WorldWideScience

Sample records for sinking particulate organic

  1. Impacts of the Changjiang diluted water on sinking processes of particulate organic matters in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukigara, Chiho; Mino, Yoshihisa; Tripathy, Sarat Chandra; Ishizaka, Joji; Matsuno, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    Intensive surveys with repeated CTD and microstructure turbulent observations, water and sediments sampling as well as onboard incubation and sediment trap experiments were conducted to reveal the nitrogen budget in the center of the East China Sea (ECS) during July 2010 and 2011. Low salinity water (Changjiang Diluted Water, CDW) covered the study area in 2010, but not in 2011. Higher chlorophyll a (chl. a) concentration, primary productivity, and downward particle flux in the upper layer were observed in 2010 than those in 2011. Existence of the CDW resulted in a steep pycnocline and an associated subsurface chl. a maximum (SCM) layer directly beneath the CDW. From chemical analyses of particulate carbon and nitrogen contents and isotope ratios, it became apparent that the particles sunk out the euphotic zone in 2010 was primarily originated in the CDW layer and secondly in the SCM layer. Whereas, in 2011, sinking particles were originated in the surface layer but a part of them were decomposed in the bottom of pycnocline. Our findings indicate that the CDW would supply particles into the deep layer and contribute to the downward transport of materials and the efficiency of biological pump in the ECS.

  2. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  3. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: Update on molecular drivers of sink strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia eBihmidine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INV, not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell-cycle and cell-division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive feast genes, they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength

  4. Lability of Secondary Organic Particulate Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; Giles, Mary K.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Bertram, Allan K.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    Accurate simulations of the consenctrations of atmospheric organic particulate matter (PM) are needed for predicting energy flow in the Earth’s climate system. In the past, simulations of organic PM widely assume equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between the PM and surrounding vapor. Herein, we test this assumption by measuring evaporation rates and associated vapor mass concentration of organic films representative of atmospheric PM. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH), indicating equilibrium partitioning above a transition RH but not below. In contrast for films representing biogenic PM, no threshold was observed, indicating equilibrium partitioning at all RHs. The results suggest that the mass lability of atmospheric organic PM can differ in consequential ways among Earth’s natural biomes, polluted regions, and regions of land-use change, and these differences need to be considered when simulating atmospheric organic PM.

  5. Impacts of benthic coarse particulate organic matter variations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation to assess the relationship between coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) and macroinvertebrate communities was undertaken in the Njoro River, Kenya during 2010. Significantly lower macroinvertebrate densities and diversities were observed in study sites with low Coarse Particulate Organic Matter ...

  6. Temporal and spatial variations in particulate matter, particulate organic carbon and attenuation coefficient in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.

    Nine stations over a stretch of 21 km of Periyar river estuary were sampled during January to December 1981. Particulate matter varied from 3-253 mg.1 super(1) at the surface and 24.8-257mg.1 super(1) at the bottom. Particulate organic carbon ranged...

  7. Watershed storage and riverine particulate organic radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N. E.; Leithold, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Lateral movement of carbon and other materials across landscapes is punctuated with periods of storage and reaction. Though we understand basic principles concerning transport and storage effects on the nature of some materials, an adequate understanding is lacking of the cumulative impacts of those processes as material migrates across the biogeochemical landscape. This is essential to the interpretation of geochemical soil and sedimentary records of the past as well as to predicting future responses of systems to perturbations in climate or landuse. Sources of organic carbon exported from watersheds can be broadly defined as those recently derived for extant ecosystems, those derived from materials aged and altered in storage (aged soil OC), and fossil material associated with sedimentary bedrock. Separately, these materials are easy to recognize based on isotopic and molecular compositions and each could in principle be linked to specific mass transport processes such as sheet wash, shallow landsliding or gullying. The blending and alteration of original source signatures during storage appear to attenuate the variability of the exported signal within a system and complicate source identification. Riverine particulate organic carbon 14C-compositions reveal robust relationships between radiocarbon content, suspended load concentrations and % organic C. These are explained as a result of mixing of the 14C-free fossil C from sedimentary rocks with 14C-containing material derived from extant ecosystems and soils. In essence, the 14C-content of riverine POC inversely correlates with the muddiness of the system. Whereas one might predict that POC radiocarbon content might decrease with increased storage or residence time in watersheds, no obvious relationship exists between bulk 14C-content observations and watershed size. Instead, the hypothetical watershed size effect is obscured by precipitation- and discharge-driven variations in the mixture of the fossil and non

  8. Distribution of particulate organic carbon in the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Dhople, V.M.; Wagh, A.B.

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) of 161 water samples collected from 8 depths (surface to 1000m) at 21 stations was measured. The POC concentrations ranged from 154 to 554 kappa g per litre at the surface and decreased in the upper 300 m water...

  9. Distribution of particulate organic matter in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.C.; Rao, T.S.S.

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) of 161 water samples collected from 8 depths (surface to 1000 m) at 21 stations was measured The POC concentrations ranged from 154 to 554 mu g per litre at the surface and decreased in the upper 300 m water column...

  10. Model-based remote sensing algorithms for particulate organic carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrographic data, including particulate organic carbon (POC) from the Northeastern Gulf of. Mexico (NEGOM) ... along the Gulf Coast. The Northeastern Gulf of. Mexico (NEGOM), Louisiana–Texas Shelf Physi- cal Oceanography Program (LATEX), and hypoxia ..... shelf based on 32 months of moored current meter data;.

  11. Sensitivity of δ15N of nitrate, surface suspended and deep sinking particulate nitrogen to seasonal nitrate depletion in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourey, Martin J.; Trull, Thomas W.; Sigman, Daniel M.

    2003-09-01

    We report measurements of the δ15N of nitrate, suspended particulate nitrogen (PN), and sinking PN from cruises and moored sediment traps in the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) and Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia. As expected, surface water nitrate δ15N increased as nitrate was consumed during the spring/summer bloom. In contrast, the seasonal cycles of surface water suspended and sinking PN δ15N did not fit expectations from nitrate assimilation alone. Rather than increasing, the δ15N of surface suspended PN was relatively constant in the SAZ (at ˜1‰), and decreased during the summer in the PFZ (from ˜0 to ˜-4‰), most likely due to the production of low 15N PN by summertime ammonium recycling. Deep sediment trap PN δ15N also displayed seasonal decreases (from ˜4 to ˜1‰ in the SAZ, and from ˜3.5 to ˜0.5‰ in the PFZ), which correlated with PON flux magnitude. During high-flux periods, exported PN δ15N values were close to expectations from nitrate-based export, but low-flux periods exhibited higher δ15N, consistent with either a reduction in the isotope effect of nitrate assimilation or more extensive isotopic alteration of the sinking material during low-flux periods. The mass balance between net nitrate supply and exported PN that links sinking flux δ15N to nitrate utilization requires only that the annually integrated (rather than the seasonally varying) sinking flux of PN δ15N correlates with nitrate depletion. While a correlation between annually integrated sinking PN δ15N to nitrate depletion was observed in both the SAZ and PFZ, the sensitivity of sinking PN δ15N to nitrate depletion was lower than expected. Moreover, the seasonal observations raise the possibility that loss of the summertime high-flux period represents an alternative explanation to increased nitrate utilization for the high sedimentary PN δ15N observed during glacial periods.

  12. Distribution of particulate organic matter in Rajapur and Vagothan estuarines (west coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tulaskar, A.S.; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    The distribution of particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate carbohydrates (PCHO) and particulate proteins (PP) in the suspended particulate matter was studied. The POC, PCHO and PP concentrations ranged from 176 to 883 mu g.l/1, 115 to 647 mu...

  13. Eddy-driven subduction exports particulate organic carbon from the spring bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omand, Melissa M; D'Asaro, Eric A; Lee, Craig M; Perry, Mary Jane; Briggs, Nathan; Cetinić, Ivona; Mahadevan, Amala

    2015-04-10

    The export of particulate organic carbon (POC) from the surface ocean to depth is traditionally ascribed to sinking. Here, we show that a dynamic eddying flow field subducts surface water with high concentrations of nonsinking POC. Autonomous observations made by gliders during the North Atlantic spring bloom reveal anomalous features at depths of 100 to 350 meters with elevated POC, chlorophyll, oxygen, and temperature-salinity characteristics of surface water. High-resolution modeling reveals that during the spring transition, intrusions of POC-rich surface water descend as coherent, 1- to 10-kilometer-scale filamentous features, often along the perimeter of eddies. Such a submesoscale eddy-driven flux of POC is unresolved in global carbon cycle models but can contribute as much as half of the total springtime export of POC from the highly productive subpolar oceans. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Particulate organic nitrates: Sampling and night/day variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Platz, J.; Granby, K.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric day and night concentrations of particulate organic nitrates (PON) and several other air pollutants were measured in the summer 1995 over an open-land area in Denmark. The sampling of PON was evaluated comparing 24 h samples with two sets of 12 h samples. These results indicate...... that the observed low contribution of PON to NO, is real and not the result of an extensive loss during the sampling. Empirical relationships between the vapour pressure and chemical formula of organic compounds were established in order to evaluate the gas/particle distribution of organic nitrates. A positive...

  15. The Relative Importance of Aqueous vs. Vapor-Pressure Dependent Pathways for Particulate Organic Nitrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, A.; Pye, H. O. T.; Cohen, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    Formation of biogenic derived organic nitrates is known as an important immediate sink of atmospheric nitrogen oxides. Although, subsequent oxidation and photolysis of organic nitrates can return a part of the sequestered NOx to the atmosphere, other removal pathways in combination with wet and dry deposition and hydrolysis of particulate organic nitrates is of central importance in irreversible NOx removal from the atmosphere. The aim of this work is to understand how and to what degree the particle phase participates in removal of NOx. We implement a new BVOC oxidation gas phase mechanism (including a detailed representation of OH- and NO3-initiated organic nitrates) and an explicit representation of organic nitrate aerosols formation, including irreversible aqueous-phase uptake and reversible partitioning onto pre-existing organic aerosol, into the CMAQ model. Using these mechanisms, we simulate observations from the SOAS field campaigns over the southeast US in summer 2013 and examine the relative role of water-mediated vs vapor pressure processes in determining aerosol from organic nitrates.

  16. Seasonal and spatial distribution of particulate organic matter in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, L.; Bhosle, N.B.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhushan, R.

    The temporal, spatial and depth related variation of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) in the Bay of Bengal are assessed in this paper. For this purpose, suspended particulate matter (SPM) samples were collected from eight depths (2 to 1000...

  17. Aged riverine particulate organic carbon in four UK catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jessica L., E-mail: jesams@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Bryant, Charlotte L., E-mail: charlotte.bryant@glasgow.ac.uk [NERC Radiocarbon Facility, East Kilbride G75 0QF, Scotland (United Kingdom); Helliwell, Rachel C., E-mail: rachel.helliwell@hutton.ac.uk [The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland (United Kingdom); Toberman, Hannah, E-mail: hannahtoberman@hotmail.com [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Quinton, John, E-mail: j.quinton@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The riverine transport of particulate organic matter (POM) is a significant flux in the carbon cycle, and affects macronutrients and contaminants. We used radiocarbon to characterise POM at 9 riverine sites of four UK catchments (Avon, Conwy, Dee, Ribble) over a one-year period. High-discharge samples were collected on three or four occasions at each site. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was obtained by centrifugation, and the samples were analysed for carbon isotopes. Concentrations of SPM and SPM organic carbon (OC) contents were also determined, and were found to have a significant negative correlation. For the 7 rivers draining predominantly rural catchments, PO{sup 14}C values, expressed as percent modern carbon absolute (pMC), varied little among samplings at each site, and there was no significant difference in the average values among the sites. The overall average PO{sup 14}C value for the 7 sites of 91.2 pMC corresponded to an average age of 680 {sup 14}C years, but this value arises from the mixing of differently-aged components, and therefore significant amounts of organic matter older than the average value are present in the samples. Although topsoil erosion is probably the major source of the riverine POM, the average PO{sup 14}C value is appreciably lower than topsoil values (which are typically 100 pMC). This is most likely explained by inputs of older subsoil OC from bank erosion, or the preferential loss of high-{sup 14}C topsoil organic matter by mineralisation during riverine transport. The significantly lower average PO{sup 14}C of samples from the River Calder (76.6 pMC), can be ascribed to components containing little or no radiocarbon, derived either from industrial sources or historical coal mining, and this effect is also seen in the River Ribble, downstream of its confluence with the Calder. At the global scale, the results significantly expand available information for PO{sup 14}C in rivers draining catchments with low erosion rates

  18. Organic speciation of size-segregated atmospheric particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Raphael

    Particle size and composition are key factors controlling the impacts of particulate matter (PM) on human health and the environment. A comprehensive method to characterize size-segregated PM organic content was developed, and evaluated during two field campaigns. Size-segregated particles were collected using a cascade impactor (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a PM2.5 large volume sampler. A series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were solvent extracted and quantified using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Large volume injections were performed using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet to lower detection limits. The developed analysis method was evaluated during the 2001 and 2002 Intercomparison Exercise Program on Organic Contaminants in PM2.5 Air Particulate Matter led by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Ambient samples were collected in May 2002 as part of the Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Florida, USA and in July and August 2004 as part of the New England Air Quality Study - Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS - ITCT) in New Hampshire, USA. Morphology of the collected particles was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Smaller particles (one micrometer or less) appeared to consist of solid cores surrounded by a liquid layer which is consistent with combustion particles and also possibly with particles formed and/or coated by secondary material like sulfate, nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. Source apportionment studies demonstrated the importance of stationary sources on the organic particulate matter observed at these two rural sites. Coal burning and biomass burning were found to be responsible for a large part of the observed PAHs during the field campaigns. Most of the measured PAHs were concentrated in particles smaller than one micrometer and linked to combustion sources

  19. Particulate organic carbon and nitrogen export from major Arctic rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Raymond, P. A.; Striegl, R. G.; Zhulidov, A. V.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.; Tank, S. E.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Staples, R.; Gurtovaya, T. Y.; Griffin, C. G.

    2016-05-01

    Northern rivers connect a land area of approximately 20.5 million km2 to the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas. These rivers account for ~10% of global river discharge and transport massive quantities of dissolved and particulate materials that reflect watershed sources and impact biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. In this paper, multiyear data sets from a coordinated sampling program are used to characterize particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) export from the six largest rivers within the pan-Arctic watershed (Yenisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, Yukon, Kolyma). Together, these rivers export an average of 3055 × 109 g of POC and 368 × 109 g of PN each year. Scaled up to the pan-Arctic watershed as a whole, fluvial export estimates increase to 5767 × 109 g and 695 × 109 g of POC and PN per year, respectively. POC export is substantially lower than dissolved organic carbon export by these rivers, whereas PN export is roughly equal to dissolved nitrogen export. Seasonal patterns in concentrations and source/composition indicators (C:N, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N) are broadly similar among rivers, but distinct regional differences are also evident. For example, average radiocarbon ages of POC range from ~2000 (Ob') to ~5500 (Mackenzie) years before present. Rapid changes within the Arctic system as a consequence of global warming make it challenging to establish a contemporary baseline of fluvial export, but the results presented in this paper capture variability and quantify average conditions for nearly a decade at the beginning of the 21st century.

  20. Dispersal and sink pathways of suspended particulate matter from the orographically enhanced SWM regime of the SE Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Kader, U.S.A.; Vaidya, P.; Rajawat, A.S.; Ajai; Ramakrishnan, R.

    fluvial discharge. The short-length and the high-gradient of these rivers appear to aid in a rapid transfer of their TSM load into the sea. We, therefore, link higher TSM in the coastal waters to a large fluvial influx into the sea. In order... winds prevailed during SWM (~0.7 dyne sec -1 ), though their magnitude reduced after cessation of SWM (see Figure 9). These winds with equatorwards wind stress component during SWM are known to aid in sequestering of particulate matter over the inner...

  1. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, Scott [Oakland University, Rochester, MI; Lamberti, Gary A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Entrekin, Sally A. [University of Central Arkansas; Griffiths, Natalie A. [ORNL

    2017-08-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.

  2. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, Scott [Oakland University, Rochester, MI; Lamberti, Gary A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Entrekin, Sally A. [University of Central Arkansas; Griffiths, Natalie A. [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.

  3. Organic compounds in the particulate matter from burning organic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon; Jerry D. White; Skevos N. Tsoukalas

    1985-01-01

    This paper is directed to people interested in the environmental impact of natural emissions. Natural emissions are common and contribute significantly to tropospheric background levels. Several million hectares of the United States are covered by organic soils. During droughts, these soils can ignite and support slow combustion which often persists for weeks causing...

  4. Changes in the sedimentation histories of lakes using Pb-210 as a tracer of sinking particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.S.; Birch, P.B.; Spyridakis, D.E.; Schell, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed study of man's impact over the last 150 years on six lakes in Western Washington State has been made using Pb-210 dating methods and historical records. These lakes represent a gradient in watershed usage from pristine natural environments to heavily urbanized areas. Fine structures in the sediment profiles of Pb-210 measurements were found to correlate with changing watershed land use. Contemporary sedimentation rates varied from 50-679 g/m 2 x a (0.37-2.9 mm/a) and were generally higher than precultural rates. The highest average sedimentation rates (1230-1800 g/m 2 x a or 5.6-8.3 mm/a) were simultaneous with suburbanization. Construction of roads and houses appeared to be the major cause of increased erosion in the watersheds. The present day sediments of all lakes were enriched in lead compared to older background material. The stable lead profiles from all lakes except Lake Union were consistent with the local history of lead pollution based on the Pb-210 geochronologies. Water column residence times for Pb-210 and stable lead were almost identical and were consistent with algal settling rates and the sinking rates of fine silts and clays. (orig.) [de

  5. Sources of particulate organic matter discharged by the Lena River using lignin phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Trojahn, S.; Hefter, J.; Pittauer, D.; Zubrzycki, S.; Han, P.; Rethemeyer, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2016-12-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) discharged by rivers and deposited offshore their mouths is generally assumed to record an integrated signal from the watershed and therefore provides an archive of past environmental changes. Yet, in large river systems the riverine POM might be trapped in flood plains and the lower reaches resulting in an inefficient transport of POM particularly from the distal parts of the watershed. Further, the POM likely undergoes degradation during transport from source to sink. The Lena River is one of these large river systems stretching from 53°N to 71°N in central Siberia. The watershed can be broadly divided into two different biomes, taiga in the south and tundra in the northernmost part. The relative contribution of these biomes to the POM load of the river and its discharge to the ocean as well as the changes it is undergoing during transport are not well understood. Here we present the lignin phenol composition of different grain size fractions (bulk, 2mm-63µm, gymnosperm-derived POM, particularly close to the river mouth and in the <63µm fraction. Because of the large heterogeneity of organic matter degradation in the soil samples and their grain size fractions, it is not quite clear to which degree the POM gets mineralized within the soils and during transport in the river compared to degradation occurring during cross shelf transport.

  6. Fluxes of particulate organic carbon in the East China Sea in summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Hung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand carbon cycling in marginal seas better, particulate organic carbon (POC concentrations, POC fluxes and primary production (PP were measured in the East China Sea (ECS in summer 2007. Higher concentrations of POC were observed in the inner shelf, and lower POC values were found in the outer shelf. Similar to POC concentrations, elevated uncorrected POC fluxes (720–7300 mg C m−2 d−1 were found in the inner shelf, and lower POC fluxes (80–150 mg C m−2 d−1 were in the outer shelf, respectively. PP values (~ 340–3380 mg C m−2 d−1 had analogous distribution patterns to POC fluxes, while some of PP values were significantly lower than POC fluxes, suggesting that contributions of resuspended particles to POC fluxes need to be appropriately corrected. A vertical mixing model was used to correct effects of bottom sediment resuspension, and the lowest and highest corrected POC fluxes were in the outer shelf (58 ± 33 mg C m−2 d−1 and the inner shelf (785 ± 438 mg C m−2 d−1, respectively. The corrected POC fluxes (486 to 785 mg C m−2 d−1 in the inner shelf could be the minimum value because we could not exactly distinguish the effect of POC flux from Changjiang influence with turbid waters. The results suggest that 27–93% of the POC flux in the ECS might be from the contribution of resuspension of bottom sediments rather than from the actual biogenic carbon sinking flux. While the vertical mixing model is not a perfect model to solve sediment resuspension because it ignores biological degradation of sinking particles, Changjiang plume (or terrestrial inputs and lateral transport, it makes significant progress in both correcting the resuspension problem and in assessing a reasonable quantitative estimate of POC flux in a marginal sea.

  7. Buffering of Ocean Export Production by Flexible Elemental Stoichiometry of Particulate Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2017-10-01

    One of the most important factors that determine the ocean-atmosphere carbon partitioning is the sinking of particulate organic matter (POM) from the surface ocean to the deep ocean. The amount of carbon (C) removed from the surface ocean by this POM export production depends critically on the elemental ratio in POM of C to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), two essential elements that limit productivity. Recent observations indicate that P:N:C in marine POM varies both spatially and temporally due to chemical, physical, and ecological dynamics. In a new approach to predicting a flexible P:C ratio, we developed a power law model with a stoichiometry sensitivity factor, which is able to relate P:C of POM to ambient phosphate concentration. The new factor is robust, measurable, and biogeochemically meaningful. Using the new stoichiometry sensitivity factor, we present a first-order estimate that P:C plasticity could buffer against a generally expected future reduction in global carbon export production by up to 5% under a future warming scenario compared to a fixed, Redfield P:C. Further, we demonstrate that our new stoichiometry model can be implemented successfully and easily in a global model to reproduce the large-scale P:N:C variability in the ocean.

  8. Particulate and organic matter fouling of SWRO systems: Characterization, modelling and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas Rodríguez, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    Particulate/colloidal and organic fouling in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) systems results in flux decline, higher energy costs, increased salt passage, increased cleaning frequency, and use of chemicals. In practice, indices like SDI and MFI are used to assess particulate fouling, but they are

  9. Particulate and organic matter fouling of seawater reverse osmosis systems : Characterization, modelling and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas Rodriguez, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    Particulate/colloidal and organic fouling in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) systems results in flux decline, higher energy costs, increased salt passage, increased cleaning frequency, and use of chemicals. In practice, indices like SDI and MFI are used to assess particulate fouling, but they are

  10. Atmospheric oxidative chemistry of organic particulate emissions from fuel combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    "Construction and characterization of the University of Vermont Environmental Chamber (UVMEC) : were completed in this last phase of the project. The primary function of the UVMEC is to enable : tropospheric particulate formation and aging studies to...

  11. Pyrogenic organic matter production from wildfires: a missing sink in the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H; Preston, Caroline M; González-Rodríguez, Gil

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires release substantial quantities of carbon (C) into the atmosphere but they also convert part of the burnt biomass into pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM). This is richer in C and, overall, more resistant to environmental degradation than the original biomass, and, therefore, PyOM production is an efficient mechanism for C sequestration. The magnitude of this C sink, however, remains poorly quantified, and current production estimates, which suggest that ~1-5% of the C affected by fire is converted to PyOM, are based on incomplete inventories. Here, we quantify, for the first time, the complete range of PyOM components found in-situ immediately after a typical boreal forest fire. We utilized an experimental high-intensity crown fire in a jack pine forest (Pinus banksiana) and carried out a detailed pre- and postfire inventory and quantification of all fuel components, and the PyOM (i.e., all visually charred, blackened materials) produced in each of them. Our results show that, overall, 27.6% of the C affected by fire was retained in PyOM (4.8 ± 0.8 t C ha(-1)), rather than emitted to the atmosphere (12.6 ± 4.5 t C ha(-1)). The conversion rates varied substantially between fuel components. For down wood and bark, over half of the C affected was converted to PyOM, whereas for forest floor it was only one quarter, and less than a tenth for needles. If the overall conversion rate found here were applicable to boreal wildfire in general, it would translate into a PyOM production of ~100 Tg C yr(-1) by wildfire in the global boreal regions, more than five times the amount estimated previously. Our findings suggest that PyOM production from boreal wildfires, and potentially also from other fire-prone ecosystems, may have been underestimated and that its quantitative importance as a C sink warrants its inclusion in the global C budget estimates. © 2014 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, C.R.; McCrillis, R.C.; Kariher, P.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of fireplace particle size and organic speciation data gathered to date in an ongoing project. Tests are being conducted in a residential wood combustion (RWC) laboratory on three factory-built fireplaces. RWC wood smoke particles <10 microm (PM10) consist primarily of a mixture of organic compounds that have condensed into droplets; therefore, the size distribution and total mass are influenced by temperature of the sample during its collection. During the series 1 tests (15 tests), the dilution tunnel used to cool and dilute the stack gases gave an average mixed gas temperature of 47.3 C and an average dilution ration of 4.3. Averages for the PM2.5 (particles <2.5 microm) and PM10 fractions were 74 and 84%, respectively. For the series 2 tests, the dilution tunnel was modified, reducing the average mixed gas temperatures to 33.8 C and increasing the average dilution ratio to 11.0 in tests completed to date. PM2.5 and PM10 fractions were 83 and 91%, respectively. Since typical winter-time mixed gas temperatures would usually be less than 10 C, these size fraction results probably represent the lower bound; the PM10 and PM2.5 size fraction results might be higher at typical winter temperatures. The particles collected on the first stage were light gray and appeared to include inorganic ash. Particles collected on the remainder of the stages were black and appeared to be condensed organics because there was noticeable lateral bleeding of the collected materials into the filter substrate. Total particulate emission rates ranged from 10.3 to 58.4 g/h; corresponding emission factors ranged from 3.3 to 14.9 g/kg of dry wood burned. A wide range of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 8270 semivolatile organic compounds were found in the emissions; of the 17 target compounds quantified, major constituents are phenol, 2-methylphenol, 4-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, and naphthalene

  13. Long-term Trends in Particulate Organic Carbon from a Low-Gradient Autotrophic Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J.; Ford, W. I., III

    2014-12-01

    Recent insights from low-gradient streams dominated by fine surficial sediments have shown fluvial organic matter dynamics are governed by coupled hydrologic and biotic controls at event to seasonal timescales. Notwithstanding the importance of shorter timescales, quantity and quality of carbon in stream ecosystems at annual and decadal scales is of increased interest in order to understand if stream ecosystems are net stores or sinks of carbon and how stream carbon behaves under dynamic climate conditions. As part of an ongoing study in a low-gradient, agricultural watershed in the Bluegrass Region of Central Kentucky, an eight year dataset of transported particulate organic carbon (POC) was analyzed for the present study. The objective was to investigate if POC dynamics at multi-year timescales are governed by biotic or hydrologic processes. A statistical analysis using Empirical Mode Decomposition was performed on an 8 year dataset of transported sediment carbon, temperature, and log-transformed flowrates at the watershed outlet. Simulations from a previously validated, process-based, organic carbon model were utilized as further verification of drivers. Results from the analysis suggest that a 4 degree Celsius mean annual temperature shift corresponds to a 63% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem, third order outlet and a 33% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem inlet. Model and stable isotope results for the 8 year study support that long-term increases in organic carbon concentration are governed by biotic growth and humification of algal biomass in which increasing annual temperatures promote increased organic carbon production, relative to ecosystem respiration. This result contradicts conventional wisdom, suggesting projected warming trends will shift autotrophic freshwater systems to net heterotrophic, which has significant implications for the role of benthic stream ecosystems under changing climate conditions. Future work

  14. Can particulate organic matter reveal emerging changes in soil organic carbon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Magnus; Kirchmann, Holger; Magid, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed whether particulate organic matter (POM) in sand fractions, isolated by wet sieving after treatment with Na hexametaphosphate, can be a sensitive indicator of incipient changes in the content and composition of soil organic matter. In five long-term field experiments including....... Although organic matter in Fraction B had a higher intrinsic sensitivity to soil management, which was partly able to overcome the larger errors, we concluded that an observer would be more likely to detect changes by measuring total organic C and N, when monitoring decadal changes in C and N pools....... This makes the investigated POM fractions less suitable as indicators for changes in soil C stocks. However, the C/N ratio of Fraction B showed a distinct signature of the history of organic matter input to the soil, which was absent in the C/N ratio of the total fine earth....

  15. Seasonally varying nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry of particulate organic matter in Lake Kinneret, Israel

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hadas, O.; Altabet, M.A.; Agnihotri, R.

    Large temporal variations in the nitrogen isotopic composition (delta sup(15) N) of particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) species in Lake Kinneret occurred in response to seasonal phasing of dominant nitrogen cycle...

  16. Model investigation of NO3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source and heterogeneous organic aerosol (OA) sink in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J. L.; Sackinger, K.

    2012-09-01

    The relative importance of NO3-initiated source and heterogeneous sink of organic aerosol in the western United States is investigated using the WRF/Chem regional weather and chemistry model. The model is run for the four individual months, representing the four seasons, of January, May, August, and October, to produce hourly spatial maps of surface concentrations of NO3, organic aerosol (OA), and reactive organic gases (ROG, a sum of alkene species tracked in the lumped chemical mechanism employed). These "baseline" simulations are used in conjunction with literature data on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields, average organic aerosol composition, and reactive uptake coefficients for NO3 on organic surfaces to predict SOA source and OA heterogeneous loss rates due to reactions initiated by NO3. We find both source and sink rates maximized downwind of urban centers, therefore with a varying location that depends on wind direction. Both source and sink terms are maximum in summer, and SOA source dominates over OA loss by approximately three orders of magnitude, with large day-to-day variability. The NO3 source of SOA (peak production rates of 0.4-3.0 μg kg-1 h-1) is found to be significantly larger than the heterogeneous sink of OA via NO3 surface reactions (peak loss rates of 0.5-8 × 10-4 μg kg-1 h-1).

  17. Model investigation of NO3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA source and heterogeneous organic aerosol (OA sink in the western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sackinger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of NO3-initiated source and heterogeneous sink of organic aerosol in the western United States is investigated using the WRF/Chem regional weather and chemistry model. The model is run for the four individual months, representing the four seasons, of January, May, August, and October, to produce hourly spatial maps of surface concentrations of NO3, organic aerosol (OA, and reactive organic gases (ROG, a sum of alkene species tracked in the lumped chemical mechanism employed. These "baseline" simulations are used in conjunction with literature data on secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, average organic aerosol composition, and reactive uptake coefficients for NO3 on organic surfaces to predict SOA source and OA heterogeneous loss rates due to reactions initiated by NO3. We find both source and sink rates maximized downwind of urban centers, therefore with a varying location that depends on wind direction. Both source and sink terms are maximum in summer, and SOA source dominates over OA loss by approximately three orders of magnitude, with large day-to-day variability. The NO3 source of SOA (peak production rates of 0.4–3.0 μg kg−1 h−1 is found to be significantly larger than the heterogeneous sink of OA via NO3 surface reactions (peak loss rates of 0.5–8 × 10−4 μg kg−1 h−1.

  18. Mixing Model Analysis of Suspended Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Sources in White Clay Creek, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwan, D. L.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Aalto, R. E.; Marquard, J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Newbold, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Material exports from watersheds have consequences to upstream catchment elemental budgets, downstream ecosystem processes and water resources management. Despite this importance, quantifying exports of all major and trace elements associated with suspended sediments is challenging due to the highly episodic nature of that export. Constraining sediment sources using various mixing model approaches is further complicated by the diversity of potential sources. In this study, we leveraged the infrastructure of the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory (CRB-CZO) to collect large volume (200 L) samples from 17 storms, including some of the biggest storms of the decade (i.e. Hurricane Irene and Sandy), and 95 potential source soils and sediments within the White Clay Creek watershed, a third-order watershed in southeastern Pennsylvania. On all samples we analyzed major and minor elements, rare earth elements, and radioisotopes in order to determine the erosional source category of stream suspended material, such that differences in the chemical composition of source materials can be used in a multivariate statistical model to predict the chemical composition of suspended sediment. For example, 137Cs is higher in surface and near-surface terrestrial soils and low in streambanks, deeper soils, road cuts, and road dust. Elemental chromium is much higher in road dust than any other source. We integrate sediment fingerprinting analyses common in geomorphological studies of mineral suspended material with biological and ecological characterizations of particulate organic carbon. Through this combination, we determine particle source, a necessary first step to calculating the amount of excess carbon that has complexed with particles during erosion and transit through the watershed. This interdisciplinary project is conducted as one of many studies in the CRB-CZO and directly contributes to the overall research focus of this CZO: to quantify the net carbon sink or

  19. Organic carbon stock modelling for the quantification of the carbon sinks in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Pilar; Algeet, Nur; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2017-04-01

    Given the recent environmental policies derived from the serious threats caused by global change, practical measures to decrease net CO2 emissions have to be put in place. Regarding this, carbon sequestration is a major measure to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations within a short and medium term, where terrestrial ecosystems play a basic role as carbon sinks. Development of tools for quantification, assessment and management of organic carbon in ecosystems at different scales and management scenarios, it is essential to achieve these commitments. The aim of this study is to establish a methodological framework for the modeling of this tool, applied to a sustainable land use planning and management at spatial and temporal scale. The methodology for carbon stock estimation in ecosystems is based on merger techniques between carbon stored in soils and aerial biomass. For this purpose, both spatial variability map of soil organic carbon (SOC) and algorithms for calculation of forest species biomass will be created. For the modelling of the SOC spatial distribution at different map scales, it is necessary to fit in and screen the available information of soil database legacy. Subsequently, SOC modelling will be based on the SCORPAN model, a quantitative model use to assess the correlation among soil-forming factors measured at the same site location. These factors will be selected from both static (terrain morphometric variables) and dynamic variables (climatic variables and vegetation indexes -NDVI-), providing to the model the spatio-temporal characteristic. After the predictive model, spatial inference techniques will be used to achieve the final map and to extrapolate the data to unavailable information areas (automated random forest regression kriging). The estimated uncertainty will be calculated to assess the model performance at different scale approaches. Organic carbon modelling of aerial biomass will be estimate using LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging

  20. Structural changes of humic acids from sinking organic matter and surface sediments investigated by advanced solid-state NMR: Insights into sources, preservation and molecularly uncharacterized components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingdong; Tremblay, Luc; Gagné, Jean-Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the structural changes that particulate organic matter (POM) undergoes in natural systems is essential for determining its reactivity and fate. In the present study, we used advanced solid-state NMR techniques to investigate the chemical structures of sinking particulate matter collected at different depths as well as humic acids (HAs) extracted from these samples and underlying sediments from the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Lower Estuary (Canada). Compared to bulk POM, HAs contain more non-polar alkyls, aromatics, and aromatic C-O, but less carbohydrates (or carbohydrate-like structures). In the two locations studied, the C and N contents of the samples (POM and HAs) decreased with depth and after deposition onto sediments, leaving N-poor but O-enriched HAs and suggesting the involvement of partial oxidation reactions during POM microbial degradation. Advanced NMR techniques revealed that, compared to the water-column HAs, sedimentary HAs contained more protonated aromatics, non-protonated aromatics, aromatic C-O, carbohydrates (excluding anomerics), anomerics, OC q, O-C q-O, OCH, and OCH 3 groups, but less non-polar alkyls, NCH, and mobile CH 2 groups. These results are consistent with the relatively high reactivity of lipids and proteins or peptides. In contrast, carbohydrate-like structures were selectively preserved and appeared to be involved in substitution and copolymerization reactions. Some of these trends support the selective degradation (or selective preservation) theory. The results provide insights into mechanisms that likely contribute to the preservation of POM and the formation of molecules that escape characterization by traditional methods. Despite the depletion of non-polar alkyls with depth in HAs, a significant portion of their general structure survived and can be assigned to a model phospholipid. In addition, little changes in the connectivities of different functional groups were observed. Substituted and copolymerized

  1. Erosion of particulate organic material from an Andean river and its delivery to the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathryn; Hilton, Robert; West, A. Joshua; Robles Caceres, Arturo; Grocke, Darren; Marthews, Toby; Asner, Greg; New, Mark; Mahli, Yadvinder

    2016-04-01

    Organic carbon and nutrients discharged by mountainous rivers can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles from regional to global scales. The eastern Andes host productive forests on steep, rapidly eroding slopes, a combination that is primed to deliver sediment, carbon and nutrients to the lowland Amazon River. We quantify clastic sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge for the Kosñipata River, Peru, an Andean tributary of the Madre de Dios River, using suspended sediment samples and discharge measurements over one year at two gauging stations. Calculations of sediment yield on the basis of this data suggest that the Madre de Dios basin may have erosion rates ˜10 times greater than the Amazon Basin average. The total POC yield over the sampling period was up to five times higher than the yield in the lowland Amazon Basin, with most POC (70-80%) exported between December and March in the wet season. We use radiocarbon, stable C isotopes and C/N ratios to distinguish between the erosion and discharge of POC from sedimentary rocks (petrogenic POC) and POC eroded from the modern terrestrial biosphere, from vegetation and soil (biospheric POC). We find that biospheric POC discharge was significantly enhanced during flood events, over that of clastic sediment and petrogenic POC. The ultimate fate of the eroded POC may play a central role in the net carbon budget of Andean forest. In these forests, net productivity minus heterotrophic respiration is close to zero at the scale of forest plots, and the erosion of biospheric POC by this Andean river is sufficiently rapid that its fate downstream (sedimentary burial/preservation versus oxidation/degradation) may determine whether the mountain forest is a carbon sink or source to the atmosphere. In addition, the measured discharge of petrogenic POC suggests that fluxes from the Andes may be considerably higher than measured downstream in the Madeira River. If this petrogenic POC is oxidised rather

  2. Photochemical production and decomposition of particulate organic carbon in a freshwater stream

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, P. J.; Molot, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 4 (2013), s. 469-482 ISSN 1015-1621 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/0781 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dissolved organic matter * photodegradation * particulate organic matter Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.712, year: 2013

  3. Sinking rates and ballast composition of particles in the Atlantic Ocean: implications for the organic carbon fluxes to the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Karakaş, G.

    2009-01-01

    The flux of materials to the deep sea is dominated by larger, organic-rich particles with sinking rates varying between a few meters and several hundred meters per day. Mineral ballast may regulate the transfer of organic matter and other components by determining the sinking rates, e.g. via particle density. We calculated particle sinking rates from mass flux patterns and alkenone measurements applying the results of sediment trap experiments from the Atlantic Ocean. We have indication for higher particle sinking rates in carbonate-dominated production systems when considering both regional and seasonal data. During a summer coccolithophorid bloom in the Cape Blanc coastal upwelling off Mauritania, particle sinking rates reached almost 570 m per day, most probably due the fast sedimentation of densely packed zooplankton fecal pellets, which transport high amounts of organic carbon associated with coccoliths to the deep ocean despite rather low production. During the recurring winter-spring blooms off NW Africa and in opal-rich production systems of the Southern Ocean, sinking rates of larger particles, most probably diatom aggregates, showed a tendency to lower values. However, there is no straightforward relationship between carbonate content and particle sinking rates. This could be due to the unknown composition of carbonate and/or the influence of particle size and shape on sinking rates. It also remains noticeable that the highest sinking rates occurred in dust-rich ocean regions off NW Africa, but this issue deserves further detailed field and laboratory investigations. We obtained increasing sinking rates with depth. By using a seven-compartment biogeochemical model, it was shown that the deep ocean organic carbon flux at a mesotrophic sediment trap site off Cape Blanc can be captured fairly well using seasonal variable particle sinking rates. Our model provides a total organic carbon flux of 0.29 Tg per year down to 3000 m off the NW African upwelling

  4. Observations on particulate organic nitrates and unidentified components of NOy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Egeløv, A.H.; Granby, K.

    1995-01-01

    summer al an agricultural site in Denmark and compared with measurements of ozone, H2O2, SO2, formic acid, acetic acid and methane sulphonic acid. The gas NOy detector determines the sum NO + NO2 + HNO2 + HNO3 + PAN + PPN + gas phase organic nitrates + 2 x N2O5 + NO3. The content of residual gas NOy......A method to determine the total content of particulate organic nitrates (PON) has been developed and ambient air measurements of PON, NO, NO2, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), gas NOy and particulate inorganic nitrate have been performed in the spring and early...

  5. Production and properties of atmospheric organic particulate matter

    OpenAIRE

    Λούβαρης, Ευάγγελος

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol contains a variety of both inorganic and organic species and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. Organic compounds are usually the dominant component of the submicrometer particles contributing around 50% of its mass. One of the most important physical properties of organic aerosol is volatility which determines its gas-to particle partitioning and provides both direct information about its origin and indirect information about its chemical compo...

  6. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    occurred. The maximum nitrate removal rate, with particulate organic matter as carbon source, was found to I g NO3-N/(.)(-)(m(2)d), declining exponentially as tau(ANO3-N) = 1.04 e(-4t) g NO3-N/(m(2)d) (t = days). A significant release of soluble organic matter (...Two experiments were performed in order to investigate the anoxic and the aerobic degradation of filtrated organic matter in a biofilter. In submerged lab: scale reactors with Biocarbone media as filter material, accumulated particulate organic matter from pre-settled wastewater served as the only...... carbon source for anoxic and aerobic degradation respectively. In order to utilise the accumulated organic matter, the bacteria in the biofilm had to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes for the hydrolysis process. In the first experiment with anoxic degradation, a significant denitrification...

  7. Distribution of particulate organic carbon in the central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nandakumar, K.; Venkat, K.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) was measured for 77 water samples collected over a 3000 in water column along 88 degrees E in the central Bay of Bental. The POC values varied from 80 to 895 mu g per litre at the surface and 171 to 261d mu g per...

  8. Chemical characterization of organic particulate matter from on-road traffic in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyama, Beatriz Sayuri; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Herckes, Pierre; Dusek, Ulrike; Rockmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    This study reports emission of organic particulate matter by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, where vehicles run on three different fuel types: gasoline with 25 % ethanol (called gasohol, E25), hydrated ethanol (E100), and diesel (with 5 %

  9. Chlorophyll a, Phaeopigments and particulate organic carbon in the northern and western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Radhakrishna, K.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Devassy, V.P.

    Distribution of chl a at surface closely corresponds to the surface flow patterns. Integral mean concentration (IMC) of chl a in inshore waters (depth 200 m) is double than that in the offshore waters (depth 200 m) while IMC of particulate organic...

  10. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical process...

  11. Revisiting Ocean Color algorithms for chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon in the Southern Ocean using biogeochemical floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haëntjens, Nils; Boss, Emmanuel; Talley, Lynne D.

    2017-08-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) ecosystem plays a key role in the carbon cycle by sinking a major part (43%) of the ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2, and being an important source of nutrients for primary producers. However, undersampling of SO biogeochemical properties limits our understanding of the mechanisms taking place in this remote area. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project has been deploying a large number of autonomous biogeochemical floats to study the SO (as of December 2016, 74 floats out of 200 have been deployed). SOCCOM floats measurements can be used to extend remote sensing chlorophyll a (chl a) and particulate organic carbon (POC) products under clouds or during the polar night as well as adding the depth dimension to the satellite-based view of the SO. Chlorophyll a concentrations measured by a sensor embedded on the floats and POC concentrations derived from backscattering coefficients were calibrated with samples collected during the floats' deployment cruise. Float chl a and POC were compared with products derived from observations of MODIS and VIIRS sensors. We find the Ocean Color Index (OCI) global algorithm to agree well with the matchups (within 9%, on average, for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and 12%, on average, for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua (MODIS)). SO-specific algorithms estimating chl a are offset by ˜45% south of the Sea Ice Extent Front (˜60°S). In addition, POC estimates based on floats agree well with NASA's POC algorithm.

  12. Vertical Distributions of Macromolecular Composition of Particulate Organic Matter in the Water Column of the Amundsen Sea Polynya During the Summer in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Kyung; Lee, SangHoon; Ha, Sun-Yong; Jung, Jinyoung; Kim, Tae Wan; Yang, Eun Jin; Jo, Naeun; Lim, Yu Jeong; Park, Jisoo; Lee, Sang Heon

    2018-02-01

    Macromolecular compositions (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids) of particulate organic matter (POM) are crucial as a basic marine food quality. To date, however, one investigation has been carried out in the Amundsen Sea. Water samples for macromolecular compositions were obtained at selected seven stations in the Amundsen Sea Polynya (AP) during the austral summer in 2014 to investigate vertical characteristics of POM. We found that a high proportion of carbohydrates (45.9 ± 11.4%) in photic layer which are significantly different from the previous result (27.9 ± 6.9%) in the AP, 2012. The plausible reason could be the carbohydrate content strongly associated with biomass of the dominant species (Phaeocystis antarctica). The calorific content of food material (FM) in the photic layer obtained in this study is similar with that of the Ross Sea as one of the highest primary productivity regions in the Southern Ocean. Total concentrations, calorific values, and calorific contents of FM were higher in the photic layer than the aphotic layer, which implies that a significant fraction of organic matter underwent degradation. A decreasing proteins/carbohydrates (PRT/CHO) ratio with depth could be caused by preferential nitrogen loss during sinking period. Since the biochemical compositions of POM mostly fixed in photic layers could play an important role in transporting organic carbon into the deep sea, further detail studies on the variations in biochemical compositions and main controlling factors are needed to understand sinking mechanisms of POM.

  13. Deposition of organic matter and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus at the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition - a GIS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte L. Jansen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A GIS (Geographical Information System based study on deposition in the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition area has been carried out. The study is based on (i a digital bathymetry model, (ii 93 available 210Pb / 137Cs sedimentation rate estimations, (iii grain-size distributions, organic matter, C, N and P content of 64 top 1 cm sediment samples from the study area, and (iv GIS-based modelling of resuspension potentials based on wind statistics. With the use of regression statistics on depth, resuspension potential and sediment characteristics, results are extrapolatedarea-wide from the 64 sampling positions. The area is divided into sediment types and classified as accumulation or erosion/transport bottoms. Model results show good agreement with existing maps of sediment distributions, indicating that the sediment distribution is governed to a large extent by wind-induced waves. Correlations of sediment types, their deposition rates and their N and P contents were used to estimate spatial deposition rates. In all, the yearly deposition in the study area amounts to 2.8 million tons of organic matter, 0.14 million tons of total nitrogen, and 0.035 milliontons of total phosphorus. Correlations of sediment types and dry bulk densities were used to infer spatial inventories of organic matter and total nitrogen and phosphorus in the top 1 cm of the sediments. A total of 100 million tons of organic matter, 4 million tons of total nitrogen, and 0.019 million tons of total phosphorus are contained in the top 1 cm of the sediments in the study area. In general, the deep parts of the study areawith low resuspension potentials act as sinks for the fine-grained sediments and their associated particulate nutrients.

  14. Characterization of polar organics in airborne particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ambe, Y.

    The methanol-extractable highly polar organics in atmospheric aerosol were characterized using GC-MS. Dicarboxylic acids having 2-16 carbon numbers were detected with a total concentration of 172 ng m -3. Azelaic acid ( C9) was the most abundant diacid and it possibly originated from the ozonolysis of unsaturated carboxylic acids such as oleic acid and linoleic acid, which mainly originate from terrestrial plants. A compound, which was tentatively identified as tetrahydrofuroic acid, contributed to about 10% of the highly polar organics. Other polyfunctional compounds found in the samples included some ketocarboxylic acids and aromatic acids such as phthalic acids, anisic acid and vanillic acid.

  15. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeica, Natalia; Poni, Stefano; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Dai, Zhanwu

    2015-01-01

    Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3% as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1%. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9%) than under carbon sufficiency (48%). Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary metabolites.

  16. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eBobeica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3 % as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1 %. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9% than under carbon sufficiency (48%. Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary

  17. Relating hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosol particulate matter

    CERN Document Server

    Duplissy, J; Prevot, A S H; Barmpadimos, I; Jimenez, J L; Gysel, M; Worsnop, D R; Aiken, A C; Tritscher, T; Canagaratna, M R; Collins, D R; Alfarra, M R; Metzger, A; Tomlinson, J; DeCarlo, P F; Weingartner, E; Baltensperger, U

    2011-01-01

    A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) was used to measure the water uptake (hygroscopicity) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed during the chemical and photochemical oxidation of several organic precursors in a smog chamber. Electron ionization mass spectra of the non-refractory submicron aerosol were simultaneously determined with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and correlations between the two different signals were investigated. SOA hygroscopicity was found to strongly correlate with the relative abundance of the ion signal m/z 44 expressed as a fraction of total organic signal (f(44)). m/z 44 is due mostly to the ion fragment CO(2)(+) for all types of SOA systems studied, and has been previously shown to strongly correlate with organic O/C for ambient and chamber OA. The analysis was also performed on ambient OA from two field experiments at the remote site Jungfrau-joch, and the megacity Mexico City, where similar results were found. A simple empirical linear relation b...

  18. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND ORGANIC SPECIATION OF FIREPLACE EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a summary of fireplace particle size and organic speciation data gathered to date in an on-going project. Tests are being conducted in a residential wood combustion (RWC) laboratory on three factory-built fireplaces. RWC wood smoke particles <10?m (PM10) con...

  19. Hydrogenation of organic matter as a terminal electron sink sustains high CO 2 :CH 4 production ratios during anaerobic decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Rachel M.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Rich, Virginia I.; Keller, Jason K.; Bridgham, Scott D.; Zalman, Cassandra Medvedeff; Meredith, Laura; Hanson, Paul J.; Hines, Mark; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Saleska, Scott R.; Crill, Patrick; Cooper, William T.; Chanton, Jeff P.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2017-10-01

    Once inorganic electron acceptors are depleted, organic matter in anoxic environments decomposes by hydrolysis, fermentation, and methanogenesis, requiring syntrophic interactions between microorganisms to achieve energetic favorability. In this classic anaerobic food chain, methanogenesis represents the terminal electron accepting (TEA) process, ultimately producing equimolar CO2 and CH4 for each molecule of organic matter degraded. However, CO2:CH4 production in Sphagnum-derived, mineral-poor, cellulosic peat often substantially exceeds this 1:1 ratio, even in the absence of measureable inorganic TEAs. Since the oxidation state of C in both cellulose-derived organic matter and acetate is 0, and CO2 has an oxidation state of +4, if CH4 (oxidation state -4) is not produced in equal ratio, then some other compound(s) must balance CO2 production by receiving 4 electrons. Here we present evidence for ubiquitous hydrogenation of diverse unsaturated compounds that appear to serve as organic TEAs in peat, thereby providing the necessary electron balance to sustain CO2:CH4 >1. While organic electron acceptors have previously been proposed to drive microbial respiration of organic matter through the reversible reduction of quinone moieties, the hydrogenation mechanism that we propose, by contrast, reduces C-C double bonds in organic matter thereby serving as 1) a terminal electron sink, 2) a mechanism for degrading complex unsaturated organic molecules, 3) a potential mechanism to regenerate electron-accepting quinones, and, in some cases, 4) a means to alleviate the toxicity of unsaturated aromatic acids. This mechanism for CO2 generation without concomitant CH4 production has the potential to regulate the global warming potential of peatlands by elevating CO2:CH4 production ratios.

  20. Assessment of the soil organic carbon sink in a project for the conversion of farmland to forestland: a case study in Zichang county, Shaanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lan; Liang, Yinli; Han, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of farmland to forestland not only changes the ecological environment but also enriches the soil with organic matter and affects the global carbon cycle. This paper reviews the influence of land use changes on the soil organic carbon sink to determine whether the Chinese "Grain-for-Green" (conversion of farmland to forestland) project increased the rate of SOC content during its implementation between 1999 and 2010 in the hilly and gully areas of the Loess Plateau in north-central China. The carbon sink was quantified, and the effects of the main species were assessed. The carbon sink increased from 2.26×106 kg in 1999 to 8.32×106 kg in 2010 with the sustainable growth of the converted areas. The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) soil increased SOC content in the top soil (0-100 cm) in the initial 7-yr period, while the sequestration occurred later (>7 yr) in the 100-120 cm layer after the "Grain-for-Green" project was implemented. The carbon sink function measured for the afforested land provides evidence that the Grain-for-Green project has successfully excavated the carbon sink potential of the Shaanxi province and served as an important milestone for establishing an effective organic carbon management program.

  1. Assessment of the soil organic carbon sink in a project for the conversion of farmland to forestland: a case study in Zichang county, Shaanxi, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Mu

    Full Text Available The conversion of farmland to forestland not only changes the ecological environment but also enriches the soil with organic matter and affects the global carbon cycle. This paper reviews the influence of land use changes on the soil organic carbon sink to determine whether the Chinese "Grain-for-Green" (conversion of farmland to forestland project increased the rate of SOC content during its implementation between 1999 and 2010 in the hilly and gully areas of the Loess Plateau in north-central China. The carbon sink was quantified, and the effects of the main species were assessed. The carbon sink increased from 2.26×106 kg in 1999 to 8.32×106 kg in 2010 with the sustainable growth of the converted areas. The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. soil increased SOC content in the top soil (0-100 cm in the initial 7-yr period, while the sequestration occurred later (>7 yr in the 100-120 cm layer after the "Grain-for-Green" project was implemented. The carbon sink function measured for the afforested land provides evidence that the Grain-for-Green project has successfully excavated the carbon sink potential of the Shaanxi province and served as an important milestone for establishing an effective organic carbon management program.

  2. Crude glycerol combustion: Particulate, acrolein, and other volatile organic emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Crude glycerol is an abundant by-product of biodiesel production. As volumes of this potential waste grow, there is increasing interest in developing new value added uses. One possible use, as a boiler fuel for process heating, offers added advantages of energy integration and fossil fuel substitution. However, challenges to the use of crude glycerol as a boiler fuel include its low energy density, high viscosity, and high autoignition temperature. We have previously shown that a refractory-lined, high swirl burner can overcome challenges related to flame ignition and stability. However, critical issues related to ash behavior and the possible formation of acrolein remained. The work presented here indicates that the presence of dissolved catalysts used during the esterification and transesterification processes results in extremely large amounts of inorganic species in the crude glycerol. For the fuels examined here, the result is a submicron fly ash comprised primarily of sodium carbonates, phosphates, and sulfates. These particles report to a well-developed accumulation mode (0.3-0.7 μm diameter), indicating extensive ash vaporization and particle formation via nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. Particle mass emissions were between 2 and 4 g/m3. These results indicate that glycerol containing soluble catalyst is not suitable as a boiler fuel. Fortunately, process improvements are currently addressing this issue. Additionally, acrolein is of concern due to its toxicity, and is known to be formed from the low temperature thermal decomposition of glycerol. Currently, there is no known reliable method for measuring acrolein in sources. Acrolein and emissions of other volatile organic compounds were characterized through the use of a SUMMA canister-based sampling method followed by GC-MS analysis designed for ambient measurements. Results indicate crude glycerol combustion produces relatively small amounts of acrolein (∼15 ppbv) and other volatile organic

  3. Barium in Twilight Zone suspended matter as a potential proxy for particulate organic carbon remineralization: Results for the North Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehairs, F.; Jacquet, S.; Savoye, N.; Van Mooy, B.A.S.; Buesseler, K.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Lamborg, C.H.; Elskens, M.; Baeyens, W.; Boyd, P.W.; Casciotti, K.L.; Monnin, C.

    2008-04-10

    This study focuses on the fate of exported organic carbon in the twilight zone at two contrasting environments in the North Pacific: the oligotrophic ALOHA site (22 degrees 45 minutes N 158 degrees W; Hawaii; studied during June-July 2004) and the mesotrophic Subarctic Pacific K2 site (47 degrees N, 161 degrees W; studied during July-August 2005). Earlier work has shown that non-lithogenic, excess particulate Ba (Ba{sub xs}) in the mesopelagic water column is a potential proxy of organic carbon remineralization. In general Ba{sub xs} contents were significantly larger at K2 than at ALOHA. At ALOHA the Ba{sub xs} profiles from repeated sampling (5 casts) showed remarkable consistency over a period of three weeks, suggesting that the system was close to being at steady state. In contrast, more variability was observed at K2 (6 casts sampled) reflecting the more dynamic physical and biological conditions prevailing in this environment. While for both sites Ba{sub xs} concentrations increased with depth, at K2 a clear maximum was present between the base of the mixed layer at around 50m and 500m, reflecting production and release of Ba{sub xs}. Larger mesopelagic Ba{sub xs} contents and larger bacterial production in the twilight zone at the K2 site indicate that more material was exported from the upper mixed layer for bacterial degradation deeper, compared to the ALOHA site. Furthermore, application of a published transfer function (Dehairs et al., 1997) relating oxygen consumption to the observed Ba{sub xs} data indicated that the latter were in good agreement with bacterial respiration, calculated from bacterial production. These results corroborate earlier findings highlighting the potential of Ba{sub xs} as a proxy for organic carbon remineralization. The range of POC remineralization rates calculated from twilight zone excess particulate Ba contents did also compare well with the depth dependent POC flux decrease as recorded by neutrally buoyant sediment traps

  4. Characterization of dissolved and particulate natural organic matter (NOM) in Neversink Reservoir, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, Robert L.; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2005-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) was isolated from the water of the Neversink Reservoir, part of the New York City water supply, located in the Catskill Mountains of New York. The NOM was fractionated into the following nine different fractions by the isolation procedure: (1) coarse particulates, (2) fine-particulate organics, (3) solvent-extractable organics, (4) hydrophobic neutrals (HPON fraction), (5) dissolved colloids, (6) bases, (7) hydrophobic acids (HPOA), (8) transphilic acids + neutrals (TPI-A+N), and (9) hydrophilic acids + neutrals (HPI-A+N). Each of these fractions, with exception of the first and the third which were too small for the complete series of analyses, was characterized by elemental, carbohydrate, and amino acid analyses, and by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectrometry. The data obtained from these analyses indicate (1) that the fine-particulate organics and colloids are mainly composed of peptidoglycans, and lipopolysaccharides derived from algal, bacterial, and fungal cell walls, (2) that the HPO-N fraction most likely consists of a mixture of alicyclic terpenes and carbohydrates, (3) that the HPOA fraction consists mainly of lignin components conjugated to carbohydrates, (4) that the TPI-A+N and the HPI-A+N fractions most likely represent complex mixtures of relatively low molecular weight carboxylic acids derived from terpenes, carbohydrates, and peptides, and (5) that the base fraction is composed of free amino acids, browning reaction products, and peptide fragments.

  5. Analytical solutions for hydromagnetic natural convection flow of a particulate suspension through isoflux-isothermal channels in the presence of a heat source or sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamkha, Ali J.; Al-Rashidi, Seham S.

    2010-01-01

    This work considers the problem of steady natural convection hydromagnetic flow of a particulate suspension through an infinitely long channel in the presence of heat generation or absorption effects. The channel walls are maintained at isoflux-isothermal condition. That is, the thermal boundary conditions are such that one of the channel walls is maintained at constant heat flux while the other is maintained at a constant temperature. Various closed-form solutions of the governing equations for different special cases are obtained. A parametric study of the physical parameters involved in the problem is done to illustrate the influence of these parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles of both phases.

  6. Partitioning of organic aerosol components between gas phase and particulate phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkers, M.; Mentel, T. F.; Henk, H.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Otjes, R. P.; Blom, M. J.; ten Brink, H. M.

    2003-12-01

    To understand the role of organics in aerosols both the particulate composition and the gas/vapor phase composition must determined simultaneously. Ammonium sulfates and dicarboxylic acids are major components of continental, tropospheric aerosols. We performed two experiments in which we studied the partitioning of organic aerosol components between the gas and the particulate phase. As model systems we chose (NH4HSO_4 + glutaric acid) aerosol and ((NH4)HSO_4 + methyl glyoxal) aerosol (an oxidation product of isoprene). The experiment were performed in the large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ-Jülich at room temperature. The relative humidity was constantly increased in the course of the experiment (40 -> 90% r.h., 60 -> 90% r.h.).\

  7. Sink or Swim: Ions and Organics at the Ice-Air Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudait, Arpa; Allen, Michael T; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-07-26

    The ice-air interface is an important locus of environmental chemical reactions. The structure and dynamics of the ice surface impact the uptake of trace gases and kinetics of reactions in the atmosphere and snowpack. At tropospheric temperatures, the ice surface is partially premelted. Experiments indicate that ions increase the liquidity of the ice surface but hydrophilic organics do not. However, it is not yet known the extent of the perturbation solutes induce at the ice surface and what is the role of the disordered liquid-like layer in modulating the interaction between solutes and their mobility and aggregation at the ice surface. Here we use large-scale molecular simulations to investigate the effect of ions and glyoxal, one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, on the structure, dynamics, and solvation properties of the ice surface. We find that the premelted surface of ice has unique solvation properties, different from those of liquid water. The increase in surface liquidity resulting from the hydration of ions leads to a water-mediated attraction of ions at the ice surface. Glyoxal molecules, on the other hand, perturb only slightly the surface of ice and do not experience water-driven attraction. They nonetheless accumulate as dry agglomerates at the ice surface, driven by direct interactions between the organic molecules. The enhanced attraction and clustering of ions and organics at the ice surface may play a significant role in modulating the mechanism and rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring at the surface of atmospheric ice particles.

  8. Particulate organic matter in rivers of Fukushima: An unexpected carrier phase for radiocesiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulier, Maud; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boyer, Patrick; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Onda, Yuichi

    2017-02-01

    The role of particulate organic matter in radiocesium transfers from soils to rivers was investigated in areas contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Suspended and deposited sediments, filtered water, macro organic debris and dead leaves were sampled along the six most contaminated coastal river catchments of the Fukushima prefecture in the early autumns 2013 and 2014. Radiocesium concentrations of river samples and total organic carbon concentrations in suspended and deposited sediments were measured. Radiocesium concentrations of suspended and deposited sediments were significantly correlated to 137 Cs inventories in soils and total organic carbon. The distributions of radiocesium between the organic and mineral phases of both types of sediment were assessed by using a modelling approach. The results suggest that, during the early autumn season, the organic fraction was the main phase that carried the radiocesiums in deposited sediments and in suspended sediments for suspended loads Fukushima could be attributed to the high radiocesium contents of particulate organic matter. Since it is well known that organic compounds generally do not significantly adsorb radiocesium onto specific sites, several hypotheses are suggested: 1) Radiocesiums may have been absorbed into organic components at the early stage of atmospheric radioactive deposits and/or later due to biomass recycling and 2) Those elements would be partly carried by glassy hot particles together with organic matter transported by rivers in Fukushima. Both hypotheses would lead to conserve the amount of radiocesiums associated with particles during their transfers from the contaminated areas to the marine environment. Finally, such organically bound radiocesium would lead to significant deliveries of bioavailable radiocesium for living organisms at Fukushima. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Malodorous volatile organic sulfur compounds: Sources, sinks and significance in inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan B; Jüttner, Friedrich

    2017-03-01

    Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds (VOSCs) are instrumental in global S-cycling and greenhouse gas production. VOSCs occur across a diversity of inland waters, and with widespread eutrophication and climate change, are increasingly linked with malodours in organic-rich waterbodies and drinking-water supplies. Compared with marine systems, the role of VOSCs in biogeochemical processes is far less well characterized for inland waters, and often involves different physicochemical and biological processes. This review provides an updated synthesis of VOSCs in inland waters, focusing on compounds known to cause malodours. We examine the major limnological and biochemical processes involved in the formation and degradation of alkylthiols, dialkylsulfides, dialkylpolysulfides, and other organosulfur compounds under different oxygen, salinity and mixing regimes, and key phototropic and heterotrophic microbial producers and degraders (bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae) in these environs. The data show VOSC levels which vary significantly, sometimes far exceeding human odor thresholds, generated by a diversity of biota, biochemical pathways, enzymes and precursors. We also draw attention to major issues in sampling and analytical artifacts which bias and preclude comparisons among studies, and highlight significant knowledge gaps that need addressing with careful, appropriate methods to provide a more robust understanding of the potential effects of continued global development.

  10. Chemical characterization of detrital sugar chains with peptides in oceanic surface particulate organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, A.; Nishida, T.; Tanoue, E.

    2016-02-01

    For better understanding of the dynamics of organic matter in the ocean interior, particulate organic matter (POM) in oceanic surface water is a key material as a starting material in food chain and biological carbon pump, and the source of dissolved organic matter. POM consists of a mixture of non-living POM (detritus) and small amount of living POM (organisms). Particulate combined amino acids (PCAAs) are one of the major components of POM and the most important source of nitrogen and carbon for heterotrophic organisms in marine environments. In our previous studies of molecular-level characterization of PCAAs using electrophoretic separation (SDS-PAGE: sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) with specific detection of protein/peptide and sugar chains, we reported that most of PCAAs existed as small-sized peptide chains with carbohydrate-rich remnants. Although carbohydrates are one of the major carbon components of POM, the details of molecular-level structures including sugar chains are unknown. In this study, we applied electrophoretic separation for sugar chains (FACE: fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis) to the POM samples collected from the surface water of the Pacific Ocean. The results showed that sugar chains with various degree of polymerization were detected in POM. The possible roles of such sugar chains in marine biogeochemical cycle of organic matter are discussed in the presentation.

  11. Chlorophyll 'a' and particulate organic carbon in relation to some physico-chemical parameters along southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Chlorophyll 'a', Particulate Organic Carbon and other environmental parameters were studied along Kerala Coast during October 1987 and 1988. High chlorophyll 'a' content at surface water and decreasing trend towards offshore was observed. Spatial...

  12. Processes and modeling of hydrolysis of particulate organic matter in aerobic wastewater tratment - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; Kommedal, Roald; Harremoës, Poul

    2002-01-01

    Carbon cycling and the availability of organic carbon for nutrient removal processes are in most wastewater treatment systems restricted by the rate of hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable (particulate) organic matter. To date, the mechanisms of hydrolysis are not well understood for complex...... substrates and mixed populations. Most mathematical models use a simple one-step process to describe hydrolysis. In this article, mechanisms of hydrolysis and mathematical models to describe these processes in wastewater treatment processes are reviewed. Experimental techniques to determine mechanisms...... of hydrolysis and rate constants are discussed....

  13. The role of effective discharge in the ocean delivery of particulate organic carbon by small, mountainous river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Goni, M.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shown that small, mountainous river systems (SMRS) account for a significant fraction of the global flux of sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean. The enormous number of SMRS precludes intensive studies of the sort conducted on large systems, necessitating development of a conceptual framework that permits cross-system comparison and scaling up. Herein, we introduce the geomorphic concept of effective discharge to the problem of source-to-sink POC transport. This idea recognizes that transport effectiveness is the product of discharge frequency and magnitude, wherein the latter is quantified as a power-law relationship between discharge and load (the 'rating curve'). An analytical solution for effective discharge (Qe) identifies two key variables: the standard deviation of the natural logarithm of discharge (??q), and the rating exponent of constituent i (bi Data from selected SMRS are used to show that for a given river Qe-POC < Qesediment, Qe for different POC constituents (e.g., POCfossil vs. POC(modern) differs in predictable ways, and Qe for a particular constituent can vary seasonally. When coupled with the idea that discharge peaks of small rivers may be coincident with specific oceanic conditions (e.g., large waves, wind from a certain direction) that determine dispersal and burial, these findings have potentially important implications for POC fate on continental margins. Future studies of POC transport in SMRS should exploit the conceptual framework provided herein and seek to identify how constituent-specific effective discharges vary between rivers and respond to perturbations. ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  14. Source to sink characterization of dissolved organic matter in a tropical karst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Franziska; Lang, Susan Q.; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, James U. L.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Karst systems are widespread surface features present on all continents. They are characterized by complex hydrology with a multitude of possible flow regimes, from diffuse seepage through the host rock to fracture flow in larger conduits. As stalagmite proxy records are important indicators of past terrestrial climate conditions, detailed understanding of the biogeochemistry of cave systems and their relationships to the overlying karst network is crucial. Microbial communities that drive the carbon cycle in caves are nourished by dissolved organic matter (DOM) carried with water into the cave system. Water samples from the Yok Balum cave in Belize were collected for DOM analysis, including soil waters, drip waters and pool waters from inside the cave. Additionally, DOM extracts from a stalagmite from the same cave were analysed to examine DOM signatures and test their applicability for reconstruction of environmental conditions. Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (via the ESI-FT-ICR-MS technique) yielded detailed molecular fingerprints on DOM from these samples. Several thousand molecular formulae of DOM compounds were identified. In addition, radiocarbon analyses were performed on the DOM samples to gain information on karst turnover times. A principal component analysis of the molecular data revealed a clear gradient between soil waters and cave waters, as soil waters were enriched in highly unsaturated oxygen-rich compounds (typical for vascular plants), which were much less abundant in drip waters. Conversely, peptides, which can originate from bacterial processes, were present only in the drip waters. Our data clearly show connectivity between the cave and overlaying soils, and reworking of DOM by the cave bacterial community. Furthermore, we found molecular evidence for the selective removal of vascular plant-derived DOM in the caves, possibly due to abiotic interactions with minerals.

  15. Bioavailability of sinking organic matter in the Blanes canyon and the adjacent open slope (NW Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fernandez, P.; Bianchelli, S.; Pusceddu, A.; Calafat, A.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Danovaro, R.

    2013-05-01

    Submarine canyons are sites of intense energy and material exchange between the shelf and the deep adjacent basins. To test the hypothesis that active submarine canyons represent preferential conduits of available food for the deep-sea benthos, two mooring lines were deployed at 1200 m depth from November 2008 to November 2009 inside the Blanes canyon and on the adjacent open slope (Catalan Margin, NW Mediterranean Sea). We investigated the fluxes, biochemical composition and food quality of sinking organic carbon (OC). OC fluxes in the canyon and the open slope varied among sampling periods, though not consistently in the two sites. In particular, while in the open slope the highest OC fluxes were observed in August 2009, in the canyon the highest OC fluxes occurred in April-May 2009. For almost the entire study period, the OC fluxes in the canyon were significantly higher than those in the open slope, whereas OC contents of sinking particles collected in the open slope were consistently higher than those in the canyon. This result confirms that submarine canyons are effective conveyors of OC to the deep sea. Particles transferred to the deep sea floor through the canyons are predominantly of inorganic origin, significantly higher than that reaching the open slope at a similar water depth. Using multivariate statistical tests, two major clusters of sampling periods were identified: one in the canyon that grouped trap samples collected in December 2008, concurrently with the occurrence of a major storm at the sea surface, and associated with increased fluxes of nutritionally available particles from the upper shelf. Another cluster grouped samples from both the canyon and the open slope collected in March 2009, concurrently with the occurrence of the seasonal phytoplankton bloom at the sea surface, and associated with increased fluxes of total phytopigments. Our results confirm the key ecological role of submarine canyons for the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems

  16. Methods of analysis for complex organic aerosol mixtures from urban emission sources of particulate carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hildemann, L.M.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1990-10-01

    Organic aerosols comprise approximately 30% by mass of the total fine particulate matter present in urban atmospheres. The chemical composition of such aerosols is complex and reflects input from multiple sources of primary emissions to the atmosphere, as well as from secondary production of carbonaceous aerosol species via photochemical reactions. To identify discrete sources of fine carbonaceous particles in urban atmospheres, analytical methods must reconcile both bulk chemical and molecular properties of the total carbonaceous aerosol fraction. This paper presents an overview of the analytical protocol developed and used in a study of the major sources of fine carbon particles emitted to an urban atmosphere. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. A Prototype Sensor for In Situ Sensing of Fine Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee-Loon; Kai, Fuu-Ming; Tee, Ming-Hui; Tan, Nicholas; Hemond, Harold F

    2018-01-18

    Air pollution exposure causes seven million deaths per year, according to the World Health Organization. Possessing knowledge of air quality and sources of air pollution is crucial for managing air pollution and providing early warning so that a swift counteractive response can be carried out. An optical prototype sensor (AtmOptic) capable of scattering and absorbance measurements has been developed to target in situ sensing of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For particulate matter testing, a test chamber was constructed and the emission of PM2.5 from incense burning inside the chamber was measured using the AtmOptic. The weight of PM2.5 particles was collected and measured with a filter to determine their concentration and the sensor signal-to-concentration correlation. The results of the AtmOptic were also compared and found to trend well with the Dylos DC 1100 Pro air quality monitor. The absorbance spectrum of VOCs emitted from various laboratory chemicals and household products as well as a two chemical mixtures were recorded. The quantification was demonstrated, using toluene as an example, by calibrating the AtmOptic with compressed gas standards containing VOCs at different concentrations. The results demonstrated the sensor capabilities in measuring PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds.

  18. A Prototype Sensor for In Situ Sensing of Fine Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Loon Ng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution exposure causes seven million deaths per year, according to the World Health Organization. Possessing knowledge of air quality and sources of air pollution is crucial for managing air pollution and providing early warning so that a swift counteractive response can be carried out. An optical prototype sensor (AtmOptic capable of scattering and absorbance measurements has been developed to target in situ sensing of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. For particulate matter testing, a test chamber was constructed and the emission of PM2.5 from incense burning inside the chamber was measured using the AtmOptic. The weight of PM2.5 particles was collected and measured with a filter to determine their concentration and the sensor signal-to-concentration correlation. The results of the AtmOptic were also compared and found to trend well with the Dylos DC 1100 Pro air quality monitor. The absorbance spectrum of VOCs emitted from various laboratory chemicals and household products as well as a two chemical mixtures were recorded. The quantification was demonstrated, using toluene as an example, by calibrating the AtmOptic with compressed gas standards containing VOCs at different concentrations. The results demonstrated the sensor capabilities in measuring PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds.

  19. Wink Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgardner, R.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Wink Sink formed on June 3, l980. Inferred precursor of the sinkhole was a solution cavity in the Permian Salado Formation formed either by natural dissolution or by water flow in an abandoned oil well. Correlation of well logs in the area indicates that the Salado Formation contains several dissolution zones. Dissolution in the middle of the Salado evaporite sequence may have resulted from ground-water flow along fractured anhydrite interbeds. The Wink Sink lies directly above the Permian Capitan reef on the margin of a natural salt dissolution trough. Other natural collapse features overlie the reef to the north. Hydraulic head of water in the reef is higher than the elevation of the Salado Formation but lower than the head in the Triassic Santa Rosa Sandstone, a near-surface freshwater aquifer. Fracture or cavernous permeability occurs above, within, and below the Salado Formation. Consequently, a brine-density flow may be operating: relatively fresh water moves upward through fractures under artesian pressure and dissolves salt; the denser brine moves downward under gravity flow. Alternatively, downward flow of water from freshwater aquifers above the salt may have caused dissolution. An oil well drilled into the Permian Yates Formation (with the aid of nitroglycerine) in 1928 was located within the sinkhole. The well initially produced about 80% saline water from the Permian Tansill Formation, which directly underlies the Salado. About 600 ft of casing was removed from the well when it was plugged and abandoned in 1964.

  20. Sensitivity of δ13C of Southern Ocean suspended and sinking organic matter to temperature, nutrient utilization, and atmospheric CO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourey, Martin J.; Trull, Thomas W.; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2004-02-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of organic matter ( δ13C org) was measured for particles suspended in surface waters (from six north-south transects across the subantarctic (SAZ) and polar frontal zones (PFZ) of the Southern Ocean south of Australia between September 1997 and March 1998), and obtained from sediment traps deployed during the same period at 1060, 2050 and 3850 m depth in the SAZ (47°S), 3080 m under the Subantarctic Front (51°S) and 830 and 1580 m in the PFZ (54°S). We examined whether spatial and temporal patterns of particulate δ13C org at the surface were preserved at depth, and also investigated the connection between the dissolved molecular CO 2 concentration ([CO 2(aq)]) and δ13C org in the SAZ and PFZ, including the relative importance of temperature and biological activity in controlling this relationship. δ13C org of surface-water organic matter was up to 4.5‰ higher in the SAZ than the PFZ and underwent a seasonal increase of ˜2.5‰ (from ˜-25.5‰ to ˜-23‰) in the SAZ and ˜1.5‰ (from ˜-26.5‰ to ˜-25‰) in the PFZ. These spatial and temporal variations in δ13C org are well correlated with variations in the [CO 2(aq)]. δ13C org of material collected in deep-water sediment traps was also higher in the SAZ (˜-22‰) than PFZ (˜-24.5‰), with some variability but no clear seasonal change in either region. The δ13C org of organic matter reaching deep-water sediment traps (>830 m) in the spring was higher than at the surface by ˜4‰ in the SAZ and ˜2‰ in the PFZ, suggesting that preferential export of some components of surface organic matter may occur or that the extent of remineralisation of sinking materials varies seasonally. However, the seasonally averaged offset between δ13C org at the surface and δ13C org in the sediment traps was similar in the two regions (1.5‰ and 1.8‰ in the SAZ and PFZ, respectively). The largest differences in δ13C org encountered here (i.e. between the SAZ and the PFZ

  1. Characterisation of solvent extractable organic constituents in atmospheric particulate matter: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia A. Alves

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of accounting for 10-70% of the atmospheric aerosol mass, particulate-phase organic compounds are not well characterised, and many aspects of aerosol formation and evolution are still unknown. The growing awareness of the impact of particulate aerosols on climate, and the incompletely recognised but serious effects of anthropogenic constituents on air quality and human health, have conducted to several scientific studies. These investigations have provided information about the behaviour of atmospheric particulate matter and the description of the character of its carbonaceous content. The compilation of such results is important as they append to the emergent global-wide dataset of the organic composition of atmospheric aerosols. The contribution of the major emission sources to regional particulate pollution can be diagnosed by using specific molecular markers. This overview is mainly focused on results obtained with gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, since it is the analytical method of choice in elucidating the solvent-extractable organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matter. A synopsis of the selection of organic tracers and the application of geochemical parameters to the analysis of organic constituents as a tool for source apportionment is shown here. Besides the assessment of current knowledge, this paper also presents the identification of further areas of concern.Apesar de constituirem 10-70% da massa do aerosol atmosférico, a caracterização dos compostos orgânicos particulados permanece ainda deficitária e vários aspectos relativos à formação e evolução do aerossol são ainda desconhecidos. A crescente preocupação com o impacto do aerosol particulado no clima e os reconhecidos efeitos dos constituintes antropogênicos na qualidade do ar e na saúde humana têm motivado a realização de numerosos estudos. Estas investigações têm fornecido informações relevantes sobre o comportamento

  2. Improved method for minimizing sulfur loss in analysis of particulate organic sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Kwang Young

    2014-02-04

    The global sulfur cycle depends primarily on the metabolism of marine microorganisms, which release sulfur gas into the atmosphere and thus affect the redistribution of sulfur globally as well as the earth's climate system. To better quantify sulfur release from the ocean, analysis of the production and distribution of organic sulfur in the ocean is necessary. This report describes a wet-based method for accurate analysis of particulate organic sulfur (POS) in the marine environment. The proposed method overcomes the considerable loss of sulfur (up to 80%) that occurs during analysis using conventional methods involving drying. Use of the wet-based POS extraction procedure in conjunction with a sensitive sulfur analyzer enabled accurate measurements of cellular POS. Data obtained using this method will enable accurate assessment of how rapidly sulfur can transfer among pools. Such information will improve understanding of the role of POS in the oceanic sulfur cycle.

  3. Long-term dynamics of organic matter and elements exported as coarse particulates from two Caribbean montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Heartsill Scalley; F.N. Scatena; S. Moya; A.E. Lugo

    2012-01-01

    In heterotrophic streams the retention and export of coarse particulate organic matter and associated elements are fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence water quality, food webs and the structural complexity of forested headwater streams. Nevertheless, few studies have documented the quantity and quality of exported organic matter over multiple years and...

  4. [Sample preparation methods for chromatographic analysis of organic components in atmospheric particulate matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-09-01

    The determination of organic composition in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is of great importance in understanding how PM affects human health, environment, climate, and ecosystem. Organic components are also the scientific basis for emission source tracking, PM regulation and risk management. Therefore, the molecular characterization of the organic fraction of PM has become one of the priority research issues in the field of environmental analysis. Due to the extreme complexity of PM samples, chromatographic methods have been the chief selection. The common procedure for the analysis of organic components in PM includes several steps: sample collection on the fiber filters, sample preparation (transform the sample into a form suitable for chromatographic analysis), analysis by chromatographic methods. Among these steps, the sample preparation methods will largely determine the throughput and the data quality. Solvent extraction methods followed by sample pretreatment (e. g. pre-separation, derivatization, pre-concentration) have long been used for PM sample analysis, and thermal desorption methods have also mainly focused on the non-polar organic component analysis in PM. In this paper, the sample preparation methods prior to chromatographic analysis of organic components in PM are reviewed comprehensively, and the corresponding merits and limitations of each method are also briefly discussed.

  5. High particulate organic carbon export during the decline of a vast diatom bloom in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Martí, Montserrat; Puigcorbé, Viena; Iversen, Morten H.; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Klaas, Christine; Cheah, Wee; Bracher, Astrid; Masqué, Pere

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fixation by phytoplankton plays a key role in the uptake of atmospheric CO2 in the Southern Ocean. Yet, it still remains unclear how efficiently the particulate organic carbon (POC) is exported and transferred from ocean surface waters to depth during phytoplankton blooms. In addition, little is known about the processes that control the flux attenuation within the upper twilight zone. Here, we present results of downward POC and particulate organic nitrogen fluxes during the decline of a vast diatom bloom in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean in summer 2012. We used thorium-234 (234Th) as a particle tracer in combination with drifting sediment traps (ST). Their simultaneous use evidenced a sustained high export rate of 234Th at 100 m depth in the weeks prior to and during the sampling period. The entire study area, of approximately 8000 km2, showed similar vertical export fluxes in spite of the heterogeneity in phytoplankton standing stocks and productivity, indicating a decoupling between production and export. The POC fluxes at 100 m were high, averaging 26±15 mmol C m-2 d-1, although the strength of the biological pump was generally low. Only <20% of the daily primary production reached 100 m, presumably due to an active recycling of carbon and nutrients. Pigment analyses indicated that direct sinking of diatoms likely caused the high POC transfer efficiencies ( 60%) observed between 100 and 300 m, although faecal pellets and transport of POC linked to zooplankton vertical migration might have also contributed to downward fluxes.

  6. Coastal sources, sinks and strong organic complexation of dissolved cobalt within the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect GA03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Abigail E.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Saito, Mak A.

    2017-06-01

    Cobalt is the scarcest of metallic micronutrients and displays a complex biogeochemical cycle. This study examines the distribution, chemical speciation, and biogeochemistry of dissolved cobalt during the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect expeditions (GA03/3_e), which took place in the fall of 2010 and 2011. Two major subsurface sources of cobalt to the North Atlantic were identified. The more prominent of the two was a large plume of cobalt emanating from the African coast off the eastern tropical North Atlantic coincident with the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) likely due to reductive dissolution, biouptake and remineralization, and aeolian dust deposition. The occurrence of this plume in an OMZ with oxygen above suboxic levels implies a high threshold for persistence of dissolved cobalt plumes. The other major subsurface source came from Upper Labrador Seawater, which may carry high cobalt concentrations due to the interaction of this water mass with resuspended sediment at the western margin or from transport further upstream. Minor sources of cobalt came from dust, coastal surface waters and hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The full depth section of cobalt chemical speciation revealed near-complete complexation in surface waters, even within regions of high dust deposition. However, labile cobalt observed below the euphotic zone demonstrated that strong cobalt-binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration there, implying that mesopelagic labile cobalt was sourced from the remineralization of sinking organic matter. In the upper water column, correlations were observed between total cobalt and phosphate, and between labile cobalt and phosphate, demonstrating a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Along the western margin off the North American coast, this correlation with phosphate was no longer observed and instead a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, reflecting the importance of

  7. Autoxidation as a major player in the fate of terrestrial particulate organic matter in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeron, Marie-Aimée.; Radakovitch, Olivier; Charrière, Bruno; Vaultier, Frédéric; Rontani, Jean-François

    2017-05-01

    The Rhône River plays a major role in the Mediterranean Sea, being both its main freshwater source and its major particulate matter provider. This survey of the fate of terrestrial particulate organic matter (POM) was conducted along the salinity gradient of the Rhône River plume, between 2012 and 2014. It revealed that autoxidation acts rapidly and intensely upon the POM's arrival at sea, with α-amyrin and β-amyrin autoxidation rates going from 12.9 ± 2.9% to 45.0 ± 6.4% and 10.7 ± 4.0% to 50.3 ± 4.4%, respectively, between fresh water (salinity 0) and seawater (salinity 38). These compounds, being unambiguous markers of the terrestrial origin of POM, allow us to unequivocally characterize the POM as terrestrial. While it was originally believed that a desorption of redox-active trace metal ions was the favoring factor that kick-started this intense autoxidation, this study evidences no trace metal desorption in the Rhône River mixing zone and hence no correlation between high autoxidation rates and the presence of trace metal ions. Autoxidation rates however were very well correlated with salinity levels within the river plume, with r2 reaching 0.801, 0.962, and 0.943 for sitosterol, α-amyrin, and β-amyrin, respectively, in November 2014.

  8. 234Th-derived particulate organic carbon export in the Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Ma; Zhi Zeng; Jianping Cheng; Zhengbing Han; Wuhui Lin; Shi Zeng

    2014-01-01

    234 Th activities in sea water were measured using Fe(OH) 3 co-precipitation and beta counting at six stations in Prydz Bay in March 2008 during the 24th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition. Total 234 Th activities ranged from 0.96 to 2.44 dpm L -1 with an average of 1.61 dpm L -1 , showing an apparent deficit with respect to 238 U due to scavenging and export with particles. With a one-dimensional steady state model, 234 Th export fluxes were converted to particulate organic carbon (POC) export using bottle ratios of POC concentrations to particulate 234 Th activities on suspended particles. POC fluxes at the depth of 100 m varied between 33 and 297 mmol m -2 day -1 , comparable to prior work in the same region and higher than those of some other sea areas in the Southern Ocean, and indicated efficient running of biological pump in Prydz Bay. The results could be helpful to expand the knowledge of carbon cycle in seasonally ice-covered coastal regions around Antarctica. (author)

  9. Variation pattern of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen in oceans and inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changchun; Jiang, Quanliang; Yao, Ling; Yang, Hao; Lin, Chen; Huang, Tao; Zhu, A.-Xing; Zhang, Yimin

    2018-03-01

    We examined the relationship between, and variations in, particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate organic nitrogen (PON) based on previously acquired ocean and inland water data. The latitudinal dependency of POC / PON is significant between 20 and 90° N but weak in low-latitude areas and in the Southern Hemisphere. The mean values of POC / PON in the Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere were 7.40 ± 3.83 and 7.80 ± 3.92, respectively. High values of POC / PON appeared between 80-90 (12.2 ± 7.5) and 70-80° N (9.4 ± 6.4), while relatively low POC / PON was found from 20 (6.6 ± 2.8) to 40° N (6.7 ± 2.7). The latitudinal variation of POC / PON in the Northern Hemisphere is much stronger than in the Southern Hemisphere due to the influence of more terrestrial organic matter. Higher POC and PON could be expected in coastal waters. POC / PON growth ranged from 6.89 ± 2.38 to 7.59 ± 4.22 in the Northern Hemisphere, with an increasing rate of 0.0024 km from the coastal to open ocean. Variations of POC / PON in lake water also showed a similar latitude-variation tendency of POC / PON with ocean water but were significantly regulated by the lakes' morphology, trophic state and climate. Small lakes and high-latitude lakes prefer relatively high POC / PON, and large lakes and low-latitude lakes tend to prefer low POC / PON. The coupling relationship between POC and PON in oceans is much stronger than in inland waters. Variations in POC, PON and POC / PON in inland waters should receive more attention due to the implications of these values for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles and the indeterminacy of the relationship between POC and PON.

  10. Fine organic particulate matter dominates indoor-generated PM2.5 in RIOPA homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, Andrea; Turpin, Barbara; Meng, Qing Yu; Lee, Jong Hoon; Weisel, Clifford; Morandi, Maria; Colome, Steven; Stock, Thomas; Winer, Arthur; Zhang, Jim; Kwon, Jaymin; Alimokhtari, Shahnaz; Shendell, Derek; Jones, Jennifer; Farrar, Corice; Maberti, Silvia

    2006-07-01

    Residential indoor and outdoor fine particle (PM(2.5)) organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations (48 h) were measured at 173 homes in Houston, TX, Los Angeles County, CA, and Elizabeth, NJ as part of the Relationship of Indoor, Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study. The adsorption of organic vapors on the quartz fiber sampling filter (a positive artifact) was substantial indoors and out, accounting for 36% and 37% of measured OC at the median indoor (8.2 microg C/m(3)) and outdoor (5.0 microg C/m(3)) OC concentrations, respectively. Uncorrected, adsorption artifacts would lead to substantial overestimation of particulate OC both indoors and outdoors. After artifact correction, the mean particulate organic matter (OM=1.4 OC) concentration indoors (9.8 microg/m(3)) was twice the mean outdoor concentration (4.9 microg/m(3)). The mean EC concentration was 1.1 microg/m(3) both indoors and outdoors. OM accounted for 29%, 30% and 29% of PM(2.5) mass outdoors and 48%, 55% and 61% of indoor PM(2.5) mass in Los Angeles Co., Elizabeth and Houston study homes, respectively. Indirect evidence provided by species mass balance results suggests that PM(2.5) nitrate (not measured) was largely lost during outdoor-to-indoor transport, as reported by Lunden et al. This results in dramatic changes with outdoor-to-indoor transport in the mass and composition of ambient-generated PM(2.5) at California homes. On average, 71% to 76% of indoor OM was emitted or formed indoors, calculated by (1) Random Component Superposition (RCS) model and (2) non-linear fit of OC and air exchange rate data to the mass balance model. Assuming that all particles penetrate indoors (P=1) and there is no particle loss indoors (k=0), a lower bound estimate of 41% of indoor OM was indoor-generated (mean). OM appears to be the predominant species in indoor-generated PM(2.5), based on species mass balance results. Particulate OM emitted or formed indoors is substantial enough to alter the

  11. Organic, elemental and inorganic carbon in particulate matter of six urban environments in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, M.; Frey, A.; Hillamo, R.; Pennanen, A. S.; Salonen, R. O.

    2005-11-01

    A series of 7-week sampling campaigns were conducted in urban background sites of six European cities as follows: Duisburg (autumn), Prague (winter), Amsterdam (winter), Helsinki (spring), Barcelona (spring) and Athens (summer). The campaigns were scheduled to include seasons of local public health concern due to high particulate concentrations or findings in previously conducted epidemiological studies. Aerosol samples were collected in parallel with two identical virtual impactors that divide air particles into fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) size ranges. From the collected filter samples, elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon contents were analysed with a thermal-optical carbon analyser (TOA); total Ca, Ti, Fe, Si, Al and K by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF); As, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS); Ca2+, succinate, malonate and oxalate by ion chromatography (IC); and the sum of levoglucosan+galactosan+mannosan (∑MA) by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The campaign means of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were 8.3-29.6 µg m-3 and 5.4-28.7 µg m-3, respectively. The contribution of particulate organic matter (POM) to PM2.5 ranged from 21% in Barcelona to 54% in Prague, while that to PM2.5-10 ranged from 10% in Barcelona to 27% in Prague. The contribution of EC was higher to PM2.5 (5-9%) than to PM2.5-10 (1-6%) in all the six campaigns. Carbonate (C(CO3), that interferes with the TOA analysis, was detected in PM2.5-10 of Athens and Barcelona but not elsewhere. It was subtracted from the OC by a simple integration method that was validated. The CaCO3 accounted for 55% and 11% of PM2.5-10 in Athens and Barcelona, respectively. It was anticipated that combustion emissions from vehicle engines affected the POM content in PM2.5 of all the six sampling campaigns, but a comparison of mass concentration ratios of the selected inorganic and organic tracers of common sources of organic material to POM suggested

  12. Organic, elemental and inorganic carbon in particulate matter of six urban environments in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sillanpää

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 7-week sampling campaigns were conducted in urban background sites of six European cities as follows: Duisburg (autumn, Prague (winter, Amsterdam (winter, Helsinki (spring, Barcelona (spring and Athens (summer. The campaigns were scheduled to include seasons of local public health concern due to high particulate concentrations or findings in previously conducted epidemiological studies. Aerosol samples were collected in parallel with two identical virtual impactors that divide air particles into fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM2.5-10 size ranges. From the collected filter samples, elemental (EC and organic (OC carbon contents were analysed with a thermal-optical carbon analyser (TOA; total Ca, Ti, Fe, Si, Al and K by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF; As, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS; Ca2+, succinate, malonate and oxalate by ion chromatography (IC; and the sum of levoglucosan+galactosan+mannosan (∑MA by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS. The campaign means of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were 8.3-29.6 µg m-3 and 5.4-28.7 µg m-3, respectively. The contribution of particulate organic matter (POM to PM2.5 ranged from 21% in Barcelona to 54% in Prague, while that to PM2.5-10 ranged from 10% in Barcelona to 27% in Prague. The contribution of EC was higher to PM2.5 (5-9% than to PM2.5-10 (1-6% in all the six campaigns. Carbonate (C(CO3, that interferes with the TOA analysis, was detected in PM2.5-10 of Athens and Barcelona but not elsewhere. It was subtracted from the OC by a simple integration method that was validated. The CaCO3 accounted for 55% and 11% of PM2.5-10 in Athens and Barcelona, respectively. It was anticipated that combustion emissions from vehicle engines affected the POM content in PM2.5 of all the six sampling campaigns, but a comparison of mass concentration ratios of the selected inorganic and organic tracers of common sources of organic material to POM suggested

  13. Organic composition of aerosol particulate matter during a haze episode in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzi Bin Abas, M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah A.; Omar, Nasr Yousef M. J.; Maah, M. Jamil; Abu Samah, Azizan; Oros, Daniel R.; Otto, Angelika; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    The solvent-extractable compounds of urban airborne particulate matter were analyzed to determine the distributions of homologous and biomarker tracers. Samples were collected by high-volume air filtration during the haze episode of 1997 around the University of Malaya campus near Petaling Jaya, a suburb of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These results show that the samples contain n-alkanes, n-alkan-2-ones, n-alkanols, methyl n-alkanoates, n-alkyl nitriles, n-alkanals, n-alkanoic acids, levoglucosan, PAHs, and UCM as the dominant components, with minor amounts of terpenoids, glyceryl esters and sterols, all derived from natural biogenic sources (vascular plant wax), from burning of biomass, and from anthropogenic utilization of fossil fuel products (lubricating oil, vehicle emissions, etc.). Some compositional differences are observed in the samples and greater atmospheric concentrations were found for almost all organic components in the samples collected near a roadway. The results interpreted in terms of major sources are due to local build-up of organic contaminants from vehicular emissions, smoke from biomass burning, and natural background as a result of the atmospheric stability during the haze episodes. The organic components transported in from areas outside the region, assuming all smoke components are external to the city, amount to about 30% of the total organic particle burden.

  14. Attenuation of particulate organic carbon flux in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, is controlled by zooplankton fecal pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavan, E. L.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Poulton, A. J.; Tarling, G. A.; Ward, P.; Daniels, C. J.; Fragoso, G. M.; Sanders, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) is an important CO2 reservoir, some of which enters via the production, sinking, and remineralization of organic matter. Recent work suggests that the fraction of production that sinks is inversely related to production in the SO, a suggestion that we confirm from 20 stations in the Scotia Sea. The efficiency with which exported material is transferred to depth (transfer efficiency) is believed to be low in high-latitude systems. However, our estimates of transfer efficiency are bimodal, with stations in the seasonal ice zone showing intense losses and others displaying increases in flux with depth. Zooplankton fecal pellets dominated the organic carbon flux and at stations with transfer efficiency >100% fecal pellets were brown, indicative of fresh phytodetritus. We suggest that active flux mediated by zooplankton vertical migration and the presence of sea ice regulates the transfer of organic carbon into the oceans interior in the Southern Ocean.

  15. Quantitative extraction of organic tracer compounds from ambient particulate matter collected on polymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinyue; Alexandrova, Olga A; Herckes, Pierre; Allen, Jonathan O

    2009-05-15

    Organic compounds in ambient particulate matter (PM) samples are used as tracers for PM source apportionment. These PM samples are collected using high volume samplers; one such sampler is an impactor in which polyurethane foam (PUF) and polypropylene foam (PPF) are used as the substrates. The polymer substrates have the advantage of limiting particle bounce artifacts during sampling; however these substrates may contain background organic additives. A protocol of two extractions with isopropanol followed by three extractions with dichloromethane (DCM) was developed for both substrate precleaning and analyte extraction. Some residual organic contaminants were present after precleaning; expressed as concentrations in a 24-h ambient PM sample, the residual amounts were 1 microg m(-3) for plasticizers and antioxidants, and 10 ng m(-3) for n-alkanes with carbon number lower than 26. The quantification limit for all other organic tracer compounds was approximately 0.1 ng m(-3) in a 24-h ambient PM sample. Recovery experiments were done using NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) Urban Dust (1649a); the average recoveries for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from PPF and PUF substrates were 117+/-8% and 107+/-11%, respectively. Replicate extractions were also done using the ambient samples collected in Nogales, Arizona. The relative differences between repeat analyses were less than 10% for 47 organic tracer compounds quantified. After the first extraction of ambient samples, less than 7% of organic tracer compounds remained in the extracted substrates. This method can be used to quantify a suite of semi- and non-polar organic tracer compounds suitable for source apportionment studies in 24-h ambient PM samples.

  16. Exploring the potential influence of climate change and particulate organic carbon scenarios on the fate of neutral organic contaminants in the Arctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, James M; Wania, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to explore the potential influence of climate change and particulate organic carbon scenarios on the fate of organic chemicals in the Arctic marine environment using an evaluative modeling approach. Particulate organic carbon scenarios are included to represent changes such as enhanced primary production and terrestrial inputs. Simulations are conducted for a set of hypothetical chemicals covering a wide range of partitioning property combinations using a 40-year emission scenario. Differences in model output between the default simulations (i.e. contemporary conditions) and future scenarios during the primary emission phase are limited in magnitude (typically within a factor of two), consistent with other modeling studies. The changes to particulate organic carbon levels in the Arctic Ocean assumed in the simulations exert a relatively important influence for hydrophobic organic chemicals during the primary emission phase, mitigating the potential for exposure via the pelagic food web by reducing freely-dissolved concentrations in the water column. The changes to particulate organic carbon levels are also influential in the secondary emission/depuration phase. The model results illustrate the potential importance of changes to organic carbon levels in the Arctic Ocean and support efforts to improve the understanding of organic carbon cycling and links to climate change.

  17. Particulate organic matter composition in a semi-enclosed Periantarctic system: the Straits of Magellan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fabiano

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The elemental and biochemical composition of particulate organic matter (POM was investigated in the Straits of Magellan during February-March 1991. Twenty-two stations were selected in order to identify different areas of the Magellan ecosystem from a trophic point of view. The Strait of Magellan can be divided into three subsystems characterized by different hydrological and geomorphological conditions. Seston concentrations were mostly constrained by physical events, particularly the influence of oceanic and land run-off water inputs and the strong vertical mixing and resuspension events. POM composition displayed quali-quantitative differences between the three areas. In the first subsystem, influenced by Pacific waters, the low seston and POM concentrations and the high POC/Chl-a ratio values indicated the general predominance of the detrital and heterotrophic fractions. In the second subsystem, characterized by superficial stratification, higher seston and organic matter concentrations and lower values of POC/Chl-a ratio were found, indicating that this subsystem was influenced by an active autotrophic component. Shallow waters with intense tidal regime and strong vertical mixing characterized the third subsystem, connected to the Atlantic Ocean, which displayed an increasing importance of the inorganic fraction (values of the POC/TSM ratio lower than in the other systems. Moreover, the third subsystem showed higher values of the RNA/DNA ratio, possibly indicating that resuspension events may enhance the metabolic state of the organic particles mainly dominated by heterotrophic components.

  18. Seasonal changes in particulate and dissolved organic matter composition and quality in the Lena River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, G.; Winterfeld, M.; Hefter, J.; Bodenstab, L.; Morgenstern, A.; Eulenburg, A.; Heim, B.; Koch, B.; Schefuss, E.; Moerth, C. M.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic rivers are known to export large quantities of carbon by discharge of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), and in a warming and progressively moister Arctic, these exports may increase resulting in a reduction of arctic continental carbon stocks. These rivers have highly variable discharge rates with a pronounced maximum during the spring freshet associated with highest concentrations of DOC and POC. Most studies investigating the isotopic composition and quality of carbon exported by Arctic rivers rely on samples taken in summer during base flow, which is due to the logistical challenges associated with sampling in the remote Arctic permafrost regions. Here we present a record of δ13C and Δ14C of DOC and POC collected between late May during the freshet and late August 2014 in the Lena River Delta. POC Δ14C shows an initial trend towards older values in the spring samples, which is reversed in summer, associated with a shift towards more depleted δ13C values. We interpret this aging trend as reflecting progressive thawing throughout the ice-free season, resulting in mobilization of progressively older carbon from deeper thawed layers. The summer reversal indicates admixture of aquatic organic matter. DOC Δ14C, in contrast, remains at relatively modern levels with rather constant δ13C values throughout the sampling period. We furthermore analysed the biomarker composition of Lena Delta particulate OM collected in spring and summer. From spring to summer, we observe trends in abundance of individual leaf-wax derived biomarkers indicating higher abundance of algal biomass in the summer particles. Trends in soil microbial biomarkers and compound-specific δD of leaf-wax lipids suggest a shift in sources towards higher contributions from the southern catchment in summer. DOC composition investigated with FT-ICR-MS changes from spring with higher abundances of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios to late summer, when fewer compounds

  19. Seasonal dynamics of particulate organic matter in the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent coastal waters illustrated by amino acid enantiomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Zongguang; Hu, Jun; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Total suspended matter (TSM) was collected in the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent areas of the East China Sea in July, August, and November 2011, to study the composition and fate of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) during an August typhoon event and bottom trawling activities. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), and hydrolyzable particulate amino acids (PAA, D- and L-enantiomers) were higher during July and August than during November; however, D-arginine and alanine levels were significantly higher in November. Seasonal trends in the composition of PAAs indicate that in situ production is a key factor in their temporal distribution. No significant increase in TSM or decrease in labile organic matter was observed during the transit period following a typhoon event in August. In contrast, higher primary production was observed at this time as a result of the penetration of Changjiang Diluted Water caused by the typhoon event. Trawling effects were studied by comparing the calm season (July) with the bottom-trawling period (November) at similar sampling sites. The effect of trawling on the composition of bottom organic matter was studied by comparing D-amino acids concentrations and C/N ratios in the calm season (July) with the bottom-trawling period (November). A substantial contribution of microbial organic matter during the November cruise was indicated by a decrease in glutamic acid, an increase in TSM and D-alanine, and a lower carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio. In shallow coastal regions, anthropogenic activities (bottom trawling) may enhance the transfer of low-nutritional-value particulate organic matter into the benthic food chain.

  20. Tidal influence on particulate organic carbon export fluxes around a tall seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Dumont, Matthew; Kiriakoulakis, Kostas; Legg, Sonya; Mohn, Christian; Peine, Florian; Wolff, George

    2016-12-01

    As tall seamounts may be 'stepping stones' for dispersion and migration of deep open ocean fauna, an improved understanding of the productivity at and food supply to such systems needs to be formed. Here, the 234Th/238U approach for tracing settling particulate matter was applied to Senghor Seamount - a tall sub-marine mountain near the tropical Cape Verde archipelago - in order to elucidate the effects of topographically-influenced physical flow regimes on the export flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) from the near-surface (topmost ⩽ 100 m) into deeper waters. The comparison of a suitable reference site and the seamount sites revealed that POC export at the seamount sites was ∼2-4 times higher than at the reference site. For three out of five seamount sites, the calculated POC export fluxes are likely to be underestimates. If this is taken into account, it can be concluded that POC export fluxes increase while the passing waters are advected around and over the seamount, with the highest export fluxes occurring on the downstream side of the seamount. This supports the view that biogeochemical and biological effects of tall seamounts in surface-ocean waters might be strongest at some downstream distance from, rather than centred around, the seamount summit. Based on measured (vessel-mounted ADCP) and modelled (regional flow field: AVISO; internal tides at Senghor: MITgcm) flow dynamics, it is proposed that tidally generated internal waves result in a 'screen' of increased rates of energy dissipation that runs across the seamount and leads to a combination of two factors that caused the increased POC export above the seamount: (1) sudden increased upward transport of nutrients into the euphotic zone, driving brief pulses of primary production of new particulate matter, followed by the particles' export into deeper waters; and (2) pulses of increased shear-driven aggregation of smaller, slower-settling into larger, faster-settling particles. This study

  1. Review of recent advances in detection of organic markers in fine particulate matter and their use for source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Lee, Milton L; Eatough, Delbert J

    2010-01-01

    Fine particulate matter is believed to be more toxic than coarse particles and to exacerbate health problems such as respiratory and cardiopulmonary diseases. Specific organic compounds within atmospheric fine particulate material can be used to differentiate specific inputs from various emissions and thus is helpful in identifying the major urban air pollution sources that contribute to these health problems. Particular marker compounds that carry signature information about different emission sources (i.e., gasoline or diesel motor vehicles, wood smoke, meat cooking, vegetative detritus, and cigarette smoke) are reviewed. Aerosol organic types (e.g., from mass spectrometry data, which can also help in elucidation of carbonaceous material sources) are also discussed. Apportionment of the primary source contributions and atmospheric processes contributing to fine particulate matter and fine particulate organic material concentrations are outlined. This review provides an overview of the latest developments in chemical characterization approaches for identification and quantification of compounds in complex organic mixtures associated with fine atmospheric particles and their use in chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) source apportionment models.

  2. Isotopic composition of nitrate and particulate organic matter in a pristine dam reservoir of western India: Implications for biogeochemical processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bardhan, P.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Karapurkar, S.G.; Shenoy, D.M.; Kurian, S.; Naik, H.

    Isotopic composition of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) and particulate organic matter (POM; δ15N and δ13C) were measured in the Tillari Reservoir, located at the foothills of the Western Ghats...

  3. Peatland use and transport of particulate organic matter in boreal headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttila, Hannu; Karjalainen, Satu-Maaria; Nieminen, Mika; Kløve, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    Peatland use can cause increased transport of particulate organic matter (POM) causing deteriorated water quality and especially siltation of stream beds. Even though topic has gained major attention among stakeholders it has received only minor efforts to solve the main sources and properties of transported particles. The development of effective management practices and evaluation of purification efficiency demands understanding of the sources of particulate matter in peat dominated catchments with various land uses and hydrological conditions. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determinate physical properties of POM in headwater brooks affected by different peatland uses, and; (2) to identity the sources of transported material by using sediment fingerprinting methods. For this purpose, two headwater catchments under peat extraction and peatland forestry land uses with 8 sampling points were monitored for 2 years using time integrated suspended sediment samplers. Data was completed by gap samples from 50 other headwater locations with different upstream land uses: pristine, peatland forestry and peat extraction. For the sources analysis, disturbed topsoil, stream bed sediment, banks of ditches and brooks, algae and various vegetation types were identified as the potential sediment sources. Stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) and C/N ratio were analyzed to discriminate between the possible sources. Results are further scaled against different land uses, landscape elements and seasonal hydrological conditions in headwaters. This paper presents the preliminary results from a two year study aiming to show various patterns in transport of POM in boreal headwater catchments. Due to strong land-water relationship in headwaters, further information on the properties of particles is needed to assess the downstream impacts of land use.

  4. Reconstruction of paleo-particulate organic carbon fluxes for the Campbell Plateau region of southern New Zealand using the zinc content of sponge spicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Michael J.; Kelly, Michelle; Neil, Helen; Nodder, Scott D.

    2005-09-01

    The zinc concentration of siliceous sponge spicules was determined from spicules recovered from four sediment cores spanning the last 160 kyr, from the Campbell Plateau region southeast of New Zealand. Zinc/Si results showed little difference between Holocene and glacial aged spicules. An increase in Zn/Si was observed for core Y14, where Zn/Si peaked at about 0.6 μmol/mol during marine isotope stages 5a-5b. To better understand the role carbon export has on sponge Zn/Si, we explored the strong relationship observed between surficial sediment particulate organic carbon (POC) and the Zn/Si of sponge silica and related this to sediment trap POC flux estimates. Conversion of the Zn/Si records to benthic POC fluxes suggests that there has been little change in the amount of POC reaching Campbell Plateau sediments over the past 30 kyr. These results suggest that surface productivity over the Campbell Plateau has remained relatively low over the past 160 kyr and suggests that glacial productivity was not significantly higher than the present day. Finally, this work reveals that living marine sponges appear to act as the biological equivalents of moored sediment traps, recording the flux of POC to the seafloor by archiving zinc associated with sinking POC in the growing silica skeleton.

  5. Distribution of selected halogenated organic compounds among suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases in the Mississippi River and major tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Daniel, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases were separated and analyzed to determine spatial variation of specific organic compound transport associated with each phase in a dynamic river system. Sixteen sites along the Mississippi River and its major tributaries were sampled at low-flow conditions to maximize the possibility of equilibrium. Across the solubility range studied, the proportion transported by each phase depended on the compound solubility, with more water-soluble compounds (dacthal, trifluralin) transported predominantly in the aqueous phase and less-water soluble compounds (polychlorinated biphenyls, chlordane-related compounds) transported predominantly in the particulate and colloid phases. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Origin and composition of particulate organic matter in a macrotidal turbid estuary: The Gironde Estuary, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoye, Nicolas; David, Valérie; Morisseau, François; Etcheber, Henri; Abril, Gwenaël; Billy, Isabelle; Charlier, Karine; Oggian, Georges; Derriennic, Hervé; Sautour, Benoît

    2012-08-01

    At the interface between continent and ocean, estuaries receive particles, and especially particulate organic matter (POM) originating from these two reservoirs, but also produce POM, through autochthonous primary production. The origin and composition of surface POM in the Gironde Estuary (SW France) and the environmental forcing of its variability was investigated using the data set produced by the French Coastal Monitoring Network SOMLIT (Service d'Observation en Milieu LITtoral; monthly like sampling during years 2007-2009). This estuary is considered as a model of macrotidal turbid estuaries. Using elemental and isotopic composition of the POM, we estimated that, at the inner estuary space scale and inter-annual time scale, surface particulate organic carbon (POC) was composed of terrestrial POM originated from the turbidity maximum (96.4%; refractory POC) and flood events (1.6%; labile and refractory POC), and of riverine (0.1%), estuarine (0.8%) and marine (1.1%) phytoplankton, i.e. that POC was 98% and 2% of terrestrial and phytoplankton origin, respectively. However, there was a clear spatial gradient: the phytoplankton contribution increases from ca. 1% in the upper and middle estuary to 8.5% in the lower estuary, where light condition is more favourable to plankton growth. The low contribution of phytoplankton to the POC is a characteristic of the Gironde estuary and contrast with other large temperate estuaries. Statistical analysis indicates that salinity, river flow and SPM concentration, and thus associated hydro-dynamic and sedimentary processes, were the only environmental forcings to the composition of surface POC in this system, at intra- and inter-annual time scale. In contrast, temperature and nutrient concentrations, and thus associated processes, do not force this composition of POC. By combining POC fluxes entering the inner estuary (literature data), POC loss as dissolved organic carbon and CO2 and as sediment trapping within the inner

  7. Dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the melt water of Icelandic glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chifflard, Peter; Reiss, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Recently, glaciers have been recognized as unique ecosystems with potential effects on the global carbon cycle. Among other transport processes organic carbon stored in glacier ecosystems is released from the glaciers through melt at the glaciers surface that discharges into proglacial streams and finally into the ocean. Nevertheless, the potential role of glaciers in the carbon cycle remains poorly understood (Hood et al. 2015). One particular problem in this respect is that there is a lack in regional and global analysis of the total amount of organic carbon released from glaciers. Although, the release of organic carbon has been investigated in proglacial streams in Alaska, the European Alps and Greenland, to our knowledge, there is no information available for Icelandic proglacial streams. Thus, the aims of this study are: 1) to develop a first base information about the concentration of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC) in several Icelandic proglacial streams and 2) to detect the variability of DOC and POC along a proglacial stream from the glacier source to the mouth into the Atlantic Ocean. Therefore, a field trip was conducted between 23 and 31 July 2016, whereby, 25 water samples were taken. The sampling points cover melt water from the following Icelandic glaciers Vatnajökull, Langjökull, Hofsjökull, Myrdalsjökull and Tungnafellsjökull. Further water samples were taken along the river Hvitá starting at the glacier Langjökull and ending at the mouth into the Atlantic ocean in the southwest of Iceland. At every sample point electrical conductivity, water temperate and the pH-value were measured in situ using a calibrated portable water quality meter (Hanna Combo HI98129). The water samples (130 ml) were filtered using pre-combusted GF/F filters (Whatman, pore sizes 0.7 µm) and stored in a cooling box until the shipment to the laboratory of the Department for Geography, Philipps-University of Marburg. The DOC concentrations in

  8. Hydrothermal Plume Particulate Organic Material as a Transport Vector for a Diversity of Trace Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, J. A.; Marcus, M. A.; Fakra, S.; German, C. R.; Toner, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrothermal plumes of 9° 50’ N East Pacific Rise contain an abundance of S-rich organic C. Our research to-date provides evidence that these S-rich organic-inorganic aggregates are of central importance for plume mineralogy and trace element geochemistry; specifically, these aggregates collect a complex mixture of nano-particle mineral phases. Our detailed analysis of 2007 9° 50’ N East Pacific Rise neutrally-buoyant plume aggregates shows that they can contain a significant fraction of reduced sulfides, in addition to the pervasive polysulfide phases (e.g. S6 and S8) associated with the organic C. While 4 Fe-bearing minerals, ferrihydrite, FeS , pyrite, and pyrrhotite, account for three quarters of the particulate Fe (Fe mole fraction), our results reveal a suite of low abundance mineral phases including: Mn sulfides (e.g. hauerite, alabandite, and rambergite); Mn oxides (e.g. hausmannite, pyrolusite, bixbyite); a range of copper and iron sulfides; copper and zinc oxides (e.g, cuprite, delafossite, crednerite, and franklinite); magnetite and native Fe. Indeed, the majority of trace minerals we have found are not included in the existing thermodynamic databases routinely used with equilibrium speciation programs. Thus, at present, we lack the predictive ability that would help explain their formation. We hypothesize though that the aggregation of organic and inorganic material begins early in the rising plume such that these micro-aggregates collect a diversity of sulfide and (oxy)hydroxide mineral phases. If true, an immediate implication of this hypothesis is that these aggregates will deliver both vent-derived trace elements associated with sulfides and seawater scavenged trace elements associated with (oxy)hydroxides to the neutrally buoyant plume. This would require at least a partial reconsideration of the conceptual model of plume trace element scavenging.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Particulate Organic Carbon in the Winisk River, Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Smith, P.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Winisk River begins in the Precambrian rock of the Canadian Shield in Ontario and traverses the Hudson Bay Lowlands before terminating in Hudson Bay. It drains an area of 67,300 km2that is sparsely populated, with remote communities that depend on natural resources. Accelerated decomposition of organic carbon (OC) in the area due to climate change is supported by higher inputs of particulate and dissolved OC to surface waters (Amon et al, 2012). The Winisk River is a particularly important source of OC to Hudson Bay, shown by high rates of lignin accumulation near the mouth of the river (Kuzyk et al., 2008). Webequie First Nation (WFN) is a small community located on Eastwood Island in Winisk Lake. It is the closest community to the proposed massive development of the "Ring of Fire" chromite and other mineral deposits in the James Bay Lowlands. Mine-related developments can be expected to impact water flows, water chemistry, and carbon cycling in the region. We sampled water and sediment at the major inlets to the lake and at the northern outlet within the territorial boundaries to characterize water chemistry, relate lignin compositional patterns to C and N isotopic signatures, and interpret temporal patterns in advance of development and future climate change. Organic C in the sediments ranged from around 1% to around 30%. Samples were analyzed for lignin compounds using a CuO digestion method coupled to GC-MS to identify lignin-phenol monomers, benzoic acids, and p-hydroxy acid. Ratios of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, P-hydroxy phenols and cinnamyl phenols to total vanillyl phenols indicate that gymnosperm wood and sphagnum peat dominate the OC pool, although the proportions of gymnosperm- and sphagnum-derived material vary between sites. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N) suggests that other inputs of OC may be present that are consistent with OM derived from the erosion of older marine sediments. The results support that the proportion of sphagnum mosses

  10. The effect of typhoon on particulate organic carbon flux in the southern East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Hung

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe tropical storms play an important role in triggering phytoplankton blooms, but the extent to which such storms influence biogenic carbon flux from the euphotic zone is unclear. In 2008, typhoon Fengwong provided a unique opportunity to study the in situ biological responses including phytoplankton blooms and particulate organic carbon fluxes associated with a severe storm in the southern East China Sea (SECS. After passage of the typhoon, the sea surface temperature (SST in the SECS was markedly cooler (∼25 to 26 °C than before typhoon passage (∼28 to 29 °C. The POC flux 5 days after passage of the typhoon was 265 ± 14 mg C m−2 d−1, which was ∼1.7-fold that (140–180 mg C m−2 d−1 recorded during a period (June–August, 2007 when no typhoons occurred. A somewhat smaller but nevertheless significant increase in POC flux (224–225 mg C m−2 d−1 was detected following typhoon Sinlaku which occurred approximately 1 month after typhoon Fengwong, indicating that typhoon events can increase biogenic carbon flux efficiency in the SECS. Remarkably, phytoplankton uptake accounted for only about 5% of the nitrate injected into the euphotic zone by typhoon Fengwong. It is likely that phytoplankton population growth was constrained by a combination of light limitation and grazing pressure. Modeled estimates of new/export production were remarkably consistent with the average of new and export production following typhoon Fengwong. The same model suggested that during non-typhoon conditions approximately half of the export of organic carbon occurs via convective mixing of dissolved organic carbon, a conclusion consistent with earlier work at comparable latitudes in the open ocean.

  11. Relative humidity-dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene photo-oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei F.; Hanna, Sarah J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, Katie; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-01-01

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295±1K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10₋1 to ~6 ×106Pa s from 30 to 90%RH, and greater than ~2 × 108 Pa s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17%. These viscosities correspond to Stokes–Einstein-equivalent diffusion coefficients for large organic molecules of ~2 ×10₋15cm2s₋1 for 30 % RH, and lower than ~3 × 10₋17cm2s₋1 for RH ≤ 17 %. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1–5 h for 30% RH, and higher than ~100 h for RH ≤ 17%. As a starting point for understanding the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter over cities, we applied the mixing times determined for toluene-derived SOM particles to the world's top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in these megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Istanbul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, mixing times in organic particulate matter during certain periods of the year may be very short, and the particles may be well-mixed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long

  12. ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER IN HOLOCENE SEDIMENTS OF COASTAL PLAIN FROM PERO BEACH, CABO FRIO, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Camila Silveira de Souza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of palynofacies along a core drilled on the coastal plain of Cabo Frio, State of Rio de Janeiro, was carried out in order to contribute to the knowledge of the paleoenvironmental evolution of the Pero Beach region. The ages obtained from 14C datings allowed to verify that the studied core records the past 6761 ± 130 yrs cal BP. Thirty samples were prepared by standard methodology for palynofacies. About three hundred particles of the particulate organic material was classified and recorded for each sample. Statistical methods were employed for the associations of particulate organic matter (R-mode cluster analysis and levels (samples; Q-mode cluster analysis analyzed along the core. Furthermore, the ratio Phytoclast - Total Organic Carbon (Phy-TOC was used to verify the proximity of the source area. The three major groups of particulate organic matter found along the studied core are Phytoclasts, Amorphous Organic Matter (AOM and Palynomorphs. The samples showed in general, a predominance of phytoclasts (73.2%, followed by AOM (18.6% and Palynomorphs (8.2%. Supported by statistical analysis, it was possible to deduce that the study area evolved since the middle Holocene from a marine environment to a paleolagoon.

  13. Particulate organic matter delta C-13 variations across the Drake Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, G. H.; Takahashi, T.; Des Marais, D. J.; Sullivan, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) was sampled during two cruise transects across the Drake Passage during March 1986 to investigate the unusual C-13 depletion in high-latitude Southern Ocean plankton. This POM delta C-13 transition from -23.2 o/oo at 53.3 deg S to values as low as -30.3 o/oo at above 62 deg S does not track previously reported abrupt changes in water chemistry and plankton species composition associated with the Polar Front Zone. The north-south isotopic trend is not accompanied by significant changes in POM carbon or nitrogen concentrations, or in POM C/N. Differences in plankton standing crop or biochemistry (e.g. lipid content) do not appear responsible for the isotopic trends observed. The latitudinal change in POM delta C-13 is highly correlated with water temperature and with the calculated concentration of CO2 (aq) at equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that CO2 (aq) significantly influences POM delta C-13 in ocean surface waters.

  14. A Global Data Analysis for Representing Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Yield in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zeli [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Leung, L. Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Li, Hongyi [Montana State University, Bozeman MT USA; Tesfa, Teklu [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Vanmaercke, Matthias [Département de Géographie, Université de Liège, Liege Belgium; Poesen, Jean [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Division of Geography, KU Leuven, Leuven Belgium; Zhang, Xuesong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Lu, Hui [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing China; Hartmann, Jens [Institute for Geology, Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg Germany

    2017-12-01

    Although sediment yield (SY) from water erosion is ubiquitous and its environmental consequences are well recognized, its impacts on the global carbon cycle remain largely uncertain. This knowledge gap is partly due to the lack of soil erosion modeling in Earth System Models (ESMs), which are important tools used to understand the global carbon cycle and explore its changes. This study analyzed sediment and particulate organic carbon yield (CY) data from 1081 and 38 small catchments (0.1-200 km27 ), respectively, in different environments across the globe. Using multiple statistical analysis techniques, we explored environmental factors and hydrological processes important for SY and CY modeling in ESMs. Our results show clear correlations of high SY with traditional agriculture, seismicity and heavy storms, as well as strong correlations between SY and annual peak runoff. These highlight the potential limitation of SY models that represent only interrill and rill erosion because shallow overland flow and rill flow have limited transport capacity due to their hydraulic geometry to produce high SY. Further, our results suggest that SY modeling in ESMs should be implemented at the event scale to produce the catastrophic mass transport during episodic events. Several environmental factors such as seismicity and land management that are often not considered in current catchment-scale SY models can be important in controlling global SY. Our analyses show that SY is likely the primary control on CY in small catchments and a statistically significant empirical relationship is established to calculate SY and CY jointly in ESMs.

  15. A Global Data Analysis for Representing Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Yield in Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zeli; Leung, L. Ruby; Li, Hongyi; Tesfa, Teklu; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean; Zhang, Xuesong; Lu, Hui; Hartmann, Jens

    2017-12-01

    Although sediment yield (SY) from water erosion is ubiquitous and its environmental consequences are well recognized, its impacts on the global carbon cycle remain largely uncertain. This knowledge gap is partly due to the lack of soil erosion modeling in Earth System Models (ESMs), which are important tools used to understand the global carbon cycle and explore its changes. This study analyzed sediment and particulate organic carbon yield (CY) data from 1,081 and 38 small catchments (0.1-200 km2), respectively, in different environments across the globe. Using multiple statistical analysis techniques, we explored environmental factors and hydrological processes important for SY and CY modeling in ESMs. Our results show clear correlations of high SY with traditional agriculture, seismicity and heavy storms, as well as strong correlations between SY and annual peak runoff. These highlight the potential limitation of SY models that represent only interrill and rill erosion because shallow overland flow and rill flow have limited transport capacity due to their hydraulic geometry to produce high SY. Further, our results suggest that SY modeling in ESMs should be implemented at the event scale to produce the catastrophic mass transport during episodic events. Several environmental factors such as seismicity and land management that are often not considered in current catchment-scale SY models can be important in controlling global SY. Our analyses show that SY is likely the primary control on CY in small catchments and a statistically significant empirical relationship is established to calculate SY and CY jointly in ESMs.

  16. Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) fractions of PM2.5 particulate matter at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) sampling site for a 6-month period during the summer of 2013. The site is in a rural location remote from any populated areas, so it would be expected to reflect carbon concentration over long-distance transport patterns. During the same period in 2012, a number of prairie fires in Oklahoma and Texas had produced large plumes of smoke particles, but OC and EC particles had not been quantified. In addition, during the summer months, other wild fires, such as forest fires in the Rocky Mountain states and other areas, can produce carbon aerosols that are transported over long distances. Both of these source types would be expected to contain mixtures of both OC and EC.

  17. Validation and Intercomparison of Ocean Color Algorithms for Estimating Particulate Organic Carbon in the Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Evers-King

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate Organic Carbon (POC plays a vital role in the ocean carbon cycle. Though relatively small compared with other carbon pools, the POC pool is responsible for large fluxes and is linked to many important ocean biogeochemical processes. The satellite ocean-color signal is influenced by particle composition, size, and concentration and provides a way to observe variability in the POC pool at a range of temporal and spatial scales. To provide accurate estimates of POC concentration from satellite ocean color data requires algorithms that are well validated, with uncertainties characterized. Here, a number of algorithms to derive POC using different optical variables are applied to merged satellite ocean color data provided by the Ocean Color Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI and validated against the largest database of in situ POC measurements currently available. The results of this validation exercise indicate satisfactory levels of performance from several algorithms (highest performance was observed from the algorithms of Loisel et al., 2002; Stramski et al., 2008 and uncertainties that are within the requirements of the user community. Estimates of the standing stock of the POC can be made by applying these algorithms, and yield an estimated mixed-layer integrated global stock of POC between 0.77 and 1.3 Pg C of carbon. Performance of the algorithms vary regionally, suggesting that blending of region-specific algorithms may provide the best way forward for generating global POC products.

  18. Particulate Organic Matter Distribution along the Lower Amazon River: Addressing Aquatic Ecology Concepts Using Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Rigal, François; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Bernardes, Marcelo; Abril, Gwenaël; Meziane, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM) cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs) were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM). This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0), an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO2 in rivers, during the high water season (HW). Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3) and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7), were correlated with higher O2, chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW). Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1) downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2) enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence time

  19. Particulate organic matter distribution along the lower Amazon River: addressing aquatic ecology concepts using fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Mortillaro

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM. This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM, in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0, an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO(2 in rivers, during the high water season (HW. Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3 and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7, were correlated with higher O(2, chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW. Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1 downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2 enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence

  20. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongyan Bu

    Full Text Available Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR/cotton-rapeseed (CR rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile, intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles, and high (90th percentile levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C and N (POM-N contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively. Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  1. Photochemical Reactions of Particulate Organic Matter: Deciphering the Role of Direct and Indirect Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, A. J.; Gelfond, C. E.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical reactions of natural organic matter (NOM) represent potentially important pathways for biologically recalcitrant material to be chemically altered in aquatic systems. Irradiation can alter the physical state of organic matter by facilitating the cycling between the particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) pools, however, a molecular level understanding of this chemically dynamic system is currently lacking. Photochemical reactions of a target molecule proceed by the direct absorption of a photon, or through reaction with a second photolytically generated species (i.e. the hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, excited triplet state NOM, hydrogen peroxide, etc.). Here, we isolate the major direct and indirect photochemical reactions of a lignocellulose-rich POM material (Phragmites australis) to determine their relative importance in changing the the chemical structure of the parent POM, and in the production of DOM. We measured POM molecular structure using a combination of NMR and FTIR for bulk analyses and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) for spatially resolved chemistry, while the chemical composition of photo-produced DOM was measured using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Results are discussed in the context of the differences in chemical composition of both NOM pools resulting from the isolated photochemical pathways. All treatments result in an increase in DOM with reaction time, indicating that the larger POM matrix is likely fragmenting into smaller more soluble species. Spectroscopic measurements, on the other hand, point to functionalization reactions which increase the abundance of alcohol, acid, and carbonyl moieties in both carbon pools. This unique dataset provides new insight into how photochemical reactions alter the chemical composition of NOM while highlighting the relative importance of indirect pathways.

  2. Particulate organic matter distribution along the lower Amazon River: addressing aquatic ecology concepts using fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Rigal, François; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Bernardes, Marcelo; Abril, Gwenaël; Meziane, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM) cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs) were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM). This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0), an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO(2) in rivers, during the high water season (HW). Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3) and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7), were correlated with higher O(2), chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW). Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1) downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2) enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence time

  3. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rongyan; Lu, Jianwei; Ren, Tao; Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaokun; Cong, Rihuan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N) mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM) and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN) contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR)/cotton-rapeseed (CR) rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile), intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles), and high (90th percentile) levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C) and N (POM-N) contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN) contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively) than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively). Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials) in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  4. Particulate organic constituents of surface waters of east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreepada, R.A.; Bhat, K.L.; Parulekar, A.H.

    protein (PP) and particulate lipid (PL) fractions. High values of chlorophyll a (chl-a) characterized the coastal waters. In coastal waters, POC was dominatEd. by PCHO containing detrital matter, whereas actively growing phytoplankton significantly...

  5. Chemical composition of phytoplankton and Particulate Organic Matter in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Ríos, A. F.; Fraga, F.; Pérez, F. F.; Figueiras, F. G.

    1998-01-01

    Elemental (C, H, O, N, Si, P) and biochemical composition (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, phosphorus compounds, chlorophyll and opal) in particulate organic matter, diatoms, other autotrophs, heterotrophs and detritus from natural plankton were established simultaneously by measuring relatively few components. Using standard techniques in marine chemistry on board ship, it is possible to infer a great deal about the composition and condition of the plankton. In addition, the org...

  6. Characteristics of organic compounds in aerosol particulate matter from Dhahran city, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Rushdi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic chemical pollutants in atmospheric particulate matter (PM have a potential toxicity hazard resulting in human responses that vary from no discernible effect to premature death. The formation and sources of PM also affect air quality of metropolitan areas as well as climate change. The new developments and industrial activities in the Middle East, especially Saudi Arabia, are expected to contribute to the natural, regional, and anthropogenic input sources of organic matter (OM. Here we report the occurrence, concentrations and sources of organic tracers, including n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, plasticizers, and petroleum biomarkers, in ambient atmospheric PM from the city of Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The major compounds were unresolved complex mixtures (UCM of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons (489 ± 296 ng m−3, plasticizers (131 ± 119 ng m−3 for phenyl phosphates, 87 ± 42 ng m−3 for phthalates, n-alkanes (73 ± 53 ng m−3, hopane biomarkers (11 ± 8 ng m−3, n-alkanones (6.7 ± 6.3 ng m−3, PAHs (2.0 ± 2.1 ng m−3, n-alkanols (1.2 ± 1.2 ng m−3, sterane biomarkers (0.4 ± 0.3 ng m−3, and sterols (0.5 ± 0.4 ng m−3. Obviously, UCM and plasticizers were the major components (56 ± 9% and 26 ± 10% of the total extracts, respectively in the PM of Dhahran, which might have adverse public health effects. The major sources of this OM are emissions from industrial factories north of the city, plastics and biomass burning, and petroleum product combustion (traffic/refining.

  7. Characterization of urban and rural organic particulate in the Lower Fraser Valley using two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarra, M. Rami; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James D.; Bower, Keith N.; Boudries, Hacene; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Jayne, John T.; Garforth, Arthur A.; Li, Shao-Meng; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2004-11-01

    Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) were deployed at three sites representing urban, semi-rural and rural areas during the Pacific 2001 experiment in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), British Columbia, Canada in August 2001. The AMS provides on-line quantitative measurements of the size and chemical composition of the non-refractory fraction of submicron aerosol particles. A significant accumulation mode with a peak around 400-500 nm was observed at all sites that was principally composed of sulphate, organics, ammonium and some nitrate. Another significant mode with a peak below 200 nm was also observed at the urban site and when urban plumes affected the other sites. This paper focuses on the variability of the organic particulate composition and size distribution as a function of location and photochemical activity with a particular emphasis on the urban and rural areas. The small organic mode at the urban site was well correlated with gas phase CO, 1,3-butadiene, benzene and toluene with Pearson's r values of 0.76, 0.71, 0.79 and 0.69, respectively, suggesting that combustion-related emissions are likely to be the main source of the small organic mode at this site. The mass spectra of the urban organic particulate are similar to those of internal combustion engine lubricating oil, and of diesel exhaust aerosol particles, implying that they were composed of a mixture of n-alkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics. In contrast, organic particulate at the rural site was dominated by shorter chain oxidized organic compounds. Correlations between the two organic modes and gas phase compounds at the rural site indicated that a significant part of the small mode originated from combustion sources, while the large accumulation organic mode appeared to be the result of photochemical processing. Processing of organic particulate during a relatively high O3 episode at the rural site appeared to increase the modal diameter of the accumulation mode from

  8. Global evaluation of particulate organic carbon flux parameterizations and implications for atmospheric pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloege, Lucas; McKinley, Galen A.; Mouw, Colleen B.; Ciochetto, Audrey B.

    2017-07-01

    The shunt of photosynthetically derived particulate organic carbon (POC) from the euphotic zone and deep remineralization comprises the basic mechanism of the "biological carbon pump." POC raining through the "twilight zone" (euphotic depth to 1 km) and "midnight zone" (1 km to 4 km) is remineralized back to inorganic form through respiration. Accurately modeling POC flux is critical for understanding the "biological pump" and its impacts on air-sea CO2 exchange and, ultimately, long-term ocean carbon sequestration. Yet commonly used parameterizations have not been tested quantitatively against global data sets using identical modeling frameworks. Here we use a single one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical modeling framework to assess three common POC flux parameterizations in capturing POC flux observations from moored sediment traps and thorium-234 depletion. The exponential decay, Martin curve, and ballast model are compared to data from 11 biogeochemical provinces distributed across the globe. In each province, the model captures satellite-based estimates of surface primary production within uncertainties. Goodness of fit is measured by how well the simulation captures the observations, quantified by bias and the root-mean-square error and displayed using "target diagrams." Comparisons are presented separately for the twilight zone and midnight zone. We find that the ballast hypothesis shows no improvement over a globally or regionally parameterized Martin curve. For all provinces taken together, Martin's b that best fits the data is [0.70, 0.98]; this finding reduces by at least a factor of 3 previous estimates of potential impacts on atmospheric pCO2 of uncertainty in POC export to a more modest range [-16 ppm, +12 ppm].

  9. Patterns and controls of seasonal variability of carbon stable isotopes of particulate organic matter in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Binhe; Schelske, Claire L; Waters, Matthew N

    2011-04-01

    Carbon stable isotopes (δ(13)C) of particulate organic matter (POM) have been used as indicators for energy flow, primary productivity and carbon dioxide concentration in individual lakes. Here, we provide a synthesis of literature data from 32 freshwater lakes around the world to assess the variability of δ(13)C(POM) along latitudinal, morphometric and biogeochemical gradients. Seasonal mean δ(13)C(POM), a temporally integrated measure of the δ(13)C(POM), displayed weak relationships with all trophic state indices [total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll a (Chl a)], but decreased significantly with the increase in latitude, presumably in response to the corresponding decrease in water temperature and increase in CO(2) concentration. The seasonal minimum δ(13)C(POM) also correlated negatively with latitude while seasonal maximum δ(13)C(POM) correlated positively with all trophic state indices, pH, and δ(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Seasonal amplitude of δ(13)C(POM) (the difference between seasonal maximum and minimum values) correlated significantly with pH, TP and Chl a concentrations and displayed small variations in oligotrophic, mesotrophic and low latitude eutrophic lakes, which is attributed to low primary productivity and abundant non-living POM in the low trophic state lakes and relatively stable environmental conditions in the subtropics. Seasonal amplitude of δ(13)C(POM) was the greatest in high latitude eutrophic lakes. Greater seasonal changes in solar energy and light regime may be responsible for the large seasonal variability in high latitude productive lakes. This synthesis provides new insights on the factors controlling variations in stable carbon isotopes of POM among lakes on the global scale.

  10. Nutrient variations and isotopic evidences of particulate organic matter provenance in fringing reefs, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Di; Cao, Wenzhi, E-mail: wzcao@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, Ying; Huang, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is considered to be one of the causes of coral decline. Increase in traditional fishing in the Xuwen National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (XW) and tourism around the Sanya National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (SY) are causing this coral decline. This study reviews the current state of knowledge of the nutrient status of coastal fringing reefs in South China and evaluates the primary sources of nutrients using stable isotope method. Surveys of seawater nutrients showed that the seawater remained clean in both the XW and SY coastal coral reef areas. Based on the isotopic differences between anthropogenic sewage and naturally occurring aquatic nutrients, the isotopic values of particulate organic matter (POM) and the C/N ratios were successfully used to identify the presence of anthropogenic nutrients in aquatic environments. The δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and C/N compositions of POM from XW and SY (− 21.18 ± 2.11‰, 10.30 ± 5.54‰, and 5.35 ± 0.69 and − 20.80 ± 1.34‰, 7.06 ± 3.95‰, and 5.77 ± 2.15, respectively) showed statistically significant variations with the season. The δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of POM suggest marine and terrestrial-derived nutrient sources. Organic carbon is a mixture of marine phytoplankton, marine benthic algae and terrestrial-derived plants. The δ{sup 15}N values suggest terrestrial-derived sewage and upwelling-dominated nitrogen sources. In the presence of natural upwelling and coastal currents, coastal coral reef areas are more vulnerable to the increasing anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Anthropogenic activities might lead to large increases in the nutrient concentrations and could trigger the shift from coral- to macroalgae-dominated ecosystems, which would ultimately result in the degradation of the coastal coral reef ecosystem. These results provide some understanding of the declining coral reef ecosystem and the importance of conservation areas and coastal coral reef resource management

  11. Nutrient variations and isotopic evidences of particulate organic matter provenance in fringing reefs, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Di; Cao, Wenzhi; Liang, Ying; Huang, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is considered to be one of the causes of coral decline. Increase in traditional fishing in the Xuwen National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (XW) and tourism around the Sanya National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (SY) are causing this coral decline. This study reviews the current state of knowledge of the nutrient status of coastal fringing reefs in South China and evaluates the primary sources of nutrients using stable isotope method. Surveys of seawater nutrients showed that the seawater remained clean in both the XW and SY coastal coral reef areas. Based on the isotopic differences between anthropogenic sewage and naturally occurring aquatic nutrients, the isotopic values of particulate organic matter (POM) and the C/N ratios were successfully used to identify the presence of anthropogenic nutrients in aquatic environments. The δ(13)C, δ(15)N and C/N compositions of POM from XW and SY (-21.18±2.11‰, 10.30±5.54‰, and 5.35±0.69 and -20.80±1.34‰, 7.06±3.95‰, and 5.77±2.15, respectively) showed statistically significant variations with the season. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of POM suggest marine and terrestrial-derived nutrient sources. Organic carbon is a mixture of marine phytoplankton, marine benthic algae and terrestrial-derived plants. The δ(15)N values suggest terrestrial-derived sewage and upwelling-dominated nitrogen sources. In the presence of natural upwelling and coastal currents, coastal coral reef areas are more vulnerable to the increasing anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Anthropogenic activities might lead to large increases in the nutrient concentrations and could trigger the shift from coral- to macroalgae-dominated ecosystems, which would ultimately result in the degradation of the coastal coral reef ecosystem. These results provide some understanding of the declining coral reef ecosystem and the importance of conservation areas and coastal coral reef resource management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Nutrient variations and isotopic evidences of particulate organic matter provenance in fringing reefs, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Di; Cao, Wenzhi; Liang, Ying; Huang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is considered to be one of the causes of coral decline. Increase in traditional fishing in the Xuwen National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (XW) and tourism around the Sanya National Coral Reefs Reserve tract (SY) are causing this coral decline. This study reviews the current state of knowledge of the nutrient status of coastal fringing reefs in South China and evaluates the primary sources of nutrients using stable isotope method. Surveys of seawater nutrients showed that the seawater remained clean in both the XW and SY coastal coral reef areas. Based on the isotopic differences between anthropogenic sewage and naturally occurring aquatic nutrients, the isotopic values of particulate organic matter (POM) and the C/N ratios were successfully used to identify the presence of anthropogenic nutrients in aquatic environments. The δ 13 C, δ 15 N and C/N compositions of POM from XW and SY (− 21.18 ± 2.11‰, 10.30 ± 5.54‰, and 5.35 ± 0.69 and − 20.80 ± 1.34‰, 7.06 ± 3.95‰, and 5.77 ± 2.15, respectively) showed statistically significant variations with the season. The δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of POM suggest marine and terrestrial-derived nutrient sources. Organic carbon is a mixture of marine phytoplankton, marine benthic algae and terrestrial-derived plants. The δ 15 N values suggest terrestrial-derived sewage and upwelling-dominated nitrogen sources. In the presence of natural upwelling and coastal currents, coastal coral reef areas are more vulnerable to the increasing anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Anthropogenic activities might lead to large increases in the nutrient concentrations and could trigger the shift from coral- to macroalgae-dominated ecosystems, which would ultimately result in the degradation of the coastal coral reef ecosystem. These results provide some understanding of the declining coral reef ecosystem and the importance of conservation areas and coastal coral reef resource management. - Highlights: • The

  13. Temporal variation and fluxes of dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the Apure, Caura and Orinoco rivers, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, A.; Laraque, Alain; Moreira Turcq, Patricia; Alfonso, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of total suspended sediments (TSS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were measured in water samples taken monthly in the Apure, Caura and Orinoco rivers during a hydrological cycle (between Sept. 2007 and Aug. 2008). The DOC concentration values ranged between 1.5 and 6.8 mgC l(-1) in the Apure River; 2.07 and 4.9 mgC l(-1) in the Caura River and 1.66 and 5.35 mgC l(-1) in the Orinoco River. The mean concentration of DOC was 3.9 mgC l-1 in...

  14. Seasonal variation of the size distribution of urban particulate matter and associated organic pollutants in the ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikou, Loukia P.; Samara, Constantini A.

    Size-segregated samples of urban particulate matter (7.5 μm) were collected in Thessaloniki, northern Greece, during winter and summer of 2007-2008, in order to study the size distribution of organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) including n-alkanes and the isoprenoids pristane and phytane, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). All organic compounds were accumulated in the particle size fraction gas-to-particle transformation after emission. A second minor mode at larger particles (3.0-7.5 μm) was observed for C 19 and certain OCPs suggesting redistribution due to volatilization and condensation.

  15. The dynamic of organic carbon in South Cameroon. Fluxes in a tropical river system and a lake system as a varying sink on a glacial-interglacial time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giresse, P. [Laboratoire de Sedimentologie et Geochimie Marines, URA CNRS 715, Universite de Perpignan, 66860 Perpignan (France); Maley, J. [Paleoenvironnements et Palynologie, ISEM/CNRS, UMR 5554, ORSTOM, UR 12, Universite de Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    1998-05-01

    In the first attempt to estimate both (i) a bulk carbon flux in a tropical river system (mainly Sanaga River) and (ii) their palaeoenvironmental implications from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present, this study presents a synthetic approach based on the combined use of modern evaluation of fluxes and estuarine biodegradation in the tropical river system Sanaga and nearby Douala Bay rivers, and of sedimentation rates of a well studied marine shelf and lake system (Barombi-Mbo). In the lake Barombi-Mbo, the Holocene transfer of particulate carbon (96.6x10{sup 3} t) is very close to the mass fixed presently in soil catchments (117x10{sup 3} t). A complete process of stored carbon consumption would require some 10{sup 4} years, namely the Holocene period. During the last 20,000 years, variations in the sediment organic matter can be explained by the change of the vegetation cover, particularly with the substitution of open environments by forests. The global sedimentation was slow between ca. 18,000 and 10,000 years BP and increased after 12,000 years. But the carbon sedimentation rate remains fairly constant as the carbon content is higher in the LGM deposits. Such LGM carbon concentrations are probably explained by the input of coarse debris by rough floods and by a less degraded organic matter as a result of the cooling of the climate. Today, the total transport of dissolved and particulate organic carbon of the Sanaga and Douala Bay rivers to the Guinea Gulf is estimated as 0.62 to 0.79x10{sup 6} t C yr{sup -1}. Based on 50% biodegradation at the estuarine interface, the loss of organic matter per unit of land is evaluated around 8.8 t C km{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. Marine oceanic records of the carbon sedimentation rate reflect with difficulty the major palaeoenvironmental changes according to interfering hydrodynamic factors. The greatest input of organic carbon during warm marine biozones would be balanced by higher concentrations during the LGM resulting in

  16. Particulate organic carbon export across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at 10°E: Differences between north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigcorbé, Viena; Roca-Martí, Montserrat; Masqué, Pere; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Rutgers v. d. Loeff, Michiel; Laglera, Luis M.; Bracher, Astrid; Cheah, Wee; Strass, Volker H.; Hoppema, Mario; Santos-Echeandía, Juan; Hunt, Brian P. V.; Pakhomov, Evgeny A.; Klaas, Christine

    2017-04-01

    The vertical distribution of 234Th was measured along the 10°E meridian between 44°S and 53°S in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) during the austral summer of 2012. The overarching goal of this work was to estimate particulate organic carbon (POC) export across three fronts: the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF), the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) and the Southern Polar Front (SPF). Steady state export fluxes of 234Th in the upper 100 m ranged from 1600 to 2600 dpm m-2 d-1, decreasing with increasing latitude. Using large particle (>53 μm) C/234Th ratios, the 234Th-derived POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 25 to 41 mmol C m-2 d-1. Observed C/234Th ratios decreased with increasing depth north of the APF while south of the APF, ratios remained similar or even increased with depth. These changes in C/234Th ratios are likely due to differences in the food web. Indeed, satellite images, together with macronutrients and dissolved iron concentrations suggest two different planktonic community structures north and south of the APF. Our results indicate that higher ratios of POC flux at 100 m to primary production occurred in nanophytoplankton dominated surface waters, where primary production rates were lower. Satellite images prior to the expedition suggest that the higher export efficiencies obtained in the northern half of the transect may be the result of the decoupling between production and export (Buesseler 1998). Transfer efficiencies to 400 m, i.e. the fraction of exported POC that reached 400 m, were found to be higher south of the APF, where diatoms were dominant and salps largely abundant. This suggests different remineralization pathways of sinking particles, influencing the transfer efficiency of exported POC to depth.

  17. Sink-source and sink-sink relations during reproductive development in Lolium perenne L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warringa, J.W.; Marinissen, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    In greenhouse pot trials, L. perenne cv. Barlet plants were labelled with 13C at regular intervals from main spike emergence onwards in order to identify and measure the activity of source and sink organs during seed formation. The source activity of the various tiller groups within the plant

  18. [Emission of Particulate Matter, Organic and Elemental Carbon from Burning of Fallen Leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-zong; Liu, Gang; Li, Jiu-hai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The two kinds of burning conditions, i. e., flaming and smoldering, were selected to investigate the particulate matter (PM), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon ( EC) from burning of ten kinds of fallen leaves. In the experiment, the emission smoke was sampled from the fallen leaves burning, in which the OC and EC loadings were measured by the Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer. The results showed that the emission factors of PM, OC, and EC were 7.9-31.9, 0.9-9.7, and 3.6-13.9 g x kg(-1), with the average values of 19.7, 5.2, and 6.8 g x kg(-1), respectively, under the flaming condition. The emission factors of PM, OC, and EC were 61.3-128.9, 31.7-60.4, and 1.9-6.0 g x kg(-1), with the average values of 91.0, 43.0, and 4.0 g x kg(-1), respectively, under the smoldering condition. The OC/EC ratio ranged from 0.21 to 1.82 and from 8.16 to 16.84 under the flaming and smoldering condition, respectively. The OC/PM and EC/PM ratios ranged from 0.11 to 0.41 and from 0.18 to 0.56, respectively under the flaming condition. The OC/PM and EC/PM ratios, however, ranged from 0.43 to 0.53 and from 0.03 to 0.06, respectively, under the smoldering condition. The OC emission factor was well correlated with the PM emission factor in the two burning conditions. Those results indicated that rather different emission factors occurred in all kind of components in different burning emission. In addition, the OC emission factor was higher under the smoldering condition than that under the flaming condition. However, the EC emission factor was higher under flaming condition, compared with that under smoldering condition. Analysis of the PM, OC, and EC emission factor and their ratios was beneficial for building the emission list from the biomass burning and the sources apportionment.

  19. Impacts of traffic emissions on atmospheric particulate nitrate and organics at a downwind site on the periphery of Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi Ming; Tan, Hao Bo; Jie Li, Yong; Schurman, Misha I.; Li, Fei; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Chan, Chak K.

    2017-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution on the peripheries of Chinese megacities can be as serious as in cities themselves. Given the substantial vehicular emissions in inner-city areas, the direct transport of primary PM (e.g., black carbon and primary organics) and effective formation of secondary PM from precursors (e.g., NOx and volatile organic compounds) can contribute to PM pollution in buffer zones between cities. To investigate how traffic emissions in inner-city areas impact these adjacent buffer zones, a suite of real-time instruments were deployed in Panyu, downwind from central Guangzhou, from November to December 2014. Nitrate mass fraction was higher on high-PM days, with the average nitrate-to-sulfate ratio increasing from around 0.35 to 1.5 as the PM mass concentration increased from 10 to 160 µg m-3. Particulate nitrate was strongly correlated with excess ammonium (([NH4+] / [SO42-] - 1.5) × [SO42-]), with higher concentrations in December than in November due to lower temperatures. The organic mass fraction was the highest across all PM1 levels throughout the campaign. While organic aerosols (OA) were dominated by secondary organic aerosols (SOA = semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosols + low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosols) as a campaign average, freshly emitted hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA) contributed up to 40 % of OA during high-OA periods, which typically occurred at nighttime and contributed 23.8 to 28.4 % on average. This was due to daytime traffic restrictions on heavy-duty vehicles in Guangzhou, and HOA almost increased linearly with total OA concentration. SOA increased as odd oxygen (Ox = O3 + NO2) increased during the day due to photochemistry. A combination of nighttime traffic emissions and daytime photochemistry contributed to the buildup of PM in Panyu. The mitigation of PM pollution in inner-city areas by reducing vehicular traffic can potentially improve air quality in peripheral areas.

  20. Study on particulates and volatile organic compounds removal with TiO2 nonwoven filter prepared by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gui-Bing; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and titania (TiO2) Degussa P-25 were mixed to generate TiO2 nonwoven filters using electrospinning. The wires of titanium dioxide and the nonwoven binding titania nanofibers were formed using 14 kV voltage and a distance of 15 cm. A single-factor experimental method was used to investigate the effects of parameters such as initial concentration, retention time, and light source on acetone removal by nonwoven binding titania nanofibers. Furthermore, the effects of parameters such as gas pressure, particle size, initial concentration, and retention time on the removal of particulates were also assessed. The results showed that the degradation efficiency increased with decreasing initial concentrations and increasing retention time. The best operational conditions during this study for the removal of acetone using the TiO2 nonwoven filters were a retention time of 100 sec, initial acetone concentration of 250 ppm, and ultraviolet (UV) light source of 254 nm. Under those conditions, 99% acetone removal efficiency was obtained. In addition, 90% particulate matter removal efficiency was reached when the particulate size was greater than 200 nm and the reaction time was longer than 5 minutes. The prepared TiO2/nanofiber has good performance for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate removal at the same time. In this study, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and titania (TiO2) Degussa P-25 were mixed to generate TiO2 nonwoven filters using electrospinning. The results showed that the optimum operating conditions for the removal of acetone using the TiO2 nonwoven filters were a retention time of 100 sec, initial acetone concentration of 250 ppm, and UV light source of 254 nm. Under those conditions, 99% acetone removal efficiency was obtained.

  1. Spatial distribution of particulate organic matter pools, quantified and characterized by mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, L.; Welp, G.; Amelung, W.

    2009-04-01

    Comprising more than 60 % of the terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the principal factors regulating the global C-cycle. Against the background of worldwide increasing CO2 emissions, much effort has been put to the modelling of soil-C turnover in order to evaluate its potential for mitigation of climate change. Soil organic matter is an ever changing assemblage of various organic components that interact with the mineral matrix and in dependence of its ecological environment. Carbon storage is thereby assumed to propagate by hierarchical saturation of different carbon pools. A homogeneous distribution of the respective pools within natural environments is unlikely as the controlling soil parameters are subject to spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Several attempts to operationalize this complex soil compartment have been proposed, most of them resting upon a concept of pools with different stability and varying turnover times. Among these pools, particulate organic matter (POM) is considered to be most sensitive to environmental changes and has been shown to explain major parts of the SOC variations. Until today, rather laborious physical and physico-chemical fractionation procedures are most commonly applied for the initialization and validation of POM in C-turnover models. Mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) in combination with partial least squares regression (PLSR) could overcome this problem. The technique is fast, cheap, and requires little sample preparation. All the same, it is an appropriate technique not only for the determination of gross parameters like total soil organic carbon contents, but also for the determination and characterization of minor constituents like black carbon in soils. Basically, the infrared radiation is absorbed by molecules that express a dipole-moment during vibration. As virtually all constituents of soil organic matter and also a multitude of inorganic soil constituents express such a dipole

  2. Toxicologically important trace elements and organic compounds investigated in size-fractionated urban particulate matter collected near the Prague highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sysalová, Jiřina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Havelcová, Martina; Száková, Jiřina; Trejtnarová, Hana; Kotlík, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    Urban particulate matter was collected in the most exposed area of Prague, near a busy highway, in order to provide petrographic and chemical characterization useful for health impact assessment in that locality or other applications. Samples were collected from filters of the air conditioning system in two years, 2009 and 2010, and sieved into four grain-size fractions: 0.507–0.119 mm, 0.119–0.063 mm, 3 extracted solutions. A composition of inorganic and carbonaceous particles of natural and anthropogenic origin and their morphology were studied by optical and electron microscopy. Organic solvent extracts of the samples were analyzed using gas chromatography to compare the organic compound distribution in fractions. Only slight differences between 2009 and 2010 years are visible. The relatively high extractable part of most investigated elements confirms mobility and potential availability to organisms. The changes can be recognized in the petrographic and organic composition in samples from both years, which were likely the result of various inputs of source materials. Specific organic marker compounds indicate contribution from fossil fuels, plant materials and bacteria. -- Highlights: ► Uncommon urban particulate matter collected near the highway in years 2009 and 2010 was deeply characterized. ► Harmful organic compounds and toxic analytes were tested in grain-size fractions and completed with electron microscopy studies. ► Very similar concentration levels were found in elemental composition in samples from two years. ► Petrographic and organic compositions were different in both samples. ► Relatively high mobility of selected analytes was found in 2M HNO 3 extracted solutions.

  3. Carbon isotopic ratio of suspended organic matter of the Gironde estuary. Application to particulate Zn and Pb distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontugne, Michel; Jouanneau, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In the Gironde estuary, the isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (P.O.C.), and the ratio metal/P.O.C. indicate the occurrence of two zones. Up-river, the concentration decreases due to the consumption of the organo-metallic phase and by mixing in the ''mud plug'' with terrestrial particles impoverished in metal and P.O.C. Down-stream, the mixing of metal rich terrestrial P.O.C. with poorer marine particles determines the metal concentrations [fr

  4. Modelling the light absorption properties of particulate matter forming organic particles suspended in sea water. Part 3. Practical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Majchrowski

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings to a close our cycle of articles on modelling the light absorption properties of particulate organic matter (POM in the sea. In the first two parts of this cycle (Woźniaket al. 2005a,b we discussed these properties with reference to various model chemical classes and physical types of POM. We have put these results into practice in the present third part. As a result of the appropriate theoretical speculations, logically underpinned by empirical knowledge, we selected 25 morphological variants of marine organic detritus, to which we ascribed definite chemical compositions and physical types. On this basis and using known spectra of the mass-specific coefficients of light absorption by various naturally occurring organic substances (systematised in Parts 1 and 2, we determined the absorption properties of these 25 morphological groups of particles, that is, the spectra of the imaginary part of the refractive index n'p(λ (in the 200-700 nm range of the particulate matter. They can be applied, with the aid of Mie's or some other similar theory, to calculate the bulk optical properties (absorbing and scattering of such sets of particles in the sea.

  5. Analysis of urban particulate standard reference materials for the determination of chlorinated organic contaminants and additional chemical and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poster, D.L.; Schantz, M.M.; Wise, S.A. [Analytical Chemistry Div., National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Vangel, M.G. [Statistical Engineering Div., National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1999-02-01

    A previously issued National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM), SRM 1649, Urban Dust/Organics has been analyzed for chlorinated organic contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides) to provide certified values for a new class of compounds relative to the former certification. The material will be reissued as SRM 1649a. Four different analytical techniques were used. Specifically, two different methods of extraction (Soxhlet and pressurized fluid extraction) were used in conjunction with sample analysis by gas chromatography with two different columns (5% phenyl-methyl polysiloxane and 50% methyl C-18 dimethyl polysiloxane) that exhibit distinct selectivity, and with two different modes of detection (electron capture detection and mass spectrometry). The results from these techniques were combined to generate certified concentrations for 35 PCB congeners (some in combination) and 8 chlorinated pesticides. Ancillary assessments of additional chemical and physical properties of SRM 1649a include homogeneity, moisture, total organic carbon, extractable mass, and the particle-size distribution. The approach and the results for the certification of the PCB congeners and chlorinated pesticides in SRM 1649a, and the determination of the additional chemical and physical properties are described. In addition, the determination of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in SRM 1648, Urban Particulate Matter (a particulate material certified for inorganic constituents), is also discussed although certified values are not presented. (orig.) With 6 figs., 4 tabs., 45 refs.

  6. Phage-Bacterial Dynamics with Spatial Structure: Self Organization around Phage Sinks Can Promote Increased Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Christensen, Kelly A; Scott, Carly; Jack, Benjamin R; Crandall, Cameron J; Krone, Stephen M

    2018-01-29

    Bacteria growing on surfaces appear to be profoundly more resistant to control by lytic bacteriophages than do the same cells grown in liquid. Here, we use simulation models to investigate whether spatial structure per se can account for this increased cell density in the presence of phages. A measure is derived for comparing cell densities between growth in spatially structured environments versus well mixed environments (known as mass action). Maintenance of sensitive cells requires some form of phage death; we invoke death mechanisms that are spatially fixed, as if produced by cells. Spatially structured phage death provides cells with a means of protection that can boost cell densities an order of magnitude above that attained under mass action, although the effect is sometimes in the opposite direction. Phage and bacteria self organize into separate refuges, and spatial structure operates so that the phage progeny from a single burst do not have independent fates (as they do with mass action). Phage incur a high loss when invading protected areas that have high cell densities, resulting in greater protection for the cells. By the same metric, mass action dynamics either show no sustained bacterial elevation or oscillate between states of low and high cell densities and an elevated average. The elevated cell densities observed in models with spatial structure do not approach the empirically observed increased density of cells in structured environments with phages (which can be many orders of magnitude), so the empirical phenomenon likely requires additional mechanisms than those analyzed here.

  7. Molecular and isotopic characterization of the particulate organic matter from an eutrophic coastal bay in SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalas, Francine A.; Carreira, Renato S.; Macko, Stephen A.; Wagener, Angela L. R.

    2009-10-01

    The present work aimed at studying the origin of particulate organic matter in Guanabara Bay and in some rivers of the Guanabara basin by using elemental composition, isotopic ratios (δ13C and δ15N) and molecular markers (sterols) in samples collected in two periods (winter and summer). Elemental and isotopic compositions were determined by dry combustion and mass spectrometry, respectively, while sterols were investigated by GC-FID and GC-MS. Higher sterol concentrations were present in the north-western part of the bay in winter (5.10-23.5 μg L-1). The high abundance of algal sterols (26-57% of total sterols), the elemental composition (C/N=6-8) and the isotopic signatures (δ13C=-21.3‰ to -15.1‰ and δ15N=+7.3‰ to +11.1‰) suggested the predominance of autochthonous organic matter, as expected for an eutrophic bay, although seasonal variation in phytoplankton activity was observed. Coprostanol concentration (fecal sterol) was at least one order of magnitude higher in the particulate material from fluvial samples (4.65-55.98 μg L-1) than in the bay waters (<0.33 μg L-1). This could be ascribed to a combination of factors including efficient particle removal to sediments in the estuarine transition zone, dilution with bay water and bacterial degradation during particle transport in the water column.

  8. Increased understanding of nutrient immobilization in soil organic matter is critical for predicting the carbon sink strength of forest ecosystems over the next 100 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, R E; Medlyn, B E; Dewar, R C

    2001-08-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is currently thought to be a significant sink for atmospheric carbon (C). However, the future course of this sink under rising [CO2] and temperature is uncertain. Some contrasting possibilities that have been suggested are: that the sink is currently increasing through CO2 fertilization of plant growth but will decline over the next few decades because of CO2 saturation and soil nutrient constraints; that the sink will continue to increase over the next century because rising temperature will stimulate the release of plant-available soil nitrogen (N) through increased soil decomposition; that, alternatively, the sink will not be sustained because the additional soil N released will be immobilized in the soil rather than taken up by plants; or that the sink will soon become negative because loss of soil C through temperature stimulation of soil respiration will override any CO2 or temperature stimulation of plant growth. Soil N immobilization is thus a key process; however, it remains poorly understood. In this paper we use a forest ecosystem model of plant-soil C and N dynamics to gauge the importance of this uncertainty for predictions of the future C sink of forests under rising [CO2] and temperature. We characterize soil N immobilization by the degree of variability of soil N:C ratios assumed in the model. We show that the modeled C sink of a stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in northern Sweden is highly sensitive to this assumption. Under increasing temperature, the model predicts a strong C sink when soil N:C is inflexible, but a greatly reduced C sink when soil N:C is allowed to vary. In complete contrast, increasing atmospheric [CO2] leads to a much stronger C sink when soil N:C is variable. When both temperature and [CO2] increase, the C sink strength is relatively insensitive to variability in soil N:C; significantly, however, with inflexible soil N:C the C sink is primarily a temperature response whereas with

  9. Increase of anaerobic degradation of particulate organic matter in full-scale biogas plants by mechanical maceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hinrich; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2000-01-01

    Different concepts of implementation of mechanical pretreatment for enhancing the biogas potential from fibers in manure feedstock were evaluated by sampling before and after macerators at different biogas plants and from a fiber separation unit. An increase of the biogas potential of up to 25......% by pretreatment of the whole feed in the macerator before the reactor was observed. implementation concepts with a treatment of the fibers alone after separation from the manure showed to be not efficient due to a low recovery of organic matter in the fibers by the separation unit. The low operational costs...... of a macerator make it attractive to use this pretreatment method for a more complete degradation of particulate organic matter. investigation of the size distribution of the fibers showed that a change in biogas potential was not correlated to a smaller size of the fibers. Results from the macerators indicate...

  10. Chemical composition of phytoplankton and Particulate Organic Matter in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Ríos

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Elemental (C, H, O, N, Si, P and biochemical composition (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, phosphorus compounds, chlorophyll and opal in particulate organic matter, diatoms, other autotrophs, heterotrophs and detritus from natural plankton were established simultaneously by measuring relatively few components. Using standard techniques in marine chemistry on board ship, it is possible to infer a great deal about the composition and condition of the plankton. In addition, the organic matter content in terms of cell volume was determined for each group of plankton. Variation of chemical composition with depth was also considered. The ratio carbohydrates/lipids (Cbh/Lip was used as an indicator of the chemical quality of the plankton.

  11. Control of fossil-fuel particulate black carbon and organic matter, possibly the most effective method of slowing global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2002-10-01

    Under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, no control of black carbon (BC) was considered. Here, it is found, through simulations in which 12 identifiable effects of aerosol particles on climate are treated, that any emission reduction of fossil-fuel (f.f.) particulate BC plus associated organic matter (OM) may slow global warming more than may any emission reduction of CO2 or CH4 for a specific period. When all f.f. BC + OM and anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 emissions are eliminated together, the period is 25-100 years. It is also estimated that historical net global warming can be attributed roughly to greenhouse gas plus f.f. BC + OM warming minus substantial cooling by other particles. Eliminating all f.f. BC + OM could eliminate 20-45% of net warming (8-18% of total warming before cooling is subtracted out) within 3-5 years if no other change occurred. Reducing CO2 emissions by a third would have the same effect, but after 50-200 years. Finally, diesel cars emitting continuously under the most recent U.S. and E.U. particulate standards (0.08 g/mi; 0.05 g/km) may warm climate per distance driven over the next 100+ years more than equivalent gasoline cars. Thus, fuel and carbon tax laws that favor diesel appear to promote global warming. Toughening vehicle particulate emission standards by a factor of 8 (0.01 g/mi; 0.006 g/km) does not change this conclusion, although it shortens the period over which diesel cars warm to 13-54 years. Although control of BC + OM can slow warming, control of greenhouse gases is necessary to stop warming. Reducing BC + OM will not only slow global warming but also improve human health.

  12. Impacts of traffic emissions on atmospheric particulate nitrate and organics at a downwind site on the periphery of Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM pollution on the peripheries of Chinese megacities can be as serious as in cities themselves. Given the substantial vehicular emissions in inner-city areas, the direct transport of primary PM (e.g., black carbon and primary organics and effective formation of secondary PM from precursors (e.g., NOx and volatile organic compounds can contribute to PM pollution in buffer zones between cities. To investigate how traffic emissions in inner-city areas impact these adjacent buffer zones, a suite of real-time instruments were deployed in Panyu, downwind from central Guangzhou, from November to December 2014. Nitrate mass fraction was higher on high-PM days, with the average nitrate-to-sulfate ratio increasing from around 0.35 to 1.5 as the PM mass concentration increased from 10 to 160 µg m−3. Particulate nitrate was strongly correlated with excess ammonium (([NH4+] ∕ [SO42−] − 1.5  ×  [SO42−], with higher concentrations in December than in November due to lower temperatures. The organic mass fraction was the highest across all PM1 levels throughout the campaign. While organic aerosols (OA were dominated by secondary organic aerosols (SOA  =  semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosols + low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosols as a campaign average, freshly emitted hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA contributed up to 40 % of OA during high-OA periods, which typically occurred at nighttime and contributed 23.8 to 28.4 % on average. This was due to daytime traffic restrictions on heavy-duty vehicles in Guangzhou, and HOA almost increased linearly with total OA concentration. SOA increased as odd oxygen (Ox  =  O3 + NO2 increased during the day due to photochemistry. A combination of nighttime traffic emissions and daytime photochemistry contributed to the buildup of PM in Panyu. The mitigation of PM pollution in inner-city areas by reducing vehicular traffic can potentially

  13. Some aspects of organic and inorganic particulate transport at Rocky Flats. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, H

    1979-01-01

    Findings from the summer 1975 sampling program and the conclusions from the 1975-1976 winter sampling program are summarized. Large radionuclide particles were not found attached to pollen. Sampling the airborne pollen throughout the Rocky Flats area demonstrated that the Rocky Flats air samplers were deficient in their abilities to properly collect large lightweight pollen grains. This may not have serious consequences for the undetected transport of radionuclides by pollen, however, it has implications of sampling inefficiency in some particulate size ranges, and implies that if radionuclides are carried at times by larger particles, then the standard Rocky Flats air samplers are not sampling these materials efficiently. Some initial findings suggested that soil samples from downwind areas associated with winter snow accumulation had abnormally high fissile particle accumulations, and this suggested the need to sample these sites in winter. Areas of preferred particle accumulation such as snow banks had higher concentrations of radionuclide particles than surrounding areas which are more windswept. Any soil sampling program at Rocky Flats which seeks to monitor background radionuclide levels and movement of fissile particles across the site should take account of these topographically and wind-controlled accumulation areas, and not rely solely on a grid pattern of sampling. The snow samples contained radionuclide material in substantial quantities. In terms of fissile particulates smaller than 0.5 microns the snow banks three miles east of the plant site contained as much or more radionuclides than sites close to the Hot Spot contaminated area. The snow samples immediately east of the Hot Spot contained many more large particles (>0.5 m), as did soil samples from the upwind site next to the plant fence. The Hot Spot is clearly implicated again as the source of these materials.

  14. Some aspects of organic and inorganic particulate transport at Rocky Flats. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, H.

    Findings from the summer 1975 sampling program and the conclusions from the 1975-1976 winter sampling program are summarized. Large radionuclide particles were not found attached to pollen. Sampling the airborne pollen throughout the Rocky Flats area demonstrated that the Rocky Flats air samplers were deficient in their abilities to properly collect large lightweight pollen grains. This may not have serious consequences for the undetected transport of radionuclides by pollen, however, it has implications of sampling inefficiency in some particulate size ranges, and implies that if radionuclides are carried at times by larger particles, then the standard Rocky Flats air samplers are not sampling these materials efficiently. Some initial findings suggested that soil samples from downwind areas associated with winter snow accumulation had abnormally high fissile particle accumulations, and this suggested the need to sample these sites in winter. Areas of preferred particle accumulation such as snow banks had higher concentrations of radionuclide particles than surrounding areas which are more windswept. Any soil sampling program at Rocky Flats which seeks to monitor background radionuclide levels and movement of fissile particles across the site should take account of these topographically and wind-controlled accumulation areas, and not rely solely on a grid pattern of sampling. The snow samples contained radionuclide material in substantial quantities. In terms of fissile particulates smaller than 0.5 microns the snow banks three miles east of the plant site contained as much or more radionuclides than sites close to the Hot Spot contaminated area. The snow samples immediately east of the Hot Spot contained many more large particles (>0.5 m), as did soil samples from the upwind site next to the plant fence. The Hot Spot is clearly implicated again as the source of these materials

  15. Toxic potential of organic constituents of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in an urban road site (Barcelona).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Sofia R; van Drooge, Barend L; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Grimalt, Joan O; Barata, Carlos; Vieira, Natividade; Guimarães, Laura; Piña, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a recognized risk factor contributing to a number of diseases in human populations and wildlife globally. Organic matter is a major component of PM, but its contribution to overall toxicity of PM has not been thoroughly evaluated yet. In the present work, the biological activity of organic extracts from PM1 (particles with less than 1 μm of aerodynamic diameter) collected from an urban road site in the centre of Barcelona (NE Spain) was evaluated using a yeast-based assay (AhR-RYA) and different gene expression markers in zebrafish embryos. Dioxin-like activity of the extracts correlated to primary emissions from local traffic exhausts, reflecting weekday/weekend alternance. Expression levels of cyp1a and of gene markers for key cellular processes and development (ier2, fos) also correlated to vehicle emissions, whereas expression of gene markers related to antioxidant defence and endocrine effects (gstal, hao1, ttr) was strongly reduced in samples with strong contribution from regional air masses with aged secondary organic species or with strong influence of biomass burning emissions. Our data suggest that the toxic potential of PM1 organic chemical constituents strongly depends on the emission sources and on the process of ageing from primary to secondary organic aerosols.

  16. Toxicologically important trace elements and organic compounds investigated in size-fractionated urban particulate matter collected near the Prague highway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysalová, Jiřina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Havelcová, Martina; Száková, Jiřina; Trejtnarová, Hana; Kotlík, Bohumil

    2012-10-15

    Urban particulate matter was collected in the most exposed area of Prague, near a busy highway, in order to provide petrographic and chemical characterization useful for health impact assessment in that locality or other applications. Samples were collected from filters of the air conditioning system in two years, 2009 and 2010, and sieved into four grain-size fractions: 0.507-0.119 mm, 0.119-0.063 mm, origin and their morphology were studied by optical and electron microscopy. Organic solvent extracts of the samples were analyzed using gas chromatography to compare the organic compound distribution in fractions. Only slight differences between 2009 and 2010 years are visible. The relatively high extractable part of most investigated elements confirms mobility and potential availability to organisms. The changes can be recognized in the petrographic and organic composition in samples from both years, which were likely the result of various inputs of source materials. Specific organic marker compounds indicate contribution from fossil fuels, plant materials and bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stratification of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen in the Gdańsk Deep (southern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Burska

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Particulate organic carbon (POC and nitrogen (PON concentrations and fluxes were measured during an experiment in the Gdańsk Deep in late spring (30.05.-06.06.2001. The vertical POC and PON concentration profiles were characterised by the highest values in the euphotic layer, a gradual decrease with depth, and an increase below the halocline. The hydrophysical conditions had a decisive impact on POC and PON fluxes in the water column.     Preferential removal of nitrogen from suspended mater was observed in the entire water column (maximum - in the vicinity of thermocline. There were also differences in the diurnal effectiveness of nitrogen removal as compared to carbon removal. The removal rate was highest at night.

  18. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of particulate organic matter and biogeochemical processes in the eutrophic Danshuei Estuary in northern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.-K.; Kao, S.-J.; Wen, L.-S.; Chen, K.-L.

    2007-01-01

    The Danshuei Estuary is distinctive for the relatively short residence time (1-2 d) of its estuarine water and the very high concentration of ammonia, which is the dominant species of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in the estuary, except near the river mouth. These characteristics make the dynamics of nitrogen cycling distinctively different from previously studied estuaries and result in unusual isotopic compositions of particulate nitrogen (PN). The δ 15 N PN values ranging from - 16.4 per mille to 3.8 per mille lie in the lower end of nitrogen isotopic compositions (- 16.4 to + 18.7 per mille ) of suspended particulate matter observed in estuaries, while the δ 13 C values of particulate organic carbon (POC) and the C/N (organic carbon to nitrogen) ratios showed rather normal ranges from - 25.5 per mille to - 19.0 per mille and from 6.0 to 11.3, respectively. There were three major types of particulate organic matter (POM) in the estuary: natural terrigenous materials consisting mainly of soils and bedrock-derived sediments, anthropogenic wastes and autochthonous materials from the aquatic system. During the typhoon induced flood period in August 2000, the flux-weighted mean of δ 13 C POC values was - 24.4 per mille , that of δ 15 N PN values was + 2.3 per mille and that of C/N ratio was 9.3. During non-typhoon periods, the concentration-weighted mean was - 23.6 per mille for δ 13 C POC , - 2.6 per mille for δ 15 N PN and 8.0 for C/N ratio. From the distribution of δ 15 N PN values of highly polluted estuarine waters, we identified the waste-dominated samples and calculated their mean properties: δ 13 C POC value of - 23.6 ± 0.7 per mille , δ 15 N PN value of - 3.0 ± 0.1 per mille and C/N ratio of 8.0 ± 1.4. Using a three end-member mixing model based on δ 15 N PN values and C/N ratios, we calculated contributions of the three major allochthonous sources of POC, namely, wastes, soils and bedrock-derived sediments, to the estuary. Their contributions

  19. Diagenetic fractionation of carbon isotopes in particulate and dissolved organic matter in sediments from Skan Bay, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during organic matter diagenesis was investigated by measuring detailed depth distributions of stable carbon isotope ratios in sediment particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoirs. The δ 13 C value of the POC shifted systematically from -19 per-thousand at the surface to -21 per-thousand at 10 cm. Significant trends were also apparent in the δ 13 C-DOC profile. Proceeding down-core, DOC became isotopically heavier between 0 and 5 cm and isotopically lighter at greater depths. Two mechanisms could account for the observed down-core shift in δ 13 C-POC: (a) temporal changes in the isotope ratios of deposited organic matter and (b) isotope fractionation associated with diagenesis. The δ 15 C-DOC depth distribution is sensitive to which mechanism controls the isotopic composition of the POC reservoir. A diagenetic model that couples POC and DOC reservoirs was used to discriminate between temporal changes and diagenetic alteration of the POC isotopic composition. The model indicated that observed trends in δ 13 C-POC and δ 13 C-DOC depth distributions are consistent with isotopic fractionation of POC during diagenesis

  20. Differential roles of humic acid and particulate organic matter in the equilibrium sorption of atrazine by soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Sharma, Samriti; Huang, Weilin

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have indicated that soil organic matter (SOM) may consist of physically and chemically different fractions, including particulate organic matter (POM), such as black carbon and unburned coal materials. The present study examined the differential roles of three different SOM fractions isolated from a peat and a topsoil in the equilibrium sorption of the herbicide atrazine (ATZ). The SOM fractions isolated from the two samples included humic acids (HAs), base-extracted humin (HM), and POM after demineralization of HM. A batch technique was employed to measure both the nonequilibrium ATZ sorption on the original and HA samples and the equilibrium ATZ sorption and desorption. The results showed that the phase-distribution relationships measured under nonequilibrium conditions were more linear and had lower sorption-capacity parameters compared with their respective isotherms measured under equilibrium conditions. The sorption isotherms were variously nonlinear, with POM exhibiting the greatest organic carbon-normalized sorption capacity. There existed apparent sorption-desorption hysteresis for each sorbent-sorbate system. It appeared that the extracted HAs could facilitate hydrolysis of ATZ when the reaction time extended to 4 d or longer. The equilibrium sorptive behavior of the HAs therefore was not examined. The present study indicated that both original samples showed lower organic carbon-normalized sorption distribution coefficients compared with their respective SOM fractions, suggesting that a fraction of sorption sites in soil aggregates were not accessed by ATZ.

  1. Diffusive component of the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon in the north polar Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stramska

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffusive component of the vertical flux of particulate organiccarbon (POC from the surface ocean layer has been estimatedusing a combination of the mixed layer model and ocean colordata from the SeaWiFS satellite. The calculations were carriedout for an example location in the north polar Atlantic centeredat 75°N and 0°E for the time period of 1998-2004.The satellite estimates of surface POC derived using a regional ocean coloralgorithm were applied as an input to the model driven by localsurface heat and momentum fluxes. For each year of the examinedperiod, the diffusive POC flux was estimated at 200-m depth fromApril through December. The highest flux is generally observedin the late fall as a result of increased heat loss and convectionalmixing of surface waters. A relatively high diffusive POC fluxis also observed in early spring, when surface waters are weaklystratified. In addition, the model results demonstrate significantinterannual variability. The highest diffusive POC flux occurredin 1999 (about 4500 mg m-2 over the 9-month period. In 1998 and 2002 the estimated flux was about two orders of magnitudelower. The interannual variability of the diffusive POC fluxis associated with mixed layer dynamics and underscores the importanceof atmospheric forcing for POC export from the surface layerto the ocean's interior.

  2. Particulate organic compounds in the atmosphere surrounding an industrialised area of Prato (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincinelli, Alessandra; Mandorlo, Stefano; Dickhut, Rebecca M.; Lepri, Luciano

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected during the period from May 2000 through January 2001 at 13 different sites in and around the Baciacavallo sewage treatment plant in Prato (Italy). The urban area surrounding the plant contains significant textile industrial activity and a main arterial road. Aerosol-associated n-alkane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), nonylphenol (NP) and nonylphenolethoxylate (NPnEO) ( n=1-3) concentrations were measured in order to evaluate contributions from the sewage treatment plant, naturally produced aerosols, transportation and industrial activities to the air quality in the vicinity of the sewage treatment plant. Aerosol-associated n-alkane concentrations ranged from 36.7 to 205 ng/m 3 and their possible origin was determined by the presence of typical petroleum characteristics such as the unresolved complex mixture and an odd/even carbon ratio (Carbon Preference Index). PAH concentrations ranged from 0.855 to 24.2 ng/m 3, in accordance with those generally found for urban aerosols in Europe. NP and NPnEO ( n=1-3), as well as fine aerosol particulate matter (PM 10) were significantly correlated with relative wind direction with increased levels observed in the ambient atmosphere when the relative wind direction was from the Baciacavallo sewage treatment plant. This study confirms the use of NP and NPnEO ( n=1-3) as markers of sewage treatment emissions and the importance of the contribution of aerosols produced by sewage treatment plant aeration tanks to the local atmospheric composition.

  3. Effect of oyster shell medium and organic substrate on the performance of a particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shuang; Stocks, Justine L; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Laura C; Feng, Chuanping; Ergas, Sarina J

    2017-11-01

    The use of pyrite as an electron donor for biological denitrification has the potential to reduce alkalinity consumption and sulfate by-product production compared with sulfur oxidizing denitrification. This research investigated the effects of oyster shell and organic substrate addition on the performance of a particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) process. Side-by-side bench-scale studies were carried out in upflow packed bed bioreactors with pyrite and sand, with and without oyster shells as an alkalinity source. Organic carbon addition (10% by volume wastewater) was found to improve PPAD denitrification performance, possibly by promoting mixotrophic metabolism. After organic carbon addition and operation at a six-hour empty bed contact time, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal reached 90% in the column with oyster shells compared with 70% without. SEM images and biofilm protein measurements indicated that oyster shells enhanced biofilm growth. The results indicate that PPAD is a promising technology for treatment of nitrified wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Seascapes: the world of aquatic organisms as determined by their particulate natures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George A

    2012-03-15

    The interactions between planktonic organisms and their aquatic environment are mediated by diffusive processes on the scale of millimeters and smaller. The uptake of nutrients and food and the release of metabolic products creates localized patchiness that diffusive processes homogenize. Organism size determines, to a large extent, the character of these interactions. This paper builds a framework for considering these interactions, starting with an analysis of the diffusive environment around individual organisms and concluding with an integration over a range of organism sizes to describe aggregated properties. Several examples show the importance of the size-based abundance of organisms and other particles in determining the duration, spatial extent and frequency of environmental cues. One implication of these results is that microbial chemotactic behavior does not help them to find and utilize the majority of nutrient releases.

  5. Enhanced Input of Terrestrial Particulate Organic Matter Reduces the Resilience of the Clear-Water State of Shallow Lakes: A Model Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lischke, B.; Hilt, Sabine; Janse, J.H.; Kuiper, J.J.; Mehner, T.; Mooij, W.M.; Gaedke, U.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of terrestrial particulate organic matter (t-POM) entering lakes is predicted to increase as a result of climate change. This may especially alter the structure and functioning of ecosystems in small, shallow lakes which can rapidly shift from a clear-water, macrophyte-dominated into a

  6. Fine and Ultrafine Particulate Organic Carbon in the Los Angeles Basin: Trends in Sources and Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, PM2.5 and PM0.18 (particles with dp < 2.5μm and dp < 0.18μm, respectively) were collected during 2012-2013 in Central Los Angeles (LA) and 2013-2014 in Anaheim. Samples were chemically analyzed for carbonaceous species (elemental and organic carbon) and individual organic compounds. Concentrations of organic compounds were reported and compared with many previous studies in Central LA to quantify the impact of emissions control measurements that have been implemented for vehicu...

  7. Nighttime residential wood burning evidenced from an indirect method for estimating real-time concentration of particulate organic matter (POM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciare, J.; Sarda-Esteve, R.; Favez, O.; Cachier, H.; Aymoz, G.; Laj, P.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time analyzers of selected chemical components (sulfate, nitrate, Black Carbon) and integrative aerosol parameters (particulate matter and light scattering coefficient) were implemented for a 2-week campaign (November-December 2005) in a suburban area of Clermont-Ferrand (France) in order to document fast changes in the chemical composition of submicron aerosols. Measurements of particulate organic matter (POM) were not available in the field but were indirectly estimated from time-resolved (3-min) reconstruction of the light scattering coefficient. This methodology offered the opportunity to investigate almost real-time and artifact-free POM concentrations even at low concentrations (typically below 0.1 mu g m(-3)). The overall uncertainties associated with this POM calculation were of the order of 20%, which are comparable to those commonly referred in literature for POM calculation or measurements. A chemical mass balance (CMB) of PM1 was performed using the derived POM concentrations and showed a very good correlation (slope = 0.93; r(2) = 0.91, N = 663) with real-time PM1 measurements obtained from R and P TEOM-FDMS, demonstrating the consistency of our approach. Important diurnal variations were observed in POM concentrations, with a dominant contribution of POM from fossil fuel origin during daytime and a dominant contribution of POM from residential wood burning at night. POM was calculated to contribute as much as 70% of PM1 during our study, pointing out the major role of carbonaceous aerosols at this period of the year at our residential area. (authors)

  8. From Solute, Fluidic and Particulate Precursors to Complex Organizations of Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut

    2018-03-24

    The organization of matter from its constitutive units recruits intermediate states with distinctive degrees of self-association and molecular order. Existing as clusters, droplets, gels as well as amorphous and crystalline nanoparticles, these precursor forms have fundamental contributions towards the composition and structure of inorganic and organic architectures. In this personal account, we show that the transitions from atoms, molecules or ionic species to superstructures of higher order are intertwined with the interfaces and interactions of precursor and intermediate states. Structural organizations distributed across different length scales are explained by the multistep nature of nucleation and crystallization, which can be guided towards functional hybrid materials by the strategic application of additives, templates and reaction environments. Thus, the non-classical pathways for material formation and growth offer conceptual frameworks for elucidating, inducing and directing fascinating material organizations of biogenic and synthetic origins. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 2 of 3: sources, sinks, and transport of organic matter with fine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Mackenzie K.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) is abundant in Fanno Creek, Oregon, USA, and has been tied to a variety of water-quality concerns, including periods of low dissolved oxygen downstream in the Tualatin River, Oregon. The key sources of OM in Fanno Creek and other Tualatin River tributaries have not been fully identified, although isotopic analyses from previous studies indicated a predominantly terrestrial source. This study investigates the role of fine sediment erosion and deposition (mechanisms and spatial patterns) in relation to OM transport. Geomorphic mapping within the Fanno Creek floodplain shows that a large portion (approximately 70%) of the banks are eroding or subject to erosion, likely as a result of the imbalance caused by anthropogenic alteration. Field measurements of long- and short-term bank erosion average 4.2 cm/year and average measurements of deposition for the watershed are 4.8 cm/year. The balance between average annual erosion and deposition indicates an export of 3,250 metric tons (tonnes, t) of fine sediment to the Tualatin River—about twice the average annual export of 1,880 t of sediment at a location 2.4 km from the creek’s mouth calculated from suspended sediment load regressions from continuous turbidity data and suspended sediment samples. Carbon content from field samples of bank material, combined with fine sediment export rates, indicates that about 29–67 t of carbon, or about 49–116 t of OM, from bank sediment may be exported to the Tualatin River from Fanno Creek annually, an estimate that is a lower bound because it does not account for the mass wasting of organic-rich O and A soil horizons that enter the stream.

  10. Identification and semi-quantification of biogenic organic nitrates in ambient particulate matters by UHPLC/ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Xinfeng; Gu, Rongrong; Lu, Chunying; Zhu, Fanping; Xue, Likun; Xie, Huijun; Du, Lin; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Wenxing

    2018-03-01

    Particulate biogenic organic nitrates (PBONs) are important components of secondary organic aerosols and play an important role in the tropospheric atmosphere chemistry. However, the concentrations and the chemistry of PBONs remain poorly understood due to the lack of accurate measurement techniques on specific organic nitrates. In this study, ultra high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry was applied in detection of individual PBONs in ambient atmosphere. Total five kinds of PBONs were identified in PM2.5 samples collected in urban Ji'nan in spring according to characteristic fragments of NO2, NO3, HNO3, CO2, and H2O, including monoterpene hydroxyl nitrate (MW = 215, MHN215), pinene keto nitrate (MW = 229, PKN229), limonene di-keto nitrate (MW = 247, LDKN247), oleic acid keto nitrate (MW = 359, OAKN359), and oleic acid hydroxyl nitrate (MW = 361, OAHN361). Among them, three kinds of PBONs originated from biogenic volatile organic compounds of pinene and limonene and two kinds of PBONs came from chemical conversion of oleic acid. The concentrations of these PBONs were roughly quantified with surrogate standards of (1R,2R,5R)-(+)-2-hydroxy-3-pinanone and ricinoleic acid. The average concentrations of MHN215, PKN229, LDKN247, OAKN359, and OAHN361 were 111.6 ± 23.0, 93.1 ± 49.6, 55.3 ± 7.4, 23.4 ± 14.5, 36.8 ± 18.3 ng m-3, respectively. The total concentration of these PBONs was 325.4 ± 116.7 ng m-3, contributing to 1.64 ± 0.34‰ of PM2.5.

  11. River Export of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Carbon from Permafrost and Peat Deposits across the Siberian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, B.; Andersson, A.; Bröder, L.; Vonk, J.; Hugelius, G.; McClelland, J. W.; Raymond, P. A.; Gustafsson, O.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost and peat deposits of northern high latitudes store more than 1300 Pg of organic carbon. This carbon has been preserved for thousands of years by cold and moist conditions, but is now increasingly mobilized as temperatures rise. While part will be degraded to CO2 and CH4 and amplify global warming, part will be exported by rivers to the Arctic Ocean where it can be degraded or re-buried by sedimentation. We here use the four large Siberian rivers Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma as natural integrators of carbon mobilization in their catchments. We apply isotope based source apportionments and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulations to quantify contributions of organic carbon from permafrost and peat deposits to organic carbon exported by these rivers. More specifically, we compare the 14C signatures of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC) sampled close to the river mouths with those of five potential carbon sources; (1) recent aquatic and (2) terrestrial primary production, (3) the active layer of permafrost soils, (4) deep Holocene deposits (including thermokarst and peat deposits) and (5) Ice Complex Deposits. 14C signatures of these endmembers were constrained based on extensive literature review. We estimate that the four rivers together exported 2.4-4.5 Tg organic carbon from permafrost and peat deposits per year. While total organic carbon export was dominated by DOC (90%), the export of organic carbon from permafrost and peat deposits was more equally distributed between DOC (56%) and POC (44%). Recent models predict that ca. 200 Pg carbon will be lost as CO2 or CH4 by 2100 (RCP8.5) from the circumarctic permafrost area, of which roughly a quarter is drained by the Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma rivers. Our comparatively low estimates of river carbon export thus suggest limited transfer of organic carbon from permafrost and peat deposits to high latitude rivers, or its rapid degradation within rivers. Our findings highlight the importance

  12. Development of the GC-MS organic aerosol monitor (GC-MS OAM) for in-field detection of particulate organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, Paul M.; Overson, Devon K.; Cary, Robert A.; Eatough, Delbert J.; Chow, Judith C.; Hansen, Jaron C.

    2017-11-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is among the most harmful air pollutants to human health, but due to its complex chemical composition is poorly characterized. A large fraction of PM is composed of organic compounds, but these compounds are not regularly monitored due to limitations in current sampling and analysis techniques. The Organic Aerosol Monitor (GC-MS OAM) combines a collection device with thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to quantitatively measure the carbonaceous components of PM on an hourly averaged basis. The GC-MS OAM is fully automated and has been successfully deployed in the field. It uses a chemically deactivated filter for collection followed by thermal desorption and GC-MS analysis. Laboratory tests show that detection limits range from 0.2 to 3 ng for 16 atmospherically relevant compounds, with the possibility for hundreds more. The GC-MS OAM was deployed in the field for semi-continuous measurement of the organic markers, levoglucosan, dehydroabietic acid, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from January to March 2015. Results illustrate the significance of this monitoring technique to characterize the organic components of PM and identify sources of pollution.

  13. Factors influencing soil aggregation and particulate organic matter responses to bioenergy crops across a topographic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Ontl; Cynthia A. Cambardella; Lisa A. Schulte; Randall K. Kolka

    2015-01-01

    Bioenergy crops have the potential to enhance soil carbon (C) pools from increased aggregation and the physical protection of organic matter; however, our understanding of the variation in these processes over heterogeneous landscapes is limited. In particular, little is known about the relative importance of soil properties and root characteristics for the physical...

  14. Particulate organic carbon at reclaimed and unreclaimed post-mining soils and its microbial community composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartuška, Martin; Pawlett, M.; Frouz, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 131, August (2015), s. 92-98 ISSN 0341-8162 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1288 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil organic matter * PLFA * chronosequence * succession * reclamation Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2015

  15. Potential interactions between heterotrophic archaea and bacteria for degrading particulate organic carbon in marine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Zhang, C.; Tian, J.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is an essential process in marine carbon cycle, which constitutes an integral component of the marine ecosystem and influences climate change. It is still poorly known, however, how microorganisms interact in utilizing organic matter in the ocean. We have performed metagenomic and qPCR analyses of archaea and bacteria in both particle-attached (>3 mm) and free-living (0.2-3 mm) fractions from surface down to 8727 m in the Mariana Trench. The metagenomic results showed large numbers of genes related to the degradation of valine, leucine, isoleucine and lysine, which were similar between free-living and particle-attached fractions from surface to 6000 m depth intervals. However, the relative abundance of these genes decreased in particle-attached fractions and increased in the free-living fractions below 6000 m depth. This is consistent with the ecophysiology of marine group II (MGII) Euryarchaeota, which are suggested to be able to degrade proteins and lipids. Overall, significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) was observed between the abundance of particle-attached MGII and that of particle-attached heterotrophic bacteria in the Mariana Trench water column; whereas, the correlation was significantly reduced (R2 = 0.34) between free-living MGII and free-living bacteria. We hypothesize that particle-attached MGII and heterotrophic bacteria were mutually beneficial in degrading organic matter, which becomes less important between these organisms in the free-living population.

  16. Oxidative damage by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic extracts from urban air particulate matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzalová, Kateřina; Rössner ml., Pavel; Šrám, Radim

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 696, č. 2 (2010), s. 114-121 ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08005; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/8/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * oxidative damage in vitro * extractable organic matter Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2010

  17. Rapid prediction of particulate, humus and resistant fractions of soil organic carbon in reforested lands using infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Dinesh B; Baldock, Jeff A; Read, Zoe J; Murphy, Simon C; Cunningham, Shaun C; Perring, Michael P; Herrmann, Tim; Lewis, Tom; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; England, Jacqueline R; Paul, Keryn I; Weston, Christopher J; Baker, Thomas G

    2017-05-15

    Reforestation of agricultural lands with mixed-species environmental plantings can effectively sequester C. While accurate and efficient methods for predicting soil organic C content and composition have recently been developed for soils under agricultural land uses, such methods under forested land uses are currently lacking. This study aimed to develop a method using infrared spectroscopy for accurately predicting total organic C (TOC) and its fractions (particulate, POC; humus, HOC; and resistant, ROC organic C) in soils under environmental plantings. Soils were collected from 117 paired agricultural-reforestation sites across Australia. TOC fractions were determined in a subset of 38 reforested soils using physical fractionation by automated wet-sieving and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Mid- and near-infrared spectra (MNIRS, 6000-450 cm -1 ) were acquired from finely-ground soils from environmental plantings and agricultural land. Satisfactory prediction models based on MNIRS and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were developed for TOC and its fractions. Leave-one-out cross-validations of MNIRS-PLSR models indicated accurate predictions (R 2  > 0.90, negligible bias, ratio of performance to deviation > 3) and fraction-specific functional group contributions to beta coefficients in the models. TOC and its fractions were predicted using the cross-validated models and soil spectra for 3109 reforested and agricultural soils. The reliability of predictions determined using k-nearest neighbour score distance indicated that >80% of predictions were within the satisfactory inlier limit. The study demonstrated the utility of infrared spectroscopy (MNIRS-PLSR) to rapidly and economically determine TOC and its fractions and thereby accurately describe the effects of land use change such as reforestation on agricultural soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamics of particulate organic matter in a coastal system characterized by the occurrence of marine mucilage - A stable isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénart, Camilla; Susperregui, Nicolas; Rouaud, Vanessa; Cavalheiro, Joana; David, Valérie; Del Amo, Yolanda; Duran, Robert; Lauga, Béatrice; Monperrus, Mathilde; Pigot, Thierry; Bichon, Sabrina; Charlier, Karine; Savoye, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    In coastal systems, particulate organic matter (POM) originates from various autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter sources. Also, some coastal systems are characterized by the occurrence of large amounts of mucilaginous material of biologic origin (i.e. phytoplankton, bacteria), which aggregates and potentially traps other organisms and particles present in the water column. This study focuses on POM origin and spatio-temporal dynamics in the South-East coast of the Bay of Biscay, an area subject to mucilage occurrence. In order to investigate POM quantitative and qualitative (C and N elemental and isotopic ratios) characteristics, sampling was performed over an annual cycle at two sites experiencing different mucilage occurrence and river influence. Contribution of phytoplankton, terrestrial POM and anthropogenic POM to coastal-POM composition was calculated using a three-sources mixing model. Overall, phytoplankton dominated the coastal-POM composition at all seasons, sites and most of the depths (71.6 ± 24.2%). Terrestrial-POM contribution was moderate (22.7 ± 21.8%) and anthropogenic-POM contribution was usually negligible (5.7 ± 7.4%). Both sites mainly exhibited similar vertical and temporal variations in terms of POM origin and dynamics: terrestrial-POM contribution increased with depth and was higher in winter at all depths and in autumn in bottom waters, compared to other seasons. The main differences between both sites were related to the vertical dynamics of the terrestrial contribution to the coastal POM. Horizontal, vertical and temporal variation of POM composition was linked to processes driving the sedimentary hydrodynamics: the river flow, the direction of the river plume and events of sediment resuspension/deposition. During the study period, the mucilage occurred only as flocs (small aggregates). The mucilage was of autochthonous origin and did not trap detectable amount of allochthonous material.

  19. Photochemical Alternation of Phragmites australis Plant Litter: New Insight into the Chemical Evolution of Particulate Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, A. J.; Gelfond, C. E.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The photolysis of natural organic matter (NOM) is a potential pathway for the alteration of material that is not easily biodegraded. Irradiation can alter the physical state of organic matter by facilitating the cycling between the particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) pools. However, a detailed understanding of the underlying chemical changes to the material in both phases is lacking. Here, we use a suspension of particles derived from Phragmites australis, a common marsh reed with high lignin content, as our model "recalcitrant" POM substrate. The solution was irradiated for three weeks with regular sampling, and the composition of the POM and the photo-produced DOM were measured separately using a suite of mass spectrometric and spectroscopic techniques. The chemical composition of individual molecules was measured by coupling soft ionization techniques (electrospray (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI) to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Structural information, including the distribution of the major carbon containing functional groups, was obtained using a combination of FTIR for bulk analyses and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) for spatially resolved chemistry. Results are discussed in the context of differences in chemical composition and structure with increased irradiation time for both organic matter pools. We observed a general shift in the mass spectra of POM towards lower molecular weight masses and an increase in the abundance of ions in DOM as a function of irradiation time- hence the larger POM matrix is likely fragmenting into smaller species that are more soluble. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that the abundance of acidic and alcohol functionalities increased with irradiation in both carbon pools. These complementary approaches provide new detailed information about how the chemical composition of recalcitrant NOM evolves as it is exposed to sunlight.

  20. Fine and ultrafine particulate organic carbon in the Los Angeles basin: Trends in sources and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-01-15

    In this study, PM2.5 and PM0.18 (particles with dporganic carbons) and individual organic compounds. Concentrations of organic compounds were reported and compared with many previous studies in Central LA to quantify the impact of emissions control measurements that have been implemented for vehicular emissions over the past decades in this area. Moreover, a novel hybrid approach of molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) analysis was conducted, in which a combination of source profiles that were previously obtained from a Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model in Central LA, were combined with some traditional source profiles. The model estimated the relative contributions from mobile sources (including gasoline, diesel, and smoking vehicles), wood smoke, primary biogenic sources (including emissions from vegetative detritus, food cooking, and re-suspended soil dust), and anthropogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC). Mobile sources contributed to 0.65 ± 0.25 μg/m(3) and 0.32 ± 0.25 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 OC in Central LA and Anaheim, respectively. Primary biogenic and anthropogenic SOC sources were major contributors to OC concentrations in both size fractions and sites. Un-apportioned OC ("other OC") accounted for an average 8.0 and 26% of PM2.5 OC concentration in Central LA and Anaheim, respectively. A comparison with previous studies in Central LA revealed considerable reduction of EC and OC, along with tracers of mobile sources (e.g. PAHs, hopanes and steranes) as a result of implemented regulations on vehicular emissions. Given the significant reduction of the impacts of mobile sources in the past decade in the LA Basin, the impact of SOC and primary biogenic emissions have a larger relative impact and the new hybrid model allows the impact of these sources to be better quantified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Control of Fossil-Fuel Particulate Black Carbon and Organic Matter, the Most Effective Method of Slowing Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2001-12-01

    Under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, no control of black carbon (BC) was considered. Here, it is found, through simulations in which seven new particles feedbacks to climate are identified, that any emission reduction of fossil-fuel (f.f.) particulate BC plus associated organic matter (OM) will slow global warming more than will any emission reduction of CO2 or CH4 for a definite time period. When all f.f. BC+OM and anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 emissions are eliminated together, that period is 20-90 years. It is also found that historical net global warming can be attributed roughly to greenhouse-gas plus f.f. BC+OM warming minus anthropogenic sulfate cooling. Eliminating all f.f. BC+OM could eliminate more than 40 percent of such net warming within three years if no other changes occurred. Reducing CO2 emissions by a third would have the same effect, but after 50-200 years. Finally, diesel cars warm climate more than do equivalent gasoline cars; thus, fuel- and carbon-tax laws that favor diesel promote global warming.

  2. Study of the removal difference in indoor particulate matter and volatile organic compounds through the application of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Han Hong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of plants to purify indoor air by observing the effective reduction rate among pollutant types of particulate matter (PM and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. PM and four types of VOCs were measured in a new building that is less than three years old and under three different conditions: before applying the plant, after applying the plant, and a room without a plant. The removal rate of each pollutant type due to the plant was also compared and analyzed. In the case of indoor PM, the removal effect was negligible because of outdoor influence. However, 9% of benzene, 75% of ethylbenzene, 72% of xylene, 75% of styrene, 50% of formaldehyde, 36% of acetaldehyde, 35% of acrolein with acetone, and 85% of toluene were reduced. The purification of indoor air by natural ventilation is meaningless because the ambient PM concentration has recently been high. However, contamination by gaseous materials such as VOCs can effectively be removed through the application of plants.

  3. The spatial distribution of particulate organic carbon and microorganisms on seamounts of the South West Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, A.; Read, J. F.; Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    We used elemental analysis, to measure particulate organic carbon (POC), and flow cytometry, to estimate abundance of microorganisms from above four seamounts (Coral, Melville, Middle of What and Atlantis) along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) from latitude 32.6°S to 41.3°S, longitude 57.1°E to 42.7°E. Samples were collected from the surface to the bottom using a CTD fitted with optical sensors. POC was predicted from models created from in-situ transmission (optical) data (cp). The high resolution predicted POC in the euphotic zone showed a heterogeneous distribution both above individual and between seamounts. The shallow penetration of two of the seamounts displayed an effect on the POC concentration in the euphotic zone depleting the layer around the summit. The transmission data showed higher concentrations of particles towards the surface, caused by primary production, and near to the seabed, probably resulting from re-suspension of sediments. The POC concentrations and microbial abundance were positively correlated to cp and fluctuated with particle abundance, with microorganisms accounting for 50% of the observed POC. Based on non-metric multidimensional scaling it is clear that the microbial clusters strongly indicate three separate biological regimes associated with northeastern, central and southwestern zones of the section of the SWIR that was sampled. This biological zonation is associated with physical oceanographic boundaries represented by the Subtropical and Subantarctic Fronts, forming three distinct "biogeographical" regions.

  4. Export of fine particulate organic carbon from redwood-dominated catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers have recognized the significant role of small mountainous river systems in the transport of carbon from terrestrial environments to the ocean, and the scale of such studies have ranged from channel bed units to continents. In temperate zones, these mountain river systems commonly drain catchments that are largely forested. However, the magnitude of carbon export from rivers draining old-growth redwood forests has not been evaluated to date. Old-growth redwood stands support some of the largest quantities of biomass in the world, up to 350 000 Mg of stem biomass km-2 and soil organic carbon can reach 46 800 Mg km-2. In north coastal California, suspended sediment samples were collected at three gaging stations for two to four years on streams draining old-growth redwood forests. Carbon content, determined through loss-on-ignition tests, was strongly correlated with turbidity, and continuous turbidity records from the gaging stations were used to estimate annual carbon exports of 1 · 6 to 4 · 2 Mg km-2 yr-1. These values, representing 13 to 33% of the suspended sediment load, are some of the highest percentages reported in the global literature. The fraction of organic carbon as part of the suspended sediment load decreased with discharge, but reached an asymptote of 5 to 10% at flows 10 to 20 times the mean annual flows. Although larger rivers in this region exhibit high sediment yields (up to 3600 Mg km-2 yr-1), mainly attributed to high rates of uplift, mass movement, and timber harvest, the small pristine streams in this study have sediment yields of only 8 to 100 Mg km-2 yr-1. Because the current extent of old-growth redwood stands is less than 5% of its pre-European-settlement distribution, the present organic carbon signature in suspended sediment loads in this region is likely different from that in the early 20th century. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public

  5. Particulate soil organic carbon and stratification ratio increases in response to crop residue decomposition under no-till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clever Briedis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In soils under no-tillage (NT, the continuous crop residue input to the surface layer leads to carbon (C accumulation. This study evaluated a soil under NT in Ponta Grossa (State of Paraná, Brazil for: 1 the decomposition of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. residues, 2 relation of the biomass decomposition effect with the soil organic carbon (SOC content, the particulate organic carbon (POC content, and the soil carbon stratification ratio (SR of an Inceptisol. The assessments were based on seven samplings (t0 to t6 in a period of 160 days of three transects with six sampling points each. The oat dry biomass was 5.02 Mg ha-1 at t0, however, after 160 days, only 17.8 % of the initial dry biomass was left on the soil surface. The SOC in the 0-5 cm layer varied from 27.56 (t0 to 30.07 g dm-3 (t6. The SR increased from 1.33 to 1.43 in 160 days. There was also an increase in the POC pool in this period, from 8.1 to 10.7 Mg ha-1. The increase in SOC in the 0-5 cm layer in the 160 days was mainly due to the increase of POC derived from oat residue decomposition. The linear relationship between SOC and POC showed that 21 % of SOC was due to the more labile fraction. The results indicated that the continuous input of residues could be intensified to increase the C pool and sequestration in soils under NT.

  6. Particulate and dissolved organic carbon and chlorophyll A in the Zaire river, estuary and plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadée, G. C.

    Data were collected on POC, DOC and phytoplankton in the Zaire river, estuary and plume. Mean river value for POC was 1.1 mg·l -1, 4.7% of the suspended matter. Average DOC content of the river water was 8.5 mg·l -1. These values are in accordance with the calculations of TOC input from rivers to the world's ocean. Within the estuary POC and chlorophyll decreased regularly up to a salinity of 20. Between salinities of 20 and 32 small phytoplankton bloom occurred resulting also in higher POC values. DOC mixed conservatively up to a salinity of 25; at salinities above 25, values indicate DOC production. This DOC production occurred partly in the bottom water of the canyon where low oxygen values indicated mineralization and conversion of the accumulated POC into DOC. Another area of DOC production observed inside and outside the surface waters of the plume, was partly related to autolysis and degradation of the phytoplankton bloom. This study shows that the influence of rivers on the organic carbon in the ocean will not be confined to the amount introduced directly, but that we have to add the amounts of POC and DOC resulting from enhanced phytoplankton primary production by nutrient input from rivers and by river induced upwelling.

  7. Characterization of Extractable Organic Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere of Houston and Source Apportionment Calculations Using Organic Molecular Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M. P.; Yue, Z. W.; Buzco, B.

    2002-12-01

    Samples of atmospheric PM2.5 were collected in Houston, TX every second day during the summer of 2000 as part of the EPA sponsored Houston Fine Particle Matter Supersite program. Sampling occurred at three sites, including one industrial location (HRM-3), one suburban location (Aldine) and one coastal location (La Porte). Twenty samples collected over a 24 hour period have been analyzed to quantify the concentration of 95 individual organic compounds, including: n-alkanes (C20 to C36), aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanoic acids (C5 to C34), n-alkenoic acids (C18:1 and C18:2), carboxylic diacids (C3 to C10), petroleum biomarkers and others. As a whole, the extractable compounds were dominated by acids, especially by octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid. The measured concentration of n-alkanes exhibited a peak at C29, with carbon preference index (CPI) values in the range of 0.97 to 2.0. Using organic molecular markers, including seven alkanes, four petroleum biomarkers, seven PAH, one alkanoic acid, one alkenoic acid, levoglucosan, and three chemical components (Al, Si and Elemental Carbon), Chemical Mass Balancing (CMB) calculations have been performed on the ambient speciation data. These calculations are used to determine the contribution of seven different primary emission sources including: diesel powered vehicles, gasoline vehicles, wood combustion, fuel oil combustion, road dusts, meat cooking and vegetation waxes. The contribution of diesel powered vehicles and gasoline powered vehicles are the most important primary sources at all three sampling locations, with road dusts important at the industrial location. Meat cooking emissions were significant at all three locations. Wood combustion is an important contribution during a four-day period when uncontrolled wildfires in eastern Texas and Louisiana brought biomass combustion aerosols into the sampling region.

  8. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ13C, Δ14C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ 13 C and Δ 14 C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  9. Modelling biogeochemical processes in sediments from the north-western Adriatic Sea: response to enhanced particulate organic carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigolin, Daniele; Rabouille, Christophe; Bombled, Bruno; Colla, Silvia; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Pastres, Roberto; Pranovi, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    This work presents the result of a study carried out in the north-western Adriatic Sea, by combining two different types of biogeochemical models with field sampling efforts. A longline mussel farm was taken as a local source of perturbation to the natural particulate organic carbon (POC) downward flux. This flux was first quantified by means of a pelagic model of POC deposition coupled to sediment trap data, and its effects on sediment bioirrigation capacity and organic matter (OM) degradation pathways were investigated constraining an early diagenesis model by using original data collected in sediment porewater. The measurements were performed at stations located inside and outside the area affected by mussel farm deposition. Model-predicted POC fluxes showed marked spatial and temporal variability, which was mostly associated with the dynamics of the farming cycle. Sediment trap data at the two sampled stations (inside and outside of the mussel farm) showed average POC background flux of 20.0-24.2 mmol C m-2 d-1. The difference of organic carbon (OC) fluxes between the two stations was in agreement with model results, ranging between 3.3 and 14.2 mmol C m-2 d-1, and was primarily associated with mussel physiological conditions. Although restricted, these changes in POC fluxes induced visible effects on sediment biogeochemistry. Observed oxygen microprofiles presented a 50 % decrease in oxygen penetration depth (from 2.3 to 1.4 mm), accompanied by an increase in the O2 influx at the station below the mussel farm (19-31 versus 10-12 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) characterised by higher POC flux. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and NH4+ concentrations showed similar behaviour, with a more evident effect of bioirrigation underneath the farm. This was confirmed through constraining the early diagenesis model, of which calibration leads to an estimation of enhanced and shallower bioirrigation underneath the farm: bioirrigation rates of 40 yr-1 and irrigation depth of 15 cm were

  10. Future export of particulate and dissolved organic carbon from land to coastal zones of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strååt, Kim Dahlgren; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Undeman, Emma

    2018-01-01

    The Baltic Sea is a semi-enclosed brackish sea in Northern Europe with a drainage basin four times larger than the sea itself. Riverine organic carbon (Particulate Organic Carbon, POC and Dissolved Organic Carbon, DOC) dominates carbon input to the Baltic Sea and influences both land-to-sea transport of nutrients and contaminants, and hence the functioning of the coastal ecosystem. The potential impact of future climate change on loads of POC and DOC in the Baltic Sea drainage basin (BSDB) was assessed using a hydrological-biogeochemical model (CSIM). The changes in annual and seasonal concentrations and loads of both POC and DOC by the end of this century were predicted using three climate change scenarios and compared to the current state. In all scenarios, overall increasing DOC loads, but unchanged POC loads, were projected in the north. In the southern part of the BSDB, predicted DOC loads were not significantly changing over time, although POC loads decreased in all scenarios. The magnitude and significance of the trends varied with scenario but the sign (+ or -) of the projected trends for the entire simulation period never conflicted. Results were discussed in detail for the "middle" CO2 emission scenario (business as usual, a1b). On an annual and entire drainage basin scale, the total POC load was projected to decrease by ca 7% under this scenario, mainly due to reduced riverine primary production in the southern parts of the BSDB. The average total DOC load was not predicted to change significantly between years 2010 and 2100 due to counteracting decreasing and increasing trends of DOC loads to the six major sub-basins in the Baltic Sea. However, predicted seasonal total loads of POC and DOC increased significantly by ca 46% and 30% in winter and decreased by 8% and 21% in summer over time, respectively. For POC the change in winter loads was a consequence of increasing soil erosion and a shift in duration of snowfall and onset of the spring flood

  11. Submicron particulate organic matter in the urban atmosphere: a new method for real-time measurement, molecular-level characterization and source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; D'Anna, Barbara; Tan, Wen; Wisthaler, Armin

    2017-04-01

    We used a novel chemical analytical method for measuring submicron particulate organic matter in the atmosphere of three European cities (Innsbruck, Lyon, Valencia). Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used in combination with the "chemical analysis of aerosol online" (CHARON) inlet for detecting particulate organic compounds on-line (i.e. without filter pre-collection), in real-time (1-min time resolution), at ng m-3 concentrations, with molecular-level resolution (i.e. obtaining molecular weight and elemental composition information). The CHARON-PTR-ToF-MS system monitored molecular tracers associated with different particle sources including levoglucosan from biomass combustion, PAHs from vehicular traffic, nicotine from cigarette smoking, and monoterpene oxidation products secondarily formed from biogenic emissions. The tracer information was used for interpreting positive matrix factorization (PMF) data which allowed us to apportion the sources of submicron particulate organic matter in the different urban environments. This work was funded through the PIMMS ITN, which was supported by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme under grant agreement number 287382.

  12. Carbon sink activity of managed grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Katja; Chabbi, Abad; Gastal, Francois; Senapati, Nimai; Charrier, Xavier; Darsonville, Olivier; Creme, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion of GHG emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Recent demonstrations of carbon sink activities however, often questioned the existence of C storing grasslands, as uncertainty surrounding estimates are often larger than the sink itself. Besides climate, key components of the carbon sink activity in grasslands are type and intensity of management practices. Here, we analysed long term data on C flux and soil organic carbon stocks for two long term (>13yrs) national observation sites in France (SOERE-ACBB). These sites comprise a number of grassland fields and managements options (i.e. permanent, sowing, grazing, mowing, and fertilization) offering an opportunity to study carbon offsets (i.e. compensation of CH4 and N2O emissions), climatic-management interactions and trade-offs concerning ecosystem services (e.g. production). Furthermore, for some grassland fields, the carbon sink activity was compared using two methods; repeated soil inventory and estimation of the ecosystem C budget by continuous measurement of CO2 exchange (i.e. eddy covariance) in combination with quantification of other C imports and exports, necessary to estimate net C storage. In general grasslands, were a potential sink of C (i.e. net ecosystem exchange, NEE), where grazed sites had lower NEE compared the cut site. However, when it comes to net C storage (NCS), mowing reduced markedly potential sink leading to very low NCS compared to grazed sites. Including non-CO2 fluxes (CH4 and N2O emission) in the budget, revealed that GHG emissions were offset by C sink activity.

  13. Influence of urban pollution on the production of organic particulate matter from isoprene epoxydiols in central Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. de Sá

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric chemistry of isoprene contributes to the production of a substantial mass fraction of the particulate matter (PM over tropical forests. Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX produced in the gas phase by the oxidation of isoprene under HO2-dominant conditions are subsequently taken up by particles, thereby leading to production of secondary organic PM. The present study investigates possible perturbations to this pathway by urban pollution. The measurement site in central Amazonia was located 4 to 6 h downwind of Manaus, Brazil. Measurements took place from February through March 2014 of the wet season, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. Mass spectra of organic PM collected with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer were analyzed by positive-matrix factorization. One resolved statistical factor (IEPOX-SOA factor was associated with PM production by the IEPOX pathway. The IEPOX-SOA factor loadings correlated with independently measured mass concentrations of tracers of IEPOX-derived PM, namely C5-alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols (R = 0. 96 and 0.78, respectively. The factor loading, as well as the ratio f of the loading to organic PM mass concentration, decreased under polluted compared to background conditions. For an increase in NOy concentration from 0.5 to 2 ppb, the factor loading and f decreased by two to three fold. Overall, sulfate concentration explained 37 % of the variability in the factor loading. After segregation of factor loading into subsets based on NOy concentration, the sulfate concentration explained up to 75 % of the variability. Considering both factors, the data sets show that the suppressing effects of increased NO concentrations dominated over the enhancing effects of higher sulfate concentrations. The pollution from Manaus elevated NOy concentrations more significantly than sulfate concentrations relative to background conditions. In this light, increased emissions of nitrogen oxides, as

  14. The effects of different environmental factors on the biochemical composition of particulate organic matter in Gwangyang Bay, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Han; Lee, Dabin; Kang, Jae Joong; Joo, Hui Tae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ho Won; Ahn, So Hyun; Kang, Chang Keun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2017-04-01

    The biochemical composition of particulate organic matter (POM) produced through phytoplankton photosynthesis is important in determining food quality for planktonic consumers as well as the physiological conditions of phytoplankton. Major environmental factors controlling the biochemical composition were seasonally investigated in Gwangyang Bay, South Korea, which has only natural conditions (e.g., no artificial dams). Water samples for the biochemical compositions were obtained from three different light depths (100, 30, and 1 %) mainly at three sites in Gwangyang Bay from April 2012 to April 2013. Different biochemical classes (carbohydrates, CHO; proteins, PRT; and lipids, LIP) were extracted, and then the concentrations were determined by the optical density measured with a spectrophotometer. The highest and lowest PRT compositions among the three biochemical classes were found in April 2012 (58.0 %) and August 2012 (21.2 %), whereas the highest and lowest LIP compositions were found in August 2012 (49.0 %) and April 2012 (24.8 %), respectively. The CHO composition was recorded as high in January 2013 and remained above 25 % during the study period. The calorific contents of the food material (FM) ranged from 1.0 to 6.1 Kcal m-3 (annual average ± SD = 2.8 ± 1.1 Kcal m-3). Based on a Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis, a major governing factor in the biochemical composition of POM was dissolved inorganic nitrogen loading from the river input in Gwangyang Bay. In conclusion, a relatively larger amount of FM and the higher calorific contents of POM found in this study compared to other regions reflected good nutritive conditions for sustaining productive shellfish and fish populations in Gwangyang Bay. Continuous observations are needed to monitor the marine ecosystem response to potential environmental perturbations in Gwangyang Bay.

  15. Organic and elemental carbon bound to particulate matter in the air of printing office and beauty salon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogula-Kopiec, Patrycja; Pastuszka, Józef S.; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Mucha, Walter

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of internal sources of emissions on the concentrations of total suspended particulate matter (TSP) and its sub-fraction, so-called respirable PM (PM4; fraction of particles with particle size ≤ 4 µm) and to estimate to which extent those emissions participate in the formation of PM-bound elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon in two facilities - one beauty salon and one printing office located in Bytom (Upper Silesia, Poland). The average concentration of PM in the printing office and beauty salon during the 10-day measurement period was 10 and 4 (PM4) and 8 and 3 (TSP) times greater than the average concentration of PM fractions recorded in the same period in the atmospheric air; it was on average: 204 µg/m3 (PM4) and 319 µg/m3 (TSP) and 93 µg/m3 (PM4) and 136 µg/m3 (TSP), respectively. OC concentrations determined in the printing office were 38 µg/m3 (PM4) and 56 µg/m3 (TSP), and those referring to EC: 1.8 µg/m3 (PM4) and 3.5 µg/m3 (TSP). In the beauty salon the average concentration of OC for PM4 and TSP were 58 and 75 µg/m3, respectively and in case of EC - 3.1 and 4.7 µg/m3, respectively. The concentrations of OC and EC within the those facilities were approximately 1.7 (TSP-bound EC, beauty salon) to 4.7 (TSP-bound OC, printing office) times higher than the average atmospheric concentrations of those compounds measured in both PM fractions at the same time. In both facilities the main source of TSP-and PM4-bound OC in the indoor air were the chemicals - solvents, varnishes, paints, etc.

  16. Co-optimization of diesel fuel biodegradation and N2 fixation through the addition of particulate organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piehler, M.; Swistak, J.; Paerl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in the marine environment is widespread and current bioremedial techniques are often not cost effective for small spills. The formulation of simple and inexpensive bioremedial methods could help reduce the impacts of frequent low volume spills in areas like marinas and ports. Particulate organic carbon (POC) was added to diesel fuel amended samples from inshore marine waters in the form of corn-slash (post-harvest leaves and stems), with and without inorganic nutrients (nitrate and phosphate). Biodegradation of diesel fuel ( 14 C hexadecane mineralization) and N 2 fixation were measured in response to the additions, The addition of POC was necessary for N 2 fixation and diesel fuel biodegradation to co-occur. The effects of diesel fuel and inorganic nutrient additions on N 2 fixation rates were not consistent, with both inhibitory and stimulatory responses to each addition observed. The highest observed diesel fuel biodegradation levels were in response to treatments that included inorganic nutrients. The addition of POC alone increased diesel fuel degradation levels above that observed in the control. In an attempt to determine the effect of the POC on the microbial community, the corn particles were observed microscopically using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy with tetrazolium salt additions. The corn particles were found to have abundant attached bacterial communities and microscale oxygen concentration gradients occurring on individual particles. The formation of oxygen replete microzones may be essential for the co-occurrence of aerobic diesel fuel biodegradation and oxygen inhibited N2 fixation. Mesocosm experiments are currently underway to further examine the structure and function of this primarily heterotrophic system and to explore the potential contribution of N 2 fixation to the N requirements of diesel fuel biodegradation

  17. Spatial patterns and environmental controls of particulate organic carbon in surface waters in the conterminous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong; Xu, Xingya; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Smith, Richard A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Duan, Shuiwang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon stocks and fluxes in inland waters have been identified as important, but poorly constrained components of the global carbon cycle. In this study, we compile and analyze particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration data from 1145 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic stations to investigate the spatial variability and environmental controls of POC concentration. We observe substantial spatial variability in POC concentration (1.43 ± 2.56 mg C/ L, Mean ± Standard Deviation), with the Upper Mississippi River basin and the Piedmont region in the eastern U.S. having the highest POC concentration. Further, we employ generalized linear regression models to analyze the impacts of sediment transport and algae growth as well as twenty-one other environmental factors on the POC variability. Suspended sediment and chlorophyll-a explain 26% and 17% of the variability in POC concentration, respectively. At the national level, the twenty-one selected environmental factors combined can explain ca. 40% of the spatial variance in POC concentration. Overall, urban area and soil clay content show significant negative correlation with POC concentration, while soil water content and soil bulk density correlate positively with POC. In addition, total phosphorus concentration and dam density covariate positively with POC concentration. Furthermore, regional scale analyses reveal substantial variation in environmental controls determining POC concentration across the 18 major water resource regions in the U.S. The POC concentration and associated environmental controls also vary non-monotonically with river order. These findings indicate complex interactions among multiple factors in regulating POC production over different spatial scales and across various sections of the river networks. This complexity together with the large unexplained uncertainty highlight the need for consideration of non-linear processes that control them and developing appropriate methodologies to

  18. Organic and elemental carbon bound to particulate matter in the air of printing office and beauty salon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogula-Kopiec Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the role of internal sources of emissions on the concentrations of total suspended particulate matter (TSP and its sub-fraction, so-called respirable PM (PM4; fraction of particles with particle size ≤ 4 µm and to estimate to which extent those emissions participate in the formation of PM-bound elemental (EC and organic (OC carbon in two facilities - one beauty salon and one printing office located in Bytom (Upper Silesia, Poland. The average concentration of PM in the printing office and beauty salon during the 10-day measurement period was 10 and 4 (PM4 and 8 and 3 (TSP times greater than the average concentration of PM fractions recorded in the same period in the atmospheric air; it was on average: 204 µg/m3 (PM4 and 319 µg/m3 (TSP and 93 µg/m3 (PM4 and 136 µg/m3 (TSP, respectively. OC concentrations determined in the printing office were 38 µg/m3 (PM4 and 56 µg/m3 (TSP, and those referring to EC: 1.8 µg/m3 (PM4 and 3.5 µg/m3 (TSP. In the beauty salon the average concentration of OC for PM4 and TSP were 58 and 75 µg/m3, respectively and in case of EC - 3.1 and 4.7 µg/m3, respectively. The concentrations of OC and EC within the those facilities were approximately 1.7 (TSP-bound EC, beauty salon to 4.7 (TSP-bound OC, printing office times higher than the average atmospheric concentrations of those compounds measured in both PM fractions at the same time. In both facilities the main source of TSP-and PM4-bound OC in the indoor air were the chemicals - solvents, varnishes, paints, etc.

  19. New method to determine the total carbonyl functional group content in extractable particulate organic matter by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, J; Zheng, W; Marchand, N; Wortham, H

    2008-08-01

    A functional group analysis method was developed to determine the quantitative content of carbonyl functional groups in atmospheric particulate organic matter (POM) using constant neutral loss scanning-tandem mass spectrometry (CNLS-MS/MS). The neutral loss method consists in monitoring the loss of a neutral fragment produced by the fragmentation of a precursor ion in a collision cell. The only ions detected are the daughter ions resulting from the loss of the neutral fragment under study. Then, scanning the loss of a neutral fragment characteristic of a functional group enables the selective detection of the compounds bearing the chemical function under study within a complex mixture. The selective detection of carbonyl functional groups was achieved after derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH) by monitoring the neutral loss of C(6)F(5)N (181 amu), which was characteristic of a large panel of derivatized carbonyl compounds. The method was tested on 25 reference mixtures of different composition, all containing 24 carbonyl compounds at randomly determined concentrations. The repeatability and calibration tests were satisfying as they resulted in a relative standard deviation below 5% and a linear range between 0.01 and 0.65 mM with a calculated detection limit of 0.0035 mM. Also, the relative deviation induced by changing the composition of the mixture while keeping the total concentration of carbonyl functional groups constant was less than 20%. These reliability experiments demonstrate the high robustness of the developed procedure for accurate carbonyl functional group measurement, which was applied to atmospheric POM samples. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Precursor ion scanning-mass spectrometry for the determination of nitro functional groups in atmospheric particulate organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Julien; Abidi, Ehgere; Haddad, Imad El; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2008-06-23

    An analytical method for the quantitative determination of the total nitro functional group (R-NO2) content in atmospheric particulate organic matter is developed. The method is based on the selectivity of NO2(-) (m/z 46) precursor ion scanning (PAR 46) by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS). PAR 46 was experimented on 16 nitro compounds of different molecular structures and was compared with a neutral loss of NO (30 amu) technique in terms of sensitivity and efficiency to characterize the nitro functional groups. Covering a wider range of compounds, PAR 46 was preferred and applied to reference mixtures containing all the 16 compounds under study. Repeatability carried out using an original statistical approach, and calibration experiments were performed on the reference mixtures proven the suitability of the technique for quantitative measurements of nitro functional groups in samples of environmental interest with good accuracy. A linear range was obtained for concentrations ranging between 0.005 and 0.25 mM with a detection limit of 0.001 mM of nitro functional groups. Finally, the analytical error based on an original statistical approach applied to numerous reference mixtures was below 20%. Despite of potential artifacts related to nitro-alkanes and organonitrates, this new methodology offers a promising alternative to FT-IR measurements. The relevance of the method and its potentialities are demonstrated through its application to aerosols collected in the EUPHORE simulation chamber during o-xylene photooxidation experiments and in a suburban area of a French alpine valley during summer.

  1. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter in buses on highways in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Der-Jen; Huang, Hsiao-Lin

    2009-12-01

    Although airborne pollutants in urban buses have been studied in many cities globally, long-distance buses running mainly on highways have not been addressed in this regard. This study investigates the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and particulate matter (PM) in the long-distance buses in Taiwan. Analytical results indicate that pollutants levels in long-distance buses are generally lower than those in urban buses. This finding is attributable to the driving speed and patterns of long-distance buses, as well as the meteorological and geographical features of the highway surroundings. The levels of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) found in bus cabins exceed the proposed indoor VOC guidelines for aromatic compounds, and are likely attributable to the interior trim in the cabins. The overall average CO level is 2.3 ppm, with higher average level on local streets (2.9 ppm) than on highways (2.2 ppm). The average CO 2 level is 1493 ppm, which is higher than the guideline for non-industrial occupied settings. The average PM level in this study is lower than those in urban buses and IAQ guidelines set by Taiwan EPA. However, the average PM 10 and PM 2.5 is higher than the level set by WHO. Besides the probable causes mentioned above, fewer passenger movements and less particle re-suspension from bus floor might also cause the lower PM levels. Measurements of particle size distribution reveal that more than 75% of particles are in submicron and smaller sizes. These particles may come from the infiltration from the outdoor air. This study concludes that air exchange rates in long-distance buses should be increased in order to reduce CO 2 levels. Future research on long-distance buses should focus on the emission of VOCs from brand new buses, and the sources of submicron particles in bus cabins.

  2. Using Fluorescence to Determine the Fate and Bio-reactivity of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounshell, A.; Peierls, B. L.; Paerl, H. W.; Osburn, C. L.; Abare, B.

    2016-02-01

    Both terrestrial and autochthonous organic matter in estuarine ecosystems have received increased attention as potential substrates for microbial metabolism and nutrient sources for supporting phytoplankton production, particularly as nitrogen (N) sources in these N-sensitive systems. The fate and bio-reactivity of organic matter within the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA was examined during nutrient addition bioassays in summer and fall 2014 and summer 2015. In addition to inorganic nutrient additions, the tested terrestrial organic matter sources included river dissolved organic matter, poultry litter extract, and wastewater treatment effluent. Using excitation emission matrices (EEMs) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), identified fluorescent signatures for both dissolved and particulate organic matter were used as a proxy for organic nitrogen. Separate PARAFAC models based on particulate plus dissolved and dissolved organic matter only were generated using bioassay samples. Components identified in each model showed similarities to modeled components previously generated from in situ Neuse River Estuary samples, although some components were unique indicating potential differences in production and degradation pathways in the experimental system. By correlating the modeled fluorescent signatures with other biogeochemical parameters, including phytoplankton production and biomass, the role of organic matter, specifically organic N, in sustaining primary production and nutrient cycling was explored. Preliminary results indicate in situ autochthonous production of organic matter fluorescence due to both phytoplankton and bacterial production and potential biologic degradation of several fluorescent components identified by PARAFAC. The hypothesized results have important implications for managing organic matter (specifically organic N) loading to N-sensitive estuaries downstream from watersheds undergoing rapid agricultural and urban expansion.

  3. Energies and carbon sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedacker, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol puts a lot of emphasis on carbon sinks. This emphasis almost obliterates the other potential contributions of biomass in the fight against climatic changes and toward sustainable development. Biomass represents an infinite supply of renewable energy sources which do not increase the levels of carbon in the atmosphere, contribute to energy savings resulting from the use of wood rather than other materials, the sustainable management of soils, the fight against drought, agroforestry from which the production of foods depends, the mitigating of certain extreme climatic occurrences and the protection of dams from increased silting. The industrial revolution contributed to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions. When discussing some of the finer points of the Kyoto Protocol, the focus was placed on carbon sinks. The author indicates that the biomass cycle had to be considered, both in situ and ex situ. Details to this effect are provided, and a section dealing with greenhouse gases other than carbon must be taken into account. The rural environment must be considered globally. The author indicates that in the future, the emissions resulting from the transportation of agricultural products will have to be considered. Within the realm of the policies on sustainable development, the fight against climatic change represents only one aspect. In arid and semi-arid regions, one must take into account meeting the energy needs of the populations, the fight against drought and the preservation of biodiversity. The planting of trees offers multiple advantages apart from being a carbon sink: roughage, wood for burning, protection of soils, etc. A few examples are provided. 8 refs., 3 figs

  4. Whole-lake experiments reveal the fate of terrestrial particulate organic carbon in benthic food webs of shallow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnweber, K; Syväranta, J; Hilt, S; Brauns, M; Vanni, M J; Brothers, S; Köhler, J; Knezević-Jarić, J; Mehner, T

    2014-06-01

    Lake ecosystems are strongly linked to their terrestrial surroundings by material and energy fluxes across ecosystem boundaries. However, the contribution of terrestrial particulate organic carbon (tPOC) from annual leaf fall to lake food webs has not yet been adequately traced and quantified. In this study, we conducted whole-lake experiments to trace artificially added tPOC through the food webs of two shallow lakes of similar eutrophic status, but featuring alternative stable regimes (macrophyte rich vs. phytoplankton dominated). Lakes were divided with a curtain, and maize (Zea mays) leaves were added, as an isotopically distinct tPOC source, into one half of each lake. To estimate the balance between autochthonous carbon fixation and allochthonous carbon input, primary production and tPOC and tDOC (terrestrial dissolved organic carbon) influx were calculated for the treatment sides. We measured the stable isotope ratios of carbon (delta13C) of about 800 samples from all trophic consumer levels and compared them between lake sides, lakes, and three seasons. Leaf litter bag experiments showed that added maize leaves were processed at rates similar to those observed for leaves from shoreline plants, supporting the suitability of maize leaves as a tracer. The lake-wide carbon influx estimates confirmed that autochthonous carbon fixation by primary production was the dominant carbon source for consumers in the lakes. Nevertheless, carbon isotope values of benthic macroinvertebrates were significantly higher with maize additions compared to the reference side of each lake. Carbon isotope values of omnivorous and piscivorous fish were significantly affected by maize additions only in the macrophyte-dominated lake and delta13C of zooplankton and planktivorous fish remained unaffected in both lakes. In summary, our results experimentally demonstrate that tPOC in form of autumnal litterfall is rapidly processed during the subsequent months in the food web of shallow

  5. Mutagenicity of airborne particulate organic material from urban and industrial areas of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M I; Valent, G U; Coimbrão, C A; Coelho, M C; Sanchez Sanchez, P; Alonso, C D; Martins, M T

    1995-12-01

    The mutagenicity of airborne particulate matter at three different sites within the São Paulo urban area and the Cubatão industrial area, São Paulo State, Brazil, was evaluated using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay over a year's period (June 1990-May 1991). Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected using a Hi-vol sampler and extracted with methylene chloride by ultrasonication. Pooled seasonal extracts were tested using S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with and without metabolic activation (S9) and TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 without metabolic activation. Organic extracts of the samples with the highest monthly TSP concentration were also assayed for mutagenicity. All samples collected at São Paulo and Cubatão showed mutagenicity with strain TA98, and in general the addition of S9 did not modify the mutagenic response, suggesting the prevalence of direct-acting frameshift mutagens in the atmosphere of these sites. The mutagenicity detected in the urban areas of São Paulo (mainly downtown) was much higher than in the Cubatão industrial area and similar to the more urbanized cities in the world, where vehicle emissions are the major pollution source. Results obtained with the strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 suggested the presence of mononitro- and dinitroarenes contributed to the mutagenicity of these atmospheric samples. A seasonal variation was observed with higher levels of frameshift mutagens during Spring in São Paulo and Summer in Cubatão. During the Winter, more significant responses were found with strain TA100 in the presence of S9 at all sites. Monthly samples presented high levels of mutagenicity during the period of June to November. Results from this research provide support for Air Pollution Control Programs in the detection of the more potent organic mutagenic compounds in the atmosphere and may help in the establishment of priorities for control and regulatory actions.

  6. Discharge modulates stream metabolism dependence on fine particulate organic carbon in a Mediterranean WWTP-influenced stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. D.; Bernal, S.; Meredith, W.; Schumer, R.; Martí Roca, E.

    2017-12-01

    Waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents constitute point source inputs of fine sediment, nutrients, carbon, and microbes to stream ecosystems. A range of responses to these inputs may be observed in recipient streams, including increases in respiration rates, which augment CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Yet, little is known about which fractions of organic carbon (OC) contribute the most to stream metabolism in WWTP-influenced streams. Fine particulate OC (POC) represents ca. 40% of the total mass of OC in river networks, and is generally more labile than dissolved OC. Therefore, POC inputs from WWTPs could contribute disproportionately to higher rates of heterotrophic metabolism by stream microbial communities. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of POC inputs from a WWTP effluent on the metabolism of a Mediterranean stream over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. We hypothesized that POC inputs would have a positive effect on respiration rates, and that the response to POC availability would be larger during low flows when the dilution capacity of the recipient stream is negligible. We focused on the easily resuspended fine sediment near the sediment-water interface (top 3 cm), as this region is a known hot spot for biogeochemical processes. For one year, samples of resuspended sediment were collected bimonthly at 7 sites from 0 to 800 m downstream of the WWTP point source. We measured total POC, organic matter (OM) content (%), and the associated metabolic activity of the resuspended sediment using the resazurin-resorufin smart tracer system as a proxy for aerobic ecosystem respiration. Resuspended sediment showed no difference in total POC over the year, while the OM content increased with decreasing discharge. This result together with the decreasing trend of total POC observed downstream of the point source during autumn after a long dry period, suggests that the WWTP effluent was the main contributor to stream POC. Furthermore

  7. Quantity and biochemical composition of particulate organic matter in a highly trawled area (Thermaikos Gulf, Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pusceddu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bottom trawling represents nowadays one of the most severe anthropogenic disturbances at sea, and determines large impacts on benthic communities and processes. Bottom trawling determines also local sediment resuspension and the effects of the injection of large amounts of surface sediments into the water column have been repeatedly investigated. Few studies have assessed the consequences of sediment resuspension caused by bottom trawling on the quantity, biochemical composition and bioavailability of suspended organic particles and how these eventually rival those exerted by natural storms. To provide insights on this poorly addressed issue, we investigated concentrations and biochemical composition of total and enzymatically digestible pools of particulate organic matter (POM in the Thermaikos Gulf (Mediterranean Sea under calm sea conditions, during intensive trawling activities, and after a severe storm. We show here that sediment resuspension caused by trawling can cause large effects on POM quantity, biochemical composition and bioavailability. Both during trawling and after the storm, the relative importance of the carbohydrate pools increased (in the upper water column and the total lipid concentrations decreased (in the intermediate and bottom layers when compared to values measured during calm conditions. These results would suggest that bottom trawling could inject in the upper water column POM pools more refractory in nature (e.g., carbohydrates than those present in calm or after-storm conditions. By contrast, we show also that the bioavailable fraction of biopolymeric C increased significantly during trawling in the upper water column of the shallowest stations and in the bottom water column layer of the deepest ones. These results provide evidence that bottom trawling can influence the overall trophic status of coastal waters, exerting effects similar or stronger than those caused by natural storms, though of variable amplitude

  8. Influence of declining mean annual rainfall on the behavior and yield of sediment and particulate organic carbon from tropical watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Ayron M.; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Giardina, Christian P.; Bruland, Gregory L.

    2018-04-01

    The capacity to forecast climate and land-use driven changes to runoff, soil erosion and sediment transport in the tropics is hindered by a lack of long-term data sets and model study systems. To address these issues we utilized three watersheds characterized by similar shape, geology, soils, vegetation cover, and land use arranged across a 900 mm gradient in mean annual rainfall (MAR). Using this space-for-time design, we quantified suspended sediment (SS) and particulate organic carbon (POC) export over 18 months to examine how large-scale climate trends (MAR) affect sediment supply and delivery patterns (hysteresis) in tropical watersheds. Average daily SS yield ranged from 0.128 to 0.618 t km- 2 while average daily POC ranged from 0.002 to 0.018 t km- 2. For the largest storm events, we found that sediment delivery exhibited similar clockwise hysteresis patterns among the watersheds, with no significant differences in the similarity function between watershed pairs, indicating that: (1) in-stream and near-stream sediment sources drive sediment flux; and (2) the shape and timing of hysteresis is not affected by MAR. With declining MAR, the ratio of runoff to baseflow and inter-storm length between pulse events both increased. Despite increases in daily rainfall and the number of days with large rainfall events increasing with MAR, there was a decline in daily SS yield possibly due to the exhaustion of sediment supply by frequent runoff events in high MAR watersheds. By contrast, mean daily POC yield increased with increasing MAR, possibly as a result of increased soil organic matter decomposition, greater biomass, or increased carbon availability in higher MAR watersheds. We compared results to modeled values using the Load Estimator (LOADEST) FORTRAN model, confirming the negative relationship between MAR and sediment yield. However, because of its dependency on mean daily flow, LOADEST tended to under predict sediment yield, a result of its poor ability to

  9. Fine scale distributions of porosity and particulate excess 210Pb, organic carbon and CaCO3 in surface sediments of the deep equatorial Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnke, R.A.; Emerson, S.R.; Cochran, J.K.; Hirschberg, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sediment samples were recovered from the central equatorial Pacific Ocean, sectioned at 1-mm intervals, and analyzed for porosity, organic carbon, excess 210 Pb and CaCO 3 . Steep porosity gradients were measured in the upper 1 cm of the sediment column with extremely high values observed near the sediment surface. Similarly, particulate organic carbon contents are highest at the sediment surface, decrease sharply in the upper 1 cm, and are relatively constant between 1 and 5 cm. CaCO 3 values, on the other hand, are lowest at the sediment surface and increase to a constant value below 5-10 mm depth. At the carbonate ooze sites, excess 210 Pb is present throughout the upper 5 cm of the sediments suggesting relatively rapid particle mixing rates. However, extremely high excess 210 Pb activities (> 100 dpm/g) are observed at the sediment surface with sharp gradients present in the upper 1 cm which would suggest slow rates of mixing. This apparent contradiction along with the major features of the CaCO 3 and particulate organic carbon profiles can be explained by a particle-selective feeding mechanism in which organic carbon, excess 210 Pb-enriched particles are preferentially maintained at the sediment surface via ingestion and defecation by benthic organisms. (orig.)

  10. Partitioning of tetra- and pentabromo diphenyl ether and benzo[a]pyrene among water and dissolved and particulate organic carbon along a salinity gradient in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivikko, Miika; Sorsa, Karoliina; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kotiaho, Tapio; Vähätalo, Anssi V

    2010-11-01

    This study assessed the partitioning of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromo diphenyl ether (BDE-99) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) among water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC: 4.93-8.72 mg/L), and particulate organic carbon (POC: 191-462 µg/L) along the salinity gradient (0-5.5‰) of the Baltic Sea off the coast of Finland. Equilibrium dialysis and two solid-phase extraction techniques using polyoxymethylene polymer (POM) were used to determine partitioning coefficients. Experiments using artificial coastal water (ACW) with Nordic fulvic (FAs) and humic acids (HAs) were used to assess the effect of salinity (0 and 5.5‰) on the DOC-water partitioning of the model compounds. All three compounds bound more (2.2-3.8-fold) to the HAs than to the FAs. Increasing salinity from 0 to 5.5‰ decreased sorption to dissolved humic substances in the ACW and Baltic Sea water samples. Along the salinity gradient, the sorption of compounds to organic material decreased when the salinity increased. Particulate organic matter sorbed model compounds per unit of carbon more than dissolved organic matter. Along the studied salinity gradient, the freely dissolved portion increased from 10 to 29% to 52 to 80% in the coastal water samples, mainly because of the increasing salinity and changes in DOC and quality of POC. © 2010 SETAC.

  11. Modelling biogeochemical processes in sediments from the north-western Adriatic Sea: response to enhanced particulate organic carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brigolin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the result of a study carried out in the north-western Adriatic Sea, by combining two different types of biogeochemical models with field sampling efforts. A longline mussel farm was taken as a local source of perturbation to the natural particulate organic carbon (POC downward flux. This flux was first quantified by means of a pelagic model of POC deposition coupled to sediment trap data, and its effects on sediment bioirrigation capacity and organic matter (OM degradation pathways were investigated constraining an early diagenesis model by using original data collected in sediment porewater. The measurements were performed at stations located inside and outside the area affected by mussel farm deposition. Model-predicted POC fluxes showed marked spatial and temporal variability, which was mostly associated with the dynamics of the farming cycle. Sediment trap data at the two sampled stations (inside and outside of the mussel farm showed average POC background flux of 20.0–24.2 mmol C m−2 d−1. The difference of organic carbon (OC fluxes between the two stations was in agreement with model results, ranging between 3.3 and 14.2 mmol C m−2 d−1, and was primarily associated with mussel physiological conditions. Although restricted, these changes in POC fluxes induced visible effects on sediment biogeochemistry. Observed oxygen microprofiles presented a 50 % decrease in oxygen penetration depth (from 2.3 to 1.4 mm, accompanied by an increase in the O2 influx at the station below the mussel farm (19–31 versus 10–12 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 characterised by higher POC flux. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and NH4+ concentrations showed similar behaviour, with a more evident effect of bioirrigation underneath the farm. This was confirmed through constraining the early diagenesis model, of which calibration leads to an estimation of enhanced and shallower bioirrigation underneath the farm

  12. Seasonal variation in particulate organic matter and its cnstituent fractions under the ice covered sea near the shelf, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    discrete depths. Chl @ia@@ concentration at all the 3 depths varied from 0.026 to 0.253 mu g l@u-1@@ showing minimum values during August-September. POC values varied from 280 to 1058 mu g l@u-1@@ while its constituent fractions such as particulate...

  13. Volatile organic compounds and particulate matter in child care facilities in the District of Columbia: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Alcalá, L; Wilson, S; Witherspoon, N; Murray, R; Perodin, J; Trousdale, K; Raspanti, G; Sapkota, A

    2016-04-01

    Many young children in the U.S. spend a significant portion of their day in child care facilities where they may be exposed to contaminants linked to adverse health effects. Exposure data on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) in these settings is scarce. To guide the design of a larger exposure assessment study in urban child care facilities, we conducted a pilot study in which we characterized indoor concentrations of select VOCs and PM. We recruited 14 child care facilities in the District of Columbia (Washington, DC) and measured indoor concentrations of seven VOCs (n=35 total samples; 2-5 samples per facility): benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, p-xylene, and toluene in all facilities; and collected real-time PM measurements in seven facilities. We calculated descriptive statistics for contaminant concentrations and computed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) to evaluate the variability of VOC levels indoors. We also administered a survey to collect general health information on the children attending these facilities, and information on general housekeeping practices and proximity of facilities to potential sources of target contaminants. We detected six of the seven VOCs in the majority of child care facilities with detection frequencies ranging from 71% to 100%. Chloroform and toluene were detected in all samples. Median (range) concentrations for toluene, chloroform, benzene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, and carbon tetrachloride were: 5.6µg/m(3) (0.6-16.5µg/m(3)), 2.8µg/m(3) (0.4-53.0µg/m(3)), 1.4µg/m(3) (below the limit of detection or air fresheners and/or scented candles were used in half of the facilities, and at least one child in each facility had physician-diagnosed asthma (median asthma prevalence rate=10.2%). We found quantifiable levels of VOCs and PM in the child care facilities sampled. Given that exposures to environmental contaminants during critical developmental stages may

  14. Badlands as a major source of petrogenic particulate Organic Carbon and sediments to the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, Y.; Eyrolle-Boyer, F.; Radakovitch, O.; Poirel, A.; Raimbault, P.; Gairoard, S.; Di-Giovanni, C.

    2017-12-01

    Rivers feed the marine environments both in term of sediments and nutrients and consequently, the characterization of their nature, sources and changes over a different spatial and time ranges is a critical for many scientific (e.g. biogeochemical cycles, contaminants transfer, geomorphology, ecology) and societal issues (e.g. food security, catastrophic floods). Specifically, continental sources showing some high erosion rates deserve to be studied since their fingerprint can be significant for the rivers fluxes. These included some sedimentary rocks (e.g. marls) forming badlands and containing a significant amount of petrogenic particulate organic carbon (pPOC) for which its contribution to the Rivers still remains evasive. Our study focuses on the Mediterranean area considered as very sensitive to the Global Change and particularly the Gulf of Lion mainly fed by the Rhône River, one of the major conveyors of sediments to this Sea. Based on radiocarbon data performed on a set of riverine samples and time series analyses from monitoring stations from French CZOs, we (i) update the POC flux of the Rhône River, (ii) determine the pPOC content and flux in suspended sediments and (iii) estimate the badlands contribution from the Durance catchment (a major tributary of the Rhône River) to the pPOC flux and to sediment discharge. Sediment discharge by the Rhône River to the Sea is 6.5 ± 4.3 Tg yr-1 (period 1990-2014) , its POC discharge reaches 0.145 ± 0.095 Tg yr-1 (period 2007-2014) while pPOC (0.44 wt. %) contributes to 30 % of this POC flux. Despite their insignificant surfaces (0.2 %) regarding the Rhône catchment area, badlands presently in erosion from the Durance catchment provide respectively, 16, 5 and 20 % of the pPOC, POC and sediment fluxes to the Rhône River. Consequently, badlands can be considered as a major source of sediments and pPOC for the NW Mediterranean Sea. We suggest that river-dominated ocean margins, such as the Rhône River, with

  15. Analysis of Phytosterols and N-Alkanols in Atmospheric Organic Particulate Matter Collected in Vancouver During the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithead, A.; Li, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Pacific 2001, HiVol samples were collected from 5 sites in the Vancouver area. The samples were extracted by accelerated solvent extraction (ACE), concentrated with nitrogen blow down, and separated into fractions by silica gel chromatography. For this portion of the study, an aliquot of one of the polar fraction was derivatized with BSTFA and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The results for n-alkanols and phytosterols will be reported and discussed. Previous studies have shown that the biogenic components of particulate matter are major constituents of the total organic material in atmospheric samples. Phytosterols are present in wood smoke, epicuticular waxes of many plants and microbial sources. In addition, cholesterol has been proposed as a potential tracer for emissions from cooking. The most abundant phytosterols are cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol. It has been hypothesized that the phytosterol signature may be useful in identifying particulate matter from different source areas. The phytosterol signature for these samples will be reported and compared. The n-alkanol CPI and Cmax will also be reported. N-alkanols in atmospheric samples generally show a strong even to odd predominance indicating that their main source in particulate matter is biogenic. The n-alkanol signature for each sampling site will be compared.

  16. Direct sampling of sub-µm atmospheric particulate organic matter in sub-ng m-3 mass concentrations by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armin, W.; Mueller, M.; Klinger, A.; Striednig, M.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative characterization of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate matter is still challenging. Herein we present the novel modular "Chemical Analysis of Aerosol Online" (CHARON) particle inlet system coupled to a new-generation proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF 6000 X2, Ionicon Analytik, Austria) that quantitatively detects organic analytes in real-time and sub-pptV levels by chemical ionization with hydronium reagent ions. CHARON consists of a gas-phase denuder for stripping off gas-phase analytes (efficiency > 99.999%), an aerodynamic lens for particle collimation combined with an inertial sampler for the particle-enriched flow and a thermodesorption unit for particle volatilization prior to chemical analysis. With typical particle enrichment factors of around 30 for particle diameters (DP) between 120 nm and 1000 nm (somewhat reduced enrichment for 60 nm 6000) and excellent mass accuracies (< 10 ppm) chemical compositions can be assigned and included in further analyses. In addition to a detailed characterization of the CHARON PTR-TOF 6000 X2 we will present first results on the chemical composition of sub-µm particulate organic matter in the urban atmosphere in Innsbruck (Austria).

  17. Metabarcoding-based fungal diversity on coarse and fine particulate organic matter in a first-order stream in Nova Scotia, Canada [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wurzbacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most streams receive substantial inputs of allochthonous organic material in the form of leaves and twigs (CPOM, coarse particulate organic matter. Mechanical and biological processing converts this into fine particulate organic matter (FPOM. Other sources of particles include flocculated dissolved matter and soil particles. Fungi are known to play a role in the CPOM conversion process, but the taxonomic affiliations of these fungi remain poorly studied. The present study seeks to shed light on the composition of fungal communities on FPOM and CPOM as assessed in a natural stream in Nova Scotia, Canada. Maple leaves were exposed in a stream for four weeks and their fungal community evaluated through pyrosequencing. Over the same period, four FPOM size fractions were collected by filtration and assessed. Particles had much lower ergosterol contents than leaves, suggesting major differences in the extent of fungal colonization. Pyrosequencing documented a total of 821 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTU, of which 726 were exclusive to particles and 47 to leaf samples. Most fungal phyla were represented, including yeast lineages (e.g., Taphrinaceae and Saccharomycotina, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Cryptomycota, but several classes of Pezizomycontina (Ascomycota dominated. Cluster dendrograms clearly separated fungal communities from leaves and from particles. Characterizing fungal communities may shed some light on the processing pathways of fine particles in streams and broadens our view of the phylogenetic composition of fungi in freshwater ecosystems.

  18. Soil C:N stoichiometry controls carbon sink partitioning between above-ground tree biomass and soil organic matter in high fertility forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberti, G.; Vicca, S.; Inglima, I.; Belelli Marchesini, L.; Genesio, L.; Miglietta, F.; Marjanovic, H.; Martinez, C.; Matteucci, G.; D ' Andrea, E.; Peressotti, A.; Petrella, F.; Rodeghiero, M.; Cotrufo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    The release of organic compounds from roots is a key process influencing soil carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Through this process, plants stimulate microbial activity and soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization thus releasing nitrogen (N) that sustains

  19. Stocks and dynamics of particulate and dissolved organic matter in a large, shallow eutrophic lake (Taihu, China) with dense cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Limei; Huang, Yaxin; Lu, Yaping; Chen, Feizhou; Zhang, Min; Yu, Yang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2017-08-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms occur in eutrophic lakes worldwide, and greatly impair these ecosystems. To explore influences of cyanobacterial blooms on dynamics of both particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), which are at the base of the food chain, an investigation was conducted from December 2014 to November 2015 that included various stages of the seasonal cyanobacterial blooms (dominated by Microcystis) in a large-shallow eutrophic Chinese lake (Taihu Lake). Data from eight sites of the lake are compiled into a representative seasonal cycle to assess general patterns of POM and DOM dynamics. Compared to December, 5-fold and 3.5-fold increases were observed in July for particulate organic carbon (POC, 3.05-15.37 mg/L) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 5.48-19.25 mg/L), respectively, with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations varying from 8.2 to 97.7 μg/L. Approximately 40% to 76% of total organic carbon was partitioned into DOC. All C, N, and P in POM and DOC were significantly correlated with Chl a. POC:Chl a ratios were low, whereas proportions of the estimated phytoplankton-derived organic matter in total POM were high during bloom seasons. These results suggested that contributions of cyanobacterial blooms to POM and DOC varied seasonally. Seasonal average C:P ratios in POM and DOM varied from 79 to 187 and 299 to 2 175, respectively. Both peaked in July and then sharply decreased. Redundancy analysis revealed that Chl a explained most of the variations of C:N:P ratios in POM, whereas temperature was the most explanatory factor for DOM. These findings suggest that dense cyanobacterial blooms caused both C-rich POM and DOM, thereby providing clues for understanding their influence on ecosystems.

  20. Sinking towards destiny: High throughput measurement of phytoplankton sinking rates through time-resolved fluorescence plate spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Catherine C; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms are marine primary producers that sink in part due to the density of their silica frustules. Sinking of these phytoplankters is crucial for both the biological pump that sequesters carbon to the deep ocean and for the life strategy of the organism. Sinking rates have been previously measured through settling columns, or with fluorimeters or video microscopy arranged perpendicularly to the direction of sinking. These side-view techniques require large volumes of culture, specialized equipment and are difficult to scale up to multiple simultaneous measures for screening. We established a method for parallel, large scale analysis of multiple phytoplankton sinking rates through top-view monitoring of chlorophyll a fluorescence in microtitre well plates. We verified the method through experimental analysis of known factors that influence sinking rates, including exponential versus stationary growth phase in species of different cell sizes; Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP1335, chain-forming Skeletonema marinoi RO5A and Coscinodiscus radiatus CCMP312. We fit decay curves to an algebraic transform of the decrease in fluorescence signal as cells sank away from the fluorometer detector, and then used minimal mechanistic assumptions to extract a sinking rate (m d-1) using an RStudio script, SinkWORX. We thereby detected significant differences in sinking rates as larger diatom cells sank faster than smaller cells, and cultures in stationary phase sank faster than those in exponential phase. Our sinking rate estimates accord well with literature values from previously established methods. This well plate-based method can operate as a high throughput integrative phenotypic screen for factors that influence sinking rates including macromolecular allocations, nutrient availability or uptake rates, chain-length or cell size, degree of silification and progression through growth stages. Alternately the approach can be used to phenomically screen libraries of mutants.

  1. Characterization of particulate amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundel, L.A.; Chang, S.G.; Clemenson, M.S.; Markowitz, S.S.; Novakov, T.

    1979-01-01

    The reduced nitrogen compounds associated with ambient particulate matter are chemically characterized by means of ESCA and proton activation analysis. Ambient particulate samples collected on silver filters in Berkeley, California were washed with water and organic solvents, and ESCA and proton activation analysis were performed in order to determine the composition of various nitrogen compounds and the total nitrogen content. It is found that 85% of the amines originally present in ambient particulate matter can be removed by water extraction, whereas the ammonium and nitrate are completely removed. An observed increase in ammonium ion in the extract, compared with its concentration in the original sample, coupled with the commensurate decrease in amine concentration, is attributed to the hydrolysis of amide groups, which may cause analytical methods based on extraction to yield erroneous results

  2. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanji, Zamin A; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2008-01-01

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH i ) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RH i values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RH i for ice nucleation prevails

  3. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews

  4. Effects of Particulate Organic Matter Complexation and Photo-Irradiation on the Fate and Toxicity of Mercury(II) in Aqueous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfond, C. E.; Kocar, B. D.; Carrasquillo, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This project investigates how interactions between mercury (Hg) and particulate organic matter (POM) affect the fate, transport, and toxicity of Hg in the environment. Previous studies have evaluated the coordination of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with Hg, but the coordination of POM with Hg has not been thoroughly addressed. Owing to a high density of reactive functional groups, POM will sorb appreciable quantities of Hg, resulting in a large pool of Hg susceptible to organic matter dependent transformations. Particulate organic carbon is also susceptible photolysis, hence chemical changes induced by irradiation by natural sunlight is also important. Further, photo-reduction of Hg(II) to elemental mercury in the presence of DOM has been observed, yet studies examining this process with Hg(II) complexed to POM are less exhaustive. Here, we illustrate that POM derived from fresh plant detritus is a powerful sorbent of Hg(II), and sorbent properties are altered during POM photolysis. Further, we examine redox transformations of Hg(II), and examine functional groups that contribute to mercury association with POM. Batch sorption isotherms of Hg to dark and irradiated POM from ground Phragmites australis ("common reed") were performed and data was collected using ICP-MS. Coordination of Hg to POM was lower in the irradiated samples, resulting from the decrease in Hg-associated (reduced) sulfur bearing functional groups as measured using X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS). Further analysis of the dark and irradiated POM was performed using FT-IR microscopy and STXM to determine changes in distribution and alteration of functional groups responsible for Hg sorption to POM.

  5. The role of plantation sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that in the long term biofuel should play a significant role in global climate policy. Recent technological developments, as well as sustainable development criteria, would favour growing biofuel in community- scale plantations in developing countries. It is also pointed out that the lead times involved in growing biofuels are so great that the inclusion of biofuel plantation sinks in the CDM for the first commitment period would be desirable. It is suggested that to meet opposition to the inclusion of plantation sinks in the first commitment period plantation, sinks should be linked to biofuels technology development and production, and a biofuels obligation for plantation sink projects in the CDM should be established. (Author)

  6. Sinking coastal cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent

  7. Spatial distribution of organic contaminants in three rivers of Southern England bound to suspended particulate material and dissolved in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John L; Hooda, Peter S; Swinden, Julian; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    The spatial distribution of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and other emerging contaminants (ECs) such as plasticisers, perflourinated compounds (PFCs) and illicit drug metabolites in water and bound to suspended particulate material (SPM) is not well-understood. Here, we quantify levels of thirteen selected contaminants in water (n=88) and their partition to suspended particulate material (SPM, n=16) in three previously-unstudied rivers of Greater London and Southern England during a key reproduction/spawning period. Analysis was conducted using an in-house validated method for Solid Phase Extraction followed by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry. Analytes were extracted from SPM using an optimised method for ultrasonic-assisted solvent extraction. Detection frequencies of contaminants dissolved in water ranged from 3% (ethinylestradiol) to 100% (bisphenol-A). Overall mean concentrations in the aqueous-phase ranged from 14.7ng/L (benzoylecgonine) to 159ng/L (bisphenol-A). Sewage treatment works (STW) effluent was the predominant source of pharmaceuticals, while plasticisers/perfluorinated compounds may additionally enter rivers via other sources. In SPM, detection frequencies ranged from 44% (PFOA) to 94% (hydroxyacetophenone). Mean quantifiable levels of analytes bound to SPM ranged from 13.5ng/g dry SPM (0.33ng bound/L water) perfluorononanoic acid to 2830ng/g dry SPM (14.3ng bound/L water) perfluorooctanesulfonic acid. Long chain (>C7) amphipathic and acidic PFCs were found to more preferentially bind to SPM than short chain PFCs and other contaminants (Kd=34.1-75.5 vs contaminants entering rivers ranged from 0.157μg/person/day of benzoylecgonine (cocaine metabolite) to 58.6μg/person/day of bisphenol-A. The large sample size of this work (n=104) enabled ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD post-hoc tests to establish significant trends in PPCP/EC spatial distribution from headwaters through downstream stretches of studied

  8. Mutagenic and recombinagenic activity of airborne particulates, PM10 and TSP, organic extracts in the Drosophila wing-spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Dihl, Rafael; Grazielli Azevedo da Silva, Carla; Souza do Amaral, Viviane; Reguly, Maria Luiza; Rodrigues de Andrade, Heloisa Helena

    2008-01-01

    The genotoxicity associated with air pollution in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), was assessed in November (spring) and January (summer). We applied the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster in its standard version with normal bioactivation (ST) and in its variant with increased cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformation capacity (HB). The data indicated the genotoxicity of TSP and PM10 collected in November, in both ST and HB crosses. The genotoxic activity of the PM10 material in the spring sample was exclusively associated with the induction of mitotic recombination, whereas the TSP genetic toxicity was due to both recombinational as well as point and/or chromosomal mutation events. Considering PM10 collected in January, a positive response-100% (17.10 m 3 /ml) concentration-was observed in the HB cross, which was not detected in the ST cross. - Drosophila Wing-Spot Test can be used for detection of airborne particulates mutagenesis

  9. Modelling the light absorption properties of particulate matter forming organic particles suspended in seawater.Part 1. Model description, classification of organic particles, and example spectra of the light absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index of particulate matter for phytoplankton cells and phytoplankton-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on organic substances in the sea are applied to distinguish hypothetical chemical classes and physical types of suspended particulate organic matter (POM in seawater. Spectra of the light absorption coefficients of particulate matter apm(λ and the imaginary refractive index n'p(λ, are assessed for some of these classes and types of POM in seawater, that is, for live phytoplankton cells and phytoplankton-like particles. The spectral characteristics of these coefficients are established and the probable ranges of variability of their absolute magnitudes defined on the basis of the mass-specific coefficients of light absorption by the various organic substances forming the particles. Also presented are mathematical relationships linking the coefficients apm(λ and n'p(λ for the various chemical classes of POM with their physical parameters, such as the relative contents of organic matter, water, air or some other gas. This article is part of a bio-optical study undertaken by the authors, the objective of which is to implement remote sensing techniques in the investigation of Baltic ecosystems (Woźniak et al. 2004.

  10. Analysis of the atmospheric distribution, sources, and sinks of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals based on measurements over the Pacific during TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L. J.; Chatfield, R. B.; Czech, E.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.; Evans, M. J.; Field, B. D.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Talbot, R.; Sachse, G.; Crawford, J. H.; Avery, M. A.; Sandholm, S.; Fuelberg, H.

    2004-08-01

    Airborne measurements of a large number of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC) were carried out in the Pacific troposphere (0.1-12 km) in winter/spring of 2001 (24 February to 10 April). Specifically, these measurements included acetone (CH3COCH3), methylethyl ketone (CH3COC2H5, MEK), methanol (CH3OH), ethanol (C2H5OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), propionaldehyde (C2H5CHO), peroxyacylnitrates (PANs) (CnH2n+1COO2NO2), and organic nitrates (CnH2n+1ONO2). Complementary measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO), methyl hydroperoxide (CH3OOH), and selected tracers were also available. OVOC were abundant in the clean troposphere and were greatly enhanced in the outflow regions from Asia. Background mixing ratios were typically highest in the lower troposphere and declined toward the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere. Their total abundance (ΣOVOC) was nearly twice that of nonmethane hydrocarbons (ΣC2-C8 NMHC). Throughout the troposphere, the OH reactivity of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NMHC. A comparison of these data with western Pacific observations collected some 7 years earlier (February-March 1994) did not reveal significant differences. Mixing ratios of OVOC were strongly correlated with each other as well as with tracers of fossil and biomass/biofuel combustion. Analysis of the relative enhancement of selected OVOC with respect to CH3Cl and CO in 12 plumes originating from fires and sampled in the free troposphere (3-11 km) is used to assess their primary and secondary emissions from biomass combustion. The composition of these plumes also indicates a large shift of reactive nitrogen into the PAN reservoir thereby limiting ozone formation. A three-dimensional global model that uses state of the art chemistry and source information is used to compare measured and simulated mixing ratios of selected OVOC. While there is reasonable agreement in many cases, measured aldehyde concentrations are significantly larger than

  11. Investigation to describe the dynamics of contamination with heavy metals and organic pollutants in relation to suspended particulate matter during flood events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, M.; Baborowski, M.; Tuempling, W. von Jr. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung

    2001-07-01

    Heavy metals and non-polar anthropogenic organic substances like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and chloropesticides can be adsorbed on suspended particulate matter (SPM). In rivers thereby SPM can be a major carrier of such contaminants. The deposition of SPM in rivers results in an enrichment of these substances in sediments, while their resuspension leads to a pollution of river water again. Until the end of the 80{sup th} the Elbe river was contaminated with high amounts of chloropesticides and SPM by several chemical plants located in the former GDR and CSSR. Sediments in groynefields and flood plains are highly contaminated with these substances. Whether there is any recontamination of river water during flood events is a subject of several projects in our institute.

  12. Ocean carbon sinks and international climate policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehdanz, K.; Tol, R.S.J.; Wetzel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial vegetation sinks have entered the Kyoto Protocol as offsets for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, but ocean sinks have escaped attention. Ocean sinks are as unexplored and uncertain as were the terrestrial sinks at the time of negotiation of the Kyoto Protocol. It is not unlikely

  13. Evolution of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory to the Astromaterial Sample Curation Facility: Technical Tensions Between Containment and Cleanliness, Between Particulate and Organic Cleanliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; Calaway, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) was planned and constructed in the 1960s to support the Apollo program in the context of landing on the Moon and safely returning humans. The enduring science return from that effort is a result of careful curation of planetary materials. Technical decisions for the first facility included sample handling environment (vacuum vs inert gas), and instruments for making basic sample assessment, but the most difficult decision, and most visible, was stringent biosafety vs ultra-clean sample handling. Biosafety required handling of samples in negative pressure gloveboxes and rooms for containment and use of sterilizing protocols and animal/plant models for hazard assessment. Ultra-clean sample handling worked best in positive pressure nitrogen environment gloveboxes in positive pressure rooms, using cleanable tools of tightly controlled composition. The requirements for these two objectives were so different, that the solution was to design and build a new facility for specific purpose of preserving the scientific integrity of the samples. The resulting Lunar Curatorial Facility was designed and constructed, from 1972-1979, with advice and oversight by a very active committee comprised of lunar sample scientists. The high precision analyses required for planetary science are enabled by stringent contamination control of trace elements in the materials and protocols of construction (e.g., trace element screening for paint and flooring materials) and the equipment used in sample handling and storage. As other astromaterials, especially small particles and atoms, were added to the collections curated, the technical tension between particulate cleanliness and organic cleanliness was addressed in more detail. Techniques for minimizing particulate contamination in sample handling environments use high efficiency air filtering techniques typically requiring organic sealants which offgas. Protocols for reducing adventitious carbon on sample

  14. Dynamics of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic phosphorus during the peak and declining phase of an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom in the eastern subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takeshi; Nishioka, Jun; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for all organisms and thus the P cycle plays a key role in determining the dynamics of lower trophic levels in marine ecosystems. P in seawater occurs conceptually in particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic (POP, PIP, DOP, and DIP, respectively) pools and clarification of the dynamics in these P pools is the basis to assess the biogeochemical cycle of P. Despite its importance, behaviors of each P pool with phytoplankton dynamics have not been fully examined. We measured the four operationally defined P pools (POPop, PIPop, DOPop, and SRP) during an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom (as part of the subarctic ecosystem response to iron enrichment study (SERIES)) in the eastern subarctic Pacific in summer 2002. During our observations of the iron-enriched patch from day 15 to day 26 after the iron infusion, chlorophyll-a concentration in the surface layer decreased from 6.3 to 1.2 μg L- 1, indicating the peak through decline phase of the phytoplankton bloom. At the bloom peak, P was partitioned into POPop, PIPop, and DOPop in proportions of 60, 27, and 13%, respectively. While chlorophyll-a and POPop showed similar temporal variations during the declining phase, PIPop showed a different peak timing with a 2 day delay compared to POPop, resulting in a rapid change in the relative proportion of PIPop to total particulate P (TPP = POPop + PIPop) at the peak (25%) and during the declining phase of the bloom (50%). A part of POPop was replaced by PIPop just after slowing down of phytoplankton growth. This process may have a significant role in the subsequent regeneration of P. We conclude that measurement of TPP alone is insufficient to show the interaction between P and phytoplankton dynamics and fractionation of TPP into POPop and PIPop provides useful insights to clarify the biogeochemical cycle of P.

  15. Terrestrial Particulate Organic Matter Degradation in Estuarine and Coastal Areas: Coupling Lipid Tracers and Molecular Tools to Better Understand Deltaic Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeron, M. A.; Volkman, J. K.; Rontani, J. F.; Radakovitch, O.; Charriere, B.; Amiraux, R.

    2016-02-01

    Deltaic and coastal areas have been studied extensively worldwide, due to their high economic and ecosystemic value. It was long thought that terrestrial particulate organic matter (TPOM) degraded during river transport was refractory to further degradation upon its arrival at sea. But studies on coastal sediments and in the Mackenzie delta (Canada) showed that, on the contrary, TPOM was undergoing intense degradation upon reaching seawater. In order to generalize these results to worldwide river basins, we propose to trace degradation processes impacting TPOM during in-stream transport as well as coastal distribution. We selected the Rhône River (France) for its differences with the Mackenzie River (latitude, temperature, coastal salinity) and carefully researched lipid tracers to help us pinpoint both the origin of the POM and the degradative processes undergone. Betulin, α-/β-amyrins, dehydroabietic acid, sitosterol and their specific degradation products were selected. While the Rhône delta has been studied for decades, there is very little research on its in-stream processes, and how they can be linked with coastal cycles and fluxes. Coupling new specific lipid tracers especially selected for the monitoring of higher plant degradation and molecular biology tools, we were able to better trace the origin of TPOM transported along the Rhône River, as well as better understand its degradation state in the river, the delta, and upon its arrival at sea. We show here that autoxidation (free radical induced oxidation), long overlooked, is a major degradation process impacting TPOM transported along the Rhone River, and is even more intense upon the arrival of TPOM at sea. Salinity, metal ion desorption, bacterial and biochemical activity are amongst the factors studied as inducers of such an intense degradation. This understanding is crucial if we want a truly extensive knowledge of terrestrial particulate organic matter transport and deposition, as well as

  16. Characterisation of the organic composition of size segregated atmospheric particulate matter at traffic exposed and background sites in Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirante, F.; Perez, R.; Alves, C.; Revuelta, M.; Pio, C.; Artiñano, B.; Nunes, T.

    2010-05-01

    The growing awareness of the impact of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on climate, and the incompletely recognised but serious effects of anthropogenic aerosols on air quality and human health, have led to diverse studies involving almost exclusively the coarse or the fine PM fractions. However, these environmental effects, the PM formation processes and the source assignment depend greatly on the particle size distribution. The innovative character of this study consists in obtaining time series with a size-segregated detailed chemical composition of PM for differently polluted sites. In this perspective, a summer sampling campaign was carried out from 1 of June to 1 of July 2009. One of the sampling sites was located at a representative urban monitoring station (Escuelas Aguirre) belonging to the municipal network, located at a heavy traffic street intersection in downtown Madrid. Other sampling point was positioned within the CIEMAT area, located in the NW corner of the city, which can be considered an urban background or suburban site. Particulate matter was sampled with high volume cascade impactors at 4 size stages: 10-2.5, 2.5-0.95, 0.95-0.45 and acids), special attention was given to the determination of specific molecular markers for different sources (e.g. vehicular). Carbon preference indices (CPI) close to the unity and the presence of PAHs point out vehicle exhaust as the main emission source of the aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic fractions, especially for the roadside aerosols. Concentration ratios between PAHs were also used to assign emission sources. The abundance and the sources of these carcinogenic pollutants are discussed and compared taking into account the local/regional characteristics. Water-soluble ions in PM were also analysed by ionic chromatography. A portion of the same filters was subjected to metal speciation by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) or Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Receptor

  17. Origin and fate of particulate organic matter in the southern Beaufort Sea - Amundsen Gulf region, Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magen, Cedric; Chaillou, Gwenaelle; Crowe, Sean

    2010-01-01

    To establish the relative importance of terrigenous and marine organic matter in the southern Beaufort Sea, we measured the concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of organic carbon and total nitrogen in sediments and in settling particles intercepted by sediment traps. The organic...... carbon content of surface! sediment in the Chukchi and southern Beaufort Seas ranged from 0.6 to 1.6% dry wt., without a clear geographical pattern. The C-ORG:N-TOT ratio ranged from 7.0 to 10.4 and did not vary significantly downcore at any one station. Values delta C-13(ORG) and delta N-15(TOT...... from and much more variable than in the bottom sediments. The isotopic signature of organic matter in the Beaufort Sea is well constrained by three distinct end-members: a labile marine component produced in situ by planktonic organisms, a refractory marine component, the end product of respiration...

  18. Long-term particulate matter modeling for health effect studies in California - Part 2: Concentrations and sources of ultrafine organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianlin; Jathar, Shantanu; Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi; Chen, Shu-Hua; Cappa, Christopher D.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is a major constituent of ultrafine particulate matter (PM0. 1). Recent epidemiological studies have identified associations between PM0. 1 OA and premature mortality and low birth weight. In this study, the source-oriented UCD/CIT model was used to simulate the concentrations and sources of primary organic aerosols (POA) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in PM0. 1 in California for a 9-year (2000-2008) modeling period with 4 km horizontal resolution to provide more insights about PM0. 1 OA for health effect studies. As a related quality control, predicted monthly average concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2. 5) total organic carbon at six major urban sites had mean fractional bias of -0.31 to 0.19 and mean fractional errors of 0.4 to 0.59. The predicted ratio of PM2. 5 SOA / OA was lower than estimates derived from chemical mass balance (CMB) calculations by a factor of 2-3, which suggests the potential effects of processes such as POA volatility, additional SOA formation mechanism, and missing sources. OA in PM0. 1, the focus size fraction of this study, is dominated by POA. Wood smoke is found to be the single biggest source of PM0. 1 OA in winter in California, while meat cooking, mobile emissions (gasoline and diesel engines), and other anthropogenic sources (mainly solvent usage and waste disposal) are the most important sources in summer. Biogenic emissions are predicted to be the largest PM0. 1 SOA source, followed by mobile sources and other anthropogenic sources, but these rankings are sensitive to the SOA model used in the calculation. Air pollution control programs aiming to reduce the PM0. 1 OA concentrations should consider controlling solvent usage, waste disposal, and mobile emissions in California, but these findings should be revisited after the latest science is incorporated into the SOA exposure calculations. The spatial distributions of SOA associated with different sources are not sensitive to the choice of

  19. Source-sink relationships in radish plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Starck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of source-sink relationships in di- and tetraploidal radish plants grown in. hydroponic cultures was investigated in two stages of their development: with intensively growing swollen hypocotyl and in the period of actively accumulating nutrients in the storage organ. It was found, that the proportion, between the mass of organs, their RGR and NAR was very similar in di- and tetraploidal populations, probably owing to a similar rate of photosynthesis and pattern of assimilates distribution. The high variability of swollen hypocotyls size is slightly correlated with the size of the whole aerial part and is not correlated with the rate of photosynthesis in leaves. Partial defoliation of radish plants did not affect the rate of photosynthesis of the remaining leaves. Only in the cotyledones the oldest donors of 14C-assimilates, a slight compensation of photosynthesis was reported. It may suggest, that the rate of photosynthesis in radish plants is not under the control of sink activity. The size of the storage organ have determined in some extent its attractive force and influenced the amount of 14C-assimilates exported from their donors. Translocation of photosynthates from the young, still growing leaves was conditioned mainly by their retention power. Therefore, in young radish plants cotyledons were the main donor of 14C-assimilates.

  20. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The distribution of organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay monthly through spring and summer 1996 along the salinity gradient from the Sacramento River to Central Bay. Dissolved constituents included monosaccharides (MONO), total carbohydrates (TCHO), dissolved ...

  1. Organic speciation of ambient quasi-ultrafine particulate matter (PM0.36) in Augsburg, Germany: Seasonal variability and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengxia; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Cyrys, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Gu, Jianwei; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Orasche, Jürgen; Peters, Annette; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2018-02-15

    To investigate the organic composition and their sources of very fine atmospheric particulate matter (PM), size-segregated PM was sampled using rotating drum impactor (RDI) in series with a sequential filter sampler in Augsburg, Germany, from April 2014 to February 2015. Organic speciation analysis and organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analysis was performed for the smallest size fraction PM 0.36 (PMsource apportionment study. PMF resolved 5 sources including biogenic dominated secondary organic aerosol (bioSOA), isoprene dominated SOA (isoSOA), traffic, biomass burning (BB) and biomass burning originated SOA (bbSOA). On annual average, PMF results indicate the largest contribution of biogenic originated SOA (bioSOA plus isoSOA) to OC, followed by traffic and then BB related sources (BB plus bbSOA). Traffic was found to be associated with the smallest particles; whereas bioSOA and BB are associated with larger particles. Secondary organic marker compounds from biogenic precursors, OC2, OC3 and bioSOA, isoSOA source factors show summer maximum. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), biomass burning markers, OC4 and BB, bbSOA source factors show winter maximum. Hopanes and the traffic source factor show little seasonal variation. Summer peaks of OC3 and OC2 are well modeled by PMF and are attributed mainly to biogenic SOA. OC4 was generally poorly modeled due to lack of characteristic low volatile markers. Summer maxima of biogenic SOA related compounds and source factors are positively correlated with temperature, global radiation, O 3 concentration and mixing layer height (MLH). Winter maxima of BB related compounds and source factors are negatively correlated with temperature and MLH; whereas positively correlated with NO 2 level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. How Low Can You Sink?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. How Low Can You Sink? In Search of Global Minima. Vivek S Borkar. General Article Volume 2 ... Author Affiliations. Vivek S Borkar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  3. Exportation of dissolved (inorganic and organic) and particulate carbon from mangroves and its implication to the carbon budget in the Indian Sundarbans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R; Baum, A; Rixen, T; Gleixner, G; Jana, T K

    2018-04-15

    Mangroves are known for exchanging organic and inorganic carbon with estuaries and oceans but studies that have estimated their contribution to the global budget are limited to a few mangrove ecosystems which exclude world's largest the Sundarbans. Here, we worked in the Indian Sundarbans and in the Hooghly river/estuary in May (pre-monsoon) and December (post-monsoon), 2014. Aims were, i) to quantify the riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC, DIC)) of the Hooghly into the Bay of Bengal (BoB), ii) to estimate the C export (DOC, DIC, POC) from the Sundarbans into the BoB by using a simple mixing model, as well as iii) to revise the existing C budget constructed for the mangroves. The riverine exports of POC, DOC and DIC account for 0.07TgCyr -1 , 0.34TgCyr -1 and 4.14TgCyr -1 , respectively, and were largest during the monsoon period. Results revealed that mangrove plant derived organic matter and its subsequent degradation is the primary source of DIC and DOC in the Hooghly estuary whereas POC is linked to soil erosion. Mangroves are identified as a major source of carbon (POC, DOC, DIC) transported from the Sundarbans into the BoB, with export rates of 0.58 TgCyr -1 , 3.03TgCyr -1 , and 3.69TgCyr -1 respectively, altogether amounting to 7.3TgCyr -1 . This C export from the Indian Sundarbans exceeds the 'missing C' of the previous budget, thus necessitating further research to finally resolve the mangrove C budget. However, these first baseline data on C exports from the world's largest deltaic mangrove improves limited global data inventory and signifies the need of acquiring more data from different mangrove settings to reduce uncertainties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Controls on suspended sediment, particulate and dissolved organic carbon export from two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses, Exmoor UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendell, M.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    The fluvial export of total organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) plays an important role in the transportation of organic carbon from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, with implications for the understanding of the global carbon cycle and calculations of regional carbon budgets. The terrestrial biosphere contains large amounts of stored carbon in the soil and vegetation, thus a small change in the terrestrial carbon pool may have significant implications for atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Since the onset of agriculture, human activities have accelerated soil erosion rates 10- to 100- fold above all estimated natural background levels, especially in the uplands and at lower latitudes, whilst increasing DOC concentrations over the past decades have been reported in rivers across Western Europe and North America, raising concerns about potential destabilisation of the terrestrial soil carbon pool. The increased input of fine sediment and organic carbon into aquatic environments is also an important factor in stream water quality, being responsible for direct ecological effects as well as transport of a range of contaminants. Many factors, such as topography, hydrological regime and vegetation are known to influence the fluvial export of carbon from catchments. However, most work to date has focused on DOC losses from either forested or peaty catchments, with only limited studies examining the controls and rates of TOC (dissolved and particulate) fluxes from agricultural catchments, particularly during flood events. This research aims to: • Quantify the fluxes of total suspended sediment, total dissolved and total particulate carbon in two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses and • Examine the controlling factors of total fluvial carbon fluxes in a semi-natural and agricultural catchment in order to assess the impact of agricultural land-use on fluvial carbon export. The two contrasting study catchments (the Aller and Horner), in south

  5. Aggregation controls the stability of lignin and lipids in clay-sized particulate and mineral associated organic matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angst, Gerrit; Mueller, K.E.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Freeman, K.H.; Mueller, C.W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 3 (2017), s. 307-324 ISSN 0168-2563 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : incubation * physical fractionation * GC/MS * C-13 NMR * CuO * soil organic matter Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science OBOR OECD: Soil science Impact factor: 3.428, year: 2016

  6. Tetra- and hexavalent uranium forms bidentate-mononuclear complexes with particulate organic matter in a naturally uranium-enriched peatland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikutta, Christian; Langner, Peggy; Bargar, John R.

    2016-01-01

    % organic C, 4.1-58.6 g/kg Fe, and up to 335 mg/kg geogenic U. Uranium was found to be heterogeneously distributed at the micrometer scale and enriched as both U(IV) and U(VI) on fibrous and woody plant debris (48 ± 10% U(IV), x̅ ± σ, n = 22). Bulk U X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy...

  7. Mercury, trace elements and organic constituents in atmospheric fine particulate matter, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA: A combined approach to sampling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, A.; Engle, M.A.; Orem, W.H.; Bunnell, J.E.; Lerch, H.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Olson, M.L.; McCord, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Compliance with U.S. air quality regulatory standards for atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on meeting average 24 hour (35 ?? m-3) and yearly (15 ??g m-3) mass-per-unit-volume limits, regardless of PM2.5 composition. Whereas this presents a workable regulatory framework, information on particle composition is needed to assess the fate and transport of PM2.5 and determine potential environmental/human health impacts. To address these important non-regulatory issues an integrated approach is generally used that includes (1) field sampling of atmospheric particulate matter on filter media, using a size-limiting cyclone, or with no particle-size limitation; and (2) chemical extraction of exposed filters and analysis of separate particulate-bound fractions for total mercury, trace elements and organic constituents, utilising different USGS laboratories optimised for quantitative analysis of these substances. This combination of sampling and analysis allowed for a more detailed interpretation of PM2.5 sources and potential effects, compared to measurements of PM2.5 abundance alone. Results obtained using this combined approach are presented for a 2006 air sampling campaign in Shenandoah National Park (Virginia, USA) to assess sources of atmospheric contaminants and their potential impact on air quality in the Park. PM2.5 was collected at two sampling sites (Big Meadows and Pinnacles) separated by 13.6 km. At both sites, element concentrations in PM2.5 were low, consistent with remote or rural locations. However, element/Zr crustal abundance enrichment factors greater than 10, indicating anthropogenic input, were found for Hg, Se, S, Sb, Cd, Pb, Mo, Zn and Cu, listed in decreasing order of enrichment. Principal component analysis showed that four element associations accounted for 84% of the PM 2.5 trace element variation; these associations are interpreted to represent: (1) crustal sources (Al, REE); (2) coal combustion (Se, Sb), (3) metal production

  8. Sleuthing for drivers of particulate organic matter chemical fingerprints: Effects of land use history and soil heterogeneity in the winegrape region of Napa, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, O. T.; Calderon, F. J.; Greenhut, R. F.; Hollander, A. D.; O'Geen, A.; Burns, K. N.; Steenwerth, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Quantity and quality of soil organic matter (SOM, whole soil) and particulate organic matter (POM) fractions may reflect land use history and soil heterogeneity. Attributes of soil heterogeneity like soil mineralogy and texture serve as crucial components in stabilizing SOM, especially the fine fraction (characterization of SOM chemical profiles, or fingerprints. Here, we investigate the combined roles of soil management, land use history and soil heterogeneity on content POM and SOM and chemical fingerprints of SOM and silt/clay-associated OM to reveal how agricultural practices influence soil carbon balance in Mediterranean climates. Soils of a winegrape growing region (Napa, California) were formed into eight clusters by Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM), using existing datasets from NRCS SoilWeb for soil great group, texture class, aspect, slope, elevation, irradiation, and soil organic matter. At least three vineyards (three locations per vineyard) of each soil cluster type were surveyed for soil attributes (pH, exchangeable cations, cation exchange capacity, texture, SOM, POM, TOC, DON; n = 72 sampled locations). The chemical fingerprints of SOM and silt/clay associated-OM (land use history were gathered through interviews with vineyard managers. Soil mineralogy was determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Data trends suggest that drivers (any natural or human-induced factor that causes a change) of the chemical fingerprints were linked to management practices and land use history, whereas content was strongly linked to soil heterogeneity and mineralogy. Using vineyards as the model system, these data establish the framework for a comprehensive study linking agricultural landscape attributes to processes directing SOM stabilization, greenhouse gas emissions, and the soil microorganisms responsible for such emissions.

  9. Water column distribution and carbon isotopic signal of cholesterol, brassicasterol and particulate organic carbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-J. Cavagna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of concentrations and δ13C signatures of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC and sterols provides a powerful approach to study ecological and environmental changes in both the modern and ancient ocean. We applied this tool to study the biogeochemical changes in the modern ocean water column during the BONUS-GoodHope survey (February–March 2008 from Cape Basin to the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. Cholesterol and brassicasterol were chosen as ideal biomarkers of the heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon pools, respectively, because of their ubiquitous and relatively refractory nature. We document depth distributions of concentrations (relative to bulk POC and δ13C signatures of cholesterol and brassicasterol combined with CO2 aq. surface concentration variation. While the relationship between CO2 aq. and δ13C of bulk POC and biomarkers have been reported by others for the surface water, our data show that this persists in mesopelagic and deep waters, suggesting that δ13C signatures of certain biomarkers in the water column could be applied as proxies for surface water CO2 aq. We observed a general increase in sterol δ13C signatures with depth, which is likely related to a combination of particle size effects, selective feeding on larger cells by zooplankton, and growth rate related effects. Our data suggest a key role of zooplankton fecal aggregates in carbon export for this part of the Southern Ocean (SO. Additionally, in the southern part of the transect south of the Polar Front (PF, the release of sea-ice algae during the ice demise in the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ is hypothesized to influence the isotopic signature of sterols in the open ocean. Overall, the combined use of δ13C values and concentrations measurements of both bulk organic C and specific sterols throughout the water column offers the promising potential to explore the recent history of plankton and the fate of organic matter in the SO.

  10. Multi-lead heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, L.D.

    1982-08-25

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

  11. Tropical Wetlands as Carbon Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. B.; Saunders, M.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation focuses on the tropical wetlands of sub-Saharan Africa. These are an understudied ecosystem in which large emergent grasses and sedges normally dominate and which have the potential to sequester significant amounts of carbon. Measurements of Net Primary Production of these wetlands show that they are some of the highest values recorded for any ecosystem. We have used eddy covariance to measure Net Ecosystem Exchange of pristine and disturbed wetlands and show that pristine systems can have sink strengths as strong as tropical forests while disturbed systems that have been reclaimed for agricultural purposes have a very much reduced carbon sink activity and may be net carbon sources. The management issues surrounding the use of these wetlands illustrate a direct conflict between the production of food crops for the local population and the maintenance of carbon sequestration as an ecosystem service.

  12. Chemical composition and speciation of particulate organic matter from modern residential small-scale wood combustion appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Hendryk; Miersch, Toni; Orasche, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Michalke, Bernhard; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Streibel, Thorsten; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2018-01-15

    Combustion technologies of small-scale wood combustion appliances are continuously developed decrease emissions of various pollutants and increase energy conversion. One strategy to reduce emissions is the implementation of air staging technology in secondary air supply, which became an established technique for modern wood combustion appliances. On that account, emissions from a modern masonry heater fuelled with three types of common logwood (beech, birch and spruce) and a modern pellet boiler fuelled with commercial softwood pellets were investigated, which refer to representative combustion appliances in northern Europe In particular, emphasis was put on the organic constituents of PM2.5, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) and phenolic species, by targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometric analysis techniques. Compared to conventional wood stoves and pellet boilers, organic emissions from the modern appliances were reduced by at least one order of magnitude, but to a different extent for single species. Hence, characteristic ratios of emission constituents and emission profiles for wood combustion identification and speciation do not hold for this type of advanced combustion technology. Additionally, an overall substantial reduction of typical wood combustion markers, such as phenolic species and anhydrous sugars, were observed. Finally, it was found that slow ignition of log woods changes the distribution of characteristic resin acids and phytosterols as well as their thermal alteration products, which are used as markers for specific wood types. Our results should be considered for wood combustion identification in positive matrix factorisation or chemical mass balance in northern Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in industrial and municipal effluents: Concentrations, congener profiles, and partitioning onto particulates and organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramani, Aparna, E-mail: aparna.27889@gmail.com; Howell, Nathan L., E-mail: nlhowell@central.uh.edu; Rifai, Hanadi S., E-mail: rifai@uh.edu

    2014-03-01

    Wastewater effluent samples were collected in the summer of 2009 from 16 different locations which included municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants and petrochemical industrial outfalls in the Houston area. The effluent samples were analyzed for all 209 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners using high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) using the USEPA method 1668A. The total PCBs (∑ 209) concentration in the dissolved medium ranged from 1.01 to 8.12 ng/L and ranged from 2.03 to 31.2 ng/L in the suspended medium. Lighter PCB congeners exhibited highest concentrations in the dissolved phase whereas, in the suspended phase, heavier PCBs exhibited the highest concentrations. The PCB homolog concentrations were dominated by monochlorobiphenyls through hexachlorobiphenyls, with dichlorobiphenyls exhibiting the highest concentration amongst them at most of the effluent outfalls, in the suspended phase. Both total suspended solids (TSS) and various organic carbon fractions played an important role in the distribution of the suspended fractions of PCBs in the effluents. The log K{sub oc} values determined in the effluents suggest that effluent PCB loads might have more risk and impact than what standard partitioning models predict. - Highlights: • 209 PCB congeners were measured in 16 different municipal and industrial effluents. • PCB congener differences were elucidated for the various effluent types. • In addition to log K{sub ow}, organic carbon and TSS affect partitioning of PCBs. • High concentrations of homolog 2 maybe due to biotransformation of PCBs.

  14. Relationships between the surface concentration of particulate organic carbon and optical properties in the eastern South Pacific and eastern Atlantic Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stramski

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We have examined several approaches for estimating the surface concentration of particulate organic carbon, POC, from optical measurements of spectral remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(λ, using field data collected in tropical and subtropical waters of the eastern South Pacific and eastern Atlantic Oceans. These approaches include a direct empirical relationship between POC and the blue-to-green band ratio of reflectance, RrsB/Rrs(555, and two-step algorithms that consist of relationships linking reflectance to an inherent optical property IOP (beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient and POC to the IOP. We considered two-step empirical algorithms that exclusively include pairs of empirical relationships and two-step hybrid algorithms that consist of semianalytical models and empirical relationships. The surface POC in our data set ranges from about 10 mg m−3 within the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre to 270 mg m−3 in the Chilean upwelling area, and ancillary data suggest a considerable variation in the characteristics of particulate assemblages in the investigated waters. The POC algorithm based on the direct relationship between POC and RrsB/Rrs(555 promises reasonably good performance in the vast areas of the open ocean covering different provinces from hyperoligotrophic and oligotrophic waters within subtropical gyres to eutrophic coastal upwelling regimes characteristic of eastern ocean boundaries. The best error statistics were found for power function fits to the data of POC vs. Rrs(443/Rrs(555 and POC vs. Rrs(490/Rrs(555. For our data set that includes over 50 data pairs, these relationships are characterized by the mean normalized bias of about 2% and the normalized root mean square error of about 20%. We

  15. Predator transitory spillover induces trophic cascades in ecological sinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casini, Michele; Blenckner, Thorsten; Möllmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of cross-system fluxes is fundamental in ecosystem ecology and biological conservation. Source-sink dynamics and spillover processes may link adjacent ecosystems by movement of organisms across system boundaries. However, effects of temporal variability in these cross...

  16. EVALUATION OF SINK EFFECTS ON VOCS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sink strength of two common indoor materials, a carpet and a gypsum board, was evaluated by environmental chamber tests with four volatile organic compounds (VOCs): propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol (BEE), and texanol. These oxygenated compounds rep...

  17. Flux and stable C and N isotope composition of sinking particles in the Ulleung Basin of the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun Kwak, Jung; Han, Eunah; Hwang, Jeomshik; Kim, Young, II; Lee, Chung Il; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2017-09-01

    Seasonal variability of sinking fluxes of total mass (TMF), particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON) was examined using sinking particles collected from sediment traps during July 2011 to December 2011, and December 2012 to June 2013 at an offshore channel site; and from November 2013 to August 2014 at a nearshore slope site of the Ulleung Basin in the East/Japan Sea. δ13C and δ15N values of sinking particles were measured to elucidate the major export processes of POC and PON. Annual TMF (112-638 g m-2 yr-1) and fluxes of POC and PON (9.6-32.1 g C m-2 yr-1 and 1.2-4.5 g N m-2 yr-1, respectively) in the Ulleung Basin corresponded to the upper limit of values reported for other open seas and oceans in the world. No great seasonal variability in both quantitative (TMF, and fluxes and contents of POC and PON) and qualitative (C/N ratios, and δ13C and δ15N values) estimates of vertical fluxes was observed, reflecting a steady standing stock of chlorophyll a in the upper part of water column. Furthermore, high contents of POC and PON and nearly constant δ13C and δ15N values in sinking particles collected in the sediment traps, indicate that primary production in the euphotic zone may be a good predictor of TMF and export flux of organic matter. In this regard, our pilot study points out the importance of high annual primary production and low water temperature (sources such as lateral advection through resuspended clay mineral, and aeolian and terrestrial inputs to the sedimentary flux.

  18. Developing a semi-analytical algorithm to estimate particulate organic carbon (POC) levels in inland eutrophic turbid water based on MERIS images: A case study of Lake Taihu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Heng; Wang, Yannan; Jin, Qi; Shi, Lei; Li, Yunmei; Wang, Qiao

    2017-10-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in the carbon cycle in water due to its biological pump process. In the open ocean, algorithms can accurately estimate the surface POC concentration. However, no suitable POC-estimation algorithm based on MERIS bands is available for inland turbid eutrophic water. A total of 228 field samples were collected from Lake Taihu in different seasons between 2013 and 2015. At each site, the optical parameters and water quality were analyzed. Using in situ data, it was found that POC-estimation algorithms developed for the open ocean and coastal waters using remote sensing reflectance were not suitable for inland turbid eutrophic water. The organic suspended matter (OSM) concentration was found to be the best indicator of the POC concentration, and POC has an exponential relationship with the OSM concentration. Through an analysis of the POC concentration and optical parameters, it was found that the absorption peak of total suspended matter (TSM) at 665 nm was the optimum parameter to estimate POC. As a result, MERIS band 7, MERIS band 10 and MERIS band 12 were used to derive the absorption coefficient of TSM at 665 nm, and then, a semi-analytical algorithm was used to estimate the POC concentration for inland turbid eutrophic water. An accuracy assessment showed that the developed semi-analytical algorithm could be successfully applied with a MAPE of 31.82% and RMSE of 2.68 mg/L. The developed algorithm was successfully applied to a MERIS image, and two full-resolution MERIS images, acquired on August 13, 2010, and December 7, 2010, were used to map the POC spatial distribution in Lake Taihu in summer and winter.

  19. POM Pulses: Characterizing the Physical and Chemical Properties of Particulate Organic Matter (POM) Mobilized by Large Storm Events and its Influence on Receiving Fluvial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. R.; Rowland, R. D.; Protokowicz, J.; Inamdar, S. P.; Kan, J.; Vargas, R.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme storm events have tremendous erosive energy which is capable of mobilizing vast amounts of material from watershed sources into fluvial systems. This complex mixture of sediment and particulate organic matter (POM) is a nutrient source, and has the potential to impact downstream water quality. The impact of POM on receiving aquatic systems can vary not only by the total amount exported but also by the various sources involved and the particle sizes of POM. This study examines the composition of POM in potential sources and within-event POM by: (1) determining the amount and quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that can be leached from coarse, medium and fine particle classes; (2) assessing the C and N content and isotopic character of within-event POM; and (3) coupling physical and chemical properties to evaluate storm event POM influence on stream water. Storm event POM samples and source sediments were collected from a forested headwater catchment (second order stream) in the Piedmont region of Maryland. Samples were sieved into three particle classes - coarse (2mm-1mm), medium (1mm-250µm) and fine (solid state event and source material. Future work will include examination of microbial communities associated with POM particle size classes. Physical size class separation of within-event POM exhibited differences in C:N ratios, δ15N composition, and extracted DOM lability. Smaller size classes exhibited lower C:N ratios, more enriched δ15N and more recalcitrant properties in leached DOM. Source material had varying C:N ratios and contributions to leached DOM. These results indicate that both source and size class strongly influence the POM contribution to fluvial systems during large storm events.

  20. Verification of Carbon Sink Assessment. Can We Exclude Natural Sinks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, G.; Yamagata, Y

    2004-01-01

    Any human-induced terrestrial sink is susceptible to the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, climate variability and other natural or indirect human-induced factors. It has been suggested in climate negotiations that the effects of these factors should be excluded from estimates of carbon sequestration used to meet the emission reduction commitments under the Kyoto Protocol. This paper focuses on the methodologies for factoring out the effects of atmospheric and climate variability/change. We estimate the relative magnitude of the non-human induced effects by using two biosphere models and discuss possibilities for narrowing estimate uncertainty

  1. Land-use impacts on fatty acid profiles of suspended particulate organic matter along a larger tropical river

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boëchat, Iola; Krüger, Angela; Chavez, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    (SPOM-FAs) as indicators of land-use change in tropical catchments, and at identifying major human impacts on the biochemical composition of SPOM, which represents an important basal energy and organic matter resource for aquatic consumers. River water SPOM and total FA concentrations ranged between 2.......8 and 10.2 mg dry weight (DW) L− 1 and between 130.6 and 268.2 μg DW L− 1, respectively, in our study. Urbanization was the only land-use category correlating with both FA composition and concentrations, despite its low contribution to whole catchment (1.5–5.6%) and riparian buffer land cover (1.......7–6.6%). Higher concentrations of saturated FAs, especially C16:0 and C18:0, which are the main components of domestic sewage, were observed at sampling stations downstream of urban centers, and were highly correlated to urbanization, especially within the 60 m riparian buffer zone. Compared to water chemical...

  2. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Source to sink: Evolution of lignin composition in the Madre de Dios River system with connection to the Amazon basin and offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Feakins, Sarah J.; Liu, Zongguang; Ponton, Camilo; Wang, Renée. Z.; Karkabi, Elias; Galy, Valier; Berelson, William M.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Meir, Patrick; West, A. Joshua

    2016-05-01

    While lignin geochemistry has been extensively investigated in the Amazon River, little is known about lignin distribution and dynamics within deep, stratified river channels or its transformations within soils prior to delivery to rivers. We characterized lignin phenols in soils, river particulate organic matter (POM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) across a 4 km elevation gradient in the Madre de Dios River system, Peru, as well as in marine sediments to investigate the source-to-sink evolution of lignin. In soils, we found more oxidized lignin in organic horizons relative to mineral horizons. The oxidized lignin signature was maintained during transfer into rivers, and lignin was a relatively constant fraction of bulk organic carbon in soils and riverine POM. Lignin in DOM became increasingly oxidized downstream, indicating active transformation of dissolved lignin during transport, especially in the dry season. In contrast, POM accumulated undegraded lignin downstream during the wet season, suggesting that terrestrial input exceeded in-river degradation. We discovered high concentrations of relatively undegraded lignin in POM at depth in the lower Madre de Dios River in both seasons, revealing a woody undercurrent for its transfer within these deep rivers. Our study of lignin evolution in the soil-river-ocean continuum highlights important seasonal and depth variations of river carbon components and their connection to soil carbon pools, providing new insights into fluvial carbon dynamics associated with the transfer of lignin biomarkers from source to sink.

  4. Investigation of internally finned LED heat sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Xiong, Lun; Lai, Chuan; Tang, Yumei

    2018-03-01

    A novel heat sink is proposed, which is composed of a perforated cylinder and internally arranged fins. Numerical studies are performed on the natural convection heat transfer from internally finned heat sinks; experimental studies are carried out to validate the numerical results. To compare the thermal performances of internally finned heat sinks and externally finned heat sinks, the effects of the overall diameter, overall height, and installation direction on maximum temperature, air flow and heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results demonstrate that internally finned heat sinks show better thermal performance than externally finned heat sinks; the maximum temperature of internally finned heat sinks decreases by up to 20% compared with the externally finned heat sinks. The existence of a perforated cylinder and the installation direction of the heat sink affect the thermal performance significantly; it is shown that the heat transfer coefficient of the heat sink with the perforated cylinder is improved greater than that with the imperforated cylinder by up to 34%, while reducing the mass of the heat sink by up to 13%. Project supported by the Scientific Research Fund of Sichuan Provincial Education Department (No. 18ZB0516) and the Sichuan University of Arts and Science (No. 2016KZ009Y).

  5. Contributions of resuspended soil and road dust to organic carbon in fine particulate matter in the Midwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Andrew P.; Snyder, David C.; Schauer, James J.; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Olson, Michael R.; DeMinter, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty still exists regarding the contribution of resuspended soil and road dust to PM 2.5 organic carbon (OC) in US urban areas. Contributing factors are the limited knowledge of the OC content of resuspended soils and road dusts, and the variability of the ratio of OC to traditional soil markers such as silicon and aluminum. This study investigates the composition of resuspended soils and road dusts in the Midwestern US, and the contributions of these soils to atmospheric PM 2.5 OC. Paved road dust and soil samples were resuspended in a residence chamber from which PM 2.5 size fractions were collected and analyzed to generate source profiles. Differences significant to 1 standard deviation were observed in the mass ratios between OC, and silicon and aluminum across different soil types which were larger between soil types within each city (61-97%), than between samples of the same soil type collected in different cities (29-57%). CMB 8.2 source apportionment results revealed large biases in soil apportionments, but these did not greatly affect the overall OC apportionments in six Midwest cities due to the small contributions of soil to total OC (ranging between 0.01 and 0.1 μg m -3). Apportionments of total PM 2.5 mass were more greatly affected: biases up to 0.7 μg m -3 for total PM 2.5 masses ranging between 7 and 14 μg m -3 were observed when soil profiles were interchanged.

  6. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ{sup 13}C, Δ{sup 14}C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-15

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C and Δ{sup 14}C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  7. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., particulate specific gravity, particle shape, and physical and chemical properties of particle surfaces. (b... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates..., usually smaller than silt, and organic particles. Suspended particulates may enter water bodies as a...

  8. Concentration, composition, bioavailability, and N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential of particulate and dissolved organic nitrogen in wastewater effluents: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haidong; Ma, Haijun; Ding, Lili; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Yingying; Ren, Hongqiang, E-mail: hqren@nju.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater-derived organic nitrogen (org-N) can act as both nutrients and carcinogenic nitrogenous disinfection byproduct precursors. In this study, the concentration, composition, bioavailability, and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) from three different municipal wastewater treatment plants were characterized and compared with that of effluent dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). The average effluent PON and DON concentrations ranged from 0.09 to 0.55 mg N/L and from 0.91 to 1.88 mg N/L, respectively. According to principal component analysis, org-N composition and characterization differed in PON and DON samples (n = 20). Compared with DON, PON tended to be enriched in protein and nucleic acids, and showed a more proteinaceous character. Composition of org-N functional groups estimated from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy N 1s spectra indicate no significant differences in the molecular weight distribution of the protein-like materials between PON and DON. Moreover, PON exhibited a significantly higher bioavailability (61.0 ± 13.3%) compared to DON (38.5 ± 12.4%, p < 0.05, t-test) and a significantly higher NDMA yields (791.4 ± 404.0 ng/mg-N) compared to DON (374.8 ± 62.5 ng/mg-N, p < 0.05, t-test). Accordingly, PON contributed to approximately 12.3–41.7% of the total bioavailable org-N and 22.0–38.4% of the total NDMA precursors in wastewater effluents. Thus, the potential adverse effects of PON on wastewater discharge and reuse applications should not be overlooked, even though it only accounted for 7.4–26.8% of the total effluent org-N. - Highlights: • The concentration, composition, bioavailability, and NDMA FP of PON and DON in wastewater effluents are compared. • PON is enriched in protein and nucleic acids. • PON is more bioavailable and shows higher NDMA yields compared to DON. • PON contributes12–42% of total bioavailable org-N and 22–38% of total NDMA precursors.

  9. Sources and transformation of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre indicated by compound-specific δ15N analysis of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the use of compound-specific nitrogen isotopes of amino acids (δ15NAA) of coupled dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen (DON, PON) samples as a new approach to examine relative sources, transformation processes, and the potential coupling of these two major forms of N cycle in the ocean water column. We measured δ15NAA distributions in high-molecular-weight dissolved organic nitrogen (HMW DON) and suspended PON in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) from surface to mesopelagic depths. A new analytical approach achieved far greater δ15NAA measurement precision for DON than earlier work, allowing us to resolve previously obscured differences in δ15NAA signatures, both with depth and between ON pools. We propose that δ15N values of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) represents a proxy for proteinaceous ON δ15N values in DON and PON. Together with bulk δ15N values, this allows δ15N values and changes in bulk, proteinaceous, and ;other-N; to be directly evaluated. These novel measurements suggest three main conclusions. First, the δ15NAA signatures of both surface and mesopelagic HMW DON suggest mainly heterotrophic bacterial sources, with mesopelagic HMW DON bearing signatures of far more degraded material compared to surface material. These results contrast with a previous proposal that HMW DON δ15NAA patterns are essentially ;pre-formed; by cyanobacteria in the surface ocean, undergo little change with depth. Second, different δ15NAA values and patterns of HMW DON vs. suspended PON in the surface NPSG suggest that sources and cycling of these two N reservoirs are surpisingly decoupled. Based on molecular δ15N signatures, we propose a new hypothesis that production of surface HMW DON is ultimately derived from subsurface nitrate, while PON in the mixed layer is strongly linked to N2 fixation and N recycling. In contrast, the comparative δ15NAA signatures of HMW DON vs. suspended PON in the mesopelagic also suggest a

  10. Changes in particulate organic matters and plankton populations in nature-like fishways: role of nature-like fish ways in water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Sung-Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature-like fishways, designed to mimic a small natural stream, have been widely used in river restoration projects as well as in rivers with dams and weirs. Because they are built with diverse natural materials similar to those in natural streams, we aimed to estimate the self-purification ability of nature-like fishways. Monthly sampling was conducted at inlet and outlet points of two nature-like fishways in Korea: the Baekjae and Sejong fishways. Two artificial fishways and main river channels were also evaluated to be used as references. Suspended solids (SS, chlorophyll a (Chl. a, and plankton abundances were measured. A significant reduction in plankton abundances and decrease in SS and Chl. a were observed in nature-like fishways, and no significant changes were observed in concrete artificial fishways and main river channels. In Baekjae and Sejong fishways, average 28.2% and 14.9% of the SS concentrations were reduced, respectively. The Chl. a concentration also significantly decreased (44.8% and 29.8% in Baekjae and Sejong fishways, respectively. A decreasing pattern was more apparent in the Baekjae fishway, which is longer and has a slower water velocity. The rate of decrease was higher when SS and Chl. a concentrations were high at the inlet points. Thus, we confirmed that particulate organic matters could be reduced in nature-like fishways. However, the direct cause and purification process mechanisms in them could not be clearly identified. Further studies should examine the biological and chemical mechanisms in fishways, allowing us to estimate their capacity for self-purification.

  11. The dynamic ocean biological pump: Insights from a global compilation of particulate organic carbon, CaCO3, and opal concentration profiles from the mesopelagic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Doney, Scott C.; Bishop, James K. B.

    2011-09-01

    We have compiled a global data set of 62 open ocean profiles of particulate organic carbon (POC), CaCO3, and opal concentrations collected by large volume in situ filtration in the upper 1000 m over the last 30 years. We define concentration-based metrics for the strength (POC concentration at depth) and efficiency (attenuation of POC with depth in the mesopelagic) of the biological pump. We show that the strength and efficiency of the biological pump are dynamic and are characterized by a regime of constant and high transfer efficiency at low to moderate surface POC and a bloom regime where the height of the bloom is characterized by a weak deep biological pump and low transfer efficiency. The variability in POC attenuation length scale manifests in a clear decoupling between the strength of the shallow biological pump (e.g., POC at the export depth) and the strength of the deep biological pump (POC at 500 m). We suggest that the paradigm of diatom-driven export production is driven by a too restrictive perspective on upper mesopelagic dynamics. Indeed, our full mesopelagic analysis suggests that large, blooming diatoms have low transfer efficiency and thus may not export substantially to depth; rather, our analysis suggests that ecosystems characterized by smaller cells and moderately high %CaCO3 have a high mesopelagic transfer efficiency and can have higher POC concentrations in the deep mesopelagic even with relatively low surface or near-surface POC. This has negative implications for the carbon sequestration prospects of deliberate iron fertilization.

  12. Sink-to-Sink Coordination Framework Using RPL: Routing Protocol for Low Power and Lossy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meer M. Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RPL (Routing Protocol for low power and Lossy networks is recommended by Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF for IPv6-based LLNs (Low Power and Lossy Networks. RPL uses a proactive routing approach and each node always maintains an active path to the sink node. Sink-to-sink coordination defines syntax and semantics for the exchange of any network defined parameters among sink nodes like network size, traffic load, mobility of a sink, and so forth. The coordination allows sink to learn about the network condition of neighboring sinks. As a result, sinks can make coordinated decision to increase/decrease their network size for optimizing over all network performance in terms of load sharing, increasing network lifetime, and lowering end-to-end latency of communication. Currently, RPL does not provide any coordination framework that can define message exchange between different sink nodes for enhancing the network performance. In this paper, a sink-to-sink coordination framework is proposed which utilizes the periodic route maintenance messages issued by RPL to exchange network status observed at a sink with its neighboring sinks. The proposed framework distributes network load among sink nodes for achieving higher throughputs and longer network’s life time.

  13. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additional China sites are used in this system. The core component of this system is an atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2008. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern America and southern South America. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2008, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO. The terrestrial carbon sinks in China also show an increasing trend. However, the IAV in China is not the same as that of the globe. There is relatively stronger land sink in 2002, lowest sink in 2006, and strongest sink in 2007 in China. This IAV could be reasonably explained with the IAVs of temperature and precipitation in China. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002–2008 are −3.20 ± 0.63 and −0.28 ± 0.18 PgC yr−1, respectively. Considering the carbon emissions in the form of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs and from the import of wood and food, we further estimate that China's land sink is about −0.31 PgC yr−1.

  14. Particulate Matter (PM) Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Particulate Matter (PM) Pollution Contact Us Share Most PM particles form in ... and cause serious health effects. Particulate Matter (PM) Pollution PM Basics What is PM, and how does ...

  15. Forced air heat sink apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

  16. Fracture as a material sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokh, K. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Cracks are created by massive breakage of molecular or atomic bonds. The latter, in its turn, leads to the highly localized loss of material, which is the reason why even closed cracks are visible by a naked eye. Thus, fracture can be interpreted as the local material sink. Mass conservation is violated locally in the area of material failure. We consider a theoretical formulation of the coupled mass and momenta balance equations for a description of fracture. Our focus is on brittle fracture and we propose a finite strain hyperelastic thermodynamic framework for the coupled mass-flow-elastic boundary value problem. The attractiveness of the proposed framework as compared to the traditional continuum damage theories is that no internal parameters (like damage variables, phase fields, etc.) are used while the regularization of the failure localization is provided by the physically sound law of mass balance.

  17. Short term variation in particulate matter in the shelf waters of the Princess Astrid Coast, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Bhosle, N.B.

    -C), particulate organic carbon (POC) and its constituent fractions including particulate carbohydrates (PCHO), particulate protein (PP) and particulate lipids (PL). Chl @ia@@, ATP and POC varied from 0.051 to 3.1, 0.33 to 1.81 and 305 to 1850 mu g l@u1...

  18. Kinetics of ROS generation induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic extracts from ambient air particulate matter in model human lung cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libalova, Helena; Milcova, Alena; Cervena, Tereza; Vrbova, Kristyna; Rossnerova, Andrea; Novakova, Zuzana; Topinka, Jan; Rossner, Pavel

    2018-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with particulate matter (PM) may induce oxidative damage via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, the kinetics of ROS production and the link with antioxidant response induction has not been well studied. To elucidate the differences in oxidative potential of individual PAH compounds and extractable organic matter (EOM) from PM containing various PAH mixtures, we studied ROS formation and antioxidant response [total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and expression of HMOX1 and TXNRD1] in human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 cells) and human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells). We treated the cells with three concentrations of model PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, B[a]P; 3-nitrobenzanthrone, 3-NBA) and EOM from PM ROS levels were evaluated at 8 time intervals (30 min-24 h). In both cell lines, B[a]P treatment was associated with a time-dependent decrease of ROS levels. This trend was more pronounced in HEL12469 cells and was accompanied by increased TAC. A similar response was observed upon 3-NBA treatment in HEL12469 cells. In A549 cells, however, this compound significantly increased superoxide levels. This response was accompanied by the decrease of TAC as well as HMOX1 and TXNRD1 expression. In both cell lines, a short-time exposure to EOMs tended to increase ROS levels, while a marked decrease was observed after longer treatment periods. This was accompanied by the induction of HMOX1 and TXNRD1 expression in HEL12469 cells and increased TAC in A549 cells. In summary, our data indicate that in the studied cell lines B[a]P and EOMs caused a time-dependent decrease of intracellular ROS levels, probably due to the activation of the antioxidant response. This response was not detected in A549 cells following 3-NBA treatment, which acted as a strong superoxide inducer. Pro-oxidant properties of EOMs are limited to short-time exposure periods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of Hop-and-Sink Locomotion of Water Fleas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    The freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is a widely studied zooplankton in relation to food webs, predator-prey interactions, and other biological/ecological considerations; however, their locomotion is poorly quantified and understood. These water fleas utilize a hop-and-sink mechanism that consists of making quick, impulsive jumps by beating their antennae to propel themselves forward (roughly 1 body length). The animals then sink for a period, during which they stretch out their antennae to increase drag and thereby reduce their sinking velocity. Time-resolved three-dimensional flow fields surrounding the animals were quantified with a unique infrared tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) system. Three-dimensional kinematics data were also extracted from the image sequences. In the current work, we compared body kinematics and flow disturbance among organisms of size in the range of 1.3 to 2.8 mm. The stroke cycle averaged 150 +/- 20 ms, with each stroke cycle split nearly evenly between power and recovery strokes. The kinematics data collapsed onto a self-similar curve when properly nondimensionalized, and a general trend was shown to exist between the nondimensionalized peak body speed and body length. The fluid flow induced by each antennae consisted of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrated a slow decay in the wake. The viscous dissipation showed no clear dependence on body size, whereas the volume of fluid exceeding 5 mm/s (the speed near the sinking speed of the animal) decayed more slowly with increasing body size.

  20. Source to sink transport and regulation by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi eLemoine

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Source-to-sink transport of sugar is one of the major determinants of plant growth and relies on the efficient and controlled distribution of sucrose (and some other sugars such as raffinose and polyols across plant organs through the phloem. However, sugar transport through the phloem can be affected by many environmental factors that alter source/sink relationships. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge about the phloem transport mechanisms and review the effects of several abiotic (water and salt stress, mineral deficiency, CO2, light, temperature, air and soil pollutants and biotic (mutualistic and pathogenic microbes, viruses, aphids and parasitic plants factors. Concerning abiotic constraints, alteration of the distribution of sugar among sinks is often reported, with some sinks as roots favoured in case of mineral deficiency. Many of these constraints impair the transport function of the phloem but the exact mechanisms are far from being completely known. Phloem integrity can be disrupted (e.g. by callose deposition and under certain conditions, phloem transport is affected, earlier than photosynthesis. Photosynthesis inhibition could result from the increase in sugar concentration due to phloem transport decrease. Biotic interactions (aphids, fungi, viruses… also affect crop plant productivity. Recent breakthroughs have identified some of the sugar transporters involved in these interactions on the host and pathogen sides. The different data are discussed in relation to the phloem transport pathways. When possible, the link with current knowledge on the pathways at the molecular level will be highlighted.

  1. Economic optimization of heat sink design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzer, T.M.; Lau, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and derivation of an optimum heat sink design for maximizing the thermoelectric cooling performance of a laboratory liquid chiller. The methods employed consisted of certain key changes in the design of the heat sink in order to improve its thermal performance. Parametric studies were performed in order to determine the optimized cooling system design per dollar

  2. Thermoelectric heat sink modeling and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buist, R.J.; Nagy, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Proper design and optimization of a thermoelectric heat sinks has been neglected somewhat in the design of the thermoelectric cooling systems. TE Technology, Inc. has developed a model over a period of 30 hears. The use and application of this model through optimizing heat sink performance is presented

  3. Forest carbon sinks in the northern hemisphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodale, C.L.; Apps, M.J.; Birdsey, R.A.; Field, C.B.; Heath, L.S.; Houghton, R.A.; Jenkins, J.C.; Kohlmaier, G.H.; Kurz, W.; Liu, S.R.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Nilsson, S.; Shvidenko, A.Z.

    2002-01-01

    There is general agreement that terrestrial systems in the Northern Hemisphere provide a significant sink for atmospheric CO2; however, estimates of the magnitude and distribution of this sink vary greatly. National forest inventories provide strong, measuretment-based constraints on the magnitude

  4. Water column particulate matter: A key contributor to phosphorus regeneration in a coastal eutrophic environment, the Chesapeake Bay: Particulate phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiying [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Reardon, Patrick [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at NMR Facility, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; McKinley, James P. [Geochemistry Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Joshi, Sunendra R. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bai, Yuge [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bear, Kristi [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Jaisi, Deb P. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA

    2017-04-01

    Particulate phosphorus (PP) in the water column is an essential component of phosphorus (P) cycling in aquatic ecosystems yet its composition and transformations remain largely uncharacterized. To understand the roles of suspended particulates on regeneration of inorganic P (Pi) into the water column as well as sequestration into more stable mineral precipitates, we studied seasonal variation in both organic and inorganic P speciation in suspended particles in three sites in the Chesapeake Bay using sequential P extraction, 1D (31P) and 2D (1H-31P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and electron microprobe analyses (EMPA). Remineralization efficiency of particulate P average 8% and 56% in shallow and deep sites respectively, suggesting the importance of PP remineralization is in resupplying water column Pi. Strong temporal and spatial variability of organic P composition, distributions, and remineralization efficiency were observed relating to water column parameters such as temperature and redox conditions: concentration of orthophosphate monoesters and diesters, and diester-to-monoester (D/M) ratios decreased with depth. Both esters and the D/M ratios were lower in the hypoxic July and September. In contrast, pyrophosphate and orthophosphate increased with depth, and polyphosphates was high in the anoxic water column. Sequential extraction and EMPA analyses of the suspended particles suggest presence of Ca-bound phosphate in the water column. We hypothesize authigenic precipitation of carbonate fluorapatite and/or its precursor mineral(s) in Pi rich water column, supported by our thermodynamic calculations. Our results, overall, reveal the important role suspended particles play in P remineralization and P sequestration in the Chesapeake Bay water column, provide important implications on P bioavailability and P sinks in similar eutrophic coastal environments.

  5. Carbon storage in soil: how different land uses affect particulate organic matter composition. A molecular approach using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Marco; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Rumpel, Cornelia; Dignac, Marie-France; Doumert, Bertrand; Chabbi, Abad

    2017-04-01

    The future soil carbon stocks in a climate change scenario is being closely monitored. However, the huge edaphoclimatic variability impedes to disclose the mechanisms which underlie the cycle of accumulation/mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil environment could be described as a complex three phases matrix in which gases, liquids, and solids are not uniformly mixed, and in which microbes, fungi, vegetal residues, and roots are continuously interacting with the soil matrix and with each other. Molecular analyses on soil samples are crucial to estimate how stable those pools are and to predict which practices may accumulate larger C stocks. However, the study of land use impact through molecular characterization of a complex mixture like SOM is a challenge that requires a multidisciplinary approach. The present study applied a combination of soil physical fractionation (separation by density of the particulate organic matter (POM) within water stable aggregate fractions) followed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a way to overcome spatial variability and to quantify the changes in the composition of SOM induced by land-use changes. The objective of the study was to assess, at a molecular level, the impact of different land managements, i.e. the introduction of temporary (ley) grassland into cropping cycles, on the chemical composition of SOM. Soil samples were collected at the long-term experimental observatory in Lusignan (http://www.soere-acbb.com/), in which control plots under permanent grassland, permanent cropland, and bare fallow are part of the experiment. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio (especially in the aromatic-C region), samples were analyzed using a ramped cross polarization-single pulse/magic angle spinning (CPSP/MAS) experiment. Peak integrals of different spectral regions (indicating different compound classes) were compared between treatments and two different molecular mixing models, calibrated against standard

  6. Ocean Acidification-Induced Restructuring of the Plankton Food Web Can Influence the Degradation of Sinking Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Stange

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is expected to alter plankton community structure in the future ocean. This, in turn, could change the composition of sinking organic matter and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. So far, most OA experiments involving entire plankton communities have been conducted in meso- to eutrophic environments. However, recent studies suggest that OA effects may be more pronounced during prolonged periods of nutrient limitation. In this study, we investigated how OA-induced changes in low-nutrient adapted plankton communities of the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean may affect particulate organic matter (POM standing stocks, POM fluxes, and POM stoichiometry. More specifically, we compared the elemental composition of POM suspended in the water column to the corresponding sinking material collected in sediment traps. Three weeks into the experiment, we simulated a natural upwelling event by adding nutrient-rich deep-water to all mesocosms, which induced a diatom-dominated phytoplankton bloom. Our results show that POM was more efficiently retained in the water column in the highest CO2 treatment levels (>800 μatm pCO2 subsequent to this bloom. We further observed significantly lower C:N and C:P ratios in post-bloom sedimented POM in the highest CO2 treatments, suggesting that degradation processes were less pronounced. This trend is most likely explained by differences in micro- and mesozooplankton abundance during the bloom and post-bloom phase. Overall, this study shows that OA can indirectly alter POM fluxes and stoichiometry in subtropical environments through changes in plankton community structure.

  7. Complexity analysis in particulate matter measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Telesca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the complex temporal fluctuations of particulate matter data recorded in London area by using the Fisher-Shannon (FS information plane. In the FS plane the PM10 and PM2.5 data are aggregated in two different clusters, characterized by different degrees of order and organization. This results could be related to different sources of the particulate matter.

  8. Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) and Particulate N (PN) behaviors in Response to Storm Events in the Clear Creek, IA Site of the Intensively Managed Landscape - Critical Zone Observatory (IML-CZO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N. E.; Ward, A. S.; Bettis, E. A., III; Zhou, N.; Kazmierczak, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    A goal of the NSF-sponsored IML-CZO (EAR-1331906) is to understand how the Critical Zone of the agricultural Midwest of North America will respond to the pressures of increased land use and climate change. As a step towards that goal, the landscape response to storm events of one of the IML-CZO field sites, the Clear Creek watershed in Iowa, was studied to determine the sources and quantities of suspended load POC and PN to the creek. The Clear Creek watershed is 270 km2 and is dominated by corn-soybean agriculture. Water samples were collected prior to, during and after 6 storm events during the 2014-2016 period at up to three stations on the creek. The suspended particulate load was isolated via filtration and characterized by C, N elemental and stable isotope analyses. Sediment concentration - discharge relationships vary considerably between storm events. POC δ13C values exhibit pronounced yet consistent changes within events as a function of discharge. In general, δ13C values are reflective of C3 plant sources ( -30‰) at base flow and trend towards an asymptotic value of -22‰ with increasing discharge. The most positive δ13C values also correlate with higher C/N ratios. The 13C-enrichment of the suspended load thus seems to be the result of the inclusion of C4 plant debris, principally corn, from surface soils. Bank erosion with mobilization of in-channel production likely dominate the POC sources at base flow. Top soil erosion incorporating corn (and C3 plant) residue dominate stream inputs at Q >3000 l/s. The C4 plant signal is more prevalent at upstream stations, which is consistent with land use patterns. The presence of corn in the system provides an in situ particle tracer for POC and PN that can be followed downstream and used to investigate exchanges of material between the landscape and stream.

  9. Ocean carbon sinks and international climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehdanz, Katrin; Tol, Richard S.J.; Wetzel, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial vegetation sinks have entered the Kyoto Protocol as offsets for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, but ocean sinks have escaped attention. Ocean sinks are as unexplored and uncertain as were the terrestrial sinks at the time of negotiation of the Kyoto Protocol. It is not unlikely that certain countries will advocate the inclusion of ocean carbon sinks to reduce their emission reduction obligations in post-2012 negotiations. We use a simple model of the international market for carbon dioxide emissions to evaluate who would gain or loose from allowing for ocean carbon sinks. Our analysis is restricted to information on anthropogenic carbon sequestration within the exclusive economic zone of a country. We use information on the actual carbon flux and derive the human-induced uptake for the period from 1990 onwards. Like the carbon sequestration of business as usual forest management activities, natural ocean carbon sequestration applies at zero costs. The total amount of anthropogenic ocean carbon sequestration is large, also in the exclusive economic zones. As a consequence, it substantially alters the costs of emission reduction for most countries. Countries such as Australia, Denmark, France, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway and Portugal would gain substantially, and a large number of countries would benefit too. Current net exporters of carbon permits, particularly Russia, would gain less and oppose the inclusion of ocean carbon sinks

  10. The Sinking Sequence of MV Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Kehren, Felix-Ingo

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reconstructs the sinking of the RoPax Ferry MV Estonia on September 28th 1994, with a strong focus on describing the chain of events that caused the eventual sinking, and how the ship sank. Once the sinking is understood, this thesis explores possible safety improvements that should be implemented in the design of new vessels of this type. The investigation is based on a combination of testimonies of survivors as well as numerical calculations based on the framework of the testimo...

  11. Organic particulate matter formation at varying relative humidity using surrogate secondary and primary organic compounds with activity corrections in the condensed phase obtained using a method based on the Wilson equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E. I.; Pankow, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere is currently often modeled using a multiple lumped "two-product" (N·2p) approach. The N·2p approach neglects: 1) variation of activity coefficient (ζi) values and mean molecular weight MW in the particulate matter (PM) phase; 2) water uptake into the PM; and 3) the possibility of phase separation in the PM. This study considers these effects by adopting an (N·2p)ζpMW,ζ approach (θ is a phase index). Specific chemical structures are assigned to 25 lumped SOA compounds and to 15 representative primary organic aerosol (POA) compounds to allow calculation of ζi and MW values. The SOA structure assignments are based on chamber-derived 2p gas/particle partition coefficient values coupled with known effects of structure on vapor pressure pL,io (atm). To facilitate adoption of the (N·2p)ζpMW,θ approach in large-scale models, this study also develops CP-Wilson.1 (Chang-Pankow-Wilson.1), a group-contribution ζi-prediction method that is more computationally economical than the UNIFAC model of Fredenslund et al. (1975). Group parameter values required by CP-Wilson.1 are obtained by fitting ζi values to predictions from UNIFAC. The (N·2p)ζpMW,θ approach is applied (using CP-Wilson.1) to several real α-pinene/O3 chamber cases for high reacted hydrocarbon levels (ΔHC≈400 to 1000 μg m-3) when relative humidity (RH) ≍50%. Good agreement between the chamber and predicted results is obtained using both the (N·2p)ζpMW,θ and N·2p approaches, indicating relatively small water effects under these conditions. However, for a hypothetical α-pinene/O3 case at ΔHC=30 μg m-3 and RH=50%, the (N·2p)ζpMW,θ approach predicts that water uptake will lead to an organic PM level that is more double that predicted by the N·2p approach. Adoption of the (N·2p)ζpMW,θ approach using reasonable lumped structures for SOA and POA compounds is recommended for ambient PM modeling.

  12. Contributions of biomass/biofuel burning to organic aerosols and particulate matter in Tanzania, East Africa, based on analyses of ionic species, organic and elemental carbon, levoglucosan and mannosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkoma, S. L.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P. Q.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples of PM2.5 and PM10 were collected at a rural site in Tanzania, East Africa, in 2011 during wet and dry seasons and were analysed for carbonaceous components, levoglucosan, mannosan and water-soluble inorganic ions. The contributions of biomass/biofuel burning to the organic carbon (OC) and particulate matter (PM) mass were estimated to be 46-52% and 87-13%, respectively. The mean mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were 28 ± 6 μg m-3 and 47 ± 8 μg m-3 in wet season, and 39 ± 10 μg m-3 and 61 ± 19 μg m-3 in dry season, respectively. Total carbon (TC) accounted for 16-19% of the PM2.5 mass and 13-15% of the PM10 mass. On average, 86 to 89% of TC in PM2.5 and 87 to 90% of TC in PM10 was OC, of which 67-72% and 63% was found to be water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. We found that concentrations of levoglucosan and mannosan (specific organic tracers of pyrolysis of cellulose) well correlated with non-sea-salt potassium (nss-K+) (r2 = 0.56-0.75), OC (r2 = 0.75-0.96) and WSOC (r2 = 0.52-0.78). The K+ / OC ratios varied from 0.06 to 0.36 in PM2.5 and from 0.03 to 0.36 in PM10 with slightly higher ratios in dry season. Mean percent ratios of levoglucosan and mannosan to OC were found to be 3-4% for PM2.5 and PM10 in both seasons. We found lower levoglucosan / K+ ratios and higher K+ / EC (elemental carbon) ratios in the biomass-burning aerosols from Tanzania than those reported from other regions. This feature is consistent with the high levels of potassium reported in the soils of Morogoro, Tanzania, suggesting an importance of direct emission of potassium by soil resuspension although K+ is present mostly in fine particles. It is also likely that biomass burning of vegetation of Tanzania emits high levels of potassium that may be enriched in plant tissues. The present study demonstrates that emissions from mixed biomass- and biofuel-burning activities largely influence the air quality in Tanzania.

  13. Contributions of biomass/biofuel burning to organic aerosols and particulate matter in Tanzania, East Africa, based on analyses of ionic species, organic and elemental carbon, levoglucosan and mannosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Mkoma

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol samples of PM2.5 and PM10 were collected at a rural site in Tanzania, East Africa, in 2011 during wet and dry seasons and were analysed for carbonaceous components, levoglucosan, mannosan and water-soluble inorganic ions. The contributions of biomass/biofuel burning to the organic carbon (OC and particulate matter (PM mass were estimated to be 46–52% and 87–13%, respectively. The mean mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were 28 ± 6 μg m−3 and 47 ± 8 μg m−3 in wet season, and 39 ± 10 μg m−3 and 61 ± 19 μg m−3 in dry season, respectively. Total carbon (TC accounted for 16–19% of the PM2.5 mass and 13–15% of the PM10 mass. On average, 86 to 89% of TC in PM2.5 and 87 to 90% of TC in PM10 was OC, of which 67–72% and 63% was found to be water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC in PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. We found that concentrations of levoglucosan and mannosan (specific organic tracers of pyrolysis of cellulose well correlated with non-sea-salt potassium (nss-K+ (r2 = 0.56–0.75, OC (r2 = 0.75–0.96 and WSOC (r2 = 0.52–0.78. The K+ / OC ratios varied from 0.06 to 0.36 in PM2.5 and from 0.03 to 0.36 in PM10 with slightly higher ratios in dry season. Mean percent ratios of levoglucosan and mannosan to OC were found to be 3–4% for PM2.5 and PM10 in both seasons. We found lower levoglucosan / K+ ratios and higher K+ / EC (elemental carbon ratios in the biomass-burning aerosols from Tanzania than those reported from other regions. This feature is consistent with the high levels of potassium reported in the soils of Morogoro, Tanzania, suggesting an importance of direct emission of potassium by soil resuspension although K+ is present mostly in fine particles. It is also likely that biomass burning of vegetation of Tanzania emits high levels of potassium that may be enriched in plant tissues. The present study demonstrates that emissions from mixed biomass- and biofuel-burning activities largely

  14. Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahan, E.; Ten Brink, H.M.; Weijers, E.P.

    2008-10-01

    Carbon compounds account for a large fraction of airborne particulate matter ('carbonaceous aerosols'). Their presence raises a number of scientific questions dealing with climate issues and possible effects on human health. This review describes the current state of knowledge with respect to the ambient concentrations levels (elemental carbon, organic carbon and organic matter) and the various emission sources, and summarizes the role of atmospheric carbon in the various environmental issues. The report finishes by identifying the actual gaps in knowledge and gives (related) suggestions for future research

  15. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  16. Observations of total RONO2 over the boreal forest: NOx sinks and HNO3 sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Browne

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast with the textbook view of remote chemistry where HNO3 formation is the primary sink of nitrogen oxides, recent theoretical analyses show that formation of RONO2 (ΣANs from isoprene and other terpene precursors is the primary net chemical loss of nitrogen oxides over the remote continents where the concentration of nitrogen oxides is low. This then increases the prominence of questions concerning the chemical lifetime and ultimate fate of ΣANs. We present observations of nitrogen oxides and organic molecules collected over the Canadian boreal forest during the summer which show that ΣANs account for ~20% of total oxidized nitrogen and that their instantaneous production rate is larger than that of HNO3. This confirms the primary role of reactions producing ΣANs as a control over the lifetime of NOx (NOx = NO + NO2 in remote, continental environments. However, HNO3 is generally present in larger concentrations than ΣANs indicating that the atmospheric lifetime of ΣANs is shorter than the HNO3 lifetime. We investigate a range of proposed loss mechanisms that would explain the inferred lifetime of ΣANs finding that in combination with deposition, two processes are consistent with the observations: (1 rapid ozonolysis of isoprene nitrates where at least ~40% of the ozonolysis products release NOx from the carbon backbone and/or (2 hydrolysis of particulate organic nitrates with HNO3 as a product. Implications of these ideas for our understanding of NOx and NOy budget in remote and rural locations are discussed.

  17. Enhancement of photocurrents due to the oxidation of water and organic compounds at BiZn2VO6 particulate thin film electrodes by treatment with a TiCl4 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haimei; Imanishi, Akihito; Yang Wensheng; Nakato, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Photocurrents due to water oxidation at BiZn 2 VO 6 (E g 2.4 eV) particulate thin film electrodes were largely enhanced by pre-treatment with an aqueous TiCl 4 solution. Photocurrents for BiZn 2 VO 6 electrodes with no TiCl 4 treatment were also enhanced by the addition of organic compounds such as methanol and trimethyl amine to the aqueous electrolyte. Interestingly, such enhanced photocurrents by organic compounds were further enhanced by the TiCl 4 pre-treatment. EDAX and SEM investigations showed the formation of a flock-like TiO 2 overlayer on BiZn 2 VO 6 particles after the TiCl 4 treatment. The photocurrent enhancement by the TiCl 4 pre-treatment is thus mainly attributed to the necking effect of the flock-like TiO 2 overlayer, which facilitates the transport of photogenerated electrons within the BiZn 2 VO 6 particulate thin film electrode.

  18. CORRELATION BETWEEN PARTICULATE MATTER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIG TIMMY

    Measurement of atmospheric particulate matter was carried out with a view to establish the potential influence of meteorological parameters such as wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and global radiation on the mass concentration. Particulate matter (PM) in two size fractions ( 2.5 m and ...

  19. Airborne particulate discriminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creek, Kathryn Louise [San Diego, CA; Castro, Alonso [Santa Fe, NM; Gray, Perry Clayton [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-08-11

    A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

  20. Effect of type and concentration of ballasting particles on sinking rate of marine snow produced by the Appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; Guidi, L.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ballast material (organic, opal, calcite, lithogenic) is suggested to affect sinking speed of aggregates in the ocean. Here, we tested this hypothesis by incubating appendicularians in suspensions of different algae or Saharan dust, and observing the sinking speed of the marine snow formed by the...

  1. Colloids as a sink for certain pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskaoui, Khalid; Zhou, John L

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment is recognized as one of the emerging issues in environmental chemistry and as a matter of public concern. Existing data tend to focus on the concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the aqueous phase, with limited studies on their concentrations in particulate phase such as sediments. Furthermore, current water quality monitoring does not differentiate between soluble and colloidal phases in water samples, hindering our understanding of the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in aquatic organisms. In this study, an investigation was conducted into the concentrations and phase association (soluble, colloidal, suspended particulate matter or SPM) of selected pharmaceuticals (propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, meberverine, thioridazine, carbamazepine, tamoxifen, indomethacine, diclofenac, and meclofenamic acid) in river water, effluents from sewage treatment works (STW), and groundwater in the UK. The occurrence and phase association of selected pharmaceuticals propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, meberverine, thioridazine, carbamazepine, tamoxifen, indomethacine, diclofenac, and meclofenamic acid in contrasting aquatic environments (river, sewage effluent, and groundwater) were studied. Colloids were isolated by cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF). Water samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE), while SPM was extracted by microwave. All sample extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the multiple reaction monitoring. Five compounds propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, indomethacine, and diclofenac were detected in all samples, with carbamazepine showing the highest concentrations in all phases. The highest concentrations of these compounds were detected in STW effluents, confirming STW as a key source of these compounds in the aquatic environments. The calculation of partition coefficients of pharmaceuticals between SPM and

  2. Factors influencing particulate lipid production in the East Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašparović, B.; Frka, S.; Koch, B. P.; Zhu, Z. Y.; Bracher, A.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Neogi, S. B.; Lara, R. J.; Kattner, G.

    2014-07-01

    Extensive analyses of particulate lipids and lipid classes were conducted to gain insight into lipid production and related factors along the biogeochemical provinces of the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Data are supported by particulate organic carbon (POC), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phaeopigments, Chl a concentrations and carbon content of eukaryotic micro-, nano- and picophytoplankton, including cell abundances for the latter two and for cyanobacteria and prokaryotic heterotrophs. We focused on the productive ocean surface (2 m depth and deep Chl a maximum (DCM). Samples from the deep ocean provided information about the relative reactivity and preservation potential of particular lipid classes. Surface and DCM particulate lipid concentrations (3.5-29.4 μg L-1) were higher than in samples from deep waters (3.2-9.3 μg L-1) where an increased contribution to the POC pool was observed. The highest lipid concentrations were measured in high latitude temperate waters and in the North Atlantic Tropical Gyral Province (13-25°N). Factors responsible for the enhanced lipid synthesis in the eastern Atlantic appeared to be phytoplankton size (micro, nano, pico) and the low nutrient status with microphytoplankton having the most expressed influence in the surface and eukaryotic nano- and picophytoplankton in the DCM layer. Higher lipid to Chl a ratios suggest enhanced lipid biosynthesis in the nutrient poorer regions. The various lipid classes pointed to possible mechanisms of phytoplankton adaptation to the nutritional conditions. Thus, it is likely that adaptation comprises the replacement of membrane phospholipids by non-phosphorus containing glycolipids under low phosphorus conditions. The qualitative and quantitative lipid compositions revealed that phospholipids were the most degradable lipids, and their occurrence decreased with increasing depth. In contrast, wax esters, possibly originating from zooplankton, survived downward transport probably due to the fast sinking

  3. Sink Potential of Canadian Agricultural Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Junkins, B.; Desjardins, R.; Lindwall, W.; Kulshreshtha, S.

    2004-01-01

    Net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from Canadian crop and livestock production were estimated for 1990, 1996 and 2001 and projected to 2008. Net emissions were also estimated for three scenarios (low (L), medium (M) and high (H)) of adoption of sink enhancing practices above the projected 2008 level. Carbon sequestration estimates were based on four sink-enhancing activities: conversion from conventional to zero tillage (ZT), reduced frequency of summerfallow (SF), the conversion of cropland to permanent cover crops (PC), and improved grazing land management (GM). GHG emissions were estimated with the Canadian Economic and Emissions Model for Agriculture (CEEMA). CEEMA estimates levels of production activities within the Canadian agriculture sector and calculates the emissions and removals associated with those levels of activities. The estimates indicate a decline in net emissions from 54 Tg CO2-Eq yr-1 in 1990 to 52 Tg CO2-Eq yr-1 in 2008. Adoption of the sink-enhancing practices above the level projected for 2008 resulted in further declines in emissions to 48 Tg CO2-Eq yr-1 (L), 42 Tg CO2-Eq yr-1 (M) or 36 Tg CO2-Eq yr-1 (H). Among the sink-enhancing practices, the conversion from conventional tillage to ZT provided the largest C sequestration potential and net reduction in GHG emissions among the scenarios. Although rates of C sequestration were generally higher for conversion of cropland to PC and adoption of improved GM, those scenarios involved smaller areas of land and therefore less C sequestration. Also, increased areas of PC were associated with an increase in livestock numbers and CH4 and N2O emissions from enteric fermentation and manure, which partially offset the carbon sink. The CEEMA estimates indicate that soil C sinks are a viable option for achieving the UNFCCC objective of protecting and enhancing GHG sinks and reservoirs as a means of reducing GHG emissions (UNFCCC, 1992)

  4. Dust deposition: iron source or sink? A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A significant decrease of dissolved iron (DFe concentration has been observed after dust addition into mesocosms during the DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem (DUNE, carried out in the summer of 2008. Due to low biological productivity at the experiment site, biological consumption of iron can not explain the magnitude of DFe decrease. To understand processes regulating the observed DFe variation, we simulated the experiment using a one-dimensional model of the Fe biogeochemical cycle, coupled with a simple ecosystem model. Different size classes of particles and particle aggregation are taken into account to describe the particle dynamics. DFe concentration is regulated in the model by dissolution from dust particles and adsorption onto particle surfaces, biological uptake, and photochemical mobilisation of particulate iron.

    The model reproduces the observed DFe decrease after dust addition well. This is essentially explained by particle adsorption and particle aggregation that produces a high export within the first 24 h. The estimated particle adsorption rates range between the measured adsorption rates of soluble iron and those of colloidal iron, indicating both processes controlling the DFe removal during the experiment. A dissolution timescale of 3 days is used in the model, instead of an instantaneous dissolution, underlining the importance of dissolution kinetics on the short-term impact of dust deposition on seawater DFe.

    Sensitivity studies reveal that initial DFe concentration before dust addition was crucial for the net impact of dust addition on DFe during the DUNE experiment. Based on the balance between abiotic sinks and sources of DFe, a critical DFe concentration has been defined, above which dust deposition acts as a net sink of DFe, rather than a source. Taking into account the role of excess iron binding ligands and biotic processes, the critical DFe concentration might be applied to

  5. Landfills as sinks for (hazardous) substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Heijo

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of waste regulations is to protect human health and the environment. This requires the removal from the material cycle of those materials that cannot be processed without harm. Policies to promote recycling hold a risk that pollutants are dispersed. Materials have an environmental impact during their entire life cycle from extraction through production, consumption and recycling to disposal. Essentially there are only two routes for pollutants that cannot be rendered harmless: storage in sinks or dispersion into the environment. Many sinks do not contain substances absolutely, but result in slow dispersion. Dispersion leads to exposure and impact to human health and the environment. It is therefore important to assess the impact of the release to the environment. Based on various sources this paper discusses important material flows and their potential impact. This is compared with the intentions and achievements of European environmental and resource policy. The polluter pays principle is being implemented in Europe, but lags behind implementation of waste management regulations. As long as producers are allowed to add hazardous substances to their products and don't take their products back, it is in society's best interest to carefully consider whether recycling or storage in a sink is the better solution. This requires further development of life-cycle assessment tools and harmonization of regulations. In many cases the sink is unavoidable. Landfills as sinks will be needed in the future. Fail-safe design and construction as well as sustainable management of landfills must be further developed.

  6. Longevity of terrestrial Carbon sinks: effects of soil degradation on greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Berger, Samuel; Kuonen, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is a key process of soil and land degradation. In addition, significant amounts of nutrients and organic Carbon are moved from eroding source areas to landscape sinks. As a consequence, areas affected by erosion suffer a loss of fertility, while sinks experience the development of a stockpile of the deposited sediment, including soil organic matter and nutrients. The deposited nutrients are largely unavailable for the plants growing in these landscape sediment sinks once the thickness of the deposited layer is greater than the rooting depth of the plants. In addition, the deposited organic matter is decomposed slowly through the pack of sediment. At sites of erosion, nutrients have to be replaced and organic matter content of the soil declines due to a destruction of the A horizon. Over time, the risk of a significant reduction in productivity, for example caused by a loss of top soil with a sufficient water storage capacity for maximum plant growth, leads to a decline in CO2 uptake by photosynthesis. Soil organic matter at eroding sites therefore declines and consequently the sediment that is moved to landscape sinks also has a smaller organic matter content than sediment generated from the non-degraded soil. The sediment sinks, on the other hand, emit an increasing amount of greenhouse gases as a consequence of the increasing amount of organic matter deposited while the upslope area is eroded. Over time, the perceived sink effect of soil erosion for greenhouse gases is therefore replaced with a neutral or positive emission balance of erosion in agricultural landscapes. Such a switch from none or a negative emission balance of agricultural landscapes to a positive balance carries the risk of accelerating climate change. In this study, we tried to estimate the risk associated with ongoing soil degradation and closing landscape soil organic matter sinks. Currently observed global erosion rates were linked to known limitations of soil

  7. Boreal forest BVOC exchange: emissions versus in-canopy sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Taipale, Ditte; Rannik, Üllar; Rantala, Pekka; Petteri Rissanen, Matti; Chen, Dean; Boy, Michael

    2017-12-01

    A multilayer gas dry deposition model has been developed and implemented into a one-dimensional chemical transport model SOSAA (model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to calculate the dry deposition velocities for all the gas species included in the chemistry scheme. The new model was used to analyse in-canopy sources and sinks, including gas emissions, chemical production and loss, dry deposition, and turbulent transport of 12 featured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) or groups of BVOCs (e.g. monoterpenes, isoprene+2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), sesquiterpenes, and oxidation products of mono- and sesquiterpenes) in July 2010 at the boreal forest site SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations). According to the significance of modelled monthly-averaged individual source and sink terms inside the canopy, the selected BVOCs were classified into five categories: 1. Most of emitted gases are transported out of the canopy (monoterpenes, isoprene + MBO). 2. Chemical reactions remove a significant portion of emitted gases (sesquiterpenes). 3. Bidirectional fluxes occur since both emission and dry deposition are crucial for the in-canopy concentration tendency (acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, formaldehyde). 4. Gases removed by deposition inside the canopy are compensated for by the gases transported from above the canopy (acetol, pinic acid, β-caryophyllene's oxidation product BCSOZOH). 5. The chemical production is comparable to the sink by deposition (isoprene's oxidation products ISOP34OOH and ISOP34NO3). Most of the simulated sources and sinks were located above about 0.2 hc (canopy height) for oxidation products and above about 0.4 hc for emitted species except formaldehyde. In addition, soil deposition (including deposition onto understorey vegetation) contributed 11-61 % to the overall in-canopy deposition. The emission sources peaked at about 0.8-0.9 hc, which was higher than 0.6 hc

  8. Organic particulate matter formation at varying relative humidity using surrogate secondary and primary organic compounds with activity corrections in the condensed phase obtained using a method based on the Wilson equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Chang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation in the atmosphere is currently often modeled using a multiple lumped "two-product" (N·2p approach. The N·2p approach neglects: 1 variation of activity coefficient (ζi values and mean molecular weight MW in the particulate matter (PM phase; 2 water uptake into the PM; and 3 the possibility of phase separation in the PM. This study considers these effects by adopting an (N·2pζpMW,ζ approach (θ is a phase index. Specific chemical structures are assigned to 25 lumped SOA compounds and to 15 representative primary organic aerosol (POA compounds to allow calculation of ζi and MW values. The SOA structure assignments are based on chamber-derived 2p gas/particle partition coefficient values coupled with known effects of structure on vapor pressure pL,io (atm. To facilitate adoption of the (N·2pζpMW,θ approach in large-scale models, this study also develops CP-Wilson.1 (Chang-Pankow-Wilson.1, a group-contribution ζi-prediction method that is more computationally economical than the UNIFAC model of Fredenslund et al. (1975. Group parameter values required by CP-Wilson.1 are obtained by fitting ζi values to predictions from UNIFAC. The (N·2pζpMW,θ approach is applied (using CP-Wilson.1 to several real α-pinene/O3 chamber cases for high reacted hydrocarbon levels (ΔHC≈400 to 1000 μg m−3 when relative humidity (RH ≈50%. Good agreement between the chamber and predicted results is

  9. Distribution of particulate carbohydrate species in the Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    into the Bay large quantities of fresh water .... Distribution of temperature, salinity, particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (TPN), C/N ratio, ... of the surface seawater collected at various locations of the Bay of Bengal. TPURA/. Station. Temperature. POC. TPN. C/N. TPCHO. TPURA. TPCHO no. (. ◦. C). Salinity.

  10. Distribution of particulate carbohydrate species in the Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composition of carbohydrates are influenced by several factors including nutrient levels, compo- sition of organisms, growth phase, etc. Carbo- .... particulate uronic acids (TPURA) and TPURA/TPCHO ratio in suspended particulate matter of the surface seawater collected at various locations of the Bay of Bengal. TPURA/.

  11. Topology Optimization of Thermal Heat Sinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaas Haertel, Jan Hendrik; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, topology optimization is applied to optimize the cooling performance of thermal heat sinks. The coupled two-dimensional thermofluid model of a heat sink cooled with forced convection and a density-based topology optimization including density filtering and projection are implemented...... in COMSOL Multiphysics. The optimization objective is to minimize the heat sink’s temperature for a prescribed pressure drop and fixed heat generation. To conduct the optimization, COMSOL’s Optimization Module with GCMMA as the optimization method is used. The implementation of this topology optimization...

  12. Sinking rates of microplastics and potential implications of their alteration by physical, biological, and chemical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Nicole; Reichardt, Aurelia M; Waniek, Joanna J

    2016-08-15

    To follow the pathways of microplastics in aquatic environments, profound knowledge about the behaviour of microplastics is necessary. Therefore, sinking experiments were conducted with diverse polymer particles using fluids with different salinity. Particles ranged from 0.3 and 3.6mm with sinking rates between 6 and 91×10(-3)ms(-1). The sinking velocity was not solely related to particle density, size and fluid density but also to the particles shape leading to considerable deviation from calculated theoretical values. Thus, experimental studies are indispensable to get basic knowledge about the sinking behaviour and to gain representative datasets for model approaches estimating the distribution of microplastics in aquatic systems. The sinking behaviour may be altered considerably by weathering and biofouling demanding further studies with aged and fouled plastic particles. Furthermore, assumptions are made about the influence of sinking fouled microplastics on the marine carbon pump by transferring organic carbon to deeper water depths. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Habitat-specific demography: evidence for source-sink population structure in a mammal, the pika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, M P; Huntly, N J

    2003-02-01

    Theory suggests that populations may persist in sink habitats that cannot support replacement-level birth rates. Although it is commonly believed that organisms that can actively select habitat should rarely occur in sinks, the frequency of use of sinks in free-ranging species is not well-documented. We found that a population of American pikas ( Ochotona princeps, Lagomorpha) inhabiting distinct alpine habitats (meadow and snowbed) in Wyoming, USA, had habitat-specific demographic rates that produced a source-sink population structure. Population size increased in both habitats in summer and declined in both habitats in winter, with populations in snowbeds increasing more during summer and decreasing more over winter. Birth rates were consistently higher in meadows and populations in meadows had a consistently higher finite rate of increase (lambda, from life tables) than did those in snowbeds, for which lambda was far below that needed for replacement. Patterns of immigration, population structure, and temporal variation in population size were as expected if meadows were functional sources and snowbeds functional sinks. Patterns of snowmelt differed between habitats, predicted the critical difference in birth rates between habitats, and are a likely primary cause of the differences in habitat-specific birth rates that we observed. This study provides a clear example of source-sink population structure for a mammal.

  14. Reconstructing source-sink dynamics in a population with a pelagic dispersal phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Chen

    Full Text Available For many organisms, the reconstruction of source-sink dynamics is hampered by limited knowledge of the spatial assemblage of either the source or sink components or lack of information on the strength of the linkage for any source-sink pair. In the case of marine species with a pelagic dispersal phase, these problems may be mitigated through the use of particle drift simulations based on an ocean circulation model. However, when simulated particle trajectories do not intersect sampling sites, the corroboration of model drift simulations with field data is hampered. Here, we apply a new statistical approach for reconstructing source-sink dynamics that overcomes the aforementioned problems. Our research is motivated by the need for understanding observed changes in jellyfish distributions in the eastern Bering Sea since 1990. By contrasting the source-sink dynamics reconstructed with data from the pre-1990 period with that from the post-1990 period, it appears that changes in jellyfish distribution resulted from the combined effects of higher jellyfish productivity and longer dispersal of jellyfish resulting from a shift in the ocean circulation starting in 1991. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the source-sink reconstruction is robust to typical systematic and random errors in the ocean circulation model driving the particle drift simulations. The jellyfish analysis illustrates that new insights can be gained by studying structural changes in source-sink dynamics. The proposed approach is applicable for the spatial source-sink reconstruction of other species and even abiotic processes, such as sediment transport.

  15. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eLudewig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g. roots, flowers, small leaves and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartmentalized. Photoassimilates are allocated to distinct compartments of these tissues in all organs, requiring a set of metabolite transporters mediating this intercompartmental transfer.The general route of photoassimilates can be briefly described as follows. Upon fixation of carbon dioxide in chloroplasts of mesophyll cells, triose phosphates either enter the cytosol for mainly sucrose formation or remain in the stroma to form transiently stored starch which is degraded during the night and enters the cytosol as maltose or glucose to be further metabolized to sucrose. In both cases, sucrose enters the phloem for long distance transport or is transiently stored in the vacuole, or can be degraded to hexoses which also can be stored in the vacuole.In the majority of plant species, sucrose is actively loaded into the phloem via the apoplast. Following long distance transport, it is released into sink organs, where it enters cells as source of carbon and energy. In storage organs, sucrose can be stored, or carbon derived from sucrose can be stored as starch in plastids, or as oil in oil bodies, or - in combination with nitrogen - as protein in protein storage vacuoles and protein bodies.Here, we focus on transport proteins known for either of these steps, and discuss the implications for yield increase in plants upon genetic engineering of respective transporters.

  16. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Iversen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted, Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted, and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted. Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d−1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study vary between 0.08 d−1 and 0.20 d−1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m−1 and 0.0030 m−1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  17. Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

  18. An innovative ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization to determine persistent organic pollutants in air particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain-Montiel, E; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Arias-Loaiza, G E; Gómez-Arroyo, S L; Amador-Muñoz, O

    2016-12-16

    New clean technologies are needed to determine concentration of organic pollutants without generating more pollution. A method to extract Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) from airborne particulate matter was developed using a novel technology recently patented called ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell (UAE-MSC). This technology extracts, filters, collects the sample, and evaporates the solvent, on-line. No sample transfer is needed. The cell minimizes sample manipulation, solvent consumption, waste generation, time, and energy; fulfilling most of the analytical green chemistry protocol. The methodology was optimized applying a centred 2 3 factorial experimental design. Optimum conditions were used to validate and determine concentration of 16 organochlorine pesticides (OCls) and 6 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The best conditions achieved were 2 extractions with 5mL (each) of dichloromethane over 5min (each) at 60°C and 80% ultrasound potency. POPs were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization (GC/MS-NCI). Analytical method validation was carried out on airborne particles spiked with POPs at seven concentration levels between 0.5 and 26.9pgm -3 . This procedure was done by triplicate (N=21). Recovery, ranged between 65.5±2.3% and 107.5±3.0% for OCls and between 79.1±6.5% and 105.2±3.8% for PBDEs. Linearity (r 2 ) was ≥0.94 for all compounds. Method detection limits, ranged from 0.5 to 2.7pgm -3 , while limits of quantification (LOQ), ranged from 1.7 to 9.0pgm -3 . A Bias from -18.6% to 9% for PBDEs was observed in the Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2787. SRM 2787 did not contain OCls. OCls recoveries were equivalent by UAE-MSC and Soxhlet methods UAE-MSC optimized extraction conditions reduced 30 times less solvent and decreased the extraction time from several hours to ten minutes, respect to Soxhlet. UAE-MSC was applied to 15 samples of particles less than 2.5μm (PM 2.5 ) from three

  19. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  20. Comparison of ASE and SFE with Soxhlet, Sonication, and Methanolic Saponification Extractions for the Determination of Organic Micropollutants in Marine Particulate Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemken, O P; Theobald, N; Wenclawiak, B W

    1997-06-01

    The methods of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated hydrocarbons from marine samples were investigated. The results of extractions of a certified sediment and four samples of suspended particulate matter (SPM) were compared to classical Soxhlet (SOX), ultrasonication (USE), and methanolic saponification extraction (MSE) methods. The recovery data, including precision and systematic deviations of each method, were evaluated statistically. It was found that recoveries and precision of ASE and SFE compared well with the other methods investigated. Using SFE, the average recoveries of PAHs in three different samples ranged from 96 to 105%, for ASE the recoveries were in the range of 97-108% compared to the reference methods. Compared to the certified values of sediment HS-6, the average recoveries of SFE and ASE were 87 and 88%, most compounds being within the limits of confidence. Also, for alkanes the average recoveries by SFE and ASE were equal to the results obtained by SOX, USE, and MSE. In the case of SFE, the recoveries were in the range 93-115%, and ASE achieved recoveries of 94-107% as compared to the other methods. For ASE and SFE, the influence of water on the extraction efficiency was examined. While the natural water content of the SPM sample (56 wt %) led to insufficient recoveries in ASE and SFE, quantitative extractions were achieved in SFE after addition of anhydrous sodium sulfate to the sample. Finally, ASE was applied to SPM-loaded filter candles whereby a mixture of n-hexane/acetone as extraction solvent allowed the simultaneous determination of PAHs, alkanes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  1. Carbon source-sink relationship in Arabidopsis thaliana: the role of sucrose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mickaël; Mainson, Dany; Porcheron, Benoît; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2018-03-01

    The regulation of source-to-sink sucrose transport is associated with AtSUC and AtSWEET sucrose transporters' gene expression changes in plants grown hydroponically under different physiological conditions. Source-to-sink transport of sucrose is one of the major determinants of plant growth. Whole-plant carbohydrates' partitioning requires the specific activity of membrane sugar transporters. In Arabidopsis thaliana plants, two families of transporters are involved in sucrose transport: AtSUCs and AtSWEETs. This study is focused on the comparison of sucrose transporter gene expression, soluble sugar and starch levels and long distance sucrose transport, in leaves and sink organs (mainly roots) in different physiological conditions (along the plant life cycle, during a diel cycle, and during an osmotic stress) in plants grown hydroponically. In leaves, the AtSUC2, AtSWEET11, and 12 genes known to be involved in phloem loading were highly expressed when sucrose export was high and reduced during osmotic stress. In roots, AtSUC1 was highly expressed and its expression profile in the different conditions tested suggests that it may play a role in sucrose unloading in roots and in root growth. The SWEET transporter genes AtSWEET12, 13, and 15 were found expressed in all organs at all stages studied, while differential expression was noticed for AtSWEET14 in roots, stems, and siliques and AtSWEET9, 10 expressions were only detected in stems and siliques. A role for these transporters in carbohydrate partitioning in different source-sink status is proposed, with a specific attention on carbon demand in roots. During development, despite trophic competition with others sinks, roots remained a significant sink, but during osmotic stress, the amount of translocated [U- 14 C]-sucrose decreased for rosettes and roots. Altogether, these results suggest that source-sink relationship may be linked with the regulation of sucrose transporter gene expression.

  2. Sensitivity analyses of OH missing sinks over Tokyo metropolitan area in the summer of 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ishii

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OH reactivity is one of key indicators which reflect impacts of photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. An observation campaign has been conducted in the summer of 2007 at the heart of Tokyo metropolitan area to measure OH reactivity. The total OH reactivity measured directly by the laser-induced pump and probe technique was higher than the sum of the OH reactivity calculated from concentrations and reaction rate coefficients of individual species measured in this campaign. And then, three-dimensional air quality simulation has been conducted to evaluate the simulation performance on the total OH reactivity including "missing sinks", which correspond to the difference between the measured and calculated total OH reactivity. The simulated OH reactivity is significantly underestimated because the OH reactivity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and missing sinks are underestimated. When scaling factors are applied to input emissions and boundary concentrations, a good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured concentrations of VOCs. However, the simulated OH reactivity of missing sinks is still underestimated. Therefore, impacts of unidentified missing sinks are investigated through sensitivity analyses. In the cases that unknown secondary products are assumed to account for unidentified missing sinks, they tend to suppress formation of secondary aerosol components and enhance formation of ozone. In the cases that unidentified primary emitted species are assumed to account for unidentified missing sinks, a variety of impacts may be observed, which could serve as precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA and significantly increase SOA formation. Missing sinks are considered to play an important role in the atmosphere over Tokyo metropolitan area.

  3. Short term variations in particulate matter in Mahi river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.

    The particulate matter (PM) collected from Mahi River Estuary was analysed for organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). The concentration of PM, POC, PON and Chl a showed short term variations. Average surface concentration...

  4. Dose-dependent regulation of microbial activity on sinking particles by polyunsaturated aldehydes: Implications for the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bethanie R; Bidle, Kay D; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2015-05-12

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, fixing CO2 into organic carbon, which may then be exported to depth via sinking particles. The molecular diversity of this organic carbon is vast and many highly bioactive molecules have been identified. Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are bioactive on various levels of the marine food web, and yet the potential for these molecules to affect the fate of organic carbon produced by diatoms remains an open question. In this study, the effects of PUAs on the natural microbial assemblages associated with sinking particles were investigated. Sinking particles were collected from 150 m in the water column and exposed to varying concentrations of PUAs in dark incubations over 24 h. PUA doses ranging from 1 to 10 µM stimulated respiration, organic matter hydrolysis, and cell growth by bacteria associated with sinking particles. PUA dosages near 100 µM appeared to be toxic, resulting in decreased bacterial cell abundance and metabolism, as well as pronounced shifts in bacterial community composition. Sinking particles were hot spots for PUA production that contained concentrations within the stimulatory micromolar range in contrast to previously reported picomolar concentrations of these compounds in bulk seawater. This suggests PUAs produced in situ stimulate the remineralization of phytoplankton-derived sinking organic matter, decreasing carbon export efficiency, and shoaling the average depths of nutrient regeneration. Our results are consistent with a "bioactivity hypothesis" for explaining variations in carbon export efficiency in the oceans.

  5. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... merchandise as ``drawn stainless steel sinks with single or multiple drawn bowls, with or without drain boards... finishing the vertical corners to form the bowls. Stainless steel sinks with fabricated bowls may sometimes...

  6. Subchronic effects of inhaled ambient particulate matter on glucose homeostasis and target organ damage in a type 1 diabetic rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yuan-Horng [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Charles, Chou C.-K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jyh-Seng [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chun-Liang [Department of Pathology, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Li, Ya-Ru; Lo, Kai [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported associations between particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular effects, and diabetes mellitus (DM) patients might be susceptible to these effects. The chief chronic injuries resulting from DM are small vascular injuries (micro-vascular complications) or large blood vessel injuries (macro-vascular complications). However, toxicological data regarding the effects of PM on DM-related cardiovascular complications is limited. Our objective was to investigate whether subchronic PM exposure alters glucose homeostasis and causes cardiovascular complications in a type 1 DM rat model. We constructed a real world PM{sub 2.5} exposure system, the Taipei Air Pollution Exposure System for Health Effects (TAPES), to continuously deliver non-concentrated PM for subchronic exposure. A type 1 DM rat model was induced using streptozotocin. Between December 22, 2009 and April 9, 2010, DM rats were exposed to PM or to filtered air (FA) using TAPES in Taipei, Taiwan, 24 h/day, 7 days/week, for a total of 16 weeks. The average concentrations (mean [SD]) of PM{sub 2.5} in the exposure and control chambers of the TAPES were 13.30 [8.65] and 0.13 [0.05] μg/m{sup 3}, respectively. Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was significantly elevated after exposure to PM compared with exposure to FA (mean [SD], 7.7% [3.1%] vs. 4.7% [1.0%], P < 0.05). Interleukin 6 and fibrinogen levels were significantly increased after PM exposure. PM caused focal myocarditis, aortic medial thickness, advanced glomerulosclerosis, and accentuation of tubular damage of the kidney (tubular damage index: 1.76 [0.77] vs. 1.15 [0.36], P < 0.001). PM exposure might induce the macro- and micro-vascular complications in DM through chronic hyperglycemia and systemic inflammation. - Highlights: • The study demonstrated cardiovascular and renal effects of PM in a rat model of DM. • TAPES is a continuous, real world, long-term PM exposure system. • HbA1c, a marker of glycemic

  7. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor is the major toxic mode of action of an organic extract of a reference urban dust particulate matter mixture: The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrysik, Zdenek; Vondracek, Jan; Marvanova, Sona; Ciganek, Miroslav; Neca, Jiri; Pencikova, Katerina; Mahadevan, Brinda; Topinka, Jan; Baird, William M.; Kozubik, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → SRM1649a extract and its fractions are potent activators of AhR in a model of epithelial cells. → AhR-dependent effects include both induction of CYP1 enzymes and disruption of cell proliferation control. → Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the neutral SRM1649a fraction are major contributors to the AhR-mediated toxic effects. → Activation of AhR and related nongenotoxic effects occur at significantly lower doses than the formation of DNA adducts and activation of DNA damage response. → More attention should be paid to the AhR-dependent nongenotoxic events elicited by urban particulate matter constituents. - Abstract: Many of the toxic and carcinogenic effects of urban air pollution have been linked to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to airborne particulate matter (PM). The carcinogenic properties of PAHs in complex organic mixtures derived from PM have been chiefly attributed to their mutagenicity. Nevertheless, PAHs are also potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which may contribute to their nongenotoxic effects, including tumor promotion. As the genotoxicity of carcinogenic PAHs in complex mixtures derived from urban PM is often inhibited by other mixture constituents, the AhR-mediated activity of urban PM extracts might significantly contribute to the carcinogenic activity of such mixtures. In the present study, we used an organic extract of the urban dust standard reference material, SRM1649a, as a model mixture to study a range of toxic effects related to DNA damage and AhR activation. Both the organic extract and its neutral aromatic fraction formed a low number of DNA adducts per nucleotide in the liver epithelial WB-F344 cells model, without inducing DNA damage response, such as tumor suppressor p53 activation and apoptosis. In contrast, we found that this extract, as well as its neutral and polar fractions, were potent inducers of a range of AhR-mediated responses, including induction

  8. Why do bubbles in Guinness sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, E. S.; Cummins, C. P.; Lee, W. T.

    2013-02-01

    Stout beers show the counter-intuitive phenomena of sinking bubbles, while the beer is settling. Previous research suggests that this phenomenon is due to the small size of the bubbles in these beers and the presence of a circulatory current, directed downwards near the side of the wall and upwards in the interior of the glass. The mechanism by which such a circulation is established and the conditions under which it will occur has not been clarified. In this paper, we use simulations and experiments to demonstrate that the flow in a glass of stout beer depends on the shape of the glass. If it narrows downwards (as the traditional stout glass, the pint, does), the flow is directed downwards near the wall and upwards in the interior and sinking bubbles will be observed. If the container widens downwards, the flow is opposite to that described above and only rising bubbles will be seen.

  9. Source and sink nodes in absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner C; Machado, Birajara S; Caboclo, Luis Otavio S F; Fujita, Andre; Baccala, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    As opposed to focal epilepsy, absence seizures do not exhibit a clear seizure onset zone or focus since its ictal activity rapidly engages both brain hemispheres. Yet recent graph theoretical analysis applied to absence seizures EEG suggests the cortical focal presence, an unexpected feature for this type of epilepsy. In this study, we explore the characteristics of absence seizure by classifying the nodes as to their source/sink natures via weighted directed graph analysis based on connectivity direction and strength estimation using information partial directed coherence (iPDC). By segmenting the EEG signals into relatively short 5-sec-long time windows we studied the evolution of coupling strengths from both sink and source nodes, and the network dynamics of absence seizures in eight patients.

  10. Mine shaft sinking in recent decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    Between 1976 and 1985, 172 new shafts with a total depth of 74,166 m have been sunk in Chinese coal mines. Of the 172 new shafts, 89 were sunk by a conventional method while 83 were sunk by special shaft sinking methods. The shaft excavation technology and equipment in China is near to or has reached world advanced level. There are wide application of mechanisation and improvement in the various shaft excavation techniques. 3 tabs.

  11. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized Tariff... notification of a preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from China...

  12. Short-term changes in particulate fluxes measured by drifting sediment traps during end summer oligotrophic regime in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Marty

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Short-term changes in the flux of particulate matter were determined in the central north western Mediterranean Sea (near DYFAMED site using drifting sediment traps at 200 m depth in the course of the DYNAPROC 2 cruise (14 September–17 October 2004. In this period of marked water column stratification, POC fluxes varied by an order of magnitude, in the range of 0.03–0.29 mgC m−2 h−1 over the month and showed very rapid and high variations. Particulate carbon export represented less than 5% of integrated primary production, suggesting that phytoplankton production was essentially sustained by internal recycling of organic matter and retained within the photic zone. While PON and POP fluxes paralleled one another, the elemental ratios POC/PON and POC/POP, varied widely over short-term periods. Values of these ratios generally higher than the conventional Redfield ratio, together with the very low chlorophyll a flux recorded in the traps (mean 0.017 μg m−2 h−1, and the high phaeopigment and acyl lipid hydrolysis metabolite concentrations of the settling material, indicated that the organic matter reaching 200 m depth was reworked (by grazing, fecal pellets production, degradation and that algal sinking, dominated by nano- and picoplankton, made a small contribution to the downward flux. Over time, the relative abundance of individual lipid classes in organic matter (OM changed from glycolipids-dominated to neutral (wax esters, triacylglycerols and phospholipids-dominated, suggesting ecosystem maturation as well as rapid and continual exchanges between dissolved, suspended and sinking pools. Our most striking result was documenting the rapid change in fluxes of the various measured parameters. In the situation encountered here, with dominant regenerated production, a decrease of fluxes was noticed during windy periods (possibly through reduction of grazing. But fluxes increased as soon as calm

  13. Sticky windows: chemical and biological characteristics of the organic film derived from particulate and gas-phase air contaminants found on an urban impervious surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, E M; Diamond, M L; McCarry, B E; Stern, G A; Harper, P A

    2003-05-01

    A novel environmentally derived mixture that integrates exposure to atmospherically derived gas- and particle-phase compounds in urban areas-namely, the organic film that develops as a thin layer on urban impervious surfaces-was investigated for its ability to induce gene expression via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The organic film on window glass from 21 sites in downtown Toronto (Ontario, Canada) was found to contain a complex mixture of environmental contaminants typical of urban environments, notably PAHs, n-alkanes, PCBs, organochlorine (OC) pesticides, and polar constituents. Using a stably transfected reporter cell line, we found that the crude extract of organic film induces AhR-dependent gene expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Three subfractions of the crude extract induced significant luciferase expression: nonpolar aromatic > polar aromatic > nonpolar aliphatic. Recombination of the fractions did not lead to recovery of the full activity of the crude extract, which may indicate that some of the compounds lost during fractionation were significant contributors to the induction observed with the crude extract. The interactions between a tonic dose of B[ a]P (10(-7) M) and each of the aromatic fractions were determined to be antagonistic following analysis by the method of isoboles. Our results suggest that organic film makes up a diverse array of compounds active at the AhR and that these compounds may not interact in a strictly additive manner.

  14. Recent Changes to the Strength of the CO2 Sink in Boreal Land Regions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, D. J.; McGuire, A. D.; Kicklighter, D. W.; Gurney, K. R.; Melillo, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Studies suggest that high-latitude terrestrial ecosystems have had a significant influence on the global carbon budget by acting as a substantial sink of atmospheric CO2 over the latter part of the 20th Century. However, recent changes in the controlling factors of this sink, including surface air temperature warming and increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances, have the potential to alter the C balance of boreal land regions. Whether these ecosystems continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these changes is a key question in global change science and policy, as any changes to the strength of this major terrestrial sink will have important implications for the global C budget and climate system. Here, we diagnose and attribute contemporary terrestrial CO2 sink strength in the boreal land regions using a biogeochemical process model within a simulation framework that incorporates the impacts of recent changes in atmospheric chemistry and climate variability, as well as fire, forest management and agricultural land use regimes. The simulations estimate that the boreal land regions acted as a net sink of 102 TgC yr-1 from 1960 to 1980 that declined in strength to 28 TgC yr-1 for the 1990s and switched to a source of 99 TgC yr-1 from years 2000 to 2006. The weakening sink strength in the 1990s was largely a result of C losses from Boreal North American tundra and forest ecosystems through increasing decomposition of soil organic matter in response to warmer temperatures. Compared to previous decades, a near doubling of fire emissions was the major factor causing the boreal land regions to switch to a net C source since 2000 when large burn years occurred across the region, particularly in forests of Boreal Asia. A steady sink averaging 23 TgC yr-1 was estimated for Boreal European ecosystems from 1960 to 2006, with the ‘fertilization’ effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and N deposition primarily responsible for the

  15. Airborne particulates. European directives and standardization; Matieres particulaires dans l`air ambiant directives europeennes et normalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdret, J.L. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 59 - Douai (France)

    1996-12-31

    The development of future European directives concerning atmospheric dusts and particulates, organization of the in-charge committee, measurement requirements and limit value determination processes are presented. Various measuring methods and instruments used for particulate and aerosol measurements are reviewed

  16. Plant Fructokinases: Evolutionary, Developmental, and Metabolic Aspects in Sink Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Stein

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose, a glucose–fructose disaccharide, is the main sugar transported in the phloem of most plants and is the origin of most of the organic matter. Upon arrival in sink tissues, the sucrose must be cleaved by invertase or sucrose synthase. Both sucrose-cleaving enzymes yield free fructose, which must be phosphorylated by either fructokinase (FRK or hexokinase (HXK. The affinity of FRK to fructose is much higher than that of HXK, making FRKs central for fructose metabolism. An FRK gene family seems to exist in most, if not all plants and usually consists of several cytosolic FRKs and a single plastidic FRK. These genes are expressed mainly in sink tissues such as roots, stems, flowers, fruits, and seeds, with lower levels of expression often seen in leaves. Plant FRK enzymes vary in their biochemical properties such as affinity for fructose, inhibition by their substrate (i.e., fructose, and expression level in different tissues. This review describes recently revealed roles of plant FRKs in plant development, including the combined roles of the plastidic and cytosolic FRKs in vascular tissues and seed development.

  17. Effects of silvicultural management intensity on fluxes of dissolved and particulate organic matter in 27 forest sites of the Biodiversity Exploratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, Beate; Bischoff, Sebastian; Levia, Delphis; Schwarz, Martin; Escher, Peter; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Thieme, Lisa; Kerber, Katja; Kaupenjohann, Martin; Siemens, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In forested ecosystems, throughfall and stemflow function as key components in the cycling of water and associated biogeochemistry. Analysing annual flux data collected from 27 intensively monitored forest sites of the Biodiversity Exploratories, we found throughfall fluxes of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) linearly related (R2 = 0.40, p losses of DOC and POC from the litter layer of forests increased significantly with increasing forest management intensity. The observed relationships revealed by intensive flux monitoring are important because they allow us to link organic matter fluxes to forest metrics of larger forested areas (e.g. derived from LiDAR imagery), and hence to model and up-scale water-bound OC dynamics to the landscape level.

  18. Variation in heat sink shape for thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. M.; Aziz, M. H. B. A.; Ong, N. R.; Alcain, J. B.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    The concern about the thermal performance of microelectronics is on the increase due to recent over-heating induced failures which have led to product recalls. Removal of excess heat from microelectronic systems with the use of heat sinks could improve thermal efficiency of the system. The shape of the heat sink model with difference fin configuration has significant influence on cooling performances. This paper investigates the effect of change in heat sink geometry on an electronic package through COMSOL Multiphysics software as well as the thermal performance of difference heat sink geometry corresponding to various air inlet velocities. Based on this study, plate fin heat sink has better thermal performance than strip pin fin and circular pin fin heat sink due to less obstruction of the heat sink design.

  19. Anaerobic nitrogen turnover by sinking diatom aggregates at varying ambient oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host...... anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40......% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7...

  20. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hohaus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to understand the formation process, composition, and properties of aerosols and facilitates source identification and relative contributions from different types of sources to ambient aerosols in the atmosphere. However, current analytical methods are far from full speciation of organic aerosols and often require sampling times of up to one week. Offline methods are also subjected to artifacts during aerosol collection and storage.

    In the present work a new technique for quasi on-line compound specific measurements of organic aerosol particles was developed. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM focuses particles into a beam which is directed to a cooled sampling surface. The sampling takes place in a high vacuum environment where the gas phase from the sample volume is removed. After collection is completed volatile and semi-volatile compounds are evaporated from the collection surface through heating and transferred to a detector.

    For laboratory characterization the ACM was interfaced with a Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer, Flame Ionization Detector system (GC/MS-FID, abbreviated as ACM GC-MS. The particle collection efficiency, gas phase transfer efficiency, and linearity of the ACM GC-MS were determined using laboratory generated octadecane aerosols. The ACM GC-MS is linear over the investigated mass range of 10 to 100 ng and a recovery rate of 100% was found for octadecane particles.

    The ACM GC-MS was applied to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed from β-pinene oxidation. Nopinone, myrtanal, myrtenol, 1-hydroxynopinone, 3-oxonopinone, 3,7-dihydroxynopinone, and bicyclo[3,1,1]hept-3-ene-2-one were found as products in the SOA. The ACM GC-MS results are compared to quartz filter

  1. Effects of the flood pulse on the isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N of the particulate organic carbon (POC in the upper Paraná floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fabrício Fiori

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The particulate organic carbon (POC is an important energy source present in the food chain of detritivorous fish. Considering its importance, this study aimed to investigate the effect of the flood pulse on the composition of the POC in a neotropical floodplain. For this, we analyzed the seasonal variations of the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N in two different hydrological periods in the years 2000 and 2009. Sampling of potential sources of primary producers, as well as the POC, was held in different subsystems of the floodplain of the upper Paraná river (subsystems of the rivers Parana, Baía and Ivinheima. In 2000, there were significant differences on isotopic signature (δ13C of the POC, unlike what was seen in 2009, where the values of δ13C were depleted us three subsystems, and showed significant differences both in the Paraná and Baia rivers. As this isotopic variation was attributed to the presence of flooding in 2009, that may be incorporated into new sources of the ecosystem. This is contrary to what was observed in 2000, when they were filled with recorded values below3.5 m fluviometric. Thus, it can be concluded that the flood event has an effect on the composition of POC and therefore can directly influence the structure of fish food chains scavengers of the basin.

  2. Molecular fingerprinting of particulate organic matter as a new tool for its source apportionment: changes along a headwater drainage in coarse, medium and fine particles as a function of rainfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Rowland, Richard; Inamdar, Shreeram

    2018-02-01

    Tracking the sources of particulate organic matter (POM) exported from catchments is important to understand the transfer of energy from soils to oceans. The suitability of investigating the molecular composition of POM by thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation using tetramethylammonium hydroxide directly coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is presented. The results of this molecular-fingerprint approach were compared with previously published elemental (% C, % N) and isotopic data (δ13C, δ15N) acquired in a nested headwater catchment in the Piedmont region, eastern United States of America (12 and 79 ha). The concordance between these results highlights the effectiveness of this molecular tool as a valuable method for source fingerprinting of POM. It emphasizes litter as the main source of exported POM at the upstream location (80±14 %), with an increasing proportion of streambed (SBed) sediment remobilization downstream (42 ± 29 %), specifically during events characterized by high rainfall amounts. At the upstream location, the source of POM seems to be controlled by the maximum and median hourly rainfall intensity. An added value of this method is to directly investigate chemical biomarkers and to mine their distributions in terms of biogeochemical functioning of an ecosystem. In this catchment, the distribution of plant-derived biomarkers characterizing lignin, cutin and suberin inputs were similar in SBed and litter, while the proportion of microbial markers was 4 times higher in SBed than in litter. These results indicate that SBed OM was largely from plant litter that has been processed by the aquatic microbial community.

  3. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

    2000-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

  4. Particulate matter and plankton dynamics in the Ross Sea Polynya of Terra Nova Bay during the Austral Summer 1997/98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda Umani, S.; Accornero, A.; Budillon, G.; Capello, M.; Tucci, S.; Cabrini, M.; Del Negro, P.; Monti, M.; De Vittor, C.

    2002-07-01

    The structure and variability of the plankton community and the distribution and composition of suspended particulate matter, were investigated in the polynya of Terra Nova Bay (western Ross Sea) during the austral summer 1997/1998, with the ultimate objective of understanding the trophic control of carbon export from the upper water column. Sampling was conducted along a transect parallel to the shore, near the retreating ice edge at the beginning of December, closer to the coast at the beginning of February, and more offshore in late February. Hydrological casts and water sampling were performed at several depths to measure total particulate matter (TPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), biogenic silica (BSi), chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phaeopigment (Phaeo) concentrations. Subsamples were taken for counting autotrophic and heterotrophic pico- and nanoplankton and to assess the abundance and composition of microphyto- and microzooplankton. Statistical analysis identified two major groups of samples: the first included the most coastal surface samples of early December, characterized by the prevalence of autotrophic nanoplankton biomass; the second included all the remaining samples and was dominated by microphytoplankton. With regard to the relation of the plankton community composition to the biogenic suspended and sinking material, we identified the succession of three distinct periods. In early December Phaeocystis dominated the plankton assemblage in the well-mixed water column, while at the retreating ice-edge a bloom of small diatoms (ND) was developing in the lens of superficial diluted water. Concentrations of biogenic particulates were generally low and confined to the uppermost layer. The very low downward fluxes, the near absence of faecal pellets and the high Chl a/Phaeo ratios suggested that the herbivorous food web was not established yet or, at least, was not working efficiently. In early February the superficial pycnocline and the increased water

  5. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 2: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2015-04-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south-stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl : vanillyl (C / V) and syringyl : vanillyl (S / V) ratios are > 0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are > 0.16 and > 0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C / V and S / V ratios, and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (~ 12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad / AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (> 0.7 and > 0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (> 1.0 and > 0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River

  6. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River Delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 1: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-10-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl:vanillyl (C/V) and syringyl:vanillyl (S/V) ratios are >0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are >0.16 and >0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C/V and S/V ratios and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (∼12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad/AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (>0.7 and >0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (>1.0 and >0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River summer TSM could

  7. Mechanisms and rates of bacterial colonization of sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, H.P.; Ploug, H.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling...... (0 to 2 s(-1)). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. 00 Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii......) Tumbling strains colonize aggregates enriched with organic substrates faster than unenriched aggregates, while a nontumbling strain did not. (iv) Once on the aggregates, the bacteria may detach and typical residence time is about 3 h. Thus, there is a rapid exchange between attached and free bacteria. (v...

  8. Assessing the Influence of Seasonal and Spatial Variations on the Estimation of Secondary Organic Carbon in Urban Particulate Matter by Applying the EC-Tracer Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Wagener

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The elemental carbon (EC-tracer method was applied to PM10 and PM1 data of three sampling sites in the City of Berlin from February to October 2010. The sites were characterized by differing exposure to traffic and vegetation. The aim was to determine the secondary organic carbon (SOC concentration and to describe the parameters influencing the application of the EC-tracer method. The evaluation was based on comparisons with results obtained from positive matrix factorization (PMF applied to the same samples. To obtain site- and seasonal representative primary OC/EC-ratios ([OC/EC]p, the EC-tracer method was performed separately for each station, and additionally discrete for samples with high and low contribution of biomass burning. Estimated SOC-concentrations for all stations were between 11% and 33% of total OC. SOC-concentrations obtained with PMF exceeded EC-tracer results more than 100% at the park in the period with low biomass burning emissions in PM10. The deviations were besides others attributed to the high ratio of biogenic to combustion emissions and to direct exposure to vegetation. The occurrences of biomass burning emissions in contrast lead to increased SOC-concentrations compared to PMF in PM10. The obtained results distinguish that the EC-tracer-method provides well comparable results with PMF if sites are strongly influenced by one characteristic primary combustion source, but was found to be adversely influenced by direct and relatively high biogenic emissions.

  9. Vertical transport of suspended particulate trace elements in the North Atlantic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuss, J.; Kremling, K.; Scholten, J.

    1999-01-01

    Suspended marine particles play a key role in the exchange processes between rapidly sinking particles and seawater because of their large surface area and long residence times. They are involved in the transport processes of rapidly sinking particles (∼ 100 m/day) through aggregation and disaggregation. This mechanism results in a net downward transport of suspended particulate trace elements (TE). To provide more information to these processes TE in suspended particulate material (SPM) have been measured on three cruises from 1995 to 1997 along 20 deg. W using a large volume in situ filtration between 25 m and 4150 m depth in addition to particle flux measurements with sediment traps. These studies were performed under the framework of German JGOFS

  10. Geological characterization of the Prestige sinking area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercilla, Gemma; Córdoba, Diego; Gallart, Josep; Gràcia, Eulalia; Muñoz, Josep A; Somoza, Luis; Vázquez, Juan T; Vilas, Federico

    2006-01-01

    The tanker Prestige sank off NW Iberia on the 19th November 2002. The stern and bow of the Prestige wreck are located on the southwestern edge of the Galicia Bank, at 3565 m and 3830 m water depths, respectively. This bank is a structural high controlled by major faults with predominant N-S, NNE-SSW, and NNW-SEE trends. It is characterized by moderate to low seismic activity. The faults have controlled the local depositional architecture, deforming, fracturing, relocating and distributing sediments since the Valangian (early Cretaceous). The Prestige sinking area corresponds to an asymmetric half-graben structure with a N-S trend, which conditions the present-day morphology. The faulted flank outcrops and its activity and erosion have favoured the occurrence of mass-movements (slumps, slump debris, mass-flows and turbidity currents), building valleys and depositional lobes. Nearsurface sediments comprise mostly terrigenous and biogenous turbiditic muds and sands with a minor presence of hemipelagic muds, except on the fault scarp where pelagites predominate. Potential geological hazards resulting from tectonic and sedimentary processes affect almost the entire Prestige sinking area.

  11. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  12. Evaluation of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) in an urban area downwind of major petrochemical complexes, in Harris County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Daryl F.

    Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs), in particular, the toxic ozone precursors, ethylene, propylene, butenes (1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene) and 1, 3 butadiene found in the Houston area are the most critical in the formation of ozone. Exposure to such chemical can cause adverse health effect on the local population of the area, ranging from respiratory distress, asthma, COPD to Cancer. Urban ambient air samples were collected and analyzed from eight monitoring stations (Sites), encompassing the Houston Ship Channel (HSC), in Harris County, Texas. The data was interpreted and analyzed for changes in the concentration of air pollutants, data was collected daily (24 hours) over a time period from September 2013 to August 2014. One 40-minute sample was collected each hour and analyzed by automated gas chromatograph (Auto-GCs) on-site. A total of 70 compounds are measured hourly at each site, in this research the following chemicals were analysis for their average, seasonal and monthly concentrations: ethane, ethylene, propane, propylene, isobutane, n-butane, 1-butene, c-2-butene, t-2-butene and 1,3-butadiene. In this study, seasonal conditions in the area produced ranges from low to high concentrations of these compounds at certain locations. Two Stations had extremely high yearly average concentrations of butane and its isomers (c-2-butene, t-2-butene) and three stations, 1-butene and isobutene concentrations exceeded normal safety limits along with 1,3-butadiene. One station, in particular, close to the HSC had the highest yearly average propylene concentration. Local meteorology also promotes risk issues to the local health of persons within the area/community of interest. This research concluded that the analyzed results of ambient air samples in the urban areas surrounding the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) in Harris County, Texas posed a dual threat. The production of ozone in the daylight hours and depletion of ozone at night, as well as the

  13. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseung Choo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs. They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks and disseminate information from multi-source nodes to the multi-mobile sinks. In particular, a stationary dissemination path may no longer be effective in mobile sink applications, due to sink mobility. In this paper, we propose a Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service (SDLS approach to handle sink mobility. In SDLS, we propose an Eight-Direction Anchor (EDA system that acts as a location service server. EDA prevents intensive energy consumption at the border sensor nodes and thus provides energy balancing to all the sensor nodes. Then we propose a Location-based Shortest Relay (LSR that efficiently forwards (or relays data from a source node to a sink with minimal delay path. Our results demonstrate that SDLS not only provides an efficient and scalable location service, but also reduces the average data communication overhead in scenarios with multiple and moving sinks and sources.

  14. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeonjae; Park, Kwangjin; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Choo, Hyunseung

    2009-01-01

    Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs). They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks and disseminate information from multi-source nodes to the multi-mobile sinks. In particular, a stationary dissemination path may no longer be effective in mobile sink applications, due to sink mobility. In this paper, we propose a Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service (SDLS) approach to handle sink mobility. In SDLS, we propose an Eight-Direction Anchor (EDA) system that acts as a location service server. EDA prevents intensive energy consumption at the border sensor nodes and thus provides energy balancing to all the sensor nodes. Then we propose a Location-based Shortest Relay (LSR) that efficiently forwards (or relays) data from a source node to a sink with minimal delay path. Our results demonstrate that SDLS not only provides an efficient and scalable location service, but also reduces the average data communication overhead in scenarios with multiple and moving sinks and sources.

  15. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: A revision of global budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, S.; Borges, A.V.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N.C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.-Y.; Marchand, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Smith, T. J.; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove primary production from the literature results in a conservative estimate of ???-218 ?? 72 Tg C a-1. When using the best available estimates of various carbon sinks (organic carbon export, sediment burial, and mineralization), it appears that >50% of the carbon fixed by mangrove vegetation is unaccounted for. This unaccounted carbon sink is conservatively estimated at ??? 112 ?? 85 Tg C a-1, equivalent in magnitude to ??? 30-40% of the global riverine organic carbon input to the coastal zone. Our analysis suggests that mineralization is severely underestimated, and that the majority of carbon export from mangroves to adjacent waters occurs as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). CO2 efflux from sediments and creek waters and tidal export of DIC appear to be the major sinks. These processes are quantitatively comparable in magnitude to the unaccounted carbon sink in current budgets, but are not yet adequately constrained with the limited published data available so far. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Cooling characteristics of a strip fin heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riu, Kap Jong; Park, Cheol Woo; Jang, Chung Sun; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2005-01-01

    Air-cooled heat sinks are employed in many electronic cooling applications since they provide significant heat transfer enhancement and operational flexibility. Strip-shaped fin heat sink is of interest and needs to be investigated as general cooling products for more applicability. The purposes of this study are to evaluate heat sink performance without bypass flow condition and to determine optimal heat sink geometries. The results show that the decreasing rate of thermal resistance of a heat sink decreases with increasing inlet air velocity, and the increasing rate of pressure drop increases with increasing inlet air velocity, but is not affected by input power. The increasing rate of optimal longitudinal fin spacing is larger than that of transverse fin spacing. The strip fin heat sink tested in this study showed better cooling performance compared to that of other plate fin type

  17. Organic carbon deliveries and their flow related dynamics in the Fitzroy estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Phillip; Tillman, Pei; Robson, Barbara; Webster, Ian T.

    2005-01-01

    The Fitzroy estuary (Queensland, Australia) receives large, but highly episodic, river flows from a catchment (144,000 km 2 ) which has undergone major land clearing. Large quantities of suspended sediments, and particulate and dissolved organic carbon are delivered. At peak flows, δ 13 C (-21.7 ± 0.8%o) and C/N (14.8 ± 1.3) of the suspended solids indicate that the particulate organic material entering the estuary is principally soil organic carbon. At the lower beginning flows the particulate organic matter comes from in-stream producers (δ 13 C = -26%o). The DOC load is about 10 times the POC load. Using the inverse method, budgets for POC and DOC were constructed for high and low flows. Under high flows, only a small portion of the POC and DOC load is lost in the estuary. Under dry season (low flow) conditions the estuary is a sink for DOC, but remains a source of POC to the coastal waters

  18. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  19. Forest Carbon Sinks and Biodiversity Conservation from China's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mingde Cao, Ying Chen

    2010-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol established the use of forest carbon sinks as one way of compensating for forest ecological values. Forest carbon sinks can promote sustainable economic development and help developed nations reduce their GHG emissions. But without proper legal regulation they may influence the local ecological environment and, in particular, they may harm biodiversity. States need to make laws that regulate forest carbon sinks and protect biodiversity. Environmental law urgently needs to s...

  20. Global Modelling of the total OH reactivity: validation against measurements and atmospheric implications of the 'missing' sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracci, Valerio; Archibald, Alexander T.; Pyle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    The removal of most trace gases emitted into the atmosphere is primarily initiated by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH. A number of field campaigns over the last two decades have observed the presence of a "missing" sink of the OH radical in a variety of regions across the planet, from urban areas to remote forests: comparison of the direct measurements of the OH loss rate, also known as total OH reactivity, with the sum of individual known OH sinks (obtained via the simultaneous detection of species such as volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) indicated that, in some cases, up to 80% of the total OH loss rate was unaccounted for. The implications of this finding are significant, as a potentially major OH sink operating in the atmosphere is not currently accounted for in atmospheric models: the presence of an additional OH sink might, for instance, lead to an increase in the atmospheric lifetime of a number of trace species, including high-impact greenhouse gases such as methane. The only modelling of the total OH reactivity is currently performed on a regional scale; a thorough assessment of the impact of the missing sink on the chemistry and climate of the planet by global modelling is therefore highly desirable. In this work a chemistry-climate model (the Met Office's Unified Model with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols scheme, UM-UKCA) was used to calculate the total OH reactivity at the planetary boundary layer. The model output was validated against available field measurements to verify that the known OH sinks observed in the field were reproduced correctly by the model: a good agreement was found between the data from more than 30 field campaigns and the model output. Following this, the effects of introducing novel OH sinks in the chemistry scheme were investigated. The first step was the introduction in the model of the newly characterised reactions of peroxy radicals (RO2) with OH, the kinetics and products of which have only

  1. The potential contribution of sinks to meeting Kyoto Protocol commitments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missfeldt, F.; Haites, E.

    2001-01-01

    scenario, at least some of the sinks have costs lower than the market price, so the larger the eligible sinks, the lower the compliance costs for industrialised countries. Greater use of sinks also reduces the net income received by the economies in transition and developing countries. Increased use......, a range of average costs is used with the lowest cost allowing maximum use of sinks. The effects considered are the impacts on compliance costs for OECD countries, economies in transition, and developing countries and the mix of actions used by industrialised countries to achieve compliance. In every...

  2. Effects of biofouling on the sinking behavior of microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, David; Kowalski, Nicole; Waniek, Joanna J.

    2017-12-01

    Although plastic is ubiquitous in marine systems, our current knowledge of transport mechanisms is limited. Much of the plastic entering the ocean sinks; this is intuitively obvious for polymers such as polystyrene (PS), which have a greater density than seawater, but lower density polymers like polyethylene (PE) also occur in sediments. Biofouling can cause large plastic objects to sink, but this phenomenon has not been described for microplastics microplastic particles in estuarine and coastal waters to determine how biofouling changes their sinking behavior. Sinking velocities of PS increased by 16% in estuarine water (salinity 9.8) and 81% in marine water (salinity 36) after 6 weeks of incubation. Thereafter sinking velocities decreased due to lower water temperatures and reduced light availability. Biofouling did not cause PE to sink during the 14 weeks of incubation in estuarine water, but PE started to sink after six weeks in coastal water when sufficiently colonized by blue mussels Mytilus edulis, and its velocity continued to increase until the end of the incubation period. Sinking velocities of these PE pellets were similar irrespective of salinity (10 vs. 36). Biofilm composition differed between estuarine and coastal stations, presumably accounting for differences in sinking behavior. We demonstrate that biofouling enhances microplastic deposition to marine sediments, and our findings should improve microplastic transport models.

  3. Investigation of Heat Sink Efficiency for Electronic Component Cooling Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Ž.; Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    of relatively simple heat sink application is performed using modeling based on finite element method, and also the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real-world measurements and comparing obtained results. Thermal modeling was accomplished using finite element analysis software COMSOL and thermo-imaging......Research and optimisation of cooling of electronic components using heat sinks becomes increasingly important in modern industry. Numerical methods with experimental real-world verification are the main tools to evaluate efficiency of heat sinks or heat sink systems. Here the investigation...... camera was used to measure the thermal field distribution. Ideas for future research involving improvement of the experimental setup and modeling verification are given....

  4. Sources and sinks of stratospheric water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1979-11-01

    A tutorial review of the understanding of stratospheric H 2 O and the processes controlling it is presented. Paradoxes posed by currently available observational data are cited and suggestions made as to how they might be resolved. Such resolution appears to require: that the bulk of our current data provides unrepresentative and misleading vertical and latitudinal H 2 O gradients immediately downstream from the tropical tropopause; and, that there exists within the troposphere a mechanism different from or in addition to the tropical tropopause cold trap for drying air to the mixing ratios found in the lower stratosphere. Satisfaction of these requirements will reconcile much heretofore puzzling observational data and will obviate the necessity for a stratospheric sink for H 2 O

  5. How phosphorus limitation can control climatic gas sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypens, Nathalie; Borges, Alberto V.; Ghyoot, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1950's, anthropogenic activities severely increased river nutrient loads in European coastal areas. Subsequent implementation of nutrient reduction policies have considerably reduced phosphorus (P) loads from mid-1980's, while nitrogen (N) loads were maintained, inducing a P limitation of phytoplankton growth in many eutrophied coastal areas such as the Southern Bight of the North Sea (SBNS). When dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIP) is limiting, most phytoplankton organisms are able to indirectly acquire P from dissolved organic P (DOP). We investigate the impact of DOP use on the importance of phytoplankton production and atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the SBNS from 1951 to 2007 using an extended version of the R-MIRO-BIOGAS model. This model includes a description of the ability of phytoplankton organisms to use DOP as a source of P. Results show that primary production can increase up to 70% due to DOP uptake in limiting DIP conditions. Consequently, simulated DMS emissions double while CO2 emissions to the atmosphere decrease, relative to the reference simulation without DOP uptake. At the end of the simulated period (late 2000's), the net direction of air-sea CO2 annual flux, changed from a source to a sink for atmospheric CO2 in response to use of DOP and increase of primary production.

  6. UHS, Ultimate Heat Sink Cooling Pond Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codell, R.; Nuttle, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: Three programs model performance of an ultimate heat sink cooling pond. National Weather Service data is read and analyzed to predict periods of lowest cooling performance and highest evaporative loss. The data is compared to local site data for significant differences. Then the maximum pond temperature is predicted. Five programs model performance of an ultimate heat sink spray pond. The cooling performance, evaporative water loss, and drift water loss as a function of wind speed are estimated for a spray field. These estimates are used in conjunction with National Weather Service data to predict periods of lowest cooling performance and highest evaporative loss. This data is compared to local site data for significant differences. Then the maximum pond temperature is predicted. 2 - Method of solution: The transfer of heat and water vapor is modeled using an equilibrium temperature procedure for an UHS cooling pond. The UHS spray pond model considers heat, mass, and momentum transfer from a single water drop with the surrounding air, and modification of the surrounding air resulting from the heat, mass, and momentum transfer from many drops in different parts of a spray field. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program SPRCO uses RANF, a uniform random number generator which is an intrinsic function on the CDC. All programs except COMET use the NAMELIST statement, which is non standard. Otherwise these programs conform to the ANSI Fortran 77 standard. The meteorological data scanning procedure requires tens of years of recorded data to be effective. The models and methods, provided as useful tool for UHS analyses of cooling ponds and spray ponds, are intended as guidelines only. Use of these methods does not automatically assure NRC approval, nor are they required procedures for nuclear-power-plant licensing

  7. Using plant growth modeling to analyse C source-sink relations under drought: inter and intra specific comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit ePallas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to assimilate C and allocate NSC (non structural carbohydrates to the most appropriate organs is crucial to maximize plant ecological or agronomic performance. Such C source and sink activities are differentially affected by environmental constraints. Under drought, plant growth is generally more sink than source limited as organ expansion or appearance rate is earlier and stronger affected than C assimilation. This favors plant survival and recovery but not always agronomic performance as NSC are stored rather than used for growth due to a modified metabolism in source and sink leaves. Such interactions between plant C and water balance are complex and plant modeling can help analyzing their impact on plant phenotype. This paper addresses the impact of trade-offs between C sink and source activities and plant production under drought, combining experimental and modeling approaches. Two contrasted monocotyledonous species (rice, oil palm were studied. Experimentally, the sink limitation of plant growth under moderate drought was confirmed as well as the modifications in NSC metabolism in source and sink organs. Under severe stress, when C source became limiting, plant NSC concentration decreased. Two plant models dedicated to oil palm and rice morphogenesis were used to perform a sensitivity analysis and further explore how to optimize C sink and source drought sensitivity to maximize plant growth. Modeling results highlighted that optimal drought sensitivity depends both on drought type and species and that modeling is a great opportunity to analyse such complex processes. Further modeling needs and more generally the challenge of using models to support complex trait breeding are discussed.

  8. Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of sinking particles and sediments from the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaye-Haake, G.; Lahajnar, N.; Emeis, K.-Ch.; Unger, D; Rixen, T.; Suthhof, A.; Ramaswamy, V.; Schulz, H.; Paropkari, A.L.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Ittekkot, V.

    (15)N values in Arabian Sea particulate matter and surface sediments. Delta sup(15)N minima in the northern Bay of Bengal are caused by input of terrestrial organic matter as well as depleted nitrate from rivers. Delta sup(15)N is about 8 ppt...

  9. Application of in situ observations, high frequency radars, and ocean color, to study suspended matter, particulate carbon, and dissolved organic carbon fluxes in coastal waters of the Barents Sea - the NORDFLUX project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Yngve Børsheim, Knut; Białogrodzka, Jagoda; Cieszyńska, Agata; Ficek, Dariusz; Wereszka, Marzena

    2016-04-01

    There is still a limited knowledge about suspended and dissolved matter fluxes transported from coastal regions into the open sea regions in the Arctic. The land/sea interface is environmentally important and sensitive to climate change. Important biogeochemical material entering the oceans (including carbon) passes through this interface, but too little is known about the efficiency of this transport. Our goal in the NORDFLUX program is to improve quantitative understanding of the environmental feedbacks involved in these processes through an interdisciplinary study with innovative in situ observations. Completed work includes two in situ experiments in the Norwegian fiord (Porsangerfjorden) in the summers of 2014 and 2015. Experiments used research boat for collection of water samples and in situ bio-optical data, an autonomous glider, mooring with T S sensors, and a high frequency radar system. We have used these data to derive spatial maps of water temperature, salinity, surface currents, chlorophyll fluorescence, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence, and inherent optical properties (IOPs) of the water. The interpretation of these data in terms of suspended matter concentration and composition is possible by in situ 'calibrations' using water samples from discrete hydrographic stations. Total suspended matter (TSM), particulate carbon (POC and PIC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations together with measured water currents will allow us to estimate reservoirs and fluxes. Concentrations and fluxes will be related to physical conditions and meteorological data. An important aspect of this project is the work on regional ocean color algorithms. Global ocean color (OC) algorithms currently used by NASA do not perform sufficiently well in coastal Case 2 waters. Our data sets will allow us to derive such local algorithms. We will then use these algorithms for interpretation of OC data in terms of TSM concentrations and composition and DOC. After

  10. Modeling the reversible sink effect in response to transient contaminant sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dongye; Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2001-02-01

    A physically based diffusion model is used to evaluate the sink effect of diffusion-controlled indoor materials and to predict the transient contaminant concentration in indoor air in response to several time-varying contaminant sources. For simplicity, it is assumed the predominant indoor material is a homogeneous slab, initially free of contaminant, and the air within the room is well mixed. The model enables transient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations to be predicted based on the material/air partition coefficient (K) and the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D) of the sink. Model predictions are made for three scenarios, each mimicking a realistic situation in a building. Styrene, phenol, and naphthalene are used as representative VOCs. A styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) backed carpet, vinyl flooring (VF), and a polyurethane foam (PUF) carpet cushion are considered as typical indoor sinks. In scenarios involving a sinusoidal VOC input and a double exponential decaying input, the model predicts the sink has a modest impact for SBR/styrene, but the effect increases for VF/phenol and PUF/naphthalene. In contrast, for an episodic chemical spill, SBR is predicted to reduce the peak styrene concentration considerably. A parametric study reveals for systems involving a large equilibrium constant (K), the kinetic constant (D) will govern the shape of the resulting gas-phase concentration profile. On the other hand, for systems with a relaxed mass transfer resistance, K will dominate the profile.

  11. Efficient Data Collection by Mobile Sink to Detect Phenomena in Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Abu Safia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of Internet of Things (IoT, more and more static and mobile sensors are being deployed for sensing and tracking environmental phenomena, such as fire, oil spills and air pollution. As these sensors are usually battery-powered, energy-efficient algorithms are required to extend the sensors’ lifetime. Moreover, forwarding sensed data towards a static sink causes quick battery depletion of the sinks’ nearby sensors. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a distributed energy-efficient algorithm, called the Hilbert-order Collection Strategy (HCS, which uses a mobile sink (e.g., drone to collect data from a mobile wireless sensor network (mWSN and detect environmental phenomena. The mWSN consists of mobile sensors that sense environmental data. These mobile sensors self-organize themselves into groups. The sensors of each group elect a group head (GH, which collects data from the mobile sensors in its group. Periodically, a mobile sink passes by the locations of the GHs (data collection path to collect their data. The collected data are aggregated to discover a global phenomenon. To shorten the data collection path, which results in reducing the energy cost, the mobile sink establishes the path based on the order of Hilbert values of the GHs’ locations. Furthermore, the paper proposes two optimization techniques for data collection to further reduce the energy cost of mWSN and reduce the data loss.

  12. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... reason of imports from China of drawn stainless sinks, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the... than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Government of China. \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207...

  13. Copepods use chemical trails to find sinking marine snow aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; Koski, Marja; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Copepods are major consumers of sinking marine particles and hence reduce the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. Their high abundance on marine snow suggests that they can detect sinking particles remotely. By means of laboratory observations, we show that the copepod Temora longicornis ca...

  14. Sinking in Quicksand: An Applied Approach to the Archimedes Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. M.; Evans, S. C.; Moreno-Atanasio, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a laboratory experiment that explains the phenomenon of sinking in quicksand simulated as a fluidized bed. The paper demonstrates experimentally and theoretically that the proportion of a body that sinks in quicksand depends on the volume fraction of solids and the density of the body relative to the…

  15. Transcriptional profiling of mechanically and genetically sink-limited soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absence of a reproductive sink causes physiological and morphological changes in soybean plants. These include increased accumulation of nitrogen and starch in the leaves and delayed leaf senescence. To identify transcriptional changes that occur in leaves of these sink-limited plants, we used R...

  16. Grain boundary strength as point defect sink strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volobuev, A.V.; Gann, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    Sink strength of spherical grain boundary as an absolutely absorbing surface and as finite thickness wall consisting of the edge dislocations are considered. The values of the grain boundary sink strength are shown to be critically dependent on the point defect recombination degree

  17. Characterizing source-sink dynamics with genetic parentage assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peery, M. Zachariah; Beissinger, Steven R.; House, Roger F.; Berube, Martine; Hall, Laurie A.; Sellas, Anna; Palsboll, Per J.

    2008-01-01

    Source-sink dynamics have been suggested to characterize the population structure of many species, but the prevalence of source-sink systems in nature is uncertain because of inherent challenges in estimating migration rates among populations. Migration rates are often difficult to estimate directly

  18. The Global Carbon Sink in Tidal Salt Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, G. L.

    2004-05-01

    For decades researchers have concentrated on proving that C is exported from salt marshes to coastal waters, with limited success. Yet, the C retained in the marsh soils may be equally important. Presumptions that minor amounts of C are stored in salt marsh soils are based upon measurements of low percentages of C in many marshes. Simply measuring the organic matter content of marsh soils provides little indication of the amount or rate of C stored, as this parameter is based upon the percent by mass of the soil. The critical parameter to calculate is C density, derived from percent organic matter and bulk density. (The latter is often neglected in marsh soil studies.) Calculation of C density reveals that minerogenic soils with high bulk densities may have C densities or C storage rates equivalent to more organic soils with low bulk densities. A global average soil C density of 0.055 ± 0.004 g cm-3 has been calculated from 107 measurements reported for salt marshes around the world (Gulf of Mexico, NE and NW Atlantic, Mediterranean and NE Pacific). Assuming an average marsh soil depth of 0.5 m and using inventories of marsh area available for Europe, Scandinavia, Africa, Canada and the U.S., the C stored globally in salt marshes is greater than 430 ± 30 Tg C. The global carbon storage could be twice this as there are no marsh inventories available for Asia or South America. Rates of C storage can be calculated from 96 C density measurements where soil accretion rates also were measured. Globally, marshes sequester an average of 210 g CO2 m-2 yr-1, an order of magnitude greater than rates reported for peatlands. Salt marsh C storage can have regional importance. At a magnitude of 5 Tg C yr-1, tidal wetlands comprise 1--2 percent of the C sink (300--580 Tg C yr-1) estimated for the coterminous U.S. In the Bay of Fundy restoration of salt marshes reclaimed for agricultural land could enable sequestration of an additional 240 to 360 Gg C yr-1, equivalent to 4 to 6

  19. Sinks as integrative elements of the anthropogenic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Ulrich; Brunner, Paul H.

    2015-04-01

    The anthropogenic metabolism is an open system requiring exchange of materials and energy between the anthroposphere and the environment. Material and energy flows are taken from nature and become utilized by men. After utilization, the materials either remain in the anthroposphere as recycling products, or they leave the anthroposphere as waste and emission flows. To accommodate these materials without jeopardizing human and environmental health, limited natural sinks are available; thus, man-made sinks have to be provided where natural sinks are missing or overloaded. The oral presentation (1) suggests a coherent definition of the term "sink", encompassing natural and man-made processes, (2) presents a framework to analyse and evaluate anthropogenic material flows to sinks, based on the tool substance flow analysis and impact assessment methodology, and (3) applies the framework in a case study approach for selected substances such as Copper and Lead in Vienna and Perfluorooctane sulfonate in Switzerland. Finally, the numeric results are aggregated in terms of a new indicator that specifies on a regional scale which fractions of anthropogenic material flows to sinks are acceptable. The following results are obtained: In Vienna, 99% of Cu flows to natural and man-made sinks are in accordance with accepted standards. However, the 0.7% of Cu entering urban soils and the 0.3% entering receiving waters surpass the acceptable level. In the case of Pb, 92% of all flows into sinks prove to be acceptable, but 8% are disposed of in local landfills with limited capacity. For PFOS, 96% of all flows into sinks are acceptable. 4% cannot be evaluated due to a lack of normative criteria, despite posing a risk for human health and the environment. The case studies corroborate the need and constraints of sinks to accommodate inevitable anthropogenic material flows.

  20. Fire ants perpetually rebuild sinking towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonekeo, Sulisay; Mlot, Nathan; Monaenkova, Daria; Hu, David L.; Tovey, Craig

    2017-07-01

    In the aftermath of a flood, fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, cluster into temporary encampments. The encampments can contain hundreds of thousands of ants and reach over 30 ants high. How do ants build such tall structures without being crushed? In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we investigate the shape and rate of construction of ant towers around a central support. The towers are bell shaped, consistent with towers of constant strength such as the Eiffel tower, where each element bears an equal load. However, unlike the Eiffel tower, the ant tower is built through a process of trial and error, whereby failed portions avalanche until the final shape emerges. High-speed and novel X-ray videography reveal that the tower constantly sinks and is rebuilt, reminiscent of large multicellular systems such as human skin. We combine the behavioural rules that produce rafts on water with measurements of adhesion and attachment strength to model the rate of growth of the tower. The model correctly predicts that the growth rate decreases as the support diameter increases. This work may inspire the design of synthetic swarms capable of building in vertical layers.

  1. A Nonlinear Energy Sink with Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Daniel

    The transfer of energy between systems is a natural process, manifesting in many different ways. In engineering transferable energy can be considered wanted or unwanted. Specifically in mechanical systems, energy transfer can occur as unwanted vibrations, passing from a source to a receiver. In electrical systems, energy transfer can be desirable, where energy from a source may be used elsewhere. This work proposes a method to combine the two, converting unwanted mechanical energy into useable electrical energy. A nonlinear energy sink (NES) is a vibration absorber that passively localizes vibrational energy, removing mechanical energy from a primary system. Consisting of a mass-spring-damper such that the stiffness is essentially nonlinear, a NES can localize vibrational energy from a source and dissipate it through damping. Replacing the NES mass with a series of magnets surrounded by coils fixed to the primary mass, the dissipated energy can be directly converted to electrical energy. A NES with energy harvesting properties is constructed and introduced. The system parameters are identified, with the NES having an essentially cubic nonlinear stiffness. A transduction factor is quantified linking the electrical and mechanical systems. An analytic analysis is carried out studying the transient and harmonically excited response of the system. It is found that the energy harvesting does not reduce the vibrational absorption capabilities of the NES. The performance of the system in both transient and harmonically excited responses is found to be heavily influenced by input energies. The system is tested, with good match to analytic results.

  2. Contribution of unburned lubricating oil and diesel fuel to particulate emission from passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenberger, Sandro; Mohr, Martin; Grob, Koni; Neukom, Hans Peter

    In this study we determined particle-bound paraffins in the exhaust of six light-duty diesel vehicles on a chassis dynamometer for different driving cycles and ambient temperatures. The filters containing particulate matter were extracted with dichloromethane in a Soxhlet apparatus, and the paraffin analysis was performed using two-dimensional normal phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled on-line to gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The different molecular mass of lubricant and diesel paraffins facilitated the distinction between diesel and lubricant contribution to the emission. Although all vehicles were certified according to the same emission class, there were considerable variations between vehicles. The study showed that under cold-start conditions the organic mass fraction ranged from 10% to 30% with respect to particle mass and the paraffins from 30% to 60% with respect to the organic mass. With cold engine, falling ambient temperature increased the emission of unburned diesel fuel, whereas that from unburned lubricating oil was less affected. Under warm-start conditions, the ambient temperature had less impact on the emission of paraffins. The emissions were also affected by the operating conditions of the engine: driving cycles with higher mean load tend towards higher emissions of lubricant. The operating conditions also affected the distribution of paraffins: the emission of light paraffins seemed to be lower with higher load in the driving cycle. With an urban and a highway cycle, roughly 40% and 80% w/w, respectively, of unburned paraffins were contributed by the lubricant. Measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in lubricating oil showed lubricant to be a sink for PAHs. As lubricant significantly contributes to the organic emission, as shown in this study, it can be assumed that it is also a significant source of PAH emissions.

  3. Exposure to the elemental carbon, organic carbon, nitrate and sulfate fractions of fine particulate matter and risk of preterm birth in New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania (2000-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Particulate matter ≤2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) has been consistently associated with preterm birth (PTB) to varying degrees, but roles of PM2.5 species have been less studied.OBJECTIVE:We estimated risk differences (RD) of PTB (reported per 106 pregnancies...

  4. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  5. Emission factors of fine particulate matter, organic and elemental carbon, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide for four solid fuels commonly used in residential heating by the U.S. Navajo Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Wyatt M; Connors, Lea; Montoya, Lupita D

    2017-09-01

    Most homes in the Navajo Nation use wood as their primary heating fuel, often in combination with locally mined coal. Previous studies observed health effects linked to this solid-fuel use in several Navajo communities. Emission factors (EFs) for common fuels used by the Navajo have not been reported using a relevant stove type. In this study, two softwoods (ponderosa pine and Utah juniper) and two high-volatile bituminous coals (Black Mesa and Fruitland) were tested with an in-use residential conventional wood stove (homestove) using a modified American Society for Testing and Materials/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ASTM/EPA) protocol. Filter sampling quantified PM 2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm) and organic (OC) and elemental (EC) carbon in the emissions. Real-time monitoring quantified carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and total suspended particles (TSP). EFs for these air pollutants were developed and normalized to both fuel mass and energy consumed. In general, coal had significantly higher mass EFs than wood for all pollutants studied. In particular, coal emitted, on average, 10 times more PM 2.5 than wood on a mass basis, and 2.4 times more on an energy basis. The EFs developed here were based on fuel types, stove design, and operating protocols relevant to the Navajo Nation, but they could be useful to other Native Nations with similar practices, such as the nearby Hopi Nation. Indoor wood and coal combustion is an important contributor to public health burdens in the Navajo Nation. Currently, there exist no emission factors representative of Navajo homestoves, fuels, and practices. This study developed emission factors for PM 2.5 , OC, EC, CO, and CO 2 using a representative Navajo homestove. These emission factors may be utilized in regional-, national-, and global-scale health and environmental models. Additionally, the protocols developed and results presented here may inform on-going stove design of

  6. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak; Rich Gebert

    2001-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hr parametric tests and 100-hr proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency. Since all of the developmental goals of Phase I were met, the approach was scaled up in Phase II to a size of 255 m{sup 3}/min (9000 acfm) (equivalent in size to 2.5 MW) and was installed on a slipstream at the Big Stone Power Plant. For Phase II, the AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant was operated continuously from late July 1999 until mid-December 1999. The Phase II results were highly successful in that ultrahigh particle collection efficiency was achieved, pressure drop was well controlled, and system operability was excellent. For Phase III, the AHPC was modified into a more compact configuration, and components were installed that were closer to what would be used in a full-scale commercial design. The modified AHPC was operated from April to July 2000. While operational results were acceptable during this time, inspection of bags in the summer of 2000 revealed some membrane damage to the fabric that appeared to be

  7. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.A.; Fang, J.; Houghton, R.; Kauppi, P.E.; Kurz, W.A.; Phillips, O.L.; Shvidenko, A.; Lewis, S.L.; Canadell, J.G.; Ciais, P.; Jackson, R.B.; Pacala, S.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Piao, S.; Rautiainen, A.; Sitch, S.; Hayes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ?? 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year-1) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ?? 0.7 Pg C year-1 from tropical land-use change, consisting of a gross tropical deforestation emission of 2.9 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1 partially compensated by a carbon sink in tropical forest regrowth of 1.6 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1. Together, the fluxes comprise a net global forest sink of 1.1 ?? 0.8 Pg C year-1, with tropical estimates having the largest uncertainties. Our total forest sink estimate is equivalent in magnitude to the terrestrial sink deduced from fossil fuel emissions and land-use change sources minus ocean and atmospheric sinks.

  8. A simple method to convert sink particles into stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormani, Mattia C.; Treß, Robin G.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Glover, Simon C. O.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of star formation often do not possess the dynamic range needed to fully resolve the build-up of individual stars and star clusters, and thus have to resort to sub-grid models. A popular way to do this is by introducing Lagrangian sink particles, which replace contracting high-density regions at the point where the resolution limit is reached. A common problem then is how to assign fundamental stellar properties to sink particles, such as the distribution of stellar masses. We present a new and simple statistical method to assign stellar contents to sink particles. Once the stellar content is specified, it can be used to determine a sink particle's radiative output, supernovae rate or other feedback parameters that may be required in the calculations. Advantages of our method are: (I) it is simple to implement; (II) it guarantees that the obtained stellar populations are good samples of the initial mass function; (III) it can easily deal with infalling mass accreted at later times; and (IV) it does not put restrictions on the sink particles' masses in order to be used. The method works very well for sink particles that represent large star clusters and for which the stellar mass function is well sampled, but can also handle the transition to sink particles that represent a small number of stars.

  9. Maximizing Lifetime of Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Sink Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yourong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to maximize network lifetime and balance energy consumption when sink nodes can move, maximizing lifetime of wireless sensor networks with mobile sink nodes (MLMS is researched. The movement path selection method of sink nodes is proposed. Modified subtractive clustering method, k-means method, and nearest neighbor interpolation method are used to obtain the movement paths. The lifetime optimization model is established under flow constraint, energy consumption constraint, link transmission constraint, and other constraints. The model is solved from the perspective of static and mobile data gathering of sink nodes. Subgradient method is used to solve the lifetime optimization model when one sink node stays at one anchor location. Geometric method is used to evaluate the amount of gathering data when sink nodes are moving. Finally, all sensor nodes transmit data according to the optimal data transmission scheme. Sink nodes gather the data along the shortest movement paths. Simulation results show that MLMS can prolong network lifetime, balance node energy consumption, and reduce data gathering latency under appropriate parameters. Under certain conditions, it outperforms Ratio_w, TPGF, RCC, and GRND.

  10. Correlation between dynamic tomato fruit-set and source-sink ratio: a common relationship for different plant densities and seasons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, MengZhen; Yang, LiLi; Zhang, BaoGui; de Reffye, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    It is widely accepted that fruit-set in plants is related to source-sink ratio. Despite its critical importance to yield, prediction of fruit-set remains an ongoing problem in crop models. Functional-structural plant models are potentially able to simulate organ-level plasticity of plants. To predict fruit-set, the quantitative link between source-sink ratio and fruit-set probability is analysed here via a functional-structural plant model, GreenLab. Two experiments, each with four plant densities, were carried out in a solar greenhouse during two growth seasons (started in spring and autumn). Dynamic fruit-set probability was estimated by frequent observation on inflorescences. Source and sink parameter values were obtained by fitting GreenLab outputs for the biomass of plant parts (lamina, petiole, internode, fruit), at both organ and plant level, to corresponding destructive measurements at six dates from real plants. The dynamic source-sink ratio was calculated as the ratio between biomass production and plant demand (sum of all organ sink strength) per growth cycle, both being outputs of the model. Most sink parameters were stable over multiple planting densities and seasons. From planting, source-sink ratio increased in the vegetative stage and reached a peak after fruit-set commenced, followed by a decrease of leaf appearance rate. Fruit-set probability was correlated with the source-sink ratio after the appearance of flower buds. The relationship between fruit-set probability and the most correlated source-sink ratio could be quantified by a single regression line for both experiments. The current work paves the way to predicting dynamic fruit-set using a functional structure model.

  11. Spread from the Sink to the Patient:In SituStudy Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-Expressing Escherichia coli To Model Bacterial Dispersion from Hand-Washing Sink-Trap Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotay, Shireen; Chai, Weidong; Guilford, William; Barry, Katie; Mathers, Amy J

    2017-04-15

    There have been an increasing number of reports implicating Gammaproteobacteria as often carrying genes of drug resistance from colonized sink traps to vulnerable hospitalized patients. However, the mechanism of transmission from the wastewater of the sink P-trap to patients remains poorly understood. Herein we report the use of a designated hand-washing sink lab gallery to model dispersion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Escherichia coli from sink wastewater to the surrounding environment. We found no dispersion of GFP-expressing E. coli directly from the P-trap to the sink basin or surrounding countertop with coincident water flow from a faucet. However, when the GFP-expressing E. coli cells were allowed to mature in the P-trap under conditions similar to those in a hospital environment, a GFP-expressing E. coli -containing putative biofilm extended upward over 7 days to reach the strainer. This subsequently resulted in droplet dispersion to the surrounding areas (<30 in.) during faucet operation. We also demonstrated that P-trap colonization could occur by retrograde transmission along a common pipe. We postulate that the organisms mobilize up to the strainer from the P-trap, resulting in droplet dispersion rather than dispersion directly from the P-trap. This work helps to further define the mode of transmission of bacteria from a P-trap reservoir to a vulnerable hospitalized patient. IMPORTANCE Many recent reports demonstrate that sink drain pipes become colonized with highly consequential multidrug-resistant bacteria, which then results in hospital-acquired infections. However, the mechanism of dispersal of bacteria from the sink to patients has not been fully elucidated. Through establishment of a unique sink gallery, this work found that a staged mode of transmission involving biofilm growth from the lower pipe to the sink strainer and subsequent splatter to the bowl and surrounding area occurs rather than splatter directly from the water in

  12. Biological control of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-D. Schulze

    2006-01-01

    plant growth has different reasons depending on the region of the world: anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is the controlling factor in Europe, increasing global temperatures is the main factor in Siberia, and maybe rising CO2 the factor controlling the carbon fluxes in Amazonia. However, this has not lead to increases in net biome productivity, due to associated losses. Also important is the interaction between biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. It is shown that net primary productivity increases with plant species diversity (50% species loss equals 20% loss in productivity. However, in this extrapolation the action of soil biota is poorly understood although soils contribute the largest number of species and of taxonomic groups to an ecosystem. The global terrestrial carbon budget strongly depends on areas with pristine old growth forests which are carbon sinks. The management options are very limited, mostly short term, and usually associated with high uncertainty. Unmanaged grasslands appear to be a carbon sink of similar magnitude as forest, but generally these ecosystems lost their C with grazing and agricultural use. Extrapolation to the future of Earth climate shows that the biota will not be able to balance fossil fuel emissions, and that it will be essential to develop a carbon free energy system in order to maintain the living conditions on earth.

  13. Electrically heated particulate filter restart strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-07-12

    A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a propagation module that estimates a propagation status of combustion of particulate matter in the particulate filter. A regeneration module controls current to the particulate filter to re-initiate regeneration based on the propagation status.

  14. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This monitor will be sensitive to particle...

  15. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauvaux, T.

    2008-01-01

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO 2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO 2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO 2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  16. Development of Problem Sets for K-12 and Engineering on Pharmaceutical Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelski, Mariano J.; Slater, C. Stewart; Del Vecchio, Christopher A.; Kosteleski, Adrian J.; Wilson, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Educational problem sets have been developed on structured organic particulate systems (SOPS) used in pharmaceutical technology. The sets present topics such as particle properties and powder flow and can be integrated into K-12 and college-level curricula. The materials educate students in specific areas of pharmaceutical particulate processing,…

  17. Low Carbon sink capacity of Red Sea mangroves

    KAUST Repository

    Almahasheer, Hanan

    2017-08-22

    Mangroves forests of Avicennia marina occupy about 135 km2 in the Red Sea and represent one of the most important vegetated communities in this otherwise arid and oligotrophic region. We assessed the soil organic carbon (C-org) stocks, soil accretion rates (SAR; mm y(-1)) and soil C-org sequestration rates (g C-org m(-2) yr(-1)) in 10 mangrove sites within four locations along the Saudi coast of the Central Red Sea. Soil C-org density and stock in Red Sea mangroves were among the lowest reported globally, with an average of 4 +/- 0.3 mg Corg cm(-3) and 43 +/- 5 Mg C-org ha(-1) (in 1 m-thick soils), respectively. Sequestration rates of C-org, estimated at 3 +/- 1 and 15 +/- 1 g C-org m(-2) yr(-1) for the long (millennia) and short (last century) temporal scales, respectively, were also relatively low compared to mangrove habitats from more humid bioregions. In contrast, the accretion rates of Central Red Sea mangroves soils were within the range reported for global mangrove forests. The relatively low C-org sink capacity of Red Sea mangroves could be due to the extreme environmental conditions such as low rainfall, nutrient limitation and high temperature, reducing the growth rates of the mangroves and increasing soil respiration rates.

  18. Long-period astronomically-forced terrestrial carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Luis; Cabrera, Lluís; Sáez, Alberto; Garcés, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Sequestration of organic matter by peat accumulation constitutes a primary sink for carbon in the global carbon cycle. The processes that control the formation and storage of peat at geological time scales are poorly understood but are of a non-solved issue of fundamental importance for understanding the global climate system. We analyzed a 7 million years long terrestrial record of Late Oligocene age from the As Pontes Basin in Northern Spain, which demonstrates that minima in the 405-kyr and 2.4-Myr eccentricity cycles play a key role in peat formation. Such nodes exhibit reduced precession amplitudes, thus avoiding extremes in seasons and seasonal contrast for a prolonged period of time. In the As Pontes Basin, this orbital configuration is associated with a decrease in siliciclastic sedimentation and enhanced peat formation. Feedbacks between equilibrium landscapes and ecosystem stability will lead to a deceleration of weathering and erosion rates in catchment areas and to minimum and stable sediment flux along the sediment routing system. Mid-latitude peat burial could contribute to disturb the carbon cycle by removing (atmospheric) carbon at times of minimum eccentricity.

  19. Electrical diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-12-31

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

  20. An update on source-to-sink carbon partitioning in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eOsorio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth and carbon metabolism are closely associated since carbohydrate in the form of sucrose generated by photosynthesis, provides the primary source of building blocks and energy for the production and maintenance of biomass. Regulation of carbon partitioning between source and sink tissues is important because it has a vast influence on both plant growth and development.The regulation of carbon partitioning at the whole plant level is directly linked to the cellular pathways of assimilate transport and the metabolism and allocation of sugars, mainly sucrose and hexoses in source leaves and sink organs such as roots and fruit. By using tomato plant as a model, this review documents and discusses our current understanding of source-sink interactions from molecular to physiological perspectives focussing on those that regulate the growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive organs. It furthermore discusses the impact that environmental conditions play in maintenance of this balance in an attempt to address the link between physiological and ecological aspects of growth.

  1. Exploiting leaf starch synthesis as a transient sink to elevate photosynthesis, plant productivity and yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kelly; Park, Jong-Sug; Nagai, Yasuko; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Cho, Young-Chan; Roh, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Si-Myung; Kim, Dong-Hern; Choi, Sang-Bong; Ito, Hiroyuki; Edwards, Gerald E; Okita, Thomas W

    2011-09-01

    Improvements in plant productivity (biomass) and yield have centered on increasing the efficiency of leaf CO(2) fixation and utilization of products by non-photosynthetic sink organs. We had previously demonstrated a correlation between photosynthetic capacity, plant growth, and the extent of leaf starch synthesis utilizing starch-deficient mutants. This finding suggested that leaf starch is used as a transient photosynthetic sink to recycle inorganic phosphate and, in turn, maximize photosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa L.) lines were generated with enhanced capacity to make leaf starch with minimal impact on carbon partitioning to sucrose. The Arabidopsis engineered plants exhibited enhanced photosynthetic capacity; this translated into increased growth and biomass. These enhanced phenotypes were displayed by similarly engineered rice lines. Manipulation of leaf starch is a viable alternative strategy to increase photosynthesis and, in turn, the growth and yields of crop and bioenergy plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic Algorithm Design of a 3D Printed Heat Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tong [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Ayers, Curtis William [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a genetic algorithm- (GA-) based approach is discussed for designing heat sinks based on total heat generation and dissipation for a pre-specified size andshape. This approach combines random iteration processesand genetic algorithms with finite element analysis (FEA) to design the optimized heat sink. With an approach that prefers survival of the fittest , a more powerful heat sink can bedesigned which can cool power electronics more efficiently. Some of the resulting designs can only be 3D printed due totheir complexity. In addition to describing the methodology, this paper also includes comparisons of different cases to evaluate the performance of the newly designed heat sinkcompared to commercially available heat sinks.

  3. Efficient Information Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks using Mobile Sinks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincze, Zoltan; Vidacs, Attila; Vida, Rolland

    2006-01-01

    ...; therefore, relaying information between sensors and a sink node, possibly over multiple wireless hops, in an energy-efficient manner is a challenging task that preoccupies the research community for some time now...

  4. Using Stable Isotopes to Link Nutrient Sources in the Everglades and Biological Sinks in Florida Bay: A Biogeochemical Approach to Evaluate Ecosystem Response to Changing Nutrient Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, A. M.; Hollander, D. J.; Heil, C.; Glibert, P.; Murasko, S.; Revilla, M.; Alexander, J.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic influences in South Florida have led to deterioration of its two major ecosystems, the Everglades wetlands and the Florida Bay estuary. Consequently, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has been proposed to restore the Everglades ecosystem; however, restoration efforts will likely exert new ecological changes in the Everglades and ultimately Florida Bay. The success of the Florida Everglades restoration depends on our understanding and ability to predict how regional changes in the distribution and composition of dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients will direct the downstream biogeochemical dynamics of Florida Bay. While the transport of freshwater and nutrients to Florida Bay have been studied, much work remains to directly link nutrient dynamics in Florida Bay to nutrient sources in the Everglades. Our study uses stable C and N isotopic measurements of chemical and biological materials from the Everglades and Florida Bay as part of a multi-proxy approach to link nutrient sources in the Everglades to biological sinks in Florida Bay. Isotopic analyses of dissolved and particulate species of water, aquatic vegetation and sedimentary organic matter show that the watersheds within the Everglades are chemically distinct and that these signatures are also reflected in the bay. A large east-west gradient in both carbon and nitrogen (as much as 10‰ for δ15N POM) reflect differing nutrient sources for each region of Florida Bay and is strongly correlated with upstream sources in the Everglades. Isotopic signatures also reflect seasonal relationships associated with wet and dry periods. High C and N measurements of DOM and POM measurements suggest significant influence from waste water in Canal C-111 in eastern Florida Bay, particularly during the dry season. These observations show that nutrients from the Everglades watersheds enter Florida Bay and are important in controlling biogeochemical processes in the bay. This study proves that

  5. Cost Estimates Of Concentrated Photovoltaic Heat Sink Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    water heating , but the majority of installed solar systems , are PV (EIA, 2015). Solar power generation has great benefits for the DON considering the...Current CPV systems use basic heat sink designs to increase efficiency. Modern heat sink design can achieve greater overall efficiencies of electricity...professionally developed cost analysis of adding optimized cooling technologies to concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) systems . Current CPV systems use basic heat

  6. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yude Pan; Richard A. Birdsey; Jingyun Fang; Richard Houghton; Pekka E. Kauppi; Werner A. Kurz; Oliver L. Phillips; Anatoly Shvidenko; Simon L. Lewis; Josep G. Canadell; Philippe Ciais; Robert B. Jackson; Stephen W. Pacala; A. David McGuire; Shilong Piao; Aapo Rautiainen; Stephen Sitch; Daniel. Hayes

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ± 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year-1) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ± 0.7 Pg...

  7. Sink- or Source-driven Phanerozoic carbon cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godderis, Y.; Donnadieu, Y.; Maffre, P.; Carretier, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Phanerozoic evolution of the atmospheric CO2 level is controlled by the fluxes entering or leaving the exospheric system. Those fluxes (including continental weathering, magmatic degassing, organic carbon burial, oxidation of sedimentary organic carbon) are intertwined, and their relative importance in driving the global carbon cycle evolution may have fluctuated through time. Deciphering the causes of the Phanerozoic climate evolution thus requires a holistic and quantitative approach. Here we focus on the role played by the paleogeographic configuration on the efficiency of the CO2 sink by continental silicate weathering, and on the impact of the magmatic degassing of CO2. We use the spatially resolved numerical model GEOCLIM (geoclimmodel.worpress.com) to compute the response of the silicate weathering and atmospheric CO2 to continental drift for 22 time slices of the Phanerozoic. Regarding the CO2 released by the magmatic activity, we reconstruct several Phanerozoic histories of this flux, based on published indexes. We calculate the CO2 evolution for each degassing scenario, and accounting for the paleogeographic setting. We show that the paleogeographic setting is a main driver of the climate from 540 Ma to about the beginning of the Jurassic. Regarding the role of the magmatic degassing, the various reconstructions do not converge towards a single signal, and thus introduce large uncertainties in the calculated CO2 level over time. Nevertheless, the continental dispersion, which prevails since the Jurassic, promotes the CO2 consumption by weathering and forces atmospheric CO2 to stay low. Warm climates of the "middle" Cretaceous and early Cenozoic require enhanced CO2 degassing by magmatic activity. In summary, the Phanerozoic climate evolution can be hardly assigned to a single process, but is the result of complex and intertwined processes.

  8. Amino sugars in suspended particulate matter from the Bay of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The SPM samples were de-carbonated overnight using fuming HCl in a desiccator (Ferrari et al. 2003), dried at 50. ◦. C and then analyzed for par- ticulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) using a Perkin Elmer Elemental ana- lyzer 2400 CHN analyzer. The precision of the methods was better than 7%.

  9. Amino sugars in suspended particulate matter from the Bay of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amino sugars (AS)are important constituents of organic matter.However,very little is known about their cycling in marine waters.In this research,we assessed the distribution and cycling of these compounds in waters of the Bay of Bengal.For this purpose,samples of suspended particulate matter (SPM)were collected from 8 ...

  10. Generation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aerosols during handwashing from contaminated sink drains, transmission to hands of hospital personnel, and its prevention by use of a new heating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, G; Ulrich, M; Müller, W; Bitzer, J; Schmidt-Koenig, L; Münst, L; Grupp, H; Wolz, C; Stern, M; Botzenhart, K

    1991-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from sinks of washing basins, showers, toilets and bathtubs, from the personnel and patients of a mixed infectious disease ward in a German children's hospital during a prospective 4-week epidemiological study. 81% of all sinks were contaminated with P. aeruginosa strains. Upon entering the hospital, all personnel hand cultures were P. aeruginosa-negative. However, during duty, 42.5% of the personnel members carried different P. aeruginosa strains on their hands. Detection of P. aeruginosa strains in sinks preceding the isolation of identical genotypes from personnel hands suggested a transmission route from sinks to hands. Opening of water taps generated aerosols containing P. aeruginosa sink organisms which contaminated hands during hand washing. Survival times of various P. aeruginosa strains in aerosols was dependent on strain characteristics, light and humidity, and t 1/2 differed between 3-76 min. Heating of washing basin sinks to 70 degrees C with a new, safe and inexpensive device inhibited bacterial growth in sinks, generation of P. aeruginosa aerosols, and resulted in hand cultures negative for P. aeruginosa after washing.

  11. Impact of human activities on organic carbon transport in the Yellow River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Zhang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Using data from four field investigations between 2003 and 2009 along the Yellow River mainstream, we examined the transport features and seasonal variations of organic carbon, with a focus on contrasting the impacts of human activities with those of natural processes. Particulate organic carbon (POC in the Yellow River originated mainly from the Loess Plateau, and thus the POC content in suspended sediments was much lower than in the world's other large rivers. Owing to both natural and human influences, dissolved organic carbon (DOC has only a weak correlation with discharge. DOC varied as a result of human activities such as agricultural irrigation and pollution in the whole basin except for the upstream Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau. Our study also suggested that while reservoirs are a POC sink over short periods, a long-term POC storage flux cannot be easily estimated as discharge and sediment regulations have completely changed the relationship between the fluxes of water, sediments, and rainfall. However, this carbon sink can be obtained reliably through high-frequency sampling over long time periods. In addition, the annual water and sediment regulation (WSR scheme has imposed an extremely severe human disturbance on the transport pattern of river organic carbon. Our study demonstrated for the first time that in a WSR event of less than 20 days, large proportions of the annual DOC (35% and POC (56% fluxes of the Yellow River were transported to the estuarine and coastal zone, potentially influencing estuarine and coastal geochemistry and ecosystems profoundly.

  12. Estimating Sources and Sinks of Methane from Soils in the Contiguous United States (CONUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, S.; Jain, A. K.; Kheshgi, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    The global methane (CH4) budget estimated based on state-of-the-art models remains highly uncertain. Sources and sinks of CH4 from soils, including wetlands, are the most important source of uncertainty. Soils are estimated to account for about 45% of global CH4 emissions. At the same time oxidation of CH4 by soils is a significant sink, representing about 10% of the total sink. However, most regional and global scale modeling studies of soil CH4 fluxes have ignored the sink through soil oxidation and the source of CH4 emissions from the wet soils with shallow water tables. In this study, we link a bottom-up soil gas diffusion and CH4 biogeochemistry model to a land surface model, ISAM, to calculate the sources, emissions from both wetlands and non-wetlands, and sinks, soil oxidation, of CH4 from soils for the CONUS over the period 1900-2100. The newly developed soil CH4 model framework consists of a gas diffusion module with the vertically resolved soil hydrology (depth up to 3.5 m soil) and soil organic carbon (SOC) and CH4 biogeochemistry module. SOC profile is estimated by modeling vertical soil mixing and thus can represent the deep SOC content and estimate CH4 production from the deep non-wetland soil. For the diffusion calculations, we separately consider both the dissolved and gaseous O2 and CH4 at each soil layer. For CH4 biogeochemistry, we parameterize the production, soil oxidation, ebullition and aerenchyma transportation of CH4 for both seasonal/permanent wetland and wet soil. The SWAMP inundated fraction dataset with 8-day temporal resolution is incorporated to prescribe the extent of permanent and seasonal wetland extent for the recent decade. The model is first evaluated using a compilation of published CH4 site measurement data for CONUS. We then perform two different model experiments: 1) forced by the CRUNCEP climate data from 1900 to 2010 to estimate the contemporary CH4 emission and 2) forced by a climate projection of IPCC's highest

  13. Simulated carbon sink response of shortgrass steppe, tallgrass prairie and forest ecosystems to rising [CO2], temperature and nitrogen input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, D. A.; Del Grosso, S. J.; McMurtrie, R. E.; Parton, W. J.

    2005-03-01

    The response of plant ecosystems to environmental change will determine whether the terrestrial biosphere will remain a substantial carbon sink or become a source during the next century. We use two ecosystem models, the Generic Decomposition And Yield model (G'DAY) and the daily time step version of the Century model (DAYCENT), to simulate net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for three contrasting ecosystems (shortgrass steppe in Colorado, tallgrass prairie in Kansas, and Norway spruce in Sweden) with varying degrees of water, temperature, and nutrient limitation, to determine responses to gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]), temperature, and nitrogen input over 100 years. Using G'DAY, under rising [CO2], there is evidence of C sink "saturation," defined here as positive NEP reaching an upper limit and then declining toward zero, at all three sites (due largely to increased N immobilization in soil organic matter) but a positive C sink is sustained throughout the 100 years. DAYCENT also predicts a sustained C sink at all three sites under rising [CO2], with evidence of C sink saturation for the Colorado grassland and the C sink levels off after 80 years for the Kansas grassland. Warming reduces soil C and the C sink in both grassland ecosystems but increases the C sink in the forest. Warming increases decomposition and soil N mineralization, which stimulates net primary productivity (NPP) at all sites except when inducing water limitation. At the forest site some of the enhanced N release is allocated to a woody biomass pool with a low N:C ratio so that warming enhances NEP without increased N input at the forest site, but not at the grassland sites. Responses to combinations of treatments are generally additive for DAYCENT but more interactive for G'DAY, especially under combined rising [CO2] and warming at the strongly water- and N-limited shortgrass steppe. Increasing N input alleviates C sink saturation and enhances NEP, NPP, and soil C at

  14. Particulate carbon in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surakka, J.

    1992-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are emitted to the atmosphere in combustion processes. Carbon particles are very small and have a long residence time in the air. Black Carbon, a type of carbon aerosol, is a good label when transport of combustion emissions in the atmosphere is studied. It is also useful tool in air quality studies. Carbon particles absorb light 6.5 to 8 times stronger than any other particulate matter in the air. Their effect on decreasing visibility is about 50 %. Weather disturbances are also caused by carbon emissions e.g. in Kuwait. Carbon particles have big absorption surface and capacity to catalyze different heterogenous reactions in air. Due to their special chemical and physical properties particulate carbon is a significant air pollution specie, especially in urban air. Average particulate carbon concentration of 5.7 μg/m 2 have been measured in winter months in Helsinki

  15. Characterization of the particulate air pollution in contrasted mega cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favez, O.

    2008-02-01

    This work aims at characterizing the physics and the chemistry that govern particulate air pollution in two mega cities (Paris and Cairo) for which the size distribution and the chemical composition of airborne particles were poorly documented. Seasonal variations of the main aerosol sources and transformation processes are investigated in these two urban centres, with a particular attention to semi-volatile material and secondary organic aerosols. Short-term health effects of Paris size-segregated aerosols, as well as particulate pollution during the Cairo 'Black Cloud' season, are also emphasized here. Finally, the comparison of results obtained for the two mega cities and for another one (Beijing) allows investigating main factors responsible for particulate air pollution in urban centres with contrasted climatic conditions and development levels. Notably, this work also allows the build-up of an experimental dataset which is now available for the modelling of urban air quality and of environmental impacts of mega city air pollution. (author)

  16. Accumulation of microplastic on shorelines woldwide: sources and sinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Crump, Phillip; Niven, Stewart J; Teuten, Emma; Tonkin, Andrew; Galloway, Tamara; Thompson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Plastic debris microplastic) is accumulating in marine habitats. Ingestion of microplastic provides a potential pathway for the transfer of pollutants, monomers, and plastic-additives to organisms with uncertain consequences for their health. Here, we show that microplastic contaminates the shorelines at 18 sites worldwide representing six continents from the poles to the equator, with more material in densely populated areas, but no clear relationship between the abundance of miocroplastics and the mean size-distribution of natural particulates. An important source of microplastic appears to be through sewage contaminated by fibers from washing clothes. Forensic evaluation of microplastic from sediments showed that the proportions of polyester and acrylic fibers used in clothing resembled those found in habitats that receive sewage-discharges and sewage-effluent itself. Experiments sampling wastewater from domestic washing machines demonstrated that a single garment can produce >1900 fibers per wash. This suggests that a large proportion of microplastic fibers found in the marine environment may be derived from sewage as a consequence of washing of clothes. As the human population grows and people use more synthetic textiles, contamination of habitats and animals by microplastic is likely to increase.

  17. Production of Dissolved Organic Matter During Doliolid Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellane, N. J.; Paffenhofer, G. A.; Stubbins, A.

    2016-02-01

    The biological carbon pump (BCP) draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and buries it at the seafloor. The efficiency of the BCP is determined in part by the sinking rates of particulate organic carbon (POC) from ocean surface waters. Zooplankton can package POC into fecal pellets with higher sinking rates than their food source (e.g. phytoplankton), increasing the efficiency of the BCP. However, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is also produced as zooplankton ingest and egest food, reducing the efficiency of BCP. The pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri (doliolid) is a gelatinous zooplankton found at high concentrations in shelf waters, including our study site: the South Atlantic Bight. Doliolids are efficient grazers capable of stripping large quantities of phytoplankton from the water column. To determine the balance between pellet formation and DOC production during feeding, doliolids (6-7 mm gonozooids) were placed in natural seawater amended with a live phytoplankton food source and incubated on a plankton wheel. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) released directly to the water as well as the water soluble fraction of pellet organic matter were quantified and optically characterized. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorbance and fluorescence spectra revealed that doliolid feeding produces DOM with optical properties that are commonly indicative of newly produced, highly biolabile DOM of microbial origin. Based upon these optical characteristics, doliolid-produced DOM is expected to be highly bio-labile in the environment and therefore rapidly degraded by surface ocean microbes shunting phytoplankton-derived organic carbon out of the BCP and back to dissolved inorganic carbon.

  18. Acetone in the atmosphere: Distribution, sources, and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; O'Hara, D.; Herlth, D.; Sachse, W.; Blake, D. R.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Kanakidou, M.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) was found to be the dominant nonmethane organic species present in the atmosphere sampled primarily over eastern Canada (0-6 km, 35 deg-65 deg N) during ABLE3B (July to August 1990). A concentration range of 357 to 2310 ppt (= 10(exp -12) v/v) with a mean value of 1140 +/- 413 ppt was measured. Under extremely clean conditions, generally involving Arctic flows, lowest (background) mixing ratios of 550 +/- 100 ppt were present in much of the troposphere studied. Correlations between atmospheric mixing ratios of acetone and select species such as C2H2, CO, C3H8, C2Cl4 and isoprene provided important clues to its possible sources and to the causes of its atmospheric variability. Biomass burning as a source of acetone has been identified for the first time. By using atmospheric data and three-dimensional photochemical models, a global acetone source of 40-60 Tg (= 10(exp 12) g)/yr is estimated to be present. Secondary formation from the atmospheric oxidation of precursor hydrocarbons (principally propane, isobutane, and isobutene) provides the single largest source (51%). The remainder is attributable to biomass burning (26%), direct biogenic emissions (21%), and primary anthropogenic emissions (3%). Atmospheric removal of acetone is estimated to be due to photolysis (64%), reaction with OH radicals (24%), and deposition (12%). Model calculations also suggest that acetone photolysis contributed significantly to PAN formation (100-200 ppt) in the middle and upper troposphere of the sampled region and may be important globally. While the source-sink equation appears to be roughly balanced, much more atmospheric and source data, especially from the southern hemisphere, are needed to reliably quantify the atmospheric budget of acetone.

  19. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models.

  20. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  1. Ethanol fuel improves pitfall traps through rapid sinking and death of captured orthopterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinwelski, N; Yotoko, K S C; Solar, R; Seleme, L R; Sperber, C F

    2013-08-01

    The choice of killing solutions for pitfall traps can influence sampling and is highly dependent on the objectives of each study. It is becoming increasingly common, however, and is more environmentally friendly, to use the same organisms to extract information for different kinds of studies. The killing solution should, therefore, be able to sample local active organisms, as well as maintain the integrity of their organs, tissues, and macromolecules. In a previous work, we showed that using ethanol fuel as a killing solution maintains the integrity of the specimens and enhances the Orthoptera richness and abundance of samples. In the current study, we evaluated two explanations for this pattern. We set up a field experiment to test whether ethanol fuel is attractive for orthopterans, and we investigated in the laboratory whether individuals of Gryllus sp. sink or die faster in ethanol fuel than in other killing solutions. Our results allowed us to refute the hypotheses of attraction caused by ethanol fuel and showed that the higher sampling efficiency of ethanol fuel is directly linked to the specimens sinking and dying faster than in other killing solutions. Thus, in addition to taxonomic, anatomical, and molecular studies, we recommend ethanol fuel for sampling organisms active in the litter in ecological studies.

  2. [Corruption as individual and organizational sinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The article qualifies the nature of psychosociological perspective in analysing corruption in organizations. Corruption is analysed as a mental event and social conditions of corruption are investigated. In particular six social and organizational factors are identified as relevant in determining the diffusion of corruption: meaning, work wellbeing, consistency, social recognition, reflexivity, social relations. The main hypothesis explored in the article is that to take managerial care of the organisational factors above mentioned is a strong and active prevention of the risk of corruption.

  3. Allochthonous subsidies of organic matter across a lake-river-fjord landscape in the Chilean Patagonia: Implications for marine zooplankton in inner fjord areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Martinez, Rodrigo A.; San Martin, Valeska; Aguayo, Mauricio; Silva, Nelson; Torres, Rodrigo

    2011-03-01

    Ecosystems can act as both sources and sinks of allochthonous nutrients and organic matter. In this sense, fjord ecosystems are a typical interface and buffer zone between freshwater systems, glaciated continents, and the coastal ocean. In order to evaluate the potential sources and composition of organic matter across fjord ecosystems, we characterized particulate organic matter along a lake-river-fjord corridor in the Chilean Patagonia using stable isotope (δ 13C) and lipid (fatty acid composition) biomarker analyses. Furthermore, estimates of zooplankton carbon ingestion rates and measurements of δ 13C and δ 15N in zooplankton (copepods) were used to evaluate the implications of allochthonous subsidies for copepods inhabiting inner fjord areas. Our results showed that riverine freshwater flows contributed an important amount of dissolved silicon but, scarce nitrate and phosphate to the brackish surface layer of the fjord ecosystem. Isotopic signatures of particulate organic matter from lakes and rivers were distinct from their counterparts in oceanic influenced stations. Terrestrial allochthonous sources could support around 68-86% of the particulate organic carbon in the river plume and glacier melting areas, whereas fatty acid concentrations were maximal in the surface waters of the Pascua and Baker river plumes. Estimates of carbon ingestion rates and δ 13C in copepods from the river plume areas indicated that terrestrial carbon could account for a significant percentage of the copepod body carbon (20-50%) during periods of food limitation. Particulate organic matter from the Pascua River showed a greater allochthonous contribution of terrigenous/vascular plant sources. Rivers may provide fjord ecosystems with allochthonous contributions from different sources because of the distinct vegetation coverage and land use along each river's watershed. These observations have significant implications for the management of local riverine areas in the context of

  4. CDC WONDER: Daily Fine Particulate Matter

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Daily Fine Particulate Matter data available on CDC WONDER are geographically aggregated daily measures of fine particulate matter in the outdoor air, spanning...

  5. Effect of elevated CO2 on organic matter pools and fluxes in a summer Baltic Sea plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A. J.; Bach, L. T.; Schulz, K.-G.; Boxhammer, T.; Czerny, J.; Achterberg, E. P.; Hellemann, D.; Trense, Y.; Nausch, M.; Sswat, M.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to influence plankton community structure and biogeochemical element cycles. To date, the response of plankton communities to elevated CO2 has been studied primarily during nutrient-stimulated blooms. In this CO2 manipulation study, we used large-volume (~ 55 m3) pelagic in situ mesocosms to enclose a natural summer, post-spring-bloom plankton assemblage in the Baltic Sea to investigate the response of organic matter pools to ocean acidification. The carbonate system in the six mesocosms was manipulated to yield average fCO2 ranging between 365 and ~ 1230 μatm with no adjustment of naturally available nutrient concentrations. Plankton community development and key biogeochemical element pools were subsequently followed in this nitrogen-limited ecosystem over a period of 7 weeks. We observed higher sustained chlorophyll a and particulate matter concentrations (~ 25 % higher) and lower inorganic phosphate concentrations in the water column in the highest fCO2 treatment (1231 μatm) during the final 2 weeks of the study period (Phase III), when there was low net change in particulate and dissolved matter pools. Size-fractionated phytoplankton pigment analyses indicated that these differences were driven by picophytoplankton (early in the experiment during an initial warm and more productive period with overall elevated chlorophyll a and particulate matter concentrations. However, the influence of picophytoplankton on bulk organic matter pools was masked by high biomass of larger plankton until Phase III, when the contribution of the small size fraction (< 2 μm) increased to up to 90 % of chlorophyll a. In this phase, a CO2-driven increase in water column particulate carbon did not lead to enhanced sinking material flux but was instead reflected in increased dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Hence ocean acidification may induce changes in organic matter partitioning in the upper water column during the low-nitrogen summer period

  6. Phenology, growth and physiological adjustments of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) to sink limitation induced by fruit pruning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, S; Mialet-Serra, I; Caliman, J-P; Siregar, F A; Clement-Vidal, A; Fabre, D; Dingkuhn, M

    2009-11-01

    Despite its simple architecture and small phenotypic plasticity, oil palm has complex phenology and source-sink interactions. Phytomers appear in regular succession but their development takes years, involving long lag periods between environmental influences and their effects on sinks. Plant adjustments to resulting source-sink imbalances are poorly understood. This study investigated oil palm adjustments to imbalances caused by severe fruit pruning. An experiment with two treatments (control and complete fruit pruning) during 22 months in 2006-2008) and six replications per treatment was conducted in Indonesia. Phenology, growth of above-ground vegetative and reproductive organs, leaf morphology, inflorescence sex differentiation, dynamics of non-structural carbohydrate reserves and light-saturated net photosynthesis (A(max)) were monitored. Artificial sink limitation by complete fruit pruning accelerated development rate, resulting in higher phytomer, leaf and inflorescence numbers. Leaf size and morphology remained unchanged. Complete fruit pruning also suppressed the abortion of male inflorescences, estimated to be triggered at about 16 months before bunch maturity. The number of female inflorescences increased after an estimated lag of 24-26 months, corresponding to time from sex differentiation to bunch maturity. The most important adjustment process was increased assimilate storage in the stem, attaining nearly 50 % of dry weight in the stem top, mainly as starch, whereas glucose, which in controls was the most abundant non-structural carbohydrate stored in oil palm, decreased. The development rate of oil palm is in part controlled by source-sink relationships. Although increased rate of development and proportion of female inflorescences constituted observed adjustments to sink limitation, the low plasticity of plant architecture (constant leaf size, absence of branching) limited compensatory growth. Non-structural carbohydrate storage was thus the main

  7. Particle sinking dynamics and POC fluxes in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific based on 234Th budgets and sediment trap deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William Z., II; Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2013-11-01

    Assuming steady-state over seasonal to annual timescales, and limited horizontal export of dissolved nutrients, the vertical fluxes of limiting nutrients into the euphotic zone should be balanced by particle export. Sediment traps and 234Th budgets have both been used extensively throughout the oceans as a means to measure this particulate flux from the upper ocean. One main goal of these efforts has been to determine the amount of CO2 fixed by primary producers in the surface ocean that is exported as particulate organic carbon (POC) and conversely, the decrease of particle flux with depth has been used to estimate remineralization rates of nutrients. Although disagreement between trap-derived and 234Th-derived fluxes has often been noted, the possible reasons for the imbalance are numerous, and thus often it is difficult to assign causes. Here, we examine many commonly implicated contributors to the disagreement, allowing us to assess data from a recent 2-year study in the ETSP that shows systematic disagreement between the two methods. Averaging results from both years, sediment traps collected 0.2-1.5 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean: 0.74 mmol C m-2 d-1) of POC, while the thorium-based method estimated an average POC flux of 1.5-14 mmol C m- d-1 (mean: 6.2 mmol C m-2 d-1). The study area spans regions of differing ecological structure, as inferred from trap mineralogy, and the flux disagreement coincides with this ecological range. We interpret the difference as undercollection of poorly ballasted, slowly sinking particles by the sediment traps. Using both methods simultaneously offers insight into ecosystem structure and resulting particle flux dynamics. The thorium deficit-based flux is 5-10% of previously published estimates of primary productivity based on 14C incubations (Pennington et al., 2006), and 8-20% of concurrent estimates based on 14C incubations and oxygen supersaturation (Capone et al., personal communication; Prokopenko et al., personal communication).

  8. Particulate Matter: a closer look

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsman E; Beck JP; Bree L van; Cassee FR; Koelemeijer RBA; Matthijsen J; Thomas R; Wieringa K; LED; MGO

    2005-01-01

    The summary in booklet form 'Fijn stof nader bekeken' (Particulate Matter: a closer look) , published in Dutch by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP) and the Environment and Safety Division of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), has been designed to

  9. Particulate matter and preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM) has been variably associated with preterm birth (PTB) (gestation <37 weeks), but the role played by specific chemical components of PM has been little studied. We examined the association between ambient PM <2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.S) ...

  10. Transport phenomena in particulate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, José Teixeira; Ferreira, Maria do Carmo

    2012-01-01

    This volume spans 10 chapters covering different aspects of transport phenomena including fixed and fluidized systems, spouted beds, electrochemical and wastewater treatment reactors. This e-book will be valuable for students, engineers and researchers aiming to keep updated on the latest developments on particulate systems.

  11. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  12. Elemental Concentration of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previously, the capture of suspended particulate matter focused on the total suspended particulate matter, until recent research into the health impacts of suspended particulate matter suggests that minute particles that have toxic substances adsorbed onto their surface are insidious and deleterious for human health and ...

  13. Two decades of ocean CO2 sink and variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, C. Le; Bopp, L.; Heimann, M.; Prentice, I.C.; Aumont, O.; Bousquet, P.; Ciais, P.; Francey, R.; Rayner, P.J.; Keeling, C.D.; Keeling, R.F.; Piper, S.C.; Kheshgi, H.; Peyliln, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 has increased at a nearly identical average rate of 3.3 and 3.2 Pg C/yr for the decades of the 1980s and the 1990s, in spite of a large increase in fossil fuel emissions from 5.4 to 6.3 Pg C/yr. Thus, the sum of the ocean and land CO 2 sinks was 1 Pg C/yr larger in the 1990s than in to the 1980s. Here we quantify the ocean and land sinks for these two decades using recent atmospheric inversions and ocean models. The ocean and land sinks are estimated to be, respectively, 0.3 (0.1 to 0.6) and 0.7 (0.4 to 0.9) Pg C/yr larger in the 1990s than in the 1980s. When variability less than 5 yr is removed, all estimates show a global oceanic sink more or less steadily increasing with time, and a large anomaly in the land sink during 1990-1994. For year-to-year variability, all estimates show 1/3 to 1/2 less variability in the ocean than on land, but the amplitude and phase of the oceanic variability remain poorly determined. A mean oceanic sink of 1.9 Pg C/yr for the 1990s based on O 2 observations corrected for ocean outgassing is supported by these estimates, but an uncertainty on the mean value of the order of ±0.7 Pg C/yr remains. The difference between the two decades appears to be more robust than the absolute value of either of the two decades

  14. Pediatric sink-bathing: a risk for scald burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggott, Kaitlin; Rabbitts, Angela; Leahy, Nicole E; Bourke, Patrick; Yurt, Roger W

    2013-01-01

    Our burn center previously reported a significant incidence of scald burns from tap water among patients treated at the center. However, mechanism of these scalds was not investigated in detail. A recent series of pediatric patients who sustained scalds while bathing in the sink was noted. To evaluate the extent of these injuries and create an effective prevention program for this population, a retrospective study of bathing-related sink burns among pediatric patients was performed. Patients between the ages of 0 and 5.0 years who sustained scald burns while being bathed in the sink were included in this study. Sex, race, age, burn size, length of stay, and surgical procedures were reviewed. During the study period of January 2003 through August 2008, 56 patients who were scalded in the sink were admitted, accounting for 54% of all bathing-related scalds. Among these, 56% were boys and 45% were Hispanic. Mean age was 0.8 ± 0.1 years. Burn size and hospital length of stay averaged 5 ± 0.7% and 11 ± 1 days, respectively. Of this group, 10.7% required skin grafting. The overwhelming majority (94% of patients) were discharged home. The remaining patients were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation, foster care, and others. Pediatric scald burns sustained while bathing in a sink continue to be prevalent at our burn center. Because of limited space and the child's proximity to faucet handles and water flow, sinks are an unsafe location to bathe a child. While such practice may be necessary for some families, comprehensive burn prevention education must address this hazard.

  15. Inventory of primary particulates emissions; Inventaire des emissions de particules primaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    CITEPA carried out a national inventory on particulate emissions. This report presents the results of this study for a great number of sectors and it covers a larger number of sources than the previous CITEPA inventories on particles and some other inventories carried out by International organisms (TNO, IIASA). In particular, at the present time, fugitive dust emissions for some sources are rarely taken into account in inventories because of poor knowledge and they are still the subject of researches in order to validate the emission results. (author)

  16. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

    2003-02-01

    This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

  17. New Method of Sinking Caisson Tunnel in Soft Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Bame, Abda Berisso

    2013-01-01

    Sinking a caisson tunnel in soft soil is new idea and this new concept could be an alternative method of tunneling in soft soil. The aim of this study is to evaluate geotechnical feasibility of sinking the caisson tunnel to the desired depth at the selected soil profile along tunnel alignment. This caisson tunneling method is proposed to reduce the use of temporary works such as propping of sheet pile walls and increase the ease and speed of construction. Besides, it reduces the disturbance o...

  18. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  20. Latest acquisition will sink to new depths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The introduction of a state-of-the-art remotely operated vehicle (ROV) for use at Hibernia was presented. The ROV is a small submarine that is equipped with cameras, sonars and remote-operated robot arms. It is used to perform visual inspections of various components of the underwater equipment at Hibernia. The remotely operated arms make it possible to perform maintenance and repairs if necessary. The ROV will be used to check the entire network of subsea pipelines and valves in the offshore loading system to ensure that there are no leaks or unnecessary stresses on the system. It can also produce a visual record of the external ice wall of the gravity base structure from the surface to the ocean floor. The system can be mobilized in case of an emergency within 24 hours. Other organizations can also subcontract the ROV. 1 fig

  1. Organic carbon budget for the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre: major role of DOC in mesopelagic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Falcón, Yeray; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón; Pérez-Hernández, María Dolores; Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Mason, Evan; Arístegui, Javier

    2017-08-31

    Transports of suspended particulate (POC susp ) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon are inferred from a box-model covering the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Corresponding net respiration rates (R) are obtained from a net organic carbon budget that is based on the transport estimates, and includes both vertical and lateral fluxes. The overall R in the mesopelagic layer (100-1500 m) is 1.6 ± 0.4 mmol C m -2 d -1 . DOC accounts for up to 53% of R as a result of drawdown of organic carbon within Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) that is entrained into sinking Mediterranean Overflow Water (MOW) that leads to formation of Mediterranean water (MW) at intermediate depths (~900 m). DOC represents 90% of the respired non-sinking organic carbon. When converted into oxygen units, the computed net respiration rate represents less than half the oxygen utilization rates (OUR) reported for the mesopelagic waters of the subtropical North Atlantic. Mesoscale processes in the area, not quantified with our approach, could account in part for the OUR differences observed between our carbon budget and other published studies from the North Atlantic, although seasonal or interannual variability could also be responsible for the difference in the estimates.

  2. 210Pb dating of sediments from the central and the northern Adriatic Sea: The deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, T.; Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C.; La Rosa, J.

    1996-04-01

    A central goal of the ELNA project is to assess the carbon assimilation capacity of the Northern Adriatic Sea. This requires fundamental quantitative information on budgets and sinks of organic carbon. Any change in carbon production in the water column should be reflected in the underlying sediments. Moreover, the fraction of particulate organic carbon reaching the sea floor which is subsequently preserved in the sediment will be strongly coupled to sediment accumulation and mixing. In this study a series of box cores were collected in order to characterize a hypothetical eutrophication gradient extending from the Po River outflow region in the north down to the shallow meso-Adriatic depression (Jabuka Pit). The main tasks assigned to IAEA-MEL were to provide 210 Pb derived sedimentation and dry-mass accumulation rates and to examine the possible correlations between sedimentary processes, the deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon and pelagic primary productivity

  3. Sink strength simulations using the Monte Carlo method: Applied to spherical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.

    2017-12-01

    The sink strength is an important parameter for the mean-field rate equations to simulate temporal changes in the micro-structure of materials. However, there are noteworthy discrepancies between sink strengths obtained by the Monte Carlo and analytical methods. In this study, we show the reasons for these differences. We present the equations to estimate the statistical error for sink strength calculations and show the way to determine the sink strengths for multiple traps. We develop a novel, very fast Monte Carlo method to obtain sink strengths. The results show that, in addition to the well-known sink strength dependence of the trap concentration, trap radius and the total sink strength, the sink strength also depends on the defect diffusion jump length and the total trap volume fraction. Taking these factors into account, allows us to obtain a very accurate analytic expression for the sink strength of spherical traps.

  4. Effect of source/sink ratios on yield components, growth dynamics and structural characteristics of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Benoît; Mialet-Serra, Isabelle; Rouan, Lauriane; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Caliman, Jean-Pierre; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Source/sink ratios are known to be one of the main determinants of oil palm growth and development. A long-term experiment (9 years) was conducted in Indonesia on mature oil palms subjected to continuous bunch ablation and partial defoliation treatments to artificially modify source/sink ratios. During the experiment, all harvested bunches were dissected and phenological measurements were carried out to analyse the effect of source/sink ratios on yield components explaining variations in bunch number, the number of fruits per bunch and oil dry weight per fruit. An integrative variable (supply/demand ratio) describing the ratio between the assimilate supply from sources and the growing organ demand for carbohydrate was computed for each plant on a daily basis from observations of the number of developing organs and their sink strength, and of climate variables. Defoliation and bunch ablation affected the bunch number and the fruit number per bunch. Variations in bunch number per month were mainly due to variations in the fraction of aborted inflorescence and in the ratio between female and male inflorescences. Under fluctuating trophic conditions, variations in fruit number per bunch resulted both from changes in fruit-set and in the number of branches (rachillae) per inflorescence. For defoliated plants, the decrease in the number of developing reproductive sinks appeared to be sufficient to maintain fruit weight and oil concentration at the control level, without any major decrease in the concentration of non-structural carbohydrate reserves. Computation of the supply/demand ratio revealed that each yield component had a specific phase of sensitivity to supply/demand ratios during inflorescence development. Establishing quantitative relationships between supply/demand ratios, competition and yield components is the first step towards a functional model for oil palm.

  5. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  6. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  7. Visualization of particulates distribution from electrode erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, ZHONG; Ao, XU; Yunlong, LIU; Lei, CHEN

    2018-02-01

    Particulates generated from electrode erosion in gas spark gap is inevitable and may initiate self-breakdown behavior with high risk. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by empirical method qualitatively. To push this old problem forward, this paper conducts laser confocal microscopy measurement of eroded surface and a statistical method is introduced to obtain visualization of particulates distribution from electrode erosion after different shots. This method allows dense particulates to be classified with their heights in z direction and scattered figures of particulates within certain height range are obtained. Results indicate that the higher-than-10 μm particulates start to emerge after 200 discharge shots and particulates number has a waved radial distribution with a 0.5 mm wide deposition zone. Based on these quantitative results, the risk of reignition and field-distortion failure that are triggered by particulates can be assessed.

  8. Quantifying greenhouse gas sources and sinks in managed wetland systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen M Ogle; Patrick Hunt; Carl Trettin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides methodologies and guidance for reporting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and sinks at the entity scale for managed wetland systems. More specifically, it focuses on methods for managed palustrine wetlands.1 Section 4.1 provides an overview of wetland systems and resulting GHG emissions, system boundaries and temporal scale, a summary of the...

  9. An unusual presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma | Sinke | Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An unusual presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma. EA Sinke, EJ van Hasselt. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  10. Minimization of sink mark defects in injection molding process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Handling of numerous processing variables to control defects is a mammoth task that costs time, effort and money. This paper presents a simple and efficient way to study the influence of injection molding variables on sink marks using Taguchi approach. Using the Taguchi approach, optimal parameter settings and the ...

  11. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul, E-mail: sohel0991@gmail.com; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000. Bangladesh (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  12. A new method to optimize natural convection heat sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampio, K.; Karvinen, R.

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a heat sink cooled by natural convection is strongly affected by its geometry, because buoyancy creates flow. Our model utilizes analytical results of forced flow and convection, and only conduction in a solid, i.e., the base plate and fins, is solved numerically. Sufficient accuracy for calculating maximum temperatures in practical applications is proved by comparing the results of our model with some simple analytical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions. An essential advantage of our model is that it cuts down on calculation CPU time by many orders of magnitude compared with CFD. The shorter calculation time makes our model well suited for multi-objective optimization, which is the best choice for improving heat sink geometry, because many geometrical parameters with opposite effects influence the thermal behavior. In multi-objective optimization, optimal locations of components and optimal dimensions of the fin array can be found by simultaneously minimizing the heat sink maximum temperature, size, and mass. This paper presents the principles of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and applies it as a basis for optimizing existing heat sinks.

  13. Cleaning up nitrogen pollution may reduce future carbon sinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Baojing; Ju, Xiaotang; Wu, Yiyun; Erisman, Jan Willem; Bleeker, Albert; Reis, Stefan; Sutton, Mark A.; Lam, Shu Kee; Smith, Pete; Oenema, Oene; Smith, Rognvald I.; Lu, Xuehe; Ye, Xinyue; Chen, Deli

    2018-01-01

    Biosphere carbon sinks are crucial for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to mitigate global warming, but are substantially affected by the input of reactive nitrogen (Nr). Although the effects of anthropogenic CO2 emission and nitrogen deposition (indicated by Nr emission to

  14. Million Trees Los Angeles: Carbon dioxide sink or source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; A. Kendall; S. Albers

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to answer the question, 'Will the Million Trees LA (MTLA) programme be a CO2 sink or source?' Using surveys, interviews, field sampling and computer simulation of tree growth and survival over a 40-year period, we developed the first process-based life cycle inventory of CO2 for a large tree...

  15. Development of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwers, B.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Vanderauwera, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM operations. Based on a given workpiece geometry (e.g. mould), regions to be EDM'ed are automatically indentified. For a given electrode configuration, consisting of one or more regions, EDM

  16. Children's Typically-Perceived-Situations of Floating and Sinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Yong Jae

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore children's typically-perceived-situations (TPS) of "floating" and "sinking". TPS refers to the situation rising spontaneously in an individual's mind when they first think of a phenomenon or concept. Data were collected from 148 Year 5 Korean children. As a result of analysing the data…

  17. Role of Sink Density in Nonequilibrium Chemical Redistribution in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Enrique; Senninger, Oriane; Caro, Alfredo; Soisson, Frédéric; Nastar, Maylise; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2018-03-01

    Nonequilibrium chemical redistribution in open systems submitted to external forces, such as particle irradiation, leads to changes in the structural properties of the material, potentially driving the system to failure. Such redistribution is controlled by the complex interplay between the production of point defects, atomic transport rates, and the sink character of the microstructure. In this work, we analyze this interplay by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) framework with an underlying atomistic model for the Fe-Cr model alloy to study the effect of ideal defect sinks on Cr concentration profiles, with a particular focus on the role of interface density. We observe that the amount of segregation decreases linearly with decreasing interface spacing. Within the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a general analytical model is derived and assessed against the KMC simulations to elucidate the structure-property relationship of this system. Interestingly, in the kinetic regime where elimination of point defects at sinks is dominant over bulk recombination, the solute segregation does not directly depend on the dose rate but only on the density of sinks. This model provides new insight into the design of microstructures that mitigate chemical redistribution and improve radiation tolerance.

  18. Emission and Sink of Greenhouse Gases in Soils of Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozharova, N. V.; Kulachkova, S. A.; Lebed'-Sharlevich, Ya. I.

    2018-03-01

    The first inventory and zoning of the emission and sink of methane and carbon dioxide in the urban structure of greenhouse gases from soils and surface technogenic formations (STFs) (Technosols) on technogenic, recrementogenic, and natural sediments have been performed with consideration for the global warming potential under conditions of different formation rate of these gases, underflooding, and sealing. From gas geochemical criteria and anthropogenic pedogenesis features, the main sources of greenhouse gases, their intensity, and mass emission were revealed. The mass fractions of emissions from the sectors of waste and land use in the inventories of greenhouse gas emissions have been determined. New sources of gas emission have been revealed in the first sector, the emissions from which add tens of percent to the literature and state reports. In the second sector, emissions exceed the available data in 70 times. Estimation criteria based on the degree of manifestation and chemical composition of soil-geochemical anomalies and barrier capacities have been proposed. The sink of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and the internal (latent) sink of methane in soils and STFs have been determined. Ecological functions of soils and STFs have been shown, and the share of latent methane sink has been calculated. The bacterial oxidation of methane in soils and STFs exceeds its emission to the atmosphere in almost hundred times.

  19. Source and Sink Strength of Carbon Dioxide, Methane and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    Full-text Available Online at www.bioline.org.br/ja. Source and Sink Strength of Carbon Dioxide, Methane and Distribution of Sulfate in Salt-marsh Soils at the Wadden Sea Coast of Northern Germany. ·1KHAN, MD. HARUNOR RASHID; 2HANS-PETER BLUME; 1TADASHI. ADACHI; 3ULRICH PFISTERER; 3UDO MÜLLER- ...

  20. Pathway of phloem unloading in tobacco sink leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgeon, R.

    1987-01-01

    Phloem unloading in transition sink leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) was analyzed by quantitative autoradiography. Source leaves were labeled with 14 CO 2 and experimental treatments were begun approximately 1 h later when label had entered the sink leaves. Autoradiographs were prepared from rapidly frozen, lyophilized sink tissue at the beginning and end of the treatments and the amount of label in veins and in surrounding cells was determined by microdensitometry. Photoassimilate unloaded from third order and larger, but not smaller, veins. Long-distance import and unloading did not respond the same way to all experimental treatments. Import was completely inhibited by cold, anaerobiosis or steam girdling the sink leaf petiole. Unloading was inhibited by cold but continued in an anaerobic atmosphere and after steam girdling. Uptake of exogenous [ 14 C]sucrose was inhibited by anaerobiosis. Since an apoplastic pathway of phloem unloading would involve solute uptake from the apoplast the results are most consistent with passive symplastic unloading of photoassimilates from phloem to surrounding cells

  1. Minimization of sink mark defects in injection molding process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Arriving at critical variables based on initial screening. 5. Additional expanded Taguchi's experiments for minimization of sink marks. 2.1. Design of simple, scalable and generic model and machine selection: A simple and scalable disc part (Figure 1) was prepared using Pro/Engineer. The model base wall was fixed at 3mm.

  2. Analysis of ultimate-heat-sink spray ponds. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codell, R.

    1981-08-01

    This report develops models which can be utilized in the design of certain types of spray ponds used in ultimate heat sinks at nuclear power plants, and ways in which the models may be employed to determine the design basis required by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.27

  3. Sink or Swim? Debt Review's Ambivalent "Lifeline" ____A Second ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full title: Sink or Swim? Debt Review's Ambivalent "Lifeline" ---- A Second Sequel To "… A Tale of Two Judgments" Nedbank V Andrews (240/2011) 2011 Zaecpehc 29 (10 May 2011); Firstrand Bank Ltd V Evans 2011 4 SA 597 (KZD) And Firstrand Bank Ltd V Janse Van Rensburg 2012 2 All SA 186 (ECP). The interface ...

  4. Particulate pollutants in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westrich, B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Hydraulik Lab.

    2001-07-01

    In Germany the input of pollutants from the industry and private houses has been significantly reduced since the mid-70s and after the unification in 1990 and hence, young sediments are less polluted than older ones. However, some hydrological risk of erosion and subsequent remobilisation of contaminants from deeper sediment layers still exists. Many heavy metals such as Cd, Cr, Pb are chemically fixed so there is almost no risk of remobilisation unless hydrodynamic erosion followed by chemical reaction takes place. Therefore, hydrodynamic erodibility of deposited sediments is a key issue for particulate contaminant mobility assessment in fluvial systems. We have not yet a clear view of toxic effects of sediment-bound contaminants caused by sediment erosion, repartitioning of particulate and dissolved pollutants after resuspension, biochemical transfer and degradation in a fluvial environment. (orig.)

  5. LBA-ECO ND-11 Organic Carbon Watershed Exports, Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2003-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains stream water exports of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) and coarse particulate organic carbon (CPOC) during 2003-2004 from...

  6. LBA-ECO ND-11 Organic Carbon Watershed Exports, Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2003-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains stream water exports of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) and coarse particulate organic carbon (CPOC) during 2003-2004 from four...

  7. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon turnover in sinking marine snow from surface waters of Southern California Bight: implications for the carbon cycle in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Grossart, HP; Azam, F.

    1999-01-01

    aggregate in darkness, which yielded a turnover time of 8 to 9 d for the total organic carbon in aggregates. Thus, marine snow is not only a vehicle for vertical flux of organic matter; the aggregates are also hotspots of microbial respiration which cause a fast and efficient respiratory turnover...... of particulate organic carbon in the sea....

  8. Monitoring diesel particulate matter and calculating diesel particulate densities using Grimm model 1.109 real-time aerosol monitors in underground mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbal, Kyle C; Pahler, Leon; Larson, Rodney; VanDerslice, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA)-approved sampling method that provides real-time results for ambient concentrations of diesel particulates. This study investigated whether a commercially available aerosol spectrometer, the Grimm Portable Aerosol Spectrometer Model 1.109, could be used during underground mine operations to provide accurate real-time diesel particulate data relative to MSHA-approved cassette-based sampling methods. A subset was to estimate size-specific diesel particle densities to potentially improve the diesel particulate concentration estimates using the aerosol monitor. Concurrent sampling was conducted during underground metal mine operations using six duplicate diesel particulate cassettes, according to the MSHA-approved method, and two identical Grimm Model 1.109 instruments. Linear regression was used to develop adjustment factors relating the Grimm results to the average of the cassette results. Statistical models using the Grimm data produced predicted diesel particulate concentrations that highly correlated with the time-weighted average cassette results (R(2) = 0.86, 0.88). Size-specific diesel particulate densities were not constant over the range of particle diameters observed. The variance of the calculated diesel particulate densities by particle diameter size supports the current understanding that diesel emissions are a mixture of particulate aerosols and a complex host of gases and vapors not limited to elemental and organic carbon. Finally, diesel particulate concentrations measured by the Grimm Model 1.109 can be adjusted to provide sufficiently accurate real-time air monitoring data for an underground mining environment.

  9. Acidotolerant Bacteria and Fungi as a Sink of Methanol-Derived Carbon in a Deciduous Forest Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Morawe, Mareen; Hoeke, Henrike; Wissenbach, Dirk K.; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Kr?ber, Eileen; Kolb, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Methanol is an abundant atmospheric volatile organic compound that is released from both living and decaying plant material. In forest and other aerated soils, methanol can be consumed by methanol-utilizing microorganisms that constitute a known terrestrial sink. However, the environmental factors that drive the biodiversity of such methanol-utilizers have been hardly resolved. Soil-derived isolates of methanol-utilizers can also often assimilate multicarbon compounds as alternative substrate...

  10. Particulate export vs lateral advection in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Capotondi, L.; Giglio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of our study was to describe and quantify the influence of lateral advection relative to the vertical export in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean). In areas where lateral advection of particulate material is significant, budgets of bioactive elements can be inaccurate if fluxes through the water column and to the seabed are exclusively interpreted as passive sinking of particles. However, detailed information on the influence of lateral advection in the water column in the southern ocean is lacking. With this in mind, our study focused between the twilight zone (i.e. mesopelagic) and the benthic nepheloid layer to understand the relative importance of lateral flux with increasing water depth. Measurements were performed south of the Antarctic Polar Front for 1 year (January 10th 1999-January 3rd 2000) at 900, 1300, 2400, and 3700 m from the sea surface. The study was carried out using a 3.5 km long mooring line instrumented with sediment traps, current meters and sensors of temperature and conductivity. Sediment trap samples were characterized via several parameters including total mass flux, elemental composition (organic carbon, total nitrogen, biogenic silica, and calcium carbonate), concentration of metals (aluminum, iron, barium, and manganese), 210Pb activity, and foraminifera taxonomy. High fluxes of biogenic particles were observed in both summer 1999 and 2000 as a result of seasonal algal blooms associated with sea ice retreat and water column stratification. During no-productive periods, several high energy events occurred and resulted in advecting resuspended biogenic particles from flat-topped summits of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Whereas the distance between seabed and uppermost sediment traps was sufficient to avoid lateral advection processes, resuspension was significant in the lowermost sediment traps accounting for ~60 and ~90% of the material caught at 2400 and 3700 m, respectively. Samples collected during

  11. Seasonal cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products, dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols in fine and coarse air particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-08-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse air particulate matter (PM) collected over a period of one year in central Europe (Mainz, Germany) were analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), including the α- and β-pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), as well as a variety of dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features in fine, coarse, and total PM (TSP) are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks in comparison to data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid and phthalic acid to azelaic acid indicate that the investigated aerosol samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. A strong Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature (R2 = 0.79, n = 52, Ea = 126 ± 10 kJ mol-1, temperature range 275-300 K). Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence observed for 3-MBTCA can be explained by enhanced photochemical production due to an increase of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration with increasing temperature, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. The results indicate that the OH-initiated oxidation of pinonic acid is the rate-limiting step in the formation of 3-MBTCA, and that 3-MBTCA may be a suitable tracer for the chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by OH radicals. An Arrhenius-type temperature dependence was also observed for the concentration of pinic acid (R2 = 0.60, n = 56, Ea = 84 ± 9 kJ mol-1); it can be tentatively explained by the temperature dependence of biogenic pinene emission as the rate-limiting step of pinic acid formation.

  12. Source apportionment of PM10 mass and particulate carbon in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Mann; Park, Jin-Soo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Hyunjae; Jeon, Haeun; Cho, Chaeyoon; Kim, Ji-Hyoung; Hong, Seungkyu; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Panday, Arnico K.; Park, Rokjin J.; Hong, Jihyung; Yoon, Soon-Chang

    2015-12-01

    The Kathmandu Valley in Nepal is a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills with a serious problem of fine particulate air pollution that impacts local health and impairs visibility. Particulate carbon concentrations have reached severe levels that threaten the health of 3.5 million local residents. Moreover, snow and ice on the Himalayan mountains are melting as a result of additional warming due to particulate carbon, especially high black carbon concentrations. To date, the sources of the Valley's particulate carbon and the impacts of different sources on particulate carbon concentrations are not well understood. Thus, before an effective control strategy can be developed, these particulate carbon sources must be identified and quantified. Our study has found that the four primary sources of particulate carbon in the Kathmandu Valley during winter are brick kilns, motor vehicles, fugitive soil dust, and biomass/garbage burning. Their source contributions are quantified using a recently developed new multivariate receptor model SMP. In contrast to other highly polluted areas such as China, secondary contribution is almost negligible in Kathmandu Valley. Brick kilns (40%), motor vehicles (37%) and biomass/garbage burning (22%) have been identified as the major sources of elemental carbon (black carbon) in the Kathmandu Valley during winter, while motor vehicles (47%), biomass/garbage burning (32%), and soil dust (13%) have been identified as the most important sources of organic carbon. Our research indicates that controlling emissions from motor vehicles, brick kilns, biomass/garbage burning, and soil dust is essential for the mitigation of the particulate carbon that threatens public health, impairs visibility, and influences climate warming within and downwind from the Kathmandu Valley. In addition, this paper suggests several useful particulate carbon mitigation methods that can be applied to Kathmandu Valley and other areas in South Asia with

  13. Moving multiple sinks through wireless sensor networks for lifetime maximization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrioli, Chiara (Universita di Roma); Carosi, Alessio (Universita di Roma); Basagni, Stefano (Northeastern University); Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2008-01-01

    Unattended sensor networks typically watch for some phenomena such as volcanic events, forest fires, pollution, or movements in animal populations. Sensors report to a collection point periodica