systems implicit in the development of the symbiotic biofilm. Thus, S. fredii SMH12 by means of a unique key molecule, the flavonoid, efficiently forms biofilm, colonizes the legume roots and activates the synthesis of Nod factors, required for successfully symbiosis.

  11. Two Plant Bacteria, S. meliloti and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, Share Functional znuABC Homologues That Encode for a High Affinity Zinc Uptake System

    OpenAIRE

    Vahling-Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Zhou, Huasong; Benyon, Lesley; Morgan, J. Kent; Duan, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    The Znu system, encoded for by znuABC, can be found in multiple genera of bacteria and has been shown to be responsible for the import of zinc under low zinc conditions. Although this high-affinity uptake system is known to be important for both growth and/or pathogenesis in bacteria, it has not been functionally characterized in a plant-associated bacterium. A single homologue of this system has been identified in the plant endosymbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, while two homologous systems w...

  12. The Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 MucR1 Global Regulator Is Connected With the nod Regulon and Is Required for Efficient Symbiosis With Lotus burttii and Glycine max cv. Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Alias-Villegas, Cynthia; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Zehner, Susanne; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Soto, María J; Ollero, Francisco-Javier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Göttfert, Michael; Vinardell, José-María

    2016-09-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial strain showing a broad host range of nodulation. In addition to the induction of bacterial nodulation genes, transition from a free-living to a symbiotic state requires complex genetic expression changes with the participation of global regulators. We have analyzed the role of the zinc-finger transcriptional regulator MucR1 from S. fredii HH103 under both free-living conditions and symbiosis with two HH103 host plants, Glycine max and Lotus burttii. Inactivation of HH103 mucR1 led to a severe decrease in exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis but enhanced production of external cyclic glucans (CG). This mutant also showed increased cell aggregation capacity as well as a drastic reduction in nitrogen-fixation capacity with G. max and L. burttii. However, in these two legumes, the number of nodules induced by the mucR1 mutant was significantly increased and decreased, respectively, with respect to the wild-type strain, indicating that MucR1 can differently affect nodulation depending on the host plant. RNA-Seq analysis carried out in the absence and the presence of flavonoids showed that MucR1 controls the expression of hundreds of genes (including some related to EPS production and CG transport), some of them being related to the nod regulon.

  13. The DMI1 and DMI2 Early Symbiotic Genes of Medicago truncatula Are Required for a High-Affinity Nodulation Factor-Binding Site Associated to a Particulate Fraction of Roots1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Bridget V.; Cullimore, Julie V.; Ranjeva, Raoul; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis between Medicago spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti is dependent on the production of sulfated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation (Nod) factors by the bacterial partner. In this article, using a biochemical approach to characterize putative Nod factor receptors in the plant host, we describe a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 0.45 nm) for the major Nod factor produced by S. meliloti. This site is termed Nod factor-binding site 3 (NFBS3). NFBS3 is associated to a high-density fraction prepared from roots of Medicago truncatula and shows binding specificity for lipo-chitooligosaccharidic structures. As for the previously characterized binding sites (NFBS1 and NFBS2), NFBS3 does not recognize the sulfate group on the S. meliloti Nod factor. Studies of Nod factor binding in root extracts of early symbiotic mutants of M. truncatula reveals that the new site is present in Nod factor perception and does not make infections 3 (dmi3) mutants but is absent in dmi1 and dmi2 mutants. Roots and cell cultures of all these mutants still contain sites similar to NFBS1 and NFBS2, respectively. These results suggest that NFBS3 is different from NFBS2 and NFBS1 and is dependent on the common symbiotic genes DMI1 and DMI2 required for establishment of symbioses with both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The potential role of this site in the establishment of root endosymbioses is discussed. PMID:16377749

  14. A nodule-specific protein secretory pathway required for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.; Griffitts, J.; Starker, C.; Fedorova, E.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Ivanov, S.E.; Bisseling, T.; Long, S.

    2010-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous host plant Medicago truncatula occurs in a specialized root organ called the nodule. Bacteria that are released into plant cells are surrounded by a unique plant membrane compartment termed a symbiosome. We found that in

  15. A nodule-specific protein secretory pathway required for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Griffitts, Joel; Starker, Colby; Fedorova, Elena; Limpens, Erik; Ivanov, Sergey; Bisseling, Ton; Long, Sharon

    2010-02-26

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous host plant Medicago truncatula occurs in a specialized root organ called the nodule. Bacteria that are released into plant cells are surrounded by a unique plant membrane compartment termed a symbiosome. We found that in the symbiosis-defective dnf1 mutant of M. truncatula, bacteroid and symbiosome development are blocked. We identified the DNF1 gene as encoding a subunit of a signal peptidase complex that is highly expressed in nodules. By analyzing data from whole-genome expression analysis, we propose that correct symbiosome development in M. truncatula requires the orderly secretion of protein constituents through coordinated up-regulation of a nodule-specific pathway exemplified by DNF1.

  16. Genetic identification and symbiotic efficiency of Sinorhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization by rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR was applied to study the status of S. melitloti populations inhabiting nodules of alfalfa. Cluster analysis of rep-PCR profiles showed significant differences among S. meliloti isolates. Both methods resulted in almost identical grouping of strains. Among indigenous strains ...

  17. Rhizobium meliloti mutants that overproduce the R. meliloti acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, D.; Glazebrook, J.; Walker, G.C.; Leigh, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium meliloti Rm1021 plays one or more critical roles in nodule invasion and possible in nodule development. Two loci, exoR and exoS, that effect the regulation of synthesis of this exopolysaccharide were identified by screening for derivatives of strain Rm1021 that formed mucoid colonies that fluoresced extremely brightly under UV light when grown on medium containing Calcofluor. The exopolysaccharide produced in large quantities by the exoR95::Tn5 and exoS96::Tn5 strains was indistinguishable from that produced by the parental strain Rm1021, and its synthesis required the function of at least the exoA, exoB, and exoF genes. Both the exoR and exoS loci were located on the chromosome, and the exo96::Tn5 mutation was 84% linked to the trp-33 mutation by ΦM12 transduction. Synthesis of the Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide by strain Rm1021 was greatly stimulated by starvation for ammonia. In contrast, the exoR95::Tn5 mutant produced high levels of exopolysaccharide regardless of the presence or absence of ammonia in the medium. The exoS96::Tn5 mutant produced elevated amounts of exopolysaccharide in the presence of ammonia, but higher amounts were observed after starvation for ammonia. The presence of either mutation increased the level of expression of exoF::TnphoA and exoP::TnphoA fusions. Analyses of results obtained when alfalfa seedlings were inoculated with the exoR95::Tn5 strain indicated that the mutant strain could not invade nodules. However, pseudorevertants that retained the original exoR95::Tn5 mutant but acquired unlinked suppressors so that they produced an approximately normal amount of exopolysaccharide were able to invade nodules and fix nitrogen

  18. A novel RNA-binding peptide regulates the establishment of the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Philippe; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Velasco, Isabel; Csorba, Tibor; Van de Velde, Willem; Campalans, Anna; Burgyan, Joszef; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Miguel; Crespi, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Plants use a variety of small peptides for cell to cell communication during growth and development. Leguminous plants are characterized by their ability to develop nitrogen-fixing nodules via an interaction with symbiotic bacteria. During nodule organogenesis, several so-called nodulin genes are induced, including large families that encode small peptides. Using a three-hybrid approach in yeast cells, we identified two new small nodulins, MtSNARP1 and MtSNARP2 (for small nodulin acidic RNA-binding protein), which interact with the RNA of MtENOD40, an early induced nodulin gene showing conserved RNA secondary structures. The SNARPs are acidic peptides showing single-stranded RNA-binding activity in vitro and are encoded by a small gene family in Medicago truncatula. These peptides exhibit two new conserved motifs and a putative signal peptide that redirects a GFP fusion to the endoplasmic reticulum both in protoplasts and during symbiosis, suggesting they are secreted. MtSNARP2 is expressed in the differentiating region of the nodule together with several early nodulin genes. MtSNARP2 RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic roots showed aberrant early senescent nodules where differentiated bacteroids degenerate rapidly. Hence, a functional symbiotic interaction may be regulated by secreted RNA-binding peptides.

  19. A FIELD STUDY WITH GENETICALLY ENGINEERED ALFALFA INOCULATED WITH RECOMBINANT SINORHIZOBIUM MELILOTI: EFFECTS ON THE SOIL ECOSYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The agricultural use of genetically engineered plants and microorganisms has become increasingly common. Because genetically engineered plants and microorganisms can produce compounds foreign to their environment, there is concern that they may become established outside of thei...

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyl rhizoremediation by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 derivatives, using a Sinorhizobium meliloti nod system to drive bph gene expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villacieros, M.; Whelan, C.; Macková, Martina; Molgaard, J.; Sánchez-Contreras, M.; Lloret, J.; Cárcer de, D.; Oruezábal, R. I.; Bolanos, L.; Macek, Tomáš; Karlson, U.; Dowling, D. N.; Martín, M.; Rivilla, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 5 (2005), 2687-2694 ISSN 0099-2240 Grant - others:5thFW(XE) QLK3-CT-2001-00101; European Commission(XE) BIO4-CT97-2227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : polychlorinated biphenyls * rhizoremediation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.818, year: 2005

  1. Sinorhizobium arboris sp. nov. and Sinorhizobium kostiense sp. nov., isolated from leguminous trees in Sudan and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, G; de Lajudie, P; Eardly, B D; Suomalainen, S; Paulin, L; Zhang, X; Gillis, M; Lindström, K

    1999-10-01

    SDS-PAGE of total bacterial proteins was applied to the classification of 25 Sudanese and five Kenyan strains isolated from the root nodules of Acacia senegal and Prosopis chilensis. Twenty strains were also studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) and the whole 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from two strains representing the two major clusters. These results, together with the previously reported numerical taxonomy analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies, DNA-DNA dot-blot hybridization, genomic fingerprinting using repetitive sequence-based PCR, DNA base composition analysis, DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and RFLP analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene, showed that all 30 strains belong to the genus Sinorhizobium. Two of the strains grouped with Sinorhizobium saheli and seven with Sinorhizobium terangae, while the rest did not cluster with any of the established species. The majority of the strains formed two phenotypically and genotypically distinct groups and we therefore propose that these strains should be classified as two new species, Sinorhizobium arboris sp. nov. and Sinorhizobium kostiense sp. nov.

  2. Chrysoeriol and Luteolin Released from Alfalfa Seeds Induce nod Genes in Rhizobium meliloti1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed and root exudates induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The flavone luteolin previously was isolated from alfalfa seeds by other workers and identified as the first nod gene inducer for R. meliloti. Our recent study of `Moapa 69' alfalfa root exudates found no luteolin but did identify three other nod gene inducers: 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone. The goal of the current study was to identify and quantify nod gene-inducing flavonoids that may influence Rhizobium populations around a germinating alfalfa seed. Aqueous rinses of Moapa 69 alfalfa seeds were collected and assayed for induction of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti. During the first 4 hours of imbibition, total nod gene-inducing activity was released from seeds at 100-fold higher rates than from roots of 72-hour-old seedlings. Five flavonoids were purified and identified by spectroscopic analyses (ultraviolet/visible absorbance, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy) and comparison with authentic standards. Two very active nod gene-inducing flavonoids, chrysoeriol (3′-methoxyluteolin) and luteolin, were identified in seed rinses. Luteolin required a higher concentration (18 nanomolar) than chrysoeriol (5 nanomolar) for half-maximum induction of nodABC-lacZ in R. meliloti, and both were less active than 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone (2 nanomolar) from root exudates. Seeds exuded three other luteolin derivatives: luteolin-7-O-glucoside, 5-methoxyluteolin, and 3′,5-dimethoxyluteolin. Their combined quantities were 24-fold greater than that of luteolin plus chrysoeriol. Most nod gene-inducing activity of these luteolin derivatives apparently is associated with degradation to luteolin and chrysoeriol. However, their presence in large quantities suggests that they may contribute significantly to nod gene-inducing activity in the

  3. An ABC-Type Cobalt Transport System Is Essential for Growth of Sinorhizobium melilotiat Trace Metal Concentrations ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Poduska, Branislava; Morton, Richard A.; Finan, Turlough M.

    2011-01-01

    We report expression and mutant phenotypes for a gene cluster in Sinorhizobium meliloti, designated cbtJKL, that has been shown to encode an ABC-type cobalt transport system. Transcription of cbtJKLinitiated 384 nucleotides upstream from the cbtJtranslation start codon, and the resulting 5′ region contained a putative B12riboswitch. Expression of the cbtJKLgenes appeared to be controlled by (cobalt-loaded) cobalamin interacting at the B12riboswitch, since (i) a putative B12riboswitch was located within this large upstream region, (ii) cbtJtranscription was repressed upon addition of cobalt or vitamin B12, and (iii) deletions in the B12riboswitch resulted in constitutive cbtJKLtranscription. Insertion mutants in cbtJKLfailed to grow in LB medium, and growth was restored through the addition of cobalt but not other metals. This growth phenotype appeared to be due to the chelation of cobalt present in LB, and cbtJKLmutants also failed to grow in minimal medium containing the chelating agent EDTA unless the medium was supplemented with additional or excess cobalt. In uptake experiments, 57Co2+accumulation was high in wild-type cells expressing the cbtJKLgenes, whereas wild-type cells in which cbtJKLexpression was repressed showed reduced accumulation. In cbtJKLmutant cells, 57Co2+accumulation was reduced relative to that of the wild type, and presumably, this residual cobalt transport occurred via an alternate ion uptake system(s) that is not specific to cobalt. In symbiosis, the alternate system(s) appeared to mediate cobalt transport into bacteroid cells, as low cbtJKLexpression was detected in bacteroids and cbtJKLmutants formed N2-fixing nodules on alfalfa. PMID:21725018

  4. Biochemical and Molecular Phylogenetic Study of Agriculturally Useful Association of a Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium and Nodule Sinorhizobium with Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Karaushu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed inoculation with bacterial consortium was found to increase legume yield, providing a higher growth than the standard nitrogen treatment methods. Alfalfa plants were inoculated by mono- and binary compositions of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. Their physiological and biochemical properties were estimated. Inoculation by microbial consortium of Sinorhizobium meliloti T17 together with a new cyanobacterial isolate Nostoc PTV was more efficient than the single-rhizobium strain inoculation. This treatment provides an intensification of the processes of biological nitrogen fixation by rhizobia bacteria in the root nodules and an intensification of plant photosynthesis. Inoculation by bacterial consortium stimulates growth of plant mass and rhizogenesis and leads to increased productivity of alfalfa and to improving the amino acid composition of plant leaves. The full nucleotide sequence of the rRNA gene cluster and partial sequence of the dinitrogenase reductase (nifH gene of Nostoc PTV were deposited to GenBank (JQ259185.1, JQ259186.1. Comparison of these gene sequences of Nostoc PTV with all sequences present at the GenBank shows that this cyanobacterial strain does not have 100% identity with any organisms investigated previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this cyanobacterium clustered with high credibility values with Nostoc muscorum.

  5. Biochemical and Molecular Phylogenetic Study of Agriculturally Useful Association of a Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium and Nodule Sinorhizobium with Medicago sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaushu, E V; Lazebnaya, I V; Kravzova, T R; Vorobey, N A; Lazebny, O E; Kiriziy, D A; Olkhovich, O P; Taran, N Yu; Kots, S Ya; Popova, A A; Omarova, E; Koksharova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Seed inoculation with bacterial consortium was found to increase legume yield, providing a higher growth than the standard nitrogen treatment methods. Alfalfa plants were inoculated by mono- and binary compositions of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. Their physiological and biochemical properties were estimated. Inoculation by microbial consortium of Sinorhizobium meliloti T17 together with a new cyanobacterial isolate Nostoc PTV was more efficient than the single-rhizobium strain inoculation. This treatment provides an intensification of the processes of biological nitrogen fixation by rhizobia bacteria in the root nodules and an intensification of plant photosynthesis. Inoculation by bacterial consortium stimulates growth of plant mass and rhizogenesis and leads to increased productivity of alfalfa and to improving the amino acid composition of plant leaves. The full nucleotide sequence of the rRNA gene cluster and partial sequence of the dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene of Nostoc PTV were deposited to GenBank (JQ259185.1, JQ259186.1). Comparison of these gene sequences of Nostoc PTV with all sequences present at the GenBank shows that this cyanobacterial strain does not have 100% identity with any organisms investigated previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this cyanobacterium clustered with high credibility values with Nostoc muscorum.

  6. The conjugative plasmid of a bean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii strain is assembled from sequences of two Rhizobium plasmids and the chromosome of a Sinorhizobium strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Susana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bean-nodulating Rhizobium etli originated in Mesoamerica, while soybean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii evolved in East Asia. S. fredii strains, such as GR64, have been isolated from bean nodules in Spain, suggesting the occurrence of conjugative transfer events between introduced and native strains. In R. etli CFN42, transfer of the symbiotic plasmid (pRet42d requires cointegration with the endogenous self-transmissible plasmid pRet42a. Aiming at further understanding the generation of diversity among bean nodulating strains, we analyzed the plasmids of S. fredii GR64: pSfr64a and pSfr64b (symbiotic plasmid. Results The conjugative transfer of the plasmids of strain GR64 was analyzed. Plasmid pSfr64a was self-transmissible, and required for transfer of the symbiotic plasmid. We sequenced pSfr64a, finding 166 ORFs. pSfr64a showed three large segments of different evolutionary origins; the first one presented 38 ORFs that were highly similar to genes located on the chromosome of Sinorhizobium strain NGR234; the second one harbored 51 ORFs with highest similarity to genes from pRet42d, including the replication, but not the symbiosis genes. Accordingly, pSfr64a was incompatible with the R. etli CFN42 symbiotic plasmid, but did not contribute to symbiosis. The third segment contained 36 ORFs with highest similarity to genes localized on pRet42a, 20 of them involved in conjugative transfer. Plasmid pRet42a was unable to substitute pSfr64a for induction of pSym transfer, and its own transfer was significantly diminished in GR64 background. The symbiotic plasmid pSfr64b was found to differ from typical R. etli symbiotic plasmids. Conclusions S. fredii GR64 contains a chimeric transmissible plasmid, with segments from two R. etli plasmids and a S. fredii chromosome, and a symbiotic plasmid different from the one usually found in R. etli bv phaseoli. We infer that these plasmids originated through the transfer of a symbiotic

  7. Bacterial Molecular Signals in the Sinorhizobium fredii-Soybean Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. López-Baena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium (Ensifer fredii (S. fredii is a rhizobial species exhibiting a remarkably broad nodulation host-range. Thus, S. fredii is able to effectively nodulate dozens of different legumes, including plants forming determinate nodules, such as the important crops soybean and cowpea, and plants forming indeterminate nodules, such as Glycyrrhiza uralensis and pigeon-pea. This capacity of adaptation to different symbioses makes the study of the molecular signals produced by S. fredii strains of increasing interest since it allows the analysis of their symbiotic role in different types of nodule. In this review, we analyze in depth different S. fredii molecules that act as signals in symbiosis, including nodulation factors, different surface polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, cyclic glucans, and K-antigen capsular polysaccharides, and effectors delivered to the interior of the host cells through a symbiotic type 3 secretion system.

  8. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baumgardt, K.; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, H.; Lochnit, G.; Robledo, M.; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2016), s. 486-499 ISSN 1547-6286 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Agrobacterium * autoinducer synthase * degradosome Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.900, year: 2016

  9. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  10. Structure and Biological Roles of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Exopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Soto, María J.; Margaret, Isabel; Crespo-Rivas, Juan C.; Sanjuan, Juan; Temprano, Francisco; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Sainz, José E.; Vinardell, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report that the structure of the Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide (EPS) is composed of glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, pyruvic acid, in the ratios 5∶2∶2∶1 and is partially acetylated. A S. fredii HH103 exoA mutant (SVQ530), unable to produce EPS, not only forms nitrogen fixing nodules with soybean but also shows increased competitive capacity for nodule occupancy. Mutant SVQ530 is, however, less competitive to nodulate Vigna unguiculata. Biofilm formation was reduced in mutant SVQ530 but increased in an EPS overproducing mutant. Mutant SVQ530 was impaired in surface motility and showed higher osmosensitivity compared to its wild type strain in media containing 50 mM NaCl or 5% (w/v) sucrose. Neither S. fredii HH103 nor 41 other S. fredii strains were recognized by soybean lectin (SBL). S. fredii HH103 mutants affected in exopolysaccharides (EPS), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), cyclic glucans (CG) or capsular polysaccharides (KPS) were not significantly impaired in their soybean-root attachment capacity, suggesting that these surface polysaccharides might not be relevant in early attachment to soybean roots. These results also indicate that the molecular mechanisms involved in S. fredii attachment to soybean roots might be different to those operating in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. PMID:25521500

  11. Degradation of phenanthrene by the rhizobacterium Ensifer meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratova, Anna; Pozdnyakova, Natalya; Makarov, Oleg; Baboshin, Mikhail; Baskunov, Boris; Myasoedova, Nina; Golovleva, Ludmila; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2014-11-01

    The biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenantherene by the rhizobacterial strain Ensifer meliloti P221, isolated from the root zone of plant grown in PAH-contaminated soil was studied. Bacterial growth and phenanthrene degradation under the influence of root-exuded organic acids were also investigated. Analysis of the metabolites produced by the strain by using thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and mass-spectrometry revealed that phenanthrene is bioconverted via two parallel pathways. The first, major pathway is through terminal aromatic ring cleavage (presumably at the C3-C4 bond) producing benzocoumarin and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, whose further degradation with the formation of salicylic acid is difficult or is very slow. The second pathway is through the oxidation of the central aromatic ring at the C9-C10 bond, producing 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxyphenanthrene, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and 2,2'-diphenic acid. This is the first time that the dioxygenation of phenanthrene at the C9 and C10 atoms, proven by identification of characteristic metabolites, has been reported for a bacterium of the Ensifer genus.

  12. Identification of Salt-Tolerant Sinorhizobium sp Strain BL3 Membrane Proteins Based on Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 is a salt-tolerant strain that can fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with leguminous host plants under salt-stress conditions. Since cell membranes are the first barrier to environmental change, it is interesting to explore the membrane proteins within this protective...

  13. Competitive Advantage Provided by Bacterial Motility in the Formation of Nodules by Rhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Peter; Bergman, Kostia

    1981-01-01

    The effect of motility on the competitive success of Rhizobium meliloti in nodule production was investigated. A motile strain formed more nodules than expected when mixed at various unfavorable ratios with either flagellated or nonflagellated nonmotile derivatives. We conclude that motility confers a selective advantage on rhizobia when competing with nonmotile strains. PMID:7298580

  14. Flavonoids Released Naturally from Alfalfa Seeds Enhance Growth Rate of Rhizobium meliloti1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) releases different flavonoids from seeds and roots. Imbibing seeds discharge 3′,4′,5,7-substituted flavonoids; roots exude 5-deoxy molecules. Many, but not all, of these flavonoids induce nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The dominant flavonoid released from alfalfa seeds is identified here as quercetin-3-O-galactoside, a molecule that does not induce nod genes. Low concentrations (1-10 micromolar) of this compound, as well as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, another major flavonoid released from germinating seeds, and the aglycones, quercetin and luteolin, increase growth rate of R. meliloti in a defined minimal medium. Tests show that the 5,7-dihydroxyl substitution pattern on those molecules was primarily responsible for the growth effect, thus explaining how 5-deoxy flavonoids in root exudates fail to enhance growth of R. meliloti. Luteolin increases growth by a mechanism separate from its capacity to induce rhizobial nod genes, because it still enhanced growth rate of R. meliloti lacking functional copies of the three known nodD genes. Quercetin and luteolin also increased growth rate of Pseudomonas putida. They had no effect on growth rate of Bacillus subtilis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but they slowed growth of two fungal pathogens of alfalfa. These results suggest that alfalfa can create ecochemical zones for controlling soil microbes by releasing structurally different flavonoids from seeds and roots. PMID:16668056

  15. The Rhizobium meliloti putA gene: its role in the establishment of the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Zurdo, J I; García-Rodríguez, F M; Toro, N

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the energy sources used by rhizobia during colonization, invasion and root nodule formation on leguminous plants. We have recently reported that an impaired proline metabolism in rhizobium meliloti leads to a reduced nodulation efficiency and competitiveness on alfalfa roots. In the present study we have characterized the R. meliloti proline dehydrogenase gene (putA) and addressed the question of its role in symbiosis. This rhizobial gene encodes a 1224-amino-acid-long polypeptide which is homologous to enteric bacteria, Rhodobacter capsulatus and Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA proteins. Like the situation in these bacteria, sequence analysis identified the proline dehydrogenase (PDH) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains in the R. meliloti putA-encoded protein. Beta-galactosidase assays performed with free-living cells carrying a putA-lacZ transcriptional fusion revealed that R. meliloti putA gene expression is induced by proline, autoregulated by its encoded product, and independent of the general nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr). In addition, analysis of putA expression during the different steps of the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa showed that expression of this gene is turned on by the root exudates (RE), during root invasion and nodule formation, but not in differentiated nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Furthermore, we show that the PutA- phenotype leads to a significant reduction of alfalfa root colonization by R. meliloti.

  16. The nitrate-reduction gene cluster components exert lineage-dependent contributions to optimization of Sinorhizobium symbiosis with soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li Xue; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Hu, Yue; Jiao, Jian; Guo, Hui Juan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Zhang, Biliang; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2017-12-01

    Receiving nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes does not guarantee rhizobia an effective symbiosis with legumes. Here, variations in gene content were determined for three Sinorhizobium species showing contrasting symbiotic efficiency on soybeans. A nitrate-reduction gene cluster absent in S. sojae was found to be essential for symbiotic adaptations of S. fredii and S. sp. III. In S. fredii, the deletion mutation of the nap (nitrate reductase), instead of nir (nitrite reductase) and nor (nitric oxide reductase), led to defects in nitrogen-fixation (Fix - ). By contrast, none of these core nitrate-reduction genes were required for the symbiosis of S. sp. III. However, within the same gene cluster, the deletion of hemN1 (encoding oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) in both S. fredii and S. sp. III led to the formation of nitrogen-fixing (Fix + ) but ineffective (Eff - ) nodules. These Fix + /Eff - nodules were characterized by significantly lower enzyme activity of glutamine synthetase indicating rhizobial modulation of nitrogen-assimilation by plants. A distant homologue of HemN1 from S. sojae can complement this defect in S. fredii and S. sp. III, but exhibited a more pleotropic role in symbiosis establishment. These findings highlighted the lineage-dependent optimization of symbiotic functions in different rhizobial species associated with the same host. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_003078 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etitiveness [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MQLSACARRREAVRYRRRMARILILLFSLLSAFAFPVTPVP... NC_003078 gi|16264863 >gi|16264863|ref|NP_437655.1| probable membrane protein necessary for nodulation comp

  18. A nopA deletion mutant of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257, a soybean symbiont, is impaired in nodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 employs type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cells through filamentous surface appendages, called pili. The NopA protein is the major component of USDA257 pili. The promoter region of USDA257 nopA posses a well conserved tts box. Se...

  19. Specificity traits consistent with legume-rhizobia coevolution displayed by Ensifer meliloti rhizosphere colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, María Eugenia; Lozano, Mauricio Javier; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter Omar; Serrania, Javier; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo Arturo; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Nilsson, Juliet Fernanda; Pistorio, Mariano; Del Papa, María Florencia; Parisi, Gustavo; Becker, Anke; Lagares, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Rhizobia are α- and ß-proteobacteria that associate with legumes in symbiosis to fix atmospheric nitrogen. The chemical communication between roots and rhizobia begins in the rhizosphere. Using signature-tagged-Tn5 mutagenesis (STM) we performed a genome-wide screening for Ensifer meliloti genes that participate in colonizing the rhizospheres of alfalfa and other legumes. The analysis of ca. 6,000 mutants indicated that genes relevant for rhizosphere colonization account for nearly 2% of the rhizobial genome and that most (ca. 80%) are chromosomally located, pointing to the relevance and ancestral origin of the bacterial ability to colonize plant roots. The identified genes were related to metabolic functions, transcription, signal transduction, and motility/chemotaxis among other categories; with several ORFs of yet-unknown function. Most remarkably, we identified a subset of genes that impacted more severely the colonization of the roots of alfalfa than of pea. Further analyses using other plant species revealed that such early differential phenotype could be extended to other members of the Trifoliae tribe (Trigonella, Trifolium), but not the Fabeae and Phaseoleae tribes. The results suggest that consolidation of E. meliloti into its current symbiotic state should have occurred in a rhizobacterium that had already been adapted to rhizospheres of the Trifoliae tribe. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Toxic effects of arsenic on Sinorhizobium-Medicago sativa symbiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo, Eloísa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Dary, Mohammed; Palomares, Antonio J

    2008-07-01

    Recently, the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction has been proposed as an interesting tool in bioremediation. However, little is known about the effect of most common contaminants on this process. The phytotoxic effects of arsenic on nodulation of Medicago sativa have been examined in vitro using the highly arsenic resistant and symbiotically effective Sinorhizobium sp. strain MA11. The bacteria were able to grow on plates containing As concentrations as high as 10 mM. Nevertheless, as little as 25-35 microM arsenite produced a 75% decrease in the total number of nodules, due to a 90% reduction in the number of rhizobial infections, as could be determined using the strain MA11 carrying a lacZ reporter gene. This effect was associated to root hair damage and a shorter infective root zone. However, once nodulation was established nodule development seemed to continue normally, although earlier senescence could be observed in nodules of arsenic-grown plants.

  1. Symbiotic Properties of Sinorhizobium Fredii, J-TGS50 an Indonesian Soybean Nodule Forming Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyo Hadi Waluyo

    2004-01-01

    Green House experiments were conducted to study symbiotic properties of Sinorhizobium Fredii, J-TGS50. Sinorhizobium Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217 and Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 were used as references. Yeast extract mannitol broth culture of the bacteria were made and used as inoculation for several local and imported soybean varieties used in this study. Plants were harvested at 20 days after inoculation. Number of nodules were counted, fresh weight of nodules and shoot were determined. S. Fredii J-TGS50 and S. Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217 were found different in their symbiotic properties. S. Fredii J-TGS50 formed nodules on same imported soybean. While there were no nodules obtained from the plant inoculated with S. Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217. S. Fredii J-TGS50 and recommended B. Japonicum USDA 110 formed nodule on several local soybean varieties. There was no differences between those two bacteria either in nodulation efficiency or in the effectiveness of the formed nodules. Results of this study can be concluded that S. Fredii, J-TGS50 is a native to Indonesian soil and it is a promising soybean nodule forming bacteria in Indonesia. Using indigenous bacteria is valuable. Since they are mostly more tolerant and adaptable than the introduced ones. An important aspect for the success of Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF) is insight in the structure of indigenous soybean rhizobia populations. Study on the biodiversity of soybean rhizobia was important conducted. (author)

  2. Production of nodulation factors by Rhizobium meliloti: fermentation, purification and characterization of glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohring, B; Baier, R; Niehaus, K; Pühler, A; Flaschel, E

    1997-12-01

    Lipooligosaccharides, synthesized by soil bacteria of the genera Rhizobium, are known to have multifunctional effects on a wide variety of plants as signal substances in symbiosis initiation, cell response elicitation and growth regulation. These so called nodulation (Nod-) factors represent interesting biotechnological products with respect to fundamental studies of symbiotic interactions as well as for potential applications. Therefore, a batch fermentation process on a scale of 30 l has been developed by means of the Rhizobium meliloti strain R.m. 1021 (pEK327) strongly overexpressing the genes for the synthesis of Nod factors. Induction by the flavone luteolin led to growth associated production of the lipooligosaccharides. Ultrafiltration was used for separating the biomass from the filtrate containing the extracellular Nod factors. Simultaneously, ultrafiltration reduced the amount of lipophilic substances, which would otherwise interfere with processes downstream. The second separation step consisted in adsorption on XAD-2, a nonspecific hydrophobic adsorptive resin. Adsorption of Nod factors was carried out by batch operation of a stirred tank. Desorption was performed by elution with methanol in a fixed bed column. A semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC (Polygoprep 100-30 C18) was chosen as the final purification step. The Nod factors were obtained after evaporation and lyophilization. Thus, about 600 mg of Nod factors were produced from 20 l of fermentation broth. The Nod factors produced by Rhizobium meliloti R.m. 1021 (pEK327) were identified by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry and by reversed-phase HPLC as fluorescent derivatives of 2-aminobenzamide. The biological activity of the products was demonstrated by means of the root hair deformation (HAD-) assay.

  3. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 160 U. Lactose-resistant mutants had defects in the plasmid-carried E. coli beta-galactosidase or beta-galactoside permease and in the R. meliloti genome. We speculate that uncontrolled production of galactose by the action of the lactose operon proteins was responsible for growth inhibition. PMID:6427192

  4. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 16...

  5. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. II. Nucleotide sequence, transcription start sites and protein products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.F.; Swanson, J.A.; Mulligan, J.T.; Long, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have established the DNA sequence and analyzed the transcription and translation products of a series of putative nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti strain 1021. Four loci have been designated nodF, nodE, nodG and nodH. The correlation of transposon insertion positions with phenotypes and open reading frames was confirmed by sequencing the insertion junctions of the transposons. The protein products of these nod genes were visualized by in vitro expression of cloned DNA segments in a R. meliloti transcription-translation system. In addition, the sequence for nodG was substantiated by creating translational fusions in all three reading frames at several points in the sequence; the resulting fusions were expressed in vitro in both E. coli and R. meliloti transcription-translation systems. A DNA segment bearing several open reading frames downstream of nodG corresponds to the putative nod gene mutated in strain nod-216. The transcription start sites of nodF and nodH were mapped by primer extension of RNA from cells induced with the plant flavone, luteolin. Initiation of transcription occurs approximately 25 bp downstream from the conserved sequence designated the nod box, suggesting that this conserved sequence acts as an upstream regulator of inducible nod gene expression. Its distance from the transcription start site is more suggestive of an activator binding site rather than an RNA polymerase binding site

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003037 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n with ... localized conservation [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] ... pir||B95312 hypothetical p...rvation [Sinorhizobium ... meliloti 1021] gb|AAK65060.1| hypothetical protei... NC_003037 gi|16262858 >1i0rB 4 152 13 156 2e-27 ... ref|NP_435648.1| hypothetical protein with localized conse

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003037 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n with ... localized conservation [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] ... pir||B95312 hypothetical p...rvation [Sinorhizobium ... meliloti 1021] gb|AAK65060.1| hypothetical protei... NC_003037 gi|16262855 >1i0rB 4 152 13 156 2e-27 ... ref|NP_435648.1| hypothetical protein with localized conse

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15964777 >1v4aA 24 435 49 467 e-101 ... emb|CAC45596.1| PUTATIVE GLUTAMATE-AMMONIA...-LIGASE ADENYLYLTRANSFERASE PROTEIN ... [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ref|NP_385130.1| PUTATIVE ... GLUTAMATE-AMMO...NIA-LIGASE ADENYLYLTRANSFERASE PROTEIN ... [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] sp|

  9. “Ménage à trois”: the presence/absence of thyme shapes the mutualistic interaction between the host plant Medicago truncatula (Fabaceae) and its symbiotic bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Bodil Kirstine; Grøndahl, Eva; Ronfort, Joelle

    2012-01-01

    (carvacrol) leached into the soil by Thymus vulgaris—a common plant of the Mediterranean vegetation, often co-occuring with Medicago. We show that the presence of carvacrol in the soil dramatically affects fitness of the rhizobial partner and increases the magnitude of rG between plant and rhizobia fitness...

  10. The structure of Sinorhizobium meliloti phage ΦM12, which has a novel T=19l triangulation number and is the founder of a new group of T4-superfamily phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Brewer, Tess E; Sousa, Duncan R; Jones, Kathryn M

    2014-02-01

    ΦM12 is the first example of a T=19l geometry capsid, encapsulating the recently sequenced genome. Here, we present structures determined by cryo-EM of full and empty capsids. The structure reveals the pattern for assembly of 1140 HK97-like capsid proteins, pointing to interactions at the pseudo 3-fold symmetry axes that hold together the asymmetric unit. The particular smooth surface of the capsid, along with a lack of accessory coat proteins encoded by the genome, suggest that this interface is the primary mechanism for capsid assembly. Two-dimensional averages of the tail, including the neck and baseplate, reveal that ΦM12 has a relatively narrow neck that attaches the tail to the capsid, as well as a three-layer baseplate. When free from DNA, the icosahedral edges expand by about 5nm, while the vertices stay at the same position, forming a similarly smooth, but bowed, T=19l icosahedral capsid. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogeography of a Novel Ensifer meliloti Clade Associated with the Australian Legume Trigonella suavissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardly, Bertrand; Elia, Patrick; Brockwell, John; Golemboski, Daniel; van Berkum, Peter

    2017-05-15

    Here, we describe a novel clade within Ensifer meliloti and consider how geographic and ecological isolation contributed to the limited distribution of this group. Members of the genus Ensifer are best known for their ability to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with forage legumes of three related genera, Medicago L., Melilotus Mill., and Trigonella L., which are members of the tribe Trifolieae. These legumes have a natural distribution extending from the Mediterranean Basin through western Asia, where there is an unsurpassed number of species belonging to these genera. Trigonella suavissima L. is unusual in that it is the only species in the tribe Trifolieae that is native to Australia. We compared the genetic diversity and taxonomic placement of rhizobia nodulating T. suavissima with those of members of an Ensifer reference collection. Our goal was to determine if the T. suavissima rhizobial strains, like their plant host, are naturally limited to the Australian continent. We used multilocus sequence analysis to estimate the genetic relatedness of 56 T. suavissima symbionts to 28 Ensifer reference strains. Sequence data were partitioned according to the replicons in which the loci are located. The results were used to construct replicon-specific phylogenetic trees. In both the chromosomal and chromid trees, the Australian strains formed a distinct clade within E. meliloti The strains also shared few alleles with Ensifer reference strains from other continents. Carbon source utilization assays revealed that the strains are also unusual in their ability to utilize 2-oxoglutarate as a sole carbon source. A strategy was outlined for locating similar strains elsewhere. IMPORTANCE In this study, we employed a biogeographical approach to investigate the origins of a symbiotic relationship between an Australian legume and its nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The question of the ancestral origins of these symbionts is based on the observation that the legume host is not closely

  12. Toxic effects of arsenic on Sinorhizobium-Medicago sativa symbiotic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajuelo, Eloisa [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain); Rodriguez-Llorente, Ignacio D. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)], E-mail: irodri@us.es; Dary, Mohammed; Palomares, Antonio J. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Recently, the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction has been proposed as an interesting tool in bioremediation. However, little is known about the effect of most common contaminants on this process. The phytotoxic effects of arsenic on nodulation of Medicago sativa have been examined in vitro using the highly arsenic resistant and symbiotically effective Sinorhizobium sp. strain MA11. The bacteria were able to grow on plates containing As concentrations as high as 10 mM. Nevertheless, as little as 25-35 {mu}M arsenite produced a 75% decrease in the total number of nodules, due to a 90% reduction in the number of rhizobial infections, as could be determined using the strain MA11 carrying a lacZ reporter gene. This effect was associated to root hair damage and a shorter infective root zone. However, once nodulation was established nodule development seemed to continue normally, although earlier senescence could be observed in nodules of arsenic-grown plants. - First steps of nodulation of alfalfa, in particular infection thread formation, are more sensitive to As than nitrogen fixation due to plant effects.

  13. Mutualistic co-evolution of type III effector genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Kimbrel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved.

  14. Escherichia coli BdcA controls biofilm dispersal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Thomas K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we showed that BdcA controls Escherichia coli biofilm dispersal by binding the ubiquitous bacterial signal cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP; upon reducing the concentration of c-di-GMP, the cell shifts to the planktonic state by increasing motility, decreasing aggregation, and decreasing production of biofilm adhesins. Findings Here we report that BdcA also increases biofilm dispersal in other Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Rhizobium meliloti. BdcA binds c-di-GMP in these strains and thereby reduces the effective c-di-GMP concentrations as demonstrated by increases in swimming motility and swarming motility as well as by a reduction in extracellular polysaccharide production. We also develop a method to displace existing biofilms by adding BdcA via conjugation from E. coli in mixed-species biofilms. Conclusion Since BdcA shows the ability to control biofilm dispersal in diverse bacteria, BdcA has the potential to be used as a tool to disperse biofilms for engineering and medical applications.

  15. Characterization of genes for synthesis and catabolism of a new rhizopine induced in nodules by Rhizobium meliloti Rm220-3: extension of the rhizopine concept.

    OpenAIRE

    Saint, C P; Wexler, M; Murphy, P J; Tempé, J; Tate, M E; Murphy, P J

    1993-01-01

    Rhizopines are selective growth substrates synthesized in nodules only by strains of rhizobia capable of their catabolism. We report the isolation and study of genes for the synthesis and catabolism of a new rhizopine, scyllo-inosamine (sIa), from alfalfa nodules induced by Rhizobium meliloti Rm220-3. This compound is similar in structure to the previously described rhizopine 3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine from R. meliloti L5-30 (P.J. Murphy, N. Heycke, Z. Banfalvi, M.E. Tate, F.J. de Bruijn, A....

  16. Ensifer meliloti overexpressing Escherichia coli phytase gene (appA) improves phosphorus (P) acquisition in maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Ajit; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli phytase gene appA encoding enzyme AppA was cloned in a broad host range plasmid pBBR1MCS2 (lac promoter), termed pVA1, and transformed into the Ensifer meliloti 1020. Transformation of pVA1 in Ensifer meliloti {E. m (pVA1)} increased its phosphatase and phytase activity by ∼9- and ∼50-fold, respectively, compared to the transformants containing empty plasmid as control {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)}. The western blot experiments using rabbit anti-AppA antibody showed that AppA is translocated into the periplasm of the host after its expression. Ensifer meliloti harboring AppA protein {E. m (pVA1)} and {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} could acidify the unbuffered phytate minimal media (pH 8.0) containing Ca-phytate or Na-phytate as sole organic P (Po) source to below pH 5.0 and released P. However, both {E. m (pVA1)} and {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} neither dropped pH of the medium nor released P when the medium was buffered at pH 8.0 using Tris-Cl, indicating that acidification of medium was important for the enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate. Further experiments proved that maize plants inoculated with {E. m. (pVA1)} showed increase in growth under sterile semi solid agar (SSA) medium containing Na-phytate as sole P source. The present study could be helpful in generating better transgenic bioinoculants harboring phosphate mineralization properties that ultimately promote plant growth.

  17. Ensifer meliloti overexpressing Escherichia coli phytase gene ( appA) improves phosphorus (P) acquisition in maize plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Ajit; Archana, G.; Kumar, G. Naresh

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli phytase gene appA encoding enzyme AppA was cloned in a broad host range plasmid pBBR1MCS2 ( lac promoter), termed pVA1, and transformed into the Ensifer meliloti 1020. Transformation of pVA1 in Ensifer meliloti { E. m (pVA1)} increased its phosphatase and phytase activity by ˜9- and ˜50-fold, respectively, compared to the transformants containing empty plasmid as control { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)}. The western blot experiments using rabbit anti-AppA antibody showed that AppA is translocated into the periplasm of the host after its expression. Ensifer meliloti harboring AppA protein { E. m (pVA1)} and { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} could acidify the unbuffered phytate minimal media (pH 8.0) containing Ca-phytate or Na-phytate as sole organic P (Po) source to below pH 5.0 and released P. However, both { E. m (pVA1)} and { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} neither dropped pH of the medium nor released P when the medium was buffered at pH 8.0 using Tris-Cl, indicating that acidification of medium was important for the enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate. Further experiments proved that maize plants inoculated with { E. m. (pVA1)} showed increase in growth under sterile semi solid agar (SSA) medium containing Na-phytate as sole P source. The present study could be helpful in generating better transgenic bioinoculants harboring phosphate mineralization properties that ultimately promote plant growth.

  18. Identification of the rctA Gene, Which Is Required for Repression of Conjugative Transfer of Rhizobial Symbiotic Megaplasmids†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Edgardo; Pando, Victoria; Muñoz, Socorro; Nogales, Joaquina; Olivares, José; Soto, Maria J.; Herrera-Cervera, José A.; Romero, David; Brom, Susana; Sanjuán, Juan

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the conjugative transfer of pRetCFN42d, the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli, has revealed a novel gene, rctA, as an essential element of a regulatory system for silencing the conjugative transfer of R. etli pSym by repressing the transcription of conjugal transfer genes in standard laboratory media. The rctA gene product lacks sequence conservation with other proteins of known function but may belong to the winged-helix DNA-binding subfamily of transcriptional regulators. Similar to that of many transcriptional repressors, rctA transcription seems to be positively autoregulated. rctA expression is greatly reduced upon overexpression of another gene, rctB, previously identified as a putative activator of R. etli pSym conjugal transfer. Thus, rctB seems to counteract the repressive action of rctA. rctA homologs are present in at least three other bacterial genomes within the order Rhizobiales, where they are invariably located adjacent to and divergently transcribed from putative virB-like operons. We show that similar to that of R. etli pSym, conjugative transfer of the 1.35-Mb symbiotic megaplasmid A of Sinorhizobium meliloti is also subjected to the inhibitory action of rctA. Our data provide strong evidence that the R. etli and S. meliloti pSym plasmids are indeed self-conjugative plasmids and that this property would only be expressed under optimal, as yet unknown conditions that entail inactivation of the rctA function. The rctA gene seems to represent novel but probably widespread regulatory systems controlling the transfer of conjugative elements within the order Rhizobiales. PMID:16237017

  19. A Transposable Partitioning Locus Used To Stabilize Plasmid-Borne Hydrogen Oxidation and Trifolitoxin Production Genes in a Sinorhizobium Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Angela D.; Wojtasiak, Michelle L.; Robleto, Eduardo A.; Triplett, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nitrogen-fixing inoculum strains for leguminous crops must be able to effectively compete with indigenous strains for nodulation, enhance legume productivity compared to the productivity obtained with indigenous strains, and maintain stable expression of any added genes in the absence of selection pressure. We constructed a transposable element containing the tfx region for expression of increased nodulation competitiveness and the par locus for plasmid stability. The transposon was inserted into tetA of pHU52, a broad-host-range plasmid conferring the H2 uptake phenotype. The resulting plasmid, pHUTFXPAR, conferred the plasmid stability, trifolitoxin production, and H2 uptake phenotypes in the broad-host-range organism Sinorhizobium sp. strain ANU280. The broad applications of a transposon conferring plasmid stability are discussed. PMID:9572932

  20. Conservation of gene order and content in the circular chromosomes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' asiaticus and other rhizbiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is a member of the Rhizobiales, as are the nitrogen fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Whole genome compar...

  1. Comparison of the 'Ca Liberibacter asiaticus' genome adapted for an intracellular lifestyle with other members of the rhizobiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ a member of the Rhizobiales, is related to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Bartonella henselae, an intracellular mammalian pathogen. Whole chromosome comparisons identified at least 52 clust...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ... ENZYME) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ... ... ref|NP_386950.1| PROBABLE 1,4-ALPHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ... ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ENZYME) PROTEI

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ... ENZYME) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ... ... ref|NP_386950.1| PROBABLE 1,4-ALPHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ... ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ENZYME) PROTEI

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ... ENZYME) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ... ... ref|NP_386950.1| PROBABLE 1,4-ALPHA-GLUCAN BRANCHING ... ENZYME (GLYCOGEN BRANCHING ENZYME) PROTEI

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965983 >1bu6Y 1 436 4 408 6e-44 ... emb|CAC46809.1| PUTATIVE CARBOHYDRATE... KINASE PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ref|NP_386336.1| PUTATIVE CARBOHYDRATE KINASE PROTEIN

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965553 >1rkd0 3 268 9 275 2e-23 ... emb|CAC46379.1| PUTATIVE CARBOHYDRATE... KINASE PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ref|NP_385906.1| PUTATIVE CARBOHYDRATE KINASE PROTEIN

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE LARGE CHAIN (AMMONIA CHAIN ... ARGININE BIOSYNTHESIS) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium... meliloti] ... ref|NP_385682.1| PROBABLE CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE ... LARGE CHAIN (AMMONIA

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965329 >gi|15965329|ref|NP_385682.1| PROBABLE CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE LARGE CHAIN (AMMO...NIA CHAIN ARGININE BIOSYNTHESIS) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MPKRQDIKSILI

  9. Identification of Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) medicae based on a specific genomic sequence unveiled by M13-PCR fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Ana Catarina; Alves, Paula I L; Tenreiro, Tania; Ferreira, Eugénio M; Tenreiro, Rogério; Fareleira, Paula; Crespo, M Teresa Barreto

    2009-12-01

    A collection of nodule isolates from Medicago polymorpha obtained from southern and central Portugal was evaluated by M13-PCR fingerprinting and hierarchical cluster analysis. Several genomic clusters were obtained which, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected representatives, were shown to be associated with particular taxonomic groups of rhizobia and other soil bacteria. The method provided a clear separation between rhizobia and co-isolated non-symbiotic soil contaminants. Ten M13-PCR groups were assigned to Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) medicae and included all isolates responsible for the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules upon re-inoculation of M. polymorpha test-plants. In addition, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting indicated a high genomic heterogeneity within the major M13- PCR clusters of S. medicae isolates. Based on nucleotide sequence data of an M13-PCR amplicon of ca. 1500 bp, observed only in S. medicae isolates and spanning locus Smed_3707 to Smed_3709 from the pSMED01 plasmid sequence of S. medicae WSM419 genome's sequence, a pair of PCR primers was designed and used for direct PCR amplification of a 1399-bp sequence within this fragment. Additional in silico and in vitro experiments, as well as phylogenetic analysis, confirmed the specificity of this primer combination and therefore the reliability of this approach in the prompt identification of S. medicae isolates and their distinction from other soil bacteria.

  10. Three phylogenetic groups of nodA and nifH genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium isolates from leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, K; Lindström, K; Young, J P

    1998-02-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels.

  11. Three Phylogenetic Groups of nodA and nifH Genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium Isolates from Leguminous Trees Growing in Africa and Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Kaisa; Lindström, Kristina; Young, J. Peter W.

    1998-01-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels. PMID:9464375

  12. Characterization of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 Prophages and Virus-Encoded DNA Methyltransferases in the Light of Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Sinorhizobial Virome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Decewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Sinorhizobium/Ensifer mostly groups nitrogen-fixing bacteria that create root or stem nodules on leguminous plants and transform atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which improves the productivity of the plants. Although these biotechnologically-important bacteria are commonly found in various soil environments, little is known about their phages. In this study, the genome of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 isolated from a heavy-metal-contaminated copper mine in Poland was investigated for the presence of prophages and DNA methyltransferase-encoding genes. In addition to the previously identified temperate phage, ΦLM21, and the phage-plasmid, pLM21S1, the analysis revealed the presence of three prophage regions. Moreover, four novel phage-encoded DNA methyltransferase (MTase genes were identified and the enzymes were characterized. It was shown that two of the identified viral MTases methylated the same target sequence (GANTC as cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM of the bacterial host strain, LM21. This discovery was recognized as an example of the evolutionary convergence between enzymes of sinorhizobial viruses and their host, which may play an important role in virus cycle. In the last part of the study, thorough comparative analyses of 31 sinorhizobial (prophages (including active sinorhizobial phages and novel putative prophages retrieved and manually re-annotated from Sinorhizobium spp. genomes were performed. The networking analysis revealed the presence of highly conserved proteins (e.g., holins and endolysins and a high diversity of viral integrases. The analysis also revealed a large number of viral DNA MTases, whose genes were frequently located within the predicted replication modules of analyzed prophages, which may suggest their important regulatory role. Summarizing, complex analysis of the phage protein similarity network enabled a new insight into overall sinorhizobial virome diversity.

  13. Molecular characterization of the pSinB plasmid of the arsenite oxidizing, metallotolerant Sinorhizobium sp. M14 - insight into the heavy metal resistome of sinorhizobial extrachromosomal replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Dziewit, Lukasz; Decewicz, Przemyslaw; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Radlinska, Monika; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. M14 is an As(III)-oxidizing, psychrotolerant strain, capable of growth in the presence of extremely high concentrations of arsenic and many other heavy metals. Metallotolerant abilities of the M14 strain depend upon the presence of two extrachromosomal replicons: pSinA (∼ 109 kb) and pSinB (∼ 300 kb). The latter was subjected to complex analysis. The performed analysis demonstrated that the plasmid pSinB is a narrow-host-range repABC-type replicon, which is fully stabilized by the phd-vapC-like toxin-antitoxin stabilizing system. In silico analysis showed that among the phenotypic gene clusters of the plasmid pSinB, eight modules are potentially involved in heavy metals resistance (HMR). These modules carry genes encoding efflux pumps, permeases, transporters and copper oxidases, which provide resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc. The functional analysis revealed that the HMR modules are active and have an effect on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values observed for the heterological host cells. The phenotype was manifested by an increase or decrease of the MICs of heavy metals and it was strain specific. The analysis of distribution of the heavy metal resistance genes, i.e. resistome, in Sinorhizobium spp. plasmids, revealed that the HMR modules are common in these replicons. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Colonization and nitrogenase activity of Triticum aestivum (cv. Baccross and Mahdavi) to the dual inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and Rhizobium meliloti plus 2,4-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehry, Askary; Akbar, Mostajeran; Giti, Emtiazi

    2008-06-15

    The potential enhancement of root colonization and nitrogenase activity of wheat cultivars (Baccross and Mahdavi) was studied with application of two Azospirillum brasilense strains (native and Sp7) co-inoculated with two Rhizobium meliloti strains (native and DSMZ 30135). The results indicated that the colonization was different due to the strains and cultivars of wheat were used. Native A. brasilense colonized wheat root better than Sp7 strain. However, Baccross cv. reacted better with native Azospirillum compared to Mahdavi cv. which reacted better with Sp7. When plants inoculated with dual inoculants (SP7 with standard Rhizobium), the colonization of Azospirillum were increased significantly (from 1.67 x 10(5) to 22 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccras cv. and 3.67 x 10(5) to 26 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cultivar). When the standard Rhizobium as co-inoculants changed to the native Rhizobium, the colonization of Azospirillum was higher when compared to the single inoculants but was almost the same when compared to the standard Rhizobium. When the standard or native strains of Rhizobium used as single inoculation of wheat roots, the number of Rhizobium in the wheat roots were not changed significantly. However, when plants co-inoculated with Rhizobium and Azospirillum, the colonization of Rhizobium was increased. Co-inoculation of standard strain of R. melilot with A. brasilense Sp7 showed that the colonization of Rhizobium were increased from 0.67 x 10(5) to 21 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccross cv. and 0.33 x 10(5) to 18 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cv. This behavior was the same when inoculation of Rhizobium was happened with the native one. In dual inoculation, the highest nitrogenase activity was measured in combination of the local strains (native A. brasilense with the native R. meliloti) and the lower one belongs to the combination of standard strains (Sp7 with standard R. meliloti). The difference in nirtogenase activity for different cultivars of

  15. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  16. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing, succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  17. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  18. Alfalfa nodules elicited by a flavodoxin-overexpressing Ensifer meliloti strain display nitrogen-fixing activity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Francisco J; Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Lucas, M Mercedes; Pueyo, José J

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation by legumes is very sensitive to salinity stress, which can severely reduce the productivity of legume crops and their soil-enriching capacity. Salinity is known to cause oxidative stress in the nodule by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavodoxins are involved in the response to oxidative stress in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Prevention of ROS production by flavodoxin overexpression in bacteroids might lead to a protective effect on nodule functioning under salinity stress. Tolerance to salinity stress was evaluated in alfalfa nodules elicited by an Ensifer meliloti strain that overexpressed a cyanobacterial flavodoxin compared with nodules produced by the wild-type bacteria. Nitrogen fixation, antioxidant and carbon metabolism enzyme activities were determined. The decline in nitrogenase activity associated to salinity stress was significantly less in flavodoxin-expressing than in wild-type nodules. We detected small but significant changes in nodule antioxidant metabolism involving the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and metabolites, as well as differences in activity of the carbon metabolism enzyme sucrose synthase, and an atypical starch accumulation pattern in flavodoxin-containing nodules. Salt-induced structural and ultrastructural alterations were examined in detail in alfalfa wild-type nodules by light and electron microscopy and compared to flavodoxin-containing nodules. Flavodoxin reduced salt-induced structural damage, which primarily affected young infected tissues and not fully differentiated bacteroids. The results indicate that overexpression of flavodoxin in bacteroids has a protective effect on the function and structure of alfalfa nodules subjected to salinity stress conditions. Putative protection mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Final report for DOE grant FG02-06ER15805

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gage, Daniel

    2012-05-31

    DOE funding was used to investigate the role of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) in the symbiotic, nodulating bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. This system is well studied in several bacterial species. However, it's organization and function in S. meliloti is substantially different than in the those other, well-studied bacteria. The S. meliloti PTS, through our DOE-funded work, has become a model for how this important signal transduction system works in the a-proteobacteria. We have found that the PTS is relatively simple, used for only signal transduction and not transport, and is involved in regulation of carbon metabolism in response to carbon availability and nitrogen availability.

  20. Effect of exogenous application of rhizopine on lucerne root nodulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhizopine, 3-0 -methyl scyllo-inosamine was applied to the roots of luceme seedling inoculated with either rhizopine synthesizing Sinorhizobium meliloti strain L530 or the non-rhizopine synthesizing strain Rm 1021 . There was an initial delay in nodule formation. A significant increase in the number of nodules formed in ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15966596 >1c8kA 12 814 20 819 0.0 ... emb|CAC47422.1| PROBABLE GLYCOGEN ...PHOSPHORYLASE PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ref|NP_386949.1| PROBABLE GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE P

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15966599 >1rzuB 1 478 1 479 e-145 ... emb|CAC47425.1| PROBABLE GLYCOGEN ...SYNTHASE (STARCH [BACTERIAL GLYCOGEN] SYNTHASE) ... PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ref|NP_386952.1| ... PROBABLE GLYC...OGEN SYNTHASE (STARCH [BACTERIAL GLYCOGEN] ... SYNTHASE) PROTEIN [Sinorhizob

  3. Analysis of nodule meristem persistence and ENOD40 functioning in Medicago truncatula nodule formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan Xi,

    2007-01-01

    Medicago root nodules are formed as a result of the interaction of the plant with the soil-borne bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several plant genes are induced during nodule formation and MtENOD40 is one of the earliest genes activated. The precise function as well as the molecule

  4. effect of exogenous application of rhizopine on lucerne root nodulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    U1111·ersi1y of Adelaide, South Australia. *Corresspondaning author. AB TRACT. Rhizopine, 3-0 -methyl scyllo-inosamine was applied to the roots of luceme seedling inoculated with either rhizopine synthesizing Sinorhizobium meliloti strain L530 or the non-rhizopine synthesizing strain Rm 1021. There was an initial ...

  5. Analysis of nodule meristem persistence and ENOD40 functioning in Medicago truncatula nodule formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan Xi,

    2007-01-01

    Medicago root nodules are formed as a result of the interaction of the plant with the soil-borne bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several plant genes are induced during nodule formation and MtENOD40 is one of the earliest genes activated. The precise function as well as the molecule harboring the

  6. An integrated physical, genetic and cytogenetic map around the sunn locus of Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnabel, E.; Kulikova, O.; Penmetsa, R.V.; Bisseling, T.; Cook, D.R.; Frugoli, J.

    2003-01-01

    The sunn mutation of Medicago truncatula is a single-gene mutation that confers a novel supernodulation phenotype in response to inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti. We took advantage of the publicly available codominant PCR markers, the high-density genetic map, and a linked cytogenetic map to

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15966456 >1gkmA 2 501 3 499 e-107 ... emb|CAC47282.1| PUTATIVE HISTIDINE AMMONIA...-LYASE PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti] ... ref|NP_386809.1| PUTATIVE HISTIDINE AMMONIA-LYASE

  8. Análisis y caracterización molecular del material genético adyacente a la región nfe, contenido en el plásmido críptico pRmeGR4b de Rhizobium meliloti GR4

    OpenAIRE

    Zekri, Sanae

    2013-01-01

    1.- los estudios de competitividad y eficiencia de nodulacion en la cepa rm2011 demuestran que la infectividad y competitividad determinadas por el plasmido prmnt40, en este fondo genetico, no son debidas exclusivamente a los genes nfe. otros genes contenidos en el plasmido prmegr4b, clonados en prmnt40, estan implicados en el proceso. 2.- la cepa gr4 de r. meliloti contiene genes adicionales implicados en la biosintesis de lisina y diamin...

  9. Acacia senegal and Prosopis chilensis-nodulating rhizobia Sinorhizobium arboris HAMBI 2361 and S. kostiense HAMBI 2362 produce tetra- and pentameric LCOs that are N-methylated, O-6-carbamoylated and partially sulfated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Petri; Soupas, Laura; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Lindström, Kristina

    2004-04-28

    Sinorhizobium arboris and S. kostiense are rhizobia that nodulate the tropical leguminous trees Acacia senegal and Prosopis chilensis. The lipochito-oligosaccharidic signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361 and S. kostiense HAMBI 2362 were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The major LCOs produced by the strains were shown to be pentameric, acylated with common fatty acids, N-methylated, O-6-carbamoylated and partially sulfated, as are the LCOs characterized to date for other Acacia-nodulating rhizobia. Besides the major LCOs the two strains produced (i) tetrameric LCOs, (ii) LCOs acylated with fatty acids other than those commonly found, (iii) LCOs with only an acyl substituent and (iv) noncarbamoylated LCOs. Production of LCOs (i) to (iii) are novel among Acacia-nodulating rhizobia. The roles of the different structural characteristics of LCOs in the rhizobium-A. senegal symbiosis are discussed. Specific structural features of the LCOs are proposed to be important in the selection of effective nitrogen-fixing rhizobia by A. senegal.

  10. LysM domains of Medicago truncatula NFP protein involved in Nod factor perception. Glycosylation state, molecular modeling and docking of chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Lonneke; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie; Imberty, Anne

    2006-09-01

    The establishment of the symbiosis between legume plants and rhizobial bacteria depends on the production of rhizobial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signals (the Nod factors) that are specifically recognized by roots of the host plant. In Medicago truncatula, specific recognition of Sinorhizobium meliloti and its Nod factors requires the NFP (Nod factor perception) gene, which encodes a putative serine/threonine receptor-like kinase (RLK). The extracellular region of this protein contains three tandem lysin motifs (LysMs), a short peptide domain that is implicated in peptidoglycan or chitin binding in various bacterial or eukaryotic proteins, respectively. We report here the homology modeling of the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP based on the structure of a LysM domain of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosidase D (MltD). Expression of NFP in a homologous system (M. truncatula roots) revealed that the protein is highly N-glycosylated, probably with both high-mannose and complex glycans. Surface analysis and docking calculations performed on the models of the three domains were used to predict the most favored binding modes for chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors. A convergent model can be proposed where the sulfated, O-acetylated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod factor of S. meliloti binds in similar orientation to the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP. N-glycosylation is not expected to interfere with Nod factor binding in this orientation.

  11. Seamless Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Naumchev, Alexandr; Meyer, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Popular notations for functional requirements specifications frequently ignore developers' needs, target specific development models, or require translation of requirements into tests for verification; the results can give out-of-sync or downright incompatible artifacts. Seamless Requirements, a new approach to specifying functional requirements, contributes to developers' understanding of requirements and to software quality regardless of the process, while the process itself becomes lighter...

  12. Ecology, Diversity and Comparative Genomics of Oceanic Cyanobacterial Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 (ZP_00107423). 170 Chisholm Supplementary Figure 5 Agrobacterium tumefaciens Brucella melitensis • Sinorhizobium meliloti 9...phosphatase of Synechococcus PCC 7942 and related cyanobacterial genes. Accession numbers as follows: Brucella melitensis (NP_541633.1), Agrobacterium...can result in a rapid succession of phi PM2, was isolated off the coast of Chile in microbial species (Thingstad and Lignell, 1997; the 1960s (Espejo

  13. Genetic identification and symbiotic efficiency of Sinorhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... assess genetic diversity and genetic relationships amongst strains of natural populations and (iii) to provide information about ... The perennial species Medicago sativa is the most widely cultivated species of alfalfa .... inoculated with 5 mL of broth culture containing 109 cells/ml at planting time. Plants were ...

  14. Requirements Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, Elizabeth; Dick, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Written for those who want to develop their knowledge of requirements engineering process, whether practitioners or students.Using the latest research and driven by practical experience from industry, Requirements Engineering gives useful hints to practitioners on how to write and structure requirements. It explains the importance of Systems Engineering and the creation of effective solutions to problems. It describes the underlying representations used in system modeling and introduces the UML2, and considers the relationship between requirements and modeling. Covering a generic multi-layer r

  15. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  16. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  17. Choline Uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the High-Affinity ChoXWV Transporter▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A.; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called “Venus flytrap mechanism” of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  18. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Paul A; Tanner, Houston R; Dillon, Brett A; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C; Griffitts, Joel S

    2015-12-08

    Legume-rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes.

  19. A bioassay for the detection of benzimidazoles reveals their presence in a range of environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence S Crofts

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cobamides are a family of enzyme cofactors that include vitamin B12 (cobalamin and are produced solely by prokaryotes. Structural variability in the lower axial ligand has been observed in cobamides produced by diverse organisms. Of the three classes of lower ligands, the benzimidazoles are uniquely found in cobamides, whereas the purine and phenolic bases have additional biological functions. Many organisms acquire cobamides by salvaging and remodeling cobamides or their precursors from the environment. These processes require free benzimidazoles for incorporation as lower ligands, though the presence of benzimidazoles in the environment has not been previously investigated. Here, we report a new purification method and bioassay to measure the total free benzimidazole content of samples from microbial communities and laboratory media components. The bioassay relies on the calcofluor-bright phenotype of a bluB mutant of the model cobalamin-producing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. The concentrations of individual benzimidazoles in these samples were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Several benzimidazoles were detected in subpicomolar to subnanomolar concentrations in host-associated and environmental samples. In addition, benzimidazoles were found to be common contaminants of laboratory media components. These results suggest that benzimidazoles present in the environment and in laboratory media have the potential to influence microbial metabolic activities.

  20. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Nisa-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP with reverse transcriptase (RT and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns.

  1. Different biochemical mechanisms ensure network-wide balancing of reducing equivalents in microbial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-04-01

    To sustain growth, the catabolic formation of the redox equivalent NADPH must be balanced with the anabolic demand. The mechanisms that ensure such network-wide balancing, however, are presently not understood. Based on 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactor specificities for all relevant central metabolic enzymes, we have quantified catabolic NADPH production in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Paracoccus versutus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Zymomonas mobilis. For six species, the estimated NADPH production from glucose catabolism exceeded the requirements for biomass synthesis. Exceptions were P. fluorescens, with balanced rates, and E. coli, with insufficient catabolic production, in which about one-third of the NADPH is supplied via the membrane-bound transhydrogenase PntAB. P. versutus and B. subtilis were the only species that appear to rely on transhydrogenases for balancing NADPH overproduction during growth on glucose. In the other four species, the main but not exclusive redox-balancing mechanism appears to be the dual cofactor specificities of several catabolic enzymes and/or the existence of isoenzymes with distinct cofactor specificities, in particular glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. An unexpected key finding for all species, except E. coli and B. subtilis, was the lack of cofactor specificity in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, which contrasts with the textbook view of the pentose phosphate pathway dehydrogenases as being NADP+ dependent.

  2. The trehalose utilization gene thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti does not influence competitiveness for nodulation on Lotus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Jensen, John Beck

    2014-03-01

    Competitiveness for nodulation is a desirable trait in rhizobia strains used as inoculant. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 mutation in either of the trehalose utilization genes thuA or thuB influences its competitiveness for root colonization and nodule occupancy depending on the interacting host. We have therefore investigated whether mutation in the thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 also leads to a similar competitive phenotype on its hosts. The results show that M. loti thuA mutant Ml7023 was symbiotically effective and was as competitive as the wild type in colonization and nodule occupancy on Lotus corniculatus and Lotus japonicus. The thuA gene in M. loti was not induced during root colonization or in the infection threads unlike in S. meliloti, despite its induction by trehalose and high osmolarity in in vitro assays.

  3. Stable symbiotic nitrogen fixation under water-deficit field conditions by a stress-tolerant alfalfa microsymbiont and its complete genome sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Brambilla, Silvina; Frare, Romina; Stritzler, Margarita; Piccinetti, Carlos; Puente, Mariana; Berini, Carolina Andrea; Pérez, Pedro Reyes; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás

    2017-12-10

    We here characterized the stress-tolerant alfalfa microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti B401. B401-treated plants showed high nitrogen fixation rates under humid and semiarid environments. The production of glycine betaine in isolated bacteroids positively correlated with low precipitation levels, suggesting that this compound acts as a critical osmoprotectant under field conditions. Genome analysis revealed that strain B401 contains alternative pathways for the biosynthesis and uptake of glycine betaine and its precursors. Such genomic information will offer substantial insight into the environmental physiology of this biotechnologically valuable nitrogen-fixing bacterium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The thuEFGKAB operon of rhizobia and agrobacterium tumefaciens codes for transport of trehalose, maltitol, and isomers of sucrose and their assimilation through the formation of their 3-keto derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Avetisyan, Anna; Hansen, Espen; Svenson, Johan; Huser, Thomas; Jensen, John Beck; Bhuvaneswari, T V

    2013-09-01

    The thu operon (thuEFGKAB) in Sinorhizobium meliloti codes for transport and utilization functions of the disaccharide trehalose. Sequenced genomes of members of the Rhizobiaceae reveal that some rhizobia and Agrobacterium possess the entire thu operon in similar organizations and that Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 lacks the transport (thuEFGK) genes. In this study, we show that this operon is dedicated to the transport and assimilation of maltitol and isomers of sucrose (leucrose, palatinose, and trehalulose) in addition to trehalulose, not only in S. meliloti but also in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. By using genetic complementation, we show that the thuAB genes of S. meliloti, M. loti, and A. tumefaciens are functionally equivalent. Further, we provide both genetic and biochemical evidence to show that these bacteria assimilate these disaccharides by converting them to their respective 3-keto derivatives and that the thuAB genes code for this ketodisaccharide-forming enzyme(s). Formation of 3-ketotrehalose in real time in live S. meliloti is shown through Raman spectroscopy. The presence of an additional ketodisaccharide-forming pathway(s) in A. tumefaciens is also indicated. To our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genes that code for the conversion of disaccharides to their 3-ketodisaccharide derivatives in any organism.

  5. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  6. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  7. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  8. Roles of Extracellular Polysaccharides and Biofilm Formation in Heavy Metal Resistance of Rhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Nocelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface components and extracellular compounds, particularly flagella, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, and exopolysaccharides (EPSs, in combination with environmental signals and quorum-sensing signals, play crucial roles in bacterial autoaggregation, biofilm development, survival, and host colonization. The nitrogen-fixing species Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti produces two symbiosis-promoting EPSs: succinoglycan (or EPS I and galactoglucan (or EPS II. Studies of the S. meliloti/alfalfa symbiosis model system have revealed numerous biological functions of EPSs, including host specificity, participation in early stages of host plant infection, signaling molecule during plant development, and (most importantly protection from environmental stresses. We evaluated functions of EPSs in bacterial resistance to heavy metals and metalloids, which are known to affect various biological processes. Heavy metal resistance, biofilm production, and co-culture were tested in the context of previous studies by our group. A range of mercury (Hg II and arsenic (As III concentrations were applied to S. meliloti wild type strain and to mutant strains defective in EPS I and EPS II. The EPS production mutants were generally most sensitive to the metals. Our findings suggest that EPSs are necessary for the protection of bacteria from either Hg (II or As (III stress. Previous studies have described a pump in S. meliloti that causes efflux of arsenic from cells to surrounding culture medium, thereby protecting them from this type of chemical stress. The presence of heavy metals or metalloids in culture medium had no apparent effect on formation of biofilm, in contrast to previous reports that biofilm formation helps protect various microorganism species from adverse environmental conditions. In co-culture experiments, EPS-producing heavy metal resistant strains exerted a protective effect on AEPS-non-producing, heavy metal-sensitive strains; a phenomenon

  9. Oligo- and polysaccharide synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium meliloti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species are capable of synthesizing a variety of extracellular and cellular oligo- and polysaccharides. Changes in environmental conditions may all affect the composition, physical properties, and relative amounts of

  10. Postmarket Requirements and Commitments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides information to the public on postmarket requirements and commitments. The phrase postmarket requirements and commitments refers to studies and clinical...

  11. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  12. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  13. Future Home Network Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbonnier, Benoit; Wessing, Henrik; Lannoo, Bart

    This paper presents the requirements for future Home Area Networks (HAN). Firstly, we discuss the applications and services as well as their requirements. Then, usage scenarios are devised to establish a first specification for the HAN. The main requirements are an increased bandwidth (towards 1...

  14. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products

  15. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In most IT system development processes, the identification or elicitation of user requirements is recognized as a key building block. In practice, the identification of user needs and wants is a challenge and inadequate or faulty identifications in this step of an IT system development can cause...... involvement and requirements elicitation Usable security requirements for design of privacy...

  16. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, D.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study is an empirical investigation of requirements evolution for groupware systems in use by means of case studies. Its goal is to contribute to the development of a theory of requirements evolution. A conceptual framework offering an integrated view of requirements as a collection of domains

  17. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document establishes the Transportation system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are derived from the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document (CRD). The Transportation System Requirements Document (TSRD) was developed in accordance with LP-3.1Q-OCRWM, Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of National Transportation Level-2 Baseline Requirements. As illustrated in Figure 1, the TSRD forms a part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Technical Baseline

  18. Transportation System Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  19. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Semantic Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Motoshi

    Requirements engineering (RE) techniques play a crucial role in information systems development processes. There are many excellent techniques of RE to assist requirements analysts and stakeholders in producing requirements specification of higher quality, and some of them are put into practice in industry. However, one of the issues of these RE techniques is that they do not handle semantic aspects of requirements. If we can deal with the meaning of requirements by using automated techniques, we can get more effective RE techniques to produce requirements specifications of higher quality. In this chapter, we consider an ontology as a semantic domain so as to provide the meaning for requirements, and discuss the potentials of the RE techniques using an ontology as a semantic basis. Especially, we illustrate an extension of goal-oriented requirements analysis where this idea is embedded, i.e. we provide the semantics for goal descriptions written in natural language using a mapping from them to an ontology. The inference mechanisms of the ontology allow us to decompose a goal into sub-goals and to find missing goals. Furthermore, in this chapter we discuss the possibilities of the techniques to support the other activities of RE processes using this ontological technique, e.g. measuring quality metrics and controlling versions of requirements from a semantic view. Due to similarity to Semantic Web techniques, we call a family of these engineering techniques Semantic Requirements Engineering in this chapter.

  1. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel E. van Noorden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes.

  2. Environmental Requirements Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  3. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauzart, Ariel; Vandenbrink, Joshua; Kiss, John

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬- Sinorhizobium meliloti - Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis), or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  4. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel J.C. Dauzart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬– Sinorhizobium meliloti – Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis, or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  5. Creativity in Requirement Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Olesen, Henning

    Traditional requirements engineering focuses mainly on analysis and elicitation. However, current trends in new system, device and software are towards involving all stakeholders in the early stages of the engineering process to define the user requirements. Creativity is here seen as a major...

  6. Navigating the Requirements Jungle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Boris; Tautschnig, Michael

    Research on validation and verification of requirements specifications has thus far focused on functional properties. Yet, in embedded systems, functional requirements constitute only a small fraction of the properties that must hold to guarantee proper and safe operation of the system under design.

  7. Writing testable software requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knirk, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial identifies common problems in analyzing requirements in the problem and constructing a written specification of what the software is to do. It deals with two main problem areas: identifying and describing problem requirements, and analyzing and describing behavior specifications.

  8. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In most IT system development processes, the identification or elicitation of user requirements is recognized as a key building block. In practice, the identification of user needs and wants is a challenge and inadequate or faulty identifications in this step of an IT system development can cause...... huge problems with the final product. The elicitation of user requirements as such changes according to age groups;, to gender,; to cultural settings,; and into time; and experience in the use of the system/software. User requirements, therefore, cannot be used between projects, IT systems......, and different software. That makes the elicitation of user requirements an inherent part of any software development project and a resourceful activity as well. This book provides insights to the process of identifying user requirements and to different types by describing varying case studies in which...

  9. Requirements in engineering projects

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, João M

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on various topics related to engineering and management of requirements, in particular elicitation, negotiation, prioritisation, and documentation (whether with natural languages or with graphical models). The book provides methods and techniques that help to characterise, in a systematic manner, the requirements of the intended engineering system.  It was written with the goal of being adopted as the main text for courses on requirements engineering, or as a strong reference to the topics of requirements in courses with a broader scope. It can also be used in vocational courses, for professionals interested in the software and information systems domain.   Readers who have finished this book will be able to: - establish and plan a requirements engineering process within the development of complex engineering systems; - define and identify the types of relevant requirements in engineering projects; - choose and apply the most appropriate techniques to elicit the requirements of a giv...

  10. TWRSview system requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.A.; Lee, A.K.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the system requirements specification for the TWRSview software system. The TWRSview software system is being developed to integrate electronic data supporting the development of the TWRS technical baseline

  11. Turning Desirements into Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    27 Defense AT&L: September–October 2015 Turning “Desirements” into Requirements Charles Court Court is the Requirements Center Director at the...Defense Systems Management College at the Defense Acquisition University at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He is a former Wild Weasel Electronic Warfare Officer...a Mustang would do much better. (The author wanted the Aston Martin from the movie “Goldfinger.” You know: The one with the ejection seat, automated

  12. Automatic requirements traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Andžiulytė, Justė

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on automatic requirements traceability and algorithms that automatically find recommendation links for requirements. The main objective of this paper is the evaluation of these algorithms and preparation of the method defining algorithms to be used in different cases. This paper presents and examines probabilistic, vector space and latent semantic indexing models of information retrieval and association rule mining using authors own implementations of these algorithms and o...

  13. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  14. BRD usability requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-12

    This document describes the usability requirements for the Biosurveillance resource directory (BRD); that is, who will be using the tool and what tasks they will be using it for. It does not include information on technical implementation (e.g., whether specific information is contained in the database or pulled on demand from other sources). It also avoids specific design ideas (such as widget descriptions) unless they are necessary to illustrate a requirement.

  15. Utility requirements for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondrasek, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes work done and results obtained during performance of Task 1 of a study of Utility Requirements and Criteria for Fusion Options. The work consisted of developing a list of utility requirements for fusion optics containing definition of the requirements and showing their relative importance to the utility industry. The project team members developed a preliminary list which was refined by discussions and literature searches. The refined list was recast as a questionnaire which was sent to a substantial portion of the utility industry in this country. Forty-three questionnaire recipients responded including thirty-two utilities. A workshop was held to develop a revised requirements list using the survey responses as a major input. The list prepared by the workshop was further refined by a panel consisting of vice presidents of the three project team firms. The results of the study indicate that in addition to considering the cost of energy for a power plant, utilities consider twenty-three other requirements. Four of the requirements were judged to be vital to plant acceptability: Plant Capital Cost, Financial Liability, Plant Safety and Licensability

  16. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  17. NP Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. To support SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In August 2011, ESnet and the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP), of the DOE SC, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by NP. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  18. Quantifying requirements volatility effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulk, G.P.; Verhoef, C.

    2008-01-01

    In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements volatility. This representative portfolio

  19. Data Crosscutting Requirements Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Plata, Charity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    In April 2013, a diverse group of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientific community assembled to assess data requirements associated with DOE-sponsored scientific facilities and large-scale experiments. Participants in the review included facilities staff, program managers, and scientific experts from the offices of Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, High Energy Physics, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research. As part of the meeting, review participants discussed key issues associated with three distinct aspects of the data challenge: 1) processing, 2) management, and 3) analysis. These discussions identified commonalities and differences among the needs of varied scientific communities. They also helped to articulate gaps between current approaches and future needs, as well as the research advances that will be required to close these gaps. Moreover, the review provided a rare opportunity for experts from across the Office of Science to learn about their collective expertise, challenges, and opportunities. The "Data Crosscutting Requirements Review" generated specific findings and recommendations for addressing large-scale data crosscutting requirements.

  20. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ely, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harper, Warren W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heimbigner, Tom R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, Charles W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Humble, Paul H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Madison, Jill C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Panisko, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ripplinger, Mike D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stewart, Timothy L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  1. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  2. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  3. Entrepreneurial learning requires action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove; Madsen, Svend Ole

    2014-01-01

    apply in industry. The findings of this study show that SME managers employ a practice-shaped holistic multi- and cross-disciplinary approach to learning. This learning approach is supported by theory dissemination, business challenge applications, and organisational prerequisites. Diversified learning......This paper reveals how managers of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can utilise their participation in research-based training. Empirical research from a longitudinal study of 10 SMEs managers in the wind turbine industry is provided to describe a learning approach that SME managers can...... that is enhanced by essential large-scale industry players and other SME managers are required to create action and value in learning. An open-mindedness to new learning approaches by SME managers and an open-mindedness to multi- and cross-disciplinary collaboration with SME managers by facilitators is required....

  4. Ecodesign requirements for televisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huulgaard, Rikke Dorothea; Dalgaard, Randi; Merciai, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    phase. This is not in line with the scientific understanding of ecodesign, where attention should be put on all life cycle phases and all relevant environmental impact categories. This study focuses on the requirements for televisions (TV). A life cycle assessment (LCA) is carried out on two TVs...... to analyse if other environmental hotspots and life cycle phases should be included in the requirements in the IM of the Ecodesign Directive besides energy consumption in the use phase analysis. Methods The consequential approach is used. The data for the LCA have been gathered from two manufacturers of TVs....... In one case, the data were delivered in Excel spreadsheets; in the other case, the authors of this paper together with the manufacturer disassembled a TV and collected the data manually. Results and discussion When applying the consequential approach, the production phase has the highest environmental...

  5. Preanalytical requirements of urinalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanghe, Joris; Speeckaert, Marijn

    2014-01-01

    Urine may be a waste product, but it contains an enormous amount of information. Well-standardized procedures for collection, transport, sample preparation and analysis should become the basis of an effective diagnostic strategy for urinalysis. As reproducibility of urinalysis has been greatly improved due to recent technological progress, preanalytical requirements of urinalysis have gained importance and have become stricter. Since the patients themselves often sample urine specimens, urinalysis is very susceptible to preanalytical issues. Various sampling methods and inappropriate specimen transport can cause important preanalytical errors. The use of preservatives may be helpful for particular analytes. Unfortunately, a universal preservative that allows a complete urinalysis does not (yet) exist. The preanalytical aspects are also of major importance for newer applications (e.g. metabolomics). The present review deals with the current preanalytical problems and requirements for the most common urinary analytes. PMID:24627718

  6. LHCb Online Networking Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, B

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the networking requirements of the LHCb online installation. It lists both quantitative aspects such as the number of required switch ports, as well as some qualitative features of the equipment, such as minimum buffer sizes in switches. The document comprises both the data acquisition network and the controls/general-purpose network. While the numbers represent our best current knowledge and are intended to give (in particular) network equipment manufacturers an overview of our needs, this document should not be confused with a market survey questionnaire or a formal tendering document. However the information contained in this document will be the input of any such document. A preliminary schedule for procurement and installation is also given.

  7. Utility requirements for HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Eskom, the state utility of South Africa, is currently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the helium cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor with a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system for future power generating additions to its electric system. This paper provides an overview of the Eskom system including the needs of the utility for future generation capacity and the key performance requirements necessary for incorporation of this gas cooled reactor plant. (author)

  8. BER Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alapaty, Kiran; Allen, Ben; Bell, Greg; Benton, David; Brettin, Tom; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Cotter, Steve; Crivelli, Silvia; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Desai, Narayan; Egan, Richard; Tierney, Brian; Goodwin, Ken; Gregurick, Susan; Hicks, Susan; Johnston, Bill; de Jong, Bert; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Livny, Miron; Markowitz, Victor; McGraw, Jim; McCord, Raymond; Oehmen, Chris; Regimbal, Kevin; Shipman, Galen; Strand, Gary; Flick, Jeff; Turnbull, Susan; Williams, Dean; Zurawski, Jason

    2010-11-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  9. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM

  10. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  11. BES Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biocca, Alan; Carlson, Rich; Chen, Jackie; Cotter, Steve; Tierney, Brian; Dattoria, Vince; Davenport, Jim; Gaenko, Alexander; Kent, Paul; Lamm, Monica; Miller, Stephen; Mundy, Chris; Ndousse, Thomas; Pederson, Mark; Perazzo, Amedeo; Popescu, Razvan; Rouson, Damian; Sekine, Yukiko; Sumpter, Bobby; Dart, Eli; Wang, Cai-Zhuang -Z; Whitelam, Steve; Zurawski, Jason

    2011-02-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  12. BES Science Network Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  13. NIRVANA network requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, B.J.

    1990-08-01

    NIRVANA is an effort to standardize electrical computer-aided design workstations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The early effect of this project will be the introduction of at least 60 new engineering workstations at Sandia National Laboratories. Albuquerque, and at Allied Signal, Kansas City Division. These workstations are expected to begin arriving in September 1990. This paper proposes a design and outlines the requirements for a network to support the NIRVANA project. The author proposes a near-term network design, describes the security profile and caveats of this design, and proposes a long-term networking strategy for NIRVANA. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Finding Incorrect and Missing Quality Requirements Definitions Using Requirements Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Atsushi

    Defining quality requirements completely and correctly is more difficult than defining functional requirements because stakeholders do not state most of quality requirements explicitly. We thus propose a method to measure a requirements specification for identifying the amount of quality requirements in the specification. We also propose another method to recommend quality requirements to be defined in such a specification. We expect stakeholders can identify missing and unnecessary quality requirements when measured quality requirements are different from recommended ones. We use a semi-formal language called X-JRDL to represent requirements specifications because it is suitable for analyzing quality requirements. We applied our methods to a requirements specification, and found our methods contribute to defining quality requirements more completely and correctly.

  15. Section 4: Requirements Intertwining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucopoulos, Pericles

    Business analysts are being asked to develop increasingly complex and varied business systems that need to cater to the changing and dynamic market conditions of the new economy. This is particularly acute in today’s turbulent business environment where powerful forces such as deregulation, globalisation, mergers, advances in information and telecommunications technologies, and increasing education of people provide opportunities for organising work in ways that have never before been possible. Enterprises attempt to create wealth either by getting better at improving their products and services or by harnessing creativity and human-centred management to create innovative solutions. In these business settings, requirements become critical in bridging system solutions to organisational and societal problems. They intertwine organisational, social, cognitive, and implementation considerations and they can provide unique insights to change in systems and their business context. Such design situations often involve multiple stakeholders from different participating organisations, subcontractors, divisions, etc., who may have a diversity of expertise, come from different organisational cultures and often have competing goals. The success or failure of many projects depends, to a large extent, on understanding the contextual setting of requirements and their interaction amongst a diverse population of stakeholders.

  16. Beauty Requires Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brielmann, Aenne A; Pelli, Denis G

    2017-05-22

    The experience of beauty is a pleasure, but common sense and philosophy suggest that feeling beauty differs from sensuous pleasures such as eating or sex. Immanuel Kant [1, 2] claimed that experiencing beauty requires thought but that sensuous pleasure can be enjoyed without thought and cannot be beautiful. These venerable hypotheses persist in models of aesthetic processing [3-7] but have never been tested. Here, participants continuously rated the pleasure felt from a nominally beautiful or non-beautiful stimulus and then judged whether they had experienced beauty. The stimuli, which engage various senses, included seeing images, tasting candy, and touching a teddy bear. The observer reported the feelings that the stimulus evoked. The time course of pleasure, across stimuli, is well-fit by a model with one free parameter: pleasure amplitude. Pleasure amplitude increases linearly with the feeling of beauty. To test Kant's claim of a need for thought, we reduce cognitive capacity by adding a "two-back" task to distract the observer's thoughts. The distraction greatly reduces the beauty and pleasure experienced from stimuli that otherwise produce strong pleasure and spares that of less-pleasant stimuli. We also find that strong pleasure is always beautiful, whether produced reliably by beautiful stimuli or just occasionally by sensuous stimuli. In sum, we confirm Kant's claim that only the pleasure associated with feeling beauty requires thought and disprove his claim that sensuous pleasures cannot be beautiful. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Finding Incorrect and Missing Quality Requirements Definitions Using Requirements Frame

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiya, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Defining quality requirements completely and correctly is more difficult than defining functional requirements because stakeholders do not state most of quality requirements explicitly. We thus propose a method to measure a requirements specification for identifying the amount of quality requirements in the specification. We also propose another method to recommend quality requirements to be defined in such a specification. We expect stakeholders can identify missing and unnecessary quality r...

  18. Display Parameters and Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  19. SOFG: Standards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, T.; Grigorov, S.; Kozhukharov, V.; Brashkova, N.

    2005-01-01

    It is well-known that Solid Oxide Fuel Cells will have industrial application in the nearest future. In this context, the problem of SOFC materials and SOFC systems standardization is of high level of priority. In the present study the attention is focused on the methods for physical and chemical characterization of the materials for SOFC components fabrication and about requirements on single SOFC cells tests. The status of the CEN, ISO, ASTM (ANSI, ASSN) and JIS class of standards has been verified. Standards regarding the test methods for physical-chemical characterization of vitreous materials (as sealing SOFC component), ceramic materials (as electrodes and electrolyte components, including alternative materials used) and metallic materials (interconnect components) are subject of overview. It is established that electrical, mechanical, surface and interfacial phenomena, chemical durability and thermal corrosion behaviour are the key areas for standardization of the materials for SOFC components

  20. SDC detector foundation requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, J.L.; Butalla, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) Detector weighs approximately 32,000 metric tons, and its ability to perform to design specifications is directly related to its internal alignment. The limits of the misalignment tolerance envelope in combination with the detector weight impose a set of tolerance limits of performance directly upon the foundation structure. The foundation must accommodate different detector loading conditions during installation, operation, maintenance, and future enhancements. The foundation must also respond to the loading conditions within a restrictive set of displacement limitations in order to maintain the detector's critical alignment, thereby guaranteeing its operational integrity. This paper will present the results of this study, which has been issued to the Architect Engineer/Construction Manager as user requirements of design. The total structural system performance of the combination of both the detector and its foundation will be discussed

  1. Equipment Operational Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  2. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high

  3. Requirements of quality standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture traces the development of nuclear standards, codes, and Federal regulations on quality assurance (QA) for nuclear power plants and associated facilities. The technical evolution of the last twelve years, especially in the area of nuclear technology, led to different activities and regulatory initiatives, and the present result is: several nations have their own homemade standards. The lecture discusses the former and especially current activities in standard development, and gives a description of the requirements of QA-standards used in USA and Europe, especially Western Germany. Furthermore the lecture attempts to give a comparison and an evaluation of the international quality standards from the author's viewpoint. Finally the lecture presents an outlook for the future international implications of QA-standards. There is an urgent need within the nuclear industry for simplification and standardization of QA-standards. The relationship between the various standards, and the applicability of the standards need clarification and a better transparancy. To point out these problems is the purpose of the lecture. (orig.) [de

  4. Internationalization of regulatory requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet, Y

    2003-02-01

    The aim of harmonisation of medicines regulatory requirements is to allow the patient quicker access to new drugs and to avoid animal and human duplications. Harmonisation in the European Union (EU) is now completed, and has led to the submission of one dossier in one language study leading to European marketing authorizations, thanks in particular to efficacy guidelines published at the European level. With the benefit of the European experience since 1989, more than 40 guidelines have been harmonised amongst the EU, Japan and the USA through the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH). ICH is a unique process gathering regulators and industry experts from the three regions. Its activity is built on expertise and trust. The Common Technical Document (CTD), an agreed common format for application in the three regions, is a logical follow-up to the ICH first phase harmonising the content of the dossier. The CTD final implementation in July 2003 will have considerable influence on the review process and on the exchange of information in the three regions.

  5. THE EQUALITY PRINCIPLE REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA ANDRIŢOI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem premises and the objectives followed: the idea of inserting the equality principle between the freedom and the justice principles is manifested in positive law in two stages, as a general idea of all judicial norms and as requirement of the owner of a subjective right of the applicants of an objective law. Equality in face of the law and of public authorities can not involve the idea of standardization, of uniformity, of enlisting of all citizens under the mark of the same judicial regime, regardless of their natural or socio-professional situation. Through the Beijing Platform and the position documents of the European Commission we have defined the integrative approach of equality as representing an active and visible integration of the gender perspective in all sectors and at all levels. The research methods used are: the conceptualist method, the logical method and the intuitive method necessary as means of reasoning in order to argue our demonstration. We have to underline the fact that the system analysis of the research methods of the judicial phenomenon doesn’t agree with “value ranking”, because one value cannot be generalized in rapport to another. At the same time, we must fight against a methodological extremism. The final purpose of this study is represented by the reaching of the perfecting/excellence stage by all individuals through the promotion of equality and freedom. This supposes the fact that the existence of a non-discrimination favourable frame (fairness represents a means and a condition of self-determination, and the state of perfection/excellency is a result of this self-determination, the condition necessary for the obtaining of this nondiscrimination frame for all of us and in conditions of freedom for all individuals, represents the same condition that promotes the state of perfection/excellency. In conclusion we may state the fact that the equality principle represents a true catalyst of the

  6. Requirements Reasoning for Distributed Requirements Analysis using Semantic Wiki

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Peng; Avgeriou, Paris; Clerc, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    In large-scale collaborative software projects, thousands of requirements with complex interdependencies and different granularity spreading in different levels are elicited, documented, and evolved during the project lifecycle. Non-technical stakeholders involved in requirements engineering

  7. Requirement Assurance: A Verification Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Requirement Assurance is an act of requirement verification which assures the stakeholder or customer that a product requirement has produced its "as realized product" and has been verified with conclusive evidence. Product requirement verification answers the question, "did the product meet the stated specification, performance, or design documentation?". In order to ensure the system was built correctly, the practicing system engineer must verify each product requirement using verification methods of inspection, analysis, demonstration, or test. The products of these methods are the "verification artifacts" or "closure artifacts" which are the objective evidence needed to prove the product requirements meet the verification success criteria. Institutional direction is given to the System Engineer in NPR 7123.1A NASA Systems Engineering Processes and Requirements with regards to the requirement verification process. In response, the verification methodology offered in this report meets both the institutional process and requirement verification best practices.

  8. Colorimetric Detection of Some Highly Hydrophobic Flavonoids Using Polydiacetylene Liposomes Containing Pentacosa-10,12-diynoyl Succinoglycan Monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of plant secondary metabolites including polyphenolic molecules, and they are well known for antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral propertied. In general, flavonoids are detected with various non-colorimetric detection methods such as column liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and electrochemical analysis. For the first time, we developed a straightforward colorimetric detection system allowing recognition of some highly hydrophobic flavonoids such as alpha-naphthoflavone and beta-naphthoflavone, visually using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) derivatized with succinoglycan monomers isolated from Sinorhizobium meliloti. Besides changes in visible spectrum, we also demonstrate fluorescence changes using our detection system in the presence of those flavonoids. The succinoglycan monomers attached to PCDA molecules may function as an unstructured molecular capturer for some highly hydrophobic flavonoids by hydrophobic interactions, and transmit their molecular interactions as a color change throughout the PCDA liposome. PMID:26600071

  9. Rhizobium strains differ considerably in outer membrane permeability and polymyxin B resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaniecka, Iwona; Zamłyńska, Katarzyna; Zan, Radosław; Staszczak, Magdalena; Pawelec, Jarosław; Seta, Irena; Choma, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Six rhizobium (Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. Trifolii TA1, Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243(T), Ochrobactrum lupini LUP 21(T), Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 and B. elkanii USDA 76) and two Escherichia coli strains (E. coli ATCC 25922 and E. coli HB 101) were compared in respect to polymyxin B and EDTA resistance, as well as bacterial outer membrane (OM) permeability to a fluorescent hydrophobic agent (N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine - NPN). TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and a microbial test demonstrated that all the rhizobia were much more resistant to polymyxin B in comparison with E. coli strains. EDTA and polymyxin B enhance permeability of B. japonicum and O. lupini OM. Other rhizobia incorporated NPN independently of the presence of membrane-deteriorating agents; however, the level of fluorescence (measured as NPN absorption) was strain dependent.

  10. How rhizobial symbionts invade plants: the Sinorhizobium–Medicago model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn M.; Kobayashi, Hajime; Davies, Bryan W.; Taga, Michiko E.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants have evolved complex signal exchange mechanisms that allow a specific bacterial species to induce its host plant to form invasion structures through which the bacteria can enter the plant root. Once the bacteria have been endocytosed within a host-membrane-bound compartment by root cells, the bacteria differentiate into a new form that can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Bacterial differentiation and nitrogen fixation are dependent on the microaerobic environment and other support factors provided by the plant. In return, the plant receives nitrogen from the bacteria, which allows it to grow in the absence of an external nitrogen source. Here, we review recent discoveries about the mutual recognition process that allows the model rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti to invade and differentiate inside its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and the model host plant barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). PMID:17632573

  11. Overexpression of flavodoxin in bacteroids induces changes in antioxidant metabolism leading to delayed senescence and starch accumulation in alfalfa root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Francisco J; de la Peña, Teodoro Coba; Morcillo, César N; Lucas, M Mercedes; Pueyo, José J

    2009-02-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti cells were engineered to overexpress Anabaena variabilis flavodoxin, a protein that is involved in the response to oxidative stress. Nodule natural senescence was characterized in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants nodulated by the flavodoxin-overexpressing rhizobia or the corresponding control bacteria. The decline of nitrogenase activity and the nodule structural and ultrastructural alterations that are associated with nodule senescence were significantly delayed in flavodoxin-expressing nodules. Substantial changes in nodule antioxidant metabolism, involving antioxidant enzymes and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and metabolites, were detected in flavodoxin-containing nodules. Lipid peroxidation was also significantly lower in flavodoxin-expressing nodules than in control nodules. The observed amelioration of the oxidative balance suggests that the delay in nodule senescence was most likely due to a role of the protein in reactive oxygen species detoxification. Flavodoxin overexpression also led to high starch accumulation in nodules, without reduction of the nitrogen-fixing activity.

  12. Waste management system requirements document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This volume defines the top level requirements for the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). It is designed to be used in conjunction with Volume 1 of the WMSR, General System Requirements. It provides a functional description expanding the requirements allocated to the MGDS in Volume 1 and elaborates on each requirement by providing associated performance criteria as appropriate. Volumes 1 and 4 of the WMSR provide a minimum set of requirements that must be satisfied by the final MGDS design. This document sets forth specific requirements that must be fulfilled. It is not the intent or purpose of this top level document to describe how each requirement is to be satisfied in the final MGDS design. Each subsequent level of the technical document hierarchy must provide further guidance and definition as to how each of these requirements is to be implemented in the design. It is expected that each subsequent level of requirements will be significantly more detailed. Section 2 of this volume provides a functional description of the MGDS. Each function is addressed in terms of requirements, and performance criteria. Section 3 provides a list of controlling documents. Each document cited in a requirement of Chapter 2 is included in this list and is incorporated into this document as a requirement on the final system. The WMSR addresses only federal requirements (i.e., laws, regulations and DOE orders). State and local requirements are not addressed. However, it will be specifically noted at the potentially affected WMSR requirements that there could be additional or more stringent regulations imposed by a state or local requirements or administering agency over the cited federal requirements

  13. Imperfect Requirements in Software Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noppen, J.A.R.; van den Broek, P.M.; Aksit, Mehmet; Sawyer, Pete; Paech, Barbara; Heymans, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Requirement Specifications are very difficult to define. Due to lack of information and differences in interpretation, software engineers are faced with the necessity to redesign and iterate. This imperfection in software requirement specifications is commonly addressed by incremental design. In

  14. Requirement Development Process and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayt, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Requirements capture the system-level capabilities in a set of complete, necessary, clear, attainable, traceable, and verifiable statements of need. Requirements should not be unduly restrictive, but should set limits that eliminate items outside the boundaries drawn, encourage competition (or alternatives), and capture source and reason of requirement. If it is not needed by the customer, it is not a requirement. They establish the verification methods that will lead to product acceptance. These must be reproducible assessment methods.

  15. Waste Management System Requirement document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This volume defines the top level technical requirements for the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. It is designed to be used in conjunction with Volume 1, General System Requirements. Volume 3 provides a functional description expanding the requirements allocated to the MRS facility in Volume 1 and, when appropriate, elaborates on requirements by providing associated performance criteria. Volumes 1 and 3 together convey a minimum set of requirements that must be satisfied by the final MRS facility design without unduly constraining individual design efforts. The requirements are derived from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (NWPAA), the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (40 CFR 191), NRC Licensing Requirements for the Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear and High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR 72), and other federal statutory and regulatory requirements, and major program policy decisions. This document sets forth specific requirements that will be fulfilled. Each subsequent level of the technical document hierarchy will be significantly more detailed and provide further guidance and definition as to how each of these requirements will be implemented in the design. Requirements appearing in Volume 3 are traceable into the MRS Design Requirements Document. Section 2 of this volume provides a functional breakdown for the MRS facility. 1 tab

  16. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  17. Capital Requirements and Banks' Leniency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J. Kimball; Wihlborg, Clas

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the effect of changes in capital regulation on the strictness(leniency) of loan terms using a simple model of bank capital requirements andasset quality examinations. Banks offer different levels of `leniency' in the senseof willingness to offer automatic extensions of loans...... rates. As capital requirements increase thedifference between initial capital levels and between interest rates of strict andlenient banks decrease. Thus, higher capital requirements in recessions tend toreduce the interest rate premium paid for leniency. If a recession is interpreted asan increase...... in the required return, the interest rate premium paid for leniency isincreased in recession at a given level of required capital....

  18. Tool-based requirement traceability between requirement and design artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Turban, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Processes for developing safety-critical systems impose special demands on ensuring requirements traceability. Achieving valuable traceability information, however, is especially difficult concerning the transition from requirements to design. Bernhard Turban analyzes systems and software engineering theories cross-cutting the issue (embedded systems development, systems engineering, software engineering, requirements engineering and management, design theory and processes for safety-critical systems). As a solution, the author proposes a new tool approach to support designers in their thinkin

  19. National Ignition Facility site requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The Site Requirements (SR) provide bases for identification of candidate host sites for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for the generation of data regarding potential actual locations for the facilities. The SR supplements the NIF Functional Requirements (FR) with information needed for preparation of responses to queries for input to HQ DOE site evaluation. The queries are to include both documents and explicit requirements for the potential host site responses. The Sr includes information extracted from the NIF FR (for convenience), data based on design approaches, and needs for physical and organization infrastructure for a fully operational NIF. The FR and SR describe requirements that may require new construction or may be met by use or modification of existing facilities. The SR do not establish requirements for NIF design or construction project planning. The SR document does not constitute an element of the NIF technical baseline

  20. UTM TCL2 Software Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Irene S.; Rios, Joseph L.; McGuirk, Patrick O.; Mulfinger, Daniel G.; Venkatesan, Priya; Smith, David R.; Baskaran, Vijayakumar; Wang, Leo

    2017-01-01

    The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Traffic Management (UTM) Technical Capability Level (TCL) 2 software implements the UTM TCL 2 software requirements described herein. These software requirements are linked to the higher level UTM TCL 2 System Requirements. Each successive TCL implements additional UTM functionality, enabling additional use cases. TCL 2 demonstrated how to enable expanded multiple operations by implementing automation for beyond visual line-of-sight, tracking operations, and operations flying over sparsely populated areas.

  1. Information requirements for enterprise systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerville, Ian; Lock, Russell; Storer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss an approach to system requirements engineering, which is based on using models of the responsibilities assigned to agents in a multi-agency system of systems. The responsibility models serve as a basis for identifying the stakeholders that should be considered in establishing the requirements and provide a basis for a structured approach, described here, for information requirements elicitation. We illustrate this approach using a case study drawn from civil emergenc...

  2. Addressing the Resource Requirements Mismatch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, William

    2003-01-01

    ... on the other, appear to be developing a requirements-resource mismatch. The goals and objectives of the transformation rhetoric intuitively resonate with the military's increasingly technologic culture...

  3. Requirements for Medical Modeling Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maas, Arnoud A.F.; Ter Hofstede, Arthur H.M.; Ten Hoopen, A. Johannes

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The development of tailor-made domain-specific modeling languages is sometimes desirable in medical informatics. Naturally, the development of such languages should be guided. The purpose of this article is to introduce a set of requirements for such languages and show their application in analyzing and comparing existing modeling languages. Design: The requirements arise from the practical experience of the authors and others in the development of modeling languages in both general informatics and medical informatics. The requirements initially emerged from the analysis of information modeling techniques. The requirements are designed to be orthogonal, i.e., one requirement can be violated without violation of the others. Results: The proposed requirements for any modeling language are that it be “formal” with regard to syntax and semantics, “conceptual,” “expressive,” “comprehensible,” “suitable,” and “executable.” The requirements are illustrated using both the medical logic modules of the Arden Syntax as a running example and selected examples from other modeling languages. Conclusion: Activity diagrams of the Unified Modeling Language, task structures for work flows, and Petri nets are discussed with regard to the list of requirements, and various tradeoffs are thus made explicit. It is concluded that this set of requirements has the potential to play a vital role in both the evaluation of existing domain-specific languages and the development of new ones. PMID:11230383

  4. Federal Environmental Requirements for Construction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This guide provides information on federal environmental requirements for construction projects. It is written primarily for owners of construction projects and for...

  5. Consensus standard requirements and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents information from the ANS Criticality Alarm System Workshop relating to the consensus standard requirements and guidance. Topics presented include: definition; nomenclature; requirements and recommendations; purpose of criticality alarms; design criteria; signal characteristics; reliability, dependability and durability; tests; and emergency preparedness and planning

  6. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment

  7. Requirements Engineering for Pervasive Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolos, L.; Poulisse, Gert-Jan; van Eck, Pascal; Videira lopes, C.; Schaefer, S.; Clarke, S.; Elrad, T.; Jahnke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Developing pervasive mobile services for a mass market of end customers entails large up-front investments and therefore a good understanding of customer requirements is of paramount importance. This paper presents an approach for developing requirements engineering method that takes distinguishing

  8. Physician Requirements-1990. For Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Joan K.

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in nephrology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. In estimating service requirements for nephrology, a nephrology Delphi panel reviewed reference and incidence-prevalence and utilization data for 34 conditions that are treated in the…

  9. NPR1 protein regulates pathogenic and symbiotic interactions between Rhizobium and legumes and non-legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-12-21

    Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes.

  10. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzart, Ariel J. C.; Vandenbrink, Joshua P.; Kiss, John Z., E-mail: jzkiss@olemiss.edu [Department of Biology, Graduate School, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in reduced or altered is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula—Sinorhizobium meliloti—Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis), or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  11. Metabolite profiles of nodulated alfalfa plants indicate that distinct stages of nodule organogenesis are accompanied by global physiological adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsch, Aiko; Tellström, Verena; Patschkowski, Thomas; Küster, Helge; Niehaus, Karsten

    2006-09-01

    An effective symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its host plant Medicago sativa is dependent on a balanced physiological interaction enabling the microsymbiont to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Maintenance of the symbiotic interaction is regulated by still poorly understood control mechanisms. A first step toward a better understanding of nodule metabolism was the determination of characteristic metabolites for alfalfa root nodules. Furthermore, nodules arrested at different developmental stages were analyzed in order to address metabolic changes induced during the progression of nodule formation. Metabolite profiles of bacteroid-free pseudonodule extracts indicated that early nodule developmental processes are accompanied by photosynthate translocation but no massive organic acid formation. To determine metabolic adaptations induced by the presence of nonfixing bacteroids, nodules induced by mutant S. meliloti strains lacking the nitrogenase protein were analyzed. The bacteroids are unable to provide ammonium to the host plant, which is metabolically reflected by reduced levels of characteristic amino acids involved in ammonium fixation. Elevated levels of starch and sugars in Fix(-) nodules provide strong evidence that plant sanctions preventing a transformation from a symbiotic to a potentially parasitic interaction are not strictly realized via photosynthate supply. Instead, metabolic and gene expression data indicate that alfalfa plants react to nitrogen-fixation-deficient bacteroids with a decreased organic acid synthesis and an early induction of senescence. Noneffective symbiotic interactions resulting from plants nodulated by mutant rhizobia also are reflected in characteristic metabolic changes in leaves. These are typical for nitrogen deficiency, but also highlight metabolites potentially involved in sensing the N status.

  12. Co-inoculation of arbusculr mycorrhizae and nitrogen fixing bacteria enhance alfalfa yield under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R.; Tang, F.; Liu, F.; Chen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study was to investigate the effects of combined inoculation of Glomus mosseae (arbusculr mycorrhizae fungi, AMF) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (nitrogen-fixing bacteria, i.e., an Rhizobium meliloti, RM) on yield, nutrient contents, nodulation and mycorrhizal colonization of different alfalfa cultivars under saline conditions. An experiment was conducted to test the efficacy of AMF and RM inoculation in development of salt tolerance in alfalfa cultivars (Zhaodong, Nongjing and Longmu) under different salinity levels (0, 60, 120 and 180 mM NaCl). We found that under non stress condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased the alfalfa yield, nodule weight and number, as well as shoot proline contents, the most when plants were double inoculated followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. Whereas under salinity condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased alfalfa yield, mycorrhizal infection, nodule weight and number as well as increased in shoot proline content, the most followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. The Results suggest that growth of alfalfa may be improved by combined inoculation of alfalfa with AM and rhizobium under salt and non-stress conditions. Alleviation of alfalfa growth under saline condition was perhaps due to an increase in mycorrhizal infection and nodule weight and number as well as an increased in shoot proline content by dual inoculation. (author)

  13. NPR1 protein regulates pathogenic and symbiotic interactions between Rhizobium and legumes and non-legumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smadar Peleg-Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA. SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes.

  14. Diversity and numbers of root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia in Polish soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Martyniuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a sand pouch-plant infection method, populations of several species of root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia were enumerated in eighty soils collected throughout Poland. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae (symbionts of pea, faba bean, vetch and R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii (symbionts of clover were detected in 77 and 76 soils, respectively. Most of these soils contained moderate and high numbers of these species of the rhizobia. Symbionts of beans, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, were assessed in 76 soils; of this number 15 soils had no detectable populations of bean rhizobia and in 40 soils high or moderate numbers of these bacteria were found. Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus, root-nodule bacteria of lupine and serradella, were absent in 19 soils, out of 80 tested, and 34 soils were colonised by high or moderate populations of bradyrhizobia. Sinorhizobium meliloti, rhizobia nodulating alfalfa, were sparse in the examined soils; with 56 soil containing no detectable numbers of S. meliloti and only 6 soils harbouring high or moderate populations of this species. The estimated numbers of the rhizobia in the studied soils were also related to some physical and chemical properties of these soils.

  15. The NLC Software Requirements Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoaee, Hamid

    2002-08-20

    We describe the software requirements and development methodology developed for the NLC control system. Given the longevity of that project, and the likely geographical distribution of the collaborating engineers, the planned requirements management process is somewhat more formal than the norm in high energy physics projects. The short term goals of the requirements process are to accurately estimate costs, to decompose the problem, and to determine likely technologies. The long term goal is to enable a smooth transition from high level functional requirements to specific subsystem and component requirements for individual programmers, and to support distributed development. The methodology covers both ends of that life cycle. It covers both the analytical and documentary tools for software engineering, and project management support. This paper introduces the methodology, which is fully described in [1].

  16. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  17. Industrial requirements in food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P M

    1990-01-01

    The principles of establishing industrial requirements in food safety are described, taking risk potentials all along the food chain into their respective account. Regulations will, in the future, lead to increased autocontrol in production. The rapid changes in food technology require constant adaptation to new problems, to keep the global quality of food at a high level. Regulatory authorities will, in the new European market, concentrate on enforcement of 'essential requirements' while industrialists will follow good manufacturing practices. Open dialogue between the latter, the former and the scientific community is highly desirable since mutual knowledge of the problem will help maintain a high level of food safety, for the benefit of everybody.

  18. Development of transportation operations requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, S.T.; Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Peterson, R.W.; Pope, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Transport conditions at various utility sties vary dramatically in terms of characteristics at and near the site, requirements, administrative procedures, and other factors. Continuation of design efforts for the OCRWM transportation operations system requires that the operating requirements for the transportation system -- quantity of fuel per unit time per site -- be identified so that the effect the variations have on the system can be accommodated. The approach outlined in this paper provides for an identification of specific sites, evaluation of shipment capabilities at each site, and integration of the sites into multi-site shipping campaigns to scope the logistics management problem for the transportation operations system. 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  20. Electrocardiogram Scanner-System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-03-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been conducted to establish the feasibility for scanning and digitizing electrocardiogram records. The technical requirements and relative costs for two systems are discussed herein. One is designed to automat...

  1. PFP requirements development planning guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The PFP Requirements Development Planning Guide presents the strategy and process used for the identification, allocation, and maintenance of requirements within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) integrated project baseline. Future revisions to this document will be included as attachments (e.g., results of the PFP Requirements Analysis attributable to this approach). This document is intended be a Project-owned management tool. As such, this document will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described. Future updates may be made to this document by PFP management and final approval of the content will be accomplished in a Baseline Change Request as it impacts the Multi-Year Work Plan, or baseline information managed in the Hanford Site Systems Engineering Baseline

  2. Guest Comment: Universal Language Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne

    1979-01-01

    Explains that reading English among Scientists is almost universal, however, there are enormous problems with spoken English. Advocates the use of Esperanto as a viable alternative, and as a language requirement for graduate work. (GA)

  3. Data Requirements for Pesticide Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    In evaluating a pesticide registration application, we assess a wide variety of potential human health and environmental effects associated with use of the product. Learn about these data requirements.

  4. Fusion technology status and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined

  5. Grant Closeout Requirements and Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requirements and reports to comply with grant closeout, including Final Federal Financial Report (FFR, SF425); Final Research Performance Progress Report (FRPPR); Interim Research Performance Progress Report (IRPPR); Final Invention Statement (FIS, HHS

  6. Requirement Tracing using Term Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saati, Najla; Abdul-Jaleel, Raghda

    2015-01-01

    Requirements traceability is an essential step in ensuring the quality of software during the early stages of its development life cycle. Requirements tracing usually consists of document parsing, candidate link generation and evaluation and traceability analysis. This paper demonstrates the applicability of Statistical Term Extraction metrics to generate candidate links. It is applied and validated using two data sets and four types of filters two for each data set, 0.2 and 0.25 for MODIS, 0...

  7. Capturing Requirements for Autonomous Spacecraft with Autonomy Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassev, Emil; Hinchey, Mike

    2014-08-01

    The Autonomy Requirements Engineering (ARE) approach has been developed by Lero - the Irish Software Engineering Research Center within the mandate of a joint project with ESA, the European Space Agency. The approach is intended to help engineers develop missions for unmanned exploration, often with limited or no human control. Such robotics space missions rely on the most recent advances in automation and robotic technologies where autonomy and autonomic computing principles drive the design and implementation of unmanned spacecraft [1]. To tackle the integration and promotion of autonomy in software-intensive systems, ARE combines generic autonomy requirements (GAR) with goal-oriented requirements engineering (GORE). Using this approach, software engineers can determine what autonomic features to develop for a particular system (e.g., a space mission) as well as what artifacts that process might generate (e.g., goals models, requirements specification, etc.). The inputs required by this approach are the mission goals and the domain-specific GAR reflecting specifics of the mission class (e.g., interplanetary missions).

  8. MiR171h restricts root symbioses and shows like its target NSP2 a complex transcriptional regulation in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Legumes have the unique capability to undergo root nodule and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Both types of root endosymbiosis are regulated by NSP2, which is a target of microRNA171h (miR171h). Although, recent data implies that miR171h specifically restricts arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in the root elongation zone of Medicago truncatula roots, there is limited knowledge available about the spatio-temporal regulation of miR171h expression at different physiological and symbiotic conditions. Results We show that miR171h is functionally expressed from an unusual long primary transcript, previously predicted to encode two identical miR171h strands. Both miR171h and NSP2 transcripts display a complex regulation pattern, which involves the symbiotic status and the fertilization regime of the plant. Quantitative Real-time PCR revealed that miR171h and NSP2 transcript levels show a clear anti-correlation in all tested conditions except in mycorrhizal roots, where NSP2 transcript levels were induced despite of an increased miR171h expression. This was also supported by a clear correlation of transcript levels of NSP2 and MtPt4, a phosphate transporter specifically expressed in a functional AM symbiosis. MiR171h is strongly induced in plants growing in sufficient phosphate conditions, which we demonstrate to be independent of the CRE1 signaling pathway and which is also not required for transcriptional induction of NSP2 in mycorrhizal roots. In situ hybridization and promoter activity analysis of both genes confirmed the complex regulation involving the symbiotic status, P and N nutrition, where both genes show a mainly mutual exclusive expression pattern. Overexpression of miR171h in M. truncatula roots led to a reduction in mycorrhizal colonization and to a reduced nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti. Conclusion The spatio-temporal expression of miR171h and NSP2 is tightly linked to the nutritional status of the plant and, together with the results from

  9. Quality Assurance Requirements and Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram Murthy

    2002-01-01

    The Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) is the principal Quality Assurance (QA) document for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program (Program). It establishes the minimum requirements for the QA program [INTRODUCTION :1p2s (NOT A REQUIREMENT)]. The QARD contains regulatory requirements and program commitments necessary for the development of an effective QA program [INTRODUCTION :1p3s (NOT A REQUIREMENT)]. Implementing documents must be based on, and be consistent with the QARD. The QARD applies to the following: (1) Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. (2) Transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. (3) Storage of spent nuclear fuel through receipt of storage cask certification or a facility operating license. (4) Monitored Geologic Repository, including the site characterization activities [Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and surface based testing], through receipt of an operating license. (5) High-level waste form development through qualification, production, and acceptance. (6) Characterization of DOE spent nuclear fuel, and conditioning through acceptance of DOE spent nuclear fuel. Section 2.0, Quality Assurance Program, defines in greater detail criteria for determining work subject to the QARD

  10. Requirement Metrics for Risk Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Theodore; Huffman, Lenore; Wilson, William; Rosenberg, Linda; Hyatt, Lawrence

    1996-01-01

    The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) is part of the Office of Mission Assurance of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SATC's mission is to assist National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) projects to improve the quality of software which they acquire or develop. The SATC's efforts are currently focused on the development and use of metric methodologies and tools that identify and assess risks associated with software performance and scheduled delivery. This starts at the requirements phase, where the SATC, in conjunction with software projects at GSFC and other NASA centers is working to identify tools and metric methodologies to assist project managers in identifying and mitigating risks. This paper discusses requirement metrics currently being used at NASA in a collaborative effort between the SATC and the Quality Assurance Office at GSFC to utilize the information available through the application of requirements management tools.

  11. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation

  12. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-08-18

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation.

  13. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli [ESNet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESNet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-09-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In December 2011, ESnet and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), of the DOE Office of Science (SC), organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by FES. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  14. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deland, Sharon M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  15. Overview of SSC accelerator requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper will present a general overview of the requirements of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) accelerators. Each accelerator in the injector chain will be discussed separately, followed by a discussion of the collider itself. In conclusion, the top level requirements of the overall accelerator system will be presented. For each accelerator, the primary operating parameters will be presented in tabular form. A brief narrative discussion of the principal technical features of each machine will be given. Finally, the principal technical design challenges for the machine will be noted, together with the currently planned solution to these challenges

  16. Lysine requirements of growing emus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, P F; Kent, P B; Barram, K M; Trappett, P C; Blight, G W; Sales, J

    1999-05-01

    1. The lysine requirement of growing emus between 23 and 65 d of age was determined according to growth response variables. 2. The optimal lysine requirement of emus was found to be 0.83 and 0.90 g/MJ ME for growth rate and gain:food ratio respectively. These findings are in accordance with the recommended value of 0.80 g/MJ ME, but is lower than the recommended value for ostriches (1.02 g/MJ ME) and higher than determined values for broilers (0.75 g/MJ ME) of the same age range.

  17. An Introduction to Requirements Traceability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.

    This report surveys the requirements traceability literature and gives some recommendations for further research and for an approach to consultancy concerning traceability in the 2RARE project. The problem of maintaining traceability in a development project is viewed as the problem of maintaining

  18. Requirements for flexible learner monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Glahn, C., Specht, M., & Koper, R. (2007). Requirements for flexible learner monitoring. In T. Navarette, J. Blat & R. Koper (Eds.). Proceedings of the 3rd TENCompetence Open Workshop 'Current Research on IMS Learning Design and Lifelong Competence Development Infrastructures' (pp. 89-96). June,

  19. Requirements Engineering: Solutions and Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebert, C.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Aurum, A.; Wohlin, C.

    2005-01-01

    This last chapter of the book describes solutions and trends in the discipline of RE. Starting from a wrap-up of what was presented throughout this book, it suggests a framework of requirements engineering and indicates what current solutions are available in this framework. Beyond providing a short

  20. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  1. Requirements for effective modelling strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaunt, J.L.; Riley, J.; Stein, A.; Penning de Vries, F.W.T.

    1997-01-01

    As the result of a recent BBSRC-funded workshop between soil scientists, modellers, statisticians and others to discuss issues relating to the derivation of complex environmental models, a set of modelling guidelines is presented and the required associated research areas are discussed.

  2. Time Elements May Require Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Molly J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that school districts may need to use a different time frame to accommodate the varied time requirements of the more flexible outcome-based education. Discusses three "alternate" scheduling methods currently in use and how they affect the teaching of journalism. (SR)

  3. Conversion of dependability deterministic requirements into probabilistic requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgade, E.; Le, P.

    1993-02-01

    This report concerns the on-going survey conducted jointly by the DAM/CCE and NRE/SR branches on the inclusion of dependability requirements in control and instrumentation projects. Its purpose is to enable a customer (the prime contractor) to convert into probabilistic terms dependability deterministic requirements expressed in the form ''a maximum permissible number of failures, of maximum duration d in a period t''. The customer shall select a confidence level for each previously defined undesirable event, by assigning a maximum probability of occurrence. Using the formulae we propose for two repair policies - constant rate or constant time - these probabilized requirements can then be transformed into equivalent failure rates. It is shown that the same formula can be used for both policies, providing certain realistic assumptions are confirmed, and that for a constant time repair policy, the correct result can always be obtained. The equivalent failure rates thus determined can be included in the specifications supplied to the contractors, who will then be able to proceed to their previsional justification. (author), 8 refs., 3 annexes

  4. 12 CFR 614.4935 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 614.4935 Section 614.4935... Insurance Requirements § 614.4935 Escrow requirement. If a System institution requires the escrow of taxes... shall also require the escrow of all premiums and fees for any flood insurance required under § 614.4930...

  5. The European Utility Requirement Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, I.I.

    1999-01-01

    The major European electricity producers work on a common requirement document for future LWR plants since 1992. They aim at requirements acceptable together by the owners, the public and the authorities. Thus the designers can develop standard LWR designs acceptable everywhere in Europe and the utilities can open their consultations to vendors on common bases. Such a standardisation promotes an improvement of generation costs and of safety : public and authorities acceptance should be improved as well ; significant savings are expected in development and construction costs. Since the early stages of the project, the EUR group has grown significantly. It now includes utilities from nine European countries. Utilities from two other European countries are joining the group. Specific cooperation agreements are also in progress with a few extra-European partners

  6. Documentation requirements for radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    Several standards are recently approved or are under development by the standard organizations ISO and CEN in the field of radiation sterilization. Particularly in Europe these standards define new requirements on some issues and on other issues they emphasize the necessary documentation for appr......Several standards are recently approved or are under development by the standard organizations ISO and CEN in the field of radiation sterilization. Particularly in Europe these standards define new requirements on some issues and on other issues they emphasize the necessary documentation...... for approval of radiation sterilized products. The impact of these standards on the radiation sterilization is discussed, with special attention given to a few special issues, mainly traceability and uncertainty of measurement results....

  7. ROS signalling - specificity is required

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian M; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases in plants under stress. ROS can damage cellular components, but they can also act in signal transduction to help the cell counteract the oxidative damage in the stressed compartment. H2O2 might induce a general stress response, but it does not have...... the required specificity to selectively regulate nuclear genes required for dealing with localized stress, e.g. in chloroplasts or mitochondria. Here we argue that peptides deriving from proteolytic breakdown of oxidatively damaged proteins have the requisite specificity to act as secondary ROS messengers...... and regulate source-specific genes and in this way contribute to retrograde ROS signalling during oxidative stress. Likewise, unmodified peptides deriving from the breakdown of redundant proteins could help coordinate organellar and nuclear gene expression...

  8. Grading of quality assurance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The present Manual provides guidance and illustrative examples for applying a method by which graded quality assurance requirements may be determined and adapted to the items and services of a nuclear power plant in conformance with the requirements of the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS) Code and Safety Guides on quality assurance. The Manual replaces the previous publication IAEA-TECDOC-303 on the same subject. Various methods of grading quality assurance are available in a number of Member States. During the development of the present Manual it was not considered practical to attempt to resolve the differences between those methods and it was preferred to identify and benefit from the good practices available in all the methods. The method presented in this Manual deals with the aspects of management, documentation, control, verification and administration which affect quality. 1 fig., 4 tabs

  9. Host City Contract operational requirements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Host City Contract - Operational Requirements (the “HCC Operational Requirements”) are an important part of the Host City Contract, detailing a set of core elements for the project, which provide Olympic quality conditions for the athletes and all participants, while at the same time allowing potential host cities to responsibly match their Games concepts to their own sport, economic, social, and environmental long-term planning needs.

  10. Nutritional requirements after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnic, Gordana

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an overview of postoperative nutritional requirements and goals following bariatric surgery. It summarizes current diet progression and nutrient intake guidelines geared toward optimizing weight loss and maintaining adequate nutritional status, nutrient absorption, as well as hydration. The article further emphasizes the importance of postoperative follow-up with a bariatric multidisciplinary team for appropriate postoperative care, diet management, and nutrient deficiency screenings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulatory requirements for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.; Cunningham, R.E.; Hard, J.E.; Mattson, R.J.; Smith, R.D.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for radiation protection have evolved and matured over several decades. Due to the wide adoption of recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), there exists international agreement on the principles to be followed for radiation protection. This foundation will be increasingly important due to the growing need for international agreements and standards for radiation protection and radioactive materials management. During the infancy of the commercial nuclear industry, primary reliance was placed on the protection of the individual, both in the work force and as a member of the public. With the growth of nuclear power in the 1960's and 1970's, environmental impact assessments and expert reviews of bio-effects data have focused attention on statistical risks to large population groups and the use of the collective dose commitment concept to estimate potential effects. The potential release of long-lived radionuclides from the nuclear fuel cycle requires further consideration of radionuclide accumulation in the biosphere and calls for controls conceived and implemented at the international level. The initial development efforts for addressing these concerns already have been instituted by the ICRP and the IAEA. However, formal international agreements and a unified set of international standards may be required to implement the recommendations of these groups. Further international efforts in the field of radiation protection are also called for in developing waste management practices and radioactive effluent control technology, in site selection for fuel reprocessing plants and waste dispersal facilities, and for ensuring safe transport of high-level wastes in various forms. Since the regulation of very low dose rates and doses will be involved, it will be useful to reexamine dose-effect relationships and societal goals for health protection. Improved criteria and methodologies for ''as low as readily

  12. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W,; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2012-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1 G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  13. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  14. Superluminal travel requires negative energies

    OpenAIRE

    Olum, Ken D.

    1998-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between faster-than-light travel and weak-energy-condition violation, i.e., negative energy densities. In a general spacetime it is difficult to define faster-than-light travel, and I give an example of a metric which appears to allow superluminal travel, but in fact is just flat space. To avoid such difficulties, I propose a definition of superluminal travel which requires that the path to be traveled reach a destination surface at an earlier time than any neig...

  15. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  16. The development of safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorel, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the safety approach followed in France for the design of nuclear reactors. This safety approach is based on safety principles from which stem safety requirements that set limiting values for specific parameters. The improvements in computerized simulation, the use of more adequate new materials, a better knowledge of the concerned physical processes, the changes in the reactor operations (higher discharge burnups for instance) have to be taken into account for the definition of safety criteria and the setting of limiting values. The developments of the safety criteria linked to the risks of cladding failure and loss of primary coolant are presented. (A.C.)

  17. Physical requirements in Olympic sailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, J; Larsson, B; Aagaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical fitness and muscular strength are important performance parameters in Olympic sailing although their relative importance changes between classes. The Olympic format consists of eight yacht types combined into 10 so-called events with total 15 sailors (male and female) in a compl......Abstract Physical fitness and muscular strength are important performance parameters in Olympic sailing although their relative importance changes between classes. The Olympic format consists of eight yacht types combined into 10 so-called events with total 15 sailors (male and female....... Another group of studies has investigated boardsailing and provided evidence to show that windsurfing requires very high aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Although data exist on other types of sailors, the information is limited, and moreover the profile of the Olympic events has changed markedly over...... the last few years to involve more agile, fast and spectacular yachts. The change of events in Olympic sailing has likely added to physical requirements; however, data on sailors in the modern-type yachts are scarce. The present paper describes the recent developments in Olympic sailing with respect...

  18. Quality requirements for EHR archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Dipak; Tapuria, Archana; Austin, Tony; De Moor, Georges

    2012-01-01

    The realisation of semantic interoperability, in which any EHR data may be communicated between heterogeneous systems and fully understood by computers as well as people on receipt, is a challenging goal. Despite the use of standardised generic models for the EHR and standard terminology systems, too much optionality and variability exists in how particular clinical entries may be represented. Clinical archetypes provide a means of defining how generic models should be shaped and bound to terminology for specific kinds of clinical data. However, these will only contribute to semantic interoperability if libraries of archetypes can be built up consistently. This requires the establishment of design principles, editorial and governance policies, and further research to develop ways for archetype authors to structure clinical data and to use terminology consistently. Drawing on several years of work within communities of practice developing archetypes and implementing systems from them, this paper presents quality requirements for the development of archetypes. Clinical engagement on a wide scale is also needed to help grow libraries of good quality archetypes that can be certified. Vendor and eHealth programme engagement is needed to validate such archetypes and achieve safe, meaningful exchange of EHR data between systems.

  19. 12 CFR 760.5 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 760.5 Section 760.5 Banks... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 760.5 Escrow requirement. If a credit union requires the escrow of taxes... shall also require the escrow of all premiums and fees for any flood insurance required under § 760.3...

  20. 12 CFR 339.5 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 339.5 Section 339.5 Banks... IN AREAS HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 339.5 Escrow requirement. If a bank requires the escrow of... bank shall also require the escrow of all premiums and fees for any flood insurance required under...

  1. 12 CFR 572.5 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 572.5 Section 572.5 Banks... FLOOD HAZARDS § 572.5 Escrow requirement. If a savings association requires the escrow of taxes... association shall also require the escrow of all premiums and fees for any flood insurance required under...

  2. Nuclear Energy, Long Term Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2006-01-01

    There are serious warnings about depletion of oil and gas and even more serious warnings about dangers of climate change caused by emission of carbon dioxide. Should developed countries be called to replace CO2 emitting energy sources as soon as possible, and the time available may not be longer then few decades, can nuclear energy answer the call and what are the requirements? Assuming optimistic contribution of renewable energy sources, can nuclear energy expand to several times present level in order to replace large part of fossil fuels use? Paper considers intermediate and long-term requirements. Future of nuclear power depends on satisfactory answers on several questions. First group of questions are those important for near and intermediate future. They deal with economics and safety of nuclear power stations in the first place. On the same time scale a generally accepted concept for radioactive waste disposal is also required. All these issues are in the focus of present research and development. Safer and more economical reactors are targets of international efforts in Generation IV and INPRO projects, but aiming further ahead these innovative projects are also addressing issues such as waste reduction and proliferation resistance. However, even assuming successful technical development of these projects, and there is no reason to doubt it, long term and large-scale nuclear power use is thereby not yet secured. If nuclear power is to play an essential role in the long-term future energy production and in reduction of CO2 emission, than several additional questions must be replied. These questions will deal with long-term nuclear fuel sufficiency, with necessary contribution of nuclear power in sectors of transport and industrial processes and with nuclear proliferation safety. This last issue is more political then technical, thus sometimes neglected by nuclear engineers, yet it will have essential role for the long-term prospects of nuclear power. The

  3. Requirements and Markets for Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    The semiconductor market grew 2010 by 70Bio. against 2009, more than in the previous 9 years taken together, and the semiconductor industry launched the biggest investment program in its history with 100Bio. over a 2-year period. This was the overture to a decade with great potential and great challenges. We look at the market segments and the required electronic functions, and we highlight four product and service areas: Approaching 6 Billion mobile-phone subscribers Access to education for any child One Carebot (personal robot) per family Efficient and safe personal mobility. At the level of over four billion active mobile phones 2010, it is clear that mobile electronic companions have become the drivers of nanoelectronic innovations with growth only limited by the creation and support of new, attractive features and services. Energy, bandwidth, size and weight requirements of these consumer products provide the largest pressure for System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures. Other exemplary new products are selected for their significance, some for their lengthy path into the market. Health care is such an example: The non-invasive glucose sensor and the portable ECG recorder" with automatic, neuroprocessor-driven event detection in the size of a quarter would serve hundreds of millions of people. Nanoelectronics for self-guided health is an area of public policy in view of the cost of "a posteriori" medical care. Access to information and education for any child/student will be provided by 1 tablets where service contracts and the spin-offs from surfing and cloud-computing will generate the revenue. Personal robots, coined by the ageing Japanese nation as the key product after the PC and ridiculed by others, will arrive as carebots for education, entertainment, rehabilitation, and home-service, accepted as a large-scale need by 2020 in most developed countries including China. Accident prevention systems on rail and road already would make millions of units per year

  4. SGA Requirements in Coming Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Stephen J.

    Refineries report various physical and chemical properties of Smelting Grade Alumina, SGA, on Certificate of Analysis data sheets. Without strong understanding of customer needs this data may fall short of meeting the true needs of smelters and downstream customers. For example, improving excess fluoride control with no specification or target for the variability of Na2O content may be a challenge. Downstream customers for aluminum conductor products require excellent conductivity, but this does not always translate itself into alumina shipping limits for Cr2O3, MnO or V2O5. The author presents these and other examples for consideration during the joint sessions between Alumina & Bauxite and Aluminum Reduction Technology.

  5. [Regulatory requirements for topical preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlrab, J; Klauck, D; Savtcheva, E

    2014-03-01

    Professional use of topical treatment in dermatological practice requires not only knowledge about the pharmacological properties, efficacy, safety and pharmaceutical quality of a preparation, but also about its regulatory classification. The latter essentially determines the physician's prescription practice and therapeutic freedom. The regulatory framework with which one is confronted unfortunately lacks transparency. It regulates not only the prescribability and reimbursability of proprietary medicinal products and extemporaneous preparations, but also the obligation to give information as well as the details of liability of both the prescriber (physician) and the manufacturer (pharmaceutical company or pharmacist). The prescriber needs to be aware of to what extent the pharmacist has the possibility and even obligation to change the prescribed preparation. In some cases this can directly affect the therapeutic concept of the physician and even impair the effectiveness and safety of the chosen therapy.

  6. Chilling requirement of Ribes cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlyn eJones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually thought that adequate winter chill is required for the full flowering of many temperate woody species. This paper investigates the sensitivity of blackcurrant bud burst and flowering to natural weather fluctuations in a temperate maritime climate, and compares a range of chill models that have been proposed for assessing the accumulation of winter chill. Bud break for four contrasting cultivars are compared in an exceptionally cold and in a mild winter in Eastern Scotland. The results confirm the importance of chilling at temperatures lower than 0ºC and demonstrate that no single chilling function applies equally to all blackcurrant cultivars. There is a pressing need for further model development to take into account the relationship between chilling temperatures and warming temperatures occurring both during and after the chill accumulation period.

  7. Programmable data communications controller requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The design requirements for a Programmable Data Communications Controller (PDCC) that reduces the difficulties in attaching data terminal equipment to a computer are presented. The PDCC is an interface between the computer I/O channel and the bit serial communication lines. Each communication line is supported by a communication port that handles all line control functions and performs most terminal control functions. The port is fabricated on a printed circuit board that plugs into a card chassis, mating with a connector that is joined to all other card stations by a data bus. Ports are individually programmable; each includes a microprocessor, a programmable read-only memory for instruction storage, and a random access memory for data storage.

  8. Requirements engineering for digital health

    CERN Document Server

    Thümmler, Christoph; Gavras, Anastasius

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare and well-being have captured the attention of established software companies, start-ups, and investors. Software is starting to play a central role for addressing the problems of the aging society and the escalating cost of healthcare services. Enablers of such digital health are a growing number of sensors for sensing the human body and communication infrastructure for remote meetings, data sharing, and messaging. The challenge that lies in front of us is how to effectively make use of these capabilities, for example to empower patients and to free the scarce resources of medical personnel. Requirements engineering is the process by which the capabilities of a software product are aligned with stakeholder needs and a shared understanding between the stakeholders and development team established. This book provides guide for what to look for and do when inquiring and specifying software that targets healthcare and well-being, helping readers avoid the pitfalls of the highly regulated and sensible h...

  9. The EURS (European utilities requirements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbey, P.

    2000-01-01

    The major European electricity producers have worked on a common requirement document for future LWR plants since 1992 to get specifications acceptable together by the owners, the public and the authorities. Thus the designers can develop standard LWR designs that could be acceptable everywhere in Europe and the utilities can open their consultations to vendors on common bases. Public and authority's acceptance should be improved as well. Significant saving are expected in development and construction costs. Since the release of the last versions of the EUR texts in 1996, a lot of work has been carried out: reviews by the regulators and other external organisations, comparisons, assessment of compliance of designs vs. EUR and clarification works on the controversial topics that deserved changes or clarification. At the beginning of 1999 enough material was available to start a complete revision of the EUR document

  10. Nitrogen control of bacterial signal production in Rhizobium meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusha, Ilona

    2002-09-01

    Under nitrogen-depleted conditions nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria of the family Rhizobiaceae are able to induce symbiotic nodules on the roots of leguminous plants where bacteroids convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. The presence of exogenous nitrogen source inhibits the development and the functioning of bacterium-plant symbiosis. Earlier experiments demonstrated that nitrate inhibited all stages of symbiotic interaction, affecting primarily the host functions. The investigation of the possible involvement of the microsymbiont in nitrogen regulation showed that two signalling steps were controlled by ammonium. The synthesis of the first bacterial signal, the Nod factor was repressed by ammonium. The nitrogen signal is conveyed to nodulation (nod) genes by the general nitrogen regulatory (ntr) system and by the nodD3-syrM self-amplifying system. The fine control also involves a negative regulatory factor, ntrR. When ntrR is mutated, more efficient nodule formation and nitrogen fixation is observed in symbiosis with alfalfa even in the presence of ammonium. The biosynthesis of the second bacterial signal succinoglycan is also controlled by ammonium. SyrM, a common regulatory factor for nod and exo gene expression, may contribute to the adjustment of the amount of succinoglycan and the ratio of its biologically active form.

  11. Requirements for an energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conant, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The central issue facing the US today lies in the rise of oil imports. No supergiant (5 billion barrels) oil discoveries have been made in the US. Production from existing fields is declining. The 1985-86 oil price collapse from $26 to less than $15 per barrel had a disastrous effect on the budgets of smaller oil companies which do most of the exploring, and on the service industry. Budgets for overseas exploration has been generally sustained. Oil prices are not expected to sustain domestic exploration. Gulf oil sources will, in the next five years, supply some 75 percent of all oil in international trade. Without an energy policy, involvement in Middle East oil will grow exponentially, as will the needs of others for Gulf oil. The natural gas situation is different, with a spare producing capacity of one trillion cubic feet this year, which could double next year. Natural gas deregulation has created an unbelievable mess in the requirements of producers/suppliers and purchasers to have dependable business arrangements. Coal is plentiful and will be until the end of time. Public opposition to emission problems and the greenhouse effect are an obstacle to greater use of coal. The nuclear option may be dead, with no new orders since 1978. Statistics are provided on proven world reserves of conventional crude oil, recoverable heavy oils, tar sands, and shale oil; which indicates for the long term an ability to transform the Geopolitics of oil away from the middle east. Energy options require energy R ampersand D, use of Alaskan gas, conservation and efficiency in energy use, strategic reserves, close energy relations with allies, and a government-industry link which insures meeting the US oil needs from the Western Hemisphere

  12. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics advantages, including Ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, lower ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits) and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic field, larger aspect ratios and smaller plasma cross-sections, translate to significant cost reductions for both ignition and reactor applications. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. Devices that are under construction should go a long way toward resolving this scaling uncertainty. The 4 MA ZTH is expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data by three orders of magnitude above the results of ZT-40M, and, if the present scaling holds, ZTH is expected to achieve a D-T equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q = 1. A base case RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. (author). 19 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Physical System Requirements: Transport Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy (DOE) the responsibility for managing the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for that purpose. The Secretary of Energy, in his November 1989 report to Congress (DOE/RW-0247), announced three new initiatives for the conduct of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program. One of these initiatives was to establish improved management structure and procedures. In response, OCRWM performed a management study and the Director subsequently issued the Management Systems Improvement Strategy (MSIS) on August 10, 1990, calling for a rigorous implementation of systems engineering principles with a special emphasis on functional analysis. The functional analysis approach establishes a framework for integrating the program management efforts with the technical requirements analysis into a single, unified, and consistent program. This approach recognizes that just as the facilities and equipment comprising the physical waste management system must perform certain functions, so must certain programmatic and management functions be performed within the program in order to successfully bring the physical system into being. The objective of this document is to establish the essential functions, requirements, interfaces, and system architecture for the Transport Waste mission. Based upon the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the mission of the Waste Transportation System is to transport SNF and/or HLW from the purchaser's/producer's facilities to, and between, NWMS facilities in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment makes effective use of financial and other resources, and to the fullest extent possible uses the private sector

  14. Meeting US and European supplier control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawa, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Medical device manufacturers operating under European quality system requirements are sometimes surprised to learn that their supplier control procedures do not fully meet United States (US) requirements. This article discusses important differences between US and European requirements for controlling suppliers.

  15. Design requirement on HYPER blanket fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, B. O.; Nam, C.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Park, W. S.

    2000-07-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket assembly of the HYPER as design guidance. The blanket assembly of the HYPER consists of blanket fuel rods, mounting rail, spacer, upper nozzle with handling socket, bottom nozzle with mounting rail and skeleton structure. The blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with key way, blanket fuel slug, and cladding. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements for the blanket fuel assembly of the HYPER

  16. [Subcloning and sequencing of DNA fragment related to salt tolerance in Sinorhizobium fredii RT19].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, X L; Ge, S C; Yang, S S

    2000-01-01

    A 23 kb DNA fragment related to salt tolerance was obtained from the gene library of S. fredii strain RT19. In this study, BamH I was selected to digest 23 kb DNA fragment into different length of DNA fragments. The resulting fragments were ligated with plasmid pML122, then the recombinant plasmids were transformed to competent cells of E. coli S17-1 on selective medium and three transformants TR were obtained. Two-parental mating experiments were carried out with these transformants as donor and salt sensitive S. fredii strain RC3-3 as recipient, and the transconjugant BR2 was selected on FY plates containing gentamycin and 0.4 mol/L NaCl. Thus, a 4.4 kb DNA fragment related to salt tolerance was obtained. Based on its physical map, six restriction fragments were subcloned into plasmid pUC18 for DNA sequencing. Subsequently, sequencing and analysis of 4.4 kb DNA fragment showed that fixO, fixN genes and three ORFs were obtained.

  17. Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 Translocates NopP into Vigna unguiculata Root Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs), which are found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, inject virulence proteins directly into host cells during infection. T3SSs are also present in some strains of rhizobia, bacteria that form symbiotic associations with legumes and fix nitrogen in speciali...

  18. Rapid quality assurance with requirements smells

    OpenAIRE

    Femmer, Henning; Méndez Fernández, Daniel; Wagner, Stefan; Eder, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Context: Bad requirements quality can cause expensive consequences during the software development lifecycle, especially if iterations are long and feedback comes late. Objectives: We aim at a light-weight static requirements analysis approach that allows for rapid checks immediately when requirements are written down. Method: We transfer the concept of code smells to Requirements Engineering as Requirements Smells. To evaluate the benefits and limitations, we define Requirements Smells, real...

  19. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified

  20. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  1. Menorrhagia in adolescents requiring hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Y R; Quint, E H; Hertzberg, R B

    1998-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the causes and treatments of menorrhagia in adolescents hospitalized for this menstrual disorder. A retrospective chart review was performed of all adolescents adolescents with 46 admissions for menorrhagia were identified. The average age of menarche was 12.9 years and the average age at admission was 15.9 years. Nineteen adolescents had significant medical diseases. For the 46 admissions, causes of menorrhagia were anovulation (21), hematologic disease (15), chemotherapy-related (5), and infections (5). Transfusions of blood products were performed in 28 of the admissions. Treatments included oral contraceptive pills or progestins (30), intravenous conjugated estrogens (8), antibiotics (4), immune gammaglobulin (3), DDAVP (3), and prednisone (1). Twelve surgical procedures were performed, including eight dilatation and curettages (D&Cs), three laparoscopies, and one hysterectomy. Sixty-one percent of admissions for adolescent menorrhagia were in adolescents with significant medical problems. The patients with menorrhagia who required admission had severe anemia and were transfused in 63% of cases. The predominant causes for these admissions included anovulation in 46%, hematologic disease in 33%, chemotherapy in 11%, and infection in 11%. Hormonal regulation or suppression of menses should be considered in adolescents with significant medical disease.

  2. Global Land Transport Infrastructure Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Over the next four decades, global passenger and freight travel is expected to double over 2010 levels. In order to accommodate this growth, it is expected that the world will need to add nearly 25 million paved road lane-kilometres and 335 000 rail track kilometres. In addition, it is expected that between 45 000 square kilometres and 77 000 square kilometres of new parking spaces will be added to accommodate vehicle stock growth. These land transport infrastructure additions, when combined with operations, maintenance and repairs, are expected to cost as much as USD 45 trillion by 2050. This publication reports on the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) analysis of infrastructure requirements to support projected road and rail travel through 2050, using the IEA Mobility Model. It considers land transport infrastructure additions to support travel growth to 2050. It also considers potential savings if countries pursue “avoid and shift” policies: in this scenario, cumulative global land transport infrastructure spending could decrease as much as USD 20 trillion by 2050 over baseline projections.

  3. Plutonium storage: Requirements and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Haschke, J.M.; Martz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The retirement of large numbers of nuclear weapons will necessitate management of unprecedented quantities of excess plutonium. In addition, surplus material and residues from previous weapon production activities comprise a substantial quantity of concentrated plutonium that exists in a variety of chemical forms. Storage of plutonium for an indefinite period will be necessary until a decision regarding ultimate disposition is made. Selection of the most suitable storage option(s) for this interim period is complicated by technical issues, nuclear proliferation concerns, contingency planning, political factors, and uncertainty regarding the length of the interim period. Options for excess plutonium include storage as intact weapon components and storage as extracted nuclear material. Specific advantages for storage of excess material in a variety of chemical forms have been presented. In this paper, technical issues associated with various storage options are examined with emphasis on relevant physical and chemical properties of candidate materials. Technology and facility requirements for preparing and certifying storage forms are considered and recommendations, based on our assessment of options, are presented

  4. General lighting requirements for photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, D.R. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A review of the general lighting requirements for photosynthesis reveals that four aspects of light are important: irradiance, quality, timing and duration. These properties of light affect photosynthesis by providing the energy that drives carbon assimilation as well as by exerting control over physiology, structure and morphology of plants. Irradiance, expressed as energy flux, W m{sup -2}, or photon irradiance, {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, determines the rate at which energy is being delivered to the photosynthetic reaction centers. Spectral quality, the wavelength composition of light, is important because photons differ in their probability of being absorbed by the light harvesting complex and hence their ability to drive carbon assimilation. Also the various light receptors for light-mediated regulation of plant form and physiology have characteristic absorption spectra and hence photons differ in their effectiveness for eliciting responses. Duration is important because both carbon assimilation and regulation are affected by the total energy or integrated irradiance delivered during a given period. Many processes associated with photosynthesis are time-dependent, increasing or decreasing with duration. Timing is important because the effectiveness of light in the regulation of plant processes varies with the phase of the diumal cycle as determined by the plant`s time-measuring mechanisms.

  5. Physical system requirements: Overall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy (DOE) the responsibility for managing the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for that purpose. The Secretary of Energy, in his November 1989 report to Congress (DOE/RW-0247), announced three new initiatives for conduct of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program. One of these initiatives was to establish improved management structure and procedures. In response, OCRWM performed a management study and the Direct subsequently issued the Management Systems Improvement Strategy (MSIS) on August 10, 1990, calling for a rigorous implementation of systems engineering principles with a special emphasis on functional analysis. This approach establishes a framework for integrating the program management efforts with the technical requirements analysis into a single, unified, and consistent program. The functional analysis approach recognizes that just the facilities and equipment comprising the physical waste management system must perform certain functions, so must certain programmatic and management functions be performed within the program in order to successfully bring the physical system into being

  6. 12 CFR 22.5 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 22.5 Section 22.5 Banks and... HAZARDS § 22.5 Escrow requirement. If a bank requires the escrow of taxes, insurance premiums, fees, or..., increased, extended, or renewed on or after October 1, 1996, the bank shall also require the escrow of all...

  7. 17 CFR 41.45 - Required margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required margin. 41.45 Section... PRODUCTS Customer Accounts and Margin Requirements § 41.45 Required margin. (a) Applicability. Each security futures intermediary shall determine the required margin for the security futures and related...

  8. 21 CFR 1304.11 - Inventory requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the inventory of the registered location to which they are subject to control or to which the person... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory requirements. 1304.11 Section 1304.11... REGISTRANTS Inventory Requirements § 1304.11 Inventory requirements. (a) General requirements. Each inventory...

  9. 10 CFR 61.59 - Institutional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutional requirements. 61.59 Section 61.59 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.59 Institutional requirements. (a) Land ownership...

  10. 20 CFR 655.152 - Advertising requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.152 Section 655... Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) Post-Acceptance Requirements § 655.152 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted to satisfy the required recruitment activities under § 655.151 must...

  11. Definition and validation of requirements management measures

    OpenAIRE

    Loconsole, Annabella

    2007-01-01

    The quality of software systems depends on early activities in the software development process, of which the management of requirements is one. When requirements are not managed well, a project can fail or become more costly than intended, and the quality of the software developed can decrease. Among the requirements management practices, it is particularly important to quantify and predict requirements volatility, i.e., how much the requirements are likely to change over time. Software meas...

  12. Virtual Observatories: Requirements for Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    The principal act that separates science from engineering is that of discovery. Virtual Observatories are a development with great potential for advancing our ability to do science by enabling us to do research effectively and to do research across disciplines. Access to data is one of the factors that enables discovery. A well-designed VO should enable discovery as well as providing for a uniform means by which data are accessed: thus, enabling discovery is the key challenge of a VO in fact it is and should be the principle that distinguishes a VO from a traditional archive. As the number of satellites in the Heliophysics Great observatory starts to decline due to the slower launch cadence and the reduction in funding for extended missions, it becomes more imperative that the community have the means to fully utilize and access the available resources. With the proliferation of low-cost computing and community-based models, cross-disciplinary studies become the new frontier. Many, if not the great majority of research papers are, at this time, confined to a particular discipline. Some of this "stove piping" may be due to the difficulty in accessing products from outside one's own discipline. One would hope and expect that VOs would address this. Two of the principal challenges associated with the vitality of the VOs, aside from the provision of the funds required to maintain the VOs, is 1) the limitation on the availability of data from non-NASA sources and 2) the need for some level of continued support for expertise on the data accessed through the VOs. The first issue is one of culture - some organizations support the view that the data belong to the PI whereas in Heliophysics "data rights" are curtailed. The second issue is to be addressed by the concept of the Resident Archive. This talk will provide an overview of the issues and challenges associated with VOs, Resident Archives, data rights, space missions, and instruments and their associated ground data

  13. Closed Loop Requirements and Analysis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Michael; Verhoef, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Effective systems engineering involves the use of analysis in the derivation of requirements and verification of designs against those requirements. The initial development of requirements often depends on analysis for the technical definition of specific aspects of a product. Following the allocation of system-level requirements to a product's components, the closure of those requirements often involves analytical approaches to verify that the requirement criteria have been satisfied. Meanwhile, changes that occur in between these two processes need to be managed in order to achieve a closed-loop requirement derivation/verification process. Herein are presented concepts for employing emerging Team center capabilities to jointly manage requirements and analysis data such that analytical techniques are utilized to effectively derive and allocate requirements, analyses are consulted and updated during the change evaluation processes, and analyses are leveraged during the design verification process. Recommendations on concept validation case studies are also discussed.

  14. Personal belief exemptions from school vaccination requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekema, Douglas S

    2014-01-01

    Despite the impact vaccination has had on the control and prevention of many infectious diseases, some parents choose not to vaccinate their children. Although there is no federal law requiring vaccination of children in the United States, all states require evidence of vaccination against at least some diseases as a condition of school entry. Which vaccines are required; how many doses are required; whether entry requirements apply to child care, kindergarten, or middle school; and whether exemptions from vaccine requirements will be allowed all differ by state. All but two states allow some kind of personal belief exemption from school vaccination requirements. This article reviews the history of school vaccination requirements and exemptions, the legal status of state vaccination laws and exemptions, the impact of school vaccination requirements and personal belief exemptions on vaccination rates and disease incidence, and strategies for maintaining adequate vaccination rates in states that allow personal belief exemptions.

  15. 7 CFR 1416.7 - Insurance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements. For the Citrus, Fruit and Vegetable, Tropical Fruit and Nursery Disaster Programs: (a) Payment... producers required to purchase a citrus policy may purchase a fruit or tree policy; or (2) NAP coverage. (c...

  16. Higher speed freight truck design : performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This proposed requirements document combines a set of requirements for high-speed freight car truck design and performance : from the generally accepted standards in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), the Association of American Railroads : (...

  17. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Nicoline; Ringholm, Lene; Stage, Edna

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy.......To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy....

  18. Requirements Engineering for Software Integrity and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    2002-01-01

    Requirements flaws are the most common cause of errors and software-related accidents in operational software. Most aerospace firms list requirements as one of their most important outstanding software development problems and all of the recent, NASA spacecraft losses related to software (including the highly publicized Mars Program failures) can be traced to requirements flaws. In light of these facts, it is surprising that relatively little research is devoted to requirements in contrast with other software engineering topics. The research proposed built on our previous work. including both criteria for determining whether a requirements specification is acceptably complete and a new approach to structuring system specifications called Intent Specifications. This grant was to fund basic research on how these ideas could be extended to leverage innovative approaches to the problems of (1) reducing the impact of changing requirements, (2) finding requirements specification flaws early through formal and informal analysis, and (3) avoiding common flaws entirely through appropriate requirements specification language design.

  19. Ecological flow requirements for South African rivers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferrar, AA

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available This document contains the proceedings of a workshop which was convened to debate the ecological flow requirements of South African rivers. Topics which are discussed include the influence of weirs and impoundments, the quantity requirements...

  20. Security Requirements for Post-Transition Cuba

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowther, Glenn A

    2007-01-01

    .... With that change, Cuba's security requirements will change as well. This monograph analyzes security requirements that the new Cuba will face and proposes what missions and structure the Cuban security forces might have after a...

  1. Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NELSON, R.E.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

  2. 8 CFR 1216.2 - Notification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... second time of the requirement that the alien and the petitioning spouse or alien entrepreneur must file... does not relieve the alien and the petitioning spouse, or alien entrepreneur of the requirement to file...

  3. Rapid quality assurance with Requirements Smells

    OpenAIRE

    Femmer, H.; Fernández, D. Méndez; Wagner, S.; Eder, S.

    2016-01-01

    Bad requirements quality can cause expensive consequences during the software development lifecycle, especially if iterations are long and feedback comes late. %-- the faster a problem is found, the cheaper it is to fix. This makes explicit the need of a lightweight detection mechanism of requirements quality violations. We aim at a light-weight static requirements analysis approach that allows for rapid checks immediately when requirements are written down. We transfer the concept of code sm...

  4. Meta-requirements that Model Change

    OpenAIRE

    Gouri Prakash

    2010-01-01

    One of the common problems encountered in software engineering is addressing and responding to the changing nature of requirements. While several approaches have been devised to address this issue, ranging from instilling resistance to changing requirements in order to mitigate impact to project schedules, to developing an agile mindset towards requirements, the approach discussed in this paper is one of conceptualizing the delta in requirement and modeling it, in order t...

  5. Cloud computing security requirements: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Iankoulova, Iliana; Daneva, Maia; Rolland, C; Castro, J.; Pastor, O

    2012-01-01

    Many publications have dealt with various types of security requirements in cloud computing but not all types have been explored in sufficient depth. It is also hard to understand which types of requirements have been under-researched and which are most investigated. This paper's goal is to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of cloud computing security requirements and solutions. We carried out a systematic review and identified security requirements from previous publications th...

  6. Dosimeter characteristics and service performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    The requirements for personal dosimeters and dosimetry services given by ICRP 26, ICRP 35, ICRP 60 and ICRP 75 are summarised and compared with the requirements given in relevant international standards. Most standards could be made more relevant to actual workplace conditions. In some standards, the required tests of energy and angular dependence of the response are not sufficient, or requirements on overall uncertainty are lacking. (author)

  7. 40 CFR 141.80 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... service line replacement, and public education. These requirements are triggered, in some cases, by lead... requirements. (1) All water systems shall install and operate optimal corrosion control treatment as defined in... specified by the State under § 141.83. (f) Lead service line replacement requirements. Any system exceeding...

  8. 7 CFR 1948.96 - Audit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Program § 1948.96 Audit requirements. (a) Audit requirements for Site Development and Acquisition Grants will be made in accordance with FmHA Instruction 1942-G. (b) Audits for planning grants made in... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Audit requirements. 1948.96 Section 1948.96...

  9. Understand the Design Requirement in Companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xuemeng; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2015-01-01

    requirements can lead to inappropriate products (Hall, et al., 2002). Understanding the nature of design requirements and the sources, from where they can or should be generated, is critical to before developing methods and processes to support this process. Requirement Engineering research, originated from...

  10. Capturing security requirements for software systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadary, Hassan; El-Kassas, Sherif

    2014-01-01

    Security is often an afterthought during software development. Realizing security early, especially in the requirement phase, is important so that security problems can be tackled early enough before going further in the process and avoid rework. A more effective approach for security requirement engineering is needed to provide a more systematic way for eliciting adequate security requirements. This paper proposes a methodology for security requirement elicitation based on problem frames. The methodology aims at early integration of security with software development. The main goal of the methodology is to assist developers elicit adequate security requirements in a more systematic way during the requirement engineering process. A security catalog, based on the problem frames, is constructed in order to help identifying security requirements with the aid of previous security knowledge. Abuse frames are used to model threats while security problem frames are used to model security requirements. We have made use of evaluation criteria to evaluate the resulting security requirements concentrating on conflicts identification among requirements. We have shown that more complete security requirements can be elicited by such methodology in addition to the assistance offered to developers to elicit security requirements in a more systematic way. PMID:25685514

  11. 24 CFR 241.1069 - Escrow requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escrow requirements. 241.1069...-Eligibility Requirements § 241.1069 Escrow requirements. (a) An equity loan provided in connection with a plan... behalf of the borrower, 10 percent of the loan amount in an escrow account, controlled by the...

  12. 12 CFR 16.31 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Escrow requirement. 16.31 Section 16.31 Banks... RULES § 16.31 Escrow requirement. The OCC may require that any funds received in connection with an offer or sale of securities be held in an independent escrow account at an unrelated insured depository...

  13. 38 CFR 36.4704 - Escrow requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Escrow requirement. 36...) LOAN GUARANTY Sale of Loans, Guarantee of Payment, and Flood Insurance § 36.4704 Escrow requirement. If the Secretary requires the escrow of taxes, insurance premiums, fees, or any other charges for a loan...

  14. 28 CFR 80.12 - Accounting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accounting requirements. 80.12 Section 80... PROCEDURE § 80.12 Accounting requirements. Neither the submission of a request for an FCPA Opinion, its... comply with the accounting requirements of 15 U.S.C. 78m(b)(2) and (3). ...

  15. Understanding the Requirements for Open Source Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-17

    Elicitation in the Post-Methodology Era’, Requirements Engineering, 5, 67-73, (2000). 3. Bollinger , T.: Use of Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS) in the U.S...Paris, France , December, (2003). 46. Robinson, W.: A Requirements Monitoring Framework for Enterprise Systems, Requirements Engineering, 11(1), 17

  16. 49 CFR 383.111 - Required knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... importance of proper visual search, and proper visual search methods. (6) Communication. The principles and procedures for proper communications and the hazards of failure to signal properly. (7) Speed management. The... STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Required Knowledge and Skills § 383.111 Required knowledge. All...

  17. 7 CFR 1770.13 - Accounting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting requirements. 1770.13 Section 1770.13... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR RUS TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1770.13 Accounting requirements. (a) Each borrower shall maintain its books of accounts on the...

  18. 22 CFR 126.13 - Required information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required information. 126.13 Section 126.13... PROVISIONS § 126.13 Required information. (a) All applications for licenses (DSP-5, DSP-61, DSP-73, and DSP... are multiple consignors, consignees or freight forwarders, and all the required information cannot be...

  19. 50 CFR 660.15 - Equipment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... operational requirements for scales used to weigh catch at sea, scales used to weigh catch at IFQ first... software requirements. (i) A personal computer with Pentium 75-MHz or higher. Random Access Memory (RAM... required under this subsection are fully operational and functional whenever the Pacific whiting primary...

  20. 46 CFR 298.13 - Financial requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the reporting requirements imposed by § 298.42. (2) “Working Capital” means the excess, if any, of... Working Capital requirements, as set forth in paragraph (f) of this section. (1) The various financial..., minimum requirements at Closing usually are as follows: (i) Working Capital. The Company's Working Capital...

  1. 10 CFR 4.21 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements. 4.21 Section 4.21 Energy NUCLEAR... and Title IV of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 Assurances Required § 4.21 General requirements... purpose involving the provision of similar services or benefits. In the case of personal property the...

  2. Variations in land requirements for meat production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, E. V.; Nonhebel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Production of meat requires substantial amounts of feed grains which in turn require vast amounts of land. Future population growth and increase in consumption will raise the demand for meat and with it the land required for meat production. This paper analyses the various factors that affect land

  3. 40 CFR 35.6450 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Copyright Requirements Under A Cooperative Agreement § 35.6450 General requirements. The recipient... comply with the requirements regarding contract copyright provisions described in § 35.6595(b)(2). Use of...

  4. 75 FR 12803 - Fingerprint Submission Requirements Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL Fingerprint Submission Requirements Rule... Fingerprint Submission Requirements Rule, title 28 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 901. FOR FURTHER... the Fingerprint Submission Requirements Rule (28 CFR, part 901) when health or safety of vulnerable...

  5. 29 CFR 96.12 - Audit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) The audit requirements contained in 29 CFR part 99 shall be followed for audits of all fiscal... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit requirements. 96.12 Section 96.12 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Audits of States, Local...

  6. 23 CFR 1313.4 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED DRIVING PREVENTION PROGRAMS § 1313.4 General requirements. (a) Qualification requirements... enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving prevention programs in § 1313.6 and other associated costs permitted... certification that it has an alcohol-impaired driving prevention program that meets the requirements of 23 U.S.C...

  7. 10 CFR 61.40 - General requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirement. 61.40 Section 61.40 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Performance Objectives § 61.40 General requirement. Land disposal facilities must be sited, designed, operated, closed...

  8. 40 CFR 63.181 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring, quality improvement) for each type of equipment. All records and information required by this... service is not required. Equipment subject to the provisions of this subpart may be identified on a plant... information shall be recorded for each dual mechanical seal system: (i) Design criteria required in §§ 63.163...

  9. 40 CFR 97.6 - Standard requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard requirements. 97.6 Section 97... General Provisions § 97.6 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The NOX authorized account... a complete NOX Budget permit application under § 97.22 in accordance with the deadlines specified in...

  10. 76 FR 50881 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ..., Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale Tests AGENCY: Grain... January 20, 2011, and on April 4, 2011, concerning required scale tests. Those documents defined ``limited...), concerning required scale tests. Those documents incorrectly defined limited seasonal basis in Sec. 201.72(a...

  11. From document to database: modernizing requirements management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giajnorio, J.; Hamilton, S.

    2007-01-01

    The creation, communication, and management of design requirements are central to the successful completion of any large engineering project, both technically and commercially. Design requirements in the Canadian nuclear industry are typically numbered lists in multiple documents created using word processing software. As an alternative, GE Nuclear Products implemented a central requirements management database for a major project at Bruce Power. The database configured the off-the-shelf software product, Telelogic Doors, to GE's requirements structure. This paper describes the advantages realized by this scheme. Examples include traceability from customer requirements through to test procedures, concurrent engineering, and automated change history. (author)

  12. Legal requirements governing proxy voting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2008-01-01

    The requirements in Danish company law concerning proxy voting in companies whose shares have been accepted for listing on a regulated market have been successively tightened in recent years, and corporate governance principles have also led to the introduction of several requirements concerning...... proxy holders. A thorough knowledge of these requirements is important not only for the listed companies but also for their advisers and investors in Denmark and abroad. This article considers these requirements as well as the additional requirements which will derive from Directive 2007...

  13. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  14. Managing Legal Texts in Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Paul N.; Antón, Annie I.

    Laws and regulations are playing an increasingly important role in requirements engineering and systems development. Monitoring systems for requirements and policy compliance has been recognized in the requirements engineering community as a key area for research. Similarly, legal compliance is critical in systems development, especially given that non-compliance can result in both financial and criminal penalties. Working with legal texts can be very challenging, however, because they contain numerous ambiguities, cross-references, domain-specific definitions, and acronyms, and are frequently amended via new statutes, regulations, and case law. Requirements engineers and compliance auditors must be able to identify relevant legal texts, extract requirements and other key concepts, and monitor compliance. This chapter surveys research efforts over the past 50 years in handling legal texts for systems development. This survey can aid requirements engineers and auditors to better specify, test, and monitor systems for compliance.

  15. Requirements Analysis in the Value Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, Alison Marie

    2001-05-01

    The Value Methodology (VM) study brings together a multidisciplinary team of people who own the problem and have the expertise to identify and solve it. With the varied backgrounds and experiences the team brings to the study, come different perspectives on the problem and the requirements of the project. A requirements analysis step can be added to the Information and Function Analysis Phases of a VM study to validate whether the functions being performed are required, either regulatory or customer prescribed. This paper will provide insight to the level of rigor applied to a requirements analysis step and give some examples of tools and techniques utilized to ease the management of the requirements and functions those requirements support for highly complex problems.

  16. Waste Acceptance System Requirements document (WASRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Waste Acceptance System Requirements document (WA-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and the technical requirements for a Waste Acceptance System for accepting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). This revision of the WA-SRD addresses the requirements for the acceptance of HLW. This revision has been developed as a top priority document to permit DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to commence waste qualification runs at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in a timely manner. Additionally, this revision of the WA-SRD includes the requirements from the Physical System Requirements -- Accept Waste document for the acceptance of SNF. A subsequent revision will fully address requirements relative to the acceptance of SNF

  17. Virtual phosphorus ore requirement of Japanese economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubae, Kazuyo; Kajiyama, Jun; Hiraki, Takehito; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    Phosphorus is indispensable for agricultural production. Hence, the consumption of imported food indirectly implies the import of phosphorus resources. The global consumption of agricultural products depends on a small number of ore-producing countries. For sustainable management of phosphorus resources, the global supply and demand network should be clarified. In this study, we propose the virtual phosphorus ore requirement as a new indicator of the direct and indirect phosphorus requirements for our society. The virtual phosphorus ore requirement indicates the direct and indirect demands for phosphorus ore transformed into agricultural products and fertilizer. In this study, the virtual phosphorus ore requirement was evaluated for the Japanese economy in 2005. Importantly, the results show that our society requires twice as much phosphorus ore as the domestic demand for fertilizer production. The phosphorus contained in "eaten" agricultural products was only 12% of virtual phosphorus ore requirement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements document (MGDS-RD) describes the functions to be performed by, and the requirements for, a Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and defense high level radioactive waste (HLW) in support of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The development and control of the MGDS-RD is quality-affecting work and is subject to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance Requirements Document (QARD). As part of the technical requirements baseline, it is also subject to Baseline Management Plan controls. The MGDS-RD and the other program-level requirements documents have been prepared and managed in accordance with the Technical Document Preparation Plan (TDPP) for the Preparation of System Requirements Documents

  19. SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATION SINAPRA BERBASIS SISTEM INFORMASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hadi Waryanto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sistem Informasi Sarana dan Prasarana (SINAPRA merupakan bagian dari beberapa sistem informasi yang dipakai oleh Univeristas Negeri Yogyakarta. SINAPRA merupakan salah satu sistem yang akan dikembangkan dalam Sistem Informasi Terpadu (SIPADU. Software Requirements Specification SINAPRA merupakan acuan teknis developer dalam mengembangkan sistem untuk tahap selanjutnya. Software Requirements Specification SINAPRA dikembangkan menggunakan model WSU-TC CptS 322  dengan berbasis sistem informasi terpadu UNY Kata Kunci : Software Requirements Specification, WSU-TC CptS 322, SINAPRA

  20. Identify and Manage the Software Requirements Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Khloud Abd Elwahab; Mahmoud Abd EL Latif; Sherif Kholeif

    2016-01-01

    Management of software requirements volatility through development of life cycle is a very important stage. It helps the team to control significant impact all over the project (cost, time and effort), and also it keeps the project on track, to finally satisfy the user which is the main success criteria for the software project. In this research paper, we have analysed the root causes of requirements volatility through a proposed framework presenting the requirements volatility causes and how...

  1. Training Requirements and Information Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cillan, T.F.; Hodgson, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    This is the software user's guide for the Training Requirements and Information Management System. This guide defines and describes the software operating procedures as they apply to the end user of the software program. This guide is intended as a reference tool for the user who already has an indepth knowledge of the Training Requirements and Information Management System functions and data reporting requirement.

  2. Requirements engineering for human activity systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Guide for System Life Cycle Processes. Version 3.2. Edited by C. Haskins. San Diego, California: International Council on Systems Engineering, 2010. Jordan, J. Scott, ed. Systems Theories and A Priori Aspects of Perception. Amsterdam: Elsevier... to ensure that such requirements are properly developed and managed, by applying well defined rules and techniques (Hull, Jackson and Dick 2011). For example, a requirement should not be unrealistic and each requirement must be accompanied by criteria...

  3. Towards a framework for improving requirement traceability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Toranzo Céspedes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Work regarding requirement traceability focuses on programming aspects instead of identifying, analysing and modelling all traceable data in a software project. This paper describes the development of a framework for improving software requirement traceability. The framework consisted of classifying traced information, defining and using relationship types regarding traced information, a set of guidelines for developing a requirements traceability model for a software project and using my management tool (MyMT tool to support developing a requirement traceability model. A university library management system was used to illustrate applying the framework.

  4. Safety of Research Reactors. Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to provide a basis for safety and a basis for safety assessment for all stages in the lifetime of a research reactor. Another objective is to establish requirements on aspects relating to regulatory control, the management of safety, site evaluation, design, operation and decommissioning. Technical and administrative requirements for the safety of research reactors are established in accordance with these objectives. This Safety Requirements publication is intended for use by organizations engaged in the site evaluation, design, manufacturing, construction, operation and decommissioning of research reactors as well as by regulatory bodies

  5. 36 CFR 254.3 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; consolidation of split estates; expansion of communities; accommodation of existing or planned land use... required to exchange any Federal lands. Land exchanges are discretionary, voluntary real estate...

  6. EMS certification requirements for flight nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakes, Michael A; Lord, Wendy R

    2004-01-01

    Emergency medical technician (EMT) or paramedic (EMTP) certification requirements for flight nurses (FNs) providing on-scene patient care vary. We surveyed those requirements and evaluated the relationships between flight team composition or program location and FN EMS certification. Telephone survey of all 184 rotor-wing programs responding with a nurse to scenes The overall EMS training requirement for FNs was: none-57.6%, EMT-21.7%, EMTP-14.7%, local credential (not EMT or EMTP)-6.0%. Second team members were EMTP, RN, physician, or respiratory therapist (RRT). Overall, team configuration related significantly to FN EMS certification (P =.01). FN/EMTP and FN/RRT teams were individually significant (P EMTP teams tending not to require certification and all FN/RRT teams tending toward a certification requirement. Neither FN/FN nor FN/physician pairings related significantly with FN EMS certification requirements. Regional patterns emerged to both crew configuration and FN EMS certification requirements. Most flight programs do not require FN EMT/EMTP certification. Team configuration and geography are related to those requirements.

  7. SE Requirements Development Tool User Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Faith Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-13

    The LANL Systems Engineering Requirements Development Tool (SERDT) is a data collection tool created in InfoPath for use with the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) SharePoint sites. Projects can fail if a clear definition of the final product requirements is not performed. For projects to be successful requirements must be defined early in the project and those requirements must be tracked during execution of the project to ensure the goals of the project are met. Therefore, the focus of this tool is requirements definition. The content of this form is based on International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and Department of Defense (DoD) process standards and allows for single or collaborative input. The “Scoping” section is where project information is entered by the project team prior to requirements development, and includes definitions and examples to assist the user in completing the forms. The data entered will be used to define the requirements and once the form is filled out, a “Requirements List” is automatically generated and a Word document is created and saved to a SharePoint document library. SharePoint also includes the ability to download the requirements data defined in the InfoPath from into an Excel spreadsheet. This User Guide will assist you in navigating through the data entry process.

  8. Hydrogen tomorrow: Demands and technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    National needs for hydrogen are projected and the technologies of production, handling, and utilization are evaluated. Research and technology activities required to meet the projected needs are determined.

  9. Defense Logistics Agency Family Housing Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1999-01-01

    The Director, Defense Logistics Agency (Installation Support Group) requested the audit to review the process the Defense Logistics Agency installations use to determine family housing requirements...

  10. Nursing staff requirements for neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S; Whelan, A; Weindling, A M; Cooke, R W

    1993-01-01

    A study to estimate the number of nursing staff required for neonatal nursing was undertaken. Certain nursing tasks, such as transporting any infant, caring for the dying infant, and looking after the very unstable infant required continuous attention by one nurse (5.5 whole time equivalent (wte) nurses for each cot). The stable ventilated infant required 10.5 nursing hours each day-that is, 2.4 wte/cot. Infants with intravenous infusions, but not ventilated, required only slightly less nursi...

  11. Efecto de la inoculación con rizobios procedentes de Alberta, Canadá, en sorgo (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench, en condiciones de campo Effect of the inoculation with rhizobia from Alberta, Canada, in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench, under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J Bécquer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un experimento de campo con el objetivo de medir el efecto de cepas de rizobio en las variables agronómicas del sorgo, en las condiciones ambientales de Sancti Spíritus, Cuba. Se utilizaron 10 cepas de Sinorhizobium meliloti, procedentes de ecosistemas ganaderos de Alberta, Canadá; así como cuatro cepas de referencia pertenecientes a diferentes géneros y especies de rizobio, que procedían de la colección de Agriculture and AgriFood Canada. La confección de los inóculos y la inoculación de las semillas se realizaron por métodos estándar. El diseño experimental fue de bloques al azar, con 16 tratamientos y cuatro réplicas. Se evaluó el peso seco aéreo, la longitud del tallo y la longitud de la panoja; además, se calculó el incremento del peso seco aéreo en los tratamientos inoculados con relación al control absoluto. Los resultados demostraron la capacidad de las cepas estudiadas de influir en las variables agronómicas, ya que los tratamientos seleccionados igualaron sus valores a los del control fertilizado y presentaron un incremento de más del 100% del peso seco aéreo, comparado con el control absoluto.A field trial was conducted with the objective of measuring the effect of rhizobium strains on the agronomic variables of sorghum under the environmental conditions of Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. Ten Sinorhizobium meliloti strains, from livestock production ecosystems of Alberta, Canada, were used; as well as four reference strains belonging to different rhizobium genera and strains, which were from the collection of Agriculture and AgriFood Canada. The inoculi confection and seed inoculation were made by standard methods. The experimental design was randomized blocks, with 16 treatments and four replications. The dry aerial weight, stem length and ear length were evaluated; in addition, the increase of aerial dry weight was calculated in the inoculated treatments as compared to the absolute control. The results

  12. Functional metagenomics reveals novel β-galactosidases not predictable from gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Romantsov, Tatyana; Engel, Katja; Doxey, Andrew C; Rose, David R; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2017-01-01

    The techniques of metagenomics have allowed researchers to access the genomic potential of uncultivated microbes, but there remain significant barriers to determination of gene function based on DNA sequence alone. Functional metagenomics, in which DNA is cloned and expressed in surrogate hosts, can overcome these barriers, and make important contributions to the discovery of novel enzymes. In this study, a soil metagenomic library carried in an IncP cosmid was used for functional complementation for β-galactosidase activity in both Sinorhizobium meliloti (α-Proteobacteria) and Escherichia coli (γ-Proteobacteria) backgrounds. One β-galactosidase, encoded by six overlapping clones that were selected in both hosts, was identified as a member of glycoside hydrolase family 2. We could not identify ORFs obviously encoding possible β-galactosidases in 19 other sequenced clones that were only able to complement S. meliloti. Based on low sequence identity to other known glycoside hydrolases, yet not β-galactosidases, three of these ORFs were examined further. Biochemical analysis confirmed that all three encoded β-galactosidase activity. Lac36W_ORF11 and Lac161_ORF7 had conserved domains, but lacked similarities to known glycoside hydrolases. Lac161_ORF10 had neither conserved domains nor similarity to known glycoside hydrolases. Bioinformatic and structural modeling implied that Lac161_ORF10 protein represented a novel enzyme family with a five-bladed propeller glycoside hydrolase domain. By discovering founding members of three novel β-galactosidase families, we have reinforced the value of functional metagenomics for isolating novel genes that could not have been predicted from DNA sequence analysis alone.

  13. Bacterial PerO Permeases Transport Sulfate and Related Oxyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Pfänder, Yvonne; Tintel, Marc; Masepohl, Bernd

    2017-07-15

    Rhodobacter capsulatus synthesizes the high-affinity ABC transporters CysTWA and ModABC to specifically import the chemically related oxyanions sulfate and molybdate, respectively. In addition, R. capsulatus has the low-affinity permease PerO acting as a general oxyanion transporter, whose elimination increases tolerance to molybdate and tungstate. Although PerO-like permeases are widespread in bacteria, their function has not been examined in any other species to date. Here, we present evidence that PerO permeases from the alphaproteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens , Dinoroseobacter shibae , Rhodobacter sphaeroides , and Sinorhizobium meliloti and the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri functionally substitute for R. capsulatus PerO in sulfate uptake and sulfate-dependent growth, as shown by assimilation of radioactively labeled sulfate and heterologous complementation. Disruption of perO genes in A. tumefaciens , R. sphaeroides , and S. meliloti increased tolerance to tungstate and, in the case of R. sphaeroides , to molybdate, suggesting that heterometal oxyanions are common substrates of PerO permeases. This study supports the view that bacterial PerO permeases typically transport sulfate and related oxyanions and, hence, form a functionally conserved permease family. IMPORTANCE Despite the widespread distribution of PerO-like permeases in bacteria, our knowledge about PerO function until now was limited to one species, Rhodobacter capsulatus In this study, we showed that PerO proteins from diverse bacteria are functionally similar to the R. capsulatus prototype, suggesting that PerO permeases form a conserved family whose members transport sulfate and related oxyanions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. 7 CFR 352.8 - Marking requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking requirements. 352.8 Section 352.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANT QUARANTINE SAFEGUARD REGULATIONS § 352.8 Marking requirements. Prohibited and...

  15. 40 CFR 264.1065 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks § 264.1065 Reporting requirements. (a) A semiannual report...). (iii) The equipment identification number of each compressor for which a leak was not repaired as... monitoring required by § 264.1060 and was not corrected within 24 hours, the duration and cause of each...

  16. 40 CFR 63.982 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.982 Requirements. (a) General compliance requirements for storage vessels, process vents... subpart apply to emissions being routed to a fuel gas system or process. (e) Final recovery devices...

  17. Requirements engineering: foundation for software quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Pastor, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Welcome to the proceedings of the 22nd edition of REFSQ: the International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering – Foundation for Software Quality! Requirements engineering (RE) has been recognized as a critical factor that impacts the quality of software, systems, and services. Since the

  18. Regulatory capital requirements and bail in mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, B.P.M.; Haentjens, M.; Wessels, B.

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the Capital Requirements Regulation (CRR) in the European Union, the qualitative requirements for bank regulatory capital have changed. These changes aim at implementing in Europe the Basel III principles for better bank capital that is able to absorb losses of banks,

  19. 24 CFR 290.11 - Notification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT HUD-OWNED PROPERTIES DISPOSITION OF MULTIFAMILY PROJECTS AND SALE OF HUD-HELD MULTIFAMILY MORTGAGES Disposition of Multifamily Projects § 290.11 Notification requirements. (a) In general. HUD may combine two or more of the required notifications, as appropriate, to simplify the disposition...

  20. Quality assurance management policies and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to: set forth overall, integrated quality assurance management policies and requirements for the entire Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program; define management responsibilities for assuring quality; and provide a general framework for the development of more detailed quality assurance management policies and requirements by program, project, and contractor organizations

  1. 12 CFR 614.4255 - Independence requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Collateral Evaluation Requirements § 614.4255 Independence requirements. (a) Prohibitions. For all personal and intangible property, and for all real property exempted under § 614.4260(c) of this subpart, no... indirect interest, financial or otherwise, in the loan or subject property; (2) As a director, vote on or...

  2. 12 CFR 615.5050 - Collateral requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collateral requirements. 615.5050 Section 615... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Collateral § 615.5050 Collateral requirements. (a) Each... property acquired in connection with loans made under the Act, obligations of the United States or any...

  3. 12 CFR 614.4260 - Evaluation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... on real property has been taken as collateral in an abundance of caution, and the application, when... Collateral Evaluation Requirements § 614.4260 Evaluation requirements. (a) Valuation. Valuations of personal and intangible property, as well as real property exempted under paragraph (c) of this section, shall...

  4. 42 CFR 433.74 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Financial Participation § 433.74 Reporting requirements. (a) Beginning with the first quarter of Federal fiscal year 1993, each State must submit to CMS quarterly summary information on the source and use of... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting requirements. 433.74 Section 433.74...

  5. 29 CFR 4010.3 - Filing requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.3 Filing requirement. (a) General....10, all information specified in § 4010.6(a) with respect to all members of a controlled group and...

  6. 40 CFR 59.105 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 59.105 Section... Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.105 Reporting requirements. (a) Each regulated entity must submit an initial report no later than January 11, 1999 or within...

  7. 42 CFR 54.7 - Nondiscrimination requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondiscrimination requirement. 54.7 Section 54.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS CHARITABLE CHOICE... PROJECTS FOR ASSISTANCE IN TRANSITION FROM HOMELESSNESS GRANTS § 54.7 Nondiscrimination requirement. A...

  8. 42 CFR 441.208 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 441.208 Section 441.208 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Abortions § 441.208 Recordkeeping requirements. Medicaid agencies must maintain copies of the certifications...

  9. 46 CFR 108.213 - Heating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating requirements. 108.213 Section 108.213 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.213 Heating requirements. (a) Each accommodation space must be heated by a heating system that can maintain at least 20°C. (68°F.). (b) Radiators...

  10. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or her...

  11. 46 CFR 184.100 - General requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirement. 184.100 Section 184.100 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 184.100 General requirement...

  12. 40 CFR 761.40 - Marking requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marking requirements. 761.40 Section 761.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... PROHIBITIONS Marking of PCBs and PCB Items § 761.40 Marking requirements. (a) Each of the following items in...

  13. 11 CFR 200.2 - Procedural requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedural requirements. 200.2 Section 200.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 200.2 Procedural requirements. (a) Any interested person may file with the Commission a written petition for the...

  14. 12 CFR 574.6 - Procedural requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedural requirements. 574.6 Section 574.6 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ACQUISITION OF CONTROL OF SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 574.6 Procedural requirements. (a) Form of application or notice. An application...

  15. 40 CFR 63.707 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proposed limit; and (iv) A statement signed by a responsible official of the company that the control... monitoring system performance report and summary reports shall be submitted as required by § 63.10(e). (1... the performance test required by § 63.7: (i) The performance test or CEM data collected to establish...

  16. 50 CFR 15.12 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION... CONSERVATION ACT Prohibitions and Requirements § 15.12 Requirements. (a) No person shall import into the United...) Any exotic bird can be imported to the United States if it was legally exported from the United States...

  17. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen requirements. 97.8 Section 97.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... required by the examiner to furnish representative specimens of the variety, or its flower, fruit, or seeds...

  18. 24 CFR 201.24 - Security requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (c) Recording and perfection of security. The lender shall assure that the legal description... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security requirements. 201.24... TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Eligibility and Disbursement Requirements § 201...

  19. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the by what method the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun, in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of ongoing efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  20. 8 CFR 312.1 - Literacy requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Literacy requirements. 312.1 Section 312.1... FOR NATURALIZATION § 312.1 Literacy requirements. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in... determining English proficiency, as outlined in paragraph(c) of this section. (c) Literacy examination—(1...

  1. Tracing And Control Of Engineering Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Philip R.; Stoller, Richard L.; Neville, Ted; Boyle, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is data-base/word-processing software system created to document and maintain order of both requirements and descriptions associated with engineering project. Implemented on IBM PC under PC-DOS. Written with CLIPPER.

  2. Modeling uncertainty in requirements engineering decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Martin S.; Maynard-Zhang, Pedrito; Kiper, James D.

    2005-01-01

    One inherent characteristic of requrements engineering is a lack of certainty during this early phase of a project. Nevertheless, decisions about requirements must be made in spite of this uncertainty. Here we describe the context in which we are exploring this, and some initial work to support elicitation of uncertain requirements, and to deal with the combination of such information from multiple stakeholders.

  3. 37 CFR 2.51 - Drawing required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drawing required. 2.51... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.51 Drawing required. (a) In an application under section 1(a) of the Act, the drawing of the mark must be a substantially exact representation of the mark...

  4. NASA's acquisition requirements for configuration management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Mark P.

    1992-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA's acquisition requirements for configuration management (CM) goes over CM requirements for single mission and multi-mission orientations, CM automation and CALS implementation initiatives, NASA implementation of DOD standards and DID's (data item descriptions), impact of traceability in NASA CM support, NASA's CM efforts in modifying/upgrading equipment, and CM control of multi-vendor hardware.

  5. 40 CFR 191.13 - Containment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements. (a) Disposal systems for spent nuclear fuel or high-level or transuranic radioactive wastes shall... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containment requirements. 191.13 Section 191.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION...

  6. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Trebules

    2006-01-01

    This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document

  7. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Trebules

    2006-06-02

    This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

  8. On the Similarity between Requirements and Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.C.; van Vliet, H.

    2009-01-01

    Many would agree that there is a relationship between requirements engineering and software architecture. However, there have always been different opinions about the exact nature of this relationship. Nevertheless, all arguments have been based on one overarching notion: that of requirements as

  9. 14 CFR 205.3 - Basic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT LIABILITY INSURANCE § 205.3 Basic requirements. (a) A U.S. or foreign direct air carrier shall not engage in air transportation unless it has in effect aircraft accident liability insurance coverage that meets the requirements of this part for its air carrier or foreign air carrier...

  10. 48 CFR 8.1103 - Contract requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contractor or the Government for furnishing gasoline, motor oil, antifreeze, and similar items. (e) Unless it... PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Leasing of Motor Vehicles 8.1103 Contract requirements. Contracting officers shall include the following items in each contract for leasing motor vehicles: (a) Scope...

  11. Linoleic acid intake and vitamin E requirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, F.C.

    1973-01-01

    In experiments with rats and Peking ducklings it has been investigated to what extent the linoleic acid content of the diet is of influence on the requirement of vitamin E. This requirement was determined by adding D-α-tocopheryl acetate in increasing doses to vitamin E-free diets and to determine

  12. 13 CFR 307.5 - Application requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application requirements. 307.5 Section 307.5 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... EDA) a CEDS, except that a CEDS is not required when applying for a Strategy Grant; and (2) Explain...

  13. Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design

  14. 8 CFR 216.2 - Notification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirement that the alien apply for removal of the conditions within the ninety days immediately preceding... petitioning spouse, or alien entrepreneur of the requirement to file a petition to remove conditions within... status of conditional permanent resident. At the time an alien acquires conditional permanent residence...

  15. 49 CFR 451.25 - Required information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required information. 451.25 Section 451.25....25 Required information. (a) The safety approval number appearing on line 1 of the safety approval... safety approval plate on the freight container provided that all the information contained on the...

  16. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Technical Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this section is to explain the meaning of logical connectors with specific examples. Logical connectors are used in Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) to discriminate between, and yet connect, discrete Conditions, Required Actions, Completion Times, Surveillances, and Frequencies. The only logical connectors that appear in TSRs are AND and OR. The physical arrangement of these connectors constitutes logical conventions with specific meanings

  17. 40 CFR 65.5 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electronic media. (h) Adjustment to timing of submittals and review of required communications—(1) Alignment...) through (5) of this section. (7) Process unit identification. As an alternative to requirements specified... individual pieces of equipment. For this alternative, the kind of emission point in the process unit that...

  18. 14 CFR 65.75 - Knowledge requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.75 Knowledge requirements. (a) Each applicant for a mechanic certificate or rating must, after meeting the applicable experience requirements of § 65.77, pass a written test covering the construction and maintenance of aircraft appropriate to the...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1018 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1018 Reporting requirements. (a... § 63.1007(e)(2) and those pumps complying with the closed vent system provisions of § 63.1007(e)(3). (iv) Number of compressors subject to the requirements of § 63.1012, excluding those compressors...

  20. 13 CFR 120.860 - Required objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required objectives. 120.860 Section 120.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) Project Economic Development Goals § 120.860 Required objectives. A Project...

  1. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-climber, emergency egress, emergency interior lighting, and interior configuration design requirements set... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design...

  2. ISS Crew Transportation and Services Requirements Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayt, Robert L. (Compiler); Lueders, Kathryn L. (Compiler)

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Crew Transportation and Services Requirements Document (CCT-REQ-1130) contains all technical, safety, and crew health medical requirements that are mandatory for achieving a Crew Transportation System Certification that will allow for International Space Station delivery and return of NASA crew and limited cargo. Previously approved on TN23183.

  3. 7 CFR 1794.41 - Document requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Document requirements. 1794.41 Section 1794.41....41 Document requirements. Applicants will provide an ER in accordance with the appropriate guidance documents referenced in § 1794.7. After RUS has evaluated the ER and has determined the ER adequately...

  4. Oxygen requirement of separated hybrid catfish eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channel catfish egg masses require hatchery water with over 7.8 ppm dissolved oxygen at 80° F (95% air saturation) to maintain maximum oxygen consumption as they near hatching. This concentration is called the critical oxygen requirement by scientists but for the purpose of this article we will call...

  5. 7 CFR 4280.113 - Insurance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section A. Grants § 4280.113 Insurance requirements. Agency approved... 1806, subpart B, of this title, if applicable. (b) Business interruption insurance is required except...

  6. 14 CFR 121.433 - Training required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in a certificate holder's approved low-altitude windshear flight training program when... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training required. 121.433 Section 121.433..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Crewmember Qualifications § 121.433 Training required. (a) Initial...

  7. 10 CFR 60.3 - License required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false License required. 60.3 Section 60.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.3 License required. (a) DOE shall not receive or possess source, special nuclear, or...

  8. 10 CFR 61.3 - License required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false License required. 61.3 Section 61.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General... containing source, special nuclear, or byproduct material at a land disposal facility unless authorized by a...

  9. 20 CFR 655.1303 - Advertising requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.1303 Section... Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1303 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted... the H-2A workers. All advertising must contain the following information: (a) The employer's name and...

  10. 20 CFR 655.17 - Advertising requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.17 Section 655... States (H-2B Workers) § 655.17 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted to satisfy the... employment which are not less favorable than those to be offered to the H-2B workers. All advertising must...

  11. Security Requirements – Analysis of the Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Vincent

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Needs about security are matters little taken into account when managing requirements engineering , and when considered in the life cycle of the system , they tend to become a general list of functions, as password of protection , firewalls , virus detection tools , and other similar. But in fact, they cannot be considered as requirements of security, because they are implementation mechanisms to try to meet unspecified requirements, as an authenticated access. As a result, the security requirements for the system are ignored, which are required to protect essential services and assets, besides, when are specified, is not considered the prospect of future attacks. This paper describes the need for a systematic approach to managing security requirements engineering, in order to help avoid the problem of generic lists and take into account the future perspective. Several related approaches are described and also are provided references additional material that can help requirements engineers to ensure that their products be taken into account, effectively , the security requirements.

  12. 7 CFR 1779.9 - Environmental requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental requirements. 1779.9 Section 1779.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.9 Environmental requirements...

  13. 49 CFR 27.9 - Assurance required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General § 27.9 Assurance required. (a) General... requirements of this part for so long as the property is used for the purpose for which the Federal financial assistance was provided or for a similar purpose. (2) When Federal financial assistance is used by a...

  14. 20 CFR 632.41 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.41 Reporting requirements... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting requirements. 632.41 Section 632.41... registered mail, financial and program reports. Accuracy of all reports must be verified by the chief...

  15. 5 CFR 1315.9 - Required documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to support payment of invoices and interest penalties: (a) The following information from the... requirements under the Prompt Payment Act, including the payment of interest penalties on late invoice payments... electronic payment is required, the contract will stipulate that banking information must be submitted no...

  16. Requirements for clinical information modelling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Kalra, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes consensus requirements for clinical information modelling tools that can support modelling tasks in medium/large scale institutions. Rather than identify which functionalities are currently available in existing tools, the study has focused on functionalities that should be covered in order to provide guidance about how to evolve the existing tools. After identifying a set of 56 requirements for clinical information modelling tools based on a literature review and interviews with experts, a classical Delphi study methodology was applied to conduct a two round survey in order to classify them as essential or recommended. Essential requirements are those that must be met by any tool that claims to be suitable for clinical information modelling, and if we one day have a certified tools list, any tool that does not meet essential criteria would be excluded. Recommended requirements are those more advanced requirements that may be met by tools offering a superior product or only needed in certain modelling situations. According to the answers provided by 57 experts from 14 different countries, we found a high level of agreement to enable the study to identify 20 essential and 21 recommended requirements for these tools. It is expected that this list of identified requirements will guide developers on the inclusion of new basic and advanced functionalities that have strong support by end users. This list could also guide regulators in order to identify requirements that could be demanded of tools adopted within their institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 12 CFR 725.19 - Collateral requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collateral requirements. 725.19 Section 725.19... CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL LIQUIDITY FACILITY § 725.19 Collateral requirements. (a) Each Facility advance and each Agent loan shall be secured by a first priority security interest in collateral...

  18. 27 CFR 7.28 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption within Puerto Rico may, if desired, state the information required by this subpart solely in the... millimeters for containers larger than 40 fl. oz. (c) English language. All information, other than the brand name, required by this subpart to be stated on labels shall be in the English language. Additional...

  19. 33 CFR 203.83 - Additional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., placing sod, or seeding completed work. (d) Adequacy of requirements of local cooperation. In determining.../Cooperation Agreements § 203.83 Additional requirements. (a) Maintenance deficiencies. Rehabilitation... furnishing flood fight assistance during an emergency. (b) Areas of minor damage, flood control works...

  20. 32 CFR 552.56 - Licensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Licensing requirements. 552.56 Section 552.56 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Solicitation on Military Reservations § 552.56 Licensing requirements. To transact...

  1. 47 CFR 73.731 - Licensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing requirements. 73.731 Section 73.731 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.731 Licensing requirements. (a) A license for an international broadcasting station will be issued...

  2. 47 CFR 74.532 - Licensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing requirements. 74.532 Section 74.532 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... § 74.532 Licensing requirements. (a) An aural broadcast STL or an aural broadcast intercity relay...

  3. 47 CFR 74.632 - Licensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing requirements. 74.632 Section 74.632 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.632 Licensing requirements. (a) Licenses for television pickup, television STL, television...

  4. 10 CFR 110.5 - Licensing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensing requirements. 110.5 Section 110.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL General Provisions § 110.5 Licensing requirements. Except as provided under subpart B of this part, no person may export...

  5. 12 CFR 989.2 - Audit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit requirements. 989.2 Section 989.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE BANKS § 989.2 Audit requirements. (a) Each Bank, the OF and the Financing Corporation shall obtain annually an...

  6. 48 CFR 8.1102 - Presolicitation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Leasing of Motor Vehicles 8.1102 Presolicitation requirements. (a) Except as specified in 8.1102(b), before preparing solicitations for leasing of... automobiles (sedans and station wagons) larger than Type IA, IB, or II (small, subcompact, or compact) are...

  7. 76 FR 18348 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale... Register on January 20, 2011 (76 FR 3485), defining required scale tests. That document incorrectly defined... read as follows: Sec. 201.72 Scales; testing of. (a) * * * Except that if scales are used on a limited...

  8. Nuclear plant requirements during power system restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamski, G.; Jenkins, R.; Gill, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is one of a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. This paper discusses a number of nuclear power plant requirements that require special attention during power system restoration

  9. 30 CFR 56.6132 - Magazine requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magazine requirements. 56.6132 Section 56.6132....6132 Magazine requirements. (a) Magazines shall be— (1) Structurally sound; (2) Noncombustible or the... the inside; (5) Ventilated to control dampness and excessive heating within the magazine; (6) Posted...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6132 - Magazine requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magazine requirements. 57.6132 Section 57.6132...-Surface Only § 57.6132 Magazine requirements. (a) Magazines shall be— (1) Structurally sound; (2... magazine; (6) Posted with the appropriate United States Department of Transportation placards or other...

  11. Integrating semi-formal and formal requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.; Olivé, Antoni; Dubois, Eric; Pastor, Joan Antoni; Huyts, Sander

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the integration of informal, semiformal and formal requirements specification techniques. We present a framework for requirements specification called TRADE, within which several well-known semiformal specification techniques are placed. TRADE is based on an analysis of

  12. The strictest energy requirements in the world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Erik Hagelskjær; Jensen, Jens Stissing

    2013-01-01

    50 years of progressively strengthened energy requirements in the Danish building code appear to be a success, as the energy consumption has remained constant despite an increase in the total area in requirement of heating. This article however argues that the building code mechanism is heavily i...

  13. 40 CFR 65.42 - Control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control requirements. 65.42 Section 65.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED...) External floating roof (EFR). Operate and maintain an external floating roof meeting the requirements of...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1258 - Monitoring Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performance test is not required, the parametric levels shall be set based on the design evaluation required... device design shall be used to establish the operating parameter level. (b) Monitoring for control... not be limited to, a daily or per batch demonstration that the unit is working as designed and may...

  15. An Online Graduate Requirements Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicay-Ergin, N.; Laplante, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Requirements engineering is one of the fundamental knowledge areas in software and systems engineering graduate curricula. Recent changes in educational delivery and student demographics have created new challenges for requirements engineering education. In particular, there is an increasing demand for online education for working professionals.…

  16. 40 CFR 233.31 - Coordination requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination requirements. 233.31 Section 233.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING 404 STATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS Program Operation § 233.31 Coordination requirements. (a) If a proposed...

  17. 48 CFR 509.306 - Solicitation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Solicitation requirements... COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS First Article Testing and Approval 509.306... contracting officer must address the requirements in FAR 9.306(d) and (f) through (j) in the solicitation's...

  18. Requirements Level Semantics for UML Statecharts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.F.; Eshuis, H.; Talcott, C.L.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    We propose a formal real-time semantics for UML statecharts aimed at the requirements level. A requirements-level model assumes perfect technology and has a considerably simpler semantics than an implementation level model. Our semantics is an adaptation of the Statemate statechart semantics, with

  19. 15 CFR 760.5 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PRACTICES OR BOYCOTTS § 760.5 Reporting requirements. (a) Scope of reporting requirements. (1) A United... a restrictive trade practice or boycott fostered or imposed by a foreign country against a country... foreign boycott or restrictive trade practice. (i) A request received by a United States person located in...

  20. Critical Review of NOAA's Observation Requirements Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJoie, M.; Yapur, M.; Vo, T.; Templeton, A.; Bludis, D.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA's Observing Systems Council (NOSC) maintains a comprehensive database of user observation requirements. The requirements collection process engages NOAA subject matter experts to document and effectively communicate the specific environmental observation measurements (parameters and attributes) needed to produce operational products and pursue research objectives. User observation requirements documented using a structured and standardized manner and framework enables NOAA to assess its needs across organizational lines in an impartial, objective, and transparent manner. This structure provides the foundation for: selecting, designing, developing, acquiring observing technologies, systems and architectures; budget and contract formulation and decision-making; and assessing in a repeatable fashion the productivity, efficiency and optimization of NOAA's observing system enterprise. User observation requirements are captured independently from observing technologies. Therefore, they can be addressed by a variety of current or expected observing capabilities and allow flexibility to be remapped to new and evolving technologies. NOAA's current inventory of user observation requirements were collected over a ten-year period, and there have been many changes in policies, mission priorities, and funding levels during this time. In light of these changes, the NOSC initiated a critical, in-depth review to examine all aspects of user observation requirements and associated processes during 2017. This presentation provides background on the NOAA requirements process, major milestones and outcomes of the critical review, and plans for evolving and connecting observing requirements processes in the next year.