WorldWideScience

Sample records for singly charged species

  1. Nuclear structure and the single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Strottman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of nuclear structure on meson-induced single-charge-exchange reactions on light nuclei is discussed within the context of the Glauber approximation. Selection rules which are expected to be approximately obeyed in elastic and inelastic pion and kaon scattering are proposed. Theoretical predictions are presented for (π + ,π 0 ) and (K + ,K 0 ) reactions on 13 C. 14 figures

  2. Charge transport in single crystal organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei

    Organic electronics have engendered substantial interest in printable, flexible and large-area applications thanks to their low fabrication cost per unit area, chemical versatility and solution processability. Nevertheless, fundamental understanding of device physics and charge transport in organic semiconductors lag somewhat behind, partially due to ubiquitous defects and impurities in technologically useful organic thin films, formed either by vacuum deposition or solution process. In this context, single-crystalline organic semiconductors, or organic single crystals, have therefore provided the ideal system for transport studies. Organic single crystals are characterized by their high chemical purity and outstanding structural perfection, leading to significantly improved electrical properties compared with their thin-film counterparts. Importantly, the surfaces of the crystals are molecularly flat, an ideal condition for building field-effect transistors (FETs). Progress in organic single crystal FETs (SC-FETs) is tremendous during the past decade. Large mobilities ~ 1 - 10 cm2V-1s-1 have been achieved in several crystals, allowing a wide range of electrical, optical, mechanical, structural, and theoretical studies. Several challenges still remain, however, which are the motivation of this thesis. The first challenge is to delineate the crystal structure/electrical property relationship for development of high-performance organic semiconductors. This thesis demonstrates a full spectrum of studies spanning from chemical synthesis, single crystal structure determination, quantum-chemical calculation, SC-OFET fabrication, electrical measurement, photoelectron spectroscopy characterization and extensive device optimization in a series of new rubrene derivatives, motivated by the fact that rubrene is a benchmark semiconductor with record hole mobility ~ 20 cm2V-1s-1. With successful preservation of beneficial pi-stacking structures, these rubrene derivatives form

  3. Heat dissipation in relativistic single charged fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Perciante, A. L.; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.; Brun-Battistini, D.

    2015-11-01

    When the temperature of a fluid is increased its out of equilibrium behavior is significantly modified. In particular kinetic theory predicts that the heat flux is not solely driven by a temperature gradient but can also be coupled to other thermodynamic vector forces. We explore the nature of heat conduction in a single component charged fluid in special relativity, where the electromagnetic field is introduced as an external force. We obtain an electrothermal effect, similar to the mixture's cross-effect, which is not present in the non-relativistic simple fluid. The general lines of the corresponding calculation will be shown, emphasizing the importance of reference frame invariance and the origin of the extra heat sources, in particular the role of the modified inertia and the difference in fluid's and molecules' proper times. The constitutive equation for the heat flux obtained using Chapman-Enskog's expansion in Marle's approximation will be analyzed together with the corresponding transport coefficients.The impact of this effect in the overall dynamics of the system here considered will be briefly discussed. The authors acknowledge support from CONACyT through grant CB2011/167563.

  4. Charge exchange between singly ionized helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B.H.; Poe, R.T.; Tang, K.T.

    1978-01-01

    The plane-wave Born approximation was used to evaluate the charge transfer cross sections for the reaction He + + He + → He ++ + He. The charge transfer cross section is graphed as a function of incident energy and compared with experimental measurements

  5. Single Gold Nanorod Charge Modulation in an Ion Gel Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean S E; Wei, Xingzhan; McKenzie, Thomas G; Funston, Alison M; Mulvaney, Paul

    2016-11-09

    A reliable and reproducible method to rapidly charge single gold nanocrystals in a solid-state device is reported. Gold nanorods (Au NRs) were integrated into an ion gel capacitor, enabling them to be charged in a transparent and highly capacitive device, ideal for optical transmission. Changes in the electron concentration of a single Au NR were observed with dark-field imaging spectroscopy via localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) shifts in the scattering spectrum. A time-resolved, laser-illuminated, dark-field system was developed to enable direct measurement of single particle charging rates with time resolution below one millisecond. The added sensitivity of this new approach has enabled the optical detection of fewer than 110 electrons on a single Au NR. Single wavelength resonance shifts provide a much faster, more sensitive method for all surface plasmon-based sensing applications.

  6. Single- and double-charge exchange at low pion energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of pion single- and double-charge exchange reactions at incident energies of 25 to 65 MeV leading to isobaric analog states, and in the case of double-charge exchange leading to the ground state of the residual nucleus. The crucial role of the higher nuclear transparency at low pion energies for the analysis of the data in terms of single and double scattering is demonstrated. The large effects on double-charge exchange produced by the spatial correlations in nuclear wave functions are evident. The data on 1f 7/2 nuclei at 35 MeV are used to establish the general validity of a shell-model-based two-amplitude model for these transitions. Recent measurements of the energy dependence between 25 and 65 MeV of double-charge exchange cross sections at forward angles are presented and discussed. 33 refs., 19 figs

  7. Charge transient spectroscopy of C 60 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranc̆ok, D.; Halus̆ka, M.; Kuzmany, H.; Nádaz̆dy, V.

    1994-01-01

    Suitability of the charge transient spectroscopy — QTS for the investigation of fullerites is demonstrated. QTS can yield an information on the electrical properties of both the bulk and the interface of fullerites interfaced with metals (insulators, semiconductors) as well as on its bulk phase transition. Our measurements were carried out on C60 single crystals. We observed a single QTS peak which reflects most probably a thermally activated relaxation process (polarization or trap - limited charge emission) in the crystal. The expected phase transition was detected as a step of QTS signal at 255 K. The influence of a thermal treatment in air on the QTS peak was also observed.

  8. Single-charge tunneling in ambipolar silicon quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Filipp

    2015-01-01

    Spin qubits in coupled quantum dots (QDs) are promising for future quantum information processing (QIP). A quantum bit (qubit) is the quantum mechanical analogon of a classical bit. In general, each quantum mechanical two-level system can represent a qubit. For the spin of a single charge carrier

  9. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length ... in neutron dosimetry, gamma and cosmic rays detection, heavy ion and nuclear physics and corpuscular ..... [13] R P Henke and E V Benton, Charged particle tracks in polymers: No. 5-A com- puter code for ...

  10. Surface charge modulated aptasensor in a single glass conical nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sheng-Lin; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Zheng, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Jin-Lei; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we have proposed a label-free nanopore-based biosensing strategy for protein detection by performing the DNA-protein interaction inside a single glass conical nanopore. A lysozyme binding aptamer (LBA) was used to functionalize the walls of glass nanopore via siloxane chemistry and negatively charged recognition sites were thus generated. The covalent modification procedures and their recognition towards lysozyme of the single conical nanopore were characterized via ionic current passing through the nanopore membrane, which was measured by recording the current-voltage (I-V) curves in 1mM KCl electrolyte at pH=7.4. With the occurring of recognition event, the negatively charged wall was partially neutralized by the positively charged lysozyme molecules, leading to a sensitive change of the surface charge-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Our results not only demonstrate excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards the target protein, but also suggest a route to extend this nanopore-based sensing strategy to the biosensing platform designs of a wide range of proteins based on a charge modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  12. Spin and charge transport study in single crystal organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik V.; Mulder, Carlijn L.; Baldo, Marc A.; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2009-03-01

    Spin transport studies in amorphous rubrene films have shown exciting and promising results [1]. A large spin diffusion length in these amorphous films has increased the motivation to perform spin transport study in high purity single crystal rubrene. This will provide the fundamental understanding on the spin transport behavior in OS; not influenced by defects or traps. We will present work on small channel single crystal rubrene FET device with magnetic electrodes. For example, our preliminary studies have show mobility for FET with Co electrode to be 0.014cm^2/V-s. A study on the spin and charge transport properties in single crystals of OS with magnetic electrodes is being done and the results will be reported. The influence of gate voltage and applied magnetic field on the transport properties will be discussed. [1] J.H. Shim et al., PRL 100, 226603 (2008)

  13. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murböck, T.; Schmidt, S.; Andelkovic, Z.; Birkl, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Vogel, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 106 Mg+ ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg+ ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled 24Mg+.

  14. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.01.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  15. Light-Induced Charge Transport within a Single Asymmetric Nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU, CHONG; HWANG, YUN YEONG; JEONG, HOON EIU; YANG, PEIDONG

    2011-01-21

    Artificial photosynthetic systems using semiconductor materials have been explored for more than three decades in order to store solar energy in chemical fuels such as hydrogen. By mimicking biological photosynthesis with two light-absorbing centers that relay excited electrons in a nanoscopic space, a dual-band gap photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is expected to have higher theoretical energy conversion efficiency than a single band gap system. This work demonstrates the vectorial charge transport of photo-generated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Under UV illumination, higher surface potential was observed on the n-TiO₂ side, relative to the potential of the p-Si side, as a result of majority carriers’ recombination at the Si/TiO₂ interface. These results demonstrate a new approach to investigate charge separation and transport in a PEC system. This asymmetric nanowire heterostructure, with a dual band gap configuration and simultaneously exposed anode and cathode surfaces represents an ideal platform for the development of technologies for the generation of solar fuels, although better photoanode materials remain to be discovered.

  16. Charge-transfer interactions of Cr species with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Matysiak-Brynda, Edyta; Hepel, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Interactions of Cr species with nucleic acids in living organisms depend strongly on Cr oxidation state and the environmental conditions. As the effects of these interactions range from benign to pre-mutagenic to carcinogenic, careful assessment of the hazard they pose to human health is necessary. We have investigated methods that would enable quantifying the DNA damage caused by Cr species under varying environmental conditions, including UV, O 2 , and redox potential, using simple instrumental techniques which could be in future combined into a field-deployable instrumentation. We have employed electrochemical quartz crystal nanogravimetry (EQCN), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate the extent of DNA damage expressed in terms of guanine oxidation yield (η) and changes in specific characteristics provided by these techniques. The effects of the interactions of Cr species with DNA were analyzed using a model calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) film on a gold electrode (Au@ctDNA) in different media, including: (i) Cr(VI), (ii) Cr(VI) reduced at -0.2V, (iii) Cr(III)+UV radiation+O 2 , and Cr(III), obtaining the η values: 7.4±1.4, 1.5±0.4, 1.1±0.31%, and 0%, respectively, thus quantifying the hazard posed. The EIS measurements have enabled utilizing the decrease in charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) for ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe at an Au@ctDNA electrode to assess the oxidative ctDNA damage by Cr(VI) species. In this case, circular dichroism indicates an extensive damage to the ctDNA hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, Cr(III) species have not induced any damage to ctDNA, although the EQCN measurements show an electrostatic binding to DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring charge density of electron beam single nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.I.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Fazkullin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of a probe design and electrometric repeater circuit and technique for measuring the charge (current) density of electron beam single pulses by integrating current at a reference capacitor with a subsequent registering of voltage across the capacitor. The probe consists of a band-type signal electrodes and two oval cross-section sleeves: external and internal with larger and smaller rectangular openings, respectively. The external sleeve has antidynatron grid located over the hole. The design employs integer nickel sleever - the cores of electron tube cathodes. The signal electrode is made of nickel band 0.15 mm thick. The probe elements are insulated from each other along the whole length with a layer of teflon band (30 μm), with rectangular openings cut in compliance with the sleeve openings. The measurement range is from 0.4x10 - 9 to 1x10 - 7 C/cm 2 . The rated accuracy of measurements is no worse than +-5% for the beam energy of 0.2 to 3 KeV. The ultimate parameters the charge density - 6 C/cm 2 and direct current density 3 mA/cm 2 - are specified by the breakdown voltage (200 V) of the input capacitor and probe insulation

  18. Intrinsic Charge Carrier Mobility in Single-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, A N; Brener, S; Katsnelson, M I

    2016-06-17

    We present a theory for single- and two-phonon charge carrier scattering in anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors applied to single-layer black phosphorus (BP). We show that in contrast to graphene, where two-phonon processes due to the scattering by flexural phonons dominate at any practically relevant temperatures and are independent of the carrier concentration n, two-phonon scattering in BP is less important and can be considered negligible at n≳10^{13}  cm^{-2}. At smaller n, however, phonons enter in the essentially anharmonic regime. Compared to the hole mobility, which does not exhibit strong anisotropy between the principal directions of BP (μ_{xx}/μ_{yy}∼1.4 at n=10^{13} cm^{-2} and T=300  K), the electron mobility is found to be significantly more anisotropic (μ_{xx}/μ_{yy}∼6.2). Absolute values of μ_{xx} do not exceed 250 (700)  cm^{2} V^{-1} s^{-1} for holes (electrons), which can be considered as an upper limit for the mobility in BP at room temperature.

  19. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  20. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  1. Single-Bunch Stability With Direct Space Charge

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the suppressing effect of direct space charge on impedance-driven head-tail instabilities. The present work investigates transverse stability for the HL-LHC scenario based on our macro-particle simulation tool PyHEADTAIL using realistic bunch distributions. The impact of selfconsistent modelling is briefly discussed for non-linear space charge forces. We study how space charge pushes the instability threshold for the transverse mode coupling instability (TMCI) occurring between mode 0 and -1. Next we consider finite chromaticity: in absence of space charge, the impedance model predicts head-tail instabilities. For a selected case below TMCI threshold at Q0 = 5, we demonstrate the stabilising effect of space charge. Finally, we compare simulation results to past LHC measurements.

  2. KNO scaling analysis of singly charged projectile fragments at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Inbanathan, S.S.R.

    2016-01-01

    This research article deals with the KNO scaling behaviour of singly charged projectile fragments emitted during 84 Kr 36 interactions with nuclear emulsion detector at around one GeV per nucleon. We observed that singly charged projectile fragments are strongly obeying the KNO scaling behaviour. (author)

  3. The charge collection in single side silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V V; Roe, S; Ruggiero, G; Weilhammer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The transient current technique has been used to investigate signal formation in unirradiated silicon microstrip detectors, which are similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment at LHC. Nanosecond pulsed infrared and red lasers were used to induce the signals under study. Two peculiarities in the detector performance were observed: an unexpectedly slow rise to the signal induced in a given strip when signals are injected opposite to the strip, and a long duration of the induced signal in comparison with the calculated drift time of charge carriers through the detector thickness - with a significant fraction of the charge being induced after charge carrier arrival. These major effects and details of the detector response for different positions of charge injection are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem and compared with predictions arising from the more commonly studied phenomenon of signal formation in planar pad detectors.

  4. Deterministic Electrical Charge-State Initialization of Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Doi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Apart from applications in classical information-processing devices, the electrical control of atomic defects in solids at room temperature will have a tremendous impact on quantum devices that are based on such defects. In this study, we demonstrate the electrical manipulation of individual prominent representatives of such atomic solid-state defects, namely, the negative charge state of single nitrogen-vacancy defect centers (NV^{−} in diamond. We experimentally demonstrate, deterministic, purely electrical charge-state initialization of individual NV centers. The NV centers are placed in the intrinsic region of a p-i-n diode structure that facilitates the delivery of charge carriers to the defect for charge-state switching. The charge-state dynamics of a single NV center were investigated by time-resolved measurements and a nondestructive single-shot readout of the charge state. Fast charge-state switching rates (from negative to neutrally charged defects, which are greater than 0.72 ± 0.10  μs^{−1}, were realized. Furthermore, in no-operation mode, the realized charge states were stable for presumably much more than 0.45 s. We believe that the results obtained are useful not only for ultrafast electrical control of qubits, long T_{2} quantum memory, and quantum sensors associated with single NV centers but also for classical memory devices based on single atomic storage bits working under ambient conditions.

  5. Single charging events on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid with surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuer, Caspar; Vandewiele, Stijn; Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Electrical charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar liquids due to surfactant additives is investigated intensively, motivated by its importance in a variety of applications. Most methods rely on average electrophoretic mobility measurements of many particles, which provide only indirect information on the charging mechanism. In the present work, we present a method that allows us to obtain direct information on the charging mechanism, by measuring the charge fluctuations on individual particles with a precision higher than the elementary charge using optical trapping electrophoresis. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by studying the influence of added surfactant OLOA 11000 on the charging of single colloidal PMMA particles in dodecane. The particle charge and the frequency of charging events are investigated both below and above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and with or without applying a DC offset voltage. It is found that at least two separate charging mechanisms are present below the critical micelle concentration. One mechanism is a process where the particle is stripped from negatively charged ionic molecules. An increase in the charging frequency with increased surfactant concentration suggests a second mechanism that involves single surfactant molecules. Above the CMC, neutral inverse micelles can also be involved in the charging process.

  6. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of the penetration of charged particles in matter played a very important role in the development of modern physics. Solid state nuclear track detectors have become one of the most important tools for many branches of science and technology. An attempt has been made to ...

  7. Electrochemical charging of the single-layer graphene membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 12 (2016), s. 2331-2335 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemical charging * graphene membrane * in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  8. Control of single-electron charging of metallic nanoparticles onto amorphous silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Martin; Gmucová, Katarína; Nádazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignác; Satka, Alexander; Kopáni, Martin; Cirák, Július; Majková, Eva

    2008-11-01

    Sequential single-electron charging of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in oleic acid/oleyl amine envelope and deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto Pt electrode covered with undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon film is reported. Single-electron charging (so-called quantized double-layer charging) of nanoparticles is detected by cyclic voltammetry as current peaks and the charging effect can be switched on/off by the electric field in the surface region induced by the excess of negative/positive charged defect states in the amorphous silicon layer. The particular charge states in amorphous silicon are created by the simultaneous application of a suitable bias voltage and illumination before the measurement. The influence of charged states on the electric field in the surface region is evaluated by the finite element method. The single-electron charging is analyzed by the standard quantized double layer model as well as two weak-link junctions model. Both approaches are in accordance with experiment and confirm single-electron charging by tunnelling process at room temperature. This experiment illustrates the possibility of the creation of a voltage-controlled capacitor for nanotechnology.

  9. Charge collection measurements in single-type column 3D sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaringella, M.; Polyakov, A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Bruzzi, M.; Tosi, C.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.

    2007-01-01

    We report on charge collection studies on 3D silicon detectors of single-type column n-diffusions in p-substrate, configured either as strip or as pad detectors. The charge is generated by penetrating beta particles from a 90 Sr source which, together with a scintillation counter, serves as an electron telescope. The charge collection as a function of bias voltage is compared with the depletion thickness derived from the measured C-V characteristics

  10. Charge collection measurements with p-type Magnetic Czochralski silicon single pad detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Scaringella, M.; Petterson, M.K.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Betancourt, C.; Manna, N.; Creanza, D.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Borrello, L.; Messineo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The charge collected from beta source particles in single pad detectors produced on p-type Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon wafers has been measured before and after irradiation with 26 MeV protons. After a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 1x10 15 cm -2 the collected charge is reduced to 77% at bias voltages below 900 V. This result is compared with previous results from charge collection measurements

  11. Charge enhancement of single-stranded DNA in negative electrospray ionization using the supercharging reagent meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1% m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1% m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  12. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  13. Single molecule charge transport : From a quantum mechanical to a classical description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocherzhenko, A.A.; Grozema, F.C.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores charge transport at the single molecule level. The conductive properties of both small organic molecules and conjugated polymers (molecular wires) are considered. In particular, the reasons for the transition from fully coherent to incoherent charge transport and the approaches

  14. Glass coated single grid for charged particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Nakanishi, S.

    1968-01-01

    Glass coating is used on a single grid accelerator system for ion thrusters. The uniformly thin, smooth, dense, impervious glass coating has a high dielectric strength and is firmly bonded to the accelerator grid.

  15. NTERACTION BETWEEN SURFACE CHARGE PHENOMENA AND MULTI-SPECIES DIFFUSION IN CEMENT BASED MATERIALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Measurements strongly indicate that the ‘inner’ surface of the microscopic structure of cement based materials has a fixed negative charge. This charge contributes to the formation of so-called electrical double layers. In the case of cement based materials the ionic species located in such layers...... are typically potassium -, sodium - and calcium ions. Due to the high specific surface area of hydrated cement, a large amount of ions can be located in theses double layers even if the surface charge is relatively low. The attraction force, caused by the fixed surface charge on ions located close to surfaces...

  16. A graphene quantum dot with a single electron transistor as an integrated charge sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Zhou, Cheng; Hao, Xiao-Jie; Su, Zhan; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2010-12-01

    A quantum dot (QD) with an integrated charge sensor is becoming a common architecture for a spin or charge based solid state qubit. To implement such a structure in graphene, we have fabricated a twin-dot structure in which the larger dot serves as a single electron transistor (SET) to read out the charge state of the nearby gate controlled small QD. A high SET sensitivity of 10-3e/√Hz allowed us to probe Coulomb charging as well as excited state spectra of the QD, even in the regime where the current through the QD is too small to be measured by conventional transport means.

  17. The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem: Applications and solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Simon; Klose, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem (SSFCTP) consists in finding a minimum cost flow from a number of supplier nodes to a single demand node. Shipping costs comprise costs proportional to the amount shipped as well as a fixed-charge. Although the SSFCTP is an important special case...... of the well-known fixed-charge transportation problem, just a few methods for solving this problem have been proposed in the literature. After summarising some applications of this problem arising in manufacturing and transportation, we give an overview on approximation algorithms and worst-case results....... Finally, we briefly compare some exact solution algorithms for this problem....

  18. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Huang, Jinsong, E-mail: jhuang2@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Cao, Lei, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2017-03-11

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr{sub 3}) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr{sub 3} single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4–1.6)×10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V.

  19. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, Katsuki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio

  20. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D.M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination. - Highlights: • Analytical extension of Greening and Boag theories to multiple charge carriers. • Detailed numerical study of process of volume recombination in LICs. • Recombination in pulsed beams is independent of number and mobilities of carriers. • Multiple charge carriers have a significant effect in continuous

  1. Electrochemical Charging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Farhat, H.; Kavan, Ladislav; Kong, J.; Sasaki, K.; Saito, R.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 8 (2009), s. 2320-2328 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : single-walled carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy * electrochemical gating * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 7.493, year: 2009

  2. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  3. Final Technical Report: Improved ECR Charge Breeder for Rare Ion Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, Wayne D

    2011-04-29

    The purpose of this project was to develop a charge-breeder system not only for producing the highly charged ion species needed for nuclear physics experiments, but one that could be used as a test bed for testing and developing additional techniques and technologies. The charge-breeder ion source developed under this grant was designed as a charge-breeder from the beginning and has none of the limitations inherent of converted primary ECR sources. Additionally, the major source components are designed to be easily replaced. This document describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Scientific Solutions charge-breeder ion source. This source was delivered to Texas A&M University in October 2007 for further testing.

  4. Coulombic interactions and multicomponent ionic dispersion during transport of charged species in heterogeneous porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    the ionic interactions by mapping the Coulombic cross-coupling between the dispersive fluxes of the charged species in the heterogeneous domains. The outcomes of this study are important in many subsurface applications including migration of contaminants and propagation of reaction fronts.......Electrochemical cross-coupling plays a significant role for transport of charged species in porous media [1, 2]. In this study we performed flow-through experiments in a quasi two-dimensional setup using dilute solutions of strong electrolytes to study the influence of charge interactions on mass...... transfer of ionic species in saturated porous media. The experiments were carried out under advection-dominated conditions (seepage velocity: 1 and 1.5 m/day) in two well-defined heterogeneous domains where flow diverging around a low-permeability inclusion and flow focusing in high-permeability zones...

  5. Global Asymptotic Stability for Discrete Single Species Population Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bilgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some basic discrete models in populations dynamics of single species with several age classes. Starting with the basic Beverton-Holt model that describes the change of single species we discuss its basic properties such as a convergence of all solutions to the equilibrium, oscillation of solutions about the equilibrium solutions, Allee’s effect, and Jillson’s effect. We consider the effect of the constant and periodic immigration and emigration on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model. We also consider the effect of the periodic environment on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model.

  6. Single species victory in a two-site, two-species model of population dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Sander, Len; Kessler, David

    2008-03-01

    We study the behavior of two species, differentiated only by their dispersal rates in an environment providing heterogeneous growth rates. Previous deterministic studies have shown that the slower-dispersal species always drives the faster species to extinction, while stochastic studies show that the opposite case can occur given small enough population and spatial heterogeneity. Other models of similar systems demonstrate the existence of an optimum dispersal rate, suggesting that distinguishing the species as faster or slower is insufficient. We here study the interface of these models for a small spatial system and determine the conditions of stability for a single species outcome.

  7. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Gardner, Scott L; Reinhard, Karl; Iñiguez, Alena; Araujo, Adauto

    2012-02-20

    Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species) are possible: 1) Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans) and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs) are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2) Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3) Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4) Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  8. epidemiology of single and multiple species of helminth infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 3 March 2000. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SPECIES OF HELMINTH INFECTIONS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BUSIA DISTRICT, KENYA. S. Brooker, MA, Wellcome Trust Centre for the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, University of Oxford, ...

  9. Unbiased, complete solar charging of a neutral flow battery by a single Si photocathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedege, Kristina; Bae, Dowon; Dražević, Emil

    2018-01-01

    Solar redox flow batteries have attracted attention as a possible integrated technology for simultaneous conversion and storage of solar energy. In this work, we review current efforts to design aqueous solar flow batteries in terms of battery electrolyte capacity, solar conversion efficiency...... and depth of solar charge. From a materials cost and design perspective, a simple, cost-efficient, aqueous solar redox flow battery will most likely incorporate only one semiconductor, and we demonstrate here a system where a single photocathode is accurately matched to the redox couples to allow...... for a complete solar charge. The single TiO2 protected Si photocathode with a catalytic Pt layer can fully solar charge a neutral TEMPO-sulfate/ferricyanide battery with a cell voltage of 0.35 V. An unbiased solar conversion efficiency of 1.6% is obtained and this system represents a new strategy in solar RFBs...

  10. Solving the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem by Dynamic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauff Lind Christensen, Tue; Klose, Andreas; Andersen, Kim Allan

    The Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem (SSFCMCTP) is a problem with versatile applications. This problem is a generalization of the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge Transportation Problem (SSFCTP), which has a fixed-charge, linear cost structure. However, in at least two...... are neglected in the SSFCTP. The SSFCMCTP overcome this problem by incorporating a staircase cost structure in the cost function instead of the usual one used in SSFCTP. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for the resulting problem. To enhance the performance of the generic algorithm a number...... of enhancements is employed. The problem instance is reduced by variable pegging using a Lagrangean relaxation from which also a flow augmentation scheme is derived. Additionally a reduction in the search space is employed along with a variable transformation which generalizes a transformation known from...

  11. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  12. Observation of Frenkel and charge transfer excitons in pentacene single crystals using spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Dongchen; Su, Haibin; Bastjan, M.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Palstra, T. M.; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Ruebhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.; Rübhausen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the emerging and admixture of Frenkel and charge transfer (CT) excitons near the absorption onset in pentacene single crystals. Using high energy-resolution spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry with in-plane polarization dependence, the excitonic nature of three lowest lying

  13. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  14. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  15. Modulation and Control of Charge Transport Through Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to modulate and control charge transport though single-molecule junction devices is crucial to achieving the ultimate goal of molecular electronics: constructing real-world-applicable electronic components from single molecules. This review aims to highlight the progress made in single-molecule electronics, emphasizing the development of molecular junction electronics in recent years. Among many techniques that attempt to wire a molecule to metallic electrodes, the single-molecule break junction (SMBJ) technique is one of the most reliable and tunable experimental platforms for achieving metal-molecule-metal configurations. It also provides great freedom to tune charge transport through the junction. Soon after the SMBJ technique was introduced, it was extensively used to measure the conductances of individual molecules; however, different conductances were obtained for the same molecule, and it proved difficult to interpret this wide distribution of experimental data. This phenomenon was later found to be mainly due to a lack of precise experimental control and advanced data analysis methods. In recent years, researchers have directed considerable effort into advancing the SMBJ technique by gaining a deeper physical understanding of charge transport through single molecules and thus enhancing its potential applicability in functional molecular-scale electronic devices, such as molecular diodes and molecular transistors. In parallel with that research, novel data analysis methods and approaches that enable the discovery of hidden yet important features in the data are being developed. This review discusses various aspects of molecular junction electronics, from the initial goal of molecular electronics, the development of experimental techniques for creating single-molecule junctions and determining single-molecule conductance, to the characterization of functional current-voltage features and the investigation of physical properties other than charge

  16. From single-species advice to mixed-species management: taking the next step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Reeves, S.A.; Patterson, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    that accounts for mixed-fishery effects, but in the short term there is a need for approaches to resolve the conflicting management advice for different species within the same fishery, and to generate catch or effort advice that accounts for the mixed-species nature of the fishery. This paper documents...... a recent approach used to address these problems. The approach takes the single-species advice for each species in the fishery as a starting point, then attempts to resolve it into consistent catch or effort advice using fleet-disaggregated catch forecasts in combination with explicitly stated management...

  17. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  18. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  19. Calculations of Q values in single- and double-charge-transfer collisions of highly charged ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Lin, C.D.; Toshima, N.

    1994-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations are carried out for the Q values for electron capture processes in collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms over a broad range of energies. For single-capture processes the results for N 7+ +He and O 8+ +He collisions are in good agreement with the experimental data of Wu et al. [preceding paper, Phys. Rev. A 50, 502 (1994)]. To compare with the experimental Q values for the transfer ionization (TI) and the true double-capture (TDC) processes, an independent-electron model was used to calculate double-electron-capture cross sections. By combining with the calculated average fluorescence yields, the theoretical Q values for TI and TDC processes are also found to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. We also compared the Q values calculated by the close-coupling method and by the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method

  20. Algorithms for solving the single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem is an important subproblem of the fixed-charge transportation problem. Just a few methods have been proposed in the literature to solve this problem. In this paper, solution approaches based on dynamic programming and implicit enumeration...... are revisited. It is shown how the problem size as well as the search space of a recently published dynamic programming method can be reduced by exploiting reduced cost information. Additionally, a further implicit enumeration approach relying on solution concepts for the binary knapsack problem is introduced...

  1. Charge calculation studies done on a single walled carbon nanotube using MOPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, S.; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Chaturvedi, S.

    2018-04-01

    Dipole symmetry of induced charges on DWNTs are required for their application as a nanomotor. Earlier a molecular dynamics analysis was performed for a double-walled carbon-nanotube based motor driven by an externally applied sinusoidally varying electric field. One of the ways to get such a system is chemical or end functionalization, which promises to accomplish this specific and rare configuration of the induced charges on the surface of the carbon nanotube (CNT). CNTs are also a promising system for attaching biomolecules for bio-related applications. In an earlier work, ab initio calculations were done to study the electronic and structural properties of the groups -COOH, -OH, -NH2 and -CONH2 functionalized to an (8, 0) SWNT. The systems were shown to have a very stable interaction with the CNTs. The exterior surface of the SWNT is found to be reactive to NH2 (amidogen). In this work, charge calculations are done on a CNT using MOPAC, which is a semi empirical quantum chemistry software package. As a first step, we calculate the effect of NH2 functionalization to a (5,0) SWNT of infinite length. The symmetric charge distribution of the bare SWNT is observed to be disturbed on addition of a single NH2 in the close proximity of the SWNT. A net positive and opposite charge is observed to be induced on the opposite sides of the nanotube circumference, which is, in turn, imperative for the nanomotor applications. The minimum and maximum value of the charge on any atom is observed to increase from - 0.3 to 0.6 and from - 0.3 to - 1.8 electronic charge as compared to the bare SWNT. This fluctuation of the surface charge to larger values than bare CNT, can be attributed to the coulomb repulsion between NH2 and the rest of the charge on the surface which results into minimizing the total energy of the system. No such opposite polarity of charges are observed on adding NH2 to each ring of the SWNT implying addition of a single amidogen to be the most appropriate

  2. Charge-odd and single-spin effects in two pion production in ep bar collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galynskij, M.V.; Kuraev, E.A.; Shajkhatdenov, B.G.; Ratcliffe, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    We consider two-photon and Bremsstrahlung mechanisms for the production of two charged pions in high-energy electron (proton) scattering off a transversely polarised proton. Interference between the relevant amplitudes generates a charge-odd contribution to the cross section for the process. In a kinematics with a jet moving along electron spin-independent part may be used for determination of phase differences for pion-pion scattering in the states with orbital momentum 0 or 2 and 1 whereas in a kinematics with a jet moving along proton spin-dependent part may be used to explain the experimental data for single-spin correlations in the production of negatively charged pions. We also discuss the backgrounds and estimate the accuracy of the results at less than 10% level. In addition simplified formulae derived for specific kinematics, with small total transverse pion momentum, are given

  3. Investigation of charge multiplication in single crystalline CVD diamond particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muškinja, M.; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kagan, H. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University (United States); Kramberger, G., E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mandić, I. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuž, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Phan, S.; Smith, D.S. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University (United States); Zavrtanik, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2017-01-01

    A special metallization pattern was created on a single crystalline diamond detector aimed at creating high enough electric field for impact ionization in the detector material. Electric field line focusing through electrode design and very high bias voltages were used to obtain high electric fields. Previous measurements and theoretical calculations indicated that drifting charge multiplication by impact ionization could take place. A large increase of induced charge was observed for the smallest dot electrode which points to charge multiplication while for the large dot and pad detector structure no such effect was observed. The evolution of induced currents was also monitored with the transient current technique. Induced current pulses with duration of order 1 μs were measured. The multiplication gain was found to depend on the particle rate.

  4. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of

  5. Surface structure modification of single crystal graphite after slow, highly charged ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaher, I.; Akcöltekin, S.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Manil, B.; Dey, K. R.; Been, T.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.; Schleberger, M.; Lebius, H.

    2018-04-01

    Single crystal graphite was irradiated by slow, highly charged ions. The modification of the surface structure was studied by means of Low-Energy Electron Diffraction. The observed damage cross section increases with the potential energy, i.e. the charge state of the incident ion, at a constant kinetic energy. The potential energy is more efficient for the damage production than the kinetic energy by more than a factor of twenty. Comparison with earlier results hints to a strong link between early electron creation and later target atom rearrangement. With increasing ion fluence, the initially large-scale single crystal is first transformed into μ m-sized crystals, before complete amorphisation takes place.

  6. Transmission of Fast Highly Charged Ions through a Single Glass Macrocapillary and Polycarbonate Nanocapillary Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyad, A. M.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; DeSilva, G. G.; Elkafrawy, T.; Kayani, N.; Tanis, J. A.

    2012-11-01

    Transmission of 3 MeV protons and 16 MeV O5+ ions through a single glass macrocapillary and a polycarbonate nanocapillary foil has been investigated. Results show that 3 MeV protons transmit through the capillary and the foils with little or no energy loss, while 16 MeV O5+ ions show transmission through the capillary and the foil with energy losses that vary with the tilt angle, and there are also changes in the charge state.

  7. Single photon emission from charged excitons in CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, K. G.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Klimko, G. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Mukhin, I. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Toropov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report on micro-photoluminescence studies of individual self-organized CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots intended for single-photon-source applications in a visible spectral range. The quantum dots surface density below 1010 per cm2 was achieved by using a thermally activated regime of molecular beam epitaxy that allowed fabrication of etched mesa-structures containing only a few emitting quantum dots. The single photon emission with the autocorrelation function g(2)(0)<0.2 was detected and identified as recombination of charged excitons in the individual quantum dot.

  8. Optimized Charging Scheduling with Single Mobile Charger for Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihua Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development of wireless charging technology, the recharging issue in wireless rechargeable sensor network (WRSN has been a popular research problem in the past few years. The weakness of previous work is that charging route planning is not reasonable. In this work, a dynamic optimal scheduling scheme aiming to maximize the vacation time ratio of a single mobile changer for WRSN is proposed. In the proposed scheme, the wireless sensor network is divided into several sub-networks according to the initial topology of deployed sensor networks. After comprehensive analysis of energy states, working state and constraints for different sensor nodes in WRSN, we transform the optimized charging path problem of the whole network into the local optimization problem of the sub networks. The optimized charging path with respect to dynamic network topology in each sub-network is obtained by solving an optimization problem, and the lifetime of the deployed wireless sensor network can be prolonged. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme has good and reliable performance for a small wireless rechargeable sensor network.

  9. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  10. Single-charge craters excavated during subsurface high-explosive experiments at Big Black Test Site, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.R.; Bryan, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Single-charge and row-charge subsurface cratering experiments were performed to learn how close-spacing enhances single-crater dimensions. Our first experimental phase established cratering curves for 60-lb charges of the chemical explosive. For the second phase, to be described in a subsequent report, the Row-cratering experiments were designed and executed. This data report contains excavated dimensions and auxiliary data for the single-charge cratering experiments. The dimensions for the row-charge experiments will be in the other report. Significant changes in the soil's water content appeared to cause a variability in the excavated dimensions. This variability clouded the interpretation and application of the cratering curves obtained

  11. Single-species versus dual-species probiotic supplementation as an emerging therapeutic strategy for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, G; Jamaluddin, R; Mohtarrudin, N; Ahmad, Z; Khazaai, H; Parvaneh, M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have reported beneficial effects of specific probiotics on obesity. However, the difference in the anti-obesity effects of probiotics as single species and dual species is still uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy of single and dual species of bacteria on markers of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups of varying diets as follows: standard diet, high fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota, HFD supplemented with Bifidobacterium longum and HFD supplemented with a mixture of these two bacterial species. After 15 weeks of supplementation, the animals were examined for changes in body weight, body fat, total count of bacteria in fecal, blood serum lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin and inflammatory biomarkers. Histological analysis of the liver and adipose tissue was performed and the hepatic mRNA expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism were measured. It was found that probiotic supplementation of either B. longum or a mixture of B. longum and LcS bacteria significantly reduced weight and triglycerides in the HFD groups. Supplementation of B. longum bacteria showed better results in terms of modulating leptin level, fat mass, adipocyte size and lipoprotein lipase expression, as well as increasing adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ expression compared to dual species of bacteria. No significant differences were observed in the total count of fecal bacteria, glucose and inflammatory biomarker levels between supplemented groups. B. longum supplementation in obesity was more beneficial in metabolic profile changes than the mixture species. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B

  12. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high pT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsimon, R.J.; Flower, P.S.; Hallewell, G.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Paterson, C.N.; Sharp, P.H.; Atkinson, M.; Brook, N.; Coyle, P.; Dickinson, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Ellison, R.J.; Foster, J.M.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Ibbotson, M.; Kolya, S.D.; Lafferty, G.D.; McCann, H.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Ottewell, P.J.; Reid, D.; Thompson, R.J.; Waterhouse, J.; Barberis, D.; Davenport, M.; Eades, J.; McClatchey, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A.B.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hickman, M.T.; Keemer, N.R.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Wilson, G.W.; Danaher, S.; Galbraith, W.; Thacker, N.A.; Thompson, L.

    1989-01-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.0 T F T < 1.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features. (orig.)

  13. Charge transport across a single-Cooper-pair transistor coupled to a resonant transmission line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaekangas, Juha [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pashkin, Yuri [NEC Nano Electronics Research Laboratories, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Thuneberg, Erkki [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated charge transport in ultrasmall superconducting single and double Josephson junctions coupled to a transmission-line resonator. The microstrip resonator is naturally formed by the on-chip leads and the sample holder. We observe equidistant peaks in the transport characteristics of both types of devices and attribute them to the process involving simultaneous tunneling of Cooper pairs and photon emission into the resonator. The experimental data is well reproduced with the orthodox model of Cooper pair tunneling that accounts for the microwave photon emission into the resonator.

  14. Charging a Capacitor from an External Fluctuating Potential using a Single Conical Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5–3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes. PMID:25830563

  15. Charging a capacitor from an external fluctuating potential using a single conical nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-04-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5-3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes.

  16. Deflection of high energy channeled charged particles by elastically bent silicon single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Pisharodoy, M.; Salman, S.M.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, G.H.; Wijayawardana, R.; Forster, J.S.; Mitchell, I.V.; Baker, S.I.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Avdeichikov, V.V.; Ellison, J.A.; Siffert, P.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out to observe the deflection of charged particles by planar channeling in bent single crystals of silicon for protons with energy up to 180 GeV. Anomolous loss of particles from the center point of a three point bending apparatus was observed at high incident particle energy. This effect has been exploited to fashion a 'dechanneling spectrometer' to study dechanneling effects due to centripital displacement of channeled particle trajectories in a bent crystal. The bending losses generally conform to the predictions of calculations based on a classical model. (orig.)

  17. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  18. Solving the Single-Sink, Fixed-Charge, Multiple-Choice Transportation Problem by Dynamic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tue; Andersen, Kim Allan; Klose, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers a minimum-cost network flow problem in a bipartite graph with a single sink. The transportation costs exhibit a staircase cost structure because such types of transportation cost functions are often found in practice. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for solving...... this so-called single-sink, fixed-charge, multiple-choice transportation problem exactly. The method exploits heuristics and lower bounds to peg binary variables, improve bounds on flow variables, and reduce the state-space variable. In this way, the dynamic programming method is able to solve large...... instances with up to 10,000 nodes and 10 different transportation modes in a few seconds, much less time than required by a widely used mixed-integer programming solver and other methods proposed in the literature for this problem....

  19. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  20. Persistent Charge-Density-Wave Order in Single-Layer TaSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Chen, Yi; Kim, Heejung; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Tang, Shujie; Jiang, Juan; Liou, Franklin; Kahn, Salman; Jia, Caihong; Omrani, Arash A; Shim, Ji Hoon; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Hwang, Choongyu; Crommie, Michael F; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2018-02-14

    We present the electronic characterization of single-layer 1H-TaSe 2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that 3 × 3 charge-density-wave (CDW) order persists despite distinct changes in the low energy electronic structure highlighted by the reduction in the number of bands crossing the Fermi energy and the corresponding modification of Fermi surface topology. Enhanced spin-orbit coupling and lattice distortion in the single-layer play a crucial role in the formation of CDW order. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the nature of CDW order in the two-dimensional limit.

  1. SINGLE CHANNEL SEISMIC APPLICATION FOR GAS CHARGED SEDIMENT RECONNAISSANCE IN GEOHAZARD STUDY OF PORT CONSTRUCTION AT WETLAND AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufan Wiguna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas charged sediment as a one of parameter for geohazard study in infrastructure especially in swamp area. Instability of sediment layer for exampel subsidence and landslide result in geohazard potention that caused by gas charged sediment. Seismic single channel can be used to identufy gas charged sediment location. Seabed morphology is collected from bathymetry and tidal survey. From seismic profile interpretation shows gas charged sediment indication in Line A and Line B. That indication emerged by presence of acoustic turbid zone and acoustic blanking. Line A and Line B location will be spotlight in next geotechnic port construction study.

  2. Evolution of charged species in propane/air flames: mass-spectrometric analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, J. M.; Agneray, A.; Jaffrézic, X.; Bellenoue, M.; Labuda, S.; Leys, C.; Chernukho, A. P.; Migoun, A. N.; Cenian, A.; Savel'ev, A. M.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental and modelling studies of ion formation during combustion of propane/air mixtures are presented. The positive and negative ions mass/charge spectra in propane/air stoichiometric flame at atmospheric pressure are recorded in the range from 0 to 512 atomic mass units. The C2H3O+ and HCO_{2}^{-} ions are found to be the most abundant ionic species in the flame front region. By increasing the distance from the flame front the ion composition changes significantly. In the burnt gas region the H3O+, NO+, CO_{3}^{-} , HCO_{3}^{-} ions are found to be the major charged species. To explain the experimental results the extended kinetic model describing the ion formation in flame and in the extraction system of the mass-spectrometer as well as ion-soot interaction is developed. It is shown that the ionic clusters, which are observed experimentally, form during the adiabatic expansion in the extraction system, and the presence of soot particles may change the total positive and negative ion concentrations in the gas phase. This paper was presented at the Second International Symposium on Nonequilibrium Processes, Combustion, and Atmospheric Phenomena (Dagomys, Sochi, Russia, 3-7 October 2006).

  3. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2016-04-15

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells.

  4. Single-molecule conductance of a chemically modified, π-extended tetrathiafulvalene and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Raúl; Herranz, M Ángeles; Leary, Edmund; González, M Teresa; Bollinger, Gabino Rubio; Bürkle, Marius; Zotti, Linda A; Asai, Yoshihiro; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás; Martín, Nazario

    2015-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and single-molecule electrical transport properties of a molecular wire containing a π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) group and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ. We form single-molecule junctions using the in situ break junction technique using a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope with a range of conductance between 10 G0 down to 10(-7) G0. Within this range we do not observe a clear conductance signature of the neutral parent molecule, suggesting either that its conductance is too low or that it does not form a stable junction. Conversely, we do find a clear conductance signature in the experiments carried out on the charge-transfer complex. Due to the fact we expected this species to have a higher conductance than the neutral molecule, we believe this supports the idea that the conductance of the neutral molecule is very low, below our measurement sensitivity. This idea is further supported by theoretical calculations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported single-molecule conductance measurements on a molecular charge-transfer species.

  5. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term “fate” of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  6. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  7. Daylight-driven photocatalytic degradation of ionic dyes with negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers: dye charge-dependent roles of reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Suxiang; Cai, Lejuan; Li, Dapeng; Fa, Wenjun; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Even though dye degradation is a successful application of semiconductor photocatalysis, the roles of reactive species in dye degradation have not received adequate attention. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation of two cationic dyes (rhodamine B and methylene blue) and two anionic dyes (methyl orange and orange G) over negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers synthesized at 80 °C under indoor daylight lamp irradiation. It is notable to find In2S3 nanoflowers were more stable in anionic dyes degradation compared to that in cationic dyes removal. The active species trapping experiments indicated photogenerated electrons were mainly responsible for cationic dyes degradation, but holes were more important in anionic dyes degradation. A surface-charge-dependent role of reactive species in ionic dye degradation was proposed for revealing such interesting phenomenon. This study would provide a new insight for preparing highly efficient daylight-driven photocatalyst for ionic dyes degradation.

  8. Direct Imaging of Highly Anisotropic Photogenerated Charge Separations on Different Facets of a Single BiVO4 Photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Fan, Fengtao; Chen, Ruotian; An, Hongyu; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2015-07-27

    Spatially resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SRSPS) was employed to obtain direct evidence for highly anisotropic photogenerated charge separation on different facets of a single BiVO4 photocatalyst. Through the controlled synthesis of a single crystal with preferentially exposed {010} facets, highly anisotropic photogenerated hole transfer to the {011} facet of single BiVO4 crystals was observed. The surface photovoltage signal intensity on the {011} facet was 70 times stronger than that on the {010} facets. The influence of the built-in electric field in the space charge region of different facets on the anisotropic photoinduced charge transfer in a single semiconductor crystal is revealed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  10. Transverse target single-spin asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Argentina); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (Germany)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Collaboration

    2013-10-15

    Single-spin asymmetries were investigated in inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons from transversely polarized protons at the HERMES experiment. The asymmetries were studied as a function of the azimuthal angle {psi} about the beam direction between the target-spin direction and the hadron production plane, the transverse hadron momentum P{sub T} relative to the direction of the incident beam, and the Feynman variable x{sub F}. The sin {psi} amplitudes are positive for {pi}{sup +} and K{sup +}, slightly negative for {pi}{sup -} consistent with zero for K{sup -}, with particular P{sub T} but weak x{sub F} dependences. Especially large asymmetries are observed for two small subsamples of events, where also the scattered electron was recorded by the spectrometer.

  11. Chemical properties of astatine positive single-charged ion in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberents, V.; Khalkin, V.A.; Marinov, A.

    1983-01-01

    The mobility of the oxidized astatine in solutions H(Na)ClO 4 (μ=0.4 M) - 1x10 -4 M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 has been measured at 25 deg C in the interval 0.63 -4 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , pH 0.63 Usub(c)=2.67x10 -4 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . The effect agrees with the opinion that a single-charged cation of astatine formed in acidic solutions is a strong aquacomplex ((Hsub(2)O)sub(x)At)sup(+) (x=1-2) (protonized hypoastatine acid). Deprotonization constant of this cation is Ksub(dp)=0.032+-0.005. Specific properties of the astatine cation are given. They can be explained, probability, through the peculiarities of its structure

  12. Effect of quenched disorder on charge-orbital-spin ordering in single-layer manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masaya; Mathieu, Roland; He, Jinping; Kaneko, Yoshio; Tokura, Yoshinori; Asamitsu, Atsushi; Kumai, Reiji; Tomioka, Yasuhide; Matsui, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties have been investigated for half-doped single-layer manganites RE 0.5 Sr 1.5 MnO 4 [RE=La, (La, Pr), Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu]. Analyses of electron diffraction and ac susceptibility measurements have revealed that the long-range charge-orbital ordering (CO-OO) state as observed in La 0.5 Sr 1.5 MnO 4 is suppressed for the other materials: the CO-OO transition temperature, as well as the correlation length decreases with a decrease in the cation size of RE. Such a short-range CO-OO state shows a spin-glass behavior at low temperatures. A new electronic phase diagram is established with quenched disorder as the control parameter. (author)

  13. Single and double charge transfer in Be/sup 4+/+He collisions: A molecular (Feshbach) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-12-01

    In recent articles, we pointed out the fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of processes involving a multicharged ion and hydrogen or helium atoms, which is the (formal) autoionizing character of the molecular channels, and we reported a (new) implementation of the Feshbach method to calculate the molecular energies and couplings. In the present work we use the wave functions calculated with this Feshbach method for the BeHe/sup 4+/ quasimolecule, introduce a common translation factor in the formalism, and calculate the single and double charge-exchange cross sections in Be/sup 4+/+He(1s/sup 2/) collisions for impact energies 0.2--20 keV/amu. The mechanisms of the processes are discussed in detail.

  14. Transverse target single-spin asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 00-689 Warsaw (Poland); Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Avetisyan, E. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Belostotski, S. [K.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Bianchi, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borissov, A. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bowles, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bryzgalov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, 142281 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Burns, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Capiluppi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Capitani, G.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cisbani, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, Gruppo Collegato Sanità and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, 00161 Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-01-20

    Single-spin asymmetries were investigated in inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons from transversely polarized protons at the HERMES experiment. The asymmetries were studied as a function of the azimuthal angle ψ about the beam direction between the target-spin direction and the hadron production plane, the transverse hadron momentum P{sub T} relative to the direction of the incident beam, and the Feynman variable x{sub F}. The sin ψ amplitudes are positive for π{sup +} and K{sup +}, slightly negative for π{sup −} and consistent with zero for K{sup −}, with particular P{sub T} but weak x{sub F} dependences. Especially large asymmetries are observed for two small subsamples of events, where also the scattered electron was recorded by the spectrometer.

  15. Charging the quantum capacitance of graphene with a single biological ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yung Yu; Pham, Ted D; Zand, Katayoun; Li, Jinfeng; Burke, Peter J

    2014-05-27

    The interaction of cell and organelle membranes (lipid bilayers) with nanoelectronics can enable new technologies to sense and measure electrophysiology in qualitatively new ways. To date, a variety of sensing devices have been demonstrated to measure membrane currents through macroscopic numbers of ion channels. However, nanoelectronic based sensing of single ion channel currents has been a challenge. Here, we report graphene-based field-effect transistors combined with supported lipid bilayers as a platform for measuring, for the first time, individual ion channel activity. We show that the supported lipid bilayers uniformly coat the single layer graphene surface, acting as a biomimetic barrier that insulates (both electrically and chemically) the graphene from the electrolyte environment. Upon introduction of pore-forming membrane proteins such as alamethicin and gramicidin A, current pulses are observed through the lipid bilayers from the graphene to the electrolyte, which charge the quantum capacitance of the graphene. This approach combines nanotechnology with electrophysiology to demonstrate qualitatively new ways of measuring ion channel currents.

  16. Induction of prophage lambda by chlorinated organics: Detection of some single-species/single-site carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brooks, H.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenicity assays showed that the prophage-induction assay had a somewhat higher specificity than did the Salmonella assay (70% vs. 50%); sensitivity, concordance, and positive and negative predictivity were similar for the two microbial assays. The Microscreen prophage-induction assay failed to detect eight carcinogens, perhaps due to toxicity or other unknown factors; five of these eight carcinogens were detected by the Salmonella assay. However, the prophage-induction assay did detect six carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella assay, and five of these were single-species, single-site carcinogens, mostly mouse liver carcinogens. Some of these carcinogens, such as the chloroethanes, produce free radicals, which may be the basis for their carcinogenicity and ability to induce prophage. The prophage-induction (or other SOS) assay may be useful in identifying some genotoxic chlorinated carcinogens that induce DNA damage that do not revert the standard Salmonella tester strains.

  17. Cavity-Enhanced Real-Time Monitoring of Single-Charge Jumps at the Microsecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C.; Loo, V.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Krebs, O.; Voisin, P.; Senellart, P.; Lanco, L.

    2014-04-01

    We use fast coherent reflectivity measurements, in a strongly coupled quantum dot micropillar device, to monitor in real time single-charge jumps at the microsecond time scale. Thanks to the strong enhancement of light-matter interaction inside the cavity, and to a close to shot-noise-limited detection setup, the measurement rate is 5 orders of magnitude faster than with previous optical experiments of direct single-charge sensing with quantum dots. The monitored transitions, identified at any given time with a less than 0.2% error probability, correspond to a carrier being captured and then released by a single material defect. This high-speed technique opens the way for the real-time monitoring of other rapid single quantum events, such as the quantum jumps of a single spin.

  18. Chiral separation of tedizolid using charge single isomer derivatives of cyclodextrins by capillary electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Katarzyna; Gruba, Ewa; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta; Bednarek, Elżbieta

    2016-02-20

    A method to enantioseparate tedizolid (TED), the second analogue after linezolid (LIN) in a truly new class of antibacterial agents, the oxazolidinones, was developed based on capillary electrokinetic chromatography using cyclodextrin as chiral pseudophase (CD-cEKC). The single isomer R-tedizolid possesses one chiral centre at C5 of the oxazolidinone ring, which is associated with the antibacterial activity of the drug. Tedizolid enantiomers are non-charged and therefore require the use of charged cyclodextrins (CCDs) as carrier hosts to achieve a velocity difference during migration. During method development, hydrophilic anionic single-isomer and moderately hydrophobic and hydrophobic cyclodextrins were tested, including heptakis-(2,3-dihydroxy-6-sulfo)-β-cyclodextrin (HS-β-CD), heptakis-(2,3-diacetyl-6-sulfo)-β-cyclodextrin (HDAS-β-CD), oktakis-(2,3-diacetyl-6-sulfo)-γ-cyclodextrin (ODAS-γ-CD) and heptakis-(2,3-dimethyl-6-sulfo)-β-cyclodextrin (HDMS-β-CD). Only CDs that have acetyl groups at the C2 and C3 positions with seven (HDAS-β-CD) or eight (ODAS-γ-CD) residues of glucopyranose units provided baseline separation of the tedizolid enantiomers with the addition of organic solvent. During the experiments, different organic solvents were tested, such as methanol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, which varied in their abilities to donate or accept protons. The best enantiomer separation results were obtained using the CD-cEKC method with 37.5mM HDAS-β-CD dissolved in 50mM formic buffer (pH 4.0) with the addition of acetonitrile (81.4:18.6, v/v) at 27ºC, normal polarity, and 12kV. Finally, the apparent binding constants for each enantiomer-HDAS-β-CD pair were calculated. Moreover, in order to evaluate the behaviour of TED and LIN enantiomers relative to chiral selector, enantioselective interactions towards the precursors of TED and LIN isomers were also investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. The new ECR charge breeder for the Selective Production of Exotic Species project at INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Roncolato, C.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project is an ISOL facility under construction at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). 1+ radioactive ions, produced and extracted from the target-ion-source system, will be charge bred to high charge states by an ECR charge breeder (SPES-CB): the project will adopt an upgraded version of the PHOENIX charge breeder, developed since about twenty years by the Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC). The collaboration between LNL and LPSC started in 2010 with charge breeding experiments performed on the LPSC test bench and led, in June 2014, to the signature of a Research Collaboration Agreement for the delivery of a complete charge breeder and ancillaries, satisfying the SPES requirements. Important technological aspects were tackled during the construction phase, as, for example, beam purity issues, electrodes alignment, and vacuum sealing. This phase was completed in spring 2015, after which the qualification tests were carried out at LPSC on the 1+/q+ test stand. This paper describes the characteristics of the SPES-CB, with particular emphasis on the results obtained during the qualification tests: charge breeding of Ar, Xe, Rb, and Cs satisfied the SPES requirements for different intensities of the injected 1+ beam, showing very good performances, some of which are "best ever" for this device.

  1. Controlling charges distribution at the surface of a single GaN nanowire by in-situ strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the strain on the charge distribution at the surface of a GaN semiconductor nanowire (NW has been investigated inside transmission electron microscope (TEM by in-situ off-axis electron holography. The outer and inner surfaces of the NW bent axially under compression of two Au electrodes were differently strained, resulting in difference of their Fermi levels. Consequently, the free electrons flow from the high Fermi level to the low level until the two Fermi levels aligned in a line. The potential distributions induced by charge redistribution in the two vacuum sides of the bent NW were examined respectively, and the opposite nature of the bounded charges on the outer and inner surfaces of the bent NW was identified. The results provide experimental evidence that the charge distribution at the surfaces of a single GaN NW can be controlled by different strains created along the NW.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Charged Species in the Afterglow of Plasmas Containing Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2000-10-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of charged species densities and wall fluxes during the afterglow of an electronegative discharge have been investigated. It was found that the decay of a plasma with negative ions is quite different than that of an electropositive plasma. Decay of a plasma with negative ions consists of two stages. During the first stage, electrons dominate plasma diffusion and negative ions are trapped inside the vessel by the static electric field; the flux of negative ions to the walls is nearly zero. During the second stage of the afterglow, electrons have disappeared, and positive and negative ions diffuse to the walls with the ion-ion ambipolar diffusion coefficient. The transition time between two stages depends greatly on ratio of ion (T_i) and electron (T_e) temperatures. Theories for plasma decay have been developed for equal and strongly different ion and electron temperatures. In the case T_i=T_e, the species spatial profiles are similar and an analytic solution exists. When detachment is important in the afterglow the plasma decay crucially depends on the product of negative ion detachment frequency and diffusion time. If this factor is larger than two, negative ions convert to electrons during their diffusion towards the walls. The presence of detached electrons results in ``self-trapping" of the negative ions, due to emerging electric fields, and the negative ion flux to the walls is extremely small. Thus, negative ions can be extracted in the afterglow only if detachment is small. In case T_inew type of nonlinear structure, different from conventional hydrodynamic nonlinear waves.

  3. A Single-Phase Transformerless Inverter With Charge Pump Circuit Concept for Grid-Tied PV Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardashir, Jaber Fallah; Sabahi, Mehran; Hosseini, Seyed Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new single-phase transformerless photovoltaic (PV) inverter for grid-tied PV systems. The topology is derived from the concept of a charge pump circuit in order to eliminate the leakage current. It is composed of four power switches, two diodes, two capacitors, and an LCL ou...

  4. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Single-Particle Subcellular Irradiations at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube

  5. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  6. A space-charge treatment of the increased concentration of reactive species at the surface of a ceria solid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurhelle, Alexander F.; Souza, Roger A. de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Tong, Xiaorui; Mebane, David S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Klein, Andreas [Institute of Materials Science, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2017-11-13

    A space-charge theory applicable to concentrated solid solutions (Poisson-Cahn theory) was applied to describe quantitatively as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure published data obtained by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the concentration of Ce{sup 3+} (the reactive species) at the surface of the oxide catalyst Ce{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}. In contrast to previous theoretical treatments, these calculations clearly indicate that the surface is positively charged and compensated by an attendant negative space-charge zone. The high space-charge potential that develops at the surface (>0.8 V) is demonstrated to be hardly detectable by XPS measurements because of the short extent of the space-charge layer. This approach emphasizes the need to take into account defect interactions and to allow deviations from local charge neutrality when considering the surfaces of oxide catalysts. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Molecular simulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide immobilized on charged single-walled carbon nanotubes for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Kang, Zhengzhong; Ye, Xuesong; Wu, Tao; Zhu, Qin

    2012-12-01

    The reconstitution of apo-glucose oxidase (apo-GOx) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with the cofactor, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), greatly improved electron transfer turnover rate of the redox reactions in glucose sensing with glucose sensors. The research reported here is aimed to better understand molecular details of affection of the charging SWNT to the conformational changes of FAD, in order to find a rational design and selection scheme of SWNT which is suitable for the FAD and apo-GOx to perform their reconstitution. In this report, molecular simulations of FAD functionalized differently charged SWNTs were carried outin an aqueous environment, with counterions to maintain total charge neutrality. The conformation and orientation changes were observed by both trajectory and quantitative analyses. The simulation results showed that in both uncharged and positively charged SWNT situations, FAD adsorbed onto SWNT at the end of the simulations, which increased the steric resistance of molecules and hindered the reconstitution of apo-GOx and FAD to some degree. By contrast, FAD functionalized negatively charged SWNT maintained its original conformation largely. In addition, negatively charged SWNT may be the best choice for electron transfer mediator for the reconstitution of apo-GOx on relay-cofactor units associated with electrodes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Species distribution modelling for plant communities: Stacked single species or multivariate modelling approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilie B. Henderson; Janet L. Ohmann; Matthew J. Gregory; Heather M. Roberts; Harold S.J. Zald

    2014-01-01

    Landscape management and conservation planning require maps of vegetation composition and structure over large regions. Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used for individual species, but projects mapping multiple species are rarer. We compare maps of plant community composition assembled by stacking results from many SDMs with multivariate maps constructed...

  9. Twisted intra-molecular charge transfer investigations of semiorganic triglycine phosphate single crystal for non linear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, M. R.; Joselin Beaula, T.; Rayar, S. L.; Bena Jothy, V.

    2017-09-01

    NLO materials are gaining importance in technologies such as optical communication, optical computing and dynamic image processing. Many NLO crystals grown by mixing amino acids with various organic and inorganic acids have been reported in the literature. Hence, glycine mixed semi-organic material will be of special interest as a fundamental building block to develop many complex crystals with improved NLO properties. A semi organic Single crystal of Triglycine Phosphate (TGP) which was grown and spectral analysis have been using FTIR and Raman spectral analysis. Natural Bond Orbital Analysis and the atomic natural charges are also predicted. HOMO LUMO energy gap value suggests the possibility of charge transfer within the molecule.

  10. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2017-06-08

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  11. Charge integration successive approximation analog-to-digital converter for focal plane applications using a single amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter for on-chip focal-plane image sensor applications. The analog-to-digital converter utilizes a single charge integrating amplifier in a charge balancing architecture to implement successive approximation analog-to-digital conversion. This design requires minimal chip area and has high speed and low power dissipation for operation in the 2-10 bit range. The invention is particularly well suited to CMOS on-chip applications requiring many analog-to-digital converters, such as column-parallel focal-plane architectures.

  12. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Single $\\pi^0$ Production on Hydrocarbon using MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinok, Ozgur [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A sample of charged-current single pion production events for the semi- exclusive channel νµ + CH → µ-π0 + nucleon(s) has been obtained using neutrino exposures of the MINERvA detector. Differential cross sections for muon momentum, muon production angle, pion momentum, pion production angle, and four-momentum transfer square Q2 are reported and are compared to a GENIE-based simulation. The cross section versus neutrino energy is also re- ported. The effects of pion final-state interactions on these cross sections are investigated. The effect of baryon resonance suppression at low Q2 is examined and an event re-weight used by two previous experiments is shown to improve the data versus simulation agreement. The differential cross sections for Q2 for Eν < 4.0 GeV and Eν ≥ 4.0 GeV are examined and the shapes of these distributions are compared to those from the experiment’s $\\bar{v}$µ-CC (π0) measurement. The polarization of the pπ0 system is measured and compared to the simulation predictions. The hadronic invariant mass W distribution is examined for evidence of resonance content, and a search is reported for evidence of a two-particle two-hole (2p2h) contribution. All of the differential cross-section measurements of this Thesis are compared with published MINERvA measurements for νµ-CC (π+) and \\bar{v}$µ-CC (π0) processes.

  13. Real-Time Visualization of Active Species in a Single-Site Metal–Organic Framework Photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sizhuo [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States; Pattengale, Brian [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States; Lee, Sungsik [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60349, United States; Huang, Jier [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States

    2018-02-06

    In this work, we report a new single-site photocatalyst (Co-Ru-UIO- 67(bpy)) based on a metal-organic framework platform with incorporated molecular photosensitizer and catalyst. We show that this catalyst not only demonstrates exceptional activity for light-driven H2 production but also can be recycled without loss of activity. Using the combination of optical transient absorption spectroscopy and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we not only captured the key CoI intermediate species formed after ultrafast charge transfer from the incorporated photosensitizer but also identified the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle, providing insight into the catalysis mechanism of these single-site metal-organic framework photocatalysts.

  14. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Frisbie, Daniel [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering.

  15. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yu -San [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm-1). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS2, CH3SH, CH3SSCH3, CH3CH2SCH2CH3, HSCH2CH2SH and C4H4S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH3S, CH3CH2S and CH3SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass

  16. Ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization: singly charged molecular ions are the lucky survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, M; Glückmann, M; Schäfer, J

    2000-01-01

    A new model for the ionization processes in UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) which accounts for the major phenomena observed is presented and discussed. The model retains elements of earlier approaches, such as photoionization and photochemical reactions, but it redefines these in the light of new working questions, most importantly why only singly charged ions are detected. Based on experimental evidence, the formation of singly and multiply charged clusters by a deficiency/excess of ions and also by photoionization and subsequent photochemical processes is pointed out to be the major ionization processes, which typically occur in parallel. The generation of electrons and their partial loss into the surrounding vacuum and solid, on the one hand, results in a positively charged ion-neutral plume facilitating a high overall ionization yield. On the other hand, these electrons, and also the large excess of protonated matrix ions in the negative ion mode, induce effective ion reneutralization in the plume. These neutralization processes are most effective for the highly charged cluster ions initially formed. Their fragmentation behaviour is evidenced in fast metastable fragmentation characteristics and agrees well with an electron capture dissociation mechanism and the enthalpy transfer upon neutralization forms the rationale for the prominent fragmentation and intense chemical noise accompanying successful MALDI. Within the course of the paper, cross-correlations with other desorption/ionization techniques and with earlier discussions on their mechanisms are drawn. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yi; Hu Jian-Guo; Tan Hong-Zhou; Qin Jun-Rui

    2015-01-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well. (paper)

  18. Microencapsulation of single-cell protein from various microalgae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnama Sukardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the research was to evaluate nutritional values of microencapsulated diet made from single cell protein of microalgae. Complete randomized design was applied using three different types of microalgae for inclusion trials i.e. (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., and (C Spirulina sp. with five replications respectively. Microencapsulated diet was produced by a modification method based on thermal cross-linking with stable temperature. Phytoplankton was cultured in sea water for which fertilized by a modification of Walne and Guillard fertilizer. The results showed that the highest value of nutrition content was Spirulina sp. and the average composition of protein, crude lipid, carbohydrate, ash, nitrogen free extract, and water content was 34.80%, 0.30%, 18.53%, 20.09%, 26.29%, and 13.32%, respectively. Organoleptically, microcapsule showed that the color of capsule was dark green and smell fresh phytoplankton. Keywords: microcapsule, single-cell protein, thermal cross-linking, microalgae, phytoplankton  ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian adalah mengevaluasi kandungan nutrisi pakan mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal (single cell protein yang berasal dari berbagai jenis mikroalga (fitoplankton. Rancangan percobaan yang digunakan adalah rancangan acak lengkap, dengan perlakuan inklusi mikrokapsul dari jenis fitoplankton (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., dan (C Spirulina sp., masing-masing diulang lima kali. Pembuatan mikrokapsul dilakukan dengan menggunakan modifikasi metode dasar thermal cross-linking, serta menerapkan teknik pengeringan suhu konstan. Proses pembuatan mikrokapsul protein diawali dengan kultur fitoplankton jenis Nannochloropsis sp., Chlorella sp., dan Spirulina sp. Kultur dilakukan di dalam laboratorium menggunakan media air laut dan modifikasi pupuk Walne dan Guillard. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kandungan nutrisi tertinggi terdapat pada jenis mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal yang berasal dari

  19. The associated charged particle multiplicity of high-p/sub T/ pi /sup 0/ and single-photon events

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonou, M; Albrow, M G; Almehed, S; Benary, O; Bøggild, H; Botner, O; Cnops, A M; Cockerill, D J A; Dagan, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahl-Jensen, I; Damgaard, G; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Filippas-Tassos, A; Fokitis, E; Fowler, E C; Hallgren, A; Hansen, K H; Henning, S; Hood, D M; Hooper, J; Jarlskog, G; Karpathopoulos, S; Killian, T; Kourkoumelis, C; Kreisler, M; Lissauer, D; Lörstad, B; Ludlam, T; Mannelli, I; McCubbin, N A; Melin, A; Mjörnmark, U; Møller, R; Molzon, W; Mouzourakis, P; Nielsen, B S; Nielsen, S O; Nilsson, A; Oren, Y; Palmer, R B; Rahm, David Charles; Rehak, P; Resvanis, L K; Rosselt, L; Schistad, B; Stumer, I; Svensson, L; von Dardel, Guy F; Willis, W J

    1980-01-01

    The associated charged particle multiplicities of high-p/sub T/ pi /sup 0/ and single-photon events were measured at the CERN intersecting storage rings using lead/liquid-argon calorimeters and a scintillation counter array placed around the intersection region. The average multiplicity on the trigger side for the single-photon events was found to be significantly lower than that for the pi /sup 0/ events. The away-side multiplicity for both pi /sup 0/ and single- photon events increases with the trigger particle p/sub T/, but, at a fixed p/sub T/, the direct photon sample was found to have a slightly lower average multiplicity. The differences in the event structure can be explained if a large fraction of the single photons are produced via qg to gamma q constituent scattering. (16 refs).

  20. Interaction of singly and multiply charged ions with a lithium-fluoride surface

    CERN Document Server

    Wirtz, L

    2001-01-01

    Charge transfer between slow ions and an ionic crystal surface still poses a considerable challenge to theory due to the intrinsic many-body character of the system. For the neutralization of multiply charged ions in front of metal surfaces, the Classical Over the Barrier (COB) model is a widely used tool. We present an extension of this model to ionic crystal surfaces where the localization of valence electrons at the anion sites and the lack of cylindrical symmetry of the ion-surface system impede a simple analytical estimate of electron transfer rates. We use a classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach to calculate electron transfer rates for different charge states of the projectile ion. With these rates we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the neutralization of slow Ne10+ ions in vertical incidence on an LiF surface. Capture of one or several electrons may lead to a local positive charge up of the surface. The projectile dynamics depends on the balance between the repulsion due to this charge and the a...

  1. Detection of singly- and doubly-charged quaternary ammonium drugs in equine urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emmie N M; Kwok, W H; Wong, April S Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2012-01-13

    Quaternary ammonium drugs (QADs) are anticholinergic agents some of which are known to have been abused or misused in equine sports. A recent review of literature shows that the screening methods reported thus far for QADs mainly cover singly-charged QADs. Doubly-charged QADs are extremely polar substances which are difficult to be extracted and poorly retained on reversed-phase columns. It would be ideal if a comprehensive method can be developed which can detect both singly- and doubly-charged QADs. This paper describes an efficient liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous detection and confirmation of 38 singly- and doubly-charged QADs at sub-parts-per-billion (ppb) to low-ppb levels in equine urine after solid-phase extraction. Quaternary ammonium drugs were extracted from equine urine by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using an ISOLUTE(®) CBA SPE column and analysed by LC/MS/MS in the positive electrospray ionisation mode. Separation of the 38 QADs was achieved on a polar group embedded C18 LC column with a mixture of aqueous ammonium formate (pH 3.0, 10 mM) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. Detection and confirmation of the 38 QADs at sub-ppb to low-ppb levels in equine urine could be achieved within 16 min using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Matrix interference of the target transitions at the expected retention times was not observed. Other method validation data, including precision and recovery, were acceptable. The method was successfully applied to the analyses of drug-administration samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  3. Nanometer-size surface modification produced by single, low energy, highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    Atomically flat surfaces of insulators have been bombarded with low energy, highly charged ions to search for nanometer-size surface modifications. It is expected that the high electron deficiency of highly charged ions will capture and/or remove many of the insulator's localized electrons when impacting on an insulating surface. The resulting local electron deficiency is expected to locally disintegrate the insulator through a open-quotes Coulomb explosionclose quotes forming nanometer-size craters. Xe ions with charge states between 10+ and 45+ and kinetic energies between 0 and 10 keV/q were obtained from the KSU-CRYEBIS, a CRYogenic Electron Beam Ion Source and directed onto various insulating materials. Mica was favored as target material as atomically flat surfaces can be obtained reliably through cleaving. However, the authors observations with an atomic force microscope have shown that mica tends to defoliate locally rather than disintegrate, most likely due to the small binding forces between adjacent layers. So far the authors measurements indicate that each ion produces one blister if the charge state is sufficiently high. The blistering does not seem to depend very much on the kinetic energy of the ions

  4. Long-Lived Charge Separation at Heterojunctions between Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Perylene Diimide Electron Acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Blackburn, Jeffrey L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sisto, Thomas J. [Columbia University; Peurifoy, Samuel [Columbia University; Zhang, Boyuan [Columbia University; Nuckolls, Colin [Columbia University

    2018-04-13

    Nonfullerene electron acceptors have facilitated a recent surge in the efficiencies of organic solar cells, although fundamental studies of the nature of exciton dissociation at interfaces with nonfullerene electron acceptors are still relatively sparse. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs), unique one-dimensional electron donors with molecule-like absorption and highly mobile charges, provide a model system for studying interfacial exciton dissociation. Here, we investigate excited-state photodynamics at the heterojunction between (6,5) s-SWCNTs and two perylene diimide (PDI)-based electron acceptors. Each of the PDI-based acceptors, hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 and Trip-hPDI2, is deposited onto (6,5) s-SWCNT films to form a heterojunction bilayer. Transient absorption measurements demonstrate that photoinduced hole/electron transfer occurs at the photoexcited bilayer interfaces, producing long-lived separated charges with lifetimes exceeding 1.0 us. Both exciton dissociation and charge recombination occur more slowly for the hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 bilayer than for the Trip-hPDI2 bilayer. To explain such differences, we discuss the potential roles of the thermodynamic charge transfer driving force available at each interface and the different molecular structure and intermolecular interactions of PDI-based acceptors. Detailed photophysical analysis of these model systems can develop the fundamental understanding of exciton dissociation between organic electron donors and nonfullerene acceptors, which has not been systematically studied.

  5. Large-Scale Single Particle and Cell Trapping based on Rotating Electric Field Induced-Charge Electroosmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yupan; Ren, Yukun; Tao, Ye; Hou, Likai; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-12-06

    We propose a simple, inexpensive microfluidic chip for large-scale trapping of single particles and cells based on induced-charge electroosmosis in a rotating electric field (ROT-ICEO). A central floating electrode array, was placed in the center of the gap between four driving electrodes with a quadrature configuration and used to immobilize single particles or cells. Cells were trapped on the electrode array by the interaction between ROT-ICEO flow and buoyancy flow. We experimentally optimized the efficiency of trapping single particles by investigating important parameters like particle or cell density and electric potential. Experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. The operation of the chip was verified by trapping single polystyrene (PS) microspheres with diameters of 5 and 20 μm and single yeast cells. The highest single particle occupancy of 73% was obtained using a floating electrode array with a diameter of 20 μm with an amplitude voltage of 5 V and frequency of 10 kHz for PS microbeads with a 5-μm diameter and density of 800 particles/μL. The ROT-ICEO flow could hold cells against fluid flows with a rate of less than 0.45 μL/min. This novel, simple, robust method to trap single cells has enormous potential in genetic and metabolic engineering.

  6. Transparent Flash Memory Using Single Ta2O5Layer for Both Charge-Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Mrinal K; Alshammari, Fwzah H; Salama, Khaled N; Alshareef, Husam N

    2017-07-05

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta 2 O 5 layer is used simultaneously as a charge-trapping layer and a tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash memory cells where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ∼10.7 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance and good reliability, including data retention for more than 10 4 s and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge-trapping and tunneling layer can simplify the fabrication of advanced flash memories.

  7. Visualization of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks in conductive polystyrene nanocomposites by charge contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, Joachim; Alexeev, Alexander; Grossiord, Nadia; Koning, Cor E.; Regev, Oren

    2005-01-01

    The morphology of conductive nanocomposites consisting of low concentration of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and polystyrene (PS) has been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, in particular, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Application of charge contrast imaging in SEM allows visualization of the overall SWNT dispersion within the polymer matrix as well as the identification of individual or bundled SWNTs at high resolution. The contrast mechanism involved will be discussed. In conductive nanocomposites the SWNTs are homogeneously dispersed within the polymer matrix and form a network. Beside fairly straight SWNTs, strongly bended SWNTs have been observed. However, for samples with SWNT concentrations below the percolation threshold, the common overall charging behavior of an insulating material is observed preventing the detailed morphological investigation of the sample

  8. Analysis of some greedy algorithms for the single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görtz, Simon; Klose, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    -charge transportation problem. Nevertheless, just a few methods for solving this problem have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, some greedy heuristic solutions methods for the SSFCTP are investigated. It is shown that two greedy approaches for the SSFCTP known from the literature can be arbitrarily bad......, whereas an approximation algorithm proposed in the literature for the binary min-knapsack problem has a guaranteed worst case bound if adapted accordingly to the case of the SSFCTP....

  9. Single-hole spectral function and spin-charge separation in the t-J model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, A. S.; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Svistunov, B. V.

    2001-07-01

    Worm algorithm Monte Carlo simulations of the hole Green function with subsequent spectral analysis were performed for 0.1hole spectral function in the thermodynamic limit. Spectral analysis reveals a δ-function-sharp quasiparticle peak at the lower edge of the spectrum that is incompatible with the power-law singularity and thus rules out the possibility of spin-charge separation in this parameter range. Spectral continuum features two peaks separated by a gap ~4÷5 t.

  10. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  11. Determining a charge for the clearing of invasive alien plant species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is running out of water supply options. One option, however, is to control invasive alien plant species (IAPs) within water catchment areas and in riparian zones. The National Water Act and subsequent documentation provide a guide for the use of economic instruments to manage invasive alien plant species at ...

  12. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  13. Potential DNA barcodes for Melilotus species based on five single loci and their combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    Full Text Available Melilotus, an annual or biennial herb, belongs to the tribe Trifolieae (Leguminosae and consists of 19 species. As an important green manure crop, diverse Melilotus species have different values as feed and medicine. To identify different Melilotus species, we examined the efficiency of five candidate regions as barcodes, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS and two chloroplast loci, rbcL and matK, and two non-coding loci, trnH-psbA and trnL-F. In total, 198 individuals from 98 accessions representing 18 Melilotus species were sequenced for these five potential barcodes. Based on inter-specific divergence, we analysed sequences and confirmed that each candidate barcode was able to identify some of the 18 species. The resolution of a single barcode and its combinations ranged from 33.33% to 88.89%. Analysis of pairwise distances showed that matK+rbcL+trnL-F+trnH-psbA+ITS (MRTPI had the greatest value and rbcL the least. Barcode gap values and similarity value analyses confirmed these trends. The results indicated that an ITS region, successfully identifying 13 of 18 species, was the most appropriate single barcode and that the combination of all five potential barcodes identified 16 of the 18 species. We conclude that MRTPI is the most effective tool for Melilotus species identification. Taking full advantage of the barcode system, a clear taxonomic relationship can be applied to identify Melilotus species and enhance their practical production.

  14. The Bifurcation and Control of a Single-Species Fish Population Logistic Model with the Invasion of Alien Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study systematically the bifurcation and control of a single-species fish population logistic model with the invasion of alien species based on the theory of singular system and bifurcation. It regards Spartina anglica as an invasive species, which invades the fisheries and aquaculture. Firstly, the stabilities of equilibria in this model are discussed. Moreover, the sufficient conditions for existence of the trans-critical bifurcation and the singularity induced bifurcation are obtained. Secondly, the state feedback controller is designed to eliminate the unexpected singularity induced bifurcation by combining harvested effort with the purification capacity. It obviously inhibits the switch of population and makes the system stable. Finally, the numerical simulation is proposed to show the practical significance of the bifurcation and control from the biological point of view.

  15. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, W., E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Shikata, S. [Kwansei Gakuin Univ., 2-1, Gakuen, Mita, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Makino, T.; Koka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Hanaizumi, O. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  16. Charge Dependence and Electric Quadrupole Effects on Single-Nucleon Removal in Relativistic and Intermediate Energy Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Single nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is studied using a generalization of Weizsacker-Williams theory that treats each electromagnetic multipole separately. Calculations are presented for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations and incorporate a realistic minimum impact parameter, Coulomb recoil corrections, and the uncertainties in the input photonuclear data. Discrepancies are discussed. The maximum quadrupole effect to be observed in future experiments is estimated and also an analysis of the charge dependence of the electromagnetic cross sections down to energies as low as 100 MeV/nucleon is made.

  17. Minimizing the energy spread within a single bunch by shaping its charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    It has been known for some time that partial compensation of the longitudinal wake field effects can be obtained for any bunch by placing it ahead of the accelerating crest (in space), thereby letting the positive rising sinusoidal field offset the negative beam loading field. The work presented in this paper shows that it is possible to obtain complete compensation, i.e., to reduce the energy spread essentially to zero by properly shaping the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and by placing it at the correct position on the wave. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. The effects of charge, polymerization, and cluster size on the diffusivity of dissolved Si species in pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant cation in crustal rocks. The charge and degree of polymerization of dissolved Si significantly change depending on solution pH and Si concentration. We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the self-diffusion coefficients of dissolved Si, DSi, for 15 monomeric and polymeric species at ambient temperature. The results showed that DSi decreased with increasing negative charge and increasing degree of polymerization. The relationship between DSi and charge (Z) can be expressed by DSi/10-6 = 2.0 + 9.8e0.47Z, and that between DSi and number of polymerization (NSi) by DSi/10-6 = 9.7/NSi0.56. The results also revealed that multiple Si molecules assembled into a cluster and D decreased as the cluster size increased. Experiments to evaluate the diffusivity of Si in pore water revealed that the diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing Si concentration, a result consistent with the MD simulations. Simulation results can now be used to quantitatively assess water-rock interactions and water-concrete reactions over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions.

  19. The influence of dipolar species on charge carrier transport in a linear polysilicon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Sworakowski, J.; Kadashchuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2001), s. 432-441 ISSN 1070-9878. [International Conference on Dielectrics and Related Phenomena /6./. Spala, 06.09.2000-10.09.2000] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1050901; GA AV ČR KSK4050111; GA ČR GA106/98/0700 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : transport of charge carriers * poly[methyl(phenyl)silanediyl] * polaron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  20. Search for the Single Production of Doubly-Charged Higgs Bosons and Constraints on their Couplings from Bhabha Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, G.W.; Wilson, D.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    A search for single production of doubly-charged Higgs bosons has been performed using 600.7 pb^-1 of e+e- collision data with sqrt(s)=189--209GeV collected by the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for the existence of H++/-- is observed. Upper limits on the Yukawa coupling of the H++/-- to like-signed electron pairs are derived. Additionally, indirect constraints on the Yukawa coupling from Bhabha scattering, where the H++/-- would contribute via t-channel exchange, are derived for M(H++/--) < 2TeV. These are the first results for both a single production search and constraints from Bhabha scattering reported from LEP.

  1. Probing single-charge fluctuations at a GaAs/AlAs interface using laser spectroscopy on a nearby InGaAs quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houel, J; Kuhlmann, A V; Greuter, L; Xue, F; Poggio, M; Gerardot, B D; Dalgarno, P A; Badolato, A; Petroff, P M; Ludwig, A; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; Warburton, R J

    2012-03-09

    We probe local charge fluctuations in a semiconductor via laser spectroscopy on a nearby self-assembled quantum dot. We demonstrate that the quantum dot is sensitive to changes in the local environment at the single-charge level. By controlling the charge state of localized defects, we are able to infer the distance of the defects from the quantum dot with ±5  nm resolution. The results identify and quantify the main source of charge noise in the commonly used optical field-effect devices.

  2. Estimation of the spatial distribution of traps using space-charge-limited current measurements in an organic single crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2012-09-06

    We used a mobility edge transport model and solved the drift-diffusion equation to characterize the space-charge-limited current of a rubrene single-crystal hole-only diode. The current-voltage characteristics suggest that current is injection-limited at high voltage when holes are injected from the bottom contact (reverse bias). In contrast, the low-voltage regime shows that the current is higher when holes are injected from the bottom contact as compared to hole injection from the top contact (forward bias), which does not exhibit injection-limited current in the measured voltage range. This behavior is attributed to an asymmetric distribution of trap states in the semiconductor, specifically, a distribution of traps located near the top contact. Accounting for a localized trap distribution near the contact allows us to reproduce the temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics in forward and reverse bias simultaneously, i.e., with a single set of model parameters. We estimated that the local trap distribution contains 1.19×1011 cm -2 states and decays as exp(-x/32.3nm) away from the semiconductor-contact interface. The local trap distribution near one contact mainly affects injection from the same contact, hence breaking the symmetry in the charge transport. The model also provides information of the band mobility, energy barrier at the contacts, and bulk trap distribution with their corresponding confidence intervals. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  3. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  4. Giant plasmon excitation in single and double ionization of C60 by fast highly charged Si and O ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2007-09-01

    Se have investigated single and double ionization of C60 molecule in collisions with 2.33 MeV/u Siq+ (q=6-14) and 3.125 MeV/u Oq+ (q=5-8) projectiles. The projectile charge state dependence of the single and double ionization yields of C60 are then compared to those for an ion-atom collision system using Ne gas as a target. A large difference between the gas and the cluster target behaviour was partially explained in terms of a model based on collective excitation namely the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). The qualitative agreement between the data and GDPR model prediction for single and double ionization signifies the importance of single and double plasmon excitations in the ionization process. A large deviation of the GDPR model for triple and quadruple ionization from the experimental data imply the importance of the other low impact parameter processes such as evaporation, fragmentation and a possible solid-like dynamical screening.

  5. Giant plasmon excitation in single and double ionization of C60 by fast highly charged Si and O ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, A H; Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Tribedi, L C

    2007-01-01

    Se have investigated single and double ionization of C 60 molecule in collisions with 2.33 MeV/u Si q+ (q=6-14) and 3.125 MeV/u O q+ (q=5-8) projectiles. The projectile charge state dependence of the single and double ionization yields of C 60 are then compared to those for an ion-atom collision system using Ne gas as a target. A large difference between the gas and the cluster target behaviour was partially explained in terms of a model based on collective excitation namely the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). The qualitative agreement between the data and GDPR model prediction for single and double ionization signifies the importance of single and double plasmon excitations in the ionization process. A large deviation of the GDPR model for triple and quadruple ionization from the experimental data imply the importance of the other low impact parameter processes such as evaporation, fragmentation and a possible solid-like dynamical screening

  6. An Investigative Alternative to Single-Species Dissection in the Introductory Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Dissections of single species (e.g., fetal pig) are a common student learning activity in introductory biology courses. Such dissections demonstrate location of anatomical parts and provide dissection practice but provide less opportunity for student critical thinking, numeracy and demonstration of the scientific method. A comparative anatomy lab…

  7. Cover crops in mixtures do not use water differently than single-species plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. One of those stated benefits is greatly reduced water use by cover crops grown in mixtures. The objectives of this study were to characterize soil wat...

  8. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: sato.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS), Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2–1Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-10-21

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He{sup +}). On the other hand, compared with that of He{sup +}, silicon-ions (Si{sup +}) and gold-ions (Au{sup 3+}) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si{sup +} and 2 MeV-Au{sup 3+}, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  9. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livshits, Gideon I.; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir

    2014-01-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transport......DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set......-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4......-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA...

  10. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M White

    greater benefit to ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  11. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angela M; Zipkin, Elise F; Manley, Patricia N; Schlesinger, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  12. A fast, low power and low noise charge sensitive amplifier ASIC for a UV imaging single photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, A.; Cumming, H. S.; Varner, G.; Vallerga, J.; Raffanti, R.; Virta, V.

    2017-04-01

    NASA has funded, through their Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program, the development of a cross strip (XS) microchannel plate (MCP) detector with the intention to increase its technology readiness level (TRL), enabling prototyping for future NASA missions. One aspect of the development is to convert the large and high powered laboratory Parallel Cross Strip (PXS) readout electronics into application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to decrease their mass, volume, and power consumption (all limited resources in space) and to make them more robust to the environments of rocket launch and space. The redesign also foresees to increase the overall readout event rate, and decrease the noise contribution of the readout system. This work presents the design and verification of the first stage for the new readout system, the 16 channel charge sensitive amplifier ASIC, called the CSAv3. The single channel amplifier is composed of a charge sensitive amplifier (pre-amplifier), a pole zero cancellation circuit and a shaping amplifier. An additional output stage buffer allows polarity selection of the output analog signal. The operation of the amplifier is programmable via serial bus. It provides an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of around 600 e^- and a baseline gain of 10 mV/fC. The full scale pulse shaped output signal is confined within 100 ns, without long recovery tails, enabling up to 10 MHz periodic event rates without signal pile up. This ASIC was designed and fabricated in 130 nm, TSMC CMOS 1.2 V technology. In addition, we briefly discuss the construction of the readout system and plans for the future work.

  13. In-vitro activity of taurolidine on single species and a multispecies population associated with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Lilly; Schnyder, Simone; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of taurolidine was compared with minocycline against microbial species associated with periodontitis (four single strains and a 12-species mixture). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), killing as well as activities on established and forming single-species biofilms and a 12-species biofilm were determined. The MICs of taurolidine against single species were always 0.31 mg/ml, the MBCs were 0.64 mg/ml. The used mixed microbiota was less sensitive to taurolidine, MIC and the MBC was 2.5 mg/ml. The strains and the mixture were completely killed by 2.5 mg/ml taurolidine, whereas 256 μg/ml minocycline reduced the bacterial counts of the mixture by 5 log10 colony forming units (cfu). Coating the surface with 10 mg/ml taurolidine or 256 μg/ml minocycline prevented completely biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 but not of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and the mixture. On 4.5 d old biofilms, taurolidine acted concentration dependent with a reduction by 5 log10 cfu (P. gingivalis ATCC 33277) and 7 log10 cfu (A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4) when applying 10 mg/ml. Minocycline decreased the cfu counts by 1-2 log10 cfu independent of the used concentration. The reduction of the cfu counts in the 4.5 d old multi-species biofilms was about 3 log10 cfu after application of any minocycline concentration and after using 10 mg/ml taurolidine. Taurolidine is active against species associated with periodontitis, even within biofilms. Nevertheless a complete elimination of complex biofilms by taurolidine seems to be impossible and underlines the importance of a mechanical removal of biofilms prior to application of taurolidine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Charge transferred doping of single layer graphene by mono-dispersed manganese-oxide nanoparticles adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh Luan; Kang, Myunggoo; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, You Joong; Jung, Hyun; Yoon, Im Taek; Yang, Woochul

    2017-10-01

    We report an efficient and controllable method to introduce p-type doping in graphene by decoration with Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on mechanically exfoliated single layer graphene. A monolayer of Mn3O4 NPs, with a diameter in the range of 5-10 nm, was decorated on a graphene film using an ex-situ method, whereas by controlling the coverage of the NPs on the graphene surface, the carrier concentration could be continually adjusted. The p-type of the NP-decorated single layer graphene was confirmed by the Raman G-band. It was found that the carrier concentration could be gradually adjusted up to 26.09 × 1012 cm-2, with 90% coverage of Mn3O4 NPs. The Dirac point of the pristine graphene at the gate bias of 27 V shifted to 150 V for Mn3O4 NP decorated graphene. The p-type graphene doped with Mn3O4 NPs demonstrated significant high air-stability, even under an oxygen atmosphere for 60 days. This approach allows for the opportunity for simple, scalable, and highly stable doping of graphene for future high-performance electronic device applications.

  15. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  16. Impact of Anthropogenic Noise on Aquatic Animals: From Single Species to Community-Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Saeed Shafiei; Neo, Yik Yaw; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise underwater is on the rise and may affect aquatic animals of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Many recent studies concern some sort of impact assessment of a single species. Few studies addressed the noise impact on species interactions underwater, whereas there are some studies that address community-level impact but only on land in air. Key processes such as predator-prey or competitor interactions may be affected by the masking of auditory cues, noise-related disturbance, or attentional interference. Noise-associated changes in these interactions can cause shifts in species abundance and modify communities, leading to fundamental ecosystem changes. To gain further insight into the mechanism and generality of earlier findings, we investigated the impact on both a predator and a prey species in captivity, zebrafish (Danio rerio) preying on waterfleas (Daphnia magna).

  17. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Jernigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green and eukaryotic (green and brown algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis, five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata, and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp. were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  18. Longitudinal transport coefficients of a magnetized plasma consisting of hydrogen and a single impurity element in arbitrarily populated charge states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Gerhauser, H.; El-Sharif, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The coefficients determining the transport processes along the magnetic field in a magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons/deuterons and impurity ions in various charge states have been calculated on the basis of Grad's 21 moment approximation. Assuming a single impurity element, the determinants appearing in the transport coefficients are evaluated analytically for arbitrary ratios m z /m + between the impurity and hydrogen masses. The general formulae are then simplified for the important case m z /m + ≥ 1 and compared with existing data given by V.M. Zhdanov et al. and Yu.L. Igitkhanov et al. Whereas with minor modifications the proton/deuteron and electron coefficients agree well, there are remarkable differences in the impurity ion transport coefficients, which are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Probing single- to multi-cell level charge transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Petersen, Emily R; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Jackan, Charles S; Lieber, Alexander M; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M; Biffinger, Justin C

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells, in which living microorganisms convert chemical energy into electricity, represent a potentially sustainable energy technology for the future. Here we report the single-bacterium level current measurements of Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1 to elucidate the fundamental limits and factors determining maximum power output from a microbial fuel cell. Quantized stepwise current outputs of 92(±33) and 196(±20) fA are generated from microelectrode arrays confined in isolated wells. Simultaneous cell imaging/tracking and current recording reveals that the current steps are directly correlated with the contact of one or two cells with the electrodes. This work establishes the amount of current generated by an individual Geobacter cell in the absence of a biofilm and highlights the potential upper limit of microbial fuel cell performance for Geobacter in thin biofilms.

  20. Diffusion, Coulombic interactions and multicomponent ionic transport of charged species in saturated porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Muniruzzaman, Muhammad

    of their aqueous diffusion coefficients also the electrostatic interactions significantly affect solute displacement. We investigated electrostatic interactions between ionic species under flow-through conditions resulting in multicomponent ionic dispersion: the dispersive fluxes of the different ions in the pore...... water are cross-coupled due to the effects of Coulombic interactions. Such effects are illustrated in flow-through experiments in saturated porous media. Simple strong electrolytes (i.e., salts and strong acid solutions) were selected as tracers and their transport was studied under different advection......-dominated conditions in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media [2-3]. The model-based interpretation of the experimental results is challenging since it requires a multicomponent ionic formulation with an accurate description of local hydrodynamic dispersion and explicitly accounting for the cross...

  1. Molecular identification of broomrape species from a single seed by High Resolution Melting analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species (P. aegyptiaca, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. cumana, O. foetida, O. hederae, O. minor, and P. ramosa from a single seed. Based on trnL and rbcL plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. minor, O. hederae, and O. foetida; P. ramosa and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90 %. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples. The described assay fulfils its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  2. Molecular Identification of Broomrape Species from a Single Seed by High Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Mathieu; Dupuy, Aurélie; Pelleray, Aude; Delavault, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species ( Phelipanche aegyptiaca , Orobanche cernua , O. crenata, O. cumana , O. foetida , O. hederae , O. minor , and P. ramosa ) from a single seed. Based on trn L and rbc L plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana , O. cernua , O. crenata , O. minor , O. hederae , and O. foetida ; P. ramosa , and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90%. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples). The described assay fulfills its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  3. The Charging Process in a High-speed, Single-cylinder, Four-stroke Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Blake; Schecter, Harry; Taylor, E S

    1939-01-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations were made on an aircraft-type, single cylinder engine, in order to determine the physical nature of the inlet process, especially at high piston speeds. The engine was run at speeds from 1,500 to 2,600 r.p.m. (mean piston speeds of 1,370 to 2,380 feet per minute). Measurements were made of the cylinder pressure during the inlet stroke and of the power output and volumetric efficiency. Measurements were also made, with the engine not running, to determine the resistance and mass of air in the inlet valve port at various crank angles. Results of analysis indicate that mass has an appreciable effect, but friction plays the major part in restricting flow. The observed fact that the volumetric efficiency is considerably less than 100 percent is attributed to thermal effects. An estimate was made of the magnitude of these effects in the present case, and their general nature is discussed.

  4. Ancient host specificity within a single species of brood parasitic bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stryjewski, Katherine Faust; Quader, Suhel; Colebrook-Robjent, John F R; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-10-25

    Parasites that exploit multiple hosts often experience diversifying selection for host-specific adaptations. This can result in multiple strains of host specialists coexisting within a single parasitic species. A long-standing conundrum is how such sympatric host races can be maintained within a single parasitic species in the face of interbreeding among conspecifics specializing on different hosts. Striking examples are seen in certain avian brood parasites such as cuckoos, many of which show host-specific differentiation in traits such as host egg mimicry. Exploiting a Zambian egg collection amassed over several decades and supplemented by recent fieldwork, we show that the brood parasitic Greater Honeyguide Indicator indicator exhibits host-specific differentiation in both egg size and egg shape. Genetic analysis of honeyguide eggs and chicks show that two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages are associated with ground- and tree-nesting hosts, respectively, indicating perfect fidelity to two mutually exclusive sets of host species for millions of years. Despite their age and apparent adaptive diversification, however, these ancient lineages are not cryptic species; a complete lack of differentiation in nuclear genes shows that mating between individuals reared by different hosts is sufficiently frequent to prevent speciation. These results indicate that host specificity is maternally inherited, that host-specific adaptation among conspecifics can be maintained without reproductive isolation, and that host specificity can be remarkably ancient in evolutionary terms.

  5. Multiple Phytophthora species associated with a single riparian ecosystem in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jan H; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Gryzenhout, Marieka

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Phytophthora spp. in rivers and riparian ecosystems has received considerable international attention, although little such research has been conducted in South Africa. This study determined the diversity of Phytophthora spp. within a single river in Gauteng province of South Africa. Samples were collected over 1 y including biweekly river baiting with Rhododendron indicum leaves. Phytophthora isolates were identified with phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (coxI) gene. Eight Phytophthora spp. were identified, including a new taxon, P. taxon Sisulu-river, and two hybrid species from Cooke's ITS clade 6. Of these, species from Clade 6 were the most abundant, including P. chlamydospora and P. lacustris. Species residing in Clade 2 also were encountered, including P. multivora, P. plurivora and P. citrophthora. The detection of eight species in this investigation of Phytophthora diversity in a single riparian river ecosystem in northern South Africa adds to the known diversity of this genus in South Africa and globally. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  6. Examining the relationship between total species richness and single island palaeo- and neo-endemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallimanis, A. S.; Panitsa, M.; Bergmeier, E.; Dimopoulos, P.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, Emerson and Kolm (2005) hypothesized that diversity begets speciation (DBS hypothesis). The relationship between total species richness and single island endemic diversity (as a proportion of the total species richness of the island) has been used as evidence for the DBS hypothesis. This relationship has been documented in oceanic archipelagos, but many criticisms have been raised on whether this relationship truly supports the DBS hypothesis. In this study we tested if this hypothesis holds in the Aegean archipelago (a continental archipelago with continuous human presence over millennia). Endemism in the Aegean includes mainly neo-endemic species but also relictual populations of formerly more widespread species (i.e. palaeo-endemics). Contrary to the DBS hypothesis, we found that total species richness was not significantly correlated to single island endemics (neither neo-endemics nor palaeo-endemics) as a proportion of the island flora. Furthermore, we found that neo-endemic diversity (either as species richness or as a proportion of the islands flora) is mainly correlated to island maximum elevation, while area and isolation were less important. So if this ratio is indeed an index of speciation, then an alternative explanation might be that elevation (interpreted as a proxy for habitat heterogeneity) is the driver of speciation in our case. Palaeo-endemics, on the other hand, were present in only six of the largest islands in the Aegean and their diversity was strongly correlated only with island area, perhaps implying that larger islands support larger population sizes that buffer stochastic extinctions risks.

  7. Study of CP-violating charge asymmetries of single muons and like-sign dimuons in p pbar collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2014), "012002-1"-"012002-31" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : D0 * Fermilab * charge asymmetry * CP violation * same sign * charge: asymmetry * dimuon * charge * muon * charge * meson * mixing * width difference Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  8. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton ttbar events at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Luca, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-05

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in ttbar events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6 fb^(-1). We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  9. Study of the Bulk Charge Carrier Dynamics in Anatase and Rutile TiO2 Single Crystals by Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Partha

    2018-04-02

    Understanding of the fundamentals behind charge carriers of photo-catalytic materials are still illusive hindering progress in our quest for renewable energy. TiO2 anatase and rutile are the most understood phases in photo-catalysis and serve as the best model for fundamental studies. Their ultrafast charge carrier dynamics especially on TiO2 anatase single crystal (the most active phase) are unresolved. Here femtosecond time resolved spectroscopy (TRS) was carried out to explore the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers’ recombination in anatase single crystal, for the first time using pump fluence effects, and compares it to that of the rutile single crystal. A significant difference in charge carrier recombination rates between both crystals is observed. We found that the time constants for carrier recombination are two orders of magnitude slower for anatase (101) when compared to those of rutile (110). Moreover, bulk defects introduced by reduction of the samples via annealing in ultra-high vacuum resulted in faster recombination rates for both polymorphs. Both states (fresh and reduced) probed by pump fluence dependence measurements revealed that the major recombination channel in fresh and reduced anatase and reduced rutile is the first-order Shockley–Reed mediated. However, for fresh rutile, third-body Auger recombination was observed, attributed to the presence of higher density of intrinsic charge carriers. At all excitation wavelengths and fluence investigated, anatase (101) single crystal show longer charge carrier lifetime when compared to rutile (110) single. This may explain the superiority of the anatase phase for the electron transfer H+ reduction to molecular hydrogen.

  10. Contemporary root canal irrigants are able to disrupt and eradicate single- and dual-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Graeme; O'Donnell, Darren; Ready, Derren; Ng, Yuan-Ling; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2009-09-01

    Clinical/microbiological studies have consistently revealed the persistence of some bacteria after conventional root canal debridement. Although this was originally attributed to the complexity of the root canal anatomy and the difficulty of delivering antibacterial agents effectively, it has emerged that the biofilm encasement of bacterial cells may confer a further mechanism of resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative disruption and bactericidal effects of root canal irrigants on single- and dual-species biofilms of root canal isolates. Biofilms of Streptococcus sanguinis, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were grown on nitrocellulose membranes for 72 hours and immersed in NaOCl, EDTA, chlorhexidine, and iodine for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. The number of viable and nonviable bacteria disrupted from the biofilm and those remaining adherent were determined by using a viability stain in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy. Gram-negative obligate anaerobe species were more susceptible to cell removal than gram-positive facultative anaerobes. The majority of cells were disrupted after the first minute of exposure; however, the extent varied according to the agent and species. The most effective agent at disrupting biofilms was NaOCl. Iodine was generally effective at bacterial killing but not disruption. Biofilm disruption and cell viability were influenced by the species, their coassociation in dual-species biofilms, the test agent, and the duration of exposure. The effectiveness of NaOCl as an endodontic irrigant was reinforced.

  11. Effect of multiple plasmon excitation on single, double and multiple ionizations of C60 in collisions with fast highly charged Si ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, A H; Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Kumar, A; Tribedi, L C

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the single and multiple ionizations of the C 60 molecule in collisions with fast Si q+ projectiles for various projectile charge states (q) between q = 6 and 14. The q-dependence of the ionization cross sections and their ratios is compared with the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR) model. The excellent qualitative agreement with the model in case of single and double ionizations and also a reasonable agreement with the triple (and to some extent with quadruple) ionization (without evaporation) yields signify dominant contributions of the single-, double- and triple-plasmon excitations on the single- and multiple-ionization process

  12. Effect of multiple plasmon excitation on single, double and multiple ionizations of C60 in collisions with fast highly charged Si ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Kumar, A.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the single and multiple ionizations of the C60 molecule in collisions with fast Siq+ projectiles for various projectile charge states (q) between q = 6 and 14. The q-dependence of the ionization cross sections and their ratios is compared with the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR) model. The excellent qualitative agreement with the model in case of single and double ionizations and also a reasonable agreement with the triple (and to some extent with quadruple) ionization (without evaporation) yields signify dominant contributions of the single-, double- and triple-plasmon excitations on the single- and multiple-ionization process.

  13. Effect of multiple plasmon excitation on single, double and multiple ionizations of C{sub 60} in collisions with fast highly charged Si ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, A H; Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Kumar, A; Tribedi, L C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai -5 (India)

    2007-06-28

    We have investigated the single and multiple ionizations of the C{sub 60} molecule in collisions with fast Si{sup q+} projectiles for various projectile charge states (q) between q = 6 and 14. The q-dependence of the ionization cross sections and their ratios is compared with the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR) model. The excellent qualitative agreement with the model in case of single and double ionizations and also a reasonable agreement with the triple (and to some extent with quadruple) ionization (without evaporation) yields signify dominant contributions of the single-, double- and triple-plasmon excitations on the single- and multiple-ionization process.

  14. Measurement and Calculation of Absolute Single- and Multiple-Charge-Exchange Cross Sections for Feq+ Ions Impacting CO and CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simcic, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Mawhorter, R. J. [Pomona College; Cadez, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia; Greenwood, J. B. [Queen' s University, Belfast; Chutjian, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech; Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University; Smith, S. J. [Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Absolute cross sections are reported for single, double, and triple charge exchange of Feq+ (q=5- 13) ions with CO and CO2. The highly-charged Fe ions are generated in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Absolute data are derived from knowledge of the target gas pressure, target path length, and incident and charge-exchanged ion currents. Experimental results are compared with new calculations of these cross sections in the n-electron classical trajectory Monte-Carlo approximation, in which the ensuing radiative and non-radiative cascades are approximated with scaled hydrogenic transition probabilities and scaled Auger rates. The present data are needed in astrophysical applications of solar- and stellar-wind charge-exchange with comets, planetary atmospheres, and circumstellar clouds.

  15. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Singly and Doubly Charged Higher Fullerenes at Low Temperatures: C76-, C78-, C84- and C76(2-), C78(2-), C84(2-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Yang, Jie; Kappes, Manfred M.; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-12-06

    Photoelectron spectroscopy of vibrationally cold singly and doubly charged higher fullerenes, Cn– and Cn2– (n = 76, 78, and 84), has been investigated at several photon energies. Vibrationally resolved spectra are obtained for both the singly and doubly charged species and for n = 78 and 84 transitions from different isomers are also observed. The electron affinities (EA’s) of C76, C78, and C84 are accurately determined to be 2.975±0.010 eV for C76, 3.20±0.01 eV for C78(C2v), 3.165±0.010 eV for C78(D3), 3.23±0.02 for C78(C2v’), 3.185±0.010 eV for C84(D2), and 3.26±0.02 eV for C84(D2d). The second EA’s of the higher fullerenes, which represent the electronic stability of the doubly charged anions, are measured to be 0.325±0.010 eV for C76, 0.44±0.02 eV for C78(C2v), 0.53±0.02 eV for C78(D3), 0.60±0.04 eV for C78(C2v’), 0.615±0.010 eV for C84(D2d), and 0.82±0.01 eV for C84(D2). The spectra of the dianions are observed to be similar to that of the singly charged anions, suggesting that the charging induces relatively small structural changes to the fullerene cages. The onsite Coulomb repulsions in the doubly charged fullerenes are directly measured from the differences of the first and second EA’s and reveal strong correlation effects between the two extra electrons. The repulsive Coulomb barriers in the doubly charged fullerenes are estimated from the cutoff in the photoelectron spectra and are found to be consistent with estimates from an electrostatic model.

  16. Single and multiple ionization of C60 fullerenes and collective effects in collisions with highly charged C, F, and Si ions with energy 3 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Gulyas, L.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization of C60 in collisions with 3 MeV/u C, F, and Si projectile ions at various projectile charge states. The experiment was performed using the recoil-ion time-of-flight technique. Projectile charge state dependence of the ionization yields was compared mainly with a model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). In some cases, the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) model which is normally applied for ion-atom collisions was also used as a reference. An excellent qualitative agreement between the experimental data for single and double ionization and the GDPR model predictions was found for all projectile charge states.

  17. Single and multiple ionization of C60 fullerenes and collective effects in collisions with highly charged C, F, and Si ions with energy 3 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Tribedi, L. C.; Gulyas, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization of C 60 in collisions with 3 MeV/u C, F, and Si projectile ions at various projectile charge states. The experiment was performed using the recoil-ion time-of-flight technique. Projectile charge state dependence of the ionization yields was compared mainly with a model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). In some cases, the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) model which is normally applied for ion-atom collisions was also used as a reference. An excellent qualitative agreement between the experimental data for single and double ionization and the GDPR model predictions was found for all projectile charge states.

  18. Single-strand-conformation polymorphism of ribosomal DNA for rapid species differentiation in genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue; Richardson, Patricia A; Gallegly, Mannon E

    2003-08-01

    Single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of ribosomal DNA of 29 species (282 isolates) of Phytophthora was characterized in this study. Phytophthora boehmeriae, Phytophthora botryosa, Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora colocasiae, Phytophthora fragariae, Phytophthora heveae, Phytophthora hibernalis, Phytophthora ilicis, Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora katsurae, Phytophthora lateralis, Phytophthora meadii, Phytophthora medicaginis, Phytophthora megakarya, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora pseudotsugae, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora syringae, and Phytophthora tropicalis each showed a unique SSCP pattern. Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora citrophthora, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora drechsleri, and Phytophthora megasperma each had more than one distinct pattern. A single-stranded DNA ladder also was developed, which facilitates comparison of SSCP patterns within and between gels. With a single DNA fingerprint, 277 isolates of Phytophthora recovered from irrigation water and plant tissues in Virginia were all correctly identified into eight species at substantially reduced time, labor, and cost. The SSCP analysis presented in this work will aid in studies on taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of the genus Phytophthora.

  19. Single-electron charging effects and implications for tunneling measurements of the high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.B.; Honkanen, M.J.; Ruggiero, S.T.; Mullen, K.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Pelton, A.R.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a theory for the dynamics of two voltage-biased, ultra-small-capacitance tunnel junctions connected in series when one or more electrodes are superconducting and experiments performed on parallel arrays of such junctions. Using the semiclassical model, they find that the I-V characteristics display steps and therefore multiple peaks in dI/dV, corresponding to the time-average occupation of the interjunction region by integral numbers of electrons. The voltage at which the first step is located depends on the superconducting gap, Δ(T), and the capacitances of the junctions. The spacing between subsequent steps depends solely on the capacitances. They discuss electron tunneling results performed on metal/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//2-10 nm-diameter metal particles/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//metal junctions where this multiple-peak structure is observed. They present preliminary tunneling results in junctions employing Pb-particles, where they observe a shift of the peaks when the sample is cooled below T/sub c/ of Pb consistent with theory. Taken together, these results indicate that the multiple-peak structure commonly observed in tunneling data of high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors can be explained in terms of charging effects in a material with a single superconducting gap. Finally, they discuss possible applications in a new type of transistor element

  20. Charge transport and glassy dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based single-ion conductors under geometrical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runt, James; Iacob, Ciprian

    2015-03-01

    Segmental and local dynamics as well as charge transport are investigated in a series of poly(ethylene oxide)-based single-ion conductors (ionomers) with varying counterions (Li +, Na +) confined in uni-directional nanoporous silica membranes. The dynamics are explored over a wide frequency and temperature range by broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Slowing of segmental dynamics and a decrease in dc conductivity (strongly coupled with segmental relaxation) of the confined ionomers are associated with surface effects - resulting from interfacial hydrogen bonding between the host nanoporous silica membrane and the guest ionomers. These effects are significantly reduced or eliminated upon pore surface modification through silanization. The primary transport properties for the confined ionomers decrease by about one decade compared to the bulk ionomer. A model assuming reduced mobility of an adsorbed layer at the pore wall/ionomer interface is shown to provide a quantitative explanation for the decrease in effective transport quantities in non-silanized porous silica membranes. Additionally, the effect of confinement on ion aggregation in ionomers by using X-ray scattering will also be discussed. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Polymers Program.

  1. Active and fast charge-state switching of single NV centres in diamond by in-plane Al-Schottky junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schreyvogel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate an active and fast control of the charge state and hence of the optical and electronic properties of single and near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centres (NV centres in diamond. This active manipulation is achieved by using a two-dimensional Schottky-diode structure from diamond, i.e., by using aluminium as Schottky contact on a hydrogen terminated diamond surface. By changing the applied potential on the Schottky contact, we are able to actively switch single NV centres between all three charge states NV+, NV0 and NV− on a timescale of 10 to 100 ns, corresponding to a switching frequency of 10–100 MHz. This switching frequency is much higher than the hyperfine interaction frequency between an electron spin (of NV− and a nuclear spin (of 15N or 13C for example of 2.66 kHz. This high-frequency charge state switching with a planar diode structure would open the door for many quantum optical applications such as a quantum computer with single NVs for quantum information processing as well as single 13C atoms for long-lifetime storage of quantum information. Furthermore, a control of spectral emission properties of single NVs as a single photon emitters – embedded in photonic structures for example – can be realized which would be vital for quantum communication and cryptography.

  2. Charge exchange, surface-induced dissociation and reactions of doubly charged molecular ions SF42+ upon impact on a stainless steel surface: A comparison with surface-induced dissociation of singly charged SF4+ molecular ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Grill, V.; Zappa, F.; Endstrasser, N.; Rasul, B.; Herman, Zdeněk; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2008), s. 37-42 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doubly charged ion * surface-induced dissociations * surface-induced reaction * charge exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2008

  3. Addressing challenges in single species assessments via a simple state-space assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    Single-species and age-structured fish stock assessments still remains the main tool for managing fish stocks. A simple state-space assessment model is presented as an alternative to (semi) deterministic procedures and the full parametric statistical catch at age models. It offers a solution...... to some of the key challenges of these models. Compared to the deterministic procedures it solves a list of problems originating from falsely assuming that age classified catches are known without errors and allows quantification of uncertainties of estimated quantities of interest. Compared to full...

  4. Numerical and experimental study of the distribution of charged species in a flat stoichiometric premixed CH4/O2/Ar flame

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, an existing ion reaction mechanism is used to compute the distribution of charged species in a at stoichiometric premixed CH4/O2/Ar flame stabilized on top of a McKenna burner. The ion reaction rates and charged species thermodynamic data are updated according to the most recent data. A modified version of the detailed ARAMCO 1.3 reaction mechanism is used to describe the chemistry of neutral species. Because of the important role of CH in the chemi-ionization process, its prediction is improved based on the available measured data. The ability of the ion reaction mechanism to predict the distribution of positive ions is assessed by comparing to the experimental measurements performed in our group. The calculated results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental data, even though there exist quantitative differences that need to be addressed in future work.

  5. Irradiation of zinc single crystal with 500 keV singly-charged carbon ions: surface morphology, structure, hardness, and chemical modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas Khaliq, M.; Butt, M. Z.; Saleem, Murtaza

    2017-07-01

    Cylindrical specimens of (1 0 4) oriented zinc single crystal (diameter  =  6 mm and length  =  5 mm) were irradiated with 500 keV C+1 ions with the help of a Pelletron accelerator. Six specimens were irradiated in an ultra-high vacuum (~10‒8 Torr) with different ion doses, namely 3.94  ×  1014, 3.24  ×  1015, 5.33  ×  1015, 7.52  ×  1015, 1.06  ×  1016, and 1.30  ×  1016 ions cm-2. A field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) was utilized for the morphological study of the irradiated specimens. Formation of nano- and sub-micron size rods, clusters, flower- and fork-like structures, etc, was observed. Surface roughness of the irradiated specimens showed an increasing trend with the ions dose. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) helped to determine chemical modifications in the specimens. It was found that carbon content varied in the range 22.86-31.20 wt.% and that oxygen content was almost constant, with an average value of 10.16 wt.%. The balance content was zinc. Structural parameters, i.e. crystallite size and lattice strain, were determined by Williamson-Hall analysis using x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the irradiated specimens. Both crystallite size and lattice strain showed a decreasing trend with the increasing ions dose. A good linear relationship between crystallite size and lattice strain was observed. Surface hardness depicted a decreasing trend with the ions dose and followed an inverse Hall-Petch relation. FTIR spectra of the specimens revealed that absorption bands gradually diminish as the dose of singly-charged carbon ions is increased from 3.94  ×  1014 ions cm-1 to 1.30  ×  1016 ions cm-1. This indicates progressive deterioration of chemical bonds with the increase in ion dose.

  6. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  7. Study of Charge-Dependent Transport and Toxicity of Peptide-Functionalized Silver Nanoparticles Using Zebrafish Embryos and Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry J.; Browning, Lauren M.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unusually high surface area-to-volume ratios, and surface-determined physicochemical properties. It is essential to understand their surface-dependent toxicity in order to rationally design biocompatible nanomaterials for a wide variety of applications. In this study, we have functionalized the surfaces of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 11.7 ± 2.7 nm in diameters) with three biocompatible peptides (CALNNK, CALNNS, CALNNE) to prepare positively (Ag-CALNNK NPs+ζ), negatively (Ag-CALNNS NPs−2ζ), and more negatively charged NPs (Ag-CALNNE NPs−4ζ), respectively. Each peptide differs in a single amino acid at its C-terminus, which minimizes the effects of peptide sequences and serves as a model molecule to create positive, neutral and negative charges on the surface of the NPs at pH 4–10. We have studied their charge-dependent transport into early-developing (cleavage-stage) zebrafish embryos and their effects on embryonic development using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). We found that all three Ag-peptide NPs passively diffused into the embryos via their chorionic pore canals, and stayed inside the embryos throughout their entire development (120 h), showing charge-independent diffusion modes and charge-dependent diffusion coefficients. Notably, the NPs create charge-dependent toxic effects on embryonic development, showing that the Ag-CALNNK NPs+ζ (positively charged) are the most biocompatible while the Ag-CALNNE NPs–4ζ (more negatively charged) are the most toxic. By comparing with our previous studies of the same sized citrated Ag and Au NPs, the Ag-peptide NPs are much more biocompatible than the citrated Ag NPs, and nearly as biocompatible as the Au NPs, showing the dependence of nanotoxicity upon the surface charges, surface functional groups and chemical compositions of the NPs. This study also demonstrates powerful applications of single NP plasmonic spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of single NPs

  8. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  9. Measurement of Absolute Single and Double Charge Exchange Cross Sections for Si(7–10)+ at 0.88–2.50 KeV/u Impacting He and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Mahaptra, D. P.; Chutjian, A.

    2018-01-01

    First measurements are reported for total, absolute, single, and double charge-exchange (CE) cross sections for Si(7–10)+ ions in the solar wind (SW), colliding with the prevalent astrophysical species H2 and He found in comets, the interplanetary medium, and planetary atmospheres. Measurements are in the energy range 0.88–2.50 keV/u, corresponding to the energies of the “fast” and “slow” ion components of the SW. Limited agreement is found with single-exchange results calculated in the classical over-the-barrier model. These CE data are useful for understanding, in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, photon emissions in the X-ray to visible energy range arising from resulting ion-stabilization steps.

  10. Are single odorous components of a predator sufficient to elicit defensive behaviors in prey species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimund eApfelbach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When exposed to the odor of a sympatric predator, prey animals typically display escape or defensive responses. These phenomena have been well-documented, especially in rodents, when exposed to the odor of a cat, ferret or fox. As a result of these experiments new discussions center on the following questions: 1 is a single volatile compound such as a major or a minor mixture constituent in urine or feces, emitted by the predator sufficient to cause defensive reactions in a potential prey species or 2 is a whole array of odors required to elicit a response and 3 will the relative size or escapability of the prey as compared to the predator influence responsiveness. Most predator-prey studies on this topic have been performed in the laboratory or under semi-natural conditions. Field studies could help to find answers to these questions. Australian mammals are completely naïve towards the introduced placental carnivores. That offers ideal opportunities to analyze in the field the responses of potential prey species to unknown predator odors. During the last decades researchers have accumulated an enormous amount of data exploring the effects of eutherian predator odors on native marsupial mammals. In this review, we will give a survey about the development of olfactory research, chemical signals and their influence on the behavior and - in some cases - physiology of prey species. In addition, we report on the effects of predator odor experiments performed under natural conditions in Australia. When studying all these literature we learned that data gained under controlled laboratory conditions elucidate the role of individual odors on brain structures and ultimately on a comparatively narrow range behaviors. In contrast to single odors odor arrays mimic much more the situation prey animals are confronted to in nature. Therefore, a broad range of methodology — from chemistry to ecology including anatomy, physiology and behavior — is needed to

  11. Mining the transcriptomes of four commercially important shellfish species for single nucleotide polymorphisms within biomineralization genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrami, David L J; Shah, Abhijeet; Telesca, Luca; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional profiling not only provides insights into patterns of gene expression, but also generates sequences that can be mined for molecular markers, which in turn can be used for population genetic studies. As part of a large-scale effort to better understand how commercially important European shellfish species may respond to ocean acidification, we therefore mined the transcriptomes of four species (the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the great scallop Pecten maximus and the blunt gaper Mya truncata) for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Illumina data for C. gigas, M. edulis and P. maximus and 454 data for M. truncata were interrogated using GATK and SWAP454 respectively to identify between 8267 and 47,159 high quality SNPs per species (total=121,053 SNPs residing within 34,716 different contigs). We then annotated the transcripts containing SNPs to reveal homology to diverse genes. Finally, as oceanic pH affects the ability of organisms to incorporate calcium carbonate, we honed in on genes implicated in the biomineralization process to identify a total of 1899 SNPs in 157 genes. These provide good candidates for biomarkers with which to study patterns of selection in natural or experimental populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  13. Effects of phylogenetic reconstruction method on the robustness of species delimitation using single-locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cuong Q; Humphreys, Aelys M; Fontaneto, Diego; Barraclough, Timothy G; Paradis, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Coalescent-based species delimitation methods combine population genetic and phylogenetic theory to provide an objective means for delineating evolutionarily significant units of diversity. The generalised mixed Yule coalescent (GMYC) and the Poisson tree process (PTP) are methods that use ultrametric (GMYC or PTP) or non-ultrametric (PTP) gene trees as input, intended for use mostly with single-locus data such as DNA barcodes. Here, we assess how robust the GMYC and PTP are to different phylogenetic reconstruction and branch smoothing methods. We reconstruct over 400 ultrametric trees using up to 30 different combinations of phylogenetic and smoothing methods and perform over 2000 separate species delimitation analyses across 16 empirical data sets. We then assess how variable diversity estimates are, in terms of richness and identity, with respect to species delimitation, phylogenetic and smoothing methods. The PTP method generally generates diversity estimates that are more robust to different phylogenetic methods. The GMYC is more sensitive, but provides consistent estimates for BEAST trees. The lower consistency of GMYC estimates is likely a result of differences among gene trees introduced by the smoothing step. Unresolved nodes (real anomalies or methodological artefacts) affect both GMYC and PTP estimates, but have a greater effect on GMYC estimates. Branch smoothing is a difficult step and perhaps an underappreciated source of bias that may be widespread among studies of diversity and diversification. Nevertheless, careful choice of phylogenetic method does produce equivalent PTP and GMYC diversity estimates. We recommend simultaneous use of the PTP model with any model-based gene tree (e.g. RAxML) and GMYC approaches with BEAST trees for obtaining species hypotheses.

  14. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  15. Structural effects on charge order in single-layered manganites R{sub 1-x}A{sub 1+x}MnO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmayer, Johannes; Ulbrich, Holger; Weber, Lisa; Braden, Markus; Lorenz, Thomas [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Single-layered manganites show a complex interplay between charge, orbital, and magnetic degrees of freedom. For half-doped (x=1/2) R{sub 1-x}A{sub 1+x}MnO{sub 4} (R=Pr,La; A=Ca,Sr) the so-called Goodenough model is well established. This model proposes a site-centered charge order with a checkerboard pattern of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions accompanied by an orbital order. Furthermore a magnetic order develops with ferromagnetic three-spin zig-zag chains and antiferromagnetic interchain coupling. For x=2/3 the charge order appears as stripe pattern with two adjacent stripes of Mn{sup 4+} ions alternating with a single stripe of Mn{sup 3+} ions, while in the magnetically ordered state four-spin zig-zag chains arise. For a deeper understanding of the emergence of charge order, it is appropriate to vary on the one hand the elements R and A while keeping the doping level x constant - involving structural changes at fixed charge carrier density - and on the other hand change the doping level with the same R and A. Therefore various single crystals of R{sub 1-x}A{sub 1+x}MnO{sub 4} with R=(Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), A=(Ca, Sr) and 0.5 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 were grown and their structural parameters were determined by X-ray diffraction. Based on measurements of resistivity, magnetization, specific heat, and crystal structure we discuss the influence of structural variations on the ordering temperature.

  16. Ordered Single-Crystalline Anatase TiO2Nanorod Clusters Planted on Graphene for Fast Charge Transfer in Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Xueqin; Li, Zhen; Cao, Ya; Li, Yinchang; Liu, Xupo; Jia, Songru; Zhao, Yanli

    2017-07-01

    Achieving efficient charge transport is a great challenge in nanostructured TiO 2 -electrode-based photoelectrochemical cells. Inspired by excellent directional charge transport and the well-known electroconductibility of 1D anatase TiO 2 nanostructured materials and graphene, respectively, planting ordered, single-crystalline anatase TiO 2 nanorod clusters on graphene sheets (rGO/ATRCs) via a facial one-pot solvothermal method is reported. The hierarchical rGO/ATRCs nanostructure can serve as an efficient light-harvesting electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells. In addition, the obtained high-crystallinity anatase TiO 2 nanorods in rGO/ATRCs possess a lower density of trap states, thus facilitating diffusion-driven charge transport and suppressing electron recombination. Moreover, the novel architecture significantly enhances the trap-free charge diffusion coefficient, which contributes to superior electron mobility properties. By virtue of more efficient charge transport and higher energy conversion efficiency, the rGO/ATRCs developed in this work show significant advantages over conventional rGO-TiO 2 nanoparticle counterparts in photoelectrochemical cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dynamics of Charged Excitons and Biexcitons in CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals Revealed by Femtosecond Transient-Absorption and Single-Dot Luminescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarita, Naoki; Tahara, Hirokazu; Ihara, Toshiyuki; Kawawaki, Tokuhisa; Sato, Ryota; Saruyama, Masaki; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-04-06

    Metal-halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) are promising photonic materials for use in solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and lasers. The optoelectronic properties of these devices are determined by the excitons and exciton complexes confined in their NCs. In this study, we determined the relaxation dynamics of charged excitons and biexcitons in CsPbBr 3 NCs using femtosecond transient-absorption (TA), time-resolved photoluminescence (PL), and single-dot second-order photon correlation spectroscopy. Decay times of ∼40 and ∼200 ps were obtained from the TA and PL decay curves for biexcitons and charged excitons, respectively, in NCs with an average edge length of 7.7 nm. The existence of charged excitons even under weak photoexcitation was confirmed by the second-order photon correlation measurements. We found that charged excitons play a dominant role in luminescence processes of CsPbBr 3 NCs. Combining different spectroscopic techniques enabled us to clarify the dynamical behaviors of excitons, charged excitons, and biexcitons.

  18. Series solution for continuous population models for single and interacting species by the homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy A. El-Tawil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy analysis method (HAM is used to find approximate analytical solutions of continuous population models for single and interacting species. The homotopy analysis method contains the auxiliary parameter $hbar,$ which provides us with a simple way to adjust and control the convergence region of series solution. the solutions are compared with the numerical results obtained using NDSolve, an ordinary differential equation solver found in the Mathematica package and a good agreement is found. Also the solutions are compared with the available analytic results obtained by other methods and more accurate and convergent series solution found. The convergence region is also computed which shows the validity of the HAM solution. This method is reliable and manageable.

  19. Single neutral pion production by charged-current ν¯μ interactions on hydrocarbon at 〈Eν〉=3.6 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Le

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for ν¯e appearance oscillation experiments. The differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  20. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data reveal cryptic species within cryptic freshwater snail species-The case of theAncylus fluviatilisspecies complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martina; Weigand, Hannah; Weigand, Alexander M; Leese, Florian

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcoding utilizes short standardized DNA sequences to identify species and is increasingly used in biodiversity assessments. The technique has unveiled an unforeseeably high number of morphologically cryptic species. However, if speciation has occurred relatively recently and rapidly, the use of single gene markers, and especially the exclusive use of mitochondrial markers, will presumably fail in delimitating species. Therefore, the true number of biological species might be even higher. One mechanism that can result in rapid speciation is hybridization of different species in combination with polyploidization, that is, allopolyploid speciation. In this study, we analyzed the population genetic structure of the polyploid freshwater snail Ancylus fluviatilis , for which allopolyploidization was postulated as a speciation mechanism. DNA barcoding has already revealed four cryptic species within A. fluviatilis (i.e., A. fluviatilis s. str., Ancylus sp. A-C), but early allozyme data even hint at the presence of additional cryptic lineages in Central Europe. We combined COI sequencing with high-resolution genome-wide SNP data (ddRAD data) to analyze the genetic structure of A. fluviatilis populations in a Central German low mountain range (Sauerland). The ddRAD data results indicate the presence of three cryptic species within A. fluviatilis s. str. occurring in sympatry and even syntopy, whereas mitochondrial sequence data only support the existence of one species, with shared haplotypes between species. Our study hence points to the limitations of DNA barcoding when dealing with organismal groups where speciation is assumed to have occurred rapidly, for example, through the process of allopolyploidization. We therefore emphasize that single marker DNA barcoding can underestimate the true species diversity and argue in strong favor of using genome-wide data for species delimitation in such groups.

  1. Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Conway, Courtney J.; Piest, Linden; Burger, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

  2. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  3. Electric field reduced charging energies and two-electron bound excited states of single donors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, R.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Verduijn, J.; Tettamanzi, G.C.; Park, S.H.; Collaert, N.; Biesemans, S.; Klimeck, G.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Rogge, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present atomistic simulations of the D0 to D? charging energies of a gated donor in silicon as a function of applied fields and donor depths and find good agreement with experimental measurements. A self-consistent field large-scale tight-binding method is used to compute the D? binding energies

  4. Doubly versus Singly Positively Charged Oxygen Ions Back-Scattering from a Silicon Surface under Dynamic O2+ Bombardment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franzreb, K.; Williams, P.; Lörinčík, Jan; Šroubek, Zdeněk

    203-204, 1/4 (2003), s. 39-42 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : low-energy ion scattering * doubly charged ions * molecular orbital Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.284, year: 2003

  5. Brief communication: Is variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi sample too high to be from a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2005-07-01

    This study uses data resampling to test the null hypothesis that the degree of variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominid sample is within the range variation of a single species. The statistical significance of the variation in the Dmanisi sample is examined using simulated distributions based on comparative samples of modern humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Results show that it is unlikely to find the maximum difference observed in the Dmanisi sample in distributions of female-female pairs from comparative single-species samples. Given that two sexes are represented, the difference in the Dmanisi sample is not enough to reject the null hypothesis of a single species. Results of this study suggest no compelling reason to invoke multiple taxa to explain variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominids. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  6. Mass-charge-heat coupled transfers in a single cell of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell; Transferts couples masse-charge-chaleur dans une cellule de pile a combustible a membrane polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramousse, J.

    2005-11-15

    Understanding and modelling of coupled mass, charges and heat transfers phenomena are fundamental to analyze the electrical behaviour of the system. The aim of the present model is to describe electrical performances of a PEFMC according to the fluidic and thermal operating conditions. The water content of the membrane and the water distribution in the single cell are estimated according to the coupled simulations of mass transport in the thickness of the single cell and in the feeding channels of the bipolar plates. A microscopic model of a Gas Diffusion Electrode is built up to describe charges transfer phenomena occurring at the electrodes. Completed by a study of heat transfer in the Membrane Electrode Assembly, conditions and preferential sites of water vapor condensation can be highlighted. A set of measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of carbon felts used in fuel cells as porous backing layers have also been performed. Although the value of this parameter is essential for the study of heat transfer, it is still under investigation because of the strong thermal anisotropy of the medium. (author)

  7. The Influence of Charged Species on the Phase Behavior, Self-Assembly, and Electrochemical Performance of Block Copolymer Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Jacob Lloyd

    reversible phase transition from an ordered to a disordered nanostructure. We used temperature-dependent small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to observe this transition in the model SEO/LiTFSI system. Unlike neutral BCPs, which to a first approximation are single component systems, the SEO/LiTFSI system demonstrated the thermodynamically stable coexistence phases of ordered lamellae and disordered polymer over a finite temperature window. Analysis of the lamellar domains revealed an increase in salt concentration during the ODT, indicating local salt partitioning due to the presence of nanostructure. The performance of BCEs can also be improved by chemically functionalizing one of the polymer blocks by covalently attaching the salt anion. Since the cation is the only mobile species, these materials are coined single-ion conducting block copolymers. Single ion conduction can improve the efficiency of battery operation. In order for cation motion to occur in single-ion conducting block copolymers, it must dissociate from the backbone of the anion-containing polymer block. This direct coupling of ion dissociation (and hence conduction) and nanostructure has interesting implications for BCE performance. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. Can we predict performance and spatial structure of two-species mixtures using only single species information from monocultures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, F.-H.; Herben, Tomáš; Wildová, Radka; Hershock, C.; Goldberg, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 234, Sp. iss. (2012), s. 31-37 ISSN 0304-3800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : model * mixture * species Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.069, year: 2012

  9. Reconciling single-species TACs in the North Sea demersal fisheries using the Fcube mixed-fisheries advice framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Reeves, Stuart A.; Vermard, Youen

    2011-01-01

    be exhausted before the TAC of another, leading to catches of valuable fish that cannot be landed legally. This important issue is, however, usually not quantified and not accounted for in traditional management advice. A simple approach using traditional catch and effort information was developed, estimating...... in the North Sea and shaped into the advice framework. The substantial overquota catches of North Sea cod likely under the current fisheries regimes are quantified, and it is estimated that the single-species management targets for North Sea cod cannot be achieved unless substantial reductions in TACs of all......Single-species management is a cause of discarding in mixed fisheries, because individual management objectives may not be consistent with each other and the species are caught simultaneously in relatively unselective fishing operations. As such, the total allowable catch (TAC) of one species may...

  10. Identification of two-step chemical mechanisms using small temperature oscillations and a single tagged species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, F; Gosse, C; Jullien, L; Lemarchand, A

    2015-05-07

    In order to identify two-step chemical mechanisms, we propose a method based on a small temperature modulation and on the analysis of the concentration oscillations of a single tagged species involved in the first step. The thermokinetic parameters of the first reaction step are first determined. Then, we build test functions that are constant only if the chemical system actually possesses some assumed two-step mechanism. Next, if the test functions plotted using experimental data are actually even, the mechanism is attributed and the obtained constant values provide the rate constants and enthalpy of reaction of the second step. The advantage of the protocol is to use the first step as a probe reaction to reveal the dynamics of the second step, which can hence be relieved of any tagging. The protocol is anticipated to apply to many mechanisms of biological relevance. As far as ligand binding is considered, our approach can address receptor conformational changes or dimerization as well as competition with or modulation by a second partner. The method can also be used to screen libraries of untagged compounds, relying on a tracer whose concentration can be spectroscopically monitored.

  11. Single and dual drug selection for transgenes following bombardment of Caenorhabditis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Jennifer I; Lehner, Ben

    2014-08-01

    The use of drugs and drug resistance genes is a powerful method to select for the presence of a transgene. Unlike methods that require the complementation of a genetic mutation, this system can be used on any genetic background. Drug selection does not require extensive manipulation or costly equipment, yet it is very rapid and can achieve extremely high efficiency, selecting a small number of transgenic worms from among millions of non-transgenic worms. Introducing integrated transgenes into Caenorhabditis elegans by microparticle bombardment represents just such a challenge. Here we describe in detail the protocol we have developed for dual-drug selection in liquid with puromycin and G418 which works well in a variety of Caenorhabditis species. We also show that single drug selection with only puromycin or only G418 is effective in C. elegans. The growing number of drug selection markers that have been adapted to C. elegans are an important addition to the genetic toolkit at our disposal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A deep-sea agglutinated foraminifer tube constructed with planktonic foraminifer shells of a single species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Paul N.; Expedition 363 Shipboard Scientific Party, IODP

    2018-01-01

    Agglutinated foraminifera are marine protists that show apparently complex behaviour in constructing their shells, involving selecting suitable sedimentary grains from their environment, manipulating them in three dimensions, and cementing them precisely into position. Here we illustrate a striking and previously undescribed example of complex organisation in fragments of a tube-like foraminifer (questionably assigned to Rhabdammina) from 1466 m water depth on the northwest Australian margin. The tube is constructed from well-cemented siliciclastic grains which form a matrix into which hundreds of planktonic foraminifer shells are regularly spaced in apparently helical bands. These shells are of a single species, Turborotalita clarkei, which has been selected to the exclusion of all other bioclasts. The majority of shells are set horizontally in the matrix with the umbilical side upward. This mode of construction, as is the case with other agglutinated tests, seems to require either an extraordinarily selective trial-and-error process at the site of cementation or an active sensory and decision-making system within the cell.

  13. Charge-carrier mobilities in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals used as nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burshtein, Z.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Burger, A.; Butler, J. F.; Apotovsky, B.; Doty, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-carrier mobilities were measured for the first time in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals using time-of-flight measurements of charge carriers produced by short (10 ns) light pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The electron mobility displayed a T exp -1.1 dependence on the absolute temperature T in the range 200-320 K, with a room-temperature mobility of 1350 sq cm/V s. The hole mobility displayed a T exp -2.0 dependence in the same temperature range, with a room-temperature mobility of 120 sq cm/V s. Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te appears to be a very favorable material for a room-temperature electronic nuclear radiation detector.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens. PLoS One 5(10): 131–135. 47. Ma H, Bryers JD (2010) Non-invasive method...Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model Akhil K. Seth1*, Matthew R...Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 2 Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical

  15. Nanoampere charge pump by single-electron ratchet using silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Nanoampere single-electron pumping is presented at 20K using a single-electron ratchet comprising silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The ratchet features an asymmetric potential with a pocket that captures single electrons from the source and ejects them to the drain. Directional single-electron transfer is achieved by applying one ac signal with the frequency up to 2.3GHz. We find anomalous shapes of current steps which can be ascribed to nonadiabatic electron capture.

  16. Electron Spin Resonance study of charge trapping in α-ZnMoO.sub.4./sub. single crystal scintillator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buryi, Maksym; Spassky, D.A.; Hybler, Jiří; Laguta, Valentyn; Nikl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Sep (2015), 244-250 ISSN 0925- 3467 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Electron Spin Resonance * scintillator * charge traps * zinc molybdate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  17. Predictive DFT-based approaches to charge and spin transport in single-molecule junctions and two-dimensional materials: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Su Ying; Khoo, Khoong Hong

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The emerging field of flexible electronics based on organics and two-dimensional (2D) materials relies on a fundamental understanding of charge and spin transport at the molecular and nanoscale. It is desirable to make predictions and shine light on unexplained experimental phenomena independently of experimentally derived parameters. Indeed, density functional theory (DFT), the workhorse of first-principles approaches, has been used extensively to model charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. However, DFT is essentially a ground state theory that simply guarantees correct total energies given the correct charge density, while charge/spin transport is a nonequilibrium phenomenon involving the scattering of quasiparticles. In this Account, we critically assess the validity and applicability of DFT to predict charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. We also describe a DFT-based approach, DFT+Σ, which incorporates corrections to Kohn-Sham energy levels based on many-electron calculations. We focus on single-molecule junctions and then discuss how the important considerations for DFT descriptions of transport can differ in 2D materials. We conclude that when used appropriately, DFT and DFT-based approaches can play an important role in making predictions and gaining insight into transport in these materials. Specifically, we shall focus on the low-bias quasi-equilibrium regime, which is also experimentally most relevant for single-molecule junctions. The next question is how well can the scattering of DFT Kohn-Sham particles approximate the scattering of true quasiparticles in the junction? Quasiparticles are electrons (holes) that are surrounded by a constantly changing cloud of holes (electrons), but Kohn-Sham particles have no physical significance. However, Kohn-Sham particles can often be used as a qualitative approximation to quasiparticles. The errors in standard DFT descriptions of transport arise primarily from errors in the Kohn-Sham energy levels

  18. Discontinuous genetic variation among mesophilic Naegleria isolates: further evidence that N. gruberi is not a single species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B S; Christy, P; Hayes, S J; Dobson, P J

    1992-01-01

    Naegleria isolates which are currently placed in the type species N. gruberi display great genetic, physiological and morphological heterogeneity. There are two possible interpretations of the nature of this species--that N. gruberi is a species complex or that it is a single continuously variable species. To distinguish between these alternatives, allelic states were determined for 33 loci in 74 new isolates selected to represent wide geographic sources and diverse temperature limits for growth. The results were compared with data for culture collection strains of N. gruberi and other species in the genus. The isolates formed a discontinuous series of clusters, separated by genetic distances similar to those separating the better-characterised taxa N. fowleri, N. lovaniensis, N. jadini, N. australiensis australiensis and N. australiensis italica. Culture collection strains assigned to N. gruberi fell into six distinct clusters, while other clusters were not represented by reference strains. The data are most consistent with the interpretation that N. gruberi is a group of several distinct species, each equivalent to the recently described species in the genus. Naegleria andersoni andersoni and N. andersoni jamiesoni also formed two distinct clusters, equivalent to species. Characteristics temperature limits for growth show that the mesophilic species are ecological as well as genetic entities.

  19. Role of hyperfine interaction on electron spin optical orientation in charge-controlled InAs-GaAs single quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, O.; Eble, B.; Lemaitre, A.; Kudelski, A.; Voisin, P.; Urbaszek, B.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Kowalik, K.

    2007-01-01

    We report on electron spin physics in a single charge-tunable self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot. The hyperfine interaction between the optically oriented electron and nuclear spins leads to the polarization of the quantum dot nuclei. The sign of the resulting Overhauser-shift depends on the trion state X + or X - , and remarkably its strength does not vanish in zero magnetic field. This explains the quenching of X + spin relaxation under steady-state excitation polarization. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Single Pion Production Cross Section on Water with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2017-01-26

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross section measurements of muon neutrino charged current single positive pion production on a water target at energies ${\\sim}0.8$~GeV. The differential measurements are presented as a function of muon and pion kinematics, in the restricted phase-space defined by $p_{\\pi^+}>200$MeV/c, $p_{\\mu^-}>200$MeV/c, $\\cos \\theta_{\\pi^+}>0.3$ and $\\cos \\theta_{\\mu^-}>0.3$. The total flux integrated $\

  1. MIR and FIR Analysis of Inorganic Species in a Single Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Shilov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    The extension of the mid IR towards the far IR spectral range below 400 \\wn is of great interest for molecular vibrational analysis for inorganic and organometallic chemistry, for geological, pharmaceutical, and physical applications, polymorph screening and crystallinity analysis as well as for matrix isolation spectroscopy. In these cases, the additional far infrared region offers insight to low energy vibrations which are observable only there. This includes inorganic species, lattice vibrations or intermolecular vibrations in the ordered solid state. The spectral range of a FTIR spectrometer is defined by the major optical components such as the source, beamsplitter, and detector. The globar source covers a broad spectral range from 8000 to 20 \\wn. However a bottle neck exists with respect to the beamsplitter and detector. To extend the spectral range further into the far IR and THz spectral ranges, one or more additional far IR beam splitters and detectors have been previously required. Two new optic components have been incorporated in a spectrometer to achieve coverage of both the mid and far infrared in a single scan: a wide range MIR-FIR beam splitter and the wide range DLaTGS detector that utilizes a diamond window. The use of a standard SiC IR source with these components yields a spectral range of 6000 down to 50 \\wn in one step for all types of transmittance, reflectance and ATR measurements. Utilizing the external water cooled mercury arc high power lamp the spectral range can be ultimately extended down to 10 \\wn. Examples of application will include emission in MIR-THz range, identification of pigments, additives in polymers, and polymorphism studies.

  2. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  3. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  4. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quevedo, Beatrice; Giertsen, Elin; Zijnge, Vincent; Luethi-Schaller, Helga; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to

  5. Bianthrone in a Single-Molecule Junction: Conductance Switching with a Bistable Molecule Facilitated by Image Charge Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    isomerization events. Temperature dependence of the switching rate allows for an estimate of the activation energy of the process, on the order of 120 +/- 50 meV. Quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy relief of neutral bianthrone and its anion, including identification of transition states......, yields the isolated molecule isomerization barriers too high vs the previous estimate, though compatible with previous experimental studies in solution. Nevertheless, we show that the attraction of the anion in the vicinity of the metal surface by its image charge can change the energetic landscape...

  6. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Three Species of Placobdella (Rhynchobdellida: Glossiphoniidae) Confirms a Single Origin of Blood Feeding in Leeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Mark E; Brugler, Mercer R; Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    One of the recalcitrant questions regarding the evolutionary history of clitellate annelids involves the feeding preference of the common ancestor of extant rhynchobdellid (proboscis bearing) and arhynchobdellid (jaw bearing) leeches. Whereas early evidence, based on morphological data, pointed towards independent acquisitions of blood feeding in the 2 orders, molecular-based phylogenetic data suggest that the ancestor of modern leeches was a sanguivore. Here, we use a comparative transcriptomic approach in order to increase our understanding of the diversity of anticoagulation factors for 3 species of the genus Placobdella, for which comparative data have been lacking, and inspect these in light of archetypal anticoagulant data for both arhynchobdellid and other rhynchobdellid species. Notwithstanding the varying levels of host specificity displayed by the 3 different species of Placobdella, transcriptomic profiles with respect to anticoagulation factors were largely similar -this despite the fact that Placobdella kwetlumye only retains a single pair of salivary glands, as opposed to the 2 pairs more common in the genus. Results show that 9 different anticoagulant proteins and an additional 5 putative antihemostasis proteins are expressed in salivary secretions of the 3 species. In particular, an ortholog of the archetypal, single-copy, anticoagulant hirudin (not previously available as comparative data for rhynchobdellids) is present in at least 2 of 3 species examined, corroborating the notion of a single origin of blood feeding in the ancestral leech.

  7. A single extracellular amino acid in Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 defines antagonist species selectivity and G protein selection bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Bolognini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    that are able to block the human receptor. Docking of exemplar antagonists from two chemical series to homology models of both human and mouse Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 suggested that a single lysine - arginine variation at the extracellular face of the receptor might provide the basis for antagonist...... selectivity and mutational swap studies confirmed this hypothesis. Extending these studies to agonist function indicated that although the lysine - arginine variation between human and mouse orthologs had limited effect on G protein-mediated signal transduction, removal of positive charge from this residue...

  8. Threshold voltage variation depending on single grain boundary and stored charges in an adjacent cell for vertical silicon–oxide–nitride–oxide–silicon NAND flash memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyeongwan; Kim, Jiwon; Baek, Rock-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Soo

    2018-04-01

    The effects of single grain boundary (SGB) position and stored electron charges in an adjacent cell in silicon–oxide–nitride–oxide–silicon (SONOS) structures on the variations of threshold voltage (V th) were investigated using technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation. As the bit line voltage increases, the SGB position causing the maximum V th variation was shifted from the center to the source side in the channel, owing to the drain-induced grain barrier lowering effect. When the SGB is located in the spacer region, the potential interaction from both the SGB and the stored electron charges in the adjacent cell becomes significant and thus resulting in larger V th variation. In contrast, when the SGB is located at the center of the channel, the peak position of potential barrier is shifted to the center, so that the influence of the adjacent cell is diminished. As the gate length is scaled down to 20 nm, the influence of stored charges in adjacent cells becomes significant, resulting in larger V th variations.

  9. Neutral and Charged Exciton Fine Structure in Single Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals Revealed by Magneto-optical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming; Tamarat, Philippe; Huang, He; Even, Jacky; Rogach, Andrey L; Lounis, Brahim

    2017-05-10

    Revealing the crystal structure of lead halide perovskite nanocrystals is essential for the optimization of stability of these emerging materials in applications such as solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting devices. We use magneto-photoluminescence spectroscopy of individual perovskite CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals as a unique tool to determine their crystal structure, which imprints distinct signatures in the excitonic sublevels of charge complexes at low temperatures. At zero magnetic field, the identification of two classes of photoluminescence spectra, displaying either two or three sublevels in their exciton fine structure, shows evidence for the existence of two crystalline structures, namely tetragonal D 4h and orthorhombic D 2h phases. Magnetic field shifts, splitting, and coupling of the sublevels provide a determination of the diamagnetic coefficient and valuable information on the exciton g-factor and its anisotropic character. Moreover, this spectroscopic study reveals the optical properties of charged excitons and allows the extraction of the electron and hole g-factors for perovskite systems.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism barcoding of cytochrome c oxidase I sequences for discriminating 17 species of Columbidae by decision tree algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Wu, Kuo-Chuan; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2017-07-01

    DNA barcodes are widely used in taxonomy, systematics, species identification, food safety, and forensic science. Most of the conventional DNA barcode sequences contain the whole information of a given barcoding gene. Most of the sequence information does not vary and is uninformative for a given group of taxa within a monophylum. We suggest here a method that reduces the amount of noninformative nucleotides in a given barcoding sequence of a major taxon, like the prokaryotes, or eukaryotic animals, plants, or fungi. The actual differences in genetic sequences, called single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, provide a tool for developing a rapid, reliable, and high-throughput assay for the discrimination between known species. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for identifying different pigeon species based on available cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) data. We propose here a decision tree-based SNP barcoding (DTSB) algorithm where SNP patterns are selected from the DNA barcoding sequence of several evolutionarily related species in order to identify a single species with pigeons as an example. This approach can make use of any established barcoding system. We here firstly used as an example the mitochondrial gene COI information of 17 pigeon species (Columbidae, Aves) using DTSB after sequence trimming and alignment. SNPs were chosen which followed the rule of decision tree and species-specific SNP barcodes. The shortest barcode of about 11 bp was then generated for discriminating 17 pigeon species using the DTSB method. This method provides a sequence alignment and tree decision approach to parsimoniously assign a unique and shortest SNP barcode for any known species of a chosen monophyletic taxon where a barcoding sequence is available.

  11. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  12. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Rossi

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3 nDNA. Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  13. DFT calculations of the charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 single molecule magnets investigated in tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossa, Javier; Islam, Fhokrul; Canali, Carlo; Pederson, Mark

    2012-02-01

    For device applications of single molecule magnets (SMMs) in high-density information storage and quantum-state control it is essential that the magnetic properties of the molecules remain stable under the influence of metallic contacts or surface environment. Recent tunneling experiments [1, 2] on N@C60 and Fe4 SMM have shown that these molecules preserve their magnetic characteristics when they are used as the central island of single-electron transistors. Although quantum spin models have been used extensively to study theoretically tunneling spectroscopy of SMMs, it has been shown recently that the orbital degrees of freedom, which is absent in spin models, can significantly affect the tunneling conductance [3]. In this work we present first-principles calculations of the neutral and charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 SMMs, and discuss a strategy to include their properties into a theory of quantum transport. We also present results of the magnetic anisotropy for the different charge states of Fe4 and discuss their relevance for experiments [2] in the sequential tunneling and cotunnelling regimes. [4pt] [1]. N. Roch et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 081407 (2011). [0pt] [2]. A.S. Zyazin et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3307 (2010). [0pt] [3]. L. Michalak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 017202 (2010).

  14. Bianthrone in a Single-Molecule Junction: Conductance Switching with a Bistable Molecule Facilitated by Image Charge Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Bianthrone is a sterically hindered compound that exists in the form of two nonplanar isomers. Our experimental study of single-molecule junctions with bianthrone reveals persistent switching of electric conductance at low temperatures, which can be reasonably associated with molecular isomerizat...

  15. Giant plasmon excitation in single and double ionization of C{sub 60} by fast highly charged Si and O ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, A H; Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Tribedi, L C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai-5 (India)

    2007-09-15

    Se have investigated single and double ionization of C{sub 60} molecule in collisions with 2.33 MeV/u Si{sup q+} (q=6-14) and 3.125 MeV/u O{sup q+} (q=5-8) projectiles. The projectile charge state dependence of the single and double ionization yields of C{sub 60} are then compared to those for an ion-atom collision system using Ne gas as a target. A large difference between the gas and the cluster target behaviour was partially explained in terms of a model based on collective excitation namely the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). The qualitative agreement between the data and GDPR model prediction for single and double ionization signifies the importance of single and double plasmon excitations in the ionization process. A large deviation of the GDPR model for triple and quadruple ionization from the experimental data imply the importance of the other low impact parameter processes such as evaporation, fragmentation and a possible solid-like dynamical screening.

  16. Spontaneously formed high-performance charge-transport layers of organic single-crystal semiconductors on precisely synthesized insulating polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Tatsuyuki; Sasaki, Masayuki; Annaka, Tatsuro; Sasaki, Mari; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Kumagai, Shohei; Watanabe, Shun; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Takeya, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Charge-transporting semiconductor layers with high carrier mobility and low trap-density, desired for high-performance organic transistors, are spontaneously formed as a result of thermodynamic phase separation from a blend of π-conjugated small molecules and precisely synthesized insulating polymers dissolved in an aromatic solvent. A crystal film grows continuously to the size of centimeters, with the critical conditions of temperature, concentrations, and atmosphere. It turns out that the molecular weight of the insulating polymers plays an essential role in stable film growth and interfacial homogeneity at the phase separation boundary. Fabricating the transistor devices directly at the semiconductor-insulator boundaries, we demonstrate that the mixture of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3-d:2',3'-d']benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with the optimized weight-average molecular weight shows excellent device performances. The spontaneous phase separation with a one-step fabrication process leads to a high mobility up to 10 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a low subthreshold swing of 0.25 V dec-1 even without any surface treatment such as self-assembled monolayer modifications on oxide gate insulators.

  17. The Influence of Charged Species on the Phase Behavior, Self-Assembly, and Electrochemical Performance of Block Copolymer Electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Thelen, Jacob Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    One of the major barriers to expanding the capacity of large-scale electrochemical energy storage within batteries is the threat of a catastrophic failure. Catastrophic battery pack failure can be initiated by a defect within a single battery cell. If the failure of a defective battery cell is not contained, the damage can spread and subsequently compromise the integrity of the entire battery back, as well as the safety of those in its surroundings. Replacing the volatile, flammable liquid el...

  18. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  19. Comparative toxicity of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) on microalgae with single and multi-species bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, Timothée; Petit, Anne-Nöelle; Gagné, François; Kohli, Mohan; Nguyen, Nien; Blaise, Christian

    2011-09-01

    The potential threat of emerging chemicals to the aquatic flora is a major issue. The purpose of the study was to develop a multispecies microalgae test in order to determine the impact of species interactions on the cytoxicity of an emergent toxic contaminant: the tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Single and multi-species tests were thus performed to study the effects of this flame retardant on two microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitzschia palea) commonly observed in freshwater. A synthetic medium was designed to allow the growth of both species. The algae were exposed to 1.8, 4.8, 9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM of TBBPA for 72 h. After staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), viable cells of each alga species were analyzed by flow cytometry based on chlorophyll autofluorescence and intracellular esterase activity. Density and abundance of viable cells were assessed to follow the population growth and the cell viability. In TBBPA treated samples, the growth of the two microalgae was significantly inhibited at the three highest concentrations (9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM) in the two tests. At the end of the experiment (t=72 h), the cell viability was also significantly smaller at these concentrations. The decreases of growth rate and viable cell abundance in TBBPA treated populations of N. palea were significantly higher in multi-species test in comparison with the single-species test. No significant differences were noticed between the two tests for P. subcapitata populations exposed to TBBPA. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ab initio LCAO-MO cluster-type calculation of the self-consistent electronic screening charge density around a single hydrogen impurity in a nickel crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.W.; Lane, N.F.; Chaney, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic structure for a Ni atom cluster embedded in bulk Ni by use of a spin-averaged local exchange SCF Ni crystal potential is calculated with an ab initio LCAO-Mo variational method. A single hydrogen impurity is added at the cluster center (fcc octahedral interstitial site) and the electronic structure computed iteratively until the change in electron density from the pure Ni cluster density is self-consistent. The H-Ni 6 self-consistent density change is compared to the charge density around a free hydrogen atom and to the initial-response density change in H-Ni 14 and H-Ni 38 clusters. 14 references

  1. First principles analysis of the CDW instability of single-layer 1T-TiSe2 and its evolution with charge carrier density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guster, Bogdan; Canadell, Enric; Pruneda, Miguel; Ordejón, Pablo

    2018-04-01

    We present a density functional theory study of the electronic structure of single-layer TiSe2, and focus on the charge density wave (CDW) instability present on this 2D material. We explain the 2× 2 periodicity of the CDW from the phonon band structure of the undistorted crystal, which is unstable under one of the phonon modes at the M point. This can be understood in terms of a partial band gap opening at the Fermi level, which we describe on the basis of the symmetry of the involved crystal orbitals, leading to an energy gain upon the displacement of the atoms following the phonon mode in a 2  ×  1 structure. Furthermore, the combination of the corresponding phonons for the three inequivalent M points of the Brillouin zone leads to the 2  ×  2 distortion characteristic of the CDW state. This leads to a further opening of a full gap, which reduces the energy of the 2  ×  2 structure compared to the 2  ×  1 one of a single M point phonon, and makes the CDW structure the most stable one. We also analyze the effect of charge injection into the layer on the structural instability. We predict that the 2  ×  2 structure only survives for a certain range of doping levels, both for electrons and for holes, as doping reduces the energy gain due to the gap opening. We predict the transition from the commensurate 2  ×  2 distortion to an incommensurate one with increasing wavelength upon increasing the doping level, followed by the appearance of the undistorted 1  ×  1 structure for larger carrier concentrations.

  2. Design of custom oligonucleotide microarrays for single species or interspecies hybrids using Array Oligo Selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudy, Amy A

    2011-01-01

    New technologies for DNA sequencing have made it feasible to determine the genome sequence of any organism of interest. This sequence is the resource required to create tools for downstream studies, including DNA microarrays. A number of vendors can produce DNA microarrays containing customer-specified sequences, allowing investigators to design and order arrays customized for any species of interest. Freely available, user-friendly computer programs are available for designing microarray probes. These design programs can be used to create probes that distinguish between two related genomes, allowing investigation of gene expression or gene representation in intra- or interspecies hybrids or in samples containing DNA from multiple species.

  3. Can Kohn-Sham density functional theory predict accurate charge distributions for both single-reference and multi-reference molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pragya; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-05-24

    Dipole moments are the first moment of electron density and are fundamental quantities that are often available from experiments. An exchange-correlation functional that leads to an accurate representation of the charge distribution of a molecule should accurately predict the dipole moments of the molecule. It is well known that Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) is more accurate for the energetics of single-reference systems than for the energetics of multi-reference ones, but there has been less study of charge distributions. In this work, we benchmark 48 density functionals chosen with various combinations of ingredients, against accurate experimental data for dipole moments of 78 molecules, in particular 55 single-reference molecules and 23 multi-reference ones. We chose both organic and inorganic molecules, and within the category of inorganic molecules there are both main-group and transition-metal-containing molecules, with some of them being multi-reference. As one would expect, the multi-reference molecules are not as well described by single-reference DFT, and the functionals tested in this work do show larger mean unsigned errors (MUEs) for the 23 multi-reference molecules than the single-reference ones. Five of the 78 molecules have relatively large experimental error bars and were therefore not included in calculating the overall MUEs. For the 73 molecules not excluded, we find that three of the hybrid functionals, B97-1, PBE0, and TPSSh (each with less than or equal to 25% Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange), the range-separated hybrid functional, HSE06 (with HF exchange decreasing from 25% to 0 as interelectronic distance increases), and the hybrid functional, PW6B95 (with 28% HF exchange) are the best performing functionals with each yielding an MUE of 0.18 D. Perhaps the most significant finding of this study is that there exists great similarity among the success rate of various functionals in predicting dipole moments. In particular, of 39

  4. A single dominant Ganoderma species is responsible for root rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ganoderma root rot is the most serious disease affecting commercially planted Acacia mangium in plantations in Indonesia. Numerous Ganoderma spp. have been recorded from diseased trees of this species and to a lesser extent Eucalyptus, causing confusion regarding the primary cause of the disease. In this study, a ...

  5. Beyond the single species climate envelope: A multifaceted approach to mapping climate change vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher S. Balzotti; Stanley G. Kitchen; Clinton McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Federal land management agencies and conservation organizations have begun incorporating climate change vulnerability assessments (CCVAs) as an important component in the management and conservation of landscapes. It is often a challenge to translate that knowledge into management plans and actions, even when research infers species risk. Predictive maps can...

  6. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of selected indigenous and introduced species in the Southern Cape region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapeto, P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available indigenous tree species can provide an additional low water-use form of forestry. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of three indigenous species (Ilex mitis, Ocotea bullata and Podocarpus latifolius) and one introduced species (Pinus radiata...

  7. Study of Single Event Effects induced by highly energetic charged particles of the space environment in CMOS image Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalucaa, Valerian

    2013-01-01

    This thesis studies the single event effects of space environment in CMOS image sensors (CIS). This work focuses on the effects of heavy ions on 3T standard photodiode pixels, and 4T and 5T pinned photodiode pixels. The first part describes the space radioactive environment and the sensor architecture. The most harmful events (SEL and SETs) are identified thanks to the scientific literature. The experimentally tested sensors agree with the theoretical work. SETs are compared to STARDUST simulations with a good agreement for all ions and sensors. The work explains why the SETs on 3T pixels are insensitive to the various photodiode designs, and they are decreased when an epitaxial substrate is used. A method using anti-blooming was successfully used in 4T and 5T pixels to prevent the spread of the SETs. The mechanism of latch-up in 4T pixel sensors is described. All the identified mechanisms are very useful to provide hardening methods for the CISs. (author) [fr

  8. Development and regulation of single- and multi-species Candida albicans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Gulati, Megha; Johnson, Alexander D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota and asymptomatically colonizes healthy individuals. However, it is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe, and often fatal, bloodstream infections. The medical impact of C. albicans typically depends on its ability to form biofilms, which are closely packed communities of cells that attach to surfaces, such as tissues and implanted medical devices. In this Review, we provide an overview of the processes involved in the formation of C. albicans biofilms and discuss the core transcriptional network that regulates biofilm development. We also consider some of the advantages that biofilms provide to C. albicans in comparison with planktonic growth and explore polymicrobial biofilms that are formed by C. albicans and certain bacterial species. PMID:29062072

  9. Mapping Regional Distribution of a Single Tree Species: Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Schwartz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Moderate resolution satellite imagery traditionally has been thought to be inadequate for mapping vegetation at the species level. This has made comprehensive mapping of regional distributions of sensitive species, such as whitebark pine, either impractical or extremely time consuming. We sought to determine whether using a combination of moderate resolution satellite imagery (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, extensive stand data collected by land management agencies for other purposes, and modern statistical classification techniques (boosted classification trees could result in successful mapping of whitebark pine. Overall classification accuracies exceeded 90%, with similar individual class accuracies. Accuracies on a localized basis varied based on elevation. Accuracies also varied among administrative units, although we were not able to determine whether these differences related to inherent spatial variations or differences in the quality of available reference data.

  10. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivian, Dylan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Alm, Eric J.; Culley, David E.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lin, Li-Hung; Lowry, Stephen R.; Moser, Duane P.; Richardson, Paul; Southam, Gordon; Wanger, Greg; Pratt, Lisa M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2008-09-17

    DNA from low biodiversity fracture water collected at 2.8 km depth in a South African gold mine was sequenced and assembled into a single, complete genome. This bacterium, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, comprises>99.9percent of the microorganisms inhabiting the fluid phase of this particular fracture. Its genome indicates a motile, sporulating, sulfate reducing, chemoautotrophic thermophile that can fix its own nitrogen and carbon using machinery shared with archaea. Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator is capable of an independent lifestyle well suited to long-term isolation from the photosphere deep within Earth?s crust, and offers the first example of a natural ecosystem that appears to have its biological component entirely encoded within a single genome.

  11. Identification of squid species by melting temperature shifts on fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) using single dual-labeled probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunjung; Song, Ha Jeong; Kwon, Na Young; Kim, Gi Won; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jo, Soyeon; Park, Sujin; Park, Jihyun; Park, Eun Kyeong; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2017-06-01

    Real time PCR is a standard method for identification of species. One of limitations of the qPCR is that there would be false-positive result due to mismatched hybridization between target sequence and probe depending on the annealing temperature in the PCR condition. As an alternative, fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) could be applied for species identification. FMCA is based on a dual-labeled probe. Even with subtle difference of target sequence, there are visible melting temperature (Tm) shift. One of FMCA applications is distinguishing organisms distributed and consumed globally as popular food ingredients. Their prices are set by species or country of origin. However, counterfeiting or distributing them without any verification procedure are becoming social problems and threatening food safety. Besides distinguishing them in naked eye is very difficult and almost impossible in any processed form. Therefore, it is necessary to identify species in molecular level. In this research three species of squids which have 1-2 base pair differences each are selected as samples since they have the same issue. We designed a probe which perfectly matches with one species and the others mismatches 2 and 1 base pair respectively and labeled with fluorophore and quencher. In an experiment with a single probe, we successfully distinguished them by Tm shift depending on the difference of base pair. By combining FMCA and qPCR chip, smaller-scale assay with higher sensitivity and resolution could be possible, andc furthermore, enabling results analysis with smart phone would realize point-of-care testing (POCT).

  12. The effect of selected plant extracts on the development of single-species dental biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Z.H.; Shaikh, S.; Razak, A.; Ismail, W.N.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of a mixture of plant extracts on the adherence and retention of bacteria in dental biofilm. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study:Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from December 2009 to December 2011. Methodology: For determination of adhering ability, experimental pellicle was first treated with the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) before inoculating it with individual bacterial species ( S. mitis / S. sanguinis / S. mutans). For the determination of retention ability, the procedure was repeated with the experimental pellicle being inoculated first with the individual bacterial species and then treating it with the PEM. These two experiments were repeated with deionized distilled water (negative control) and Thymol (0.64%) (positive control). The bacterial populations in biofilms for the two experiments were expressed as Colony Forming Unit (CFU) / mL x 10/sup 4/ and the corresponding values were expressed as mean +- SD. Results: The effect of the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) for the two experiments was compared with that of Thymol and deionized distilled water. It was shown that there is a reduced adherence of bacteria to PEM-treated and Thymol (0.064%) treated experimental pellicle compared with the negative control (p < 0.001). It was also found that the retention of bacteria in both treated biofilms is also lower than that of negative control (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) may influence the development of dental biofilm by affecting the adhering and retention capacities of the bacterial species in the dental biofilms. (author)

  13. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm T. S. Huck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL. Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets.

  14. Isolation of dimorphic chloroplasts from the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Shiu-Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three terrestrial plants are known to perform C4 photosynthesis without the dual-cell system by partitioning two distinct types of chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic compartments. We report herein a protocol for isolating the dimorphic chloroplasts from Bienertia sinuspersici. Hypo-osmotically lysed protoplasts under our defined conditions released intact compartments containing the central chloroplasts and intact vacuoles with adhering peripheral chloroplasts. Following Percoll step gradient purification both chloroplast preparations demonstrated high homogeneities as evaluated from the relative abundance of respective protein markers. This protocol will open novel research directions toward understanding the mechanism of single-cell C4 photosynthesis.

  15. Chasing the hare - Evaluating the phylogenetic utility of a nuclear single copy gene region at and below species level within the species rich group Peperomia (Piperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumann Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapidly increasing number of available plant genomes opens up almost unlimited prospects for biology in general and molecular phylogenetics in particular. A recent study took advantage of this data and identified a set of nuclear genes that occur in single copy in multiple sequenced angiosperms. The present study is the first to apply genomic sequence of one of these low copy genes, agt1, as a phylogenetic marker for species-level phylogenetics. Its utility is compared to the performance of several coding and non-coding chloroplast loci that have been suggested as most applicable for this taxonomic level. As a model group, we chose Tildenia, a subgenus of Peperomia (Piperaceae, one of the largest plant genera. Relationships are particularly difficult to resolve within these species rich groups due to low levels of polymorphisms and fast or recent radiation. Therefore, Tildenia is a perfect test case for applying new phylogenetic tools. Results We show that the nuclear marker agt1, and in particular the agt1 introns, provide a significantly increased phylogenetic signal compared to chloroplast markers commonly used for low level phylogenetics. 25% of aligned characters from agt1 intron sequence are parsimony informative. In comparison, the introns and spacer of several common chloroplast markers (trnK intron, trnK-psbA spacer, ndhF-rpl32 spacer, rpl32-trnL spacer, psbA-trnH spacer provide less than 10% parsimony informative characters. The agt1 dataset provides a deeper resolution than the chloroplast markers in Tildenia. Conclusions Single (or very low copy nuclear genes are of immense value in plant phylogenetics. Compared to other nuclear genes that are members of gene families of all sizes, lab effort, such as cloning, can be kept to a minimum. They also provide regions with different phylogenetic content deriving from coding and non-coding parts of different length. Thus, they can be applied to a wide range of

  16. Single-Particle Momentum Distributions of Efimov States in Mixed-Species Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Yamashita, M.; F. Bellotti, F.; Frederico, T.

    2013-01-01

    to derive formulas for the scaling factor of the Efimov spectrum for any mass ratio assuming either that two or three of the two-body subsystems have a bound state at zero energy. We consider the single-particle momentum distribution analytically and numerically and analyse the tail of the momentum......We solve the three-body bound state problem in three dimensions for mass imbalanced systems of two identical bosons and a third particle in the universal limit where the interactions are assumed to be of zero-range. The system displays the Efimov effect and we use the momentum-space wave equation...... distribution to obtain the three-body contact parameter. Our finding demonstrate that the functional form of the three-body contact term depends on the mass ratio and we obtain an analytic expression for this behavior. To exemplify our results, we consider mixtures of Lithium with either two Caesium or Rubium...

  17. A Single Species of Clostridium Subcluster XIVa Decreased in Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kozue; Mizuno, Shinta; Mikami, Yohei; Sujino, Tomohisa; Saigusa, Keiichiro; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Naganuma, Makoto; Sato, Tadashi; Takada, Toshihiko; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kushiro, Akira; Nomoto, Koji; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-12-01

    Imbalance of the intestinal microbiota is associated with gastrointestinal disease and autoimmune disease and metabolic syndrome. Analysis of the intestinal microbiota has recently progressed, and the association with inflammatory bowel disease has been reported at the species level. Such findings suggest that the recovery of homeostasis in the intestinal microbiota could cure inflammatory bowel disease. We aimed to search new probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel disease through translational research by analysis of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients' intestinal microbiota and clarify the effects of them on inflammation. Here, we focused on Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans, which belongs to Clostridium subcluster XIVa and was successfully isolated and cultured in 2013. We analyzed the association of F. saccharivorans to UC patients' activity and inflammation for the first time. Feces from UC patients and healthy controls were analyzed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. F. saccharivorans was administered to murine colitis model. Colitic lamina propria mononuclear cells from UC patients and mice were stimulated with F. saccharivorans. The whole fecal bacteria in active UC patients were less than that in quiescent UC patients. Furthermore, F. saccharivorans was decreased in active UC patients and increased in quiescent. The administration of F. saccharivorans improved murine colitis. F. saccharivorans induced interleukin 10 production by lamina propria mononuclear cells from not only colitis model mice but also UC patients. F. saccharivorans decreased in correlation to UC activity and suppresses intestinal inflammation. These results suggest that F. saccharivorans could lead to a novel UC treatment.

  18. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Charge trapping and storage by composite P3HT/PC60BM nanoparticles investigated by fluorescence-voltage/single particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjian; Gesquiere, Andre J

    2011-12-28

    Fluorescence-voltage/single particle spectroscopy (F-V/SPS) was employed to study exciton-hole polaron interactions and interfacial charge transfer processes for pure poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanoparticles (NPs) and composite P3HT/PC(60)BM NPs in functioning hole-injection devices. F-V/SPS data collected on a particle-by-particle basis reveal an apparent bistability in the fluorescence-voltage modulation curves for composite NPs of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (PC(60)BM) that is absent for pure P3HT NPs. A pronounced deep trapping of free electrons photogenerated from the composite P3HT/PC(60)BM NPs at the NP/dielectric interface and hole trapping by fullerene anions in composite P3HT/PC(60)BM NPs under photoexcitation lies at the basis of this finding. The deep electron trapping effect reported here for composite conjugated polymer/fullerene NPs presents an opportunity for future application of these NPs in nanoscale memory and imaging devices. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Twisted intramolecular charge transfer investigation of semi organic L-Glutamic acid hydrochloride single crystal for organic light-emitting and optical limiting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Lija K.; George, Merin; Alex, Javeesh; Aravind, Arun; Sajan, D.; Vinitha, G.

    2018-03-01

    Single crystals of L-Glutamic acid hydrochloride (LGHCl) were grown by slow evaporation solution technique and good crystalline perfection was confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction studies. The complete vibrational studies of the compound were analyzed by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-visible spectra combined with Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology and density functional theory (DFT). Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT) occurs due to the presence of strong ionic intra-molecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding was confirmed by Hirshfeld Surface analysis. The existence of intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds due to the interaction between the lone pair of oxygen with the antibonding orbital was established by NBO analysis. The Z-scan result indicated that the title molecule exhibits saturable absorption behavior. The attractive third-order nonlinear properties suggest that LGHCl can be a promising candidate for the design and development devices for optical limiting applications. LGHCL exhibits distinct emission in the blue region of the fluorescence lifetime which proves to be a potential candidate for blue- Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabrication.

  1. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenant, Benoît; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Cellier, Gilles; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Lajus, Aurélie; Vallenet, David; Medigue, Claudine; Fegan, Mark; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB). All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence during vertical

  2. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Remenant

    Full Text Available The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB. All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence

  3. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Leaf Decomposition of Single-Species and Litter Mixture in Pinus tabulaeformis Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The litter decomposition process is closely correlated with nutrient cycling and the maintenance of soil fertility in the forest ecosystem. In particular, the intense environmental concern about atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition requires a better understanding of its influence on the litter decomposition process. This study examines the responses of single-species litter and litter mixture decomposition processes to N addition in Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. ecosystems. Chinese pine litter, Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb. litter, and a pine–oak mixture were selected from a plantation and a natural forest of Chinese pine. Four N addition treatments, i.e., control (N0: 0 kg N ha−1·year−1, low-N (N1: 5 kg N ha−1·year−1, medium-N (N2: 10 kg N ha−1·year−1, and high-N (N3: 15 kg N ha−1·year−1, were applied starting May 2010. In the plantation, N addition significantly stimulated the decomposition of the Chinese pine litter. In the natural forest, N addition had variable effects on the decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture. A stimulatory effect of the high-N treatment on the Chinese pine litter decomposition could be attributed to a decrease in the substrate C:N ratio. However, an opposite effect was found for the Mongolian oak litter decomposition. The stimulating effect of N addition on the Chinese pine litter may offset the suppressive effect on the Mongolian oak litter, resulting in a neutral effect on the litter mixture. These results suggest that the different responses in decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture to N addition are mainly attributed to litter chemical composition. Further investigations are required to characterize the effect of long-term high-level N addition on the litter decomposition as N deposition is likely to increase rapidly in the region where this study was conducted.

  4. 139La NMR investigation of the charge and spin order in a La1.885Sr0.115CuO4 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, A.; Takahashi, S. K.; Imai, T.; He, W.; Lee, Y. S.; Fujita, M.

    2018-02-01

    139La NMR is suited for investigations into magnetic properties of La2CuO4 -based cuprates in the vicinity of their magnetic instabilities, owing to the modest hyperfine interactions between 139La nuclear spins and Cu electron spins. We report comprehensive 139La NMR measurements on a single-crystal sample of high-Tc superconductor La1.885Sr0.115CuO4 in a broad temperature range across the charge and spin order transitions (Tcharge≃80 K, Tspinneutron≃Tc=30 K). From the high-precision measurements of the linewidth for the nuclear spin Iz=+1 /2 to -1 /2 central transition, we show that paramagnetic line broadening sets in precisely at Tcharge due to enhanced spin correlations within the CuO2 planes. Additional paramagnetic line broadening ensues below ˜35 K, signaling that Cu spins in some segments of CuO2 planes are on the verge of three-dimensional magnetic order. A static hyperfine magnetic field arising from ordered Cu moments along the a b plane, however, begins to develop only below Tspinμ S R=15 -20 K, where earlier muon spin rotation measurements detected Larmor precession for a small volume fraction (˜20 % ) of the sample. Based on the measurement of 139La nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , we also show that charge order triggers enhancement of low-frequency Cu spin fluctuations inhomogeneously; a growing fraction of 139La sites is affected by enhanced low-frequency spin fluctuations toward the eventual magnetic order, whereas a diminishing fraction continues to exhibit a behavior analogous to the optimally superconducting phase even below Tcharge. These 139La NMR results corroborate our recent 63Cu NMR observation that a very broad, anomalous winglike signal gradually emerges below Tcharge, whereas the normally behaving, narrower main peak is gradually wiped out [T. Imai et al., Phys. Rev. B 96, 224508 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.224508]. Furthermore, we show that the enhancement of low-energy spin excitations in the low-temperature regime

  5. Singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin silver coordination polymer induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells via reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senpeng; Zhang, Shuo; Jin, Xing; Tan, Xuejie; Lou, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhao, Yunxue

    2014-10-30

    Silver complexes have been shown to possess antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Ag-SP-DNC, a novel silver and singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin complex, was synthesized in our previous study. In this study, we offer evidence that Ag-SP-DNC elicits a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Ag-SP-DNC inhibited the growth of A549 cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Ag-SP-DNC induced apoptosis was associated with the levels of intracellular ROS. The further study revealed that Ag-SP-DNC disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, induced the caspase-3 activation and led to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor and endonucleaseG to the nucleus. These findings have important implications for the development of silver complexes for anticancer applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emendation of the family Chlamydiaceae: proposal of a single genus, Chlamydia, to include all currently recognized species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Konrad; Bavoil, Patrik M; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Stephens, Richard S; Kuo, Cho-Chou; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; Horn, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    The family Chlamydiaceae (order Chlamydiales, phylum Chlamydiae) comprises important, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. Subdivision of the family into the two genera Chlamydia and Chlamydophila has been discussed controversially during the past decade. Here, we have revisited the current classification in the light of recent genomic data and in the context of the unique biological properties of these microorganisms. We conclude that neither generally used 16S rRNA sequence identity cut-off values nor parameters based on genomic similarity consistently separate the two genera. Notably, no easily recognizable phenotype such as host preference or tissue tropism is available that would support a subdivision. In addition, the genus Chlamydophila is currently not well accepted and not used by a majority of research groups in the field. Therefore, we propose the classification of all 11 currently recognized Chlamydiaceae species in a single genus, the genus Chlamydia. Finally, we provide emended descriptions of the family Chlamydiaceae, the genus Chlamydia, as well as the species Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia caviae and Chlamydia felis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. A Charge Parity Ammeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Megan; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Ferguson, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    A metallic double-dot is measured with radio frequency reflectometry. Changes in the total electron number of the double-dot are determined via single electron tunnelling contributions to the complex electrical impedance. Electron counting experiments are performed by monitoring the impedance, demonstrating operation of a single electron ammeter without the need for external charge detection.

  9. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  10. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurnheer Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of

  11. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  12. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, T C M; Bas, D A; Belgers, J D M; Bibbe, L; Boerwinkel, M-C; Crum, S J H; Diepens, N J; Kraak, M H S; Vonk, J A; Roessink, I

    2016-08-01

    Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79μg a.s./g OC. The treatment-related responses observed in the microcosms are in accordance with the results of the 28-d laboratory toxicity tests. These tests showed that the insect C. riparius and the crustacean H. azteca were approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the oligochaete L. variegatus. In our laboratory tests, using field-collected sediment, the lowest 28-d EC10 (0.49μg a.s./g OC) was observed for C. riparius (endpoint survival), while for the standard OECD test with this species, using artificial sediment, a NOEC of 2.35μg a.s./g OC (endpoint emergence) is reported. In this particular case, the sediment tier-1 effect assessment using the chronic EC10 (field-collected sediment) or chronic NOEC (artificial sediment) of C

  13. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, T.C.M., E-mail: theo.brock@wur.nl [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bas, D.A. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belgers, J.D.M. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bibbe, L. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boerwinkel, M-C.; Crum, S.J.H. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Diepens, N.J. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Kraak, M.H.S.; Vonk, J.A. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roessink, I. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • In outdoor microcosms constructed with lufenuron-spiked sediment we observed that this insecticide persistent in the sediment compartment. • Sediment exposure to lufenuron caused population-level declines (insects and crustaceans) and increases (mainly oligochaete worms) of benthic invertebrates. • The direct and indirect effects observed in the microcosms were supported by results of sediment-spiked single species tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus. • The tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms recommended by the European Food Safety Authority is protective for the treatment-related responses observed in the microcosm test. - Abstract: Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79 μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79 μg a.s./g OC. The treatment

  14. Development and assessment of multiplex high resolution melting assay as a tool for rapid single-tube identification of five Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Sells, Jessica; Lee, Robin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Foster, Jeffrey T; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2014-12-11

    The zoonosis brucellosis causes economically significant reproductive problems in livestock and potentially debilitating disease of humans. Although the causative agent, organisms from the genus Brucella, can be differentiated into a number of species based on phenotypic characteristics, there are also significant differences in genotype that are concordant with individual species. This paper describes the development of a five target multiplex assay to identify five terrestrial Brucella species using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent high resolution melt curve analysis. This technology offers a robust and cost effective alternative to previously described hydrolysis-probe Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-based species defining assays. Through the use of Brucella whole genome sequencing five species defining SNPs were identified. Individual HRM assays were developed to these target these changes and, following optimisation of primer concentrations, it was possible to multiplex all five assays in a single tube. In a validation exercise using a panel of 135 Brucella strains of terrestrial and marine origin, it was possible to distinguish the five target species from the other species within this panel. The HRM multiplex offers a number of diagnostic advantages over previously described SNP-based typing approaches. Further, and uniquely for HRM, the successful multiplexing of five assays in a single tube allowing differentiation of five Brucella species in the diagnostic laboratory in a cost-effective and timely manner is described. However there are possible limitations to using this platform on DNA extractions direct from clinical material.

  15. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  16. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  17. A new method for charge trapping measurement during electron beam irradiation: application to glass containing alkali ions and single-crystalline quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhfakh, S; Ghorbel, N; Jbara, O; Rondot, S; Martin, D; Fakhfakh, Z; Kallel, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the electron irradiation behaviour of an insulating material surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The charging phenomena caused in two kinds of insulating materials (quartz and glass) by continuous electron irradiation have been observed. The discharging phenomena following switching off of irradiation have also been studied. The trapped charge density is determined by using the so-called electrostatic influence method based on the measurement, during and after the irradiation, of the influence and leakage currents using an arrangement adapted to the SEM. The experimental results reveal that the behaviour under irradiation of glass is entirely different from that of quartz. The trapped charges are found to be different, and the dependence of charging on the primary beam energy is discussed. The charging and discharging time constants have been determined accurately, and their evolution versus the mean electron penetration depth is qualitatively explained. Moreover, the role of secondary electron emission in the regulation mechanism of charging is underlined

  18. A new method for charge trapping measurement during electron beam irradiation: application to glass containing alkali ions and single-crystalline quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhfakh, S [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences BP 1039, 51687 Reims CDX 2 (France); Ghorbel, N [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences BP 1039, 51687 Reims CDX 2 (France); Jbara, O [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences BP 1039, 51687 Reims CDX 2 (France); Rondot, S [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences BP 1039, 51687 Reims CDX 2 (France); Martin, D [Saint Gobain Recherche, 39 quai Lucien Lefranc, BP 135, 93303 Aubervilliers CDX (France); Fakhfakh, Z [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra km 3, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, A [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra km 3, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2004-08-07

    The aim of this work is to study the electron irradiation behaviour of an insulating material surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The charging phenomena caused in two kinds of insulating materials (quartz and glass) by continuous electron irradiation have been observed. The discharging phenomena following switching off of irradiation have also been studied. The trapped charge density is determined by using the so-called electrostatic influence method based on the measurement, during and after the irradiation, of the influence and leakage currents using an arrangement adapted to the SEM. The experimental results reveal that the behaviour under irradiation of glass is entirely different from that of quartz. The trapped charges are found to be different, and the dependence of charging on the primary beam energy is discussed. The charging and discharging time constants have been determined accurately, and their evolution versus the mean electron penetration depth is qualitatively explained. Moreover, the role of secondary electron emission in the regulation mechanism of charging is underlined.

  19. Single-cell genomics reveals features of a Colwellia species that was dominant during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia eMason

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume developed resulting in a rapid succession of bacteria. Colwellia eventually supplanted Oceanospirillales, which dominated the plume early in the spill. These successional changes may have resulted, in part, from the changing composition and abundance of hydrocarbons over time. Colwellia abundance peaked when gaseous and simple aromatic hydrocarbons increased, yet the metabolic pathway used by Colwellia in hydrocarbon disposition is unknown. Here we used single-cell genomics to gain insights into the genome properties of a Colwellia enriched during the DWH deep-sea plume. A single amplified genome (SAG of a Colwellia cell isolated from a DWH plume, closely related (avg. 98% 16S rRNA gene similarity to other plume Colwellia, was sequenced and annotated. The SAG was similar to the sequenced isolate Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H (84% avg. nucleotide identity. Both had genes for denitrification, chemotaxis and motility, adaptations to cold environments, and a suite of nutrient acquisition genes. The Colwellia SAG may be capable of gaseous and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, which contrasts with a DWH plume Oceanospirillales SAG genome which encoded non-gaseous n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. The disparate hydrocarbon degradation pathways are consistent with hydrocarbons that were abundant at different times in the deep-sea plume; first, non-gaseous n-alkanes and cycloalkanes that could be degraded by Oceanospirillales, followed by gaseous, and simple aromatic hydrocarbons that may have been degraded by Colwellia. These insights into the genomic properties of a Colwellia species, which were supported by existing metagenomic sequence data from the plume and DWH contaminated sediments, help further our understanding of the successional changes in the dominant microbial players in the plume over the course of the DWH spill.

  20. Dynamics of a Birth-Pulse Single-Species Model with Restricted Toxin Input and Pulse Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a birth-pulses single-species model with restricted toxin input and pulse harvesting in a polluted environment. Pollution accumulates as a slowly decaying stock and is assumed to affect the growth of the renewable resource population. Firstly, by using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact 1-period solution of system whose birth function is Ricker function or Beverton-Holt function and obtain the threshold conditions for their stability. Furthermore, we show that the timing of harvesting has a strong impact on the maximum annual sustainable yield. The best timing of harvesting is immediately after the birth pulses. Finally, we investigate the effect of the amount of toxin input on the stable resource population size. We find that when the birth rate is comparatively lower, the population size is decreasing with the increase of toxin input; that when the birth rate is high, the population size may begin to rise and then drop with the increase of toxin input.

  1. Epidemiological survey in single-species flocks from Poland reveals expanded genetic and antigenic diversity of small ruminant lentiviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valas, Stephen; Kuźmak, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infections are widespread in Poland and circulation of subtypes A1, A12, A13, B1 and B2 was detected. The present work aimed at extending previous study based on the analysis of a larger number of animals from single-species flocks. Animals were selected for genetic analysis based on serological reactivity towards a range of recombinant antigens derived from Gag and Env viral proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of subtypes B2 and A12 in both goats and sheep and subtypes A1 and B1 in goats only. In addition, two novel subtypes, A16 and A17, were found in goats. Co-infections with strains belonging to different subtypes within A and B groups were detected in 1 sheep and 4 goats originating from four flocks. Although the reactivity of serum samples towards the recombinant antigens confirmed immunological relatedness between Gag epitopes of different subtypes and the cross-reactive nature of Gag antibodies, eleven serum samples failed to react with antigens representing all subtypes detected up-to-date in Poland, highlighting the limitations of the serological diagnosis. These data showed the complex nature of SRLV subtypes circulating in sheep and goats in Poland and the need for improving SRLV-related diagnostic capacity. PMID:29505612

  2. Red oak in southern New England and big-leaf mahogany in the Yucatan Peninsula: can mixed-species forests be sustainably managed for single-species production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Kelty; L. Camara-Cabrales; J. Grogan

    2011-01-01

    Complex mixed-species forests are the focus of conservation efforts that seek to maintain native biodiversity. However, much of this forestland is privately owned and is managed for timber income as well as for conservation. Management of these high-diversity forests is particularly difficult when only one tree species produces the majority of high-value timber. We...

  3. Mean carrier transport properties and charge collection dynamics of single-crystal, natural type IIa diamonds from ion-induced conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Su [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ion-induced conductivity has been used to investigate the detector characteristics of diamond detectors. Both integrated-charge, and time-resolved current measurements were performed to examine the mean carrier transport properties of diamond and the dynamics of charge collection under highly-localized and high-density excitation conditions. The integrated-charge measurements were conducted with a standard pulse-counting system with 241Am radioactivity as the excitation source for the detectors. The time-resolved current measurements were performed using a 70 GHz random sampling oscilloscope with the detectors incorporated into high-speed microstrip transmission lines and the excitation source for these measurements was an ion beam of either 5-MeV He+ or 10-MeV Si3+. The detectors used in both experiments can be described as metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) devices where a volume of the detector material is sandwiched between two metal plates. A charge collection model was developed to interpret the integrated-charge measurements which enabled estimation of the energy required to produce an electron-hole pair (ϵdi) and the mean carrier transport properties in diamond, such as carrier mobility and lifetime, and the behavior of the electrical contacts to diamond.

  4. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  5. Experimental Charge Density in an Oxidized Trinuclear Iron Complex using 15 K Synchrotron and 100 K Conventional Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overgaard, J.; Larsen, F.; Timco, G.; Iversen, B.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental electron density distribution in a crystal consisting of the simplest conceivable trinuclear carboxylate-bridged iron-μ3-oxo dianion with two α-picolinium cations has been determined using both synchrotron (15 K) and conventional (100 K) X-ray diffraction data. The constituent trinuclear oxo-centered molecule consists of six 2-bridging formate groups between the iron pairs, while the axial ligand for all iron atoms is another formate group. The compound {(Fe3O(HCOO)6(HCOO)3)2-·H2O·2(α-CH3NC5H5)+}, ( 1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/m with charge assisted hydrogen bonds linking the α-picolinium cations to the trinuclear groups. The chemical bonding in the weakly asymmetric Fe3O-core of 1 has been examined through the use of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and in combination with experimental d-orbital populations, a significant electron sharing is observed between the Fe atoms and the central oxygen. The central oxygen exhibits clear sp2 hybridization, and the iron atoms have valence shell charge concentrations in all metal-ligand bond directions. The relative bond strengths are evaluated based upon the charge density distribution and found to be in accordance with the geometrical results. Integrated group charges follow expectations from formal chemical valences.

  6. Implementing ecosystem-based fisheries management: from single-species to integrated ecosystem assessment and advice for Baltic Sea fish stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllmann, Christian; Lindegren, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Theory behind ecosystem-based management (EBM) and ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) is nowwell developed. However, the implementation of EBFM exemplified by fisheries management in Europe is still largely based on single-species assessments and ignores the wider ecosystem context and i...

  7. Measurements of the differential cross section and charge asymmetry for inclusive pp →W (muupsilon) production with 8 TeV CMS data and CMS single muon trigger efficiency study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hasan

    This dissertation presents muon charge asymmetry, fiducial differential cross section and CMS single muon trigger efficiency measurements as a function of muon pseudorapidity for inclusive W→muupsilon events produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The data were recorded by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 18.8 fb-1. Several comparisons are performed to cross-check the experimental results. Muon efficiency measurements are compared to estimated values from Monte Carlo simulations and reference values recommended by CMS physics object groups. The differential cross section and the charge asymmetry measurements are compared to theoretical predictions based on next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order QCD calculations with different PDF models. Inputs from the charge asymmetry and the differential cross section measurements for the determination of the next generation of PDF sets are expected to bring different predictions closer together and aid in reducing PDF uncertainties. The impact of the charge asymmetry on PDFs has been investigated by putting the asymmetry results into a QCD analysis at next-to-leading order and next-to-nextleading order with inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. Significant improvement of the accuracy on the valence-quark distributions is observed. This measurement is recommended for more accurate constraints in future PDF determinations. More precise measurements of PDFs will improve LHC predictions.

  8. Charge preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaminade, R.; Passerieux, J.P.

    1961-01-01

    We describe a charge preamplifier having the following properties: - large open loop gain giving both stable gain and large input charge transfer; - stable input grid current with aging and without any adjustment; - fairly fast rise; - nearly optimum noise performance; - industrial material. (authors)

  9. Charging machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine. 3 claims, 11 drawing figures

  10. Terahertz spectra revealing the collective excitation mode in charge-density-wave single crystal LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiumei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Ma, Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Balakrishnan, Geetha [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    A low-energy collective excitation mode in charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is reported via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Upon cooling from 300 to 40 K, the central resonance frequency showed a pronounced hardening from 0.85 to 1.15 THz. In analogy to the well-known low-energy optical properties of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, this emerging resonance was attributed to the charge-density-wave (CDW) collective excitations. By using the Drude-Lorentz model fitting, the CDW collective mode becomes increasingly damped with the increasing temperature. Furthermore, the kinks of the CDW collective mode at the magnetic transition temperature are analyzed, which indicate the coupling of spin order with electric polarization. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  12. A possibility for generation of two species of charge carriers along main-chain and side-chains for a π-conjugated polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Yuki; Kawabata, Kohsuke; Goto, Hiromasa

    2013-01-01

    Iodide doping produces charge carriers in π-conjugated polymers. Solitons can be generated in the case of polyacetylene, and polarons in the case of aromatic-type conjugated polymers. We synthesized a conjugated main-chain/side-chain polymer, which consists of polyene in the main-chain and aromatic-type conjugated units in the side-chains. Based on the SSH (Su, Schrieffer, Heeger) theoretical model of solitons in one-dimensional conjugated polymers, we experimentally carried out chemical doping to the main-chain/side-chains conjugated polymer. Generation of the charge carriers was examined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This study may lead to realization of a dual doping system of solitons and polarons in π-conjugation expanded to two-dimensional directions in polymers.

  13. Charge-and-energy conserving moment-based accelerator for a multi-species Vlasov–Fokker–Planck–Ampère system, part I: Collisionless aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taitano, William T., E-mail: taitano@lanl.gov; Chacón, Luis

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a charge, momentum, and energy conserving discretization for the 1D–1V Vlasov–Ampère system of equations on an Eulerian grid. The new conservative discretization is nonlinear in nature, but can be efficiently converged with a moment-based nonlinear accelerator algorithm. We demonstrate the conservation and convergence properties of the scheme with various numerical examples, including a multi-scale ion–acoustic shockwave problem.

  14. Growth response of drought-stressed Pinus sylvestris seedlings to single- and multi-species inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Kipfer

    Full Text Available Many trees species form symbiotic associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi, which improve nutrient and water acquisition of their host. Until now it is unclear whether the species richness of ECM fungi is beneficial for tree seedling performance, be it during moist conditions or drought. We performed a pot experiment using Pinus sylvestris seedlings inoculated with four selected ECM fungi (Cenococcum geophilum, Paxillus involutus, Rhizopogon roseolus and Suillus granulatus to investigate (i whether these four ECM fungi, in monoculture or in species mixtures, affect growth of P. sylvestris seedlings, and (ii whether this effect can be attributed to species number per se or to species identity. Two different watering regimes (moist vs. dry were applied to examine the context-dependency of the results. Additionally, we assessed the activity of eight extracellular enzymes in the root tips. Shoot growth was enhanced in the presence of S. granulatus, but not by any other ECM fungal species. The positive effect of S. granulatus on shoot growth was more pronounced under moist (threefold increase than under dry conditions (twofold increase, indicating that the investigated ECM fungi did not provide additional support during drought stress. The activity of secreted extracellular enzymes was higher in S. granulatus than in any other species. In conclusion, our findings suggest that ECM fungal species composition may affect seedling performance in terms of aboveground biomass.

  15. Using single strand conformational polymorphisms (SSCP) to identify Phytophthora species in Oregon forests affected by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Hansen; C. Hesse; P. Reeser; W. Sutton; L. Winton

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora species are abundant in streams, widespread in soils and occasionally found in diseased plants in the tanoak forests of southwestern Oregon. It is time-consuming and expensive to identify hundreds of isolates to species using morphology or internal transribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. We modified a published Phytophthora...

  16. E. S. R. studies of electron irradiated K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ in KCl single crystals. Mono and di-chlorinated species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugman, N.V.; Pinhal, N.M. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica)

    1983-08-20

    E.S.R. studies of KCl single crystals doped with small amounts of K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ and submitted to a prolonged 2 MeV electron irradiation at room temperature reveal the presence of the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/Cl)/sup 4 -/ and (Ir(CN)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/)/sup 4 -/. Ligand spin densities and ligand field parameters are calculated from the experimental hyperfine and superhyperfine interactions and compared with previous data on the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/)/sup 4 -/.

  17. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  18. Single-reversal charge in the β10-β11 receptor-binding loop of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa and Cry4Ba toxins reflects their different toxicity against Culex spp. larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visitsattapongse, Sarinporn; Sakdee, Somsri; Leetacheewa, Somphob; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2014-07-25

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa toxin was previously shown to be much more toxic to Culex mosquito-larvae than its closely related toxin - Cry4Ba, conceivably due to their sequence differences within the β10-β11 receptor-binding loop. Here, single-Ala substitutions of five residues (Pro(510), Thr(512), Tyr(513), Lys(514) and Thr(515)) within the Cry4Aa β10-β11 loop revealed that only Lys(514) corresponding to the relative position of Cry4Ba-Asp(454) is crucial for toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, charge-reversal mutations at Cry4Ba-Asp(454) (D454R and D454K) revealed a marked increase in toxicity against such less-susceptible larvae. In situ binding analyses revealed that both Cry4Ba-D454R and D454K mutants exhibited a significant increase in binding to apical microvilli of Culex larval midguts, albeit at lower-binding activity when compared with Cry4Aa. Altogether, our present data suggest that a positively charged side-chain near the tip of the β10-β11 loop plays a critical role in determining target specificity of Cry4Aa against Culex spp., and hence a great increase in the Culex larval toxicity of Cry4Ba was obtained toward an opposite-charge conversion of the corresponding Asp(454). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Niche overlap of congeneric invaders supports a single-species hypothesis and provides insight into future invasion risk: implications for global management of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew P; Terblanche, John S

    2014-01-01

    The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs), and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species' realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae). Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same-at least functionally-and global quarantine and management strategies applied

  20. Niche overlap of congeneric invaders supports a single-species hypothesis and provides insight into future invasion risk: implications for global management of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs, and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species' realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae. Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same

  1. Photoinactivation of single and mixed biofilms of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species using Photodythazine® [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmello, Juliana Cabrini; Alves, Fernanda; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) mediated by Photodithazine ® (PDZ) formulated in hydrogel, in the inactivation of mono and duo-species biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Standardized suspensions of each strain were prepared and after biofilm formation, mono-species were treated with 150 and 175mg/L of PDZ for 20min (pre-irradiation time), and exposed to LED light at a dose of 37.5J/cm 2 (660nm). The duo-species biofilms (C. albicans+C. glabrata and C. albicans+C. tropicalis) were treated with 150mg/L of PDZ and light. Additional samples were treated with PDZ or light only, and the control did not receive any treatment. Next, microbiological evaluation was performed by spreading the cells on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and CHROMagar Candida for colony forming units (CFU/mL). Moreover, the total biomass of biofilm was verified using the crystal violet staining assay (CV). The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc (α=0.05). The use of PDZ 150mg/L promoted a reduction of 1.0, 1.2, 1.5 log 10 in the viability of C. glabrata, C. albicans and C. tropicalis, respectively. The same concentration reduced in 1.0 log 10 the viability of each species grown as duo-species biofilms. The crystal violet assay showed that the use of 150mg/L reduced 24.4%, 39.2% and 43.7% of the total biomass of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. aPDT did not reduce the total biomass to the duo-species biofilms. Thus, PDZ-mediated aPDT was more effective in the inactivation of mono-species biofilms of Candida spp. compared with duo-species biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Depressive-like behavioural profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine MJ Camus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD, the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored.Methods: Behavioural data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances and locations in the cage were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys.Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g. inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles.Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a spontaneous model of depressive disorders.

  3. Niche Overlap of Congeneric Invaders Supports a Single-Species Hypothesis and Provides Insight into Future Invasion Risk: Implications for Global Management of the Bactrocera dorsalis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew P.; Terblanche, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs), and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species’ realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. Principal Findings Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae). Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. Conclusions/Significance Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same–at least

  4. Search for top quark partners with charge 5/3 in the single-lepton final state at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for the pair production of heavy partners of the top quark with an exotic electric charge 5/3 ($X_{5/3}$) decaying into a W boson and a top quark is presented. The search uses data collected in 2016 in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Final states considered include one electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and four or more jets. The $X_{5/3}$ masses with right-handed (left-handed) couplings below 1.32 (1.30) $\\mathrm{TeV}$ are excluded at $95\\%$ confidence level.

  5. Influence of the single EGR valve usability on development of the charge directed to individual cylinders of an internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakowian Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust gas recirculation systems (EGR, aside to a catalytic converters, are nowadays widely used in piston internal combustion engines to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx in the exhaust gas. They are characterized in that a portion of exhaust gases from the exhaust manifold is recirculated (via a condenser, and directed to a particular valve. The valve, depending on the current engine load and speed, doses the appropriate amount of exhaust gas into the exhaust manifold. Moreover, its location has a significant impact on the diverse formation of nitrogen oxides and fumes smokiness from the individual cylinders of the engine, which is a result of uneven propagation of exhaust gas into the channels of the intake manifold. This article contains the results of numerical characterized charges formed in symmetrical intake manifold with a centrally–placed EGR valve. Simulations were performed for the original intake system derived from the two-liter, turbocharged VW diesel engine.

  6. Influence of the single EGR valve usability on development of the charge directed to individual cylinders of an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowian, Konrad; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Górniak, Aleksander; Wróbel, Radosław

    2017-11-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation systems (EGR), aside to a catalytic converters, are nowadays widely used in piston internal combustion engines to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the exhaust gas. They are characterized in that a portion of exhaust gases from the exhaust manifold is recirculated (via a condenser), and directed to a particular valve. The valve, depending on the current engine load and speed, doses the appropriate amount of exhaust gas into the exhaust manifold. Moreover, its location has a significant impact on the diverse formation of nitrogen oxides and fumes smokiness from the individual cylinders of the engine, which is a result of uneven propagation of exhaust gas into the channels of the intake manifold. This article contains the results of numerical characterized charges formed in symmetrical intake manifold with a centrally-placed EGR valve. Simulations were performed for the original intake system derived from the two-liter, turbocharged VW diesel engine.

  7. Charge density analysis of SiO sub 2 under pressures over 50 GPa using a new diamond anvil cell for single-crystal structure analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, T; Komatsu, Y; Sumiya, H

    2002-01-01

    Single-crystal structure analysis of SiO sub 2 stishovite, (rutile type, P4 sub 2 /mnm z = 2) was carried out using the newly devised diamond anvil cell. The electron-density distribution was investigated at high pressures up to 50 GPa using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 and a laboratory x-ray source generator of Ag K alpha rotating anode generator. Using large diamond crystal windows instead of beryllium for the cell has several advantages for single-crystal diffraction study supplying the large Q-value.

  8. Charge-and-energy conserving moment-based accelerator for a multi-species Vlasov–Fokker–Planck–Ampère system, part II: Collisional aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taitano, William T., E-mail: taitano@lanl.gov; Knoll, Dana A.; Chacón, Luis

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we extend the moment-based acceleration algorithm for the charge, momentum, and energy conserving Vlasov–Ampère discretization developed in Ref. [1] by including a reduced Fokker–Planck operator. We propose an energy conserving discretization for the Fokker–Planck collision operator. We show by numerical experiment that the new algorithm 1) efficiently converges the nonlinearly coupled Vlasov–Fokker–Planck–Ampère system, and 2) accurately steps over stiff time-scales such as the inverse electron plasma frequency, and the electron–electron collision time-scale. We demonstrate that discrete energy conservation is critical to eliminate numerical heating issues when strong density gradients exist.

  9. Extension of a Kinetic Approach to Chemical Reactions to Electronic Energy Levels and Reactions Involving Charged Species with Application to DSMC Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties are extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. These extensions are shown to agree favorably with reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near-equilibrium conditions. Also, the extensions are applied to the second flight of the Project FIRE flight experiment at 1634 seconds with a Knudsen number of 0.001 at an altitude of 76.4 km. In order to accomplish this, NASA's direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC was rewritten to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced chemistry model, and to include the extensions presented in this work. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include a CFD solution. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid because, although near-transitional, the flow is still considered to be continuum. It is shown that the inclusion of electronic energy levels in the DSMC simulation is necessary for flows of this nature and is required for comparison to the CFD solution. The flow field solutions are also post-processed by the nonequilibrium radiation code HARA to compute the radiative portion.

  10. Who's in charge here anyway? Polycentric governance configurations and the development of policy on invasive alien species in the semisovereign Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaas, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412502976; Driessen, P.P.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069081417; Giezen, Mendel; van Laerhoven, F.S.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406832; Wassen, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07165710X

    2017-01-01

    We address the development of policy by polycentric governance configurations, taking Caribbean overseas territories and their advancements on invasive alien species (IAS) policy as an example. The British, Dutch, and French islands in the Caribbean address this matter to different degrees, which we

  11. Organometallic synthesis, reactivity and catalysis in the solid state using well-defined single-site species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sebastian D.; Weller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Acting as a bridge between the heterogeneous and homogeneous realms, the use of discrete, well-defined, solid-state organometallic complexes for synthesis and catalysis is a remarkably undeveloped field. Here, we present a review of this topic, focusing on describing the key transformations that can be observed at a transition-metal centre, as well as the use of well-defined organometallic complexes in the solid state as catalysts. There is a particular focus upon gas–solid reactivity/catalysis and single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations. PMID:25666064

  12. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wenander, F J C

    2013-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the physics processes involved in the production of highly charged ions will be introduced, and the injection and extraction beam parameters of the charge breeder defined. A description of the three main charge-breeding methods is given, namely: electron stripping in gas jet or foil; external ion injection into an electron-beam ion source/trap (EBIS/T); and external ion injection into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In addition, some preparatory devices for charge breeding and practical beam delivery aspects ...

  13. Single season effects of mixed-species cover crops on tomato health (cultivar Celebrity) in multi-state field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crop use can help mitigate the deleterious effects of common cropping practices (e.g., tillage) and is, therefore, an important component of soil health maintenance. While known to be beneficial in the long term, the short-term effects of cover crops, specifically mixed-species cover crops in ...

  14. The diploid origins of allopolyploid rose species studied using single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes flanking a microsatellite repeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Che, D.; Fougère-Danezan, M.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The taxonomy of the genus Rosa is complex, not least because of hybridisations between species.We aimed to develop a method to connect the diploid Rosa taxa to the allopolyploid taxa to which they contributed, based on the sharing of haplotypes. For this we used an SNPSTR marker, which combines a

  15. Phylogenomics of palearctic Formica species suggests a single origin of temporary parasitism and gives insights to the evolutionary pathway toward slave-making behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Rolland, Jonathan; Morandin, Claire; Keller, Laurent

    2018-03-28

    The ants of the Formica genus are classical model species in evolutionary biology. In particular, Darwin used Formica as model species to better understand the evolution of slave-making, a parasitic behaviour where workers of another species are stolen to exploit their workforce. In his book "On the Origin of Species" (1859), Darwin first hypothesized that slave-making behaviour in Formica evolved in incremental steps from a free-living ancestor. The absence of a well-resolved phylogenetic tree of the genus prevent an assessment of whether relationships among Formica subgenera are compatible with this scenario. In this study, we resolve the relationships among the 4 palearctic Formica subgenera (Formica str. s., Coptoformica, Raptiformica and Serviformica) using a phylogenomic dataset of 945 genes for 16 species. We provide a reference tree resolving the relationships among the main Formica subgenera with high bootstrap supports. The branching order of our tree suggests that the free-living lifestyle is ancestral in the Formica genus and that parasitic colony founding could have evolved a single time, probably acting as a pre-adaptation to slave-making behaviour. This phylogenetic tree provides a solid backbone for future evolutionary studies in the Formica genus and slave-making behaviour.

  16. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  17. Stand dynamics following gap-scale exogenous disturbance in a single cohort mixed species stand in Morgan County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian S. Hughett; Wayne K. Clatterbuck

    2014-01-01

    Differences in composition, structure, and growth under canopy gaps created by the mortality of a single stem were analyzed using analysis of variance under two scenarios, with stem removed or with stem left as a standing snag. There were no significant differences in composition and structure of large diameter residual stems within upper canopy strata. Some...

  18. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  19. Assessing environmental attributes and effects of climate change on Sphagnum peatland distributions in North America using single- and multi-species models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Tobi A; Hager, Heather A

    2017-01-01

    The fate of Northern peatlands under climate change is important because of their contribution to global carbon (C) storage. Peatlands are maintained via greater plant productivity (especially of Sphagnum species) than decomposition, and the processes involved are strongly mediated by climate. Although some studies predict that warming will relax constraints on decomposition, leading to decreased C sequestration, others predict increases in productivity and thus increases in C sequestration. We explored the lack of congruence between these predictions using single-species and integrated species distribution models as proxies for understanding the environmental correlates of North American Sphagnum peatland occurrence and how projected changes to the environment might influence these peatlands under climate change. Using Maximum entropy and BIOMOD modelling platforms, we generated single and integrated species distribution models for four common Sphagnum species in North America under current climate and a 2050 climate scenario projected by three general circulation models. We evaluated the environmental correlates of the models and explored the disparities in niche breadth, niche overlap, and climate suitability among current and future models. The models consistently show that Sphagnum peatland distribution is influenced by the balance between soil moisture deficit and temperature of the driest quarter-year. The models identify the east and west coasts of North America as the core climate space for Sphagnum peatland distribution. The models show that, at least in the immediate future, the area of suitable climate for Sphagnum peatland could expand. This result suggests that projected warming would be balanced effectively by the anticipated increase in precipitation, which would increase Sphagnum productivity.

  20. Luminescence and charge trapping in Cs.sub.2./sub.HfCl.sub.6./sub. single crystals: optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Robert; Babin, Vladimir; Mihóková, Eva; Buryi, Maksym; Laguta, Valentyn; Nitsch, Karel; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 22 (2017), s. 12375-12382 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA17-09933S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cs2HfCl6 * single crystal * luminescence * temperature dependence * EPR spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  1. Multi-rate Poisson tree processes for single-locus species delimitation under maximum likelihood and Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapli, P; Lutteropp, S; Zhang, J; Kobert, K; Pavlidis, P; Stamatakis, A; Flouri, T

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, molecular species delimitation has become a routine approach for quantifying and classifying biodiversity. Barcoding methods are of particular importance in large-scale surveys as they promote fast species discovery and biodiversity estimates. Among those, distance-based methods are the most common choice as they scale well with large datasets; however, they are sensitive to similarity threshold parameters and they ignore evolutionary relationships. The recently introduced "Poisson Tree Processes" (PTP) method is a phylogeny-aware approach that does not rely on such thresholds. Yet, two weaknesses of PTP impact its accuracy and practicality when applied to large datasets; it does not account for divergent intraspecific variation and is slow for a large number of sequences. We introduce the multi-rate PTP (mPTP), an improved method that alleviates the theoretical and technical shortcomings of PTP. It incorporates different levels of intraspecific genetic diversity deriving from differences in either the evolutionary history or sampling of each species. Results on empirical data suggest that mPTP is superior to PTP and popular distance-based methods as it, consistently yields more accurate delimitations with respect to the taxonomy (i.e., identifies more taxonomic species, infers species numbers closer to the taxonomy). Moreover, mPTP does not require any similarity threshold as input. The novel dynamic programming algorithm attains a speedup of at least five orders of magnitude compared to PTP, allowing it to delimit species in large (meta-) barcoding data. In addition, Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling provides a comprehensive evaluation of the inferred delimitation in just a few seconds for millions of steps, independently of tree size. mPTP is implemented in C and is available for download at http://github.com/Pas-Kapli/mptp under the GNU Affero 3 license. A web-service is available at http://mptp.h-its.org . : paschalia.kapli@h-its.org or

  2. Measurement of the single top quark production cross section and |Vtb| in events with one charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and jets at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-12-31

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV using a data set corresponding to 7.5  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process t→Wb→ℓνb by requiring the presence of an electron or muon, a large imbalance of transverse momentum indicating the presence of a neutrino, and two or three jets including at least one originating from a bottom quark. An artificial neural network is used to discriminate the signal from backgrounds. We measure a single top quark production cross section of 3.04(-0.53)(+0.57)  pb and set a lower limit on the magnitude of the coupling between the top quark and bottom quark |Vtb|>0.78 at the 95% credibility level.

  3. The role of radiative de-excitation in the neutralization process of highly charged ions interacting with a single layer of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwestka, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Gruber, E.; Heller, R.; Kozubek, R.; Schleberger, M.; Facsko, S.; Aumayr, F.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray emission of slow (graphene. To discriminate against X-ray emission originating from the graphene's support grid a coincidence technique is used. X-ray emission of 75 keV Ar17+ and Ar18+ ions with either one or two K-shell vacancies is recorded. Using a windowless Bruker XFlash detector allows us to measure additionally Ar KLL and KLM Auger electrons and determine the branching ratio of radiative vs. non-radiative decay of Ar K-shell holes. Furthermore, X-ray spectra for 100 keV Xe22+-Xe35+ ions are compared, showing a broad M-line peak for all cases, where M-shell vacancies are present. All these peaks are accompanied by emission lines at still higher energies indicating the presence of a hollow atom during X-ray decay. We report a linear shift of the main M-line peak to higher energies for increasing incident charge state, i.e. increasing number of M-shell holes.

  4. Increasing single and multi-antibiotic resistance in Shigella species isolated from shigellosis patients in Sana'a, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Harmal, Nabil S; Al-Harasy, Abdulilah H; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A

    2006-08-01

    The epidemiology and antibiotic susceptibility of Shigella species changes over time. Updated susceptibility knowledge is necessary for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. Thus, this research aimed to study these changes in 2 time periods with an interval of 10 years. Two hundreds and three Shigella strains, isolated from stool samples of diarrheic patients at the Central Health Laboratory in Sana'a, Yemen in 2 time periods (1993 and 2003) with a 10-year interval, were examined for serotyping and drug resistance pattern. Resistance patterns of the strains to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents and minimum inhibitory concentrations of the antibiotics were tested. Shigella flexneri (60%) was found to be the most common isolate of the total Shigella species, followed by Shigella dysenteriae (28.6%) and Shigella boydii (11.3%). In Shigella flexneri strains, Shigella flexneri 3 (30.5%) was the most prevalent serotype, followed by Shigella flexneri 6 (17.2%), and Shigella flexneri 1 (12.3%). All strains were found equally susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin, but more than 80% of the strains of 2003 were resistant to tetracycline, co-trimoxazole, and 52% of the same strains were resistant to ampicillin. Resistance to chloramphenicol was found in 61%, cefuroxime in 56.2%, and cephradine, 52% of the strains. Overall, Shigella species showed statistically significant increase in resistance against tetracycline, cephradine, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, and aztreonam (pYemen. Almost 55.2% of the strains were resistant to 4 drugs. This is one of the first studies reporting epidemiological pattern of Shigella species in Sana'a, Yemen with regard to serotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns. Based on these antibiotic resistance pattern findings, it is suggested that the commonly in use antibiotics including ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol should not be used for empirical

  5. Epidemiology, risk factor, species distribution, antifungal resistance and outcome of Candidemia at a single French hospital: a 7-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadec, Laurent; Talarmin, Jean-Philippe; Gastinne, Thomas; Bretonnière, Cédric; Miegeville, Michel; Le Pape, Patrice; Morio, Florent

    2016-05-01

    Candidemia remains a major cause of disease worldwide and is associated with a high mortality rate. We conducted a retrospective study of candidemia at Nantes Hospital, France, between 2004 and 2010. A total of 191 episodes (n = 188 patients) were reviewed. Incidence, demographics, risk factors, antifungal management, species identification, in vitro susceptibility and 12 weeks survival were analysed. Global incidence of candidemia was 0.37‰ admissions. Higher incidences were observed in haematology (6.65‰) and intensive care units (2‰). Central venous catheter and antibiotic exposure were the most frequent risk factors (77% and 76% respectively). Candida albicans was the predominant species (51.8%) followed by C. parapsilosis (14.5%), C. glabrata (9.8%), C. tropicalis (9.8%) and C. krusei (4.1%). However, species distribution differed significantly between medical units with frequency of C. tropicalis being higher in haematology compared to other medical units. Fluconazole and caspofungin were the main antifungals given as first-line therapy. Although not significant, 12 weeks mortality rate was 30.9%, being higher for C. tropicalis (44.4%) than for C. parapsilosis (16%). Acquired azole or echinocandin resistance was noted in some isolates, underlining the need for systematic antifungal susceptibility testing in patients with candidemia. These epidemiological findings will be of interest for antifungal stewardship at our hospital. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    13/2011 22.00 Keren K. Griffiths, Jingqiao Zhang, Ann E. Cowan, Ji Yu, Peter Setlow. Germination proteins in the inner membrane of dormant Bacillus...that this technique can be used to rapidly identify single airborne particles or bacteria collected on a slide and to monitor germination dynamics of...the environment of dipicolinic acid in the core of superdormant spores is different from that in dormant spores [J. Bacteriol., 191, 5584 (2009

  7. Influence of the Resonant Electronic Transition on the Intensity of the Raman Radial Breathing Mode of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes during Electrochemical Charging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 37 (2009), s. 16408-16413 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : single-walled carbon nanotubes * radial breathing mode * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.224, year: 2009

  8. Azimuthal transverse single-spin asymmetries of inclusive jets and charged pions within jets from polarized-proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adams, J. R.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Deppner, I. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Herrmann, N.; Hirsch, A.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Mayes, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nemes, D. B.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stewart, D. J.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, G.; Xie, W.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, J.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    We report the first measurements of transverse single-spin asymmetries for inclusive jet and jet+π± production at midrapidity from transversely polarized proton-proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV . The data were collected in 2011 with the STAR detector sampled from 23 pb-1 integrated luminosity with an average beam polarization of 53%. Asymmetries are reported for jets with transverse momenta 6 single-spin asymmetry, sensitive to twist-3 initial-state quark-gluon correlators; the Collins asymmetry, sensitive to quark transversity coupled to the polarized Collins fragmentation function; and the first measurement of the "Collins-like" asymmetry, sensitive to linearly polarized gluons. Within the present statistical precision, inclusive-jet and Collins-like asymmetries are small, with the latter allowing the first experimental constraints on gluon linear polarization in a polarized proton. At higher values of jet transverse momenta, we observe the first nonzero Collins asymmetries in polarized-proton collisions, with a statistical significance of greater than 5 σ . The results span a range of x similar to results from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering but at much higher Q2. The Collins results enable tests of universality and factorization breaking in the transverse momentum-dependent formulation of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  9. Chronic Toxicity of Ferric Iron for North American Aquatic Organisms: Derivation of a Chronic Water Quality Criterion Using Single Species and Mesocosm Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmus, Pete; Brinkman, Stephen F; May, Melynda K

    2018-01-22

    Iron is a common pollutant in waters near coal and hard rock mine disturbances. The current 1000 µg/L total recoverable chronic criterion for iron (Fe) for protection of aquatic life in the United States was developed using very limited data in 1976 and has not been revised since. To develop a more scientifically based criterion, several chronic laboratory toxicity experiments (> 30 days) were conducted with ferric Fe at circumneutral pH on a taxonomically diverse group of organisms including brown trout (Salmo trutta), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), boreal toad tadpoles (Bufo boreas), the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus, the mayfly Hexagenia limbata, and the planarian Dugesia dorotocephala. Results of these tests and those of previously published toxicity data were used to derive a Final Chronic Value (FCV) of 499 µg/L by using the US Environmental Protection Agency's recommended methods based on single species toxicity tests. In addition to single species toxicity tests, ferric Fe toxicity experiments (10 days) were performed on mesocosms containing naturally colonized communities of benthic macroinvertebrates. Fourteen genera in the mesocosms occurred at sufficient densities to estimate an iron concentration resulting in 20% reduction in abundance (EC 20 ). Three of these taxa had EC 20 s less than the FCV of 499 µg/L derived from single species tests: the mayfly Epeorus sp. (335 µg/L), the caddisfly Micrasema sp. (356 µg/L), and midge Tanytarsini (234 µg/L). When mesocosm results were included, the FCV was lowered to 251 µg/L. These findings support the suggestion that modernization of water quality criteria should include data generated from mesocosm experiments and other lines of evidence.

  10. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single-copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood and species tree inference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Nakamura, Kyoko; Stevenson, Dennis W; Lewis, Carl E; Namoff, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    Despite a recent new classification, a stable phylogeny for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study, five single-copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) are applied to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. The specific aim is to evaluate several gene tree-species tree reconciliation approaches for developing an accurate phylogeny of the order, to contrast them with concatenated parsimony analysis and to resolve the erstwhile problematic phylogenetic position of these three genera. DNA sequences of five SCNGs were obtained for 20 cycad species representing all ten genera of Cycadales. These were analysed with parsimony, maximum likelihood (ML) and three Bayesian methods of gene tree-species tree reconciliation, using Cycas as the outgroup. A calibrated date estimation was developed with Bayesian methods, and biogeographic analysis was also conducted. Concatenated parsimony, ML and three species tree inference methods resolve exactly the same tree topology with high support at most nodes. Dioon and Bowenia are the first and second branches of Cycadales after Cycas, respectively, followed by an encephalartoid clade (Macrozamia-Lepidozamia-Encephalartos), which is sister to a zamioid clade, of which Ceratozamia is the first branch, and in which Stangeria is sister to Microcycas and Zamia. A single, well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis of the generic relationships of the Cycadales is presented. However, massive extinction events inferred from the fossil record that eliminated broader ancestral distributions within Zamiaceae compromise accurate optimization of ancestral biogeographical areas for that hypothesis. While major lineages of Cycadales are ancient, crown ages of all modern genera are no older than 12 million years, supporting a recent hypothesis of mostly Miocene radiations. This phylogeny can contribute to an accurate infrafamilial classification of Zamiaceae.

  11. The development and validation of a single SNaPshot multiplex for tiger species and subspecies identification--implications for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Tobe, Shanan S; Kitchener, Andrew C; Gill, Peter; Linacre, Adrian

    2012-03-01

    The tiger (Panthera tigris) is currently listed on Appendix I of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora; this affords it the highest level of international protection. To aid in the investigation of alleged illegal trade in tiger body parts and derivatives, molecular approaches have been developed to identify biological material as being of tiger in origin. Some countries also require knowledge of the exact tiger subspecies present in order to prosecute anyone alleged to be trading in tiger products. In this study we aimed to develop and validate a reliable single assay to identify tiger species and subspecies simultaneously; this test is based on identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the tiger mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial DNA sequence from four of the five extant putative tiger subspecies that currently exist in the wild were obtained and combined with DNA sequence data from 492 tiger and 349 other mammalian species available on GenBank. From the sequence data a total of 11 SNP loci were identified as suitable for further analyses. Five SNPs were species-specific for tiger and six amplify one of the tiger subspecies-specific SNPs, three of which were specific to P. t. sumatrae and the other three were specific to P. t. tigris. The multiplex assay was able to reliably identify 15 voucher tiger samples. The sensitivity of the test was 15,000 mitochondrial DNA copies (approximately 0.26 pg), indicating that it will work on trace amounts of tissue, bone or hair samples. This simple test will add to the DNA-based methods currently being used to identify the presence of tiger within mixed samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  13. Individual activity coefficients of single ionic species of alkaline earth halogenides, alkaline earth perchlorates, and uranyl perchlorate at 25 0C in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferse, A.

    1981-01-01

    The individual activity coefficients of the single ionic species of alkaline-earth haloides, alkaline earth perchlorates and uranylic perchlorate, resp., at 25 0 C in aqueous solution are calculated and presented up to the concentration of about m = 4 mol/kg. The individual activity coefficients of the alkaline-earth ions pass mostly as a function of the concentration through a steep minimum and decrease from Mg 2+ to Ba 2+ . The individual activity coefficients of the anions pass generally as a function of the concentration through a marked flat minimum, but they increase - the complex perchlorate ions excepted - only a little above 1. (author)

  14. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276). © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  15. Melon Transcriptome Characterization: Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery for High Throughput Genotyping across the Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Blanca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Melon ( L. ranks among the highest-valued fruit crops worldwide. Some genomic tools are available for this crop, including a Sanger transcriptome. We report the generation of 689,054 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs from two 454 sequencing runs, using normalized and nonnormalized complementary DNA (cDNA libraries prepared from four genotypes belonging to the two subspecies and the main commercial types. 454 ESTs were combined with the Sanger available ESTs and de novo assembled into 53,252 unigenes. Over 63% of the unigenes were functionally annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms and 21% had known orthologs of (L. Heynh. Annotation distribution followed similar tendencies than that reported for , suggesting that the dataset represents a fairly complete melon transcriptome. Furthermore, we identified a set of 3298 unigenes with microsatellite motifs and 14,417 sequences with single nucleotide variants of which 11,655 single nucleotide polymorphism met criteria for use with high-throughput genotyping platforms, and 453 could be detected as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS. A set of markers were validated, 90% of them being polymorphic in a number of variable accessions. This transcriptome provides an invaluable new tool for biological research, more so when it includes transcripts not described previously. It is being used for genome annotation and has provided a large collection of markers that will allow speeding up the process of breeding new melon varieties.

  16. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at candidate genes involved in abiotic stress in two Prosopis species of hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Pomponio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Identify and compare SNPs on candidate genes related to abiotic stress in Prosopis chilensis, Prosopis flexuosa and interspecific hybridsArea of the study: Chaco árido, Argentina. Material and Methods: Fragments from 6 candidate genes were sequenced in 60 genotypes. DNA polymorphisms were analyzed.Main Results: The analysis revealed that the hybrids had the highest rate of polymorphism, followed by P. flexuosa and P. chilensis, the values found are comparable to other forest tree species.Research highlights: This approach will help to study genetic diversity variation on natural populations for assessing the effects of environmental changes.Keywords: SNPs; abiotic stress; interspecific variation; molecular markers. 

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations to examine structure, energetics, and evaporation/condensation dynamics in small charged clusters of water or methanol containing a single monatomic ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Christopher D; Cann, Natalie M

    2012-11-01

    We study small clusters of water or methanol containing a single Ca(2+), Na(+), or Cl(-) ion with classical molecular dynamics simulations, using models that incorporate polarizability via the Drude oscillator framework. Evaporation and condensation of solvent from these clusters is examined in two systems, (1) for isolated clusters initially prepared at different temperatures and (2) those with a surrounding inert (Ar) gas of varying temperature. We examine these clusters over a range of sizes, from almost bare ions up to 40 solvent molecules. We report data on the evaporation and condensation of solvent from the clusters and argue that the observed temperature dependence of evaporation in the smallest clusters demonstrates that the presence of heated gas alone cannot, in most cases, solely account for bare ion production in electrospray ionization (ESI), neglecting the key contribution of the electric field. We also present our findings on the structure and energetics of the clusters as a function of size. Our data agree well with the abundant literature on hydrated ion clusters and offer some novel insight into the structure of methanol and ion clusters, especially those with a Cl(-) anion, where we observe the presence of chain-like structures of methanol molecules. Finally, we provide some data on the reparameterizations necessary to simulate ions in methanol using the separately developed Drude oscillator models for methanol and for ions in water.

  18. Inner-shell spectroscopy and exchange interaction of Rydberg electrons bound by singly and doubly charged Kr and Xe atoms in small clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Hatsui, Takaki; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Ruehl, Eckart [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Kosugi, Nobuhiro, E-mail: kosugi@ims.ac.j [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Surface-site resolved Kr 3d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}5p and 3d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p and Xe 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p and 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}7p Rydberg excited states in small van der Waals Kr and Xe clusters with a mean size of = 15 are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, surface-site resolved Kr 4s{sup -2}5p, 4s{sup -2}6p, and 4s{sup -1}4p{sup -1}5p shakeup-like Rydberg states in small Kr clusters are investigated by resonant Auger electron spectroscopy. The exchange interaction of the Rydberg electron with the surrounding atoms and the induced polarization of the surrounding atoms in the singly and doubly ionized atoms are deduced from the experimental spectra to analyze different surface-site contributions in small clusters, assuming that the corner, edge, face, and bulk sites have 3, 5-6, 8, and 12 nearest neighbor atoms. These energies are almost proportional to the number of the nearest neighbor atoms. The present analysis indicates that small Kr and Xe clusters with = 15 have an average or mixture structure between the fcc-like cubic and icosahedron-like spherical structures.

  19. Elucidation of the molecular structure of hydrated vanadium oxide species by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: correlation between the V...V coordination number and distance and the point of zero charge of the support oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daphne E; Koningsberger, Diek C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2006-11-07

    The effect of the point of zero charge (PZC) of the support oxide (Al(2)O(3), Nb(2)O(5), SiO(2) and ZrO(2)) on the molecular structure of hydrated vanadium oxide species has been investigated with EXAFS spectroscopy for low-loaded vanadium oxide catalysts. It was found that the degree of clustering (i.e., the V[dot dot dot]V coordination number) and the V...V distance increase with decreasing PZC of the support oxide; i.e., Al(2)O(3) (8.7) vanadium oxide exhibited a clear alteration in the position of the oxygen atoms surrounding the central vanadium atom and the number of oxygen atoms around vanadium increased to five. In contrast, only minor changes in the molecular structure were detected for the alumina-, niobia- and zirconia-supported vanadium oxide catalysts. Based on a detailed analysis of the EXAFS data a semi-quantitative distribution of vanadium oxide species present on the surface of the different support oxides can be obtained, which is in good agreement with earlier characterization studies primarily making use of Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Using single-species toxicity tests, community-level responses, and toxicity identification evaluations to investigate effluent impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltby, L.; Clayton, S.A.; Yu, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Wood, R.M.; Yin, D.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are increasingly used to monitor compliance of consented discharges, but few studies have related toxicity measured using WET tests to receiving water impacts. Here the authors adopt a four-stage procedure to investigate the toxicity and biological impact of a point source discharge and to identify the major toxicants. In stage 1, standard WET tests were employed to determine the toxicity of the effluent. This was then followed by an assessment of receiving water toxicity using in situ deployment of indigenous (Gammarus pulex) and standard (Daphnia magna) test species. The third stage involved the use of biological survey techniques to assess the impact of the discharge on the structure and functioning of the benthic macroinvertebrate community. In stage 4, toxicity identification evaluations (TIE) were used to identify toxic components in the effluent. Receiving-water toxicity and ecological impact detected downstream of the discharge were consistent with the results of WET tests performed on the effluent. Downstream of the discharge, there was a reduction in D. magna survival, in G. pulex survival and feeding rate, in detritus processing, and in biotic indices based on macroinvertebrate community structure. The TIE studies suggested that chlorine was the principal toxicant in the effluent.

  1. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Artificial marine habitats favour a single fish species on a long-term scale: the dominance of Boops boops around off-shore fish cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Riera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Off-shore fish cages are new artificial habitats that can affect pelagic fish assemblages and constitute an important food source for wild fish assemblages. This aggregation has noticeable ecological consequences in cage areas in impoverished ecosystems such as those in the Canary archipelago (NE Atlantic Ocean. However, this new habitat could be dominated by a single species, reducing its positive ecological effects. Wild fish assemblages associated with an off-shore fish lease on the northeastern coast of Tenerife (Canary Islands were sampled for six years. Fish assemblage structure beneath fish cages and at controls ( > 500 m from cages differed significantly between locations, with 13 times greater abundance at cage locations. These differences were mainly explained by the dominance of bogue (Boops boops around fish cages. This trend was consistent in the long-term throughout the study period (2004-2009, affecting local fisheries. The presence of fish cages significantly altered wild fish assemblages in the study area, enhancing mainly biomass and abundance of one species, bogue, and causing shifts in species composition.

  3. Synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies and carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activity of carbon-modified TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaodong, E-mail: donguser@henu.edu.cn; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiaogang; Xing, Xing; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} (CT) nanoparticles were prepared via a two-step method of heat treatment without the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) polymer. As-prepared CT nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis/DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermal analysis (TA), electron spin resonance (ESR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The visible light photocatalytic activities were evaluated on the basis of the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies (SETOVs) and the carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activities of the CT nanoparticles were discussed. It was found that the crystalline phase, the morphology, and particle size of the CT nanoparticles depended on the second heat-treatment temperature instead of the first heat-treatment temperature. The visible light photocatalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of SETOVs and the carbon species, and also depended on the specific surface area of the photocatalysts. - Highlights: • Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} particles have been prepared without RF polymer. • The visible light photocatalytic activities of the particles have been evaluated. • The band gap energy structure of the carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} has been proposed. • Synergistic effect of SETOVs and carbon species has been discussed. • The activities also depend on the specific surface area of the catalysts.

  4. Environmental charges in airline markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Fredrik [Goeteborg Univ., Dept. of Economics, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Over the last two decades many airline markets have been deregulated, resulting in increased competition and use of different types of networks. At the same time there has been an intense discussion on environmental taxation of airline traffic. It is likely that an optimal environmental charge and the effects of a charge differ between different types of aviation markets. In this paper, we derive optimal flight (environmental) charges for different types of airline markets. The first type of market is a multiproduct monopoly airline operating either a point-to-point network or a hub-and-spoke network. The optimal charge is shown to be similar in construction to an optimal charge for a monopolist. We also compare the environmental impact of the two types of networks. Given no differences in marginal damages between airports we find that an airline will always choose the network with the highest environmental damages. The second type of market we investigate is a multiproduct duopoly, where two airlines compete in both passengers and flights. The formulation of the optimal charge is similar to the optimal charge of a single product oligopoly. However, we also show that it is, because of strategic effects, difficult to determine the effects of the charge on the number of flights. (Author)

  5. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  6. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, M.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Hoarau, J.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B.

    2006-01-01

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO 2 controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica capillary

  7. The Pan-AC assay: a single-reaction real-time PCR test for quantitative detection of a broad range of Aspergillus and Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basková, Lenka; Landlinger, Christine; Preuner, Sandra; Lion, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    In view of the growing incidence and the high mortality of invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis, adequate diagnostic techniques permitting timely onset of treatment are of paramount importance. More than 90 % of all invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised individuals can be attributed to Candida and Aspergillus species. To date, standardized techniques permitting rapid, sensitive and, no less importantly, economic screening for the clinically most relevant fungi are lacking. In the present report, a real-time quantitative PCR assay, developed for the detection of the most common pathogenic Candida and Aspergillus species, is described. The single-reaction PCR assay targets a judiciously selected region of the 28S subunit of the fungal rDNA gene. The unique design of the universal primer/probe system, including a pan-Aspergillus and pan-Candida (Pan-AC) hydrolysis probe, facilitates the detection of numerous Aspergillus species (e.g. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus versicolor and Aspergillus nidulans) and Candida species (e.g. Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida kefyr, Candida guilliermondii, Candida lusitaniae and Candida dubliniensis). The assay permits highly reproducible detection of 10 fg fungal DNA, which corresponds to a fraction of a fungal genome, and facilitates accurate quantification of fungal load across a range of at least five logs. Upon standardization of the technique using cultured fungal strains, the applicability in the clinical setting was assessed by investigating a series of clinical specimens from patients with documented fungal infections (n=17). The Pan-AC assay provides an attractive and economic approach to the screening and monitoring of invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis, which is readily applicable to routine clinical diagnosis.

  8. Computational approach to predict species-specific type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors using single and multiple genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Christopher K; Porter, Vanessa L; Stow, Maxwell L S; Siame, Bupe A; Tsang, Herbert H; Leung, Ka Yin

    2016-12-19

    Many gram-negative bacteria use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effector proteins into host cells. T3SS effectors can give some bacteria a competitive edge over others within the same environment and can help bacteria to invade the host cells and allow them to multiply rapidly within the host. Therefore, developing efficient methods to identify effectors scattered in bacterial genomes can lead to a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions and ultimately to important medical and biotechnological applications. We used 21 genomic and proteomic attributes to create a precise and reliable T3SS effector prediction method called Genome Search for Effectors Tool (GenSET). Five machine learning algorithms were trained on effectors selected from different organisms and a trained (voting) algorithm was then applied to identify other effectors present in the genome testing sets from the same (GenSET Phase 1) or different (GenSET Phase 2) organism. Although a select group of attributes that included the codon adaptation index, probability of expression in inclusion bodies, N-terminal disorder, and G + C content (filtered) were better at discriminating between positive and negative sets, algorithm performance was better when all 21 attributes (unfiltered) were used. Performance scores (sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve) from GenSET Phase 1 were better than those reported for six published methods. More importantly, GenSET Phase 1 ranked more known effectors (70.3%) in the top 40 ranked proteins and predicted 10-80% more effectors than three available programs in three of the four organisms tested. GenSET Phase 2 predicted 43.8% effectors in the top 40 ranked proteins when tested on four related or unrelated organisms. The lower prediction rates from GenSET Phase 2 may be due to the presence of different translocation signals in effectors from different T3SS families. The species-specific GenSET Phase 1 method offers an alternative

  9. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  10. Using the gravitational energy of water to generate power by separation of charge at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajuan; Huang, Xu; Soh, Siowling

    2015-06-01

    When a fluid comes into contact with a solid surface, charge separates at the interface. This study describes a method that harvests the gravitational energy of water-available in abundance naturally, such as in rain and rivers-through the separation of charge at the interface. Essentially, it is found that water can be charged by flowing it across a solid surface under its own weight; thus, a continuous flow of water can produce a constant supply of power. After optimizing the system, a power of up to ∼170 μW (per Teflon tube of 2 mm in diameter) can be generated. The efficiency, defined as the energy generated by the system over the gravitational energy that the water losses, can reach up to ∼3-4%. In order to generate a continuous stream of positively-charged water, there should also be a constant production of negatively-charged species in the system. Experimental results suggest that the negative charge transfers constantly to the atmosphere due to dielectric breakdown of air. With regards to applications related to high electrical potential of water droplets, the amount of charge generated in a single water droplet is found to be equivalent to that produced by charging the water droplet with a high-voltage power supply operated at ∼5 kV. In general, the energy generated is clean, renewable, and technically simple and inexpensive to produce.

  11. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  12. Genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes and C(60) fullerenes in the FE1-Mutatrade markMouse lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Pojana, Giulio; White, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Viability, cell cycle effects, genotoxicity, reactive oxygen species production, and mutagenicity of C(60) fullerenes (C(60)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were assessed in the FE1-Mutatrade markMouse lung epithelial cell line. None of these particles induced cell death within 24 hr...... at doses between 0 and 200 microg/ml or during long-term subculture exposure (576 hr) at 100 microg/ml, as determined by two different assays. However, cell proliferation was slower with SWCNT exposure and a larger fraction of the cells were in the G1 phase. Exposure to carbon black resulted...... by the comet assay. The mutant frequency in the cII gene was unaffected by 576 hr of exposure to either 100 microg/ml C(60) or SWCNT when compared with control incubations, whereas we have previously reported that carbon black and diesel exhaust particles induce mutations using an identical exposure scenario...

  13. Silviculture characterization of single-species stands of black pine in Catalonia (Spain); Caracterizacion selvicola de las masas monoespecificas de pino laricio en Cataluna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunos, A.; Riba, A.; Blanco, R.

    2009-07-01

    This study presents a silvogenetic typology of single-species stands of Pinus nigra in Catalonia (NE of Spain) based on the information supplied by the Second National Forest Inventory. Results of factor analysis applied to dendrometric variables show nine different stand types, identified mainly from variables related to diameter distribution and stand stocking. The character of uneven-aged stands, present in five of the groups though with different features, was analyzed using a truncated Weibull distribution. The typology, which is managed by computing regeneration levels and diametric classes, encompasses different developmental stages and allows the diagnosis of compromised situations in terms of stand persistence caused by low or high stocking. (Author) 24 refs.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of two single-copy nuclear genes revealed origin and complex relationships of polyploid species of Hordeum in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qianni; Sun, Genlou

    2017-06-01

    Two single-copy nuclear genes, the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2) and thioredoxin-like gene (HTL), were used to explore the phylogeny and origin of polyploid species in Hordeum. Our results were partly in accord with previous studies, but disclosed additional complexity. Both RPB2 and HTL trees confirmed the presence of Xa genome in H. capense and H. secalinum, and that H. depressum originated from H. californicum together with other American diploids, either H. intercedens or H. pusillum. American diploids solely contributed to the origin of H. depressum. The Asian diploids, either H. bogdanii or H. brevisubulatum, contributed to the formation of American polyploids except H. depressum. RPB2 and HTL sequences showed that H. roshevitzii did not contribute to the origin of American tetraploids. Our data showed a close relationship between the hexaploids H. procerum and H. parodii and the tetraploids H. brachyantherum, H. fuegianum, H. guatemalense, H. jubatum, and H. tetraploidum. The involvement of the diploid H. pusillum and the tetraploid H. jubatum in the formation of H. arizonicum was also indicated in the HTL phylogeny. Our results suggested a possible gene introgression of W- and P-genome species into the tetraploid H. jubatum and the hexaploid H. procerum.

  15. Searching for new strategies against biofilm infections: Colistin-AMP combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus single- and double-species biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jorge

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial research is being pressured to look for more effective therapeutics for the ever-growing antibiotic-resistant infections, and antimicrobial peptides (AMP and antimicrobial combinations are promising solutions. This work evaluates colistin-AMP combinations against two major pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, encompassing non- and resistant strains. Colistin (CST combined with the AMP temporin A (TEMP-A, citropin 1.1 (CIT-1.1 and tachyplesin I linear analogue (TP-I-L was tested against planktonic, single- and double-species biofilm cultures. Overall synergy for planktonic P. aeruginosa and synergy/additiveness for planktonic S. aureus were observed. Biofilm growth prevention was achieved with synergy and additiveness. Pre-established 24 h-old biofilms were harder to eradicate, especially for S. aureus and double-species biofilms; still, some synergy and addictiveness was observed for higher concentrations, including for the biofilms of resistant strains. Different treatment times and growth media did not greatly influence AMP activity. CST revealed low toxicity compared with the other AMP but its combinations were toxic for high concentrations. Overall, combinations reduced effective AMP concentrations, mainly in prevention scenarios. Improvement of effectiveness and toxicity of therapeutic strategies will be further investigated.

  16. Study of CP -violating charge asymmetries of single muons and like-sign dimuons in pp¯ collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-01-01

    We measure the inclusive single muon charge asymmetry and the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using the full data set of 10.4 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The standard model predictions of the charge asymmetries induced by CP violation are small in magnitude compared to the current experimental precision, so non-zero measurements could indicate new sources of CP violation. The measurements differ from the standard model predictions of CP violation in these asymmetries with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations. These results are interpreted in a framework of $B$ meson mixing within the CKM formalism to measure the relative width difference $\\dgg$ between the mass eigenstates of the $\\Bd$ meson system, and the semileptonic charge asymmetries $\\asld$ and $\\asls$ of $\\Bd$ and $\\Bs$ mesons respectively.

  17. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  18. Macrocluster desorption effect caused by single MCI: charges of gold clusters (2-20 nm) desorbed due to electronic processes induced by fission fragment bombardment in nanodispersed gold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, I.; Jarmiychuk, S.; Kirillov, S.; Novikov, A.; Obnorskii, V.; Pchelintsev, A.; Wien, K.; Reimann, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the charge state of the negatively charged gold nanocluster ions (2-20 nm) that were desorbed from nanodispersed gold islet targets by 252 Cf fission fragments via electronic processes is studied. Mean cluster charge was calculated as a ratio of mean cluster mass to mean mass-to-charge ratio . Cluster masses were measured by means of a collector technique employing transmission electron microscopy and scanning force microscopy, while m/q was measured by means of a tandem TOF-spectrometer. It is shown that the nanocluster ions are mostly multiply charged (2-16e) and the charge increases non-linearly with the cluster size. The results are discussed

  19. Measuring titratable alkalinity by single versus double endpoint titration: An evaluation in two cyprinodont species and implications for characterizing net H+ flux in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Kevin V; Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2013-01-01

    effectively zero in both species at pH 4.5. However, significant differences between the double endpoint (no net H(+) transport at low pH) and single endpoint titrations (net H(+) uptake at low pH) remain to be explained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. First principle study of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals are studied. The calculations are based on the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), in addition the Engel–Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The DFT calculations show that these compounds have metallic origin. The contribution of different bands was analyzed from total and partial density of states curves. The values of the density of states at Fermi energy (N(E{sub F})) for ThCu{sub 5}In (ThCu{sub 5}Sn) is 1.75 (1.63) states/eV unit cell. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be equal to 0.30 and 0.28 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn, respectively. The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. - Highlights: • The DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn compounds. • This study shows that the nature of the two compounds is metallic. • Crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction.

  1. Enabling fast charging - Vehicle considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintz, Andrew; Zhang, Jiucai; Vijayagopal, Ram; Kreutzer, Cory; Ahmed, Shabbir; Bloom, Ira; Burnham, Andrew; Carlson, Richard B.; Dias, Fernando; Dufek, Eric J.; Francfort, James; Hardy, Keith; Jansen, Andrew N.; Keyser, Matthew; Markel, Anthony; Michelbacher, Christopher; Mohanpurkar, Manish; Pesaran, Ahmad; Scoffield, Don; Shirk, Matthew; Stephens, Thomas; Tanim, Tanvir

    2017-11-01

    To achieve a successful increase in the plug-in battery electric vehicle (BEV) market, it is anticipated that a significant improvement in battery performance is required to increase the range that BEVs can travel and the rate at which they can be recharged. While the range that BEVs can travel on a single recharge is improving, the recharge rate is still much slower than the refueling rate of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. To achieve comparable recharge times, we explore the vehicle considerations of charge rates of at least 400 kW. Faster recharge is expected to significantly mitigate the perceived deficiencies for long-distance transportation, to provide alternative charging in densely populated areas where overnight charging at home may not be possible, and to reduce range anxiety for travel within a city when unplanned charging may be required. This substantial increase in charging rate is expected to create technical issues in the design of the battery system and the vehicle's electrical architecture that must be resolved. This work focuses on vehicle system design and total recharge time to meet the goals of implementing improved charge rates and the impacts of these expected increases on system voltage and vehicle components.

  2. Origin of the H genome in StH-genomic Elymus species based on the single-copy nuclear gene DMC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Genlou; Zhang, Xiaodi

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the H haplome in Elymus could originate from different diploid Hordeum species, however, which diploid species best represent the parental species remains unanswered. The focus of this study seeks to pinpoint the origin of the H genome in Elymus. Allopolyploid Elymus species that contain the StH genome were analyzed together with diploid Hordeum species and a broad sample of diploid genera in the tribe Triticeae using DMC1 sequences. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses well separated the American Hordeum species, except Hordeum brachyantherum subsp. californicum, from the H genome of polyploid Elymus species. The Elymus H-genomic sequences were formed into different groups. Our data suggested that the American Horedeum species, except H. brachyantherum subsp. californicum, are not the H-genomic donor to the Elymus species. Hordeum brevisubulatum subsp. violaceum was the progenitor species to Elymus virescens, Elymus confusus, Elymus lanceolatus, Elymus wawawaiensis, and Elymus caninus. Furthermore, North American H. brachyantherum subsp. californicum was a progenitor of the H genome to Elymus hystrix and Elymus cordilleranus. The H genomes in Elymus canadensis, Elymus sibiricus, and Elymus multisetus were highly differentiated from the H genome in Hordeum and other Elymus species. The H genome in both North American and Eurasian Elymus species was contributed by different Hordeum species.

  3. A study of single nucleotide polymorphism in the ystB gene of Yersinia enterocolitica strains isolated from various wild animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerz-Kisiel, Agata; Szczerba-Turek, Anna; Platt-Samoraj, Aleksandra; Michalczyk, Maria; Szweda, Wojciech

    2017-03-01

    Y. enterocolitica is the causative agent of yersiniosis. The objective of the article was a study of single nucleotide polymorphism in the ystB gene of Y. enterocolitica strains isolated from various wild animal species. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was applied to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ystB gene fragments of 88 Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from wild boar, roe deer, red deer and wild ducks. HRM analysis revealed 14 different melting profiles - 4 of them were defined as regular genotypes (G1, G2, G3, G4), whereas 10 as variations. 24 of the examined Y. enterocolitica strains were classified as G1, 18 strains as a G2, 21 strains as a G3, and 15 strains as a G4. Nucleotide sequences classified as G1 revealed 100% similarity with the Y. enterocolitica D88145.1 sequence (NCBI). Analysis of G2 revealed one point mutation - transition T111A. One mutation was also found in G3, but SNP was placed in a different gene region - transition G193A. Two SNPs - transitions G92C and T111A - were identified in G4. Direct sequencing of 10 variations revealed 5 new variants of the ystB nucleotide sequence: V1 - transition G129A (3 strains); V2 - transitions T111A and G193A (2 strains); V3 - transitions C118T and G193A (1 strain); V4 - transitions C141A and G193A (2 strains); and V5 characterized by 19 SNPs: G83A, T93A, A109G, G114T, C116T, A123G, T134C, T142G, T144C, A150C, G162A, T165G, T170G, T174A, T177G, G178A, A179G, A184G and G193A (2 strains). The predominant genotype in isolates from wild ducks was G1; in red deer G2; in wild boar G3; in roe deer G1 and G4. The proposed HRM method could be used to analyze Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from different sources, including humans.

  4. One single standard substance for the simultaneous determination of 17 triterpenes in Ganoderma lingzhi and its related species using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jingsong; Han, Wei; Liu, Yanfang; Feng, Jie; Tang, Chuanhong; Feng, Na; Tang, Qingjiu

    2017-11-15

    Due to the difficulty and high cost for the preparation of triterpenes, one single standard for the simultaneous determination of multi-components (SSDMC) with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an advanced solution for multi-component analysis. Experiments were carried out to investigate the feasibility of SSDMC for the analysis of Ganoderma triterpenes, with external standard method (ESM) compared, and the samples of Ganoderma were classified by the content of Ganoderma triterpenes. The analysis was performed by using a Fortis Speed Core-C18 column (150mm×4.6mm I.D., 2.6μm) at gradient elution of 0.01% glacial acetic acid-water (V/V) and acetonitrile with diode array detection (252nm), at a flow rate of 1mL/min. The results showed that all calibration curves had good linearity (r 2 >0.9999) within test ranges. The LOD and LOQ were lower than 2.52ng and 6.43ng, respectively. The RSD for intra-day and inter-day of the seventeen analytes were less than 3.12% at three levels, and the recoveries were 91.4-103.0%. The contents of other 16 triterpenes were determined with ganoderic acid A by SSDMC, which showed that there were few differences compared with the results obtained by ESM. Moreover, the classification of 25 different species and strains of Ganoderma by using the content of triterpenes intuitively reflected the distinction among Ganoderma. In summary, the developed method could be readily utilized as a method of quality evaluation for Ganoderma triterpenes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. QualitySNP: a pipeline for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions in EST data from diploid and polyploid species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voorrips Roeland E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution. Computational strategies for SNP discovery make use of the large number of sequences present in public databases (in most cases as expressed sequence tags (ESTs and are considered to be faster and more cost-effective than experimental procedures. A major challenge in computational SNP discovery is distinguishing allelic variation from sequence variation between paralogous sequences, in addition to recognizing sequencing errors. For the majority of the public EST sequences, trace or quality files are lacking which makes detection of reliable SNPs even more difficult because it has to rely on sequence comparisons only. Results We have developed a new algorithm to detect reliable SNPs and insertions/deletions (indels in EST data, both with and without quality files. Implemented in a pipeline called QualitySNP, it uses three filters for the identification of reliable SNPs. Filter 1 screens for all potential SNPs and identifies variation between or within genotypes. Filter 2 is the core filter that uses a haplotype-based strategy to detect reliable SNPs. Clusters with potential paralogs as well as false SNPs caused by sequencing errors are identified. Filter 3 screens SNPs by calculating a confidence score, based upon sequence redundancy and quality. Non-synonymous SNPs are subsequently identified by detecting open reading frames of consensus sequences (contigs with SNPs. The pipeline includes a data storage and retrieval system for haplotypes, SNPs and alignments. QualitySNP's versatility is demonstrated by the identification of SNPs in EST datasets from potato, chicken and humans. Conclusion QualitySNP is an efficient tool for SNP detection, storage and retrieval in diploid as well as polyploid species. It is available for running on Linux or UNIX systems. The program, test data, and user manual are available at

  6. QualitySNP: a pipeline for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions in EST data from diploid and polyploid species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jifeng; Vosman, Ben; Voorrips, Roeland E; van der Linden, C Gerard; Leunissen, Jack AM

    2006-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution. Computational strategies for SNP discovery make use of the large number of sequences present in public databases (in most cases as expressed sequence tags (ESTs)) and are considered to be faster and more cost-effective than experimental procedures. A major challenge in computational SNP discovery is distinguishing allelic variation from sequence variation between paralogous sequences, in addition to recognizing sequencing errors. For the majority of the public EST sequences, trace or quality files are lacking which makes detection of reliable SNPs even more difficult because it has to rely on sequence comparisons only. Results We have developed a new algorithm to detect reliable SNPs and insertions/deletions (indels) in EST data, both with and without quality files. Implemented in a pipeline called QualitySNP, it uses three filters for the identification of reliable SNPs. Filter 1 screens for all potential SNPs and identifies variation between or within genotypes. Filter 2 is the core filter that uses a haplotype-based strategy to detect reliable SNPs. Clusters with potential paralogs as well as false SNPs caused by sequencing errors are identified. Filter 3 screens SNPs by calculating a confidence score, based upon sequence redundancy and quality. Non-synonymous SNPs are subsequently identified by detecting open reading frames of consensus sequences (contigs) with SNPs. The pipeline includes a data storage and retrieval system for haplotypes, SNPs and alignments. QualitySNP's versatility is demonstrated by the identification of SNPs in EST datasets from potato, chicken and humans. Conclusion QualitySNP is an efficient tool for SNP detection, storage and retrieval in diploid as well as polyploid species. It is available for running on Linux or UNIX systems. The program, test data, and user manual are available at and as Additional files

  7. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  8. Improving the discovery potential of charged Higgs bosons at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detection of charged Higgs bosons (H ¦) at Tevatron or the LHC would unequivocally imply the existence of physics beyond the standard model (SM), since spin-less charged scalar states do not belong to its particle spectrum. Singly charged Higgs bosons appear in any two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM), including a ...

  9. Untangling nucleotide diversity and evolution of the H genome in polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species based on the single copy of nuclear gene DMC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfa Sun

    Full Text Available Numerous hybrid and polypoid species are found within the Triticeae. It has been suggested that the H subgenome of allopolyploid Elymus (wheatgrass species originated from diploid Hordeum (barley species, but the role of hybridization between polyploid Elymus and Hordeum has not been studied. It is not clear whether gene flow across polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species has occurred following polyploid speciation. Answering these questions will provide new insights into the formation of these polyploid species, and the potential role of gene flow among polyploid species during polyploid evolution. In order to address these questions, disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1 data from the allopolyploid StH Elymus are analyzed together with diploid and polyploid Hordeum species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some Elymus are very close to the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some polyploid Hordeum species, indicating either that the H genome in theses Elymus and polyploid Hordeum species originated from same diploid donor or that gene flow has occurred among them. Our analysis also suggested that the H genomes in Elymus species originated from limited gene pool, while H genomes in Hordeum polyploids have originated from broad gene pools. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences on H genome from polyploid species (π = 0.02083 in Elymus, π = 0.01680 in polyploid Hordeum is higher than that in diploid Hordeum (π = 0.01488. The estimates of Tajima's D were significantly departure from the equilibrium neutral model at this locus in diploid Hordeum species (P<0.05, suggesting an excess of rare variants in diploid species which may not contribute to the origination of polyploids. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences in Elymus polyploid species (π = 0.02083 is higher than that in polyploid Hordeum (π = 0.01680, suggesting that the degree of relationships between two parents of a polyploid might be a factor

  10. Performance on the low charge state laser ion source in BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Costanzo, M.; DeSanto, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kanesue, T.; Lambiase, R.; Lehn, D.; Liaw, C. J.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Olsen, R.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Steszyn, A.; Ikeda, S.

    2015-09-07

    On March 2014, a Laser Ion Source (LIS) was commissioned which delivers high-brightness, low-charge-state heavy ions for the hadron accelerator complex in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Since then, the LIS has provided many heavy ion species successfully. The low-charge-state (mostly singly charged) beams are injected to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), where ions are then highly ionized to fit to the following accelerator’s Q/M acceptance, like Au32+. Recently we upgraded the LIS to be able to provide two different beams into EBIS on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Now the LIS is simultaneously providing beams for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  11. Charge Retention by Monodisperse Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant; Priest, Thomas; Laskin, Julia

    2012-02-01

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Gold clusters were synthesized in methanol solution by reduction of a gold precursor with a weak reducing agent in the presence of a diphosphine capping ligand. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) it is demonstrated that the cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a fluorinated self assembled monolayer on gold. In contrast, when deposited onto carboxylic acid terminated and conventional alkyl thiol surfaces on gold the clusters exhibit larger relative abundances of the 2+ and 1+ charge states, respectively. The kinetics of charge reduction on the surface have been investigated using in-situ Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance SIMS. It is shown that an extremely slow interfacial charge reduction occurs on the fluorinated monolayer surface while an almost instantaneous neutralization takes place on the surface of the alkyl thiol monolayer. Our results demonstrate that the size and charge state of small gold clusters on surfaces, both of which exert a dramatic influence on their chemical and physical properties, may be tuned through soft landing of mass-selected ions onto selected substrates.

  12. Production, transport and charge capture measurements of highly charged recoil ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebus, U.E.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment is described to study highly charged recoil ions on-line to the heavy accelerator UNILAC at GSI. The highly charged recoil ions are produced by heavy-ion bombardment of a gas target. Subsequently the slow highly charged recoil ions are extracted from the ionization volume, and guided through a beam transport line to a Wien filter for charge state selection and to a collision region to study charge transfer processes. Several experiments were carried out to show the efficient charge state separation. Charge states up to q = 15 were observed. When using a retarding field analyzer cross sections for single electron capture were determined for different charge states of Xe q+ for q = 4 to 11 and He gas. The experiments demonstrated increasing charge transfer cross sections with increasing charge state q and indicated the effect of near resonant charge capture for q = 6. The flexible data acquisition system used, is described and other future experiments, such as for instance in flight ion-trapping are indicated in the appendix

  13. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  14. Charge Transport in Electrostatic Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. Gino

    A new analytical hyperbolic expression is presented to describe the full saturation curve of parallel-plate ionization chambers filled with air or with high atomic number gases at elevated pressures. It is shown that all parameters of the saturation curve expression can be calculated from one single measurement of ionization current at a given electric field and air gap thickness. Isothermal charge deposition on polymers to form stable foil electrets by using an apparatus resembling parallel-plate ionization chambers is reported. Charge carriers produced by irradiation of the sensitive air volume drift in the externally applied electric field and get trapped on the polymer surface to form electrets. The time dependence of the polarization and depolarization current densities, the effective electric field in the electret chamber, and the electret surface charge densities are presented for the radiation-induced foil electret and an excellent agreement is obtained with the measured electret data. The theory of linear systems is used to derive the electric field and potential in distance space in the electret chamber. The charging characteristics of ionographi latent images are discussed in terms of saturation characteristics of ionographic chambers. The minimum applied electric field needed for an optimized charge collection in the ionographic chamber is presented in terms of both the electret characteristic polarization time and the electret relaxation time. The feasibility of radiographic image subtraction based on electrostatic imaging techniques is demonstrated. Latent image charging at one polarity corresponding to the production of the primary image, and latent image discharging with the opposite chamber polarity, are used to create the final image representing the region of interest.

  15. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  16. Charged particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A device for detecting the emission of charged particles from a specimen is described. The specimen is placed within an accumulator means which statically accumulates any charged particles emitted from the specimen. The accumulator means is pivotally positioned between a first capacitor plate having a positive electrical charge and a second capacitor plate having a negative electrical charge. The accumulator means is attracted to one capacitor plate and repelled from the other capacitor plate by an amount proportional to the amount and intensity of charged particles emitted by the specimen. (auth)

  17. Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M.; Palumbo, L.

    2014-12-19

    The space charge forces are those generated directly by the charge distribution, with the inclusion of the image charges and currents due to the interaction of the beam with a perfectly conducting smooth pipe. Space charge forces are responsible for several unwanted phenomena related to beam dynamics, such as energy loss, shift of the synchronous phase and frequency , shift of the betatron frequencies, and instabilities. We will discuss in this lecture the main feature of space charge effects in high-energy storage rings as well as in low-energy linacs and transport lines.

  18. ABC's of pion charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Kaufmann, W.B.; Siegel, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of pion single charge exchange using the PWIA and DWIA are presented. Emphasis is given to the effects of absorbtion and blocking. A microscopic calculation of the 0 0 excitation and low energy angular distribution is in excellent agreement with the data. A fixed nucleon multiple scattering calculation of the pion double charge exchange reaction is presented. Various valence neutron wave functions are used, and the contributions of different spatial orientations of the last two neutrons to the reaction are examined. The DCX cross section is found to be very sensitive to the inclusion of correlations in the two-neutron wave function. Satisfactory agreement with DCX data on 14 C can be obtained using a nucleonic picture of the nucleus

  19. A method for charging a test carrier and a test carrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A method of charging a substrate with a plurality of through-going bores and a charged substrate, where the substrate is charged with a liquid comprising particles in a concentration resulting in a high percentage of bores charged with liquid with only a single particle therein....

  20. Contractor Software Charges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... Examples of computer software costs that contractors charge through indirect rates are material management systems, security systems, labor accounting systems, and computer-aided design and manufacturing...

  1. Steady-state electrophoresis of RNA against a gradient of cationic charges in a polyacrylamide matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberstein, Gleb; Shlar, Ilya; Baskin, Emmanuil; Korol, Leonid; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Bukshpan, Shmuel

    2009-11-01

    A novel method for separation of RNA fragments is reported here, based on migrating the polyanionic RNA fragments in a polycationic polyacrylamide gel, made by incorporating positively charged monomers (the Immobilines used for creating immobilized pH gradients) into the neutral polyacrylamide backbone. Separations are typically performed in a 0-10 mM, pK 10.3 Immobiline gradient under denaturing conditions (6 M urea). In the 100-1000 bp length, it is shown that separations of RNA are optimal and very sharp bands can be obtained, in comparison with conventional electrophoresis, due to the "focusing" effect originated by the charge balancing between the positively charged gel matrix and the negatively charged RNA species. Excellent separations are also obtained from micro-RNAs, single-stranded RNA molecules of 21-23 nucleotides in length, which appear to regulate gene expression in animal and plant tissues. As a third example, 2-D runs in control and polycationic gels are shown. Under native conditions, RNAs are not aligned in a diagonal, suggesting that molecular shape has a strong influence on the interaction between RNA and the charged gel matrix. Thus, 2-D runs in cationic matrices might be exploited for structural studies of RNA molecules.

  2. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  3. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied| about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  4. Evidence of Space-Charge Effects in Thermal Poling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, X.; Arentoft, Jesper; Wong, D.

    1999-01-01

    The in situ thermal poling processes in germanosilicate fibers for positive and negative poling voltages are significantly different. Thermal poling of silica fibers consists of two processes: the faster linear process of charge migration and the subsequent single exponential process of charge...... ionization. Both the shielding electrical field due to charge migration and the ionization electrical field due to charge ionization are able to be frozen-in at room temperature acid lead to the residual linear electrooptic effects, The observations support that the mechanism of the induced electrooptic...... effects is based on space charge electrical fields instead of dipole/bond orientation....

  5. Laser induced fluorescence lifetime characterization of Bacillus endospore species using time correlated single photon counting analysis with the multi-exponential fit method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clint; Edwards, Jarrod; Fisher, Andmorgan

    2010-04-01

    Rapid detection of biological material is critical for determining presence/absence of bacterial endospores within various investigative programs. Even more critical is that if select material tests positive for bacillus endospores then tests should provide data at the species level. Optical detection of microbial endospore formers such as Bacillus sp. can be heavy, cumbersome, and may only identify at the genus level. Data provided from this study will aid in characterization needed by future detection systems for further rapid breakdown analysis to gain insight into a more positive signature collection of Bacillus sp. Literature has shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of endospores could be statistically separated from other vegetative genera, but could not be separated among one another. Results of this study showed endospore species separation is possible using laser-induce fluorescence with lifetime decay analysis for Bacillus endospores. Lifetime decays of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, and B. anthracis Sterne strain were investigated. Using the Multi-Exponential fit method data showed three distinct lifetimes for each species within the following ranges, 0.2-1.3 ns; 2.5-7.0 ns; 7.5-15.0 ns, when laser induced at 307 nm. The four endospore species were individually separated using principle component analysis (95% CI).

  6. sRNAbench: profiling of small RNAs and its sequence variants in single or multi-species high-throughput experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barturen, G.; Rueda, A.; Hamberg, M.; Alganza, A.; Lebron, R.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Shi, B.-J.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Hackenberg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, SEP 30 2014 (2014), s. 21-31 ISSN 2084-7173 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : microRNA * small RNA * isomiRs * expression profiling * multi-species experiment * webserver Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Development of SCAR markers and PCR assays for single or simultaneous species-specific detection of Phytophthora nicotianae and Pythium helicoides in ebb-and-flow irrigated kalanchoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonsi, Monday O; Ling, Yin; Kageyama, Koji

    2010-11-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and Pythium helicoides are important water-borne oomycete pathogens of irrigated ornamentals particularly ebb-and-flow irrigated kalanchoe in Japan. We developed novel PCR-based sequence characterized amplified region markers and assays for rapid identification and species-specific detection of both pathogens in separate PCR reactions or simultaneously in a duplex PCR.

  8. Multiplex T-RFLP allows for increased target number and specificity: detection of Salmonella enterica and six species of Listeria in a single test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey N Elliott

    Full Text Available A multiplex T-RFLP test was developed to detect and identify Salmonella enterica and all six species of Listeria inoculated into milk at minimal levels. Extensive in silico analysis was used to design a fifteen-primer, six-amplimer methodology and in vitro application showed target organism DNA, when amplified individually, yielded the predicted terminal restriction fragments (TRFs following digestion. Non-target organisms were either not-amplified or yielded TRFs which did not interfere with target identification. Multiple target DNA analysis gave over 86% detection of total TRFs predicted, and this was improved to over 90% detection of total TRFs predicted when only two target DNA extracts were combined analysed. Co-inoculation of milk with five strains each of the target species of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes, along with five strains of the non-target species E. coli was followed by enrichment in SEL medium for M-TRFLP analysis. This allowed for detection of both target species in all samples, with detection of one S. enterica and two Listeria TRFs in all cases, and detection of a second S. enterica TRF in 91% of cases. This was from an initial inoculum of <5 cfu per 25 ml milk with a background of competing E. coli present, and gave a result from sampling of under 20 hours. The ability to increase target species number without loss of sensitivity means that extensive screening can be performed at reduced cost due to a reduction in the number of tests required.

  9. A molecular phylogeny of Afromontane dwarf geckos (Lygodactylus) reveals a single radiation and increased species diversity in a South African montane center of endemism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Scott L; Jackman, Todd R; Bauer, Aaron M

    2014-11-01

    Afromontane habitats throughout eastern sub-Saharan Africa support remarkable levels of microendemism. However, despite being the subject of decades of research interest, biogeographical patterns of diversification throughout this disjunct montane system still remain largely unknown. We examined the evolutionary relationships of diurnal dwarf geckos (Lygodactylus) from several Afromontane regions throughout southeastern Africa, focusing primarily on two species groups (rex and bonsi groups). Using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers, we generate a molecular phylogeny containing all members of the rex and bonsi groups, to evaluate the monophyly of these groups along with previous biogeographic hypotheses suggesting independent southward invasions into the greater Drakensberg Afromontane center of endemism in northeastern South Africa by each group. Our results provide no support for these taxonomic and biogeographic hypotheses, and instead reveal geographically circumscribed patterns of diversification. One clade is restricted to the highlands of southern Malawi and northern Mozambique and the other to the greater Drakensberg region of northeastern South Africa and Swaziland. Interestingly, L. bernardi from the Nyanga Highlands of eastern Zimbabwe is nested within the primarily savanna-dwelling capensis group. We use Bayesian species delimitation methods to evaluate species limits within the greater Drakensberg clade, which support the elevation of the subspecies of L. ocellatus and L. nigropunctatus, thus bringing the total to eight species within a relatively confined geographic area. These results further highlight the greater Drakensberg Afromontane region as both an important center of endemism, as well as a center of diversification contributing to the accumulation of southern Africa's rich species diversity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Charge Screening in a Charged Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a highly dense system of helium-4 nuclei and electrons in which the helium-4 nuclei have condensed. We present the condensation mechanism in the framework of low energy effective field theory and discuss the screening of electric charge in the condensate.

  11. Surface Charging and Points of Zero Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmulski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Presents Points of Zero Charge data on well-defined specimen of materials sorted by trademark, manufacturer, and location. This text emphasizes the comparison between particular results obtained for different portions of the same or very similar material and synthesizes the information published in research reports over the past few decades

  12. QualitySNP: a pipeline for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions in EST data from diploid and polyploid species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.; Vosman, B.; Voorrips, R.E.; Linden, van der C.G.; Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution. Computational strategies for SNP discovery make use of the large number of sequences present in public databases (in most cases as expressed sequence tags (ESTs)) and are

  13. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Tai

    Full Text Available To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica, 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis, as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  14. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Vera; James, Erick R; Perlman, Steve J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica), 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis), as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  15. Slow charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Beam, K G

    1985-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movements were measured in the rat omohyoid muscle with the three-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Contraction was abolished with hypertonic sucrose. The standard (ON-OFF) protocol for eliciting charge movements was to depolarize the fiber from -90 mV to a variable test potential (V) and then repolarize the fiber to -90 mV. The quantity of charge moved saturated at test potentials of approximately 0 mV. The steady state dependence of the amount of charge that moves as a function of test potential could be well fitted by the Boltzmann relation: Q = Qmax/(1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]), where Qmax is the maximum charge that can be moved, V is the potential at which half the charge moves, and k is a constant. At 15 degrees C, these values were Qmax = 28.5 nC/microF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Qmax, k, and V exhibited little temperature dependence over the range 7-25 degrees C. "Stepped OFF" charge movements were elicited by depolarizing the fiber from -90 mV to a fixed conditioning level that moved nearly all the mobile charge (0 mV), and then repolarizing the fiber to varying test potentials. The sum of the charge that moved when the fiber was depolarized directly from -90 mV to a given test potential and the stepped OFF charge that moved when the fiber was repolarized to the same test potential had at all test potentials a value close to Qmax for that fiber. In nearly all cases, the decay phase of ON, OFF, and stepped OFF charge movements could be well fitted with a single exponential. The time constant, tau decay, for an ON charge movement at a given test potential was comparable to tau decay for a stepped OFF charge movement at the same test potential. Tau decay had a bell-shaped dependence on membrane potential: it was slowest at a potential near V (the midpoint of the steady state charge distribution) and became symmetrically faster on either side of this potential. Raising the temperature from 7 to 15 degrees C caused tau decay to

  16. Unilateral CHARGE association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, J; van Stuijvenberg, M; Dikkers, FG; Pijnenburg, MWH

    A case with a predominantly unilateral CHARGE association is reported. The CHARGE association refers to a combination of congenital malformations. This boy had left-sided anomalies consisting of choanal atresia. coloboma and peripheral facial palsy. The infant had a frontal encephalocele. an anomaly

  17. Effective Area and Charge Density of Iridium Oxide Neural Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Alexander R.; Paolini, Antonio G.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2017-01-01

    The effective electrode area and charge density of iridium metal and anodically activated iridium has been measured by optical and electrochemical techniques. The degree of electrode activation could be assessed by changes in electrode colour. The reduction charge, activation charge, number of activation pulses and charge density were all strongly correlated. Activated iridium showed slow electron transfer kinetics for reduction of a dissolved redox species. At fast voltammetric scan rates the linear diffusion electroactive area was unaffected by iridium activation. At slow voltammetric scan rates, the steady state diffusion electroactive area was reduced by iridium activation. The steady state current was consistent with a ring electrode geometry, with lateral resistance reducing the electrode area. Slow electron transfer on activated iridium would require a larger overpotential to reduce or oxidise dissolved species in tissue, limiting the electrodes charge capacity but also reducing the likelihood of generating toxic species in vivo.

  18. Variation in Trembling Aspen and White Spruce Wood Quality Grown in Mixed and Single Species Stands in the Boreal Mixedwood Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis De Araujo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian boreal forest is largely represented by mixed wood forests of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. In this study, a total of 300 trees originating from three sites composed of trembling aspen and white spruce with varying compositions were investigated for wood quality traits: one site was composed mainly of aspen, one mainly of spruce and a third was a mixed site. Four wood quality traits were examined: wood density, microfibril angle (MFA, fibre characteristics, and cell wall chemistry. Social classes were also determined for each site in an attempt to provide a more in-depth comparison. Wood density showed little variation among sites for both species, with only significant differences occurring between social classes. The aspen site showed statistically lower MFAs than the aspen from the mixed site, however, no differences were observed when comparing spruce. Fibre characteristics were higher in the pure species sites for both species. There were no differences in carbohydrate contents across sites, while lignin content varied. Overall, the use of social classes did not refine the characterization of sites.

  19. {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in fruiting bodies of different fungal species collected in a single forest in southern Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mietelski, Jerzy W., E-mail: Jerzy.mietelski@ifj.edu.p [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Dubchak, Sergiy [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Blazej, Sylwia [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Anielska, Teresa; Turnau, Katarzyna [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    Fruiting bodies of fungi belonging to more than 70 species were collected within a few thousand square meter area of one forest during 2006 and 2007. The soil profile was collected to check the cumulative deposition of {sup 137}Cs, which was relatively high, equal to 64 {+-} 2 kBq/m{sup 2} (calculated for October 2006). The majority of this activity was in the first 6 cm. Fruitbodies were analyzed for radiocesium and {sup 40}K by means of gamma-spectrometry. The highest {sup 137}Cs activity was 54.1 {+-} 0.7 kBq/kg (dry weight) for a sample of Lactarius helvus collected in 2006. The results for 2006 were higher than those for 2007. In a few cases the traces of short-lived (T{sub 1/2} = 2.06 a) {sup 134}Cs were still found in samples. The importance of mycorrhizal fungi for radiocesium accumulation is confirmed. The differences in activity among the species are discussed in relation to observations and predictions from previous studies, where the change in relative accumulation between fruiting bodies of different species was at least partially explained by the differences in the depth of the mycelium localization in a litter/soil system. It is concluded that in some cases, such as Boletus edulis and Xerocomus badius, this prediction is fulfilled and therefore this explanation confirmed.

  20. Charging a Capacitor with a Photovoltaic Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco; Navarro, Luis Barba

    2017-01-01

    Charging a capacitor with a photovoltaic module is an experiment which reveals a lot about the modules characteristics. It is customary to represent these characteristics with an equivalent circuit whose elements represent its physical parameters. The behavior of a photovoltaic module is very similar to that of a single cell but the electric…

  1. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  2. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators As Related to Spacecraft Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, JR; Frederickson, A. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna

    2003-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and h...

  3. Disorder- and correlation-induced charge carriers localization in oxyborate MgFeBO{sub 4}, Mg{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}FeBO{sub 4}, CoFeBO{sub 4} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, Yu.V. [Siberian Federal University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kazak, N.V., E-mail: nat@iph.krasn.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Platunov, M.S. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Ivanova, N.B. [Siberian Federal University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Bezmaternykh, L.N. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Arauzo, A. [Servicio de Medidas Físicas, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ovchinnikov, S.G. [Siberian Federal University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Siberian State Aerospace University, 660014 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • The electrical resistance of the single crystalline warwickites has been measured. • The temperature-induced changes in the charge transfer mechanisms have been found. • The microscopic parameters of the electronic structure have been determined. • The studied warwickites have been classified as disordered correlated systems. • The Co substitution was found to lead to the weakening of the localization. - Abstract: The temperature dependence of the resistivity of single crystalline Mg{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}FeBO{sub 4} samples with x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 is investigated for the temperature range (210–400 K). The conduction was found to be governed by Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) in the low-temperature range (T = 210–270 K) and by thermo-activation mechanism in the high-temperature range (T = 280–400 K). Microscopic electronic parameters, such as the density of the localized states near the Fermi level, localization length, the hopping length, and the activation energy have been obtained. The change of the activation energy observed at high-temperature range was attributed to local structure distortions around Fe and Co atoms. The complicated behavior of charge transfer mechanisms is discussed based on two approaches: atomic disorder and electron correlations.

  4. Charge diffusion and the butterfly effect in striped holographic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Andrew [Department of Physics, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Steinberg, Julia [Department of Physics, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Recently, it has been proposed that the butterfly velocity — a speed at which quantum information propagates — may provide a fundamental bound on diffusion constants in dirty incoherent metals. We analytically compute the charge diffusion constant and the butterfly velocity in charge-neutral holographic matter with long wavelength “hydrodynamic' disorder in a single spatial direction. In this limit, we find that the butterfly velocity does not set a sharp lower bound for the charge diffusion constant.

  5. Inclusive cross sections for pairs of identified light charged hadrons and for single protons in e+e at s=10.58GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, R.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsu, C. -L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2015-11-01

    We report the first double differential cross sections of two charged pions and kaons (e+e- ->hhX) in electron-positron annihilation as a function of the fractional energies of the two hadrons for any charge and hadron combination. The dependence of these di-hadron cross sections on the topology (same, opposite-hemisphere or anywhere) is also studied with the help of the event shape variable combinations directly shed light on the contributing fragmentation functions. For example, we find energies where disfavored fragmentation is expected to be suppressed. These di-hadron results are the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. Extending the previously published single-pion and single-kaon cross sections, single-proton (e+e- -> pX) cross sections are extracted from a 159 fb^-1 data sub-sample.

  6. Role of protein surface charge in monellin sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Szczepankiewicz, Olga; Thulin, Eva; Linse, Sara; Carey, Jannette

    2009-03-01

    A small number of proteins have the unusual property of tasting intensely sweet. Despite many studies aimed at identifying their sweet taste determinants, the molecular basis of protein sweetness is not fully understood. Recent mutational studies of monellin have implicated positively charged residues in sweetness. In the present work, the effect of overall net charge was investigated using the complementary approach of negative charge alterations. Multiple substitutions of Asp/Asn and Glu/Gln residues radically altered the surface charge of single-chain monellin by removing six negative charges or adding four negative charges. Biophysical characterization using circular dichroism, fluorescence, and two-dimensional NMR demonstrates that the native fold of monellin is preserved in the variant proteins under physiological solution conditions although their stability toward chemical denaturation is altered. A human taste test was employed to determine the sweetness detection threshold of the variants. Removal of negative charges preserves monellin sweetness, whereas added negative charge has a large negative impact on sweetness. Meta-analysis of published charge variants of monellin and other sweet proteins reveals a general trend toward increasing sweetness with increasing positive net charge. Structural mapping of monellin variants identifies a hydrophobic surface predicted to face the receptor where introduced positive or negative charge reduces sweetness, and a polar surface where charges modulate long-range electrostatic complementarity.

  7. Charge gradient microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Andreas; Hong, Seungbum

    2018-02-06

    A method for rapid imaging of a material specimen includes positioning a tip to contact the material specimen, and applying a force to a surface of the material specimen via the tip. In addition, the method includes moving the tip across the surface of the material specimen while removing electrical charge therefrom, generating a signal produced by contact between the tip and the surface, and detecting, based on the data, the removed electrical charge induced through the tip during movement of the tip across the surface. The method further includes measuring the detected electrical charge.

  8. Charge equilibrium processes of energetic incident ions and their range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawagoshi, Hiroshi; Karashima, Shosuke; Watanabe, Tsutomu.

    1984-01-01

    The charge state of energetic ions passing through a certain matter is varied by charge-exchange processes. A rate equation for charge fraction is given by using electron loss and capture cross sections in collision with a target atom under idealized condition. We solved the rate equation of the charge-exchange process of a single electron in a form of linear coupled differential equation. Our calcuiation for the range of ion were carried out for He, Ne and Ar ions passing through an atomic hydrogen gas target. We discuss the charge states of the projectile in relation to a local charge balance consituting a state of charge equilibrium in the target. (author)

  9. A single amino-acid substitution toggles chloride dependence of the alpha-amylase paralog amyrel in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claisse, Gaëlle; Feller, Georges; Bonneau, Magalie; Da Lage, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    In animals, most α-amylases are chloride-dependent enzymes. A chloride ion is required for allosteric activation and is coordinated by one asparagine and two arginine side chains. Whereas the asparagine and one arginine are strictly conserved, the main chloride binding arginine is replaced by a glutamine in some rare instances, resulting in the loss of chloride binding and activation. Amyrel is a distant paralogue of α-amylase in Diptera, which was not characterized biochemically to date. Amyrel shows both substitutions depending on the species. In Drosophila melanogaster, an arginine is present in the sequence but in Drosophila virilis, a glutamine occurs at this position. We have investigated basic enzymological parameters and the dependence to chloride of Amyrel of both species, produced in yeast, and in mutants substituting arginine to glutamine or glutamine to arginine. We found that the amylolytic activity of Amyrel is about thirty times weaker than the classical Drosophila α-amylase, and that the substitution of the arginine by a glutamine in D. melanogaster suppressed the chloride-dependence but was detrimental to activity. In contrast, changing the glutamine into an arginine rendered D. virilis Amyrel chloride-dependent, and interestingly, significantly increased its catalytic efficiency. These results show that the chloride ion is not mandatory for Amyrel but stimulates the reaction rate. The possible phylogenetic origin of the arginine/glutamine substitution is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Charges for plastic bags : Motivational and behavioral effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovcevic, Adriana; Steg, Linda; Mazzeo, Nadia; Caballero, Romina; Franco, Paul; Putrino, Natalia; Favara, Jesica

    2014-01-01

    Two field studies tested the effects of a charge for single-use plastic bags recently implemented in Buenos Aires City, Argentina. Study 1 showed a greater increase in consumers' own bag use after the charge was introduced in supermarkets where the policy was introduced, in comparison to control

  11. Analysis of electrostatic powder charging for fractionation of foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Wit, de M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Boom, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic separation based on different tribo-electric charging behaviours of components has emerged as a novel, sustainable dry fractionation process. This study aims to characterise charging behaviour of single-component particles in nitrogen gas flowing through aluminium tubes. Experiments

  12. Electronic shell structure in multiply charged silver clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandler, O.; Athanassenas, K.; Echt, O.; Kreisle, D.; Leisner, T.; Recknagel, E.

    1991-01-01

    Silver clusters are generated by standard laser vaporization technique and ionized via multiphoton ionization. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals singly, doubly and triply charged clusters, Ag n z+ (z=1, 2, 3). The spectra show, for all charge states, intensity variations, indicating enhanced stabilities for cluster sizes with closed electronic configurations in accord with the spherical jellium model. (orig.)

  13. Cost Monotonic "Cost and Charge" Rules for Connection Situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, S.; Tijs, S.H.; Brânzei, R.; Norde, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    The special class of conservative charge systems for minimum cost spanning tree (mcst) situations is introduced.These conservative charge systems lead to single-valued rules for mcst situations, which can also be described with the aid of obligation functions and are, consequently, cost monotonic.A

  14. Radiation by moving charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2017-04-01

    It is generally accepted that in order to describe the dynamics of relativistic particles in the laboratory (lab) frame it is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particle momenta on the velocity. This solution of the dynamics problem in the lab frame makes no reference to Lorentz transformations. For this reason they are not discussed in particle tracking calculations in accelerator and plasma physics. It is generally believed that the electrodynamics problem can be treated within the same ''single inertial frame'' description without reference to Lorentz transformations. In particular, in order to evaluate radiation fields arising from charged particles in motion we need to know their velocities and positions as a function of the lab frame time t. The relativistic motion of a particle in the lab frame is described by Newton's second law ''corrected'' for the relativistic dependence of momentum on velocity. It is assumed in all standard derivations that one can perform identification of the trajectories in the source part of the usual Maxwell's equations with the trajectories vector x(t) measured (or calculated by using the corrected Newton's second law) in the lab frame. This way of coupling fields and particles is considered since more than a century as the relativistically correct procedure.We argue that this procedure needs to be changed, and we demonstrate the following, completely counterintuitive statement: the results of conventional theory of radiation by relativistically moving charges are not consistent with the principle of relativity. In order to find the trajectory of a particle in the lab frame consistent with the usual Maxwell's equations, one needs to solve the dynamic equation inmanifestly covariant form by using the coordinate-independent proper time τ to parameterize the particle world-line in space-time. We show that there is a difference between &apos

  15. Water Quality Protection Charges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The Water Quality Protection Charge (WQPC) is a line item on your property tax bill. WQPC funds many of the County's clean water initiatives including: • Restoration...

  16. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N.

    2013-12-16

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  17. Electric charge quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foot, R.; Lew, H.; Volkas, R.R.

    1992-06-01

    Experimentally it has been known for a long time that the electric charges of the observed particles appear to be quantized. An approach to understanding electric charge quantization that can be used for gauge theories with explicit U(1) factors - such as the standard model and its variants - is pedagogically reviewed and discussed in this article. This approach used the allowed invariances of the Lagrangian and their associated anomaly cancellation equations. It is demonstrated that charge may be de-quantized in the three-generation standard model with massless neutrinos, because differences in family-lepton-numbers are anomaly-free. The relevant experimental limits are also reviewed. This approach to charge quantization suggests that the minimal standard model should be extended so that family-lepton-number differences are explicitly broken. Some candidate extensions such as the minimal standard model augmented by Majorana right-handed neutrinos are also briefly discussed. 30 refs

  18. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karner, Donald [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Garetson, Thomas [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  19. Tandem mass spectrometry of doubly charged poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers produced by electrospray ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Marion; Carissan, Yannick; Humbel, Stéphane; Charles, Laurence

    2008-04-01

    Electrospray ionization combined with collision-induced dissociation has been applied to characterize fragmentation pathways of doubly charged poly(ethylene oxide) polymers. MS/MS spectra of doubly lithiated precursors were shown to provide the most informative data for this polymer structural analysis. Most fragment ions could be accounted for by applying the mechanisms proposed in the literature for singly charged oligomers. Although MS/MS experiments were conducted in a low collision energy regime, radical cationic fragments were also detected and were shown to further dissociate. This consecutive dissociation was explored performing hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments and ab initio studies. Two different mechanisms had to be envisaged depending on the size of the fragmenting radical cationic species.

  20. Electric Vehicle Charging Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Pia

    2014-01-01

    With an electrified passenger transportation fleet, carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced significantly depending on the electric power production mix. Increased electric power consumption due to electric vehicle charging demands of electric vehicle fleets may be met by increased amount of renewable power production in the electrical systems. With electric vehicle fleets in the transportation system there is a need for establishing an electric vehicle charging infrastructure that distribu...

  1. Clustering of continuous distributions of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D. M.; Rickayzen, G.

    2014-05-01

    An investigation is carried out of the association and clustering of equimolar mixtures of oppositely charged Gaussian charge distributions (CDs) of the form ∼ exp ( - r2 /2α2), where r is the separation between the centres of charge and α governs the extent of charge spreading (α→0 is the point charge limit). The results of molecular dynamics (MD) and Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with the mean spherical approximation (MSA) and hypernetted-chain (HNC) closures are compared for these systems. The MD and HNC radial distribution functions, g(r), agree very well for not too small α. The MD and MSA, g(r), also agree well for α ≈ 1 and greater. The potential energy per particle for the three methods also agrees well over a wider range of α values, better than might be expected from inspection of the radial distribution functions, because the dominant contributions to U come predominantly from intermediate and long distance ranges where there is good agreement between the g(r) from the MSD and HNC closures. The nature of the association and clustering of the charges as a function of α is explored through the mean nearest neighbour distance for unlike and like species and the mean and root-mean-square force. The velocity and force autocorrelation functions are also calculated; they show increasingly oscillatory behaviour in the small α limit, originating in vibrations of a pair of CDs of opposite sign.

  2. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P; Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S; Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C; Gauduel, Y A; Dou, W; Ruan, S; Barre, L; Rioult, F; Derlon, J M; Chapon, F; Fong, V; Kauffmann, F

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  3. Enabling fast charging – Vehicle considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meintz, Andrew; Zhang, Jiucai; Vijayagopal, Ram; Kreutzer, Cory; Ahmed, Shabbir; Bloom, Ira; Burnham, Andrew; Carlson, Richard B.; Dias, Fernando; Dufek, Eric J.; Francfort, James; Hardy, Keith; Jansen, Andrew N.; Keyser, Matthew; Markel, Anthony; Michelbacher, Christopher; Mohanpurkar, Manish; Pesaran, Ahmad; Scoffield, Don; Shirk, Matthew; Stephens, Thomas; Tanim, Tanvir

    2017-11-01

    To achieve a successful increase in the plug-in battery electric vehicle (BEV) market, it is anticipated that a significant improvement in battery performance is required to improve the range that BEVs can travel and the rate at which they can be recharged. While the range that BEVs can travel on a single recharge is improving, the recharging rate is still much slower than the refueling rate of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. To achieve comparable recharge times, we explore the vehicle considerations of charge rates of at least 400 kW. Faster recharge is expected to significantly mitigate the perceived deficiencies for long-distance transportation, to provide alternative charging in densely populated areas where overnight charging at home may not be possible, and to reduce range anxiety for travel within a city when unplanned charging may be required. This substantial increase in charging rate is expected to create technical issues in the design of the battery system and vehicle’s electrical architecture that must be resolved. This work focuses on battery system thermal design and total recharge time to meet the goals of implementing higher charge rates and the impacts of the expected increase in system voltage on the components of the vehicle.

  4. Asymptotic analysis of ultra-relativistic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, D.A.; Gratus, J.; Tucker, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a new approach for analysing the dynamic behaviour of distributions of charged particles in an electromagnetic field. After discussing the limitations inherent in the Lorentz-Dirac equation for a single point particle a simple model is proposed for a charged continuum interacting self-consistently with the Maxwell field in vacuo. The model is developed using intrinsic tensor field theory and exploits to the full the symmetry and light-cone structure of Minkowski spacetime. This permits the construction of a regular stress-energy tensor whose vanishing divergence determines a system of non-linear partial differential equations for the velocity and self-fields of accelerated charge. Within this covariant framework a particular perturbation scheme is motivated by an exact class of solutions to this system describing the evolution of a charged fluid under the combined effects of both self and external electromagnetic fields. The scheme yields an asymptotic approximation in terms of inhomogeneous linear equations for the self-consistent Maxwell field, charge current and time-like velocity field of the charged fluid and is defined as an ultra-relativistic configuration. To facilitate comparisons with existing accounts of beam dynamics an appendix translates the tensor formulation of the perturbation scheme into the language involving electric and magnetic fields observed in a laboratory (inertial) frame

  5. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  6. Charge Transfer Based Colorimetric Detection of Silver Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Choul; Kim, Kwang Seob; Choi, Soon Kyu; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jae Wook [Dong-A Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We have demonstrated the colorimetric chemosensor for detection of Ag{sup +} via formation of nanoparticles which is based on the intramolecular CT interaction between the electron-rich (2,6-dialkoxynaphthalene; Np) moiety and the electron-deficient (methyl viologen; MV{sup 2+}) moiety of a single sensor molecule. Under irradiation of light, Ag{sup +} was reduced to very small silver nanoparticle by CT interaction in the presence of OEGs as flexible recognition moiety of Ag{sup +} and stabilizer for Ag nanoparticles, thus Ag nanoparticles resulted to reddish brown in the color change of sensor solution, gradually. Therefore, the charge-transfer interaction between an electron-deficient and an electron-rich units existing at a sensor molecule can be regarded as a new and efficient method to construct various colorimetric chemosensors. Donor.acceptor interactions or charge transfer (CT) interactions are an important class of non-covalent interactions and have been widely exploited in self-assembling systems. Beyond molecular chemistry, supramolecular chemistry aims at constituting highly complex, functional chemical systems from components held together by intermolecular forces. Chemosensors are the molecules of abiotic origin that bind selectively and reversibly with the analyte with concomitant change in one or more properties of the system. The recognition and signaling of ionic and neutral species of varying complexity is one of the most intensively studied areas of contemporary supramolecular chemistry.

  7. Magnetotransport and charge transfer studies on delta-modulation-doped In sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As/Al sub y Ga sub 1 sub - sub y As strained single quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, M; Kim, T W; Yoo, K H; Kim, M D; Park, H S; Kim, D L

    1999-01-01

    Shubnikov-de Haas (S-dH) and Van der Pauw Hall-effect measurements on a In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 8 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 2 As/Al sub 0 sub . sub 2 sub 5 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 7 sub 5 As strained single quantum well grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been performed to investigate the existence of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 8 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 2 As single quantum well. The fast Fourier transform for the S-dH data and the observation of the quantum Hall effect clearly indicate 2DEG occupation of a subband in the In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 8 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 2 As single quantum well. Electronic subband energy and the corresponding wavefunction in the In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 8 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 2 As quantum well were calculated by a self-consistent method taking into account exchange-correlation effects together with strain and nonparabolicity effects.

  8. Charge transport by holographic Fermi surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Thomas; Liu, Hong; McGreevy, John; Vegh, David

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contribution to the conductivity from holographic Fermi surfaces obtained from probe fermions in an AdS charged black hole. This requires calculating a certain part of the one-loop correction to a vector propagator on the charged black hole geometry. We find that the current dissipation is as efficient as possible and the transport lifetime coincides with the single-particle lifetime. In particular, in the case where the spectral density is that of a marginal Fermi liquid, the resistivity is linear in temperature.

  9. Morphological and molecular evidence on the existence of a single estuarine and rocky intertidal acanthocephalan species of Profilicollis Meyer, 1931 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of southern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sara M; Diaz, Julia I; D'Elía, Guillermo

    2017-05-01

    Profilicollis chasmagnathi Holcman-Spector, Mañé-Garzón & Dei-Cas, 1977 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) has been reported to parasitise different grapsid species as intermediate hosts along the South Atlantic shores, i.e. Cyrtograpsus angulatus (Dana) and Neohelice granulata (Dana) in Uruguay and Cyrtograpsus altimanus (Rathbun) in Argentina. Larvae of a similar acanthocephalan described as Profilicollis antarcticus Zdzitowiecki, 1985 were recorded in the crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Milne-Edwards) from an estuarine habitat on the Southeast Pacific shore in Chile. Earlier studies have questioned the specific assignation of the Chilean estuarine populations of Profilicollis Meyer, 1931. The aim of this study was to re-examine the identification of these acanthocephalans by means of morphological and molecular analyses of cystacanths of Profilicollis spp. gathered from C. angulatus, N. granulata, C. altimanus and H. crenulatus. Our analyses showed that a single species of Profilicollis, P. chasmagnathi, parasitises these four crab species. The assessment of specimens from the South Shetlands Islands, the type-locality of P. antarcticus, is needed before formally proposing that P. antarcticus is a junior subjective synonym of P. chasmagnathi.

  10. Expression patterns of sex-determination genes in single male and female embryos of two Bactrocera fruit fly species during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J L; Riegler, M; Frommer, M; Shearman, D C A

    2014-12-01

    In tephritids, the sex-determination pathway follows the sex-specific splicing of transformer (tra) mRNA, and the cooperation of tra and transformer-2 (tra-2) to effect the sex-specific splicing of doublesex (dsx), the genetic double-switch responsible for male or female somatic development. The Dominant Male Determiner (M) is the primary signal that controls this pathway. M, as yet uncharacterized, is Y-chromosome linked, expressed in the zygote and directly or indirectly diminishes active TRA protein in male embryos. Here we first demonstrated the high conservation of tra, tra-2 and dsx in two Australian tephritids, Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera jarvisi. We then used quantitative reverse transcription PCR on single, sexed embryos to examine expression of the key sex-determination genes during early embryogenesis. Individual embryos were sexed using molecular markers located on the B. jarvisi Y-chromosome that was also introgressed into a B. tryoni line. In B. jarvisi, sex-specific expression of tra transcripts occurred between 3 to 6 h after egg laying, and the dsx isoform was established by 7 h. These milestones were delayed in B. tryoni lines. The results provide a time frame for transcriptomic analyses to identify M and its direct targets, plus information on genes that may be targeted for the development of male-only lines for pest management. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Charge retention by gold clusters on surfaces prepared using soft landing of mass selected ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E; Priest, Thomas; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas phase, and mass selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au(11)L(5)(3+), L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane), which was delivered to surfaces at well-controlled kinetic energies. Using in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), it is demonstrated that the Au(11)L(5)(3+) cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) on gold. In contrast, when deposited onto 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAM) and 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) surfaces on gold, the clusters exhibit larger relative abundances of the 2+ and 1+ charge states, respectively. The kinetics of charge reduction on the FSAM and HSAM surfaces are investigated using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) SIMS. It is shown that an extremely slow interfacial charge reduction occurs on the FSAM surface while an almost instantaneous neutralization takes place on the surface of the HSAM. Our results demonstrate that the size and charge state of small gold clusters on surfaces, both of which exert a dramatic influence on their chemical and physical properties, may be tuned through soft landing of mass-selected ions onto carefully selected substrates. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  13. A New Manganese Dinuclear Complex with Phenolate Ligands and a Single Unsupported Oxo Bridge. Storage of Two Positive Charges within Less than 500 mV. Relevance to Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Olivier; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Charlot, Marie-France; Tchertanov, Lyuba; Guilhem, Jean; Mattioli, Tony A.; Boussac, Alain; Girerd, Jean-Jacques

    1999-03-22

    The compound [Mn(III)(2)OL(2)](ClO(4))(2).2.23CHCl(3).0.65CH(2)Cl(2) where L(-) is the monoanionic N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N'-salicyliden-1,2-diaminoethane ligand, has been synthesized. The complex dication [Mn(III)(2)OL(2)](2+) contains a linear Mn(III)-O-Mn(III) unit with a Mn-Mn distance of 3.516 Å. The pentadentate ligand L(-) wraps around the Mn(III) ion. Electrochemically, it is possible to prepare the one electron oxidized trication [Mn(2)OL(2)](3+) which crystallizes as [Mn(2)OL(2)](ClO(4))(2.37)(PF(6))(0.63).1.5CH(3)CN. The complex trication [Mn(2)OL(2)](3+) contains a Mn(III)-O-Mn(IV) unit with a Mn-Mn distance of 3.524 Å and a Mn-O-Mn angle of 178.7(2) degrees. The contraction of the coordination sphere around the Mn(IV) is clearly observed. The [Mn(2)OL(2)](2+) dication possesses a S = 0 electronic ground state with J = -216 cm(-)(1) (H = -JS(1)().S(2)()), whereas the [Mn(2)OL(2)](3+) trication shows a S = (1)/(2) ground state with J = -353 cm(-)(1). The UV-visible spectrum of [Mn(2)OL(2)](3+) exhibits an intense absorption band (epsilon = 3040 M(-)(1) cm(-)(1)) centered at 570 nm assigned to a phenolate --> Mn(IV) charge-transfer transition. The potentials of the redox couples determined by cyclic voltammetry are E degrees ([Mn(2)OL(2)](3+)/[Mn(2)OL(2)](2+)) = 0.54 V/saturated calomel electrode (SCE) and E degrees ([Mn(2)OL(2)](4+)/[Mn(2)OL(2)](3+)) = 0.99 V/SCE. Upon oxidation at 1.3 V/SCE, the band at 570 nm shifts to 710 nm (epsilon = 2500 M(-)(1) cm(-)(1)) and a well-defined band appears at 400 nm which suggests the formation of a phenoxyl radical. The [Mn(2)OL(2)](3+)( )()complex exhibits a 18-line X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum which has been simulated with rhombic tensors |A(1)(x)()| = 160 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1); |A(1)(y)()| = 130 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1); |A(1)(z)()| = 91 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1); |A(2)(x)()| = 62 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1); |A(2)(y)()| = 59 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1); |A(2)(z)()| = 62 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1) and g(x)() = 2.006; g

  14. Battery materials for ultrafast charging and discharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byoungwoo; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2009-03-12

    The storage of electrical energy at high charge and discharge rate is an important technology in today's society, and can enable hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and provide back-up for wind and solar energy. It is typically believed that in electrochemical systems very high power rates can only be achieved with supercapacitors, which trade high power for low energy density as they only store energy by surface adsorption reactions of charged species on an electrode material. Here we show that batteries which obtain high energy density by storing charge in the bulk of a material can also achieve ultrahigh discharge rates, comparable to those of supercapacitors. We realize this in LiFePO(4) (ref. 6), a material with high lithium bulk mobility, by creating a fast ion-conducting surface phase through controlled off-stoichiometry. A rate capability equivalent to full battery discharge in 10-20 s can be achieved.

  15. Probing charge transfer between molecular semiconductors and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Kratzer, Markus; Kaufmann, Benjamin; Vujin, Jasna; Gajić, Radoš; Teichert, Christian

    2017-08-25

    The unique density of states and exceptionally low electrical noise allow graphene-based field effect devices to be utilized as extremely sensitive potentiometers for probing charge transfer with adsorbed species. On the other hand, molecular level alignment at the interface with electrodes can strongly influence the performance of organic-based devices. For this reason, interfacial band engineering is crucial for potential applications of graphene/organic semiconductor heterostructures. Here, we demonstrate charge transfer between graphene and two molecular semiconductors, parahexaphenyl and buckminsterfullerene C 60 . Through in-situ measurements, we directly probe the charge transfer as the interfacial dipoles are formed. It is found that the adsorbed molecules do not affect electron scattering rates in graphene, indicating that charge transfer is the main mechanism governing the level alignment. From the amount of transferred charge and the molecular coverage of the grown films, the amount of charge transferred per adsorbed molecule is estimated, indicating very weak interaction.

  16. Charge transfer in astrophysical nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Charge transfer has become a standard ingredient in models of ionized nebulae, supernovae remnants and active galactic nuclei. Charge transfer rate coefficients and the physics of ionized nebulae are considered. Charge transfer is applied to the ionization structure and line emission of ionized nebulae. Photoionized nebulae observations are used to test theoretical predictions of charge transfer rates. (author)

  17. Electric vehicle battery charging controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    to a battery management system in the electric vehicle to charge a battery therein, a first communication unit for receiving a charging message via a communication network, and a control unit for controlling a charging current provided from the charge source to the electric vehicle, the controlling at least...

  18. Dispersion and space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. Dispersion and space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M. [Department of Electrical Engeneering and Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Dispersion and space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring

  1. Charged black holes with scalar hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Lü, H. [Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Department of Physics,Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-09-10

    We consider a class of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories, in which the dilaton coupling to the Maxwell field is not the usual single exponential function, but one with a stationary point. The theories admit two charged black holes: one is the Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) black hole and the other has a varying dilaton. For a given charge, the new black hole in the extremal limit has the same AdS{sub 2}×Sphere near-horizon geometry as the RN black hole, but it carries larger mass. We then introduce some scalar potentials and obtain exact charged AdS black holes. We also generalize the results to black p-branes with scalar hair.

  2. Sources for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arianer, J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a basic course on charged particle sources for post-graduate students and thematic schools on large facilities and accelerator physics. A simple but precise description of the creation and the emission of charged particles is presented. This course relies on every year upgraded reference documents. Following relevant topics are considered: electronic emission processes, technological and practical considerations on electron guns, positron sources, production of neutral atoms, ionization, plasma and discharge, different types of positive and negative ion sources, polarized particle sources, materials for the construction of ion sources, low energy beam production and transport. (N.T.)

  3. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischewski, Andree, E-mail: lischews@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Mathematik, Rudower Chaussee 25, Room 1.310, D12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  4. Grain charging in dusty plasmas (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dusty plasmas represent the most general form of space, laboratory, and industrial plasmas. Interplanetary space, comets, planetary rings, asteroids, and aerosols in the atmosphere, are all examples where electrons, ions, and dust particles coexist. Dust particles immersed in plasmas and UV radiation collect electrostatic charges and respond to electromagnetic forces in addition to all the other forces acting on uncharged grains. Simultaneously, dust can alter its plasma environment. Dust particles in plasmas are unusual charge carriers. They are many orders of magnitude heavier than any other plasma particles, and they can have many orders of magnitude larger (negative or positive) time-dependent charges. The presence of dust can influence the collective plasma behavior, for example, by altering the traditional plasma wave modes and by triggering new types of waves and instabilities. This talk will focus on the charging processes, including the collection of electrons and ions in multi-species plasmas, and discuss the expected charge distribution on the dust particles as function of their size, and the dust density itself. Examples where these effects could result in novel plasma physics phenomena include Noctilucent clouds, and comets.

  5. Study of Charged Particle Species Produced in Association with $\\bar{B}$0, B-, and $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ Mesons in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usynin, Denys [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The authors study the yields of charged kaons, charged pions, and protons produced in association with B mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1960 GeV using 355 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This is the first reported measurements of these yields at a hadron collider. The B mesons are reconstructed using their semileptonic decays: B0 → ℓ+D-X, D- → K+π-π-; B0 → ℓ+D*-X, D*- → π-$\\bar{D}$0,$\\bar{D}$0 → K+π-; B+ → ℓ+$\\bar{D}$0X, $\\bar{D}$0 → K+π-; Bs→ℓ+D$-\\atop{s}$ X, D$-\\atop{s}$ → π-Φ,Φ → K+K-. The K, π, and p are identified using the Time of Flight detector (TOF), the CDF spectrometer, and the specific ionization (dE/dx) measured in the central drift chamber (COT). The fraction of charged kaons produced in association with $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons is found to be larger than the fraction produced in association with the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ and B- mesons, as expected from naive models of heavy quark hadronization to mesons. The particle species yields are found to be in qualitative agreement with simulation of B meson production in hadron collisions from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo, although the yield of kaons around $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons is found to be larger in the simulation when compared to the data. These studies are important for understanding methods of identifying the flavor of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons in measurement of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ flavor oscillations and charge conjugation-parity (CP) violation in $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ meson decays.

  6. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  7. Charge transfer in TATB and HMX under extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoyang; Ma, Yu; Jiang, Daojian

    2012-11-01

    Charge transfer is usually accompanied by structural changes in materials under different conditions. However, the charge transfer in energetic materials that are subjected to extreme conditions has seldom been explored by researchers. In the work described here, the charge transfer in single molecules and unit cells of the explosives TATB and HMX under high temperatures and high pressures was investigated by performing static and dynamic calculations using three DFT methods, including the PWC functional of LDA, and the BLYP and PBE functionals of GGA. The results showed that negative charge is transferred from the nitro groups of molecular or crystalline TATB and HMX when they are heated. All DFT calculations for the compressed TATB unit cell indicate that, generally, negative charge transfer occurs to its nitro groups as the compression increases. PWC and PBE calculations for crystalline HMX show that negative charge is first transferred to the nitro groups but, as the compression increases, the negative charge is transferred from the nitro groups. However, the BLYP calculations indicated that there was gradual negative charge transfer to the nitro groups of HMX, similar to the case for TATB. The unrelaxed state of the uniformly compressed TATB causes negative charge to be transferred from its nitro groups, in contrast to what is seen in the relaxed state. Charge transfer in TATB is predicted to occur much more easily than in HMX.

  8. Salmonella Taking Charge

    OpenAIRE

    Weigele, Bethany A.; Alto, Neal M.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens develop creative ways to undermine host defenses. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Bakowski et al. (2010) have unveiled a mechanism by which Salmonella evades lysosomal fusion by using a bacterial protein, SopB, that depletes the phagosomal membrane of negative charge.

  9. Charged Particle Optics Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hawkes, P. W.; Lencová, Bohumila

    -, č. 6 (2006), s. 6-8 Grant - others:EC 5RP(XE) G5RD-CT-2000-00344 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optics of charged particles * design of ion lithography system * spot profile * the finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering www.phantomsnet.net

  10. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  11. Charge oscillations in orbitrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, M.; Gomes, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    A statistical model for the electron distribution in orbitrons is constructed where the effect of the end plates is considered. A comparison is made with the measured density of charge. The electromagnetic oscillations generated by orbitrons are calculated as pressure waves and the results obtained are compared with the data. (Author) [pt

  12. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (films, and open opportunities to engineer improved electronic functionality into molecular devices.

  13. Charge reconstruction in large-area photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, M.; Montuschi, M.; Baldoncini, M.; Mantovani, F.; Ricci, B.; Andronico, G.; Antonelli, V.; Bellato, M.; Bernieri, E.; Brigatti, A.; Brugnera, R.; Budano, A.; Buscemi, M.; Bussino, S.; Caruso, R.; Chiesa, D.; Corti, D.; Dal Corso, F.; Ding, X. F.; Dusini, S.; Fabbri, A.; Fiorentini, G.; Ford, R.; Formozov, A.; Galet, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Giammarchi, M.; Giaz, A.; Insolia, A.; Isocrate, R.; Lippi, I.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Lombardi, P.; Marini, F.; Mari, S. M.; Martellini, C.; Meroni, E.; Mezzetto, M.; Miramonti, L.; Monforte, S.; Nastasi, M.; Ortica, F.; Paoloni, A.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pedretti, D.; Pelliccia, N.; Pompilio, R.; Previtali, E.; Ranucci, G.; Re, A. C.; Romani, A.; Saggese, P.; Salamanna, G.; Sawy, F. H.; Settanta, G.; Sisti, M.; Sirignano, C.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Strati, V.; Verde, G.; Votano, L.

    2018-02-01

    Large-area PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMT) allow to efficiently instrument Liquid Scintillator (LS) neutrino detectors, where large target masses are pivotal to compensate for neutrinos' extremely elusive nature. Depending on the detector light yield, several scintillation photons stemming from the same neutrino interaction are likely to hit a single PMT in a few tens/hundreds of nanoseconds, resulting in several photoelectrons (PEs) to pile-up at the PMT anode. In such scenario, the signal generated by each PE is entangled to the others, and an accurate PMT charge reconstruction becomes challenging. This manuscript describes an experimental method able to address the PMT charge reconstruction in the case of large PE pile-up, providing an unbiased charge estimator at the permille level up to 15 detected PEs. The method is based on a signal filtering technique (Wiener filter) which suppresses the noise due to both PMT and readout electronics, and on a Fourier-based deconvolution able to minimize the influence of signal distortions—such as an overshoot. The analysis of simulated PMT waveforms shows that the slope of a linear regression modeling the relation between reconstructed and true charge values improves from 0.769 ± 0.001 (without deconvolution) to 0.989 ± 0.001 (with deconvolution), where unitary slope implies perfect reconstruction. A C++ implementation of the charge reconstruction algorithm is available online at [1].

  14. Reactions of hydrated singly charged first-row transition-metal ions M+(H2O)n (M=V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) toward nitric oxide in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Christian; Höckendorf, Robert F; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K

    2013-03-11

    Reactions of M(+) (H2 O)n (M=V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; n≤40) with NO were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Uptake of NO was observed for M=Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn. The number of NO molecules taken up depends on the metal ion. For iron and zinc, NO uptake is followed by elimination of HNO and formation of the hydrated metal hydroxide, with strong size dependence. For manganese, only small HMnOH(+) (H2 O)n-1 species, which are formed under the influence of room-temperature black-body radiation, react with NO. Here NO uptake competes with HNO formation, both being primary reactions. The results illustrate that, in the presence of water, transition-metal ions are able to undergo quite particular and diverse reactions with NO. HNO is presumably formed through recombination of a proton and (3) NO(-) for M=Fe, Zn, preferentially for n=15-20. For manganese, the hydride in HMnOH(+) (H2 O)n-1 is involved in HNO formation, preferentially for n≤4. The strong size dependence of the HNO formation efficiency illustrates that each molecule counts in the reactions of small ionic water clusters. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Effect of charged line defects on conductivity in graphene: Numerical Kubo and analytical Boltzmann approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radchenko, T. M.; Shylau, A. A.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    Charge carrier transport in single-layer graphene with one-dimensional charged defects is studied theoretically. Extended charged defects, considered an important factor for mobility degradation in chemically vapor-deposited graphene, are described by a self-consistent Thomas-Fermi potential...

  16. Intramembrane charge movement in frog skeletal muscle fibres. Properties of charge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, G; Rios, E

    1987-06-01

    1. Membrane currents were measured in cut skeletal muscle fibres voltage-clamped in a double Vaseline gap in solutions that had impermeant ions substituted for Na+, K+ and Cl-. The fibres were maintained at a holding potential of 0 mV. Pulses to positive voltages elicited outward currents that were proportional to voltage at all times; these were used to estimate linear capacitive currents, which in turn were used in the construction of non-linear current transients. 2. Large negative-going pulses elicited proportionally larger inward currents that decayed during the pulse with voltage-dependent kinetics. A portion of the non-linear current could be eliminated by solutions containing EGTA, as well as by large negative conditioning pulses of 200 ms or more. This portion was probably an inward Ca2+ current. 3. The non-linear current remaining in EGTA-containing solutions had characteristics of intramembrane charge movement ('charge 2'). This charge depended on voltage according to a two-state Boltzmann function of average parameters Qmax = 47.7 nC/microF, V = -115 mV, K = 21.5 mV (seven fibres). 4. The charge movement current transients were single-exponential decays (after a short rising phase) with time constants (tau) that depended on voltage (V). A single-barrier Eyring rate model described well the dependence of time constant on voltage. This fit permitted an independent estimate of a transition voltage, V, and a slope parameter K related to apparent valence of the mobile particle. The values of V and K that best fitted the kinetic data were close to the corresponding values estimated from the charge vs. voltage distribution. 5. Effective capacitance was measured by the transfer of capacitive charge by a small pulse superimposed on a variable pre-pulse. The capacitance was found to depend on pre-pulse voltage. The voltage dependence of the capacitance was as expected from the properties of charge 2 measured independently in the same fibres. 6. The presence of

  17. Charged particle confinement in magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, D.; John, P.I.; Saxena, Y.C.; Varma, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of single charged particle trapped in a magnetic mirror has been investigated experimentally. The particle injected off axis and trapped in a magnetic mirror, leak out of the mirror with the leakage characterized by multiple decay times. The observed decay times are in good agreement with predictions of a ''wave mechanical like'' model by Varma, over a large range of relevant parameters. (author)

  18. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pfeifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK’s Cleavage medium or Vitrolife’s G-1 PLUS medium or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies.

  19. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  20. Comprehensive decay law for emission of charged particles and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-07

    Apr 7, 2014 ... the case of alpha, cluster and proton decays are presented together. It is seen that, all of them fall in a single straight line with a common value for slope and intercept. This shows how the decays of charged particles of any Z values from heavy nuclei are governed by a single rule of law, namely, the linear ...

  1. Simulations of charge transport in organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehoff, Thorsten

    2010-05-05

    We study the charge transport properties of organic liquid crystals, i.e. hexabenzocoronene and carbazole macrocycle, and single crystals, i.e. rubrene, indolocarbazole and benzothiophene derivatives (BTBT, BBBT). The aim is to find structure-property relationships linking the chemical structure as well as the morphology with the bulk charge carrier mobility of the compounds. To this end, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed yielding realistic equilibrated morphologies. Partial charges and molecular orbitals are calculated based on single molecules in vacuum using quantum chemical methods. The molecular orbitals are then mapped onto the molecular positions and orientations, which allows calculation of the transfer integrals between nearest neighbors using the molecular orbital overlap method. Thus we obtain realistic transfer integral distributions and their autocorrelations. In case of organic crystals the differences between two descriptions of charge transport, namely semi-classical dynamics (SCD) in the small polaron limit and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) based on Marcus rates, are studied. The liquid crystals are investigated solely in the hopping limit. To simulate the charge dynamics using KMC, the centers of mass of the molecules are mapped onto lattice sites and the transfer integrals are used to compute the hopping rates. In the small polaron limit, where the electronic wave function is spread over a limited number of neighboring molecules, the Schroedinger equation is solved numerically using a semi-classical approach. The carbazole macrocycles form columnar structures arranged on a hexagonal lattice with side chains facing inwards, so columns can closely approach each other allowing inter-columnar and thus three-dimensional transport. We are able to show that, on the time-scales of charge transport, static disorder due to slow side chain motions is the main factor determining the mobility. The high mobility of rubrene is explained by two main

  2. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilking, Michael Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  3. The quasilocalized charge approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, G J; Golden, K I; Donko, Z; Hartmann, P

    2005-01-01

    The quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA) has been used for some time as a formalism for the calculation of the dielectric response and for determining the collective mode dispersion in strongly coupled Coulomb and Yukawa liquids. The approach is based on a microscopic model in which the charges are quasilocalized on a short-time scale in local potential fluctuations. We review the conceptual basis and theoretical structure of the QLC approach and together with recent results from molecular dynamics simulations that corroborate and quantify the theoretical concepts. We also summarize the major applications of the QLCA to various physical systems, combined with the corresponding results of the molecular dynamics simulations and point out the general agreement and instances of disagreement between the two

  4. High Voltage Charge Pump

    KAUST Repository

    Emira, Ahmed A.

    2014-10-09

    Various embodiments of a high voltage charge pump are described. One embodiment is a charge pump circuit that comprises a plurality of switching stages each including a clock input, a clock input inverse, a clock output, and a clock output inverse. The circuit further comprises a plurality of pumping capacitors, wherein one or more pumping capacitors are coupled to a corresponding switching stage. The circuit also comprises a maximum selection circuit coupled to a last switching stage among the plurality of switching stages, the maximum selection circuit configured to filter noise on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage, the maximum selection circuit further configured to generate a DC output voltage based on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage.

  5. Interaction between heterogeneously charged surfaces: surface patches and charge modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2013-02-01

    When solid surfaces are immersed in aqueous solutions, some of their charges can dissociate and leave behind charged patches on the surface. Although the charges are distributed heterogeneously on the surface, most of the theoretical models treat them as homogeneous. For overall non-neutral surfaces, the assumption of surface charge homogeneity is rather reasonable since the leading terms of two such interacting surfaces depend on the nonzero average charge. However, for overall neutral surfaces the nature of the surface charge distribution is crucial in determining the intersurface interaction. In the present work we study the interaction between two charged surfaces across an aqueous solution for several charge distributions. The analysis is preformed within the framework of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For periodic charge distributions the interaction is found to be repulsive at small separations, unless the two surface distributions are completely out-of-phase with respect to each other. For quenched random charge distributions we find that due to the presence of the ionic solution in between the surfaces, the intersurface repulsion dominates over the attraction in the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The effect of quenched charge heterogeneity is found to be particularly substantial in the case of large charged domains.

  6. Charged particle analyzer PLAZMAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apathy, Istvan; Endroeczy, Gabor; Szemerey, Istvan; Szendroe, Sandor

    1985-01-01

    The scientific task of the charged particle analyzer PLAZMAG, a part of the VEGA space probe, and the physical background of the measurements are described. The sensor of the device face the Sun and the comet Halley measuring the energy and mass spectrum of ion and electron components of energies lower than 25 keV. The tasks of the individual electronic parts, the design aspects and the modes of operation in different phases of the flight are dealt with. (author)

  7. Hidden charged dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Can dark matter be stabilized by charge conservation, just as the electron is in the standard model? We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact (\\rm U)(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many novel properties not shared by neutral dark matter: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may reduce its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ∼ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially impacting properties of the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We analyze all of these effects in a WIMPless model in which the hidden sector is a simplified version of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the dark matter is a hidden sector stau. We find that charged hidden dark matter is viable and consistent with the correct relic density for reasonable model parameters and dark matter masses in the range 1 GeV ∼ X ∼< 10 TeV. At the same time, in the preferred range of parameters, this model predicts cores in the dark matter halos of small galaxies and other halo properties that may be within the reach of future observations. These models therefore provide a viable and well-motivated framework for collisional dark matter with Sommerfeld enhancement, with novel implications for astrophysics and dark matter searches

  8. Search for fractional charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  9. Proximity effect and charging in mesoscopic normal metal-superconductor junction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruder, C.; Fazio, R.; Schoen, G.

    1994-01-01

    The proximity effect influences the transport properties of normal metal-superconductor heterostructures. If these systems are small they exhibit pronounced charging effects. We show that charging suppresses the proximity effect. The effect can be made visible since the charging energy and hence the proximity effect can be modulated by gate voltages. We derive these results in a unified formulation which also describes single electron tunneling, Andreev reflection and the supercurrent through normal-superconductor systems in the presence of charging effects. (orig.)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: CHARGE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combination of major and minor characteristics. The major characteristics of CHARGE syndrome are common in this disorder and occur less ... and unusually shaped external ears. While the minor characteristics of CHARGE syndrome are common in this disorder, they are also ...

  11. Dispersal and spatial heterogeneity: Single species

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Don; Ni, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A recent result for a reaction-diffusion equation is that a population diffusing at any rate in an environment in which resources vary spatially will reach a higher total equilibrium biomass than the population in an environment in which the same total resources are distributed homogeneously. This has so far been proven by Lou for the case in which the reaction term has only one parameter, m(x)">m(x)m(x), varying with spatial location x">xx, which serves as both the intrinsic growth rate coefficient and carrying capacity of the population. However, this striking result seems rather limited when applies to real populations. In order to make the model more relevant for ecologists, we consider a logistic reaction term, with two parameters, r(x)">r(x)r(x) for intrinsic growth rate, and K(x)">K(x)K(x) for carrying capacity. When r(x)">r(x)r(x) and K(x)">K(x)K(x) are proportional, the logistic equation takes a particularly simple form, and the earlier result still holds. In this paper we have established the result for the more general case of a positive correlation between r(x)">r(x)r(x) and K(x)">K(x)K(x) when dispersal rate is small. We review natural and laboratory systems to which these results are relevant and discuss the implications of the results to population theory and conservation ecology.

  12. Pion double charge exchange in the Δ33 resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirzba, A.; Toki, H.; Siciliano, E.R.; Johnson, M.B.; Gilman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the model dependence and nuclear-structure sensitivity of several Δ 33 -dominated processes contributing to pion double charge exchange on nuclei in the region of the Δ 33 resonance. These processes include the Δ 33 -nucleon interaction V NΔ and sequential scattering, in which the pion undergoes single charge exchange on two different nucleons. In all cases, the scattering takes place through the exchange of an intermediate π and ρ meson. Sequential-mediated double charge exchange is found to be only moderately sensitive to short-range correlations, meson-nucleon form factors, and the rho meson, whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange is very sensitive to all these effects. Results are given for double charge exchange on 18 O (double isobaric analog transitions) and 16 O (nonanalog transitions). Sequential double charge exchange is shown to favor non-spin-flip matrix elements of the transition operator whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange favors spin-flip matrix elements. The energy dependence of the zero-degree cross sections for V NΔ and sequential scattering are also different: Sequential tends to increase monotonically from 100 to 300 MeV, whereas V NΔ peaks at about 150 MeV. The delta-nucleon interaction is found likely to dominate over sequential scattering in nonanalog double charge exchange. The V NΔ is also large in analog double charge exchange, but it does not enable us to explain the anomalous behavior of the 18 O differential cross sections

  13. Magnetic Generation due to Mass Difference between Charge Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shi; Dan, JiaKun; Chen, ZiYu; Li, JianFeng

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of spontaneous magnetization due to the "asymmetry in mass" of charge carriers in a system is investigated. Analysis shows that when the masses of positive and negative charge carriers are identical, no magnetization is predicted. However, if the masses of two species are different, spontaneous magnetic field would appear, either due to the equipartition of magnetic energy or due to fluctuations together with a feedback mechanism. The conditions for magnetization to occur are ...

  14. Charge orders in organic charge-transfer salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Becca, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental suggestions of charge-order-driven ferroelectricity in organic charge-transfer salts, such as κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl, we investigate magnetic and charge-ordered phases that emerge in an extended two-orbital Hubbard model on the anisotropic triangular lattice at 3/4 filling. This model takes into account the presence of two organic BEDT-TTF molecules, which form a dimer on each site of the lattice, and includes short-range intramolecular and intermolecular interactions and hoppings. By using variational wave functions and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we find two polar states with charge disproportionation inside the dimer, hinting to ferroelectricity. These charge-ordered insulating phases are stabilized in the strongly correlated limit and their actual charge pattern is determined by the relative strength of intradimer to interdimer couplings. Our results suggest that ferroelectricity is not driven by magnetism, since these polar phases can be stabilized also without antiferromagnetic order and provide a possible microscopic explanation of the experimental observations. In addition, a conventional dimer-Mott state (with uniform density and antiferromagnetic order) and a nonpolar charge-ordered state (with charge-rich and charge-poor dimers forming a checkerboard pattern) can be stabilized in the strong-coupling regime. Finally, when electron–electron interactions are weak, metallic states appear, with either uniform charge distribution or a peculiar 12-site periodicity that generates honeycomb-like charge order.

  15. Highly charged ions trapping for lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, D.

    2007-10-01

    A new experimental setup dedicated to highly charged ion trapping is presented in this work. The final goal is to perform lifetime measurement of metastable states produced by our ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. Lifetimes to be measured are in the range of a few ms and more. We have measured the lifetimes of the M1 transitions of the metastable states of Ar 9+ , Ar 13+ and Ar 14+ . These measurements are useful to test the N-body problem in the relativistic range. The trap we have built, was designed a few years ago at the Weizman Institute in Israel, it allows ions with an energy of several keV to be trapped for lifetimes of about 1 second. This trap was originally designed to study the dynamics of excited molecules. We have shown for the first time how the trap operates and that it can operate with highly charged ions. We have studied the beam dynamics of highly charged ions and the trap has been tested with various species of ions and different charge states: from O + to O 6+ , from Ar 8+ to Ar 13+ , and from Kr 13+ to Kr 20+

  16. IONIZATION AND DUST CHARGING IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Caselli, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Akimkin, V. V., E-mail: ivlev@mpe.mpg.de [Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyatnitskaya Street 48, 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-10

    Ionization–recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field, and development of instabilities in protoplanetary disks. We determine a critical gas density above which the recombination of electrons and ions on the grain surface dominates over the gas-phase recombination. For this regime, we present a self-consistent analytical model, which allows us to calculate exactly the abundances of charged species in dusty gas, without making assumptions on the grain charge distribution. To demonstrate the importance of the proposed approach, we check whether the conventional approximation of low grain charges is valid for typical protoplanetary disks, and discuss the implications for dust coagulation and development of the “dead zone” in the disk. The presented model is applicable for arbitrary grain-size distributions and, for given dust properties and conditions of the disk, has only one free parameter—the effective mass of the ions, shown to have a small effect on the results. The model can be easily included in numerical simulations following the dust evolution in dense molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks.

  17. Detecting monopole charge in Weyl semimetals via quantum interference transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing; Yao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Topological Weyl semimetals can host Weyl nodes with monopole charges in momentum space. How to detect the signature of the monopole charges in quantum transport remains a challenging topic. Here, we reveal the connection between the parity of monopole charge in topological semimetals and the quantum interference corrections to the conductivity. We show that the parity of monopole charge determines the sign of the quantum interference correction, with odd and even parity yielding the weak antilocalization and weak localization effects, respectively. This is attributed to the Berry phase difference between time-reversed trajectories circulating the Fermi sphere that encloses the monopole charges. From standard Feynman diagram calculations, we further show that the weak-field magnetoconductivity at low temperatures is proportional to +√{B } in double-Weyl semimetals and -√{B } in single-Weyl semimetals, respectively, which could be verified experimentally.

  18. Transition density of charge-exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The transition density between parent and analogue states is studied with special reference to its role in charge-exchange nuclear reactions. The structure of the target nucleus is described in a perturbative approach, in which the Coulomb and asymmetry potentials mix the eigenstates of a charge-independent single-particle Hamiltonian. In this model formulae are derived for the transition density, the Coulomb displacement energy and the neutron-proton density difference, and their relationship is used to estimate the transition density. This estimate shows that: the largest contribution comes from the density of the excess neutrons; the weight of the Coulomb-mixing effect is small up to excess neutron number 10, and grows rapidly beyond; the weight of the core polarization term induced by the excess neutrons is modest and is the same for all nuclei. It is indicated that the Coulomb effect may explain the departure from the Lane model of nucleon charge-exchange scattering found for heavy nuclei, whereas the core polarization may account for the observed anomalous dependence of the deg 0 pion charge-exchange cross section on the number of excess neutrons. (author)

  19. Theory of charged impurity scattering in two dimensional graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, S.; Hwang, E. H.; Rossi, E.; Sarma, S. Das

    2008-01-01

    We review the physics of charged impurities in the vicinity of graphene. The long-range nature of Coulomb impurities affects both the nature of the ground state density profile as well as graphene's transport properties. We discuss the screening of a single Coulomb impurity and the ensemble averaged density profile of graphene in the presence of many randomly distributed impurities. Finally, we discuss graphene's transport properties due to scattering off charged impurities both at low and hi...

  20. Multiferroicity of carbon-based charge-transfer magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Gong, Maogang; Chen, Xiaomin; Shastry, Tejas A; Sakidja, Ridwan; Yuan, Guoliang; Hersam, Mark C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-27

    A new type of carbon charge-transfer magnet, consisting of a fullerene acceptor and single-walled carbon nanotube donor, is demonstrated, which exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism and magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In addition, external stimuli (electric/magnetic/elastic field) and the concentration of a nanocarbon complex enable the tunabilities of the magnetization and ME coupling due to the control of the charge transfer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Quantum theory of space charge limited current in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel.gonzalez@uaslp.mx [Cátedras Conacyt, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78000, Mexico and Coordinación para la Innovación y la Aplicación de la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78000 (Mexico)

    2015-02-28

    We present a quantum model of space charge limited current transport inside trap-free solids with planar geometry in the mean field approximation. We use a simple transformation which allows us to find the exact analytical solution for the steady state current case. We use our approach to find a Mott-Gurney like behavior and the mobility for single charge carriers in the quantum regime in solids.

  2. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  3. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  4. O--H charge exchange in cold, dense, hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.

    1977-05-01

    It is pointed out that the accidentally resonant charge exchange reaction, O + + H 0 reverse arrows O 0 + H + , is an important mechanism for causing the loss of singly charged oxygen ions from oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasmas. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented which show that the fraction of oxygen lost because of charge exchange exceeds 1 / 3 when the parameters n/sub e/ approx. 10 13 cm -3 , n/sub H//sup o/ approx. 10 11 cm -3 and T/sub e/ approx. 3 eV are attained

  5. Transfer RNA: a dancer between charging and mis-charging for protein biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Enduo

    2013-10-01

    Transfer RNA plays a fundamental role in the protein biosynthesis as an adaptor molecule by functioning as a biological link between the genetic nucleotide sequence in the mRNA and the amino acid sequence in the protein. To perform its role in protein biosynthesis, it has to be accurately recognized by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) to generate aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs). The correct pairing between an amino acid with its cognate tRNA is crucial for translational quality control. Production and utilization of mis-charged tRNAs are usually detrimental for all the species, resulting in cellular dysfunctions. Correct aa-tRNAs formation is collectively controlled by aaRSs with distinct mechanisms and/or other trans-factors. However, in very limited instances, mis-charged tRNAs are intermediate for specific pathways or essential components for the translational machinery. Here, from the point of accuracy in tRNA charging, we review our understanding about the mechanism ensuring correct aa-tRNA generation. In addition, some unique mis-charged tRNA species necessary for the organism are also briefly described.

  6. Charged Galileon black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory

  7. Charged boson stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Rueda H., Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2013-07-01

    We study time-independent, spherically symmetric, self-gravitating systems minimally coupled to a scalar field with U(1) gauge symmetry: charged boson stars. We find numerical solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations coupled to the relativistic Klein-Gordon equation. It is shown that bound stable configurations exist only for values of the coupling constant less than or equal to a certain critical value. The metric coefficients and the relevant physical quantities, such as the total mass and charge, turn out to be, in general, bound functions of the radial coordinate, reaching their maximum values at a critical value of the scalar field at the origin. We discuss the stability problem from both the quantitative and qualitative point of view. We take into account the electromagnetic contribution to the total mass and investigate the stability issue considering the binding energy per particle. We verify the existence of configurations with positive binding energy in which objects that are apparently bound can be unstable against small perturbations, in full analogy with the effect observed in the mass-radius relation of neutron stars.

  8. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  9. A Common Single-Site Pt(II)–O(OH) xSpecies Stabilized by Sodium on “Active” and “Inert” Supports Catalyzes the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming [Department; Liu, Jilei [Department; Lee, Sungsik [X-ray; Zugic, Branko [Department; Huang, Jun [School; Allard, Lawrence F. [Materials; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria [Department

    2015-03-05

    While it is long known that different types of support oxides have different capabilities to anchor metals and thus tailor the catalytic behavior, it is not always clear whether the support is a mere carrier of the active metal site, itself not participating directly in the reaction pathway. We report that catalytically similar single-atom centric Pt sites are formed by binding to sodium ions through ?O ligands, the ensemble being equally effective on supports as diverse as TiO2, L-zeolites, and mesoporous silica MCM-41. Loading of 0.5 wt.% Pt on all these supports, preserves the Pt in atomic dispersion as Pt(II), the Pt-O(OH)x- species catalyzing the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) from ~120 to 400 oC. Since the effect of support is ?indirect,? these findings pave the way for the use of a variety of earth-abundant supports as carriers of atomically dispersed platinum for application to catalytic fuel-gas processing.

  10. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  11. Like-charged protein-polyelectrolyte complexation driven by charge patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    We study the pair complexation of a single, highly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chain (of 25 or 50 monomers) with like-charged patchy protein models (CPPMs) by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-salt Langevin dynamics computer simulations. Our previously introduced set of CPPMs embraces well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size with mono- and multipole moments comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We observe large binding affinities between the CPPM and the like-charged PE in the tens of the thermal energy, kBT, that are favored by decreasing salt concentration and increasing charge of the patch(es). Our systematic analysis shows a clear correlation between the distance-resolved potentials of mean force, the number of ions released from the PE, and CPPM orientation effects. In particular, we find a novel two-site binding behavior for PEs in the case of two-patched CPPMs, where intermediate metastable complex structures are formed. In order to describe the salt-dependence of the binding affinity for mainly dipolar (one-patched) CPPMs, we introduce a combined counterion-release/Debye-Hückel model that quantitatively captures the essential physics of electrostatic complexation in our systems.

  12. π--induced single charge exchange on polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Burleson, S.; Blanchard, T.

    1995-01-01

    Asymmetries, A y , for the (π - ,π 0 ) reaction on polarized 3 He were measured using the pion beam of the P3W channel at LAMPF. The π 0 were detected with the new Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) in coincidence with recoiling tritons. The recoil detector consisted of scintillation-counter telescopes and a wire chamber that provided energy-loss and direction information, respectively. The polarized gaseous 3 He target developed at TRIUMF was modified and run with the use of two diode lasers. Polarizations were typically 50%. The A y taken at T π = 200 MeV between 60 and 105 degrees were found to be strongly angle-dependent. The results will be compared with the theoretical predictions

  13. Laser spectroscopic investigation of singly and doubly charged thorium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielking, Johannes; Meier, David-Marcel; Glowacki, Przemyslaw; Okhapkin, Maksim V.; Peik, Ekkehard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    The {sup 229}Th isotope possesses a unique, low-energy nuclear isomeric state at about 7.8(5) eV. This fact has stimulated the development of novel ideas in the borderland between atomic and nuclear physics, for example the use as an optical nuclear clock. Since the required precise information on the isomer energy is not yet available, it is intensely searched for using different experimental approaches. For the excitation of the nuclear isomer via electronic bridge or NEET processes, we plan to use two-photon laser excitation of high-lying electronic levels in Th{sup +}. We recently expanded our search range to higher energies and measured 38 previously unknown energy levels in the range from 7.8 eV to 8.7 eV. We also prepare to study the nuclear structure of the isomeric state in cooperation with the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium at LMU Munich, using trapped recoil ions, where the isomeric state is populated via α-decay from {sup 233}U. For this purpose we investigate the hyperfine structure of suitable transitions of Th{sup 2+}.

  14. Model Predictive Control-Based Fast Charging for Vehicular Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Song

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Battery fast charging is one of the most significant and difficult techniques affecting the commercialization of electric vehicles (EVs. In this paper, we propose a fast charge framework based on model predictive control, with the aim of simultaneously reducing the charge duration, which represents the out-of-service time of vehicles, and the increase in temperature, which represents safety and energy efficiency during the charge process. The RC model is employed to predict the future State of Charge (SOC. A single mode lumped-parameter thermal model and a neural network trained by real experimental data are also applied to predict the future temperature in simulations and experiments respectively. A genetic algorithm is then applied to find the best charge sequence under a specified fitness function, which consists of two objectives: minimizing the charging duration and minimizing the increase in temperature. Both simulation and experiment demonstrate that the Pareto front of the proposed method dominates that of the most popular constant current constant voltage (CCCV charge method.

  15. Metrology and Transport of Multiply Charged Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Dhruva

    The transport and interaction of singly- and multiply-charged ions with matter has been studied. The experiments were performed in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The low- and hyperthermal-energy ion beamline was used as a source of singly charged ions, while the CUEBIT facility was used as a source of multiply charged ions. The kinetic energy of the ion beam obtained from the CUEBIT is offset from the nominal value expected from the applied electrostatic potentials. These offsets were studied by measuring the kinetic energy of the beam using a retarding field analyzer (RFA). The offset was attributed to the space charge of the electron beam that is used to create the multiply charged ions. The charge density of the electron beam was varied by changing operational parameters of the electron beam, namely the electron beam current and the energy of the electron beam. Ion beams of Ar4+ and Ar8+ were extracted from the source and the offsets observed in the kinetic energy were related to the variation in the space charge potential of the electron beam. Measurements of these offsets, ranging from 100 eV/Q to 300 eV/Q, are significant and important for experiments that aim to utilize the potential energy of slow multiply charged ions. The transport of ions using capillaries has been studied to investigate the viability of ion-guiding as a means for a novel ion delivery mechanism. Results on transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ionguided mechanisms are presented. The angle- and position-dependent transport properties were found to depend on the material of the capillary (specifically, whether metal or insulator) and the geometry of the capillary. Rb+ ions at a kinetic energy of 1 keV were transmitted through metal and glass capillaries that were a few centimeters in length and a few millimeters in diameter. Oscillations were observed in the capillaries made of glass which were absent in the metal capillaries

  16. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    potential and charge are studied by electrophoresis. Here, the velocity of the particles is measured while they are moving in an electric field. Using our real-space CLSM setup, we find that for a single-component system, the charge on the particles decreases with increasing volume fraction. Apart from structures that oppositely charged particles form close to thermodynamic equilibrium, we also study pattern formation when the system is driven out of equilibrium by an electric field. When oppositely charged particles are driven in opposite directions, the collisions between them cause particle of the same kind to form lanes. By combining our CLSM experiments with Brownian dynamics computer simulations, we study the structure and the dynamics of the suspension on the single-particle level. We find that the number of particles in a lane increases continuously with the field strength. By studying the dynamics and fluctuations parallel and perpendicular to the electric field direction, we identify the key mechanism of lane-formation. We show that pattern formation can easily become more complicated when we introduce alternating current (AC) fields. In addition to the formation of lanes parallel to the field-axis, bands of like-charged particles can form perpendicular to it. When the particles are sufficiently mobile, the system can be remixed again by changing the frequency. When AC-fields with higher field strengths are used, we show that complex patterns, including rotating instabilities, can emerge. The results in this thesis yield fundamental insight in electrophoresis, crystallization and pattern formation when systems are driven out of equilibrium. The results on lane- and band-formation can be relevant for the design of electronic ink (e-ink), where electrically driven oppositely charged particles are used to change the image on a piece of electronic paper.

  17. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  18. Surface charge compensation for a highly charged ion emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.W.; Hamza, A.V.; Newman, M.W.; Holder, J.P.; Schneider, D.H.G.; Schenkel, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface charge compensation electron flood gun has been added to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) highly charged ion (HCI) emission microscope. HCI surface interaction results in a significant charge residue being left on the surface of insulators and semiconductors. This residual charge causes undesirable aberrations in the microscope images and a reduction of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass resolution when studying the surfaces of insulators and semiconductors. The benefits and problems associated with HCI microscopy and recent results of the electron flood gun enhanced HCI microscope are discussed

  19. Understanding the Linkage between Charging Network Coverage and Charging Opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Changzheng [ORNL; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Kontou, Eleftheria [University of Florida, Gainesville; Wu, Xing [Lamar University

    2016-01-01

    Using GPS-based travel survey data, this paper estimates the relationship between public charging network coverage and charging opportunity, defined as the probability of being able to access public charging for a driver at one of his/her stops or at one travel day. Understanding this relationship is of important interests to the electric vehicle industry and government in determining appropriate charging infrastructure deployment level and estimating the impact of public charging on market adoption of electric vehicles. The analysis finds that drivers trip destinations concentrate on a few popular places. If top 1% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, on average, drivers will be able to access public charging at 20% of all their stops and 1/3 of their travel days; If 20% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, drivers will be able to access public charging at 89% of all their stops and 94% of their travel days. These findings are encouraging, implying charging network can be efficiently designed by concentrating at a few popular places while still providing a high level of charging opportunity.

  20. A Single-Pulse Integrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1974-01-01

    A single-pulse integrator is described. It gives a relative measure of the integral of the output signal from a coil monitor on the Risø 10 MeV linear accelerator, and displays the value on a digital voltmeter. The reproduccibility is found to be better than ±1% for an accelerated pulse charge...