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Sample records for single-well tracer method

  1. Single well tracer method to evaluate enhanced recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Jr., Clyde Q.; Baldwin, Jr., David E.

    1978-01-01

    Data useful to evaluate the effectiveness of or to design an enhanced recovery process (the recovery process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon-bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well) are obtained by a process which comprises sequentially: determining hydrocarbon saturation in the formation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating the formation, injecting sufficient of the mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore penetrating the formation, and determining by the single well tracer method a hydrocarbon saturation profile in a volume from which hydrocarbons are moved. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed by U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. The process is useful to evaluate surfactant floods, water floods, polymer floods, CO.sub.2 floods, caustic floods, micellar floods, and the like in the reservoir in much less time at greatly reduced costs, compared to conventional multi-well pilot test.

  2. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  3. Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.H.

    1994-11-01

    Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington

  4. Are single-well "push-pull" tests suitable tracer methods for aquifer characterization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebig, Klaus; Zeilfelder, Sarah; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Scheytt, Traugott; Marui, Atsunao

    2013-04-01

    borehole and gravel pack? How does density difference between the original groundwater and the test solution influence the tracer breakthrough curves? To solve these questions, seven push-pull tests were performed under controlled boundary conditions in the same well DD-2 (100 m depth). Only single parameters, as e.g. flow rate or salinization of the test solution, were varied during the experiments. By conducting these different test setups, conclusions could be drawn about the application of the push-pull method under different settings. References: Hebig, K.H., Ito, N., Scheytt, T.J. & Marui, A. (2011). Hydraulic and hydrochemical characterization of deep coastal sedimentary basins by single-well Push-Pull tests. GSA Annual Meeting, 9-12 October 2011, Minneapolis, USA. Zeilfelder, S., Ito, N., Marui, A., Hebig, K. & Scheytt, T. (2012). Push-Pull-Test und Tracer-Test in ei-nem tiefen Grundwasserleiter in Kameoka, Japan. Kurzfassung in: Liedl, R., Burghardt, D., Simon, E., Reimann, T. & Kaufmann-Knoke (Hg.). Grundwasserschutz und Grundwassernutzung. Tagung der Fachsektion Hydrogeologie in der DGG (FH-DGG). 16. - 20. Mai 2012, Dresden. Kurfassungen der Vorträge und Poster. Schriftenreihe der DGG, Heft 78, S. 192.

  5. Measurement of LNAPL flow using single-well tracer dilution techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Tom; Taylor, Geoffrey Ryan; Iltis, Gabriel; Lyverse, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of single-well tracer dilution techniques to resolve the rate of light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) flow through wells and the adjacent geologic formation. Laboratory studies are presented in which a fluorescing tracer is added to LNAPL in wells. An in-well mixer keeps the tracer well mixed in the LNAPL. Tracer concentrations in LNAPL are measured through time using a fiber optic cable and a spectrometer. Results indicate that the rate of tracer depletion is proportional to the rate of LNAPL flow through the well and the adjacent formation. Tracer dilution methods are demonstrated for vertically averaged LNAPL Darcy velocities of 0.00048 to 0.11 m/d and LNAPL thicknesses of 9 to 24 cm. Over the range of conditions studied, results agree closely with steady-state LNAPL flow rates imposed by pumping. A key parameter for estimating LNAPL flow rates in the formation is the flow convergence factor alpha. Measured convergence factors for 0.030-inch wire wrap, 0.030-inch-slotted polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and 0.010-inch-slotted PVC are 1.7, 0.91, and 0.79, respectively. In addition, methods for using tracer dilution data to determine formation transmissivity to LNAPL are presented. Results suggest that single-well tracer dilution techniques are a viable approach for measuring in situ LNAPL flow and formation transmissivity to LNAPL.

  6. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  7. Analytical solutions for efficient interpretation of single-well push-pull tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single-well push-pull tracer tests have been used to characterize the extent, fate, and transport of subsurface contamination. Analytical solutions provide one alternative for interpreting test results. In this work, an exact analytical solution to two-dimensional equations descr...

  8. A New Kind of Single-Well Tracer Test for Assessing Subsurface Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Lu, Z.; Reimus, P. W.; Katzman, D.

    2017-12-01

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests have historically been interpreted using the idealized assumption of tracer path reversibility (i.e., negligible background flow), with background flow due to natural hydraulic gradient being an un-modeled confounding factor. However, we have recently discovered that it is possible to use background flow to our advantage to extract additional information about the subsurface. To wit: we have developed a new kind of single-well tracer test that exploits flow due to natural gradient to estimate the variance of the log hydraulic conductivity field of a heterogeneous aquifer. The test methodology involves injection under forced gradient and withdrawal under natural gradient, and makes use of a relationship, discovered using a large-scale Monte Carlo study and machine learning techniques, between power law breakthrough curve tail exponent and log-hydraulic conductivity variance. We will discuss how we performed the computational study and derived this relationship and then show an application example in which our new single-well tracer test interpretation scheme was applied to estimation of heterogeneity of a formation at the chromium contamination site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed core hole records exist at the same site, from which it was possible to estimate the log hydraulic conductivity variance using a Kozeny-Carman relation. The variances estimated using our new tracer test methodology and estimated by direct inspection of core were nearly identical, corroborating the new methodology. Assessment of aquifer heterogeneity is of critical importance to deployment of amendments associated with in-situ remediation strategies, since permeability contrasts potentially reduce the interaction between amendment and contaminant. Our new tracer test provides an easy way to obtain this information.

  9. Single-well tracer push-pull test sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dealing with a parallel-fracture system of infinite lateral extension, four characteristic regimes of tracer signal sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and w. r. to fracture spacing s (whose reciprocal defines fracture density, or the fluid-rock interface area per volume) can be identified during the pull phase of a single-well push-pull test, also depending upon the ratio between push-phase duration Tpush and a characteristic time scale Ts (defined by s2 / D = Ts , with D denoting the tracer's effective diffusion coefficient): early-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture aperture, but insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing; sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture first increases, then decreases with Tpush / Ts (thus there will be an optimum in terms of to Tpush / Ts , at early pull times); mid-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, but insensitive w. r. to fracture aperture; sensitivity w. r. to fracture spacing increases with Tpush / Ts ; late-time regime: with increasing pull duration, tracer signals become increasingly insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, while regaining sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture; 'very late'-time regime: sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture becomes independent upon Tpush / Ts . From these different regimes, some recommendations can be derived regarding the design and dimensioning of dual-tracer single-well push-pull tests for the specific purposes of geothermal reservoir characterization, using conservative solutes and heat as tracers. Acknowledgement: This study is funded by MWK Niedersachsen (Lower-Saxony's Science and Culture Ministry) and by Baker Hughes (Celle) within task unit 'G6' of the Collaborative Research Project 'gebo' (Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling).

  10. Measurement of LNAPL flux using single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tim; Sale, Tom; Lyverse, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The stability of subsurface Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) is a key factor driving expectations for remedial measures at LNAPL sites. The conventional approach to resolving LNAPL stability has been to apply Darcy's Equation. This paper explores an alternative approach wherein single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are used to resolve LNAPL stability. As a first step, an implicit solution for single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests is derived. This includes key assumptions and limits on the allowable time between intermittent mixing events. Second, single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are conducted under conditions of known LNAPL flux. This includes a laboratory sand tank study and two field tests at active LNAPL recovery wells. Results from the sand tank studies indicate that LNAPL fluxes in wells can be transformed into formation fluxes using corrections for (1) LNAPL thicknesses in the well and formation and (2) convergence of flow to the well. Using the apparent convergence factor from the sand tank experiment, the average error between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes is 4%. Results from the field studies show nearly identical known and measured LNAPL fluxes at one well. At the second well the measured fluxes appear to exceed the known value by a factor of two. Agreement between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes, within a factor of two, indicates that single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing can be a viable means of resolving LNAPL stability. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  11. Single-well "push-pull" partitioning tracer test for NAPL detection in the subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istok, Jonathan D; Field, Jennifer A; Schroth, Martin H; Davis, Brian M; Dwarakanath, Varadarajan

    2002-06-15

    Previous environmental applications of partitioning tracer tests to detect and quantify nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in the subsurface have been limited to well-to-well tests. However, theory and numerical modeling suggests that single-well injection-extraction ("push-pull") partitioning tracer tests can also potentially detect and quantify NAPL contamination. In this type of test, retardation factors for injected partitioning tracers are estimated from the increase in apparent dispersion observed in extraction-phase breakthrough curves in the presence of NAPL. A series of laboratory push-pull tests was conducted in physical aquifer models (PAMs) packed with natural aquifer sediment prepared with and without the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Field tests were conducted in an aquifer contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbon NAPL. Injected test solutions contained a suite of partitioning and conservative (nonpartitioning) alcohol tracers. Laboratory push-pull partitioning tracer tests were able to detect and quantify sorption of partitioning tracers to aquifer sediment (in the absence of NAPL) and to detect NAPL when it was present. NAPL saturations computed from estimated retardation factors bracketed those computed from known volumes of emplaced NAPL in the sediment pack. However, numerical modeling with assumed homogeneous NAPL distribution and linear equilibrium partitioning of tracers between aqueous and NAPL phases was unable to reproduce all features of observed breakthrough curves. Excavation of the sediment pack after all tests indicated that a portion of the emplaced NAPL had sunk to the bottom of the PAM invalidating the modeling assumption of homogeneous NAPL distribution. Moreover, the apparent dispersion in extraction-phase breakthrough curves decreased when the injection-extraction pumping rate was decreased, suggesting that mass transfer limitations existed during laboratory tests. Field push-pull partitioning tracer tests were

  12. Use of single-well tracer dilution tests to evaluate LNAPL flux at seven field sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Nicholas; Sale, Tom; Smith, Tim; Lyverse, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Petroleum liquids, referred to as light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs), are commonly found beneath petroleum facilities. Concerns with LNAPLs include migration into clean soils, migration beyond property boundaries, and discharges to surface water. Single-well tracer dilution techniques were used to measure LNAPL fluxes through 50 wells at 7 field sites. A hydrophobic tracer was mixed into LNAPL in a well. Intensities of fluorescence associated with the tracer were measured over time using a spectrometer and a fiber optic cable. LNAPL fluxes were estimated using observed changes in the tracer concentrations over time. Measured LNAPL fluxes range from 0.006 to 2.6 m/year with a mean and median of 0.15 and 0.064 m/year, respectively. Measured LNAPL fluxes are two to four orders of magnitude smaller than a common groundwater flux of 30 m/year. Relationships between LNAPL fluxes and possible governing parameters were evaluated. Observed LNAPL fluxes are largely independent of LNAPL thickness in wells. Natural losses of LNAPL through dissolution, evaporation, and subsequent biodegradation, were estimated using a simple mass balance, measured LNAPL fluxes in wells, and an assumed stable LNAPL extent. The mean and median of the calculated loss rates were found to be 24.0 and 5.0 m3/ha/year, respectively. Mean and median losses are similar to values reported by others. Coupling observed LNAPL fluxes to observed rates of natural LNAPL depletion suggests that natural losses of LNAPL may be an important parameter controlling the overall extent of LNAPL bodies.

  13. The anomaly in a breakthrough curve of a single well "push-pull" tracer test: A density driven effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilfelder, Sarah; Hebig, Klaus; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Scheytt, Traugott; Marui, Atsunao

    2013-04-01

    What method is appropriate to investigate an aquifer when there is only one well available? A single well "push-pull" tracer test (PP Test) may be a suitable method in order to characterize an aquifer and to obtain information about the hydraulic and chemical properties when only one well is available for the investigations. In a PP test, a test solution that contains a known amount of solutes and a conservative tracer is injected into the aquifer ("push") and extracted afterwards ("pull"). Optionally, the test solution is flushed out of the well and the casing with untreated test solution with a so called "chaser" before being extracted. Also between the injection and the extraction phase a drifting time may be included. The breakthrough of the tracer during the extraction phase is measured and used for analyses and interpretation. In the last three years, several PP Test campaigns were conducted at two different test sites in Japan (Hebig et al. 2011, Zeilfelder et al. 2012). The aim was to investigate the applicability of the PP Test method in different geological settings and in different types of aquifers. The latest field campaign thus focussed on the question how variations of the setup are influencing the breakthrough curve of the PP Test in order to develop and enhance this method. Also the standardization of the PP Test was an aim of this study. During the campaign, a total of seven PP Tests were performed, while only single aspects of the setup were varied from test to test. The tests differed in injection and extraction rate, in the salinity of the injected test solution and in the use of a chaser solution. The general shapes of the breakthrough curves were similar and conclusions about the repeatability of the PP Test could be drawn. However, a sharp anomaly was observed in the breakthrough curve of one specific setup type. By repeating this PP test under the same boundary conditions, we were able to recreate the anomaly and could exclude any technical

  14. Single well thermal tracer test, a new experimental set up for characterizing thermal transport in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Floriant; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Thermal transport in fractured media depends on the hydrological properties of fractures and thermal characteristics of rock. Tracer tests using heat as tracer can thus be a good alternative to characterize fractured media for shallow geothermal needs. This study investigates the possibility of implementing a new thermal tracer test set up, the single well thermal tracer test, to characterize hydraulic and thermal transport properties of fractured crystalline rock. The experimental setup is based on injecting hot water in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer in the borehole while pumping and monitoring the temperature in a fracture crossing the same borehole at greater elevation. One difficulty comes from the fact that injection and withdrawal are achieved in the same borehole involving thermal losses along the injection tube that may disturb the heat recovery signal. To be able to well localize the heat influx, we implemented a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS) which allows the temperature monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolution (29 centimeters and 30 seconds respectively). Several tests, at different pumping and injection rates, were performed in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). We show through signal processing how the thermal breakthrough may be extracted thanks to Fiber-Optic distributed temperature measurements. In particular, we demonstrate how detailed distributed temperature measurements were useful to identify different inflows and to estimate how much heat was transported and stored within the fractures network. Thermal breakthrough curves of single well thermal tracer tests were then interpreted with a simple analytical model to characterize hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the fractured media. We finally discuss the advantages of these tests compared to cross-borehole thermal tracer tests.

  15. Single well techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The single well technique method includes measurement of parameters of groundwater flow in saturated rock. For determination of filtration velocity the dilution of radioactive tracer is measured, for direction logging the collimeter is rotated in the probe linked with the compass. The limiting factor for measurement of high filtration velocities is the occurrence of turbulent flow. The single well technique is used in civil engineering projects, water works and subsurface drainage of liquid waste from disposal sites. The radioactive tracer method for logging the vertical fluid movement in bore-holes is broadly used in groundwater survey and exploitation. (author)

  16. Single-well and inter-well dual-tracer test design for quantifying phase volumes and interface areas in subsurface flow and transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Licha, T.; Maier, F.; Nottebohm, M.; Schaffer, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Technology-relevant georeservoirs in the realm of energy production (such as: spent-radionuclide repositories, gas-storage, geothermal, as well as CCS candidate reservoirs) contain mobile and immobile fluid regions, and often also different fluid and solid phases. The lifetime of a particular reservoir (from a hydraulic, thermal, geomechanical and/or hydrogeochemical point of view) depends on the volumes and/or interface areas of some of these regions and/or phases. Mostly, their lifetime-effective values cannot be measured by geophysical and hydraulic methods. Since they essentially relate to fluid-based transport processes, attempting to measure them by tracer tests is a sensible endeavour. However, in designing and dimensioning such tracer tests, one should keep in mind that not every tracer test is sensitive w. r. to every fluid transport parameter. A certain complementarity exists, w. r. to parameter sensitivity, between single-well and inter-well methods, between equilibrium and kinetic exchange processes, between volume and area parameters. Mobile-fluid volumes can be measured from inter-well conservative-tracer tests, whereas single-well push-pull tests are generally insensitive w. r. to mobile-fluid volumes. Immobile-fluid volumes, in single-phase systems, are rather difficult to measure, by either kind of test. Different-phase volumes can be determined from inter-well tests using partitioning tracers at equilibrium exchange between phases; whereas single-well tracer push-pull tests are rather insensitive w. r. to tracer exchange processes at equilibrium. Im-/mobile fluid, or inter-phase interface areas can be determined from single-well tracer push-pull tests relying on kinetic exchange processes between compartments or phases. Single-well tests are often believed to be more sensitive w. r. to such processes than w. r. to advective-dispersive processes, and than inter-well tests. Inter-well tests are not physically insensitive w. r. to kinetic exchange

  17. Deep groundwater flow systems and their characterization in single-well settings by ''push-pull'' tracer tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebig-Schubert, Klaus

    2014-11-21

    This thesis demonstrates the growing importance of deep groundwater research and the increasing demand for the development of suitable single-well test methods. At the forefront of the research on groundwater in the deep underground, radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories, CO{sub 2} storage, geothermal energy supply, and aquifer storage and recovery systems (ASR) are on the agenda. The developments of suitable methods for investigating these resources are a main target. Currently available methods show considerable limitations. Accordingly, comprehensive methods for the hydraulic and hydrochemical characterization of deeper aquifers with single-well access are needed. Therefore, the goal of this PhD thesis was to identify, test, and enhance potentially suitable single-well methods for characterization of groundwater flow and solute transport in such settings. For this, several Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal (''push-pull'') tracer tests were applied at the Hamasato field site (Horonobe, Japan) in a ∝100 m deep groundwater monitoring well. Aim was to characterize the impact of a dynamic saltwater-freshwater interface on a coastal aquifer. Based on the experiences of the first methodological test, a second field campaign was conducted. This campaign focused on a systematic evaluation of the push-pull tracer test method for the first time at all. The experiments focused on the investigation of the so-called ''chaser'' and its impact on the test results. The chaser is a specific part of many push-pull tracer tests setups. From these experiments, a specific test design for the investigation of the saltwater-freshwater interface in a single-well setting was developed. The application of this design on questions regarding different fluids within the same system, e.g. different mineralized fluids (saltwater-freshwater-interface, ASR) or temperatures (geothermal research), are promising future approaches for

  18. Fluorescent dye imaging of the volume sampled by single well forced-gradient tracer tests evaluated in a laboratory-scale aquifer physical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L.; Wilson, Ryan D.; Thornton, Steven F.

    2012-02-01

    This study presents a new method to visualise forced-gradient tracer tests in 2-D using a laboratory-scale aquifer physical model. Experiments were designed to investigate the volume of aquifer sampled in vertical dipole flow tracer tests (DFTT) and push-pull tests (PPT), using a miniature monitoring well and straddle packer arrangement equipped with solute injection and recovery chambers. These tests have previously been used to estimate bulk aquifer hydraulic and transport properties for the evaluation of natural attenuation and other remediation approaches. Experiments were performed in a silica glass bead-filled box, using a fluorescent tracer (fluorescein) to deduce conservative solute transport paths. Digital images of fluorescein transport were captured under ultraviolet light and processed to analyse tracer plume geometry and obtain point-concentration breakthrough histories. Inorganic anion mixtures were also used to obtain conventional tracer breakthrough histories. Concentration data from the conservative tracer breakthrough curves was compared with the digital images and a well characterised numerical model. The results show that the peak tracer breakthrough response in dipole flow tracer tests samples a zone of aquifer close to the well screen, while the sampling volume of push-pull tests is limited by the length of the straddle packers used. The effective sampling volume of these single well forced-gradient tests in isotropic conditions can be estimated with simple equations. The experimental approach offers the opportunity to evaluate under controlled conditions the theoretical basis, design and performance of DFTTs and PPTs in porous media in relation to measured flow and transport properties. DFTT = Dipole Flow Tracer Test, PPT = Push Pull Tracer Test.

  19. Fluorescent dye imaging of the volume sampled by single well forced-gradient tracer tests evaluated in a laboratory-scale aquifer physical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L; Wilson, Ryan D; Thornton, Steven F

    2012-02-01

    This study presents a new method to visualise forced-gradient tracer tests in 2-D using a laboratory-scale aquifer physical model. Experiments were designed to investigate the volume of aquifer sampled in vertical dipole flow tracer tests (DFTT) and push-pull tests (PPT), using a miniature monitoring well and straddle packer arrangement equipped with solute injection and recovery chambers. These tests have previously been used to estimate bulk aquifer hydraulic and transport properties for the evaluation of natural attenuation and other remediation approaches. Experiments were performed in a silica glass bead-filled box, using a fluorescent tracer (fluorescein) to deduce conservative solute transport paths. Digital images of fluorescein transport were captured under ultraviolet light and processed to analyse tracer plume geometry and obtain point-concentration breakthrough histories. Inorganic anion mixtures were also used to obtain conventional tracer breakthrough histories. Concentration data from the conservative tracer breakthrough curves was compared with the digital images and a well characterised numerical model. The results show that the peak tracer breakthrough response in dipole flow tracer tests samples a zone of aquifer close to the well screen, while the sampling volume of push-pull tests is limited by the length of the straddle packers used. The effective sampling volume of these single well forced-gradient tests in isotropic conditions can be estimated with simple equations. The experimental approach offers the opportunity to evaluate under controlled conditions the theoretical basis, design and performance of DFTTs and PPTs in porous media in relation to measured flow and transport properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tracer-based quantification of individual frac discharge in single-well multiple-frac backflow: sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    a simplified flow and tracer transport model (using FEOW and assuming Darcian flow within the matrix, Hagen-Poiseuille flow within the waterfrac, and either D or H-P flow within the gel-proppant fracs), whose main findings are: (1) late tracer signals are almost independent on matrix porosity, permeability distribution, frac area (length), thickness and effective aperture, while being highly sensitive to local discharge values; 'late' means a backflow or production volume at least fivefold the injected chaser volume; (2a) early tracer signals (concentration 'peak' intervals) may exhibit slight 'acceleration' and 'damping' with increasing matrix porosity or increasing frac aperture (a 'paradoxical' behaviour which is not really surprising for single-well 'push-then-backflow' tests, actually owing to flow-field dispersion[4]), and (2b) a non-monotonous response to varying frac area, being almost insensitive to frac area as long as the linear-flow regime prevails against the radial-flow regime (effects of the latter only becoming visible at very low frac areas); (2c) the effects of these various factors on early-time tracer signals are not unambiguously discernible from each other, and this ambiguity would persist even if frac-resolved (in-situ) discharge metering were feasible. For each of the three fracs (k=1,2,3), a 'type-curve' set Ck(Q,t) (parametrized by discharge values Q) can be generated. Since every frac received a different tracer, tracer signals measured within the overall backflow will differ from individual-frac type-curves by mere dilution (no 'superposition'). Type-curve dilution by factor Qk/Qtotal can be compared to measured tracer concentrations in the total discharge, ck(ti), (i = 1, ..., no. of tracer samplings). From a formal point of view, the unknown discharge values Qk can be determined as the solution of a linear optimization task subject to the constraint Q1 + Q2 + Q3 = Qtotal (the latter being a measured value). It is recommendable to

  1. Biological tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  2. Tracers and tracing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclerc, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The first international congress on 'Tracers and tracing methods' took place in Nancy in May 2001. The objective of this second congress was to present the current status and trends on tracing methods and their applications. It has given the opportunity to people from different fields to exchange scientific information and knowledge about tracer methodologies and applications. The target participants were the researchers, engineers and technologists of various industrial and research sectors: chemical engineering, environment, food engineering, bio-engineering, geology, hydrology, civil engineering, iron and steel production... Two sessions have been planned to cover both fundamental and industrial aspects: 1)fundamental development (tomography, tracer camera visualization and particles tracking; validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations by tracer experiments and numerical residence time distribution; new tracers and detectors or improvement and development of existing tracing methods; data treatments and modeling; reactive tracer experiments and interpretation) 2)industrial applications (geology, hydrogeology and oil field applications; civil engineering, mineral engineering and metallurgy applications; chemical engineering; environment; food engineering and bio-engineering). The program included 5 plenary lectures, 23 oral communications and around 50 posters. Only 9 presentations are interested for the INIS database

  3. Single-well and inter-well dual-tracer tests for CCS pilot site characterization at Heletz (Israel): scope and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Bensabat, Jac; Niemi, Auli; Licha, Tobias; Lange, Torsten; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2013-04-01

    A semi-analytical approximation to tracer signals is proposed for evaluating the chances of unambiguous tracer test interpretation for the CCS pilot site at Heletz (www.co2mustang.eu/Heletz.aspx), given the multiple constraints imposed upon tracer test execution at any deep geological formation regarding maximum pressure buildup admissible, fluid turnover rates, injection-fluid availability and conditioning capabilities, fluid disposal capacity, maximum test duration, tracer quantities/species available, tracer metering costs, etc. At the Ketzin site in Germany (www.co2sink.org), such constraints acted prohibitively towards conducting any tracer tests prior to CO2 injection (cf. EGU2009-11625, EGU2011-2823-1). In contrast, at the Heletz site within the MUSTANG project, a particular sequence of single-well (SW) and inter-well (IW) tracer tests to be conducted prior to CO2 injection (Bensabat et al. 2011, Niemi et al. 2011) is being regarded as a critical, indispensable contribution towards the goal of georeservoir characterization. An advantage of the proposed approach, expressing tracer signals U in terms of fluid volume recovery fraction f (rather than time), is its independence upon IW distance and upon fluid injection/production rates (which may be difficult to prescribe in advance). It roughly predicts conservative- and sorptive-tracer signals, fluid mixing and temperature evolution in SW and IW tests, for stratified georeservoirs whose high- and low-permeability layers have thicknesses of same magnitude order. Thus, besides the CCS context, it can be extended to a range of geothermal applications, including some aquifer-dominated systems in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley, S-German Malm/Molasse Basin, N-German Sedimentary Basin, but excluding fracture-dominated (petrothermal) systems. IW tracer signals are sensitive to storage capacity (measured by transport-effective porosities n), but suffer from ambiguity between longitudinal heterogeneity (Peclet number Pe

  4. Merging single-well and inter-well tracer tests into one forced-gradient dipole test, at the Heletz site within the MUSTANG project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Horst; Ghergut, Julia; Bensabat, Jac; Niemi, Auli; Licha, Tobias; Ptak, Thomas; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Heletz site[1] in Israel was chosen for conducting a CO2 transport experiment within the MUSTANG project[2], whose aim is to demonstrate and validate leading-edge techniques for CCS site characterization, process monitoring and risk assessment. The major CO2 injection experiment at Heletz was supposed to be preceded and accompanied by a sequence of single-well 'push-then-pull' (SW) and inter-well (IW) tracer tests, aimed at characterizing transport properties of the storage formation, in accordance to a number of general and specific principles[3],[4]. - Instead of the rather luxurious {SW1, IW1, SW2, IW2} test sequence described in our previous work[5], we now propose a drastically economized tracer test concept, which lets the sampling stages of SW and IW tests merge into a single fluid production stage, and relies on a forced-gradient dipole flow field at any time of the overall test. Besides cost reduction, this economized design also improves on operational aspects, as well as on issues of parameter ambiguity and of scale disparity between SW and IW flow fields: (i) the new design renders SW test results more representative for the aquifer sector ('angle') actually interrogated by the IW dipole test; (ii) the new design saves time and costs on the SW test (fluid sampling for SW 'pull' now being conducted simultaneously with IW-related sampling and monitoring), while allowing for a considerably longer duration of SW 'pull' signals than had originally been intended, whose late-time tailings help improve the quantification of non-advective processes and parameters, which are of great relevance to mid- and long-term trapping mechanisms ('residual trapping', 'mineral trapping'); (iii) the quasi-simultaneous execution of fluid injection/production for the IW and SW tests considerably reduces the overall hydraulic imbalance that was originally associated with the SW test, thus preventing formation damage and supporting hydrogeomechanical stability; (iv) the new

  5. Single-well reactive tracer test and stable isotope analysis for determination of microbial activity in a fast hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbery, L; Cassiani, G; Andreotti, G; Ricchiuto, T; Semple, K T

    2004-05-01

    Single-well reactive tracer tests, such as the push-pull test are useful tools for characterising in-situ bioattenuation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the analytical models that are used to interpret push-pull data may be over-simplified, and potentially overlook important processes responsible for the frequent discrepancy between predicted and observed results obtained from push-pull tests. In this study, the limitations underlying the push-pull test methodology were investigated and were supported with results from a push-pull test conducted in a sulphate-reducing aquifer contaminated by crude oil. Poor (20% mass recoveries were achieved. Push-pull test data collected from sulphate-reducing aquifers indicate that the assumption of a well-mixed batch reactor system is incorrect and that reaction rates obtained from push-pull tests in such systems may be affected by the extraction regime implemented. Evidence of microbial respiration of the reactive tracer was provided by stable sulphur isotope analysis, from which an isotope fractionation factor of +9.9 +/- 8.1 per thousand was estimated. The stable isotope data support the argument that reaction rates calculated using push-pull tests are not uniformly distributed in space and time and are likely to be influenced by heterogeneities in the flow field.

  6. Single-well tracer test sensitivity w. r. to hydrofrac and matrix parameters (case study for the Horstberg site in the N-German Sedimentary Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Holzbecher, E.; Jung, R.; Sauter, M.; Tischner, T.

    2012-04-01

    At the geothermal pilot site Horstberg in the N-German Sedimentary Basin, a complex field experiment program was conducted (2003-2007) by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) together with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences (GGA), aimed at evaluating the performance of innovative technologies for heat extraction, for direct use, from a single geothermal well[1],[2]. The envisaged single-well operation schemes comprised inter-layer circulation through a large-area hydrofrac (whose successful creation could thus be demonstrated), and single-screen 'huff-puff' in suitable (stimulated) layers, seated in sandstone-claystone formations in 3-4 km depth, with temperatures exceeding 160 ° C. Relying on Horstberg tracer-test data, we analyze heat and solute tracer transport in three characteristic hydraulic settings: (A) single-screen, multi-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at lower well-screen in low-permeability sandstone layer ('Detfurth'), from which hydrofrac propagation (through several adjacent layers) was initiated; (B) single-screen, single-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at upper well-screen within a more permeable sandstone layer ('Solling'); (C) inter-layer vertical push through above-mentioned hydrofrac, with spiking at well-screen of A, and sampling at well-screen of B. Owing to drill-hole deviation, the hydraulically-induced frac will, in its vertical propagation, reach the upper sandstone layer in a certain horizontal distance X from the upper well-screen, whose value turns out to be the major controlling parameter for the system's thermal lifetime under operation scheme C (values of X below ~8 m leading to premature thermal breakthrough, with the minimum-target rate of fluid turnover; however, the injection pressure required for maintaining the target outflow rate will also increase with X, which renders scheme C uneconomical, or technically-infeasible, when X exceeds ~15 m). Tracer signals in C

  7. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L; Thornton, Steven F; Wilson, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  8. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: Fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L.; Thornton, Steven F.; Wilson, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  9. Heat tracer methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    The flow of heat in the subsurface is closely linked to the movement of water (Ingebritsen et al., 2006). As such, heat has been used as a tracer in groundwater studies for more than 100 years (Anderson, 2005). As with chemical and isotopic tracers (Chapter 7), spatial or temporal trends in surface and subsurface temperatures can be used to infer rates of water movement. Temperature can be measured accurately, economically, at high frequencies, and without the need to obtain water samples, facts that make heat an attractive tracer. Temperature measurements made over space and time can be used to infer rates of recharge from a stream or other surface water body (Lapham, 1989; Stonestrom and Constantz, 2003); measurements can also be used to estimate rates of steady drainage through depth intervals within thick unsaturated zones (Constantz et al., 2003; Shan and Bodvarsson, 2004). Several thorough reviews of heat as a tracer in hydrologic studies have recently been published (Constantz et al., 2003; Stonestrom and Constantz, 2003; Anderson, 2005; Blasch et al., 2007; Constantz et al., 2008). This chapter summarizes heat-tracer approaches that have been used to estimate recharge.Some clarification in terminology is presented here to avoid confusion in descriptions of the various approaches that follow. Diffuse recharge is that which occurs more or less uniformly across large areas in response to precipitation, infiltration, and drainage through the unsaturated zone. Estimates of diffuse recharge determined using measured temperatures in the unsaturated zone are referred to as potential recharge because it is possible that not all of the water moving through the unsaturated zone will recharge the aquifer; some may be lost to the atmosphere by evaporation or plant transpiration. Estimated fluxes across confining units in the saturated zone are referred to as interaquifer flow (Chapter 1). Focused recharge is that which occurs directly from a point or line source, such

  10. Single-well reactive tracer test and stable isotope analysis for determination of microbial activity in a fast hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbery, L.; Cassiani, G.; Andreotti, G.; Ricchiuto, T.; Semple, K.T

    2004-05-01

    Single-well reactive tracer tests, such as the push-pull test are useful tools for characterising in-situ bioattenuation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the analytical models that are used to interpret push-pull data may be over-simplified, and potentially overlook important processes responsible for the frequent discrepancy between predicted and observed results obtained from push-pull tests. In this study, the limitations underlying the push-pull test methodology were investigated and were supported with results from a push-pull test conducted in a sulphate-reducing aquifer contaminated by crude oil. Poor (<7%) mass recovery was achieved when the push-pull test was performed in a fast-flowing aquifer, preventing a quantifiable reaction rate to be determined. Breakthrough curve data were unexplainable using simplified analytical models, but exhibited trends analogous with tests conducted by others, when >20% mass recoveries were achieved. Push-pull test data collected from sulphate-reducing aquifers indicate that the assumption of a well-mixed batch reactor system is incorrect and that reaction rates obtained from push-pull tests in such systems may be affected by the extraction regime implemented. Evidence of microbial respiration of the reactive tracer was provided by stable sulphur isotope analysis, from which an isotope fractionation factor of +9.9{+-}8.1%o was estimated. The stable isotope data support the argument that reaction rates calculated using push-pull tests are not uniformly distributed in space and time and are likely to be influenced by heterogeneities in the flow field. - Reaction rates calculated by push-pull tests are not uniformly distributed in time and space.

  11. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  12. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Peter [Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Harris, Joel [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-05-08

    The aim of this proposal is to develop, through novel high-temperature-tracing approaches, three technologies for characterizing fracture creation within Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The objective of a first task is to identify, develop and demonstrate adsorbing tracers for characterizing interwell reservoir-rock surface areas and fracture spacing. The objective of a second task is to develop and demonstrate a methodology for measuring fracture surface areas adjacent to single wells. The objective of a third task is to design, fabricate and test an instrument that makes use of tracers for measuring fluid flow between newly created fractures and wellbores. In one method of deployment, it will be used to identify qualitatively which fractures were activated during a hydraulic stimulation experiment. In a second method of deployment, it will serve to measure quantitatively the rate of fluid flowing from one or more activated fracture during a production test following a hydraulic stimulation.

  13. P-Glycoprotein-Activity Measurements in Multidrug Resistant Cell Lines: Single-Cell versus Single-Well Population Fluorescence Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. P-gp expression has been linked to the efflux of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancers leading to multidrug resistance. Fluorescence techniques have been widely applied to measure the P-gp activity. In this paper, there is a comparison between the advantages of two fluorescence approaches of commonly available and affordable instruments: the microplate reader (MPR and the flow cytometer to detect the P-gp efflux activity using calcein-AM. Results. The selectivity, sensibility, and reproducibility of the two methods have been defined. Our results showed that the MPR is more powerful for the detection of small inhibition, whereas the flow cytometry method is more reliable at higher concentrations of the inhibitors. We showed that to determine precisely the inhibition efficacy the flow cytometry is better; hence, to get the correct Emax and EC50 values, we cannot only rely on the MPR. Conclusion. Both techniques can potentially be used extensively in the pharmaceutical industry for high-throughput drug screening and in biology laboratories for academic research, monitoring the P-gp efflux in specific assays.

  14. Proceedings of Tracer 3. International Conference on Tracers and Tracing Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Tracer 3 conference is a continuation of former Tracer 1 (1998) and Tracer 2 (2001) conferences organized by CNRS - Nancy France. The objective of this 3rd conference is presentation of different aspects of tracer method applications and development of tracer methodology.The new field of activity presented at the Conference was application of stable isotopes as natural tracers for investigations of environmental processes. The conference gave the possibility for scientific information exchange between specialists from different fields of activity such as chemical engineering, chemistry, bioengineering, environmental engineering, hydrology, civil engineering, metallurgy, etc. The presentations were divided into groups covering the principal items of Conference. Section A. Fundamental development - RTD and tracer methodology, - RTD methodology and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), - New tracers and detectors. Section B. Industrial applications - Environment, - Geology, hydrogeology and oil field applications, - Civil engineering, mineral engineering and metallurgy applications, - Food engineering and bioengineering, - Material engineering, - Chemical engineering. During the Conference INIS promotion materials were exposed by INIS liaison officer for Poland

  15. Evaluation of multiple tracer methods to estimate low groundwater flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, Paul W; Arnold, Bill W

    2017-04-01

    Four different tracer methods were used to estimate groundwater flow velocity at a multiple-well site in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: (1) two single-well tracer tests with different rest or "shut-in" periods, (2) a cross-hole tracer test with an extended flow interruption, (3) a comparison of two tracer decay curves in an injection borehole with and without pumping of a downgradient well, and (4) a natural-gradient tracer test. Such tracer methods are potentially very useful for estimating groundwater velocities when hydraulic gradients are flat (and hence uncertain) and also when water level and hydraulic conductivity data are sparse, both of which were the case at this test location. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the first three methods for their ability to provide reasonable estimates of relatively low groundwater flow velocities in such low-hydraulic-gradient environments. The natural-gradient method is generally considered to be the most robust and direct method, so it was used to provide a "ground truth" velocity estimate. However, this method usually requires several wells, so it is often not practical in systems with large depths to groundwater and correspondingly high well installation costs. The fact that a successful natural gradient test was conducted at the test location offered a unique opportunity to compare the flow velocity estimates obtained by the more easily deployed and lower risk methods with the ground-truth natural-gradient method. The groundwater flow velocity estimates from the four methods agreed very well with each other, suggesting that the first three methods all provided reasonably good estimates of groundwater flow velocity at the site. The advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, as well as some of the uncertainties associated with them are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Emission quantification using the tracer gas dispersion method: The influence of instrument, tracer gas species and source simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker

    2018-01-01

    The tracer gas dispersion method (TDM) is a remote sensing method used for quantifying fugitive emissions by relying on the controlled release of a tracer gas at the source, combined with concentration measurements of the tracer and target gas plumes. The TDM was tested at a wastewater treatment...

  17. Methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, K.; Faust, H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the stable isotope 15 N is of increasing importance in different scientific disciplines, especially in medicine, agriculture, and the biosciences. The close correlation between the growing interest and improvements of analytical procedures resulted in remarkable advances in the 15 N tracer technique. On the basis of the latest results of 15 N tracer research in life sciences and agriculture methods of 15 N tracer research in biological systems are compiled. The 15 N methodology is considered under three headings: Chemical analysis with a description of methods of sample preparation (including different separation and isolation methods for N-containing substances of biological and agricultural origin) and special procedures converting ammonia to molecular nitrogen. Isotopic analysis with a review on the most important methods of isotopic analysis of nitrogen: mass spectrometry (including the GC-MS technique), emission spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and other analytical procedures. 15 N-tracer techniques with a consideration of the role of the isotope dilution analysis as well as different labelling techniques and the mathematical interpretation of tracer data (modelling, N turnover experiments). In these chapters also sources of errors in chemical and isotopic analysis, the accuracy of the different methods and its importance on tracer experiments are discussed. Procedures for micro scale 15 N analysis and aspects of 15 N analysis on the level of natural abundance are considered. Furthermore some remarks on isotope effects in 15 N tracer experiments are made. (author)

  18. A new tracer technique for monitoring groundwater fluxes: the Finite Volume Point Dilution Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouyère, Serge; Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Goderniaux, Pascal; Dassargues, Alain

    2008-01-28

    Quantification of pollutant mass fluxes is essential for assessing the impact of contaminated sites on their surrounding environment, particularly on adjacent surface water bodies. In this context, it is essential to quantify but also to be able to monitor the variations with time of Darcy fluxes in relation with changes in hydrogeological conditions and groundwater - surface water interactions. A new tracer technique is proposed that generalizes the single-well point dilution method to the case of finite volumes of tracer fluid and water flush. It is called the Finite Volume Point Dilution Method (FVPDM). It is based on an analytical solution derived from a mathematical model proposed recently to accurately model tracer injection into a well. Using a non-dimensional formulation of the analytical solution, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the concentration evolution in the injection well, according to tracer injection conditions and well-aquifer interactions. Based on this analysis, optimised field techniques and interpretation methods are proposed. The new tracer technique is easier to implement in the field than the classical point dilution method while it further allows monitoring temporal changes of the magnitude of estimated Darcy fluxes, which is not the case for the former technique. The new technique was applied to two experimental sites with contrasting objectives, geological and hydrogeological conditions, and field equipment facilities. In both cases, field tracer concentrations monitored in the injection wells were used to fit the calculated modelled concentrations by adjusting the apparent Darcy flux crossing the well screens. Modelling results are very satisfactory and indicate that the methodology is efficient and accurate, with a wide range of potential applications in different environments and experimental conditions, including the monitoring with time of changes in Darcy fluxes.

  19. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  20. Emission quantification using the tracer gas dispersion method: The influence of instrument, tracer gas species and source simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Fredenslund, Anders M; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2018-04-04

    The tracer gas dispersion method (TDM) is a remote sensing method used for quantifying fugitive emissions by relying on the controlled release of a tracer gas at the source, combined with concentration measurements of the tracer and target gas plumes. The TDM was tested at a wastewater treatment plant for plant-integrated methane emission quantification, using four analytical instruments simultaneously and four different tracer gases. Measurements performed using a combination of an analytical instrument and a tracer gas, with a high ratio between the tracer gas release rate and instrument precision (a high release-precision ratio), resulted in well-defined plumes with a high signal-to-noise ratio and a high methane-to-tracer gas correlation factor. Measured methane emission rates differed by up to 18% from the mean value when measurements were performed using seven different instrument and tracer gas combinations. Analytical instruments with a high detection frequency and good precision were established as the most suitable for successful TDM application. The application of an instrument with a poor precision could only to some extent be overcome by applying a higher tracer gas release rate. A sideward misplacement of the tracer gas release point of about 250m resulted in an emission rate comparable to those obtained using a tracer gas correctly simulating the methane emission. Conversely, an upwind misplacement of about 150m resulted in an emission rate overestimation of almost 50%, showing the importance of proper emission source simulation when applying the TDM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Contributions to hydrological tracer methods and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The activities of the Institut fuer Radiohydrometrie of the GSF are mainly devoted to the field of environmental research studying the quality, use and protection from pollution of drinking water which has become scarce in many parts of the world. The knowledge and experience of a variety of scientific disciplines are combined to the common task of developing new tracer methods and selecting suitable hydrogeological methods to allow quantitative studies of the hydrological cycle, from rainfall to surface or sub-surface run-off. The tracers used in these studies are for the most part stable, natural radioisotopes occurring in the hydrological cycle, as well as fluorescent dyes or radionuclides for water labelling. The contributions collected in this volume are grouped according to the above outline of tasks and present a survey of current methods and measurements, illustrating their efficiency in solving hydrological problems. (orig./RW) [de

  2. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  3. Waste tank ventilation rates measured with a tracer gas method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mitroshkov, A.V.

    1998-08-01

    Passive ventilation with the atmosphere is used to prevent accumulation of waste gases and vapors in the headspaces of 132 of the 177 high-level radioactive waste Tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. Measurements of the passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of two key safety issues associated with the rates of flammable gas production and accumulation and the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out. Direct measurement of passive ventilation rates using mass flow meters is not feasible because ventilation occurs va multiple pathways to the atmosphere (i.e., via the filtered breather riser and unsealed tank risers and pits), as well as via underground connections to other tanks, junction boxes, and inactive ventilation systems. The tracer gas method discussed in this report provides a direct measurement of the rate at which gases are removed by ventilation and an indirect measurement of the ventilation rate. The tracer gas behaves as a surrogate of the waste-generated gases, but it is only diminished via ventilation, whereas the waste gases are continuously released by the waste and may be subject to depletion mechanisms other than ventilation. The fiscal year 1998 tracer studies provide new evidence that significant exchange of air occurs between tanks via the underground cascade pipes. Most of the single-shell waste tanks are connected via 7.6-cm diameter cascade pipes to one or two adjacent tanks. Tracer gas studies of the Tank U-102/U-103 system indicated that the ventilation occurring via the cascade line could be a significant fraction of the total ventilation. In this two-tank cascade, air evidently flowed from Tank U-103 to Tank U-102 for a time and then was observed to flow from Tank U-102 to Tank U-103

  4. A Lagrangian particle method with remeshing for tracer transport on the sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosler, Peter A.; Kent, James; Krasny, Robert; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    A Lagrangian particle method (called LPM) based on the flow map is presented for tracer transport on the sphere. The particles carry tracer values and are located at the centers and vertices of triangular Lagrangian panels. Remeshing is applied to control particle disorder and two schemes are compared, one using direct tracer interpolation and another using inverse flow map interpolation with sampling of the initial tracer density. Test cases include a moving-vortices flow and reversing-deformational flow with both zero and nonzero divergence, as well as smooth and discontinuous tracers. We examine the accuracy of the computed tracer density and tracer integral, and preservation of nonlinear correlation in a pair of tracers. We compare results obtained using LPM and the Lin-Rood finite-volume scheme. An adaptive particle/panel refinement scheme is demonstrated.

  5. Quantifying Methane Fluxes Simply and Accurately: The Tracer Dilution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Christopher; Crosson, Eric; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary; Dayton, Dave; Lafleur, Rick; Merrill, Ray; Tan, Sze; Thoma, Eben

    2010-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric constituent with a wide variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic, including wetlands and other water bodies, permafrost, farms, landfills, and areas with significant petrochemical exploration, drilling, transport, or processing, or refining occurs. Despite its importance to the carbon cycle, its significant impact as a greenhouse gas, and its ubiquity in modern life as a source of energy, its sources and sinks in marine and terrestrial ecosystems are only poorly understood. This is largely because high quality, quantitative measurements of methane fluxes in these different environments have not been available, due both to the lack of robust field-deployable instrumentation as well as to the fact that most significant sources of methane extend over large areas (from 10's to 1,000,000's of square meters) and are heterogeneous emitters - i.e., the methane is not emitted evenly over the area in question. Quantifying the total methane emissions from such sources becomes a tremendous challenge, compounded by the fact that atmospheric transport from emission point to detection point can be highly variable. In this presentation we describe a robust, accurate, and easy-to-deploy technique called the tracer dilution method, in which a known gas (such as acetylene, nitrous oxide, or sulfur hexafluoride) is released in the same vicinity of the methane emissions. Measurements of methane and the tracer gas are then made downwind of the release point, in the so-called far-field, where the area of methane emissions cannot be distinguished from a point source (i.e., the two gas plumes are well-mixed). In this regime, the methane emissions are given by the ratio of the two measured concentrations, multiplied by the known tracer emission rate. The challenges associated with atmospheric variability and heterogeneous methane emissions are handled automatically by the transport and dispersion of the tracer. We present detailed methane flux

  6. The characterization of petroleum contamination in heterogenous media using partitioning tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.; Rhee, S.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    A partitioning tracer method for characterizing petroleum contamination in heterogenous media was discussed. The average saturation level of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) was calculated by comparing the transport of the partitioning tracers to a conservative tracer. The NAPL saturation level represented a continuous value throughout the contaminated site. Experiments were conducted in a 2-D sandbox divided into 4 parts using different-sized sands. Soils were contaminated with a mixture of kerosene and diesel. Partitioning tracer tests were conducted both before and after contamination. A partitioning batch test was conducted to determine the partition coefficient (K) of the tracer between the NAPL and water. Breakthrough curves were obtained, and a retardation factor (R) was calculated. Results of the study showed that the calculated NAPL saturation was in good agreement with determined values. It was concluded that the partitioning tracer test is an accurate method of locating and quantifying NAPLs

  7. Understanding the effect of single-fracture heterogeneity from single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Martin; Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Niemi, Auli

    2013-12-01

    The single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer test is a method used to estimate the tracer retardation properties of a fracture or fracture zone. The effects of single-fracture aperture heterogeneity on SWIW-test tracer breakthrough curves are examined by numerical modelling. The effects of the matrix diffusion and sorption are accounted for by using a particle tracking method through the addition of a time delay added to the advective transport time. For a given diffusion and sorption property ( P m) value and for a heterogeneous fracture, the peak concentration is larger compared to a homogeneous fracture. The cumulative breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture is similar to that for a homogeneous fracture and a less sorptive/diffusive tracer. It is demonstrated that the fracture area that meets the flowing water, the specific flow-wetted surface (sFWS) of the fracture, can be determined by matching the observed breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture to that for a homogeneous fracture with an equivalent property parameter. SWIW tests are also simulated with a regional pressure gradient present. The results point to the possibility of distinguishing the effect of the regional pressure gradient from that of diffusion through the use of multiple tracers with different P m values.

  8. Measuring air-water interfacial area for soils using the mass balance surfactant-tracer method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Juliana B; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L

    2015-09-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  10. An injected gamma-tracer method for soil-moisture movement investigations in arid zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, A.R.; Navada, S.V.; Rao, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the in-situ determination of soil-moisture transport rates using K 3 60 Co(CN) 6 is discussed. The tracer compares well with tritiated water in laboratory investigations and the results obtained in limited field studies are very encouraging. The method promises to be of specific interest in arid-zone investigations where the soil-moisture fluxes in liquid and vapour phases could cause complications for tritium tracer data interpretation. (author)

  11. Determination of the Absolute Disintegration Rate of Cs-137 sources by the Tracer Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, S.; Brune, D.

    1963-07-01

    137 Cs - sources were absolutely measured by the 'tracer method', with 82 Br as a tracer nuclide and with application of the 4π β-γ coincidence technique. A self-absorption of 6 % was found in sources obtained from a solution with a carrier-content of 400 μg/ml. The precision of the method for the determination of the β-emission rate was estimated to ± 1 %. The results were compared with those of other works

  12. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Whole-site methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills were assessed using a mobile tracer dispersion method with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FFIR), using nitrous oxide as a tracer gas, or cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS), using acetylene as a tracer gas. The landfills were...... biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills...

  13. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-07-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors.

  14. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors [fr

  15. Investigation by tracer method of water balance in filling the gob with slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jureczko, J.; Skowronek, E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of investigations on the establishment of conditions of water flow in filling old workings with mud, in order to determine the degree of water hazard for mine workings in one of mines are given. For the inspection of flow, the stable tracer method and the neutron activation analysis were used. Chromium as a complex compound with EDTA was used as tracer. Geological and mining conditions in the area of investigations by tracers are given and the disposal of diluted stowing slurry is characterized. The method of interpretation of results is discussed in order to determine the water flow rate in the gob and to draw up the water balance on the basis of the curve of tracer travel. (author)

  16. A method for conducting simultaneous convergent tracer tests in multilayered aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greswell, Richard B; Durand, Véronique; Aller, Maria F; Riley, Michael S; Tellam, John H

    2014-01-01

    Forced gradient tracer tests between two boreholes can be used to study contaminant transport processes at the small field scale or investigate the transport properties of an aquifer. Full depth tests, in which tracer samples are collected just from the discharge of the abstraction borehole, often give rise to breakthrough curves with multiple peaks that are usually attributed to different flow paths through the aquifer that can rarely be identified from the test results alone. Tests in selected levels of the aquifer, such as those between packer-isolated sections of the boreholes, are time consuming, expensive; and the identification of major transport pathways is not guaranteed. We present a method for simultaneously conducting multiple tracer tests covering the full depth of the boreholes, in which tracer sampling and monitoring is carried out by a novel multilevel sampling system allowing high frequency and cumulative sampling options. The method is applied to a tracer test using fluorescein conducted in the multilayered sandstone aquifer beneath the city of Birmingham, UK, producing six well-defined tracer breakthrough curves. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency, 1 Method Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowl...

  18. Use of a variable tracer infusion method to determine glucose turnover in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.M.; Baron, A.D.; Edelman, S.V.; Brechtel, G.; Wallace, P.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The single-compartment pool fraction model, when used with the hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique to measure rates of glucose turnover, sometimes underestimates true rates of glucose appearance (Ra) resulting in negative values for hepatic glucose output (HGO). We focused our attention on isotope discrimination and model error as possible explanations for this underestimation. We found no difference in [3-3H] glucose specific activity in samples obtained simultaneously from the femoral artery and vein (2,400 +/- 455 vs. 2,454 +/- 522 dpm/mg) in 6 men during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp study where insulin was infused at 40 mU.m-2.min-1 for 3 h; therefore, isotope discrimination did not occur. We compared the ability of a constant (0.6 microCi/min) vs. variable tracer infusion method (tracer added to the glucose infusate) to measure non-steady-state Ra during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Plasma specific activity fell during the constant tracer infusion studies but did not change from base line during the variable tracer infusion studies. By maintaining a constant plasma specific activity the variable tracer infusion method eliminates uncertainty about changes in glucose pool size. This overcame modeling error and more accurately measures non-steady-state Ra (P less than 0.001 by analysis of variance vs. constant infusion method). In conclusion, underestimation of Ra determined isotopically during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies is largely due to modeling error that can be overcome by use of the variable tracer infusion method. This method allows more accurate determination of Ra and HGO under non-steady-state conditions

  19. Tracers application method for the quantitative determination of the source of oxygenic inclusions in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewienska-Kosciukowa, B.; Dalecki, W.; Michalik, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The sense and the possibility of radioactive and nonradioactive isotopic tracers application in investigations of the origin of oxygenic nonmetalic inclusions is presented. The discussed methods touch the investigations such as the origin of egzogenic inclusions which passed from external sources (fireproof lining, slag) to the steel or as the endogenic ones formed during the process of steel deoxidisation. The question of the tracers choice for refractory material and the further investigations concerned the determination of the origin of nonmetallic inclusions are discussed. The question of so called isotopic replacement tracers for the main steel deoxidizing agents is considered. The criterion of determination of oxygenic inclusions formed during the process of steel deoxidization is also discussed. Several results of laboratory and industrial investigations and also the examples of application of the discussed methods in the industrial scale are presented. (author)

  20. Development of a Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information form the previously approved extended abstract A standardized area source measurement method based on mobile tracer correlation was used for methane emissions assessment in 52 field deployments...

  1. Cyclic irradiation method for production of radioisotope tracers using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclic Irradiation Method (CIM) involving repeated irradiation of samples at regular time intervals to build up activity has been adopted for the production of 82 Br, 72 Ga, 140La, 24 Na and 46 Sc isotopes using the low power Ghana Research Reactor-1. The results indicate that the specific activities of radioisotopes from ...

  2. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  3. Mathematical basis for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers by compartmental analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    Using compartmental analysis methods, a mathematical basis is given for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers. Cardiac output is shown to be the product of the blood volume and the sum of the rate constants of tracer egress from blood, modified by a factor reflecting transcapillary diffusibility, the transfer fraction. The return of tracer to the blood and distant (intracellular) events are shown to play no role in the solution. Fractional cardiac output is the ratio of the rate constant of tracer egress from blood to an organ, divided by the sum of the egress constants from blood. Predominantly extracellular ions such as sodium or bromide are best suited for this technique, although theoretically any diffusible tracer whose compartmental model can be solved may be used. It is shown that fractional cardiac output is independent of the transfer fraction, and therefore can be measured accurately by tracers which are not freely diffusible

  4. Measuring serotonin synthesis: from conventional methods to PET tracers and their (pre)clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Anniek K.D.; Waarde, Aren van; Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Bosker, Fokko J. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Luiten, Paul G.M. [University of Groningen, Center for Behavior and Neurosciences, Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Haren (Netherlands); Boer, Johan A. den [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-03-15

    The serotonergic system of the brain is complex, with an extensive innervation pattern covering all brain regions and endowed with at least 15 different receptors (each with their particular distribution patterns), specific reuptake mechanisms and synthetic processes. Many aspects of the functioning of the serotonergic system are still unclear, partially because of the difficulty of measuring physiological processes in the living brain. In this review we give an overview of the conventional methods of measuring serotonin synthesis and methods using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, more specifically with respect to serotonergic function in affective disorders. Conventional methods are invasive and do not directly measure synthesis rates. Although they may give insight into turnover rates, a more direct measurement may be preferred. PET is a noninvasive technique which can trace metabolic processes, like serotonin synthesis. Tracers developed for this purpose are {alpha}-[{sup 11}C]methyltryptophan ([{sup 11}C]AMT) and 5-hydroxy-L-[{beta}-{sup 11}C]tryptophan ([{sup 11}C]5-HTP). Both tracers have advantages and disadvantages. [{sup 11}C]AMT can enter the kynurenine pathway under inflammatory conditions (and thus provide a false signal), but this tracer has been used in many studies leading to novel insights regarding antidepressant action. [{sup 11}C]5-HTP is difficult to produce, but trapping of this compound may better represent serotonin synthesis. AMT and 5-HTP kinetics are differently affected by tryptophan depletion and changes of mood. This may indicate that both tracers are associated with different enzymatic processes. In conclusion, PET with radiolabelled substrates for the serotonergic pathway is the only direct way to detect changes of serotonin synthesis in the living brain. (orig.)

  5. A dual tracer ratio method for comparative emission measurements in an experimental dairy housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Joachim; Zeyer, Kerstin; Keck, Margret; Keller, Markus; Zähner, Michael; Poteko, Jernej; Emmenegger, Lukas; Schrade, Sabine

    2018-04-01

    Agriculture, and in particular dairy farming, is an important source of ammonia (NH3) and non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This calls for the development and quantification of effective mitigation strategies. Our study presents the implementation of a dual tracer ratio method in a novel experimental dairy housing with two identical, but spatially separated housing areas. Modular design and flexible floor elements allow the assessment of structural, process engineering and organisational abatement measures at practical scale. Thereby, the emission reduction potential of specific abatement measures can be quantified in relation to a reference system. Emissions in the naturally ventilated housing are determined by continuous dosing of two artificial tracers (sulphur hexafluoride SF6, trifluoromethylsulphur pentafluoride SF5CF3) and their real-time detection in the ppt range with an optimized GC-ECD method. The two tracers are dosed into different experimental sections, which enables the independent assessment of both housing areas. Mass flow emissions of NH3 and GHGs are quantified by areal dosing of tracer gases and multipoint sampling as well as real-time analysis of both tracer and target gases. Validation experiments demonstrate that the technique is suitable for both areal and point emission sources and achieves an uncertainty of less than 10% for the mass emissions of NH3, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), which is superior to other currently available methods. Comparative emission measurements in this experimental dairy housing will provide reliable, currently unavailable information on emissions for Swiss dairy farming and demonstrate the reduction potential of mitigation measures for NH3, GHGs and potentially other pollutants.

  6. Measurements of industrial fugitive emissions by the FTIR Tracer Method (FTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellqvist, J.; Arlander, B.; Galle, B.; Bergqvist, B.

    1996-01-01

    A new method called the FTIR Tracer Method (FTM), has been developed for measuring and quantifying fugitive (diffuse) emissions of hydrocarbons. The method has been evaluated in field experiments which were conducted in the vicinity of several petrochemical plants and an oil refinery during 1993-1995. The technique is based on concentration measurements with infrared remote sensing by Long Path Fourier Transform InfraRed (LPFTIR), combined with tracer releases. The field experiments show the FTM to be very useful for mass flux measurements of both alkanes and alkenes and that the measurements are consistent with the conventional SF 6 method. However, the technique needs to be further validated and a more thorough understanding of the measurement uncertainties have to be achieved

  7. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  8. An in-well heat-tracer-test method for evaluating borehole flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellwood, Stephen M.; Hart, David J.; Bahr, Jean M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved method is presented for characterizing vertical borehole flow conditions in open boreholes using in-well heat tracer tests monitored by a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system. This flow logging method uses an electrical resistance heater to warm slugs of water within bedrock boreholes and DTS monitoring of subsequent heat migration to measure borehole flow characteristics. Use of an electrical resistance heater allows for controlled test initiation, while the DTS allows for detailed monitoring of heat movement within the borehole. The method was evaluated in bedrock boreholes open to Cambrian sandstone formations in south-central Wisconsin (USA). The method was successfully used to measure upward flow, downward flow, and zero flow, and to identify changes in borehole flow rates associated with fracture flow and porous media flow. The main benefits of the DTS-monitored in-well heat tracer test method of borehole flow logging are (1) borehole flow direction and changes in borehole fluid velocity are readily apparent from a simple plot of the field data, (2) the case of zero vertical borehole flow is easily and confidently identified, and (3) the ability to monitor temperatures over the full borehole length simultaneously and in rapid succession provides detailed flow data with minimal disturbance of the borehole flow. The results of this study indicate that DTS-monitored in-well heat tracer tests are an effective method of characterizing borehole flow conditions.

  9. Recover Act. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Matthew W. [California State University, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2014-05-16

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant

  10. A method for measuring mean wind velocities in a canyon with tracer balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheih, C. M.; Billman, B. J.; Depaul, F. T.

    1985-08-01

    A method using balloons as tracers for measuring mean wind velocity in street canyons or mountain valleys has been developed. Tests of the method with numerical experiments showed that the method reproduced an assumed wind field quite well provided that the buoyancy component of the balloon velocity was larger than the downward velocity component of the wind. Tests of the method with measurements of wind velocity in a street canyon of downtown Chicago showed that the method yielded flow patterns quite similar to photographic results of flow visualization of phisical simulations by other investigators. However, no direct measurements of wind velocity were available for quantitative comparison.

  11. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and

  12. Direct inversion of circulation and mixing from tracer measurements – Part 1: Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. von Clarmann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available From a series of zonal mean global stratospheric tracer measurements sampled in altitude vs. latitude, circulation and mixing patterns are inferred by the inverse solution of the continuity equation. As a first step, the continuity equation is written as a tendency equation, which is numerically integrated over time to predict a later atmospheric state, i.e., mixing ratio and air density. The integration is formally performed by the multiplication of the initially measured atmospheric state vector by a linear prediction operator. Further, the derivative of the predicted atmospheric state with respect to the wind vector components and mixing coefficients is used to find the most likely wind vector components and mixing coefficients which minimize the residual between the predicted atmospheric state and the later measurement of the atmospheric state. Unless multiple tracers are used, this inversion problem is under-determined, and dispersive behavior of the prediction further destabilizes the inversion. Both these problems are addressed by regularization. For this purpose, a first-order smoothness constraint has been chosen. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by application to various tracer measurements recorded with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. This method aims at a diagnosis of the Brewer–Dobson circulation without involving the concept of the mean age of stratospheric air, and related problems like the stratospheric tape recorder, or intrusions of mesospheric air into the stratosphere.

  13. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  14. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States); Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Departamento de Ciencias Nucleares (Ecuador); Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2017-01-21

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using optical feature point identification analogs, multiple particle tracking is achieved. • Method is compared to previous multiple particle method. • Accuracy and applicability of method is explored.

  15. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Héroux, M È; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-12-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER(1z)). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER(2z)). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER(2z) and AER(1z) estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER(2z) was higher than AER(1z). Overall, the AER(1z) estimates underestimated AER(2z) by approximately 16% (IQR: 5-32%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. The results of this study suggest that the long-standing assumption that a home represents a single well-mixed air zone may result in a substantial negative bias in air exchange estimates. Indoor air quality professionals should take this finding into consideration when developing study designs or making decisions related to the recommendation and installation of residential ventilation systems. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Health Canada.

  16. 237 Np analytical method using 239 Np tracers and application to a contaminated nuclear disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Clark, Sue B.; Olson, John E.; Watrous, Matthew G.

    2017-06-01

    Environmental 237Np analyses are challenged by low 237Np concentrations and lack of an available yield tracer; we report a rapid, inexpensive 237Np analytical approach employing the short lived 239Np (t1/2 = 2.3 days) as a chemical yield tracer followed by 237Np quantification using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 239Np tracer is obtained via separation from a 243Am stock solution and standardized using gamma spectrometry immediately prior to sample processing. Rapid digestions using a commercial, 900 watt “Walmart” microwave and Parr microwave vessels result in 99.8 ± 0.1% digestion yields, while chromatographic separations enable Np/U separation factors on the order of 106 and total Np yields of 95 ± 4% (2σ). Application of this method to legacy soil samples surrounding a radioactive disposal facility (the Subsurface Disposal Area at Idaho National Laboratory) reveal the presence of low level 237Np contamination within 600 meters of this site, with maximum 237Np concentrations on the order of 103 times greater than nuclear weapons testing fallout levels.

  17. Field measurement of mixing degree in coal mixer by later activable tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokooji, Makoto; Uemura, Katsumi; Adachi, Syoichi

    1975-01-01

    Mixing effectiveness in a rotary drum mixer for coke production was examined. Though the method to use the dispersion of characteristic values such as ash content or volatile components is common for measuring the mixing effectiveness, here the later activable tracer method with radioisotopes was employed, because the former method includes the dispersion of the characteristic values for raw materials themselves, and is poor in detectability. In a preliminary test, the expression for mixing degree was determined, and the tracer nuclide was selected. Coal mixture was irradiated in the TRIGA II reactor of St. Paul University for 4 hours at 100 kW. then further preliminary test was performed for La and Mn which were selected among the typical usable elements listed up by reviewing their γ-spectra. Finally, Mn was adopted by comparing both elements regarding their time required for activation analysis and economy. Manganese concentration originally contained in the coal mixture was 38 ppm. Mixing degree after passing through the coal mixer was 99.8%. The results of the regular test are shown in a table, and indicate that the mixer fully attained its aim. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Whole-site methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills were assessed using a mobile tracer dispersion method with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), using nitrous oxide as a tracer gas, or cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS), using acetylene as a tracer gas. The landfills were chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2)d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was 154 tons y(-1). This average was obtained from a few measurement campaigns conducted at each of the 15 landfills and extrapolating to annual emissions requires more measurements. Assuming that these landfills are representative of the average Danish landfill, the total emission from Danish landfills were calculated at 20,600 tons y(-1), which is significantly lower than the 33,300 tons y(-1) estimated for the national greenhouse gas inventory for 2011. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. [The clinical value of sentinel lymph node detection in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients with clinically negative neck by methylene blue method and radiolabeled tracer method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Dajiang; Ni, Jianming; Zhu, Guochen; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the clinical value of sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients with clinically negative neck (cN0) by methylene blue method, radiolabeled tracer method and combination of these two methods. Thirty-three patients with cN0 laryngeal carcinoma and six patients with cN0 hypopharyngeal carcinoma underwent SLN detection using both of methylene blue and radiolabeled tracer method. All these patients were accepted received the injection of radioactive isotope 99 Tc(m)-sulfur colloid (SC) and methylene blue into the carcinoma before surgery, then all these patients underwent intraopertive lymphatic mapping with a handheld gamma-detecting probe and blue-dyed SLN. After the mapping of SLN, selected neck dissections and tumor resections were peformed. The results of SLN detection by radiolabeled tracer, dye and combination of both methods were compared. The detection rate of SLN by radiolabeled tracer, methylene blue and combined method were 89.7%, 79.5%, 92.3% respectively. The number of detected SLN was significantly different between radiolabeled tracer method and combined method, and also between methylene blue method and combined method. The detection rate of methylene blue and radiolabeled tracer method were significantly different from combined method (P methylene blue can improve the detection rate and accuracy of sentinel lymph node detection. Furthermore, sentinel lymph node detection can accurately represent the cervical lymph node status in cN0 laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma.

  20. Tracer methods to quantify nutrient uptake from plough layer, sub-soil and fertilizer: implications on sustainable nutrient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haak, E.

    1996-01-01

    Two soils injection methods are presented. The first method consists of homogeneously labelling the whole plough layer with carrier free tracers. this is done in two treatments, (1) a reference treatment without connection with the sub-soil and (2) an experimental treatment where the sub-soil is freely accessible for root penetration. The second method, which is now under development, consists of using isotope labelled fertilizers instead of carrier free tracers. By application of the A-value concept it is possible to quantify (by the first method) the plant uptake of nutrients from plough layer and sub-soil, and from the second method, the uptake of nutrients from the applied fertilizer. A fertilizer strategy for phosphorus is discussed based on data obtained from tracer experiment in the field, and soil survey of specific field sites. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  1. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R L; Baumgartner, L K; Miller, D N; Repert, D A; Böhlke, J K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 microM) and ammonium (19 to 625 microM) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with (15)N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02-0.28 mumol (L aquifer)(-1) h(-1) with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 mumol (L aquifer)(-1) h(-1) with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations.

  2. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Miller, D.N.; Repert, D.A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 μM) and ammonium (19 to 625 μM) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with 15N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02–0.28 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations.

  3. Partition coefficients for alcohol tracers between nonaqueous-phase liquids and water from UNIFAC-solubility method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Dwarakanath, Varadarajan; Rouse, Bruce A.; Pope, Gary A.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy

    In this work, we have applied a group-contribution activity-coefficient model, UNIFAC, and the solubility of alcohols in water to estimate partition coefficients for alcohol tracers between water and nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs). The effects of temperature and mutual solubility between NAPL and aqueous phases on the estimation of partition coefficients were also investigated. By comparing the estimated results with experimental partition coefficients for 30 alcohol tracers between 10 NAPLs and water, we found that: i) the UNIFAC-solubility method, in which the UNIFAC model in its infinite-dilution form is applied to the NAPL phase and the solubility of tracers in water is used for estimation of the activity coefficient in the aqueous phase, works better than the UNIFAC model; ii) a linear relation between the logarithm of partition coefficients and the logarithm of tracer solubility in water is observed for those tracers having a similar chemical structure (i.e. the same number of branched methyl groups). This can serve as a useful tool for quick selection of the tracers that exhibit the desired partition coefficients; iii) the effect of mutual solubility between NAPL and aqueous phases can be neglected because such miscibility is very small, usually of the order of 10 -3 mole/mole unit; and iv) temperature variation between 15° and 25°C does not significantly affect partition coefficients.

  4. Preconcentration method using an activatable yield tracer for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Daijiro; Endo, Kazutoyo; Nakahara, Hiromichi

    1991-01-01

    Previously, the use of an enriched stable isotope as an activatable yield tracer in preconcentration steps has been tested by use of commercially available enriched 116 Cd and 156 Dy for biological standard reference materials. In the present work, this method has been further applied to the determination of lanthanoid contents in various kinds of samples: one coal fly-ash, three Japanese standard rocks, and eight standard soils. Samples were decomposed by alkali fusion in the preconcentration step. Thirteen elements were determined for coal fly-ash and soil samples, and 14 elements for rocks. The data obtained for coal fly-ash and standard rocks are compared with the data reported in literature. The data for soil samples have been newly determined in the present work. The ordinary instrumental neutron activation analysis and radiochemical neutron activation analysis were also performed to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the present method. (author) 10 refs.; 4 tabs

  5. A refinement of the potassium tracer method for residential wood smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, C. P.; Li, S.; Buchanan, J. W.; Stevens, R. K.

    Potassium has been used as a tracer for the mass of fine particles emitted to the air from residential wood burning stoves and fireplaces. The technique involves measurement by x-ray fluorescence of the total K collected on fine particle filters. Since wind blown soil particles also contain K, a correction for this contribution is made based upon soil analysis or an assumed K/Fe ratio in local soil. K in excess of this ratio is considered to be from wood smoke. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an alternative method for determining wood smoke K. The underlying assumption is that wood smoke K is water soluble but that K in crustal particles is in a mineralized form and only slightly water soluble. Results from analyses of particle samples indicate the two methods yield essentially the same amount of wood smoke K.

  6. Development of a Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work toward a standardized version of a mobile tracer correlation measurement method is discussed. The method used for assessment of methane emissions from 15 landfills in 56 field deployments from 2009 to 2013. This general area source measurement method uses advances in instrum...

  7. Single well injection withdrawal tests (SWIW) in fractured rock. Some aspects on interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Single-Well-Injection-Withdrawal, SWIW, tests are used to try to extract information on fracture apertures, sorption and diffusion properties and dispersion information in individual fractures. It is done by injecting a given amount of traced water into an isolated fracture. After a waiting period water is withdrawn from the fracture and the tracer concentration is measured. The concentration time curve is fitted to a model and the parameter values quantifying the different interaction mechanisms are determined. A number of different mechanisms influence the recovery of the tracer. One or more of the following mechanisms are considered. They include: dispersion due to velocity differences, sorption on fracture surface and on infill, diffusion in rock fragments in the fracture, diffusion between 'streamlines', diffusion into rock matrix and other stagnant water volumes, sorption kinetics and slow drift of the plume caused by the natural gradient. Many of the interaction mechanisms can influence the recovery curve in a similar way. For example, diffusion into rock matrix water and into stagnant water in the fracture adjacent to the flowing channels cannot be distinguished if only one tracer is used. Tracers with different properties can in principle be used but they will encounter different parts of the fracture, the sorbing tracer will move out less from the injection point than a nonsorbing tracer will. Diffusion and sorption in small particles in the flowpath can influence the recovery curve in a similar way as rock matrix diffusion does. Dispersion caused by diffusion between 'streamlines', Taylor dispersion, can give very different results in channels of different shapes. Such dispersion effects can be difficult to distinguish from matrix diffusion effects. Dispersion coefficients obtained in a SWIW test may have little relation to dispersion of a tracer moving from A to B. This is partly due to the different mechanisms and partly due to

  8. Single well injection withdrawal tests (SWIW) in fractured rock. Some aspects on interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars

    2007-08-01

    Single-Well-Injection-Withdrawal, SWIW, tests are used to try to extract information on fracture apertures, sorption and diffusion properties and dispersion information in individual fractures. It is done by injecting a given amount of traced water into an isolated fracture. After a waiting period water is withdrawn from the fracture and the tracer concentration is measured. The concentration time curve is fitted to a model and the parameter values quantifying the different interaction mechanisms are determined. A number of different mechanisms influence the recovery of the tracer. One or more of the following mechanisms are considered. They include: dispersion due to velocity differences, sorption on fracture surface and on infill, diffusion in rock fragments in the fracture, diffusion between 'streamlines', diffusion into rock matrix and other stagnant water volumes, sorption kinetics and slow drift of the plume caused by the natural gradient. Many of the interaction mechanisms can influence the recovery curve in a similar way. For example, diffusion into rock matrix water and into stagnant water in the fracture adjacent to the flowing channels cannot be distinguished if only one tracer is used. Tracers with different properties can in principle be used but they will encounter different parts of the fracture, the sorbing tracer will move out less from the injection point than a nonsorbing tracer will. Diffusion and sorption in small particles in the flowpath can influence the recovery curve in a similar way as rock matrix diffusion does. Dispersion caused by diffusion between 'streamlines', Taylor dispersion, can give very different results in channels of different shapes. Such dispersion effects can be difficult to distinguish from matrix diffusion effects. Dispersion coefficients obtained in a SWIW test may have little relation to dispersion of a tracer moving from A to B. This is partly due to the different mechanisms and partly due to different time scales

  9. A Rapid, Low-Cost Method to Determine Travel Times at Managed Aquifer Recharge Operations Using Noble Gas Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.; Halliwell, M.; Hillegonds, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is a key component for the sustainable use of surface water and groundwater in the arid western U.S. When recycled water is a recharge water source, subsurface residence time, required for bacteria and virus deactivation, is best verified by application of an extrinsic tracer. Desirable tracer properties include: no real or perceived health risk, inexpensive even for a large volume of tagged water, large dynamic range, efficient introduction, convenient sampling methods, and rapid, low-cost analysis. We have developed and tested a dissolved noble gas tracer technique ideally suited for tracing large water volumes at managed aquifer recharge facilities. In an application of the method at a water district's facilities in the San Francisco Bay area, Xenon was introduced into a 106 m3 pond over a period of 7 days using a 300 m length of gas-permeable silicone tubing. Samples from the pond, near-field shallow monitoring wells, and production wells about 400 m from the recharge pond were analyzed for dissolved Xe by noble gas membrane inlet mass spectrometry (NGMIMS). The NGMIMS uses a syringe pump, gas-permeable membrane inlet, and quadrupole residual gas analyzer for measurement of noble gas concentrations. Samples are collected in VOA vials, and analysis can be carried out in real-time, with a measurement uncertainty of about 5% for Xe. Tracer first appeared in a production well 136 days after starting the tracer introduction at 0.7% (C/C0) of the peak pond xenon concentration. The cost of the tracer is about US650/106 m3 water, and the NGMIMS was assembled with parts totaling approximately US50,000, making application of the tracer method feasible for most managed aquifer recharge projects. This project is part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program.

  10. Tracer diffusion in an ordered alloy: application of the path probability and Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Akbar, S.A.; Murch, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion technique has been extensively utilized to investigate diffusion phenomena and has contributed a great deal to the understanding of the phenomena. However, except for self diffusion and impurity diffusion, the meaning of tracer diffusion is not yet satisfactorily understood. Here we try to extend the understanding to concentrated alloys. Our major interest here is directed towards understanding the physical factors which control diffusion through the comparison of results obtained by the Path Probability Method (PPM) and those by the Monte Carlo simulation method (MCSM). Both the PPM and the MCSM are basically in the same category of statistical mechanical approaches applicable to random processes. The advantage of the Path Probability method in dealing with phenomena which occur in crystalline systems has been well established. However, the approximations which are inevitably introduced to make the analytical treatment tractable, although their meaning may be well-established in equilibrium statistical mechanics, sometimes introduce unwarranted consequences the origin of which is often hard to trace. On the other hand, the MCSM which can be carried out in a parallel fashion to the PPM provides, with care, numerically exact results. Thus a side-by-side comparison can give insight into the effect of approximations in the PPM. It was found that in the pair approximation of the CVM, the distribution in the completely random state is regarded as homogeneous (without fluctuations), and hence, the fluctuation in distribution is not well represented in the PPM. These examples thus show clearly how the comparison of analytical results with carefully carried out calculations by the MCSM guides the progress of theoretical treatments and gives insights into the mechanism of diffusion

  11. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract - A standardized version of a mobile tracer correlation measurement method was developed and used for assessment of methane emissions from 15 landfills in 56 field deployments from 2009 to 2013. This general area source measurement method uses advances in instrumentation...

  12. An evaluation of an improved method for computing histograms in dynamic tracer studies using positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollinger, J.M.; Snyder, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for computing approximate minimum-mean-square-error estimates of histograms from list-mode data for use in dynamic tracer studies is evaluated. Parameters estimated from these histograms are significantly more accurate than those estimated from histograms computed by a commonly used method

  13. A method to investigate inter-aquifer leakage using hydraulics and multiple environmental tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Stacey; Love, Andrew; Wohling, Daniel; Post, Vincent; Shand, Paul; Kipfer, Rolf; Tyroller, Lina

    2016-04-01

    Informed aquifer management decisions regarding sustainable yields or potential exploitation require an understanding of the groundwater system (Alley et al. 2002, Cherry and Parker 2004). Recently, the increase in coal seam gas (CSG) or shale gas production has highlighted the need for a better understanding of inter-aquifer leakage and contaminant migration. In most groundwater systems, the quantity or location of inter-aquifer leakage is unknown. Not taking into account leakage rates in the analysis of large scale flow systems can also lead to significant errors in the estimates of groundwater flow rates in aquifers (Love et al. 1993, Toth 2009). There is an urgent need for robust methods to investigate inter-aquifer leakage at a regional scale. This study builds on previous groundwater flow and inter-aquifer leakage studies to provide a methodology to investigate inter-aquifer leakage in a regional sedimentary basin using hydraulics and a multi-tracer approach. The methodology incorporates geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical information in the basin to determine the likelihood and location of inter-aquifer leakage. Of particular benefit is the analysis of hydraulic heads and environmental tracers at nested piezometers, or where these are unavailable bore couplets comprising bores above and below the aquitard of interest within a localised geographical area. The proposed methodology has been successful in investigating inter-aquifer leakage in the Arckaringa Basin, South Australia. The suite of environmental tracers and isotopes used to analyse inter-aquifer leakage included the stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, chloride-36, 87Sr/86Sr and helium isotopes. There is evidence for inter-aquifer leakage in the centre of the basin ~40 km along the regional flow path. This inter-aquifer leakage has been identified by a slight draw-down in the upper aquifer during pumping in the lower aquifer, overlap in Sr isotopes, δ2H, δ18O and chloride

  14. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Evaluation of the transport matrix method for simulation of ocean biogeochemical tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Karin F.; Khatiwala, Samar; Dietze, Heiner; Kriest, Iris; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Conventional integration of Earth system and ocean models can accrue considerable computational expenses, particularly for marine biogeochemical applications. Offline numerical schemes in which only the biogeochemical tracers are time stepped and transported using a pre-computed circulation field can substantially reduce the burden and are thus an attractive alternative. One such scheme is the transport matrix method (TMM), which represents tracer transport as a sequence of sparse matrix-vector products that can be performed efficiently on distributed-memory computers. While the TMM has been used for a variety of geochemical and biogeochemical studies, to date the resulting solutions have not been comprehensively assessed against their online counterparts. Here, we present a detailed comparison of the two. It is based on simulations of the state-of-the-art biogeochemical sub-model embedded within the widely used coarse-resolution University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). The default, non-linear advection scheme was first replaced with a linear, third-order upwind-biased advection scheme to satisfy the linearity requirement of the TMM. Transport matrices were extracted from an equilibrium run of the physical model and subsequently used to integrate the biogeochemical model offline to equilibrium. The identical biogeochemical model was also run online. Our simulations show that offline integration introduces some bias to biogeochemical quantities through the omission of the polar filtering used in UVic ESCM and in the offline application of time-dependent forcing fields, with high latitudes showing the largest differences with respect to the online model. Differences in other regions and in the seasonality of nutrients and phytoplankton distributions are found to be relatively minor, giving confidence that the TMM is a reliable tool for offline integration of complex biogeochemical models. Moreover, while UVic ESCM is a serial code, the TMM can

  16. Evaluation of the transport matrix method for simulation of ocean biogeochemical tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Kvale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventional integration of Earth system and ocean models can accrue considerable computational expenses, particularly for marine biogeochemical applications. Offline numerical schemes in which only the biogeochemical tracers are time stepped and transported using a pre-computed circulation field can substantially reduce the burden and are thus an attractive alternative. One such scheme is the transport matrix method (TMM, which represents tracer transport as a sequence of sparse matrix–vector products that can be performed efficiently on distributed-memory computers. While the TMM has been used for a variety of geochemical and biogeochemical studies, to date the resulting solutions have not been comprehensively assessed against their online counterparts. Here, we present a detailed comparison of the two. It is based on simulations of the state-of-the-art biogeochemical sub-model embedded within the widely used coarse-resolution University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM. The default, non-linear advection scheme was first replaced with a linear, third-order upwind-biased advection scheme to satisfy the linearity requirement of the TMM. Transport matrices were extracted from an equilibrium run of the physical model and subsequently used to integrate the biogeochemical model offline to equilibrium. The identical biogeochemical model was also run online. Our simulations show that offline integration introduces some bias to biogeochemical quantities through the omission of the polar filtering used in UVic ESCM and in the offline application of time-dependent forcing fields, with high latitudes showing the largest differences with respect to the online model. Differences in other regions and in the seasonality of nutrients and phytoplankton distributions are found to be relatively minor, giving confidence that the TMM is a reliable tool for offline integration of complex biogeochemical models. Moreover, while UVic ESCM is a serial

  17. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  18. Optimizing the mercury mass measurement in industrial electrolytic cells by the radio-tracer method at ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle R, J.; Angeles C, A.

    2014-10-01

    One method used in the production of chlorine and sodium is the use of electrolytic cells for the separation of chlorine and sodium from the brine; the industries apply very intense electromagnetic fields in this process. The electrolytic cells use mercury as electrode. In a chlorine production plant inventories are determined by total amount of mercury in the plant annually, since mercury losses are large and a very important parameter is to control the mass of mercury for it is necessary to measure with great precision the losses made. There are several methods to determine the mass of mercury ranging from take samples and weigh, but this involves continuous interruption of the process creating downtimes which in turn represent economic losses giving a result delimiting productivity for the industrial sector. An alternative and attractive method is to use a radioactive tracer whose principle has a similar behavior to study objective. The inert mercury has to be neutron activated in a nuclear reactor to having the characteristics of a tracer; the result makes one of the isotopes of mercury. The tracer is transported taking into account the recommendations of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (Mexico), then it is injected into the electrolytic cells mixing with the mercury in the system. By a relative radioactivity measurement and one sample by gamma spectrometry per interest cell, the mass of mercury without stopping the process is obtained. For optimal use of radio-tracer method must be taken into account as important features: irradiation time of mercury, counting conditions, vial geometry, sample volume, sample cells, mixing time and half-life of the tracer. (Author)

  19. An independent method for input accountability in reprocessing plants : magnesium tracer technique for the accountability of plutonium (MAGTRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, C.K.; Jain, H.C.; Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    A new technique 'MAGTRAP' for the measurement of the total plutonium in an accountability tank is described which does not require knowledge of either the total volume of solution in the tank or the size of the sample aliquot. The method depends on the addition of natural magnesium as a tracer and the subsequent isotope dilution of an aliquot using a spike with known 26 Mg/ 242 Pu ratio. Using only the isotopic ratios of 26 Mg/ 24 Mg and 239 Pu/ 242 Pu in the mixture, the quantity of the plutonium in the accountability tank can be calculated. In order to correct for magnesium blank, an additional measurement is required before tracer addition. The magnesium tracer technique can also be used to check the volume (or weight) calibration of the tank. Several experiments were carried out in the input accountability tank of the Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur to assess the accuracy of this method. The weight (or volume) of the solution in the tank could be measured independently with an accuracy of better than 0.5%. An experiment was also conducted to measure the total uranium in the accountability tank using MAGTRAP. The accuracy was better than 1%. The tracer technique was also used to arrive at optimum sparging times to ensure the homogeneity of the solution in the tank. Chemical procedures developed for the separation of plutonium and magnesium from dissolver solutions are also discussed. (author)

  20. Solution Methods for 3D Tomographic Inversion Using A Highly Non-Linear Ray Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, J. R.; Ballard, S.; Young, C. J.; Chang, M.

    2008-12-01

    To develop 3D velocity models to improve nuclear explosion monitoring capability, we have developed a 3D tomographic modeling system that traces rays using an implementation of the Um and Thurber ray pseudo- bending approach, with full enforcement of Snell's Law in 3D at the major discontinuities. Due to the highly non-linear nature of the ray tracer, however, we are forced to substantially damp the inversion in order to converge on a reasonable model. Unfortunately the amount of damping is not known a priori and can significantly extend the number of calls of the computationally expensive ray-tracer and the least squares matrix solver. If the damping term is too small the solution step-size produces either an un-realistic model velocity change or places the solution in or near a local minimum from which extrication is nearly impossible. If the damping term is too large, convergence can be very slow or premature convergence can occur. Standard approaches involve running inversions with a suite of damping parameters to find the best model. A better solution methodology is to take advantage of existing non-linear solution techniques such as Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) or quasi-newton iterative solvers. In particular, the LM algorithm was specifically designed to find the minimum of a multi-variate function that is expressed as the sum of squares of non-linear real-valued functions. It has become a standard technique for solving non-linear least squared problems, and is widely adopted in a broad spectrum of disciplines, including the geosciences. At each iteration, the LM approach dynamically varies the level of damping to optimize convergence. When the current estimate of the solution is far from the ultimate solution LM behaves as a steepest decent method, but transitions to Gauss- Newton behavior, with near quadratic convergence, as the estimate approaches the final solution. We show typical linear solution techniques and how they can lead to local minima if the

  1. On the self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys by the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganovici, L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys is presented. There are only a few pure metals for which diffusion coefficients in a liquid state are known. The thesis aims at increasing the number of liquid metals for which diffusion coefficients are available, by determining these values for liquids: Cd, Tl, Sb and Te. The self-diffusion coefficients of Te in some tellurium based liquid alloys such as Tl 2 Te, PbTe and Bi 90 Te 10 were also determined. Self-diffusion coefficients have been measured using two radioactive tracer methods: a) the capillary-reservoir method; b) the semi-infinite capillary method. The self-diffusion coefficients were derived from the measured radioactive concentration profile, using the solutions of Fick's second law for appropriate initial and limit conditions. The temperature dependence study of self-diffusion coefficients in liquids Cd, Tl, Sb and Te, was used to check some theoretical models on the diffusion mechanism in metallic melts. The experimental diffusion data interpreted in terms of the Arrhenius type temperature dependence, was used to propose two simple empiric relations for determining self diffusion coefficients of group I liquid metals and for liquid semi-metals. It was established a marked decrease of self-diffusion coefficients of liquid Te close to the solidification temperature. The diffusivity of Te in liquid Tl 2 Te points to an important decrease close to the solidification temperature. A simplified model was proposed for the diffusion structural unit in this alloy and the hard sphere model for liquid metals was checked by comparing the theoretical and experimental self-diffusion coefficients. (author)

  2. Atmospheric modeling to assess wind dependence in tracer dilution method measurements of landfill methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Diane M; Chow, Fotini K; Delkash, Madjid; Imhoff, Paul T

    2018-03-01

    The short-term temporal variability of landfill methane emissions is not well understood due to uncertainty in measurement methods. Significant variability is seen over short-term measurement campaigns with the tracer dilution method (TDM), but this variability may be due in part to measurement error rather than fluctuations in the actual landfill emissions. In this study, landfill methane emissions and TDM-measured emissions are simulated over a real landfill in Delaware, USA using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) for two emissions scenarios. In the steady emissions scenario, a constant landfill emissions rate is prescribed at each model grid point on the surface of the landfill. In the unsteady emissions scenario, emissions are calculated at each time step as a function of the local surface wind speed, resulting in variable emissions over each 1.5-h measurement period. The simulation output is used to assess the standard deviation and percent error of the TDM-measured emissions. Eight measurement periods are simulated over two different days to look at different conditions. Results show that standard deviation of the TDM- measured emissions does not increase significantly from the steady emissions simulations to the unsteady emissions scenarios, indicating that the TDM may have inherent errors in its prediction of emissions fluctuations. Results also show that TDM error does not increase significantly from the steady to the unsteady emissions simulations. This indicates that introducing variability to the landfill emissions does not increase errors in the TDM at this site. Across all simulations, TDM errors range from -15% to 43%, consistent with the range of errors seen in previous TDM studies. Simulations indicate diurnal variations of methane emissions when wind effects are significant, which may be important when developing daily and annual emissions estimates from limited field data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Method for assessment of stormwater treatment facilities – Synthetic road runoff addition including micro-pollutants and tracer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2017-01-01

    % in the dual porosity filter, stressing the importance of including a conservative tracer for correction of contaminant retention values. The method is considered useful in future treatment performance testing of STFs. The observed performance of the STFs is presented in coming papers.......Stormwater treatment facilities (STFs) are becoming increasingly widespread but knowledge on their performance is limited. This is due to difficulties in obtaining representative samples during storm events and documenting removal of the broad range of contaminants found in stormwater runoff...

  4. A simple method to reconstruct the molar mass signal of respiratory gas to assess small airways with a double-tracer gas single-breath washout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Johannes; Tao, Ziran; Junger, Annika; Joppek, Christoph; Tempel, Philipp; Husemann, Kim; Singer, Florian; Latzin, Philipp; Yammine, Sophie; Nagel, Joachim H; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2017-11-01

    For the assessment of small airway diseases, a noninvasive double-tracer gas single-breath washout (DTG-SBW) with sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and helium (He) as tracer components has been proposed. It is assumed that small airway diseases may produce typical ventilation inhomogeneities which can be detected within one single tidal breath, when using two tracer components. Characteristic parameters calculated from a relative molar mass (MM) signal of the airflow during the washout expiration phase are analyzed. The DTG-SBW signal is acquired by subtracting a reconstructed MM signal without tracer gas from the signal measured with an ultrasonic sensor during in- and exhalation of the double-tracer gas for one tidal breath. In this paper, a simple method to determine the reconstructed MM signal is presented. Measurements on subjects with and without obstructive lung diseases including the small airways have shown high reliability and reproducibility of this method.

  5. Diffusion of iron in β-iron telluride (Fe1.12Te) by Moessbauer spectroscopy and tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magara, Masaaki; Tsuji, Toshihide; Naito, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of iron in a β-iron telluride (Fe 1.12 Te) polycrystalline sample was measured by Moessbauer diffusional line broadening method which relates to the collapse of coherence in gamma-ray photon by the atomic jump at local sites. The diffusion coefficient of iron along the c-axis in nearly single crystal of β-iron telluride was also measured by tracer technique which shows the results of an atom transport in long distance. The activation energies for the diffusion of iron in Fe 1.12 Te obtained by the Moessbauer spectroscopy and the tracer method were 91.5±5.4 and 106±23 kJ/mol, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of iron in β-iron telluride obtained by Moessbauer line broadening are in fair agreement with the values averaged from that along c-axis obtained by tracer method and that along a- and b-axes obtained from reaction rate constant between iron and tellurium by the previous study of the present authors. (orig.)

  6. Examination of tracer method using 43K produced with a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuida, Koichi; Kawarazaki, Yuji; Shibuya, Masao; Nozaki, Tadashi.

    1980-01-01

    The 43 K tracer produced with a cyclotron is contaminated with about the same amount of 42 K. During first 43 hours after the production, the rate of attenuation of its radioactivity was greater than the theoretical value of 43 K (half-life 22.4 hours) because of the rapid attenuation of radioactivity of the contaminating 42 K (half-life 12.4 hours). After that, however, the rate of attenuation in the radioactivity of 43 K tracer followed the attenuation curve of 22.4 hr half-life, i.e., the radioactivity of the contaminating 42 K was negligible. The potassium chloride fertilizer labelled with 43 K-tracer (or 42 K-tracer) was applied for 8 days (or 4.5 days in case of 42 K) to 2-month-old rice plants grown by hydroponics, and for 7 days to rice plants grown on soil (at ripening stage). The rice plants were then dried for 24 hours at 70 deg C, and the radioactivity was measured by a scintillation counter. 43 K was able to be traced for 13.3 days in the plants grown by hydroponics, and 42 K for 5.4 days, but 43 K was able to be traced only for 7.4 days in the plants grown on soil which absorb 43 K poorly. Since 43 K and 42 K are γ-ray emittors, and the energy is not low, microautoradiograms were not able to be made, but macroautoradiograms were made. The autoradiograms for 43 K and 42 K did not differ in resolution, and both were clear. The radioactivity of 43 K did not diminish so rapidly as 42 K, but was lost in one month. Such character of 43 K is beneficial both for tracer experiments and for the prevention of environmental pollution. (Kaihara, S.)

  7. The use of chemical tracers to water injection processes applied on Romanian reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zecheru M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The hydrocarbon reservoirs are extremely complex, each reservoir having its own identity. Reservoirs heterogeneity (mainly regarding the layered ones frequently results in low recovery efficiencies, both under the primary regime and when different agents are injected from the surface. EOR processes efficiency depends on how detailed the reservoir is known and on the information related to fluids flow through reservoir. There are certain analyzes, investigations and tests providing good knowledge about the reservoir. The tracer tests are among them, being frequently used to water injection processes. Depending on the method used, IWTT (Interwell tracer test, SWTT (Single-Well Tracer Test, TWTT (Two-Well Tracer Test, information are obtained as related to: the setting of the preferential flow path of the injected fluid, the identification of water channels, evidencing the geological barriers, determining the residual oil saturation, around the well bore or along the tracer's path between two wells. This paper is focused on ICPT Câmpina efforts related to the use of the chemical tracers to the water injection processes applied to the oil reservoirs of Romania. It describes the usual tracers and the methods used to detect them in the reaction wells. Up to now, more than 50 tests with IWTT tracers have been performed on-site and this work presents some of their results.

  8. Interwell tracer testing for residual oil saturation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This research focuses mainly on the interpretation of partitioning tracer data for residual oil saturation measurement. As a secondary objective, depending on the progress of the project, it may also look into some commonly encountered phenomena related to tracer interaction with rock matrix such as adsorption and mass transfer into secondary pores. With advancement of interpretation techniques, interwell partitioning tracer tests have become popular in the industry for determining residual oil saturation to water flood or gas flood. With reported successes both in petroleum and environmental industry, it has gained wide recognition as a reliable method for measuring residual oil saturation, along with other standard techniques such as single well tracer testing, sponge coring and log-inject-log. Several levels of interpretation, depending on the degree of sophistication, are available to interpret the tracer data for residual oil saturation determination. These methods range from the simplest analytical methods namely chromatographic transformation and moment analysis to the most intricate finite difference or streamline simulation, with the semi-quantitative Brigham's Model being in between. The residual oil saturations measured by these methods are not necessarily identical. There arises a legitimate question as to what the residual oil saturation values from different methods mean. Brigham's Model has the advantage that it is semi-analytical and requires minimal effort to match the tracer data. Brigham's five spot model will be extended to model the propagation of partitioning tracer for residual oil saturation measurement. The limitation of using the model for irregular pattern will also be addressed. We will also try to construct a 7 spot, 9 spot and line drive based on Brigham's correlation. This model will also be used to study the effect of different Sor in different layers on chromatographic and moment analysis method. Other retention mechanisms such as

  9. Advancing Physically-Based Flow Simulations of Alluvial Systems Through Atmospheric Noble Gases and the Novel 37Ar Tracer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver S.; Gerber, Christoph; Partington, Daniel J.; Purtschert, Roland; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Kipfer, Rolf; Hunkeler, Daniel; Brunner, Philip

    2017-12-01

    To provide a sound understanding of the sources, pathways, and residence times of groundwater water in alluvial river-aquifer systems, a combined multitracer and modeling experiment was carried out in an important alluvial drinking water wellfield in Switzerland. 222Rn, 3H/3He, atmospheric noble gases, and the novel 37Ar-method were used to quantify residence times and mixing ratios of water from different sources. With a half-life of 35.1 days, 37Ar allowed to successfully close a critical observational time gap between 222Rn and 3H/3He for residence times of weeks to months. Covering the entire range of residence times of groundwater in alluvial systems revealed that, to quantify the fractions of water from different sources in such systems, atmospheric noble gases and helium isotopes are tracers suited for end-member mixing analysis. A comparison between the tracer-based mixing ratios and mixing ratios simulated with a fully-integrated, physically-based flow model showed that models, which are only calibrated against hydraulic heads, cannot reliably reproduce mixing ratios or residence times of alluvial river-aquifer systems. However, the tracer-based mixing ratios allowed the identification of an appropriate flow model parametrization. Consequently, for alluvial systems, we recommend the combination of multitracer studies that cover all relevant residence times with fully-coupled, physically-based flow modeling to better characterize the complex interactions of river-aquifer systems.

  10. Flowrate measurements in closed pipes by the method of transit time measurement. Pt.1 Method of transit time of a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubail, A.; Favennec, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Classical methods of flowrate measuring in closed pipes generally make use of indirect principles (for example: the measurements of the pressure loss through an orifice plate). Absolute or fundamental methods of the measurements of volume and time allow the ''in situ'' calibration and control of flowmeters in their nominal conditions of use. The method of transit-time measurements by fast injection of a radioactive tracer is described and analyzed [fr

  11. TU-AB-202-11: Tumor Segmentation by Fusion of Multi-Tracer PET Images Using Copula Based Statistical Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuyade-Lahorgue, J; Ruan, S [University of Rouen, Rouen, Normandy (France); Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Vera, P [Centre Henri-Becquerel, University de Rouen, Rouen, Normandy (France)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-tracer PET imaging is getting more attention in radiotherapy by providing additional tumor volume information such as glucose and oxygenation. However, automatic PET-based tumor segmentation is still a very challenging problem. We propose a statistical fusion approach to joint segment the sub-area of tumors from the two tracers FDG and FMISO PET images. Methods: Non-standardized Gamma distributions are convenient to model intensity distributions in PET. As a serious correlation exists in multi-tracer PET images, we proposed a new fusion method based on copula which is capable to represent dependency between different tracers. The Hidden Markov Field (HMF) model is used to represent spatial relationship between PET image voxels and statistical dynamics of intensities for each modality. Real PET images of five patients with FDG and FMISO are used to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively our method. A comparison between individual and multi-tracer segmentations was conducted to show advantages of the proposed fusion method. Results: The segmentation results show that fusion with Gaussian copula can receive high Dice coefficient of 0.84 compared to that of 0.54 and 0.3 of monomodal segmentation results based on individual segmentation of FDG and FMISO PET images. In addition, high correlation coefficients (0.75 to 0.91) for the Gaussian copula for all five testing patients indicates the dependency between tumor regions in the multi-tracer PET images. Conclusion: This study shows that using multi-tracer PET imaging can efficiently improve the segmentation of tumor region where hypoxia and glucidic consumption are present at the same time. Introduction of copulas for modeling the dependency between two tracers can simultaneously take into account information from both tracers and deal with two pathological phenomena. Future work will be to consider other families of copula such as spherical and archimedian copulas, and to eliminate partial volume

  12. Fractional Models Simulating Non-Fickian Behavior in Four-Stage Single-Well Push-Pull Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kewei; Zhan, Hongbin; Yang, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Four-stage single-well push-pull (SWPP) tracer tests, including injection, chasing, resting, and pumping, were conducted in a fractured aquifer at Newark basin. An anomalous transport phenomenon observed in the SWPP tests is the linear decline of breakthrough curves (BTCs) at late time with slope of -1.8 in log-log plots. A time-dependent fractional model is developed to interpret the anomalous transport behavior. This model considers a time-dependent power law memory function and a time-dependent fractional advection-dispersion operator. The fractional advection-dispersion equations (fADE) are solved in a radial coordinate system using the implicit Euler method. A semi-analytical solution of the first-order rate-limited mobile-immobile model (FORMIM) is derived for comparison. It is found that both the nonlocal transport in time and space can produce the long-tailed BTC. A smaller time-fractional or space-fractional index leads to a lower peak concentration and a larger late-time slope. The mass distribution of the fractional-in-space (FS) model exhibits power law decline at the leading plume edge. Early breakthrough during pumping is not observed because the mobile mass at the start of pumping is nonzero and more concentrated near the wellbore. The capacity ratio is an important factor that affects the peak concentration. A larger capacity ratio leads to greater peak concentration. A smaller time-fractional index in the injection, chasing, or resting stage will move the BTC downward and the slope of the late time BTC is determined by the space-fractional index over all stages and the time-fractional index in the pumping stage. The capability of the existing models to recover the BTC of the SWPP test is discussed and some guidelines for how to choose the appropriate model to interpret the SWPP test data are proposed.

  13. Hydrodynamics and radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margrita, R.; Santos-Cottin, H.

    1987-01-01

    Use of radioactive tracers for the description of fluid flow in chemical reactors is exposed. Method and operation are briefly described and examples of applications are given for different industries [fr

  14. Reassessment of primed constant-infusion tracer method to measure urea kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahoor, F.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The validity of the primed constant-infusion tracer technique to make short-term measurements of urea production rates (R/sub a/) in humans in a physiological steady state and during disruption of steady state was evaluated. Four subjects received a primed constant infusion (P/I = 560 min) of [ 13 C]urea for 8 h. A plateau in urea enrichment was reached after 2 h and maintained throughout. When [ 13 C]- and [ 18 O]urea were simultaneously infused into four subjects at P/I ratios of 560:1 and 360:1, respectively, both tracers reached plateau enrichment at the same time (2-4 h). The enrichment at plateau was a function of the infusion rate rather than the priming dose, and calculated urea R/sub a/ was the same with either prime. In five additional experiments the technique responded acutely to a physiological perturbation (alanine infusion) in a dose-dependent manner. The results confirm that this technique is appropriate for short-term measurements of urea R/sub a/, and the requirement for accuracy in estimating the priming dose is not impractically stringent

  15. The constant rate injection tracer method - principle and application of a useful system for the investigation of single- and two-phase flows in thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederhof, A.; Lindberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    The ''tracer technique'', developed by Brown, Boveri and Company, permits measurement of water (liquid) mass flows, as part of the requested steam wetness, in steam turbine cycles. The additionally required steam mass flows can be calculated from mass flow balances (e.g. after condensation in a heater and subsequent measuring of the condensate flow) or energy balances. This measuring method is basically a dilution measurement using a radioactive or inactive tracer. If the radionuclide 24 Na is used, the measuring uncertainties will be typically 0.5-1.0%. The tracer technique was developed for largely automated parallel measurements on up to 30 lines of large capacity steam turbines. The example of the Ringhals 3 nuclear power plant illustrates that the tracer measuring method, applied during an acceptance test, yields better information on the functioning of the turbine cycle. (orig./GL) [de

  16. Suitability of tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrological tracer techniques are a means of making statements on the direction and speed of underground water. One of the simpler tasks is to find out whether there is hydrological communication between two given points. This requires a determination of the direction of flow, which places less exacting demands on the properties of the tracer than does the task of determining the flow velocity of underground water. Tracer methods can serve to infer from flow velocity the distance (flow) velocity, which is defined as the ratio between the distance between two points located in flow direction and the actual time it takes water to flow from one to the other [de

  17. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Nallathamby, Punith Dev; Surratt, Jason D.; Lee, Anita; Lewandowski, Michael; Offenberg, John H.; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.

    2017-10-01

    The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here involves integrated sampling that is designed to allow for detailed and specific chemical analysis of particulate matter (PM) in the Bakersfield airshed. To achieve this objective, filter samples were taken during thirty-four 23-hr periods between 19 May and 26 June 2010 and analyzed for organic tracers by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Contributions to organic carbon (OC) were determined by two organic tracer-based techniques: primary OC by chemical mass balance and secondary OC by a mass fraction method. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements of the total organic carbon were also made to determine the split between the modern and fossil carbon and thereby constrain unknown sources of OC not accounted for by either tracer-based attribution technique. From the analysis, OC contributions from four primary sources and four secondary sources were determined, which comprised three sources of modern carbon and five sources of fossil carbon. The major primary sources of OC were from vegetative detritus (9.8%), diesel (2.3%), gasoline (oil impacted motor vehicle exhaust (30%); measured secondary sources resulted from isoprene (1.5%), α-pinene (<1.0%), toluene (<1.0%), and naphthalene (<1.0%, as an upper limit) contributions. The average observed organic carbon (OC) was 6.42 ± 2.33 μgC m-3. The 14C derived apportionment indicated that modern and fossil components were nearly equivalent on average; however, the fossil contribution ranged from 32 to 66% over the five week campaign. With the fossil primary and secondary sources aggregated, only 25% of the fossil organic carbon could not be attributed. Whereas, nearly 80% of the modern carbon could not be attributed to primary and secondary sources accessible to this analysis, which included tracers of biomass burning, vegetative detritus and secondary

  18. Greenhouse gas emission quantification from wastewater treatment plants, using a tracer gas dispersion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Plant-integrated methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission quantifications were performed at five Scandinavian wastewater treatment plants, using a ground-based remote sensing approach that combines a controlled release of tracer gas from the plant with downwind concentration measurements. CH4...... emission factors were between 1 and 21% of CH4 production, and between 0.2 and 3.2% of COD influent. The main CH4 emitting sources at the five plants were sludge treatment and energy production units. The lowest CH4 emission factors were obtained at plants with enclosed sludge treatment and storage units....... N2O emission factors ranged from general, measurement-based, site-specific CH4 and N2O emission factors for the five studied plants were in the upper range of the literature values and default emission factors applied...

  19. Comparison of labeled tracer methods to measure methane oxidation rates in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Susan; Heintz, Monica; Blees, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The ocean is generally considered a minor source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Macro-seepage from geological sources at the seafloor is suggested to contribute the most from all of the oceanic sources, about 25 Tg CH4/yr to the atmospheric CH4 budget (4% of total sources), whereas the open ocean contributes only 0.4 Tg CH4/yr (0.07% of total sources). However, most source estimates lack certainty due to a limited knowledge of the fate of CH4 in the water column. CH4 in the water column is mainly influenced by turbulent mixing, a process that spreads and dilutes CH4, and microbial oxidation, the only process that limits the fraction of CH4 in the water column and thus the fraction of CH4 escaping into the atmosphere. Unfortunately, measurements of the rate of microbial oxidation are still rare. Only a few attempts have been made to quantify CH4 oxidation in the water column. CH4 oxidation rates were either measured indirectly by correlation with tracers such as 3He, 222Rn, CFC11 or directly by using 14CH4 or C3H4-labeling/incubation techniques. A comparison of the two labeling/incubation techniques will be presented. The ease of use, time series experiments, kinetic experiments, and the effect of incubation temperature will be discussed and water column profiles compared. Our results indicate similar depth-profiles of turnover times using the two different labeled tracers. However, the data sets are offset. More rapid turnover times were measured using C3H4 and slower turnover of CH4 was found using 14CH4.

  20. Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. W. Weiss

    2006-09-30

    tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

  1. Sub-stoichiometric isotope dilution analysis method for the determination of iodine in common salts using iodine-131 tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vivek; Garg, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    A sub-stoichiometric isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) method was developed for the determination of iodine in different brands of common salts. An aqueous salt solution containing 131 I tracer and NaI as carrier is oxidized by tartaric acid and KIO 3 and the liberated iodine is extracted with CCl 4 . To the extract an aqueous solution of AgNO 3 is added in substoichiometric amount to obtain a colloidal solution of AgI. On adding sodium thiosulfate solution, the NaI so formed passes into aqueous solution, which is then counted. Several different brands of salt were analysed. The method is especially suitable for the determination of microgram amounts of iodide in the presence of excess of chloride. (Author)

  2. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  3. Assessing the Influence of Seasonal and Spatial Variations on the Estimation of Secondary Organic Carbon in Urban Particulate Matter by Applying the EC-Tracer Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Wagener

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The elemental carbon (EC-tracer method was applied to PM10 and PM1 data of three sampling sites in the City of Berlin from February to October 2010. The sites were characterized by differing exposure to traffic and vegetation. The aim was to determine the secondary organic carbon (SOC concentration and to describe the parameters influencing the application of the EC-tracer method. The evaluation was based on comparisons with results obtained from positive matrix factorization (PMF applied to the same samples. To obtain site- and seasonal representative primary OC/EC-ratios ([OC/EC]p, the EC-tracer method was performed separately for each station, and additionally discrete for samples with high and low contribution of biomass burning. Estimated SOC-concentrations for all stations were between 11% and 33% of total OC. SOC-concentrations obtained with PMF exceeded EC-tracer results more than 100% at the park in the period with low biomass burning emissions in PM10. The deviations were besides others attributed to the high ratio of biogenic to combustion emissions and to direct exposure to vegetation. The occurrences of biomass burning emissions in contrast lead to increased SOC-concentrations compared to PMF in PM10. The obtained results distinguish that the EC-tracer-method provides well comparable results with PMF if sites are strongly influenced by one characteristic primary combustion source, but was found to be adversely influenced by direct and relatively high biogenic emissions.

  4. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed to facilitate the design of tracer tests by root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using a preset average tracer concentration which provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass. The method uses basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) that are combined in functional relatipnships that descrive solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. These initial estimates for time of travel and velocity are then applied to a hypothetical continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as an analog for the hydrological-flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration, tracer mass, and axial dispersion. Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be necessary for descri

  5. Tracer packet: a novel conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanta Lahiri; Dalia Nayak

    2002-01-01

    A new conception over the century old tracer technique and a decade old multitracer technique has been introduced called tracer packet. The probable scope and approaches of the tracer packet technique has briefly been discussed. The various aspects of this technique include, the methods of production and their separation, the application of this technique in the study of metal accumulation and their distribution in biological systems, environmental remediation and many other fields. (Author)

  6. Single-well interference slug tests to assess the vertical hydraulic conductivity of unconsolidated aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Lefebvre, René

    2013-01-01

    SummaryMeaningful understanding of flow and solute transport in general requires the knowledge of hydraulic conductivity and its anisotropy. Various field methods allow the measurement of the horizontal component (Kh), but vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) is rarely measured, for lack of practical field tests. This paper proposes vertical interference slug tests, an adaptation of inter-well interference slug tests to a single well, for the efficient field measurement of Kv. The test is carried out in a single well between a stress and an observation interval that are vertically isolated with a three-packer assembly. An instantaneous pressure pulse is induced in the stress interval and resulting drawdowns are recorded in both the stress and the observation intervals. In a proof-of-concept field study, 12 vertical interference tests were carried out sequentially along a fully-screened well across a moderately heterogeneous and highly anisotropic aquifer made up of littoral silts and sands. A direct-push method was used to install the well, which was completed without sand-pack to allow the natural collapse of sediments in the thin annular space around the screen. Direct-push wells allow the measurement of in situ hydraulic properties of sediments and minimize well construction interferences with hydraulic tests. Drawdowns measured in stress and observation intervals of multiple tests were simultaneously inverted numerically to reconstruct heterogeneous profiles of Kh, hydraulic conductivity anisotropy (Kv/Kh), and specific storage (Ss). Results were validated by comparison of observed versus predicted drawdowns and with field and laboratory measurements of Kh and Kv made along the tested well. Results indicate that the profile of Kv values obtained with vertical interference slug tests follows a similar pattern with depth than the profile with lab measurements made with a permeameter on soil samples collected in the same intervals as the interference tests, which

  7. Study on adsorption of activated carbon fiber to background-level xenon in air by the method of 133Xe tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haitao; Wang Yalong; Zhang Lixing; Wang Xuhui; Zhang Xiaolin

    2001-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of the different activated carbon fibers to ultra-trace xenon in air are studied using the method of 133 Xe as tracer. The efficiency equation of adsorption columns are determined. The comparison of adsorptive capacity between activated carbon fibers and activated carbon indicates that activated carbon fibers are better than activated carbon under low temperature

  8. Evaluation of reference tissue model and tissue ratio method for 5-HTT using [(123)I] ADAM tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bang-Hung; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Shih-Pei; Lee, Jih-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2008-12-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) transporters (5-HTT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants. [(123)I] ADAM is a novel radiotracer that selectively binds the 5-HTT of the central nervous system. The aim for this study was to compare four-parameter model (FPM) with three-parameter model (TPM) from non-invasive reference tissue model (RTM) for 5-HTT quantification using the cerebellum as indirect input function. Furthermore, we compared tracer kinetic model with the tissue ratio (TR) method. The binding potential (BP) values derived from both models were almost the same, but ratio of delivery (R(1)) in TPM had smaller standard deviation than the FPM. There was also significant correlation between BP and specific uptake ratio (SUR). In conclusion, simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) was the better choice because of its stability and convenient implementation for non-invasive quantification of brain SPECT studies. The correlation found between BP and SUR supports the use of TR method for quantification of 5-HTT to avoid arterial sampling in dynamic SPECT scan.

  9. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with [1- 14 C]glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused [3- 3 H]glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery

  10. Systems identification: a theoretical method applied to tracer kinetics in aquatic microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halfon, E.; Georgia Univ., Athens

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model of radionuclide kinetics in a laboratory microcosm was built and the transfer parameters estimated by multiple regression and system identification techniques. Insight into the functioning of the system was obtained from analysis of the model. Methods employed have allowed movements of radioisotopes not directly observable in the experimental systems to be distinguished. Results are generalized to whole ecosystems

  11. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated sensory nerve fibres after a crush lesion of the rat sciatic nerve was investigated by means of retrograde labelling. The advantage of this method is that the degree of regeneration is estimated on the basis of sensory somata rather than the number...

  12. Pneutest: a non-destructive method of testing aircraft tyres using a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaine, J.L.; Roll, G.

    1977-01-01

    The object of this method is to evaluate the overall level of fatigue in aircraft tyres and to pinpoint localised defects before retreading. A radioactive gas (Xenon-133) is injected under pressure and diffuses along the plies inside the tyre. Suitable detectors are used to determine the location and size of accumulations of gas inside any existing porosities or defects. The process involves no risk of ruining the tyre nor of having any significantly harmful effect on personnel who have to carry out the test. The first results obtained are encouraging, and suggest that, with suitable equipment, 100% inspection could be achieved [fr

  13. A study on hepato-biliary and alimentary scintigram by means of triple tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aibata, Hirofumi; Torizumi, Kazutami; Okada, Takashi; Kiji, Shigeyuki; Yamada, Ryusaku; Shimada, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Katsutoshi; Aoki, Yozo

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate the gastric emptying and postprandial mixing of bile with food, the scintigraphies of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts by using three different kinds of radioisotopes were performed simultaneously ( 99m Tc-E · HIDA for hepatobiliary scintigraphy, 111 In-DTPA containing orange juice and 131 I-albumin containing scrambled egg for gastrointestinal scintigraphy). This method was available for observation of gastric emptying of liquid and solid foods and also examination of the mixing effect of bile and food quantitatively. (author)

  14. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated sensory nerve fibres after a crush lesion of the rat sciatic nerve was investigated by means of retrograde labelling. The advantage of this method is that the degree of regeneration is estimated on the basis of sensory somata rather than the number...... of axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...... cells that had been labelled, i.e., that had regenerated axons towards or beyond the injection site, were counted in serial sections. Large and small neurons with presumably myelinated and unmyelinated axons, respectively, were classified by immunostaining for neurofilaments. The axonal growth rate...

  15. Neutron activation analysis as a tracer technique for evaluating sample dissolution methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porritt, P.M.; Porritt, R.E.J.

    1978-01-01

    The usefulness of neutron activation analysis for monitoring sample dissolution methods has been demonstrated. Lanthanum was determined in the USGS standard rock GSP-1 by instrumental neutron activation analysis to provide a reference figure. When an irradiated sample of GSP-1 was sintered with sodium peroxide and the sinter cake washed with water, all the lanthanum-140 could be dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid. Heating an irradiated sample of GSP-1 with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid and perchloric acid and evaporating to fumes of perchloric acid dissolved only 80% of the lanthanum-140. However, evaporation to dryness, addition of perchloric acid and reevaporation to dryness rendered all the lanthanum-140 soluble

  16. Quantification of cell death in developing cerebellum by a 14C tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.S.; Woodward, D.J.; Chanda, R.

    1978-01-01

    To study the question of whether or not cell death contributes significantly to normal or stressed postnatal brain development in a way which is biochemically quantifiable, we carried out an experiment to assess the amount of cell death in developing cerebellum. By measuring the loss of DNA content and the loss of 14 C from labelled thymidine previously incorporated into the DNA fraction (DNAF) in X-irradiated neonatal animals, shown by histological methods to have cell death to the degree of degranulating the external granular layer (EGL), we showed that when cells die both label and DNA content are greatly decreased in the cerebellum. Experiments on both normal and malnourished animals showed that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development in either malnutrition-stressed or normal animals. Here, we present a biochemical tool for assessing cell death and evidence that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development

  17. New quantitative method for bone tracer uptake of temporomandibular joint using Tc-99m MDP skull SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Woo; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lee, Jaetae; Kim, Hae-Joo; Choi, Jae-Kap

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies have several advantages over qualitative studies for evaluating a temporomandibular joint (TMJ), yet in certain cases additional images are still needed. Accordingly, the current study developed a new easy SPECT quantification method for the bone tracer uptake in a TMJ and evaluated its usefulness and inter-observer variability in patients with TMJ pain. Sixty-six adult patients (11 males, 55 females) with a mean age of 31 years (range 22-79 years) suffering from TMJ pain were questioned regarding the history of their condition, and then subjected to an oromaxillofacial examination and bone SPECT. New quantitative data for TMJs (TMJ index) were calculated from a formula using TMJ and skull counts. TMJs with spontaneous pain had higher TMJ indices than those without spontaneous pain (8.87 vs. 6.87, P=0.032). TMJs with mouth-opening pain or palpatory pain also exhibited higher TMJ indices than those without such pains, although the differences were not statistically significant. Positive TMJs, according to a visual SPECT interpretation, had much higher TMJ indices than the negative ones (8.99 vs. 5.37, P<0.001). The reference skull count, mean TMJ count and TMJ index obtained using the proposed TMJ quantification method demonstrated an excellent correlation based on two independent observers (r=0.996, r=0.993 and r=0.989, respectively; P<0.001). The current results indicate that the proposed quantitative TMJ bone SPECT is easy to perform, plus the resulting TMJ index has a lower inter-observer variability, making it an effective TMJ evaluation method for patients with painful TMJs, and especially useful for serial studies. (author)

  18. Triacylglycerol secretion in rats: validation of a tracer method employing radioactive glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, M.; Williams, M.A.; Baker, N.

    1984-01-01

    A two-compartment model was developed to analyze the temporal changes in plasma triacylglycerol (TG)-specific radioactivity after injection of [2- 3 H]glycerol into rats. The analysis, which yielded fractional rate constants of TG secretion, was tested in rats fed diets either adequate or deficient in essential fatty acids (EFA) and containing either glucose, fructose or sucrose as the dietary carbohydrate. The method of analysis appeared valid, first, because of a close agreement between experimental and computer-fitted TG-specific radioactivity curves, and second, because the fractional rate constants obtained were quite similar to fractional rate constants determined previously by the Triton WR-1339 technique in rats maintained on identical diets. The results show that EFA deficiency increased the fractional rate constant of TG secretion 1.7-, 1.8- and 3.3-fold and the rate of TG secretion 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.4-fold when the dietary carbohydrate was glucose, sucrose and fructose, respectively, in comparison with control rats fed diets supplying these same carbohydrates but adequate in EFA. In the latter groups, the rates of plasma TG secretion were in the range of 0.14-0.17 mg/min per 100 g body weight, and the rate of secretion in the fructose-fed rats was only 20% higher than in the glucose-fed rats

  19. Regional brain blood flow in mouse: quantitative measurement using a single-pass radio-tracer method and a mathematical algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Radhakrishnan, K; Serhal, A; Allen, F; Lamanna, J C; Puchowicz, M A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a reliable experimental method for measuring local regional cerebral blood flows in anesthetized mice. This method is an extension of the well-established single-pass dual-label indicator method for simultaneously measuring blood flow and glucose influx in rat brains. C57BL6J mice (n = 10) were anesthetized and regional blood flows (ml/min/g) were measured using the radio-tracer method. To test the sensitivity of this method we used a mathematical algorithm to predict the blood flows and compared the two sets of results.Measured regional blood flows between 0.7 and 1.7 ml/min/g were similar to those we have previously reported in the rat. The predicted blood flows using an assumed linearly increasing arterial tracer concentration-versus-time profile (that is, a ramp) were similar to the values measured in the physiological experiments (R(2) 0.99; slope 0.91). Thus,measurements of local regional cerebral blood flow in anesthetized mice using a single-pass radio-tracer method appear to be reliable.

  20. Tracer dispersion - experiment and CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Description of tracer distribution by means of dispersion models is a method successfully used in process engineering for fifty years. Application of dispersion models in reactor engineering for characterization of flows in column apparatus, heat exchangers, etc. is summarized and experimental tracer techniques as well as CFD methods for dispersion coefficients evaluation are discussed. Possible extensions of thermal axial dispersion model (ADM) and a core-wall ADM model suitable for description of tracer dispersion in laminar flows are suggested as well as CFD implementation as 1D finite elements. (author)

  1. Boundary integral method application in the transportation modeling of radioactive tracers in porous ways; Aplicacao do metodo da integral de contorno na modelagem do transporte de tracadores radioativos em meios porosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferroni, Jose Geraldo

    1996-03-01

    This work describes a method for estimating the effluent concentrations of radioactive tracers in production wells, considering well to well injection tests and piston-like displacements of fluids in the reservoir. The model for tracer transportation takes into account effects of convection and hydrodynamic dispersion. (author)

  2. Micro scale preparation of 125mTe as tracer by the batch method using ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaki, Yoshinori; Yoshioka, Hiroe; Hasegawa, Kunihiko

    1990-01-01

    Micro scale batch method was used for the isolation of 125m Te from the system of the penta valent antimony-125 { 125 Sb(V)} and tellulium-125m ( 125m Te) system in radioactive equilibrium state. In preliminary experiments, the effects of the volume of bromine water, and the time of adsorption on the adsorption ratio were examined using the best conditions. The effects of acid concentration and the time of elution on the elution ratio were examined using 125m Te as tracer. A hundred microliters (ca. 0.03 g) of anion exchange resin (Cl - form) treated with concentrated HCl was placed in a polypropylene micro-tube (1.5 ml) equipped with a stopper. A hundred microliters of the sample solution [( 125m Sb(V)- 215m Te)/ in 9 M HCl solution including bromine water of 5 vol%] was mixed with the resin and shaken for 10 min, in order to adsorb metal ions. After the resin was precipitated by centrifugation, the supernatant solution including 125m Te(VI) was pipetted off, 9 M HCl solution including bromine water of 5 vol% was added and then analyzed for 125m Te(VI). The aliquots were ajusted to the HCl concentration of 1 M by adding of 1.0 ml of dil.HCl or deionized water. The samples were again shaken for 10 min and centrifuged. The supernatant solution including 125m Te(IV) was pipetted off. The radioactivities of the supernatant solutions were measured using scintillation counter of NaI (Tl) well-type. The yields of 125m Te(IV) by this method were 75, 97 and ca. 100% respectively for one, two and three time elutions. The elution ratio (contamination ratio) of 125 Sb(V) was 0.5∼1%. This method was compared with ordinary macro-scale column method. It was found that this method gave higher concentrations of radioactivity and that less amount of radioactive wastes because this method required less volume of the eluting solution and resin. (author)

  3. Computer Simulation of Single-Well Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SW-SAGD), SUPRI TR-119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Keith T.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    1999-08-09

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is an effective method of producing heavy oil and bitumen. In a typical SAGD approach, steam is injected into a horizontal well located directly above a horizontal producer. A steam chamber grows around the injection well and helps displace heated oil toward the production well. Single-well (SW) SAGD attempts to create a similar process using only one horizontal well. This may include steam injection from the toe of the horizontal well with production at the heel. Obvious advantages of SW-SAGD include cost savings and utility in relatively thin reservoirs. However, the process is technically challenging. To improve early-time response of SW-SAGD, it is necessary to heat the near-wellbore area to reduce oil viscosity and allow gravity drainage to take place. Ideally heating should occur with minimal circulation or bypassing of stream. Since project economics are sensitive to early production response, we are interested in optimizing the start -up procedure.

  4. Estimating transmissivity from single-well pumping tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechstein, Armin; Attinger, Sabine; Krieg, Ronald; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-01-01

    Although aquifers are naturally heterogeneous, the interpretation of pumping tests is commonly performed under the assumption of aquifer homogeneity. This yields interpreted hydraulic parameters averaged over a domain of uncertain extent which disguises their relation to the underlying heterogeneity. In this study, we numerically investigate the sensitivity of the transient drawdown at the pumping well, to nonuniform distributions of transmissivity in confined aquifers. Frechet kernels and their time derivative are used to estimate two spatially averaged transmissivities, denoted the equivalent and interpreted transmissivity, Teq and Tin, respectively, for the case of single-well pumping tests. Interrelating Teq and Tin is achieved by modeling Tin in terms of a distance dependent, radially heterogeneous field. In weakly heterogeneous aquifers, Teq approximates TPW, the local transmissivity at the pumped well. With increasing degree of heterogeneity, Teq deviates from TPW as pumping propagates. Tin starts at TPW, approaching the spatial geometric mean of transmissivity during late pumping times. Limits of the proposed spatial weighting functions are investigated by treating the interpreted storativity, Sest, as an indicator for flow connectivity. It is shown numerically that the spatial weights for Teq and Tin agree well to the underlying heterogeneity if . Finally, implications for applying the concepts of Teq and Tin to heterogeneous domains, and, for real world applications are discussed. It is found that time-dependent spatial averages of Tin agree well with estimates of the interpreted transmissivity from the Continuous-Derivation method.

  5. A nonequilibrium simulation method for calculating tracer diffusion coefficients of small solutes in n-alkane liquids and polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Briels, Willem J.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    The tracer diffusion coefficients of methane in n-alkane liquids of increasing chain length were calculated by measuring the friction from short time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The frictional constant was calculated from the exponentially decaying distance between two methane

  6. Application of the re-circulating tracer well test method to determine nitrate reaction rates in shallow unconfined aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbery, Lee F; Flintoft, Mark J; Close, Murray E

    2013-02-01

    Five re-circulating tracer well tests (RCTWTs) have been conducted in a variety of aquifer settings, at four sites across New Zealand. The tests constitute the first practical assessment of the two-well RCTWT methodology described by Burbery and Wang (Journal of Hydrology, 2010; 382:163-173) and were aimed at evaluating nitrate reaction rates in situ. The performance of the RCTWTs differed significantly at the different sites. The RCTWT method performed well when it was applied to determine potential nitrate reaction rates in anoxic, electro-chemically reductive, nitrate-free aquifers of volcanic lithology, on the North Island, New Zealand. Regional groundwater flow was not fast-flowing in this setting. An effective first-order nitrate reaction rate in the region of 0.09 d(-1) to 0.26 d(-1) was determined from two RCTWTs applied at one site where a reaction rate of 0.37 d(-1) had previously been estimated from a push-pull test. The RCTWT method performed poorly, however, in a fast-flowing, nitrate-impacted fluvio-glacial gravel aquifer that was examined on the South Island, New Zealand. This setting was more akin to the hypothetical physiochemical problem described by Burbery and Wang (2010). Although aerobic conditions were identified as the primary reason for failure to measure any nitrate reaction in the gravel aquifer, failure to establish significant interflow in the re-circulation cell due to the heterogeneous nature of the aquifer structure, and natural variability exhibited in nitrate contaminant levels of the ambient groundwater further contributed to the poor performance of the test. Our findings suggest that in practice, environmental conditions are more complex than assumed by the RCTWT methodology, which compromises the practicability of the method as one for determining attenuation rates in groundwater based on tracing ambient contaminant levels. Although limited, there appears to be a scope for RCTWTs to provide useful information on potential

  7. Application of the re-circulating tracer well test method to determine nitrate reaction rates in shallow unconfined aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbery, Lee F.; Flintoft, Mark J.; Close, Murray E.

    2013-02-01

    Five re-circulating tracer well tests (RCTWTs) have been conducted in a variety of aquifer settings, at four sites across New Zealand. The tests constitute the first practical assessment of the two-well RCTWT methodology described by Burbery and Wang (Journal of Hydrology, 2010; 382:163-173) and were aimed at evaluating nitrate reaction rates in situ. The performance of the RCTWTs differed significantly at the different sites. The RCTWT method performed well when it was applied to determine potential nitrate reaction rates in anoxic, electro-chemically reductive, nitrate-free aquifers of volcanic lithology, on the North Island, New Zealand. Regional groundwater flow was not fast-flowing in this setting. An effective first-order nitrate reaction rate in the region of 0.09 d- 1 to 0.26 d- 1 was determined from two RCTWTs applied at one site where a reaction rate of 0.37 d- 1 had previously been estimated from a push-pull test. The RCTWT method performed poorly, however, in a fast-flowing, nitrate-impacted fluvio-glacial gravel aquifer that was examined on the South Island, New Zealand. This setting was more akin to the hypothetical physiochemical problem described by Burbery and Wang (2010). Although aerobic conditions were identified as the primary reason for failure to measure any nitrate reaction in the gravel aquifer, failure to establish significant interflow in the re-circulation cell due to the heterogeneous nature of the aquifer structure, and natural variability exhibited in nitrate contaminant levels of the ambient groundwater further contributed to the poor performance of the test. Our findings suggest that in practice, environmental conditions are more complex than assumed by the RCTWT methodology, which compromises the practicability of the method as one for determining attenuation rates in groundwater based on tracing ambient contaminant levels. Although limited, there appears to be a scope for RCTWTs to provide useful information on potential

  8. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duo [Albany, CA

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  9. Single well push-pull CO2 injection experiment for evaluating in-situ residual trapping at Heletz, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Auli; Bensabat, Jacob; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Ronen, Rona; Goren, Yoni; Perez, Lily; Tsarfis, Igal; Joodaki, Saba; Yang, Zhibing; Liang, Tian; Sauter, Martin; Hassan, Jawad; Gouze, Philippe; Rasmusson, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    The Heletz sands is a depleted oil reservoir at 1.6 km depth with saline water at its edges. In the saline part of the reservoir a CO2 injection experiment site has been developed for the purpose of scientifically motivated injection experiments, especially in the context of EU FP7 projects MUSTANG and TRUST. This presentation describes the single-well CO2 injection experiment carried out in September 2016, with the objective of determining field scale values of key CO2 trapping mechanisms, the residual and dissolution trapping. The sequence consisted in creating a residually trapped CO2 zone as well as reference hydraulic and heater tests prior and after the establishment of the zone, in order to determine the in-situ residual trapping. Monitoring included down-hole pressure and temperature measurement, distributed temperature sensing along the well via an optical fiber (DTS), U-tube sampling and tracers. We here present the experimental sequence, the monitoring and sampling system, the key results as well as the first interpretations.

  10. Separation of input function for rapid measurement of quantitative CMRO{sub 2} and CBF in a single PET scan with a dual tracer administration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro [Department of Investigative Radiology, Advanced Medical-Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center-Research Institute, 5-7-1, Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

    2007-04-07

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) images can be quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) by administrating {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sup 15}{sub 2}O) and oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}). Conventionally, those images are measured with separate scans for three tracers C{sup 15}O for CBV, H{sup 15}{sub 2}O for CBF and {sup 15}O{sub 2} for CMRO{sub 2}, and there are additional waiting times between the scans in order to minimize the influence of the radioactivity from the previous tracers, which results in a relatively long study period. We have proposed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) approach (Kudomi et al 2005), which enabled us to measure CBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} rapidly by sequentially administrating H{sup 15}{sub 2}O and {sup 15}O{sub 2} within a short time. Because quantitative CBF and CMRO{sub 2} values are sensitive to arterial input function, it is necessary to obtain accurate input function and a drawback of this approach is to require separation of the measured arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) into pure water and oxygen input functions under the existence of residual radioactivity from the first injected tracer. For this separation, frequent manual sampling was required. The present paper describes two calculation methods: namely a linear and a model-based method, to separate the measured arterial TAC into its water and oxygen components. In order to validate these methods, we first generated a blood TAC for the DARG approach by combining the water and oxygen input functions obtained in a series of PET studies on normal human subjects. The combined data were then separated into water and oxygen components by the present methods. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were calculated using those separated input functions and tissue TAC. The quantitative accuracy in the CBF and CMRO{sub 2} values by the DARG approach did not exceed the acceptable range, i.e., errors in those

  11. Conditioning geostatistical simulations of a bedrock fluvial aquifer using single well pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, A.; Bentley, L. R.; Hayashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geostatistical simulation is a powerful tool to explore the uncertainty associated with heterogeneity in groundwater and reservoir studies. Nonetheless, conditioning simulations merely with lithological information does not utilize all of the available information and so some workers additionally condition simulations with flow data. In this study, we introduce an approach to condition geostatistical simulations of the Paskapoo Formation, which is a paleo-fluvial system consisting of sandstone channels embedded in mudstone. The conditioning data consist of two-hour single well pumping tests extracted from the public water well database in Alberta, Canada. In this approach, lithologic models of an entire watershed are simulated and conditioned with hard lithological data using transition probability geostatistics (TPROGS). Then, a segment of the simulation around a pumping well was used to populate a flow model (FEFLOW) with either sand or mudstone. The values of the hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of sand and mudstone were then adjusted to minimize the difference between simulated and actual pumping test data using the parameter estimation program PEST. If the simulated data do not adequately match the measured data, the lithologic model is updated by locally deforming the lithology distribution using the probability perturbation method (PPM) and the model parameters are again updated with PEST. This procedure is repeated until the simulated and measured data agree within a pre-determined tolerance. The procedure is repeated for each pumping well that has pumping test data. The method constrains the lithological simulations and provides estimates of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage that are consistent with the pumping test data. Eventually, the simulations will be combined in watershed scale groundwater models.

  12. Radioactive tracers in Sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, H.T.

    1973-01-01

    First is given a broad description of the uses of radioactive tracers in Sedimentology. The general method is established, including determinations of probability and standard deviation. Following are determined: the response law of the detector, the minimum mass for statistical detection, and the minimum mass for dynamic detection. The granularity is an important variable in these calculations. Final conclusions are given, and results are compared with existing theories

  13. Proceedings of the atmospheric tracers and tracer application workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.; Gedayloo, T. (comps.)

    1979-12-01

    In addition to presentations by participating members a general discussion was held in order to summarize and outline the goals and objectives of the workshop. A number of new low level background tracers such as heavy methanes, perfluorocarbons, multiply labeled isotopes such as /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/, helium 3, in addition to sample collection techniques and analytical methods for various tracers were discussed. This report is a summary of discussions and papers presented at this workshop.

  14. Proceedings of the atmospheric tracers and tracer application workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.; Gedayloo, T.

    1979-12-01

    In addition to presentations by participating members a general discussion was held in order to summarize and outline the goals and objectives of the workshop. A number of new low level background tracers such as heavy methanes, perfluorocarbons, multiply labeled isotopes such as 13 C 18 O 2 , helium 3, in addition to sample collection techniques and analytical methods for various tracers were discussed. This report is a summary of discussions and papers presented at this workshop

  15. The development of in vivo tracer methods to obtain new information about human disease: a study of the hallucinating brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.; Silbersweig, D.A.; Stern, E.; Schnorr, L.; Seaward, J.; Clark, J.C.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Grootoonk, S.

    1996-01-01

    An outline is provided of the development of methodological strategies to address the question of focal cerebral activation during hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. In so doing, the innovation and diligence required to tailor in vivo tracer procedures to specific clinical research issues are highlighted. Attention is drawn to the complexity of methodological advances and the way in which they are based upon close scientific and technical collaboration between clinical scientists, and non-clinical scientists and research support staff. (orig.). With 1 fig

  16. Simultaneous measurement of local glucose utilization and blood flow in the rat brain: an autoradiographic method using two tracers labeled with carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlow, T.W. Jr.; Martin, R.M.; Harrison, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified technique that uses two radionuclide tracers has been devised to measure local cerebral glucose utilization (ICGU) and local cerebral blood flow (ICBF) in the same rat. The method employs [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose and [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine to produce an autoradiogram before and another after extraction into chloroform of the [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine from the brain sections. The chloroform-extracted autoradiogram yields ICGU, and the difference in tissue carbon-14 concentration between the two autoradiograms permits calculation of ICBF. The double-isotope technique provides values of ICGU and ICBF that are statistically indistinguishable from those derived from conventional single-isotope methods

  17. Solid matrix transformation and tracer addition using molten ammonium bifluoride salt as a sample preparation method for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; O'Hara, Matthew J; Kellogg, Cynthia M; Morrison, Samuel S; Koppenaal, David W; Chan, George C-Y; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E

    2017-09-08

    Solid sampling and analysis methods, such as laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), are challenged by matrix effects and calibration difficulties. Matrix-matched standards for external calibration are seldom available and it is difficult to distribute spikes evenly into a solid matrix as internal standards. While isotopic ratios of the same element can be measured to high precision, matrix-dependent effects in the sampling and analysis process frustrate accurate quantification and elemental ratio determinations. Here we introduce a potentially general solid matrix transformation approach entailing chemical reactions in molten ammonium bifluoride (ABF) salt that enables the introduction of spikes as tracers or internal standards. Proof of principle experiments show that the decomposition of uranium ore in sealed PFA fluoropolymer vials at 230 °C yields, after cooling, new solids suitable for direct solid sampling by LA. When spikes are included in the molten salt reaction, subsequent LA-ICP-MS sampling at several spots indicate that the spikes are evenly distributed, and that U-235 tracer dramatically improves reproducibility in U-238 analysis. Precisions improved from 17% relative standard deviation for U-238 signals to 0.1% for the ratio of sample U-238 to spiked U-235, a factor of over two orders of magnitude. These results introduce the concept of solid matrix transformation (SMT) using ABF, and provide proof of principle for a new method of incorporating internal standards into a solid for LA-ICP-MS. This new approach, SMT-LA-ICP-MS, provides opportunities to improve calibration and quantification in solids based analysis. Looking forward, tracer addition to transformed solids opens up LA-based methods to analytical methodologies such as standard addition, isotope dilution, preparation of matrix-matched solid standards, external calibration, and monitoring instrument drift against external calibration standards.

  18. Radioisotope tracer applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope tracers have many advantages in industrial trouble-shooting and studies on process kinetics. The applications are mainly of two types: one leading to qualitative (Yes or No type) information and the other to quantitative characterisation of flow processes through mass balance considerations and flow models. ''Yes or No'' type methods are mainly used for leakage and blockage locations in pipelines and in other industrial systems and also for location of water seepage zones in oil wells. Flow measurements in pipelines and mercury inventory in electrolytic cells are good examples of tracer methods using the mass balance approach. Axial dispersion model and Tanks-in-Series model are the two basic flow models commonly used with tracer methods for the characterisation of kinetic processes. Examples include studies on flow processes in sugar crystallisers as well as in a precalcinator in a cement plant. (author). 18 figs

  19. Joint Cross Well and Single Well Seismic Studies at Lost Hills, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.

    2002-06-25

    A series of time-lapse seismic cross well and single well experiments were conducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor the injection of CO{sub 2} into a hydrofracture zone, based on P- and S-wave data. A high-frequency piezo-electric P-wave source and an orbital-vibrator S-wave source were used to generate waves that were recorded by hydrophones as well as three-component geophones. The injection well was located about 12 m from the source well. During the pre-injection phase water was injected into the hydrofrac-zone. The set of seismic experiments was repeated after a time interval of 7 months during which CO{sub 2} was injected into the hydrofractured zone. The questions to be answered ranged from the detectability of the geologic structure in the diatomic reservoir to the detectability of CO{sub 2} within the hydrofracture. Furthermore it was intended to determine which experiment (cross well or single well) is best suited to resolve these features. During the pre-injection experiment, the P-wave velocities exhibited relatively low values between 1700-1900 m/s, which decreased to 1600-1800 m/s during the post-injection phase (-5%). The analysis of the pre-injection S-wave data revealed slow S-wave velocities between 600-800 m/s, while the post-injection data revealed velocities between 500-700 m/s (-6%). These velocity estimates produced high Poisson ratios between 0.36 and 0.46 for this highly porous ({approx} 50%) material. Differencing post- and pre-injection data revealed an increase in Poisson ratio of up to 5%. Both, velocity and Poisson estimates indicate the dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase of the reservoir accompanied by a pore-pressure increase. The single well data supported the findings of the cross well experiments. P- and S-wave velocities as well as Poisson ratios were comparable to the estimates of the cross well data. The cross well experiment did not detect the presence of the hydrofracture but appeared to be sensitive to overall

  20. Tracer a application in marine outfall studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genders, S.

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of radioactive and fluorescent tracers for field studies to predict or investigate waste water transport and dispersion from marine outfalls is evaluated. The application of either instantaneous or continuous tracer release, 'in situ' detection of tracers and data processing are considered. The necessity of a combined use of tracer techniques and conventional hydrographic methods for a statistical prediction of transport and dillution of waste water are pointed out. A procedure to determine an outlet distance from the coast, which satisfy bathing water criteria is outlined. (M.A.) [pt

  1. THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER TECHNOLOGY: A PROVEN AND COST EFFECTIVE METHOD TO VERIFY INTEGRITY AND MONITOR LONG TERM PERFORMANCE OF WALLS, FLOORS, CAPS, AND COVER SYSTEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEISER, J.; SULLIVAN, T.

    2002-03-11

    Currently, containment system failures are detected by monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. Clearly this approach is inefficient, as the contaminants will have migrated from the disposal area before they are detected. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict impending cover failure are needed. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) technology can measure performance changes and integrity losses as the cover ages. This allows early detection of cover failure or pending failure so that repair or replacement can be made before contaminants leave the disposal cell. The PFT technology has been successfully applied to four subsurface barrier problems, one leak detection problem from underground ducts, and one surface cover problem. Testing has demonstrated that the PFTs are capable of accurately detecting and locating leaks down to fractions of an inch. The PFT technology has several advantages over competing approaches. The ability to simultaneously use multiple PFTs separates it from other gas tracer technologies. Using multiple tracers provides independent confirmation of flaw location, helps to clearly define transport pathways, and can be used for confirmatory testing (e.g., repeat the test using a new tracer). The PFT tests provide a direct measure of flaws in a barrier, whereas other measurements (pressure, moisture content, temperature, subsidence) provide indirect measures that need interpretation. The focus of the six PFT demonstrations has been on engineering aspects of the technology with the intent of finding if a flaw existed in the barrier. Work remains to be done on the scientific basis for this technology. This includes determining PFT diffusion rates through various materials (soils and barrier) as a function of moisture content, determining the effects of barometric pumping on PFT flow for cover systems, and determining wind effects on side slopes of cover systems and

  2. Sampling design for groundwater solute transport: Tests of methods and analysis of Cape Cod tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.; Garabedian, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of a one-dimensional sampling design methodology on measurements of bromide concentration collected during the natural gradient tracer test conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, demonstrate its efficacy for field studies of solute transport in groundwater and the utility of one-dimensional analysis. The methodology was applied to design of sparse two-dimensional networks of fully screened wells typical of those often used in engineering practice. In one-dimensional analysis, designs consist of the downstream distances to rows of wells oriented perpendicular to the groundwater flow direction and the timing of sampling to be carried out on each row. The power of a sampling design is measured by its effectiveness in simultaneously meeting objectives of model discrimination, parameter estimation, and cost minimization. One-dimensional models of solute transport, differing in processes affecting the solute and assumptions about the structure of the flow field, were considered for description of tracer cloud migration. When fitting each model using nonlinear regression, additive and multiplicative error forms were allowed for the residuals which consist of both random and model errors. The one-dimensional single-layer model of a nonreactive solute with multiplicative error was judged to be the best of those tested. Results show the efficacy of the methodology in designing sparse but powerful sampling networks. Designs that sample five rows of wells at five or fewer times in any given row performed as well for model discrimination as the full set of samples taken up to eight times in a given row from as many as 89 rows. Also, designs for parameter estimation judged to be good by the methodology were as effective in reducing the variance of parameter estimates as arbitrary designs with many more samples. Results further showed that estimates of velocity and longitudinal dispersivity in one-dimensional models based on data from only five

  3. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  4. Transient methods to characterize flows and mass transfer in a packed column by tracers; Methodes transitoires de caracterisation des ecoulements et du transfert de masse dans une colonne a garnissage a l'aide de traceurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, S.

    1998-06-11

    The aim of this study is to propose a packed column characterization method in the form of phases flows and mass transfer model, in which the parameters are estimated by transient technique. After a bibliographic study a model is performed and validated. It allows efficiency and precision in the parameters choice. Two tracer techniques have been implemented: they show interesting possibilities of flow diagnosis. (A.L.B.)

  5. Tracer investigations of catalytic reactions of hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermietzel, J.

    1984-12-01

    Tracer techniques with 14 C-labelled compounds were used to investigate the isomerization of C 8 -aromatics and reforming of light gasoline. The investigations aimed at determining the selectivity of newly developed catalysts and at elucidating the reaction mechanisms. The appropriate tracer methods are briefly discussed including their theoretical fundamentals

  6. Assessing the activity and diversity of fumarate-fed denitrifying bacteria by performing field single-well push-pull tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hoon; Ha, Chul-Yoon; Oa, Seong-Wook; Lee, Jin-Woo; Park, Sun-Hwa; Kwon, Soo-Youl; Kim, Sungpyo; Kim, Young

    2011-01-01

    In situ biological denitrification has been proposed as an important metabolic activity in the remediation of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. In this study, the effects of fumarate, an electron donor for biological denitrification, on the in situ denitrifying activity were determined by using three types of single-well push-pull tests; transport, biostimulation and activity tests. During the tests, changes in microbial community composition were also investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Transport test demonstrated that non-reactive tracer and biologically reactive solutes behaved similarly. A biostimulation test was conducted to stimulate the denitrifying activities of native microorganisms, which were monitored by detecting the simultaneous production of CO(2) and drastic degradations of both nitrate and fumarate after the injection of fumarate as an electron donor and/or carbon source, with nitrate as an electron acceptor. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that the taxonomic affiliation of the dominant species before biostimulation was γ-Proteobacteria, including Acinetobacter species and Pseudomonas fluorescens, while the dominant species after biostimulation were affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and high G+C gram-positive bacteria. These results suggest that the analyses of groundwater samples using a combination of single well push pull tests with DGGE can be applied to investigate the activity, diversity and composition shift of denitrifying bacteria in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer.

  7. Certification of flow measurement methods and calibration of flowmeters in oil and gas industry using radioactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, L. E. E.; Kenup, H.O. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nóbrega, Armi W.; Gonçalves, E.R.; Dualibi Filho, J.C.; Malheiro, R.L., E-mail: brandaos@ien.gov.br, E-mail: atomum@atomum.com.br [ATOMUM Serviços Tecnológicos Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Oil and gas, mineral and water supply plants are the typical example of industrial facilities where they need accuracy in fluid flow measurement's procedures. In these installations, large quantities of materials are moving daily inside pipes, and one of the major problems of these industries is the safety of operations in transport of these materials. In order to monitor the transference processes many flowmeters are installed in the pipes to measure constantly the condition of the transported fluid. These flowmeters must be periodically calibrated, and one of the problems in this standardization is that these instruments need to be removed from the pipelines where they are operating and transported to the accredited laboratories to be calibrated. To remove a flowmeter from a pipe is not an easy operation, and in most of the cases, it is a very expensive operation, and in addition, any changes in the pipeline configuration can provoke leaks and when a leak occurs, it is impossible to operate the whole line and provokes accidents. Radiotracer technique is noninvasive fluid flow measure and using proper radiotracers is possible to measure organic, aqueous and gaseous flows without any disturbance in the normal operation of the pipeline. In this work, we present the ATOMUM{sub T}RACER, a software used to determine geometrical and technical procedures to calculate the Residence Time Curves using radiotracer techniques to accurately measure flow of fluids in pipelines with uncertainties around 0.7%. (author)

  8. EFFICIENT HYDROLOGICAL TRACER-TEST DESIGN (EHTD ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed that combines basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) in functional relationships that describe solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. The new method applies these initial estimates for time of travel and velocity to a hypothetical continuously stirred tank reactor as an analog for the hydrologic flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration and axial dispersion, based on a preset average tracer concentration. Root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using the preset average tracer concentration then provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass.Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to

  9. Quadratic tracer dynamical models tobacco growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang Jiyi; Hua Cuncai; Wang Shaohua

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the non-uniformly transferring process of some tracer dosages, we assume that the absorption of some tracer by tobacco is a quadratic function of the tracer quantity of the tracer in the case of fast absorption, whereas the exclusion of the tracer from tobacco is a linear function of the tracer quantity in the case of slow exclusion, after the tracer is introduced into tobacco once at zero time. A single-compartment quadratic dynamical model of Logistic type is established for the leaves of tobacco. Then, a two-compartment quadratic dynamical model is established for leaves and calms of the tobacco. Qualitative analysis of the models shows that the tracer applied to the leaves of the tobacco is excluded finally; however, the tracer stays at the tobacco for finite time. Two methods are also given for computing the parameters in the models. Finally, the results of the models are verified by the 32 P experiment for the absorption of tobacco. (authors)

  10. Tracer SWIW tests in propped and un-propped fractures: parameter sensitivity issues, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) or 'push-then-pull' tracer methods appear attractive for a number of reasons: less uncertainty on design and dimensioning, and lower tracer quantities required than for inter-well tests; stronger tracer signals, enabling easier and cheaper metering, and shorter metering duration required, reaching higher tracer mass recovery than in inter-well tests; last not least: no need for a second well. However, SWIW tracer signal inversion faces a major issue: the 'push-then-pull' design weakens the correlation between tracer residence times and georeservoir transport parameters, inducing insensitivity or ambiguity of tracer signal inversion w. r. to some of those georeservoir parameters that are supposed to be the target of tracer tests par excellence: pore velocity, transport-effective porosity, fracture or fissure aperture and spacing or density (where applicable), fluid/solid or fluid/fluid phase interface density. Hydraulic methods cannot measure the transport-effective values of such parameters, because pressure signals correlate neither with fluid motion, nor with material fluxes through (fluid-rock, or fluid-fluid) phase interfaces. The notorious ambiguity impeding parameter inversion from SWIW test signals has nourished several 'modeling attitudes': (i) regard dispersion as the key process encompassing whatever superposition of underlying transport phenomena, and seek a statistical description of flow-path collectives enabling to characterize dispersion independently of any other transport parameter, as proposed by Gouze et al. (2008), with Hansen et al. (2016) offering a comprehensive analysis of the various ways dispersion model assumptions interfere with parameter inversion from SWIW tests; (ii) regard diffusion as the key process, and seek for a large-time, asymptotically advection-independent regime in the measured tracer signals (Haggerty et al. 2001), enabling a dispersion-independent characterization of multiple

  11. Influence of heat exchange of reservoir with rocks on hot gas injection via a single well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Vladimir E.; Ivanov, Gavril I.

    2017-11-01

    In the computational experiment the influence of heat exchange through top and bottom of the gas-bearing reservoir on the dynamics of temperature and pressure fields during hot gas injection via a single well is investigated. The experiment was carried out within the framework of modified mathematical model of non-isothermal real gas filtration, obtained from the energy and mass conservation laws and the Darcy law. The physical and caloric equations of state together with the Newton-Riemann law of heat exchange of gas reservoir with surrounding rocks, are used as closing relations. It is shown that the influence of the heat exchange with environment on temperature field of the gas-bearing reservoir is localized in a narrow zone near its top and bottom, though the size of this zone is increased with time.

  12. Simulation and interpretation of inter-well tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseby, Olaf; Sagen, Jan; Viig, Sissel; Dugstad, Øyvind

    2013-05-01

    In inter-well tracer tests (IWTT), chemical compounds or radioactive isotopes are used to label injection water and gas to establish well connections and fluid patterns in petroleum reservoirs. Tracer simulation is an invaluable tool to ease the interpretation of IWTT results and is also required for assisted history matching application of tracer data. In this paper we present a new simulation technique to analyse and interpret tracer results. Laboratory results are used to establish and test formulations of the tracer conservation equations, and the technique is used to provide simulated tracer responses that are compared with observed tracer data from an extensive tracer program. The implemented tracer simulation methodology use a fast post-processing of previously simulated reservoir simulation runs. This provides a fast, flexible and powerful method for analysing gas tracer behaviour in reservoirs. We show that simulation time for tracers can be reduced by factor 100 compared to solving the tracer flow equations simultaneously with the reservoir fluid flow equations. The post-processing technique, combined with a flexible built-in local tracer-grid refinement is exploited to reduce numerical smearing, particularly severe for narrow tracer pulses.

  13. An Adaptive Single-Well Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Applied to Trace Analysis of Clenbuterol in Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofei Xie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of stochastic resonance, an adaptive single-well stochastic resonance (ASSR coupled with genetic algorithm was developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of weak chromatographic signals. In conventional stochastic resonance algorithm, there are two or more parameters needed to be optimized and the proper parameters values were obtained by a universal searching within a given range. In the developed ASSR, the optimization of system parameter was simplified and automatic implemented. The ASSR was applied to the trace analysis of clenbuterol in human urine and it helped to significantly improve the limit of detection and limit of quantification of clenbuterol. Good linearity, precision and accuracy of the proposed method ensure that it could be an effective tool for trace analysis and the improvement of detective sensibility of current detectors.

  14. Assessing Potential Impacts of CO2 Leakage on Shallow Groundwater Quality in the SECARB Phase III Early Test site Using Single-well Push-Pull Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Mickler, P. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    A single-well push-pull test was conducted in the Cranfield shallow aquifer, the SECARB Phase III early test site, for assessing potential impacts of CO2 leakage on groundwater quality. A total of 3800 liter of groundwater equilibrated with CO2 gas at a partial pressure of 1.105 Pa was injected into a confined sand interval at ~ 70 m depth. NaBr solution was added to the injected solution as tracer. The injected groundwater incubated within the interval for about two days. Chemical parameters (pH, temperature, alkalinity, and electric conductivity) were measured on-site and water samples were collected for chemical (major ions, trace elements, and dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC) as well as for stable carbon isotopic analyses. Mineralogical analyses using XR-D and SEM techniques indicate that aquifer sediments are dominated by silicates. Concentrations of the Br tracer in the recovered samples show mixing of background water with the injected solution. Major ions, especially, Ca, Mg, K, and Si show obvious enrichment, indicating that mobilization of these ions occurred from aquifer sediments to groundwater and may be dominated by dissolution of silicates and possible carbonate minerals. δ13C of DIC of the recovered samples may also suggest potential dissolution of carbonates. Concentrations of trace elements show mobilization after injection of CO2 enriched groundwater. Mobilization of trace elements could be due to co-dissolution of silicates and carbonates and desorption from the surface of aquifer sediments. However, mass balance calculations suggest that ion mobilization is limited and; therefore, potential risks of CO2 are low, especially for arsenic and lead with concentrations in the recovered samples ~30 times less than the EPA maximum contamination level. Results of the single-well push-pull test were also compared to a laboratory batch experiment of water-rock-CO2 interactions. Overall reaction rates of most ions estimated are higher in the batch

  15. Packet Tracer network simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Jesin, A

    2014-01-01

    A practical, fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to successfully create networks and simulate them using Packet Tracer.Packet Tracer Network Simulator is aimed at students, instructors, and network administrators who wish to use this simulator to learn how to perform networking instead of investing in expensive, specialized hardware. This book assumes that you have a good amount of Cisco networking knowledge, and it will focus more on Packet Tracer rather than networking.

  16. The Application of a Novel Pressurized Liquid Extraction Method to Quantify Organic Tracers Combined with Historic and Novel Organic Contaminants for the Discover-AQ Houston Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A. E.; Yoon, S.; Sheesley, R. J.; Usenko, S.

    2014-12-01

    DISCOVER-AQ is a NASA mission seeking to better understand air quality in cities across the United States. In September 2013, flight, satellite and ground-based data was collected in Houston, TX and the surrounding metropolitan area. Over 300 particulate matter filter samples were collected as part of the ground-based sampling efforts, at four sites across Houston. Samples include total suspended particle matter (TSP) and fine particulate matter (less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5). For this project, an analytical method has been developed for the pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) of a wide variety of organic tracers and contaminants from quartz fiber filters (QFFs). Over 100 compounds were selected including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, levoglucosan, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Currently, there is no analytical method validated for the reproducible extraction of all seven compound classes in a single automated technique. Prior to extraction, QFF samples were spiked with known amounts of target analyte standards and isotopically-labeled surrogate standards. The QFF were then extracted with methylene chloride:acetone at high temperatures (100˚C) and pressures (1500 psi) using a Thermo Dionex Accelerated Solvent Extractor system (ASE 350). Extracts were concentrated, spiked with known amounts of isotopically-labeled internal standards, and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry utilizing electron ionization and electron capture negative ionization. Target analytes were surrogate recovery-corrected to account for analyte loss during sample preparation. Ambient concentrations of over 100 organic tracers and contaminants will be presented for four sites in Houston during DISCOVER-AQ.

  17. Experimental quantification of solute transport through the vadose zone under dynamic boundary conditions with dye tracers and optical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to investigate e.g. groundwater contamination, nutrient uptake by plant roots and to implement remediation strategies. Beside field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. Atmospheric forcings, such as erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles, subject the shallow subsurface to local and temporal variations in water content and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing porous media. Those variations in material properties can cause flow paths to differ between upward and downward flow periods. Thereby, the unsaturated subsurface presents a highly complicated, dynamic system. Following an extensive systematical numerical investigation of flow and transport through bimodal, unsaturated porous media under dynamic boundary conditions (Cremer et al., 2016), we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell where we introduce structural heterogeneity in the form sharp material interfaces between different porous media. In all experiments, a constant pressure head is implemented at the lower boundary, while cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases are applied at the soil surface. As a reference case a stationary infiltration with a rate corresponding to the cycle-averaged infiltration rate is applied. By initial application of dye tracers, solute transport within the domain is visualized such that transport paths and redistribution processes can be observed in a qualitative manner. Solute leaching is quantified at the bottom outlet, where breakthrough curves are obtained via spectroscopy. Liquid and vapor flow in and out of the domain is obtained from multiple balances. Thereby, the interplay of material structural heterogeneity and alternating flow (transport) directions and flow (transport) paths is investigated. Results show lateral

  18. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  19. A closed-form analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoojin; Pruess, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests entail pumping cold water into a hot and usually fractured reservoir, and monitoring the temperature recovery during subsequent backflow. Such tests have been proposed as a potential means to characterize properties of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), such as fracture spacing, connectivity, and porosity. In this paper we develop an analytical solution for thermal SWIW tests, using an idealized model of a single vertical fracture with linear flow geometry embedded in impermeable conductive wall rocks. The analytical solution shows that the time dependence of temperature recovery is dominated by the heat exchange between fracture and matrix rock, but strong thermal diffusivities of rocks as compared to typical solute diffusivities are not necessarily advantageous for characterizing fracture-matrix interactions. The effect of fracture aperture on temperature recovery during backflow is weak, particularly when the fracture aperture is smaller than 0.1 cm. The solution also shows that temperature recovery during backflow is independent of the applied injection and backflow rates. This surprising result implies that temperature recovery is independent of the height of the fracture, or the specific fracture-matrix interface areas per unit fracture length, suggesting that thermal SWIW tests will not be able to characterize fracture growth that may be achieved by stimulation treatments.

  20. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  1. A rapid method for the measurement of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), and Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr) in hydrologic tracer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    2010-01-01

    A rapid headspace method for the simultaneous laboratory determination of intentionally introduced hydrologic tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr), and other halocarbons in water and gases is described. The high sensitivity of the procedure allows for introduction of minimal tracer mass (a few grams) into hydrologic systems with a large dynamic range of analytical detection (dilutions to 1:108). Analysis times by gas chromatography with electron capture detector are less than 1 min for SF6; about 2 min for SF6 and SF5CF3; and 4 min for SF6, SF5CF3, and Halon 1211. Many samples can be rapidly collected, preserved in stoppered septum bottles, and analyzed at a later time in the laboratory. Examples are provided showing the effectiveness of the gas tracer test studies in varied hydrogeological settings.

  2. Single-well push-pull test in transient Forchheimer flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanrong; Zhan, Hongbin; Wang, Yanxin

    2017-06-01

    Using the single-well push-pull (SWPP) test to quantify in situ aquifer characteristics associated with solute transport (dispersion coefficient, geobiochemical reaction rates), the accuracy of parameter estimation was not only dependent on the solute transport models but also the groundwater flow models. However, many previous studies on the SWPP test were based on assumptions over-simplifying the flow field, namely, groundwater flow followed Darcy's law; flow was in the steady state during the entire test duration; the wellbore storage could be negligible. In this study, we have carefully examined such assumptions by developing a new finite-difference model of the SWPP test under the transient Forchheimer flow condition, considering the wellbore storage. The SWPP test included an injection phase, a chaser phase, a rest phase, and an extraction phase. The results showed that the concentration of the steady-state flow solution was greater than that of the transient flow solution at the beginning, and its peak value was also greater than that of the transient flow solution. The difference between the breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the transient flow SWPP model and the steady-state flow SWPP model was not negligible, and such a difference increased with the decreasing specific storage. We also found that BTCs were not sensitive to the inertial force coefficient, while they were sensitive to the wellbore storage. BTCs with different radius of the wellbore (rw) were clearly different from each other, and a larger rw resulted in a greater concentration at the well during the extraction phase.

  3. Tracer studies on the effect of different methods of phosphorus application on fertilizer P uptake by Sunnhemp (Crotolaria juncea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhury, J.; Ray, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relative efficacy of seven methods of phosphorus application on dry matter yield, and fertilizer phosphorus uptake and its utilization by Sunnhemp (var. K-12 yellow) was studied under field conditions using 32 P tagged superphosphate (SSP). Fertilizer was least utilized by the traditional method of application of fertilizer i.e. broadcasting, whereas placement below the seed was significantly superior to all other methods in relation to dry matter yield, total and fertilizer P uptake by Sunnhemp. The per cent utilization of fertilizer P added and per cent Pdff followed the similar pattern as that of the dry matter yield. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  4. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here...

  5. Separation of run-off components of a glacierized catchment in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, by tracer methods (mainly δ2H, δ18O) and meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Stephan M.; Unger-Shayesteh, Katy; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Kalashnikova, Olga; Ershova, Natalya

    2017-04-01

    Since 2014 the glacierized Ala Archa catchment (ca. 230 km2) in the Kyrgyz Alatau mountains south of Bishkek is investigated for run-off contributions of precipitation, groundwater, snow-melt, and glacier melt by tracer methods (δ2H, δ18O, electrical conductivity) and hydro-meteorological data (run-off, precipitation, air temperature, albedo). The investigation period is characterized by a high inter-annual variability in precipitation amount and summer run-off. The isotopic composition of run-off water is found to be governed more by the interplay of air temperature, precipitation history, and snow coverage than by its origin from direct precipitation, snow- or glacial melt. The isotopic composition of base flow in winter and early spring time is found to vary probably not due to a reservoir (mixing) but due to a phase exchange process (fractionation). In the light of these results a separation of all run-off components in such an environment simply with isotope methods appears to be unrealistic.

  6. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Quantification of Emissions from Landfills and Other Large Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an emerging need to develop cost effective measurement methods for greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water treatment ponds, open area processing units, agricultural operations, CO2 sequestration fields, and site r...

  7. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here involves integrated sampling that is designed to allow for detailed and specific chemical analysis of particulate matter ...

  8. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  9. Tracers vs. trajectories in a coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, A.; Döös, K.

    2008-12-01

    Two different methods of estimating the water exchange through a Baltic coastal region have been used, consisting of particle trajectories and passive tracers. Water is traced from and to a small discharge region near the coast. The discharge material in this region is treated as zero dimensional particles or tracers with neutral buoyancy. The real discharge material could be a leakage of radio-nuclides through the sea floor from an underground repository of nuclear waste. Water exchange rates between the discharge region and the model domain are estimated using both forward and backward trajectories as well as passive tracers. The Lagrangian trajectories can account for the time evolution of the water exchange while the tracers give one average age per model grid box. Water exchange times such as residence time, age and transient times have been calculated with trajectories but only the average age (AvA) for tracers. The trajectory calculations provide a more detailed time evolution than the tracers. On the other hand the tracers are integrated "on-line" simultaneously in the sea circulation model with the same time step while the Lagrangian trajectories are integrated "off-line" from the stored model velocities with its inherent temporal resolution, presently one hour. The sub-grid turbulence is parameterised as a Laplacian diffusion for the passive tracers and with an extra stochastic velocity for trajectories. The importance of the parameterised sub-grid turbulence for the trajectories is estimated to give an extra diffusion of the same order as the Laplacian diffusion by comparing the Lagrangian dispersions with and without parameterisation. The results of the different methods are similar but depend on the chosen diffusivity coefficient with a slightly higher correlation between trajectories and tracers when integrated with a lower diffusivity coefficient.

  10. Optimizing the mercury mass measurement in industrial electrolytic cells by the radio-tracer method at ININ; Optimizacion de la medicion de masa de mercurio en celdas electroliticas industriales por el metodo de radiotrazado en el ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle R, J.; Angeles C, A., E-mail: Ing.valle.r@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    One method used in the production of chlorine and sodium is the use of electrolytic cells for the separation of chlorine and sodium from the brine; the industries apply very intense electromagnetic fields in this process. The electrolytic cells use mercury as electrode. In a chlorine production plant inventories are determined by total amount of mercury in the plant annually, since mercury losses are large and a very important parameter is to control the mass of mercury for it is necessary to measure with great precision the losses made. There are several methods to determine the mass of mercury ranging from take samples and weigh, but this involves continuous interruption of the process creating downtimes which in turn represent economic losses giving a result delimiting productivity for the industrial sector. An alternative and attractive method is to use a radioactive tracer whose principle has a similar behavior to study objective. The inert mercury has to be neutron activated in a nuclear reactor to having the characteristics of a tracer; the result makes one of the isotopes of mercury. The tracer is transported taking into account the recommendations of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (Mexico), then it is injected into the electrolytic cells mixing with the mercury in the system. By a relative radioactivity measurement and one sample by gamma spectrometry per interest cell, the mass of mercury without stopping the process is obtained. For optimal use of radio-tracer method must be taken into account as important features: irradiation time of mercury, counting conditions, vial geometry, sample volume, sample cells, mixing time and half-life of the tracer. (Author)

  11. A solution of the dispersion-convection equation of radial tracer transportation by the finite element variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, J.

    1979-01-01

    The variational finite element method (of the Rayleigh-Ritz type) has been applied to solve the standard diffusion-convection equation of radial flow in a dispersive medium. It was shown that the imposing of the boundary condition ΔC/Δx = 0 (=null concentration gradient) introduced great errors in computation results. To remedy it this condition was imposed at the free end of the artifical domain. Its other end joined to the downstream boundary of the investigated domain. The results of calculations compared with the known analytical solutions of the parallel flow show their good accuracy. The method was used to discuss the applicability of the approximate analytical solutions of the radial flow. (author)

  12. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  13. Radio-isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfangel, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the dispersions that may be used for preparing radio-isotopic tracers, technetium labelled dispersions, processes for preparing these dispersions and their use as tracers. Technetium 99m sulphur colloids are utilized as scintillation tracers to give a picture of the reticulo-endothelial system, particularly the liver and spleen. A dispersion is provided which only requires the addition of a radioactive nuclide to form a radioactively labelled dispersion that can be injected as a tracer. It is formed of a colloid of tin sulphur dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution. Such a reagent has the advantage of being safe and reliable and is easier to use. The colloid can be prepared more quickly since additions of several different reagents are avoided. There is no need to heat up and no sulphuretted hydrogen, which is a toxic gas, is used [fr

  14. Tracer Interaction Effects During Partitioning Tracer Tests for NAPL Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Pirestani, K.; Jafarpour, Y.; Spivey, K. M.

    2002-05-01

    Partitioning tracer tests have been used in laboratory and field investigations to quantify the amount of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) within porous media. In these tests multiple chemical tracers are typically injected into flowing groundwater: conservative tracers react minimally with the NAPL, while non-conservative tracers partition into the NAPL and exhibit retarded transport. The mean travel times of the conservative and partitioning tracers can be used to estimate the NAPL saturation in the swept zone. When multiple tracers are injected in the system, the tracers themselves change the chemical composition of the NAPL, which may affect partitioning behavior. Although co-tracer interactions have been considered by others, there are no reports of such effects during actual partitioning tracer tests. In this study tracer partitioning was examined in static batch systems and dynamic column experiments using 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol and 1-hexanol as partitioning tracers and trichloroethylene as the NAPL. Co-tracer effects resulted in nonlinear partitioning of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol in batch tests, which increased with increasing tracer concentrations. The UNIFAC model was used to predict tracer activities in the NAPL, and the resulting predictions of tracer partitioning matched the data trends. Column experiments were conducted with these same tracers, and nonlinear tracer partitioning associated with co-tracer effects resulted in underestimation of NAPL mass in some systems. If linear partitioning were assumed, a priori analysis suggested that nonlinear partitioning would result in an overestimation of NAPL saturation. We discuss these observations and suggest guidelines for avoiding co-tracer effects during partitioning tracer tests.

  15. Tracer techniques in food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsovskij, E.S.; Sakharov, Eh.V.; Dolinin, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The appicability of radioactive tracer techniques to process control in food industry are considered. Investigations in the field of food industry carried out using the above method are classified. The 1 class included investigations with preliminary preparation of a radioactive indicator and its following introduction in the system studied. The 2 class includes investigations based on the introduction in the system studied of a non-active indicator which is activated in a neutron flux being in samples selected in or after the process investigated. The 3 class includes studies based on investigations of natural radioactivity of certain nuclides in food stuff. The application of tracer techniques to the above classes of investigations in various fields of food industry and the equipment applied are considered in detail [ru

  16. Using Bayesian optimization method and FLEXPART tracer model to evaluate CO emission in East China in springtime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X L; Kanaya, Y; Wang, Z F; Tang, X; Takigawa, M; Pakpong, P; Taketani, F; Akimoto, H

    2014-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is of great interest as a restriction factor for pollutants related to incomplete combustions. This study attempted to evaluate CO emission in East China using the analytical Bayesian inverse method and observations at Mount Hua in springtime. The mixing ratio of CO at the receptor was calculated using 5-day source-receptor relationship (SRR) simulated by a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (FLEXPART) and CO emission flux. The stability of the inversion solution was evaluated on the basis of repeated random sampling simulations. The inversion results demonstrated that there were two city cluster regions (the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and the low reaches of the Yangtze River Delta) where the difference between a priori (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B, INTEX-B) and a posteriori was statistically significant and the a priori might underestimate the CO emission flux by 37 %. A correction factor (a posteriori/a priori) of 1.26 was suggested for CO emission in China in spring. The spatial distribution and magnitude of the CO emission flux were comparable to the latest regional emission inventory in Asia (REAS2.0). Nevertheless, further evaluation is still necessary in view of the larger uncertainties for both the analytical inversion and the bottom-up statistical approaches.

  17. Tracer tomography: design concepts and field experiments using heat as a tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doro, Kennedy O; Cirpka, Olaf A; Leven, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Numerical and laboratory studies have provided evidence that combining hydraulic tomography with tomographic tracer tests could improve the estimation of hydraulic conductivity compared with using hydraulic data alone. Field demonstrations, however, have been lacking so far, which we attribute to experimental difficulties. In this study, we present a conceptual design and experimental applications of tracer tomography at the field scale using heat as a tracer. In our experimental design, we improve active heat tracer testing by minimizing possible effects of heat losses, buoyancy, viscosity, and changing boundary conditions. We also utilize a cost-effective approach of measuring temperature changes in situ at high resolution. We apply the presented method to the 8 m thick heterogeneous, sandy gravel, alluvial aquifer at the Lauswiesen Hydrogeological Research Site in Tübingen, Germany. Results of our tomographic heat-tracer experiments are in line with earlier work on characterizing the aquifer at the test site. We demonstrate from the experimental perspective that tracer tomography is applicable and suitable at the field scale using heat as a tracer. The experimental results also demonstrate the potential of heat-tracer tomography as a cost-effective means for characterizing aquifer heterogeneity. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Influence of residual oxygen-15-labeled carbon monoxide radioactivity on cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction in a dual-tracer autoradiographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanishi, Katsuhiro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Miyake, Yoshinori; Minato, Kotaro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) are quantitatively measured with PET with (15)O gases. Kudomi et al. developed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) protocol that enables the duration of a PET study to be shortened by sequentially administrating (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) gases. In this protocol, before the sequential PET scan with (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) gases ((15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan), a PET scan with C(15)O should be preceded to obtain CBV image. C(15)O has a high affinity for red blood cells and a very slow washout rate, and residual radioactivity from C(15)O might exist during a (15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan. As the current DARG method assumes no residual C(15)O radioactivity before scanning, we performed computer simulations to evaluate the influence of the residual C(15)O radioactivity on the accuracy of measured CBF and OEF values with DARG method and also proposed a subtraction technique to minimize the error due to the residual C(15)O radioactivity. In the simulation, normal and ischemic conditions were considered. The (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) PET count curves with the residual C(15)O PET counts were generated by the arterial input function with the residual C(15)O radioactivity. The amounts of residual C(15)O radioactivity were varied by changing the interval between the C(15)O PET scan and (15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan, and the absolute inhaled radioactivity of the C(15)O gas. Using the simulated input functions and the PET counts, the CBF and OEF were computed by the DARG method. Furthermore, we evaluated a subtraction method that subtracts the influence of the C(15)O gas in the input function and PET counts. Our simulations revealed that the CBF and OEF values were underestimated by the residual C(15)O radioactivity. The magnitude of this underestimation depended on the amount of C(15)O radioactivity and the physiological conditions. This underestimation

  19. Tracer monitoring of enhanced oil recovery projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleven R.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In enhanced oil recovery (EOR, chemicals are injected into the oil reservoir, either to increase macroscopic sweep efficiency, or to reduce remaining oil saturation in swept zones. Tracers can be used to identify reservoirs that are specifically suited for EOR operations. Injection of a selection of partitioning tracers, combined with frequent sample analysis of produced fluids, provides information suited for estimation of residual oil saturation. Tracers can also be used to evaluate and optimize the application of EOR chemicals in the reservoir. Suitable tracers will follow the EOR chemicals and assist in evaluation of retention, degradation or trapping. In addition to field applications, tracers also have a large potential as a tool to perform mechanistic studies of EOR chemicals in laboratory experiments. By labelling EOR chemicals with radioactive isotopes of elements such as H, C and S, detailed studies of transport mechanisms can be carried out. Co-injection of labelled compounds in dynamic flooding experiments in porous media will give information about retention or separation of the unique compounds constituting the chemical formulation. Separation of such compounds may be detrimental to obtaining the EOR effect expected. The paper gives new information of specific methods, and discusses current status for use of tracers in EOR operations.

  20. A standardized method for the construction of tracer specific PET and SPECT rat brain templates: validation and implementation of a toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vállez Garcia, David; Casteels, Cindy; Schwarz, Adam J; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Koole, Michel; Doorduin, Janine

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution anatomical image data in preclinical brain PET and SPECT studies is often not available, and inter-modality spatial normalization to an MRI brain template is frequently performed. However, this procedure can be challenging for tracers where substantial anatomical structures present limited tracer uptake. Therefore, we constructed and validated strain- and tracer-specific rat brain templates in Paxinos space to allow intra-modal registration. PET [18F]FDG, [11C]flumazenil, [11C]MeDAS, [11C]PK11195 and [11C]raclopride, and SPECT [99mTc]HMPAO brain scans were acquired from healthy male rats. Tracer-specific templates were constructed by averaging the scans, and by spatial normalization to a widely used MRI-based template. The added value of tracer-specific templates was evaluated by quantification of the residual error between original and realigned voxels after random misalignments of the data set. Additionally, the impact of strain differences, disease uptake patterns (focal and diffuse lesion), and the effect of image and template size on the registration errors were explored. Mean registration errors were 0.70 ± 0.32 mm for [18F]FDG (n = 25), 0.23 ± 0.10mm for [11C]flumazenil (n = 13), 0.88 ± 0.20 mm for [11C]MeDAS (n = 15), 0.64 ± 0.28 mm for [11C]PK11195 (n = 19), 0.34 ± 0.15 mm for [11C]raclopride (n = 6), and 0.40 ± 0.13 mm for [99mTc]HMPAO (n = 15). These values were smallest with tracer-specific templates, when compared to the use of [18F]FDG as reference template (ptracer-specific templates allows accurate registration of functional rat brain data, independent of disease specific uptake patterns and with registration error below spatial resolution of the cameras. The templates and the SAMIT package will be freely available for the research community [corrected].

  1. Xanthine tracers and their preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groman, E.V.; Cabelli, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Compounds useful as tracers in the radioimmunoassay of xanthine derivatives such as theophylline and pharmacologically related drugs are described. They are substituted xanthines in which at least one substituted radical contains radioiodine. The tracers are made by linking radioiodinatable or preradioiodinated radicals to the xanthine derivative which is to be assayed. The tracers may be employed in known radioimmunoassay techniques. (author)

  2. Use of radioactive tracers in dynamic sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tola, Francois.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part, developments in the use of radioactive tracers in sedimentology are recalled together with the corresponding fields of application and the identities of the main users. The state-of-the-art in France is also discussed; The main characteristics of the method are then described and compared with those of more classical methods. The results that can be obtained with tracer methods are then outlined. The criteria employed to establish the granulometry characteristics of the tracer, the particular radioisotope to be used, and the masses and activities involved, are treated. A list is then given of the main isotopes available in France and their characteristics. The various different labelling techniques employed are studied together with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The special case of pelitic sediments is mentioned. The use of reduced model isotope generators, double labelling and applications to studies of the mud plug in the Gironde Estuary are also discussed. The methods and materials used for injecting and detecting tracers are described, emphasis being given to the economic factors associated with the use of radioactive tracers in sedimentology. The second part of the report contains two chapters: - studies of transport by driftage: presentation and analysis of results and the application of the Count Rate Balance method to obtain quantitative information on transport; - studies of in-suspension transport of fine sediments in the sea: the procedures adopted from the moment when the tracer is introduced up to the time when the results are analyzed and interpreted, enables the trajectories and mean velocities of the transported sediments to be determined together with their degree of dilution and their settling speeds and rates; it is also possible to investigate the evolution and horizontal dispersion of the sediments in this way. Results from recent experiments are presented in both parts of the report

  3. 4D-SPECT/CT in orthopaedics: a new method of combined quantitative volumetric 3D analysis of SPECT/CT tracer uptake and component position measurements in patients after total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, Helmut; Falkowski, Anna L.; Forrer, Flavio [Kantonsspital Baselland, Institute for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Henckel, Johann [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Hirschmann, Michael T. [Kantonsspital Baselland, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the intra- and inter-observer reliability of combined quantitative 3D-volumetric single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT analysis including size, intensity and localisation of tracer uptake regions and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) position. Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT of 100 knees after TKA were prospectively analysed. The anatomical areas represented by a previously validated localisation scheme were 3D-volumetrically analysed. The maximum intensity was recorded for each anatomical area. Ratios between the respective value and the mid-shaft of the femur as the reference were calculated. Femoral and tibial TKA position (varus-valgus, flexion-extension, internal rotation- external rotation) were determined on 3D-CT. Two consultant radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians interpreted the SPECT/CTs twice with a 2-week interval. The inter- and intra-observer reliability was determined (ICCs). Kappa values were calculated for the area with the highest tracer uptake between the observers. The measurements of tracer uptake intensity showed excellent inter- and intra-observer reliabilities for all regions (tibia, femur and patella). Only the tibial shaft area showed ICCs <0.89. The kappa values were almost perfect (0.856, p < 0.001; 95 % CI 0.778, 0.922). For measurements of the TKA position, there was strong agreement within and between the readings of the two observers; the ICCs for the orientation of TKA components for inter- and intra-observer reliability were nearly perfect (ICCs >0.84). This combined 3D-volumetric standardised method of analysing the location, size and the intensity of SPECT/CT tracer uptake regions (''hotspots'') and the determination of the TKA position was highly reliable and represents a novel promising approach to biomechanics. (orig.)

  4. Influence of sedation and data acquisition method on tracer uptake in animal models: [{sup 123}I]-2-iodo-L-phenylalanine in pentobarbital-sedated tumor-bearing athymic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersemans, Veerle [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Universiteit Gent, Harelbekestraat 72 B-9000 Gent (Belgium)]. E-mail: veerle.kersemans@utoronto.ca; Spiegeleer, Bart de [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Universiteit Gent, Harelbekestraat 72 B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Mertens, John [Laboratory for Medical Imaging and Physics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbecklaan 103 B-1090 Brussel (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Universiteit Gent, Harelbekestraat 72 B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2006-01-15

    Objectives: To minimize movement artifacts during tracer imaging studies, the animals are generally sedated. Although many reports describe the effect of barbiturates on brain function, less is published about the general impact on the extracerebral metabolism and tracer biodistribution. This report describes the influence of pentobarbital on tumor uptake of [{sup 123}I]-2-iodo-L-phenylalanine ([{sup 123}I]-2I-L-PA) using dissection and nuclear imaging. Methods: R1M tumor-bearing athymic mice were divided into two populations: untreated and pentobarbital-treated. Each group was subjected to dynamic and static planar imaging and organ dissection after [{sup 123}I]-2I-L-PA injection. Two-compartment blood modeling was performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), t test and clustered boxplot analyses were used to compare the results between the treatment groups and between the data acquisition methods. Results: Two-compartment blood modeling demonstrated that pentobarbital decreased the elimination velocity and the distribution toward the peripheral compartment. Both observations lead to higher blood pool and kidney activities after administering pentobarbital. The dependence of the differential absorption/differential uptake ratio results on the factors organ, method and treatment (3-factor ANOVA) demonstrated that all factors had a significant effect. Moreover, a significant effect for method and treatment was observed for each individual organ, and the ratio of tumor to background showed additionally an ordinal interaction between the latter two factors. Although the tumor uptake values were lower when using sedation and nuclear imaging, the tumor could still be visualized. Conclusions: An effect of sedation treatment and data acquisition method was demonstrated for 2-iodo-phenylalanine, currently under development as tumor tracer. It is recommended that animal experiments should include quantitative investigation of sedation and the data acquisition method.

  5. Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF 6 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF 6 , indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour

  6. Methane emission quantification from landfills using a double tracer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Samuelsson, J.; Fredenslund, Anders Michael

    2007-01-01

    A tracer method was successfully used for quantification of the whole methane (CH4) emission from Fakse landfill. By using two different tracers the emission from different sections of the landfill could be quantified. Furthermore, is was possible to determine the emissions from local on site...

  7. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  8. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  9. The evaluation of data from the MACRO tracer experiment. The report for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Shingo

    1999-12-01

    On understanding the radionuclide transport in Natural Barrier in radioactive waste isolation research, the macroscopic dispersion in heterogeneous permeability field in the underground rock is regarded as an important process. Therefore, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) developed the MACRO experiment with an artificial heterogeneous permeability field and has been conducted lots of tracer experiments. To estimate the effect of characteristics of field on the macroscopic dispersion using data from those tracer experiments, the evaluation of dispersion coefficient is required. In this report, the macroscopic dispersion coefficients were evaluated for the results of the tracer experiments using the MACRO facility with a single well. The coefficients for the experiments of 18 cases were evaluated by the fitting of analytical solution to the breakthrough curve measured in the well. In the evaluations, the correction of data measured in the experiments and of the accuracy in the evaluation were considered. The conclusions are as follows. The macroscopic dispersion coefficients for 18 cases were evaluated using Least Square Method by fitting the analytical evaluation to the result of experiment. Consequently, the coefficients for 7 cases were evaluated with not enough accurate fitting results. Therefore, another evaluations for those 7 cases were required to be with more accuracy. Then, those coefficients were evaluated with enough accuracy. It was verified that the macroscopic dispersion coefficient tend to be increased with increase of the average radius of tracer front. In some cases, however, the trend was not verified because of the limit of accuracy for data measured in the experiment and for the evaluation method of the coefficient. It was found that the macroscopic dispersion coefficients evaluated for the cases with heterogeneous permeability field type B tend to be higher than those with heterogeneous permeability field type A. (author)

  10. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee; Park, Soon Chul; Lim, Dong Soon; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Jae Choon; Lee, Doo Sung; Cho, Yong Suk; Shin, Sung Kuan

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  11. Using radioactive tracer technique in municipal hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurasova, O.I.

    1974-01-01

    Work of the A. N. Syrsin Institute of General and Municiapl Hygiene using raidoactive tracers is reviewed. The studies include research on protein metabolism in the living organism following action of unfavorable factors of the environment; determination of the paths of introduction into the organism of substances with an alien composition; and study of the rate of resorption of subcutaneous papuli. Results are shown of radioactive-tracer studies on the mechanism of action of poisonous substances on the living organism and of migration of alien chemical compounds in the organism and in objects in the environment. It is concluded that the radioactive tracer method has wide application in municipal hygiene and sanitary microbiology. The absence of laborious operations, economy of time, precision of the experiments, and the possibility of obtaining additional information on the mechanism of action of poisonous substances on the organism and the low cost of such studies compared with other methods makes the radioactive tracer method economically attractive. The studies made show the various types of use of the method in municipal hygiene and sanitary microbiology

  12. Pipeline leak detection using volatile tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.M.; Golding, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of leak detection for underground storage tanks and pipelines adds volatile tracers to the products in the tanks and analyzes the surrounding shallow soil gases for tracer vapors. This method has several advantages: the success of the test is not limited by the size and structural design of the vessels, tanks can be tested at any fill level without taking the tank out of service, the location of a leak along a pipeline is clearly marked by the location of the tracer, and liquid leaks as small as 0.2 liters per hour (lph) can be detected. A limitation is: the backfill material must have some degree of air permeability in the zone above the water table. Several field tests document the success achieved using this method. A tracer leak detection system was installed at Homestead AFB after several other testing methods failed to locate a leak at a valve pit location along approximately 4 kilometers of fuel transfer piping. The leak was detected to the side of the valve pit at a depth of approximately 2.5 meters below the ground surface. Another installation of Edwards AFB involved the collection of 415 soil gas samples along approximately 3,050 meters of 15.25-centimeter fiberglass pipeline. Fourteen separate leaks were detected

  13. Use of labeled compounds in tracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The use of radiotracers in research has become common. This chapter looks at some of the underlying assumptions and advantages of labeled compounds: advantages of radiotracers; availability of suitable tracers and labeled compounds; purity of labeled compounds; autoradiolysis; storage of labeled compounds; detection systems for chromatography and electrophoretic methods. 14 refs., 2 figs

  14. Radionuclides as tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Importance of radioisotopes in medicine is because of their two characteristics: their biological behaviour is identical to their stable counterparts, and because they are radioactive their emissions can be detected by a suitable instrument. All isotopes of iodine will behave in the same way and will concentrate in the thyroid gland. There is no way of detecting the stable, natural iodine in the thyroid gland, but the presence of radioactive iodine can be detected externally in vivo by a detector. Thus, the radioactive iodine becomes a tracer, a sport of a spy, which mimics the behaviour of natural iodine and relays information to a detector. The radioactive tracers are popular because of the ease with which they can be detected in vivo and the fact that the measurement of their presence in the body can be in quantitative terms. The measurement can be very accurate and sensitive. Whenever the measurements can be done in vivo, the information is obtained in dynamic terms, as it is happening, as if the physiological events become transparent

  15. Non-input analysis for incomplete trapping irreversible tracer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Irie, Toshiaki

    2013-07-01

    When using metabolic trapping type tracers, the tracers are not always trapped in the target tissue; i.e., some are completely trapped in the target, but others can be eliminated from the target tissue at a measurable rate. The tracers that can be eliminated are termed 'incomplete trapping irreversible tracers'. These incomplete trapping irreversible tracers may be clinically useful when the tracer β-value, the ratio of the tracer (metabolite) elimination rate to the tracer efflux rate, is under approximately 0.1. In this study, we propose a non-input analysis for incomplete trapping irreversible tracers based on the shape analysis (Shape), a non-input analysis used for irreversible tracers. A Monte Carlo simulation study based on experimental monkey data with two actual PET tracers (a complete trapping irreversible tracer [(11)C]MP4A and an incomplete trapping irreversible tracer [(18)F]FEP-4MA) was performed to examine the effects of the environmental error and the tracer elimination rate on the estimation of the k3-parameter (corresponds to metabolic rate) using Shape (original) and modified Shape (M-Shape) analysis. The simulation results were also compared with the experimental results obtained with the two PET tracers. When the tracer β-value was over 0.03, the M-Shape method was superior to the Shape method for the estimation of the k3-parameter. The simulation results were also in reasonable agreement with the experimental ones. M-Shape can be used as the non-input analysis of incomplete trapping irreversible tracers for PET study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm to the Parameter Optimization of Single-Well Potential Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Aimed at Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Weak Chromatographic Peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses.

  17. Radioisotope tracer application in surface and groundwater flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monev, E.

    1983-01-01

    The ''peak to peak'' method for measurement of water flow with the use of radioactive tracer was investigated. The theoretical basis for this method has been established. The experiments in the open channel have shown the applicability of the method. Groundwater flow was studied by injection of radioactive tracer into the bore-hole followed by gamma-logging in three different time intervals. Interpretation of gamma lows in terms of filtration velocity in various depths proved to be possible

  18. Guidebook on radioisotope tracers in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The idea of using tracers (chemical, dyes, etc.) in the investigation of complex physical phenomena has always attracted the attention of scientists and engineers. When radioactive isotopes became available it was immediately recognized that they offered an almost ideal solution to tracer selection. This book is devoted to reviewing the present status of the tracer method as such and to its applications to those branches of industry which have derived large benefits from the use of this modern technology. The main objectives of the IAEA's Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section is to help Member States in introducing to their own industries the different isotope and radiation techniques which have become available as a result of developments in the nuclear sciences. This section proposed the preparation of this guidebook, putting together various radiotracer methods and the experience obtained so far in their industrial use. Chapters 2 to 4 cover the general concept of tracers, technology and safety aspects, as well as data evaluation and interpretation. In chapter 5, therefore, general applications are discussed. In chapter 6, specialists in selected fields discuss their experience in radiotracer applications in various types of industrial activity. Most case studies are illustrated by at least one detailed example of an experiment carried out at an industrial installation. Current trends in the development of radiotracer methods are discussed in chapter 7, from both a theoretical and a practical viewpoint. Some possible new RTT applications in the future are also discussed here. Sealed radioactive sources are used almost as often as radioisotope tracers in industrial measurements. Annex I gives a short review of these techniques. Readers who are interested in the basic principles of radioisotope production will find the necessary information in Annex II. Annexes III, V and VI provide a demonstration of fundamental relations and properties; useful

  19. Suitability of tracers; Eignung von Tracern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrologie

    1999-02-01

    Hydrological tracer techniques are a means of making statements on the direction and speed of underground water. One of the simpler tasks is to find out whether there is hydrological communication between two given points. This requires a determination of the direction of flow, which places less exacting demands on the properties of the tracer than does the task of determining the flow velocity of underground water. Tracer methods can serve to infer from flow velocity the distance (flow) velocity, which is defined as the ratio between the distance between two points located in flow direction and the actual time it takes water to flow from one to the other. [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe der hydrologischen Markierungstechniken koennen Aussagen ueber die Richtung und die Geschwindigkeit von Bewegungen des unterirdischen Wassers gemacht werden. Der einfachere Fall liegt vor, wenn festgestellt werden soll, ob zwischen zwei Punkten eine hydrologische Verbindung besteht. Bei dieser Fliessrichtungsbestimmung sind die Forderungen an die Eigenschaften der einzusetzenden Tracer geringer als bei der Bestimmung der Geschwindigkeit des unterirdischen Wassers. Von den Geschwindigkeiten des unterirdischen Wassers ist die Abstands-(Fliess)geschwindigkeit, die definiert ist durch das Verhaeltnis aus dem Abstand und der wahren Fliesszeit zwischen zwei in Bewegungsrichtung gelegenen Punkten, durch Tracermethoden zu bestimmen. (orig.)

  20. Sifting through the surfeit of neuroinflammation tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Paul; Burgher, Bjorn; Patkar, Omkar; Breakspear, Michael; Vasdev, Neil; Thomas, Paul; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard

    2018-02-01

    The first phase of molecular brain imaging of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory conditions began some 20 years ago with the introduction of [ 11 C]-( R)-PK11195, the prototype isoquinoline ligand for translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO). Investigations by positron emission tomography (PET) revealed microgliosis in numerous brain diseases, despite the rather low specific binding signal imparted by [ 11 C]-( R)-PK11195. There has since been enormous expansion of the repertoire of TSPO tracers, many with higher specific binding, albeit complicated by allelic dependence of the affinity. However, the specificity of TSPO PET for revealing microglial activation not been fully established, and it has been difficult to judge the relative merits of the competing tracers and analysis methods with respect to their sensitivity for detecting microglial activation. We therefore present a systematic comparison of 13 TSPO PET and single photon computed tomography (SPECT) tracers belonging to five structural classes, each of which has been investigated by compartmental analysis in healthy human brain relative to a metabolite-corrected arterial input. We emphasize the need to establish the non-displaceable binding component for each ligand and conclude with five recommendations for a standard approach to define the cellular distribution of TSPO signals, and to characterize the properties of candidate TSPO tracers.

  1. Laplace transform in tracer kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, Eliete B.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective this paper is to quantify the pharmacokinetic processes: absorption, distribution and elimination of radiopharmaceutical(tracer), using Laplace transform method. When the drug is administered intravenously absorption is complete and is available in the bloodstream to be distributed throughout the whole body in all tissues and fluids, and to be eliminated. Mathematical modeling seeks to describe the processes of distribution and elimination through compartments, where distinct pools of tracer (spatial location or chemical state) are assigned to different compartments. A compartment model is described by a system of differential equations, where each equation represents the sum of all the transfer rates to and from a specific compartment. In this work a two-tissue irreversible compartment model is used for description of tracer, [ 18 F]2-fluor-2deoxy-D-glucose. In order to determine the parameters of the model, it is necessary to have information about the tracer delivery in the form of an input function representing the time-course of tracer concentration in arterial blood or plasma. We estimate the arterial input function in two stages and apply the Levenberg-Marquardt Method to solve nonlinear regressions. The transport of FDG across de arterial blood is very fast in the first ten minutes and then decreases slowly. We use de Heaviside function to represent this situation and this is the main contribution of this study. We apply the Laplace transform and the analytical solution for two-tissue irreversible compartment model is obtained. The only approach is to determinate de arterial input function. (author)

  2. Laplace transform in tracer kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Eliete B., E-mail: eliete@pucrs.br [Instituto do Cerebro (InsCer/FAMAT/PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS, (Brazil). Faculdade de Matematica

    2013-07-01

    The main objective this paper is to quantify the pharmacokinetic processes: absorption, distribution and elimination of radiopharmaceutical(tracer), using Laplace transform method. When the drug is administered intravenously absorption is complete and is available in the bloodstream to be distributed throughout the whole body in all tissues and fluids, and to be eliminated. Mathematical modeling seeks to describe the processes of distribution and elimination through compartments, where distinct pools of tracer (spatial location or chemical state) are assigned to different compartments. A compartment model is described by a system of differential equations, where each equation represents the sum of all the transfer rates to and from a specific compartment. In this work a two-tissue irreversible compartment model is used for description of tracer, [{sup 18}F]2-fluor-2deoxy-D-glucose. In order to determine the parameters of the model, it is necessary to have information about the tracer delivery in the form of an input function representing the time-course of tracer concentration in arterial blood or plasma. We estimate the arterial input function in two stages and apply the Levenberg-Marquardt Method to solve nonlinear regressions. The transport of FDG across de arterial blood is very fast in the first ten minutes and then decreases slowly. We use de Heaviside function to represent this situation and this is the main contribution of this study. We apply the Laplace transform and the analytical solution for two-tissue irreversible compartment model is obtained. The only approach is to determinate de arterial input function. (author)

  3. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  4. The time and frequency response of tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Christopher J.; Al-Hassan, Sumani

    1988-01-01

    Two distinctly different approaches to the interpretation of advective and dispersive transport characteristics of an intermediate scale (0-6 m) tracer experiment are examined and compared. The first, or time domain method, is based on a direct analysis of the tracer breakthrough via the widely used moment method. The second, or frequency domain method, is based on a comparison of the Fourier transform of the tracer breakthrough and its theoretical counterpart the frequency response function. Both methods provide satisfactory estimates of the mean advective transport component of the experiment for both conservative and nonconservative tracers. For the sampling ports closest to the source (0-2 m), the moment method produces much larger estimates of the dispersivity than the frequency response method. This difference is attributed to a buildup of errors in the estimation of higher moments, resulting from local variations in the tracer and fluid migration rates within this zone. In the lower part of the caisson (> 2m), the tracer breakthrough is smoother, and both methods provide similar and smaller dispersivity estimates. Overall the frequency domain approach is less sensitive to random variations in the breakthrough response. This idea is illustrated with an example from optimal filtering theory.

  5. Radon diagnostics and tracer gas measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, K.; Brabec, M.

    2004-01-01

    An outline is presented of the tracer gas technique, which is used for continuous measurements of air ventilation rate (generally time-varying) and for simultaneous estimation of air ventilation rate and radon entry rate, and some of its limitations are discussed. The performance of this technique in the calculation of the air ventilation rate is demonstrated on real data from routine measurements. The potential for air ventilation rate estimation based on radon measurements only is discussed. A practical application is described of the tracer gas technique to a simultaneous estimation of the air ventilation rate and radon entry rate in a real house where the effectiveness of radon remedy was tested. The following main advantages of the CO tracer gas techniques are stressed: (i) The averaging method continuous determination of the ventilation rate with good accuracy (≤ 20 %). (ii) The newly presented and verified method based on simultaneous measurements of radon concentration and CO gas concentration enables separate continuous measurements of the radon entry rate and ventilation rate. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the inaccuracy in determination of radon entry rate showed acceptable and good agreement up to approximately 10 %. The results of comparative measurements performed with the aim to estimate the mutual commensuration of the method to the determination of the ventilation rate confirmed the expected unreliability the two parametric non-linear regression method, which is the most frequently used method in radon diagnostic in the Czech Republic

  6. Estimating of aquifer parameters from the single-well water-level measurements in response to advancing longwall mine by using particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Ersin; Karaman, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    We estimated transmissivity and storage coefficient values from the single well water-level measurements positioned ahead of the mining face by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique. The water-level response to the advancing mining face contains an semi-analytical function that is not suitable for conventional inversion shemes because the partial derivative is difficult to calculate . Morever, the logaritmic behaviour of the model create difficulty for obtaining an initial model that may lead to a stable convergence. The PSO appears to obtain a reliable solution that produce a reasonable fit between water-level data and model function response. Optimization methods have been used to find optimum conditions consisting either minimum or maximum of a given objective function with regard to some criteria. Unlike PSO, traditional non-linear optimization methods have been used for many hydrogeologic and geophysical engineering problems. These methods indicate some difficulties such as dependencies to initial model, evolution of the partial derivatives that is required while linearizing the model and trapping at local optimum. Recently, Particle swarm optimization (PSO) became the focus of modern global optimization method that is inspired from the social behaviour of birds of swarms, and appears to be a reliable and powerful algorithms for complex engineering applications. PSO that is not dependent on an initial model, and non-derivative stochastic process appears to be capable of searching all possible solutions in the model space either around local or global optimum points.

  7. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated

  8. Meteorological tracers in regional planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.H.

    1974-11-01

    Atmospheric tracers can be used as indicators to study both the ventilation of an urban region and its dispersion meteorology for air pollutants. A correlation analysis applied to the space-time dependent tracer concentrations is able to give transfer functions, the structure and characteristic parameters of which describe the meteorological and topographical situation of the urban region and its surroundings in an integral manner. To reduce the number of persons usually involved in a tracer experiment an automatic air sampling system had to be developed

  9. Tracer studies with aortic infusion result in improper tracer distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisneski, J.A.; Brooks, G.A.; Neese, R.A.; Stanley, W.C.; Morris, D.L.; Gertz, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that lactate turnover can be accurately assessed by infusing radioactive lactate tracer into the aorta and sampling blood in the vena cava. However, there may be streaming of newly infused tracer in the aorta, resulting in a nonuniform arterial specific activity (SA). Furthermore vena caval blood may not be representative of mixed venous blood. The authors examined this problem in 7 anesthetized dogs with sampling catheters in the pulmonary (PA), carotid (CA), and femoral (FA) arteries, and the superior (SVC) and inferior (IVC) vena cavi. [1- 14 C]lactate was continuously infused into the left ventricle through a catheter introduced through the femoral artery. The same SA (dpm/μmol) was found in the CA and FA, indicating adequate mixing of newly infused tracer with trace. Three dogs showed differences between SVC, IVC and PA, suggesting a mixed venous sample can not be obtained from the VC. When the catheter was moved into the aorta, wide differences in SA appeared between the CA and FA, clearly reflecting streaming of tracer. These differences also appeared in the SVC and IVC. In conclusion, adequate mixing does not occur between tracer and trace in arterial blood with aortic infusion. Further, VC sampling will not give a consistent mixed venous SA. Therefore, for practical reasons, aortic tracer infusion with vena caval sampling will lead to erroneous turnover values

  10. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  11. Redesigning TRACER trial after TRITON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2015-10-15

    Designing of smart clinical trials is critical for regulatory approval and future drug utilization. Importantly, trial design should be reconsidered if the interim analyses suggest unexpected harm, or conflicting results were yielded from the other trials within the same therapeutic area. With regard to antiplatelet agents, the perfect example is redesigning of the ongoing PRoFESS trial by eliminating aspirin from clopidogrel arm after the earlier MATCH trial results became available. The goal was to aseess the unchanged TRACER trial design in light of the evidence yielded from the earlier completed TRITON trial. TRACER was designed as a triple versus dual antiplatelet trial in NSTEMI patients with no previous long-term outcome data supporting such aggressive strategy. TRITON data represented dual versus dual antiplatelet therapy, and became available before TRACER enrollment starts revealing prasugrel front-loaded early vascular benefit predominantly in STEMI patients with the growing over time bleeding and cancer risks. Moreover, large prasugrel NSTEMI TRITON cohort exhibited trend towards excess mortality in experimental arm warning against aggressive TRACER design. The long-term TRITON results in general, and especially in the NSTEMI patients challenge unchanged TRACER trial design. Applying dual, rather than triple antiplatelet therapy protocol modification should be considered in TRACER to minimize bleeding, cancer, and non-cardiovascular death risks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Tracer transport in fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Tsang, Y.W.; Hale, F.V.

    1988-07-01

    Recent interest in the safety of toxic waste underground disposal and nuclear waste geologic repositories has motivated many studies of tracer transport in fractured media. Fractures occur in most geologic formations and introduce a high degree of heterogeneity. Within each fracture, the aperture is not constant in value but strongly varying. Thus for such media, tracer tends to flow through preferred flowpaths or channels within the fractures. Along each of these channels, the aperture is also strongly varying. A detailed analysis is carried out on a 2D single fracture with variable apertures and the flow through channels is demonstrated. The channels defined this way are not rigidly set pathways for tracer transport, but are the preferred flow paths in the sense of stream-tubes in the potential theory. It is shown that such variable-aperture channels can be characterized by an aperture probability distribution function, and not by the exact deterministic geometric locations. We also demonstrate that the 2D tracer transport in a fracture can be calculated by a model of a system of 1D channels characterized by this distribution function only. Due to the channeling character of tracer transport in fractured rock, random point measurements of tracer breakthrough curves may give results with a wide spread in value due to statistical fluctuations. The present paper suggests that such a wide spread can probably be greatly reduced by making line/areal (or multiple) measurements covering a few spatial correlation lengths. 13 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. Use of tracers for locating and designing sea outfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, M.; Quetin, B.

    1976-01-01

    Various tracers are used for investigating the propagation of substances in solution or suspension (radioactive, biological, chemical substances and floats). Floats and dyes are the most employed. The main problems associated with the use of such tracers and data interpretation are discussed and it is shown how effective quantitative data can be obtained, especially as regards estimation of turbulent diffusion parameters and identification of suitable dispersion methods for purposes of determining pollutant concentration and areas affected thereby [fr

  14. Application of the radioactive tracers for investigation of hold-up in packed distillation columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczyk, J.; Iller, E.

    1976-01-01

    Problem of hold-up liquid in packed distillation column is discussed. Two methods of measurement are presented: dilution of radioactive tracer, and measurement of residence time of radioactive tracer in bed of packing. Examples of applied methods, in which bromohydrocarbons labelled with 82 Br were used as radioactive tracer are presented. The obtained results are compared with the results of the classical method of measurement volume. (author)

  15. Elucidation of hydrogen mobility in tetralin under coal liquefaction conditions using a tritium tracer method. Effects of the addition of H2S and H2O; Tritium tracer ho wo mochiita sekitan ekika hanno jokenka deno tetralin no suiso idosei hyoka. Ryuka suiso oyobi mizu no tenka koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, M.; Saito, M.; Ishihara, A.; Kabe, T. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously reported that the tritium tracer method is useful for the quantitative consideration of hydrogen behavior in coal during coal liquefaction reaction. Tetralin is excellent hydrogen donating solvent, and is considered as one of the model compounds of coal. In this study, effects of H2S and H2O on the hydrogen exchange reaction between tetralin and gaseous hydrogen labeled by tritium were investigated. It was suggested that the conversion of tetralin and the hydrogen exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and tetralin proceed through the radical reaction mechanism with a tetralyl radical as an intermediate product. When H2S existed in this reaction, the hydrogen exchange yield increased drastically without changing the conversion yield. This suggested that the hydrogen exchange reaction proceeds even in the reaction where radical does not give any effect. In the case of H2O addition, the conversion yield and hydrogen exchange rate decreased into a half or one-third. It was suggested that H2O inhibited the formation process of tetralyl radical. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. 15N tracer techniques in pediatric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, W.; Richter, I.; Plath, C.; Wutzke, K.; Stolpe, H.J.; Tiess, M.; Toewe, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main topics of the review comprise mathematical fundamentals of the determination of N metabolism parameters using the 3-pool method, the value of different 15 N tracer substances for the determination of whole-body protein parameters, the utilization of parenterally applied D-amino acids, studies on the influence of different diets on the N metabolism of premature infants with the 15 N tracer technique, the application of the 15 N-glycine-STH-test for the evaluation of the therapeutic effect of STH in children suffering from hypothalamico-hypophyseal dwarfism, in vivo studies on urea utilization by the infant intestinal flora under various dietary regimens as well as in vitro investigations on the utilization of 15 N-labelled urea and NH 4 Cl, resp., by the intestinal flora

  17. In-Situ Characterization of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Using Partitioning Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary A. Pope; Daene C. McKinney; Akhil Datta Gupta; Richard E. Jackson; Minquan Jin

    2000-03-20

    Majors advances have been made during the past three years in our research on interwell partitioning tracers tests (PITTs). These advances include (1) progress on the inverse problem of how to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of NAPL in aquifers from the tracer data, (2) the first ever partitioning tracer experiments in dual porosity media, (3) the first modeling of partitioning tracers in dual porosity media (4) experiments with complex NAPLs such as coal tar, (5) the development of an accurate and simple method to predict partition coefficients using the equivalent alkane carbon number approach, (6) partitioning tracer experiments in large model aquifers with permeability layers, (7) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data to estimate the change in composition of a NAPL before and after remediation (8) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data after a field demonstration of surfactant foam to remediate NAPL and (9) experiments at elevated temperatures .

  18. Measurement of open streams by using tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, German F.; Tarquino, W.; Curcuy, H.; Orozco, C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an intercomparison study to be carried out between flux measurements by using tracers and moulinet. This intercomparison is scheduled to be performed at the measurement station belonging to the National Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI). Two techniques of tracer dilution are outstanded: total evaluation with tracer punctual injection and punctual evaluation with tracer continuous injection. Total evaluation with tracer punctual injection has been used since this technique is considered to be more suitable for hydrology purposes

  19. Our experience of blood flow measurements using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danet, Bernard.

    1974-01-01

    A critical study of blood flow measuring methods is proposed. After a review of the various diffusible and non-diffusible radioactive tracers and the corresponding detector systems, the principles which allow to measure blood flow from the data so obtained, are studied. There is a different principle of flow measurement for each type of tracer. The theory of flow measurement using non-diffusible tracers (human serum albumin labelled with 131 I or sup(99m)Tc, 113 In-labelled siderophiline) and its application to cardiac flow measurement are described first. Then the theory of flow measurement using diffusible tracers ( 133 Xe, 85 Kr) and its application to measurement of blood flow through tissues (muscles and kidney particularly) are described. A personal experience of this various flow measurements is reported. The results obtained, the difficulties encountered and the improvments proposed are developed [fr

  20. Systems approach to tracer data in groundwater hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review of current mathematical methods for the analysis of tracer data in groundwater hydrology has been given. The description of the hydrological cycle as a whole or in part, by a system (compartment) or sub-system under linear and stationary conditions is discussed. Basic concepts of transit time, residence time, their distributions in time and response characteristics of a system are outlined. From the knowledge of tracer input, output and systems response function for a generalised system, reservoir capacity and storage for given period can be estimated. Use of a time series model for environmental tracer data in discreet time scale aimed at the solution of hydrological problems e.g. mean transit time and reservoir capacity is also explored. It is concluded that the combination of tracer data with systems approach can go a long way in the study of some complex hydrological problems. (author)

  1. Direct Parametric Image Reconstruction in Reduced Parameter Space for Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyin; Li, Zhoulei; Liu, Zhen; Navab, Nassir; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Keller, Ulrich; Ziegler, Sibylle; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-02-12

    The separation of multiple PET tracers within an overlapping scan based on intrinsic differences of tracer pharmacokinetics is challenging, due to limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PET measurements and high complexity of fitting models. In this study, we developed a direct parametric image reconstruction (DPIR) method for estimating kinetic parameters and recovering single tracer information from rapid multi-tracer PET measurements. This is achieved by integrating a multi-tracer model in a reduced parameter space (RPS) into dynamic image reconstruction. This new RPS model is reformulated from an existing multi-tracer model and contains fewer parameters for kinetic fitting. Ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) was employed to approximate log-likelihood function with respect to kinetic parameters. To incorporate the multi-tracer model, an iterative weighted nonlinear least square (WNLS) method was employed. The proposed multi-tracer DPIR (MTDPIR) algorithm was evaluated on dual-tracer PET simulations ([18F]FDG and [11C]MET) as well as on preclinical PET measurements ([18F]FLT and [18F]FDG). The performance of the proposed algorithm was compared to the indirect parameter estimation method with the original dual-tracer model. The respective contributions of the RPS technique and the DPIR method to the performance of the new algorithm were analyzed in detail. For the preclinical evaluation, the tracer separation results were compared with single [18F]FDG scans of the same subjects measured 2 days before the dual-tracer scan. The results of the simulation and preclinical studies demonstrate that the proposed MT-DPIR method can improve the separation of multiple tracers for PET image quantification and kinetic parameter estimations.

  2. Radioactive tracers in the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, W.J.; Livingston, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    Artificial radionuclides introduced to the oceans during the last four decades have proved invaluable tools for study of many processes in marine water columns and sediments. Both global and close-in fallout of radioactivity from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing have distributed these radionuclides widely, and in amounts sufficient to be useful as tracers. An additional source of considerable significance and tracer potential comes from coastal discharges of European nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes. The nature of these sources, types and amounts of radionuclides introduced and the time histories of their introduction generate a variety of tracer distributions which illuminate a broad spectrum of physical and chemical processes active over a wide range of timescales. Depending on their respective chemistries, artificial radionuclides have been demonstrated to exhibit both conservative and non-conservative properties in the oceans. Some examples are given of the uses made of soluble, conservative tracers for the study of oceanic transport processes and of non-conservative tracers for studies of processes which move them to, and mix them within, marine sediments. Sampling and measurement techniques which have been used in these studies are described

  3. Radiochemical tracers in marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrocelli, S.R.; Anderson, J.W.; Neff, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Tracers have been used in a great variety of experimentation. More recently, labeled materials have been applied in marine biological research. Some of the existing tracer techniques have been utilized directly, while others have been modified to suit the specific needs of marine biologists. This chapter describes some of the uses of tracers in marine biological research. It also mentions the problems encountered as well as offering possible solutions and discusses further applications of these techniques. Only pertinent references are cited and additional information may be obtained by consulting these references. Due to their relative ease of maintenance, freshwater species are also utilized in studies which involve radiotracer techniques. Since most of these techniques e directly applicable to marine species, some of these studies will also be included

  4. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for the quantification of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the vadose zone: performance evaluation for heterogeneous NAPL distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-08-11

    A partitioning tracer test based on gas-phase diffusion in the vadose zone yields estimates of the residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation. The present paper investigates this technique further by studying diffusive tracer breakthrough curves in the vadose zone for a heterogeneous NAPL distribution. Tracer experiments were performed in a lysimeter with a horizontal layer of artificial kerosene embedded in unsaturated sand. Tracer disappearance curves at the injection point and tracer breakthrough curves at some distance from the injection point were measured inside and outside of the NAPL layer. A numerical code was used to generate independent model predictions based on the physicochemical sand, NAPL, and tracer properties. The measured and modeled tracer breakthrough curves were in good agreement confirming the validity of important modeling assumptions such as negligible sorption of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracers to the uncontaminated sand and their fast reversible partitioning between the soil air and the NAPL phase. Subsequently, the model was used to investigate different configurations of NAPL contamination. The experimental and model results show that the tracer disappearance curves of a single-well diffusive partitioning tracer test (DPTT) are dominated by the near-field presence of NAPL around the tip of the soil gas probe. In contrast, breakthrough curves of inter-well tracer tests reflect the NAPL saturation in between the probes, although there is no unique interpretation of the tracer signals if the NAPL distribution is heterogeneous. Numerical modeling is useful for the planning of a DPTT application. Simulations suggest that several cubic meters of soil can be investigated with a single inter-well partitioning tracer test of 24-hour duration by placing the injection point in the center of the investigated soil volume and probes at up to 1 m distance for the monitoring of gaseous tracers.

  5. Development of activable tracers for application in secondary recovering in petroleum reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Polyana Fabricia Fernandes; Moreira, Rubens Martins . Servico de Meio Ambiente e Tecnicas Nucleares.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear methods are instrumental in describing detailed flow patterns and other features of oil reservoirs that are unattainable to other methods. Tracer studies in oil fields are performed in a net of injection and producing wells. Thus, the use of only one tracer species would not discriminate the contributions of distinct injection wells to the output of a given production well. Hence, a multi-tracer experiment is required, and the use of activable tracers, capable of being measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA) is here proposed. As additional tracer choices lanthanum (La) and europium (Eu) were chosen from the rare earth series due to their large neutron cross sections and general availability. In order to decrease losses to the oil phase and the retardation of the tracer relatively to the aqueous phase, these elements were complexed with organic chelating ligands: the polyaminocarboxylic acids EDTA, DTPA and DOTA. Infrared spectrometry was used to check complexation. In order to check the partition of the tracer between the aqueous and organic phases, tests were carried stirring the two phases together and measuring the tracer concentrations in the aqueous phase; the partition coefficient (Kao) was then calculated for all the combinations of the two lanthanides and the three ligands. Tests in which the tracer was continuously pumped through reservoir rock samples were also carried out using tritiated water as a reference tracer and the complexed lanthanides. (author)

  6. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A. [Univ. of Florence (Italy)

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  8. Short-term fluid, heat, and solute transport in deep 'georeservoirs' likely to become 'EGS': some challenges to ICDP hydrogeologists who might like using artificial tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Huenges, Ernst; Rose, Peter; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    play, forced-gradient turnover of significant fluid amounts shall be on the agenda, and with it also a more comprehensive use of artificial tracers, for far more ambitious tasks than just the monitoring of drilling-related contamination. Since any ICDP project is likely to start (and mostly also end) with not more than one deep well, single-well forced-gradient test experience gained within the non-ICDP areas of hydrocarbon and geothermal exploration and engineering seem predestined for a specific knowledge transfer. Single-well 'push-then-pull' (SW) tracer methods appear as attractive for a number of reasons: less uncertainty of design and dimensioning, and lower tracer quantities required, than for inter-well (IW) tests; stronger tracer signals, enabling easier and cheaper metering, and shorter metering duration required, reaching higher tracer mass recovery, than in IW tests; last not least: no need for a second well! However, SW tracer signal inversion faces a major issue: the 'push-then-pull' design weakens the correlation between tracer residence time distribution (RTD) and fluid transport parameters, inducing insensitivity or ambiguity of tracer signal inversion against some of those georeservoir parameters that are supposed to be the target of tracer tests par excellence: pore velocity, transport-effective porosity, fracture aperture and spacing or density (where applicable), fluid/solid or fluid/fluid phase interface density. Hydraulic and geophysical methods cannot measure the transport-effective values of such parameters, because the signals they detect correlate neither with fluid motion, nor with material fluxes through (fluid-rock, or fluid-fluid) phase interfaces. Typically, pressure signals obtained in hydraulic tests do not enable to distinguish between geological formations with equal permeability, but different transport-effective porosity, nor between formations with equal permeability, equal transport-effective porosity, but different fluid

  9. Bioethics. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cathy, Comp.; Cadoree, Michelle

    This guide lists published materials on many aspects of bioethics, the literature of which is varied and scattered. Related guides in the LC Science Tracer Bullet series are TB 80-9, Terminal Care, TB 80-11, Drug Research on Human Subjects, TB 83-4, Science Policy, and TB 84-7, Biotechnology. Not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography, this…

  10. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Polyethyleneimine as tracer for electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurer, Jacob Willem

    1980-01-01

    In this thesis the development of a tracer particle for use in electron microscopy is described. Attempts were made to use this tracer particle in immuno-electron microscopy and to trace negatively charged tissue components. ... Zie: Summary

  12. Tracers of cancer cells in nuclear oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamgac, F.; Baillet, G.; Moretti, J.L.; Safi, N.; Weinmann, P.; Beco, V. de

    1997-01-01

    Evaluating the extent of disease is important in planning cancer treatment. Different types of tracers are used in vivo to diagnose tumors and these tracers can give supplementary information on the differentiation degree of tumors and response to therapy. (authors)

  13. Moisture determination of tritium tracers utilizing near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rosemary; Waterhouse, David J; Helmy, Roy

    2016-06-15

    Tritium tracers are frequently used in biological assays during the drug discovery process because of their high specific activity and relative ease of synthesis. However, this high specific activity, along with other contributing factors, can lead to an increased rate of radiolytic decomposition. As a result, following long-term storage tritium tracers often require purification. Understanding the elements that cause radiolytic decomposition is extremely important to extend the storage life, and consequently reduce unnecessary inventory purifications. One of these elements is the presence of water in tritium tracers. Upon investigation, it was discovered that aside from the relatively common tritium/water exchange that could occur, residual water could also contribute significantly to the decomposition of tritium tracers. A near-infrared method was developed utilizing a portable device to measure the water content in tritium tracers rapidly and without sample destruction. This method proved to be quick, efficient, and achieved an error less than 5% compared to that of traditional Karl Fischer titration. Method validation was performed and good accuracy, linearity, limit of detection and quantitation were all established. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of phosphatic fertilizer application methods to enhance the fertilizer use efficiency - for cotton crop using 32P radio-tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Manoj; Ramachandran, V.; D'Souza, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    Application of fertilizer in excess can result in contamination of both surface and drainage waters. Injudicious usage of phosphatic fertilizer leads to phosphate loss through surface runoff and thereby accounts for eutrophication of water in lakes, rivers and ponds. Utilization of proper method of fertilizer application not only reduces the problem of P-losses but also enhance the use efficiency of fertilizer applied. Greenhouse pot-culture experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of different methods of fertilizer application, namely, broadcasting, band placement at 5 cm depth and band placement at 10 cm depth below the seed with three fertilizer rates, namely, 60, 90 and 120 kg P 2 O 5 ha -1 using 32 P labelled single super phosphate (SSP) and growing cotton crop in a vertisol from Akola (Maharashtra). Results indicated that dry matter yield (DMY) and P uptake by plants were significantly increased in broadcasting and fertilizer placement at 5 cm depth treatments as compared to fertilizer placement at 10 cm depth. Phosphorus derived from fertilizer (%Pdft) and % Utilization of applied fertilizer P was found to be significantly higher in placement at 5 cm depth. In other words, significantly higher A-values were obtained in broadcasting and fertilizer placement at 10 cm depth treatments as compared to fertilizer application at 5 cm depth showing thereby efficient utilization of fertilizer P by plants at 5 cm depth placement. Dry matter yield, P uptake, % Pdff increased with increasing fertilizer rate, whereas, % utilization of applied fertilizer P and A-value of soil were not influenced by the different fertilizer rates. In general, results from this study revealed that fertilizer application at 5 cm depth enhanced the fertilizer use efficiency for cotton crop in vertisol. Hence, this method may be useful in reducing the loss of P and further reduce the chances of eutrophication. (author)

  15. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  16. Application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report of an IAEA consultants' meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 14-16 December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting convened by the IAEA in December 1992, made recommendations on the organization of a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) using stable isotopic techniques for international comparative studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in chronically undernourished people. The CRP will use recent developments in stable isotope tracer techniques ( 13 C and 15 N) to assess the impact of infection in undernourished people on the kinetics of protein breakdown, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, and on the synthetic rates of selected plasma proteins. Studies will be conducted in developing countries, particularly in young children. The programme goals are to (i) elaborate methods and model protocols which can be implemented in developing countries to investigate the impact on protein metabolism of infection superimposed on chronic undernutrition; (ii) test they hypothesis that dietary requirements for protein and amino acids are related to the place of nutrition and are altered substantially when infection is superimposed on chronic undernutrition. When feasible, the primary focus on protein/amino acid metabolism will be extended to assessments of protein/energy interactions when H 2 18 O becomes more readily available and/or at research sites with indirect calorimetry equipment. The data generated should be appropriate as a basis for reevaluating amino acid/protein requirements in these populations. Refs

  17. Flow-through column experiments to determine the geochemical behavior of common hydrological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, P. S. N.; Sigfússon, B.; Stefansson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer testing is one of the most effective methods used to study groundwater flow, reservoir characteristics and subsurface properties in geohydrology. Hydrological tracer tests were conducted with the basic assumption that the tracer is chemically inert and non-reactive. However, not all tracers behave non-reactive at different pH conditions, the particular tracer may interact with mineral surfaces in the reservoir. In order to study the geochemical behavior of some common hydrological tracers flow-through column experiments were conducted at 25°C. Six common hydrological tracers were investigated, amino G acid, fluorescein, napthionic acid, pyranine, rhodamine B and rhodamine G in porous rocks consisting of basaltic glass, quartz or rhyolite at pH 3, 6.5 and 9. Homogenous porous material of fixed grain size 45-125μm were dry packed in the column to conduct flow through column experiments. Tracers were pumped at fixed flow rates for 20 minutes and switched back to experimental blank solution and the tracer concentration monitored at the outlet. The measured break-through tracer curves were compared to theoretical 1-D reactive transport simulations calculated using the PHREEQC program (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). The data obtained from the breakthrough curves suggest that the tracers may be reactive, non-reactive and partially reactive depending on the rock type and solution pH. The tracers that were observed to be reactive showed the influence of adsorption and desorption. The results suggest that some tracers commonly used in ground water hydrology are not suitable under all conditions as they may react with the rocks of the groundwater system.

  18. Brush potential curve tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Hilvan A.

    1987-01-01

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics in each of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  19. Comparison of two synthetic methods to obtain [18F] N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-fluoropyridine-2-carboxamide, a potential MAO-B imaging tracer for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Haeberli, M.; Ametamey, S.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The compound Ro 19-6327, N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-chloropyridine-2-carboxamide, is known to inhibit reversibly and site specifically the enzyme monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). The 123 I-labelled iodo-analogue N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-iodopyridine-2-carboxamide (Ro 43-0463) was investigated successfully in human volunteers by means of SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography). We developed therefore the synthesis and radiolabelling of the corresponding fluoro-analogue N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-fluoropyridine-2-carboxamide with 18 F in order to carry out PET (Positron Emission Tomography) investigations of MAO-B related neuropsychiatric diseases. For this purpose two synthetic approaches leading to the electrophilic and the nucleophilic methods of 18 F radiolabelling were undertaken. The nucleophilic approach appeared to be superior when factors such as precursor synthesis, beam time, specific activity and radiochemical purity of the product are considered. (author)

  20. Tracer-tracer relations as a tool for research on polar ozone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The report includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction: ozone in the atmosphere, anthropogenic influence on the ozone layer, polar stratospheric ozone loss; (2) Tracer-tracer relations in the stratosphere: tracer-tracer relations as a tool in atmospheric research; impact of cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry on polar ozone; (3) quantifying polar ozone loss from ozone-tracer relations: principles of tracer-tracer correlation techniques; reference ozone-tracer relations in the early polar vortex; impact of mixing on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex; impact of mesospheric intrusions on ozone-tracer relations in the stratospheric polar vortex calculation of chemical ozone loss in the arctic in March 2003 based on ILAS-II measurements; (4) epilogue.

  1. Integrated nonlinear regression analysis of tracer and well test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Serhat [Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, Inonu Bulvari 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    One frequent observation from conventional pressure transient test analysis is that field data match mathematical models derived for homogeneous systems. This observation suggests that pressure data as presently interpreted may not contain details concerning certain reservoir heterogeneities. On the other hand, tracer tests may be more sensitive to heterogeneous elements present in the reservoir because of the convective nature of the flow test. In this study, a possible improvement of conventional pressure transient and tracer test analysis by integrating them using the nonlinear least square (LS) regression method is investigated. To achieve this goal, a correlation between permeability and dispersivity is used to couple the response of both tests. A multi-fracture tracer test model was coupled with double porosity pressure models using a commercial spreadsheet. The proposed method is tested using experimental well test and tracer test data obtained from a fractured geothermal reservoir model where fracture apertures and distributions were known. It has been observed that changing injection-production well depths resulted in different analyses primarily due to changing flow paths. The combination of multi-fracture tracer test model with dual-porosity pressure transient model described the physics of the experiments better than the others did. It has been also observed that the obtained solutions are highly constrained.

  2. Groundwater prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits: the merits of mineral-solution equilibria versus single element tracer methods. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanty, R.B.; Langmuir, D.; Chatham, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents the results of further research on the groundwater geochemistry of 96 well waters in two uraniferous aquifers in Texas and Wyoming, and is a continuation of the work presented by Chatham et al. (1981). In this study variations in concentrations of U, As, Mo, Se and V were compared with the saturation state of the groundwater with respect to mineral phases of these elements known or expected to occur in each area. The non-radiogenic trace elements exhibited strong redox dependence consistent with thermodynamic predictions, but their variations did not pinpoint existing uranium ore bodies, because of a shift in groundwater flow patterns since the time of ore emplacement. Saturation levels of trace element minerals such as realgar, native Se, and molybdenite showed broad anomalies around the ore-bearing areas, similar to patterns found for U minerals by Langmuir and Chatham (1980), and Chatham et al. (1981). The radiogenic elements Ra and Rn showed significant anomalies directly within the ore zones. Helium anomalies were displaced in the direction of groundwater flow, but by their magnitude and areal extent provided strong evidence for the existence of nearby uranium accumulations. Uranium isotope ratios showed no systematic variations within the two aquifers studied. Saturation maps for kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite and the zeolites analcime and clinoptilolite provided 1 to 2 km anomalies around the ore at the Texas site. Saturation values for the gangue minerals pyrite and calcite defined the redox interface and often suggested the position of probable uranium mineralization. When properly used, the groundwater geochemical concepts for exploration can accurately pinpoint uranium mineralization at a fraction of the cost of conventional methods that involve test drilling and geophysical and core logging.

  3. Groundwater prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits: the merits of mineral-solution equilibria versus single element tracer methods. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanty, R.B.; Langmuir, D.; Chatham, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents the results of further research on the groundwater geochemistry of 96 well waters in two uraniferous aquifers in Texas and Wyoming, and is a continuation of the work presented by Chatham et al. (1981). In this study variations in concentrations of U, As, Mo, Se and V were compared with the saturation state of the groundwater with respect to mineral phases of these elements known or expected to occur in each area. The non-radiogenic trace elements exhibited strong redox dependence consistent with thermodynamic predictions, but their variations did not pinpoint existing uranium ore bodies, because of a shift in groundwater flow patterns since the time of ore emplacement. Saturation levels of trace element minerals such as realgar, native Se, and molybdenite showed broad anomalies around the ore-bearing areas, similar to patterns found for U minerals by Langmuir and Chatham (1980), and Chatham et al. (1981). The radiogenic elements Ra and Rn showed significant anomalies directly within the ore zones. Helium anomalies were displaced in the direction of groundwater flow, but by their magnitude and areal extent provided strong evidence for the existence of nearby uranium accumulations. Uranium isotope ratios showed no systematic variations within the two aquifers studied. Saturation maps for kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite and the zeolites analcime and clinoptilolite provided 1 to 2 km anomalies around the ore at the Texas site. Saturation values for the gangue minerals pyrite and calcite defined the redox interface and often suggested the position of probable uranium mineralization. When properly used, the groundwater geochemical concepts for exploration can accurately pinpoint uranium mineralization at a fraction of the cost of conventional methods that involve test drilling and geophysical and core logging

  4. On-line measurements of liquid carry-over from scrubbers using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, A.; Hassfjell, S.; Finborud, A.

    2004-01-01

    A method to measure liquid carry-over from scrubbers using gamma-emitting tracers is described and results from field tests at two onshore installations are presented. One water/1,2-ethanediol (MEG) and two hydrocarbon liquid (condensate) tracers have been used in the tests. One of the condensate tracers deposited to some extent inside the process pipe, while the other had a too high vapor pressure. The water/MEG tracer showed no MEG carry-over while the carry-over of MEG was documented to be considerable. (author)

  5. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between nickel and zinc ethylenediaminetetraacetate labeled with zinc-65 is pursued. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate into a dithizone-carbon tetracloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. The method is very sensitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0.1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and the accuracy of the method are determined. The problem of interferences, trying to eliminate them by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation between nickel and other interfering metals, is also investigated [pt

  6. Push-pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non-aqueous phase liquid contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B M; Istok, J D; Semprini, L

    2002-09-01

    Naturally occurring radon in groundwater can be used as an in situ partitioning tracer for locating and quantifying non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in the subsurface. When combined with the single-well, push-pull test, this methodology has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to inter-well partitioning tracer tests. During a push-pull test, a known volume of test solution (radon-free water containing a conservative tracer) is first injected ("pushed") into a well; flow is then reversed and the test solution/groundwater mixture is extracted ("pulled") from the same well. In the presence of NAPL radon transport is retarded relative to the conservative tracer. Assuming linear equilibrium partitioning, retardation factors for radon can be used to estimate NAPL saturations. The utility of this methodology was evaluated in laboratory and field settings. Laboratory push-pull tests were conducted in both non-contaminated and trichloroethene NAPL (TCE)-contaminated sediment. The methodology was then applied in wells located in non-contaminated and light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL)-contaminated portions of an aquifer at a former petroleum refinery. The method of temporal moments and an approximate analytical solution to the governing transport equations were used to interpret breakthrough curves and estimate radon retardation factors; estimated retardation factors were then used to calculate TCE saturations. Numerical simulations were used to further investigate the behavior of the breakthrough curves. The laboratory and field push-pull tests demonstrated that radon retardation does occur in the presence of TCE and LNAPL and that radon retardation can be used to calculate TCE saturations. Laboratory injection-phase test results in TCE-contaminated sediment yielded radon retardation factors ranging from 1.1 to 1.5, resulting in calculated TCE saturations ranging from 0.2 to 0.9%. Laboratory extraction-phase test results in the same sediment

  7. Characterization of thermal tracer tests and heat exchanges in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Florian; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Lavenant, Nicolas; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, several heat tracer tests have been achieved along a borehole between two connected fractures. The heat tracer tests have been achieved at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The tracer tests consist in monitoring the temperature in the upper fracture while injecting hot water in the deeper one thanks to a field boiler. For such an experimental setup, the main difficulty to interpret the data comes from the requirement for separating the temperature advective signal of the tracer test (temperature recovery) from the heat increase due to injection of hot water through the borehole which induces heat losses all along the injection tube in the water column. For doing so, in addition to a double straddle packer used for isolating the injection chamber, the particularity of the experimental set up is the use of fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS); an innovative technology which allows spatial and temporal monitoring of the temperature all along the well. Thanks to this tool, we were able to estimate heat increases coming from diffusion along the injection tube which is found much lower than localized temperature increases resulting from tracer test recovery. With local temperatures probes, separating both effects would not have been feasible. We also show through signal processing how diffusive and advective effects may be differentiated. This allowed us to estimate temperature recovery for different heat tracer durations and setups. In particular we show that temperature recovery is highly dependent on hydraulic configuration such as perfect dipole or fully

  8. The Accurate Particle Tracer Code

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yulei; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The Accurate Particle Tracer (APT) code is designed for large-scale particle simulations on dynamical systems. Based on a large variety of advanced geometric algorithms, APT possesses long-term numerical accuracy and stability, which are critical for solving multi-scale and non-linear problems. Under the well-designed integrated and modularized framework, APT serves as a universal platform for researchers from different fields, such as plasma physics, accelerator physics, space science, fusio...

  9. Development of radioisotope tracer technology and nucleonic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee and others

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and basic technology of nuclear control systems that are widely used for automation of industrial plants, and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology, the data acquisition system, the column scanning equipment and the detection pig for a leakage test have been developed. In order to use in analyzing data of tracer experiments, a computer program for the analysis of residence time distribution has been created as well. These results were utilized in developing the tracer technologies, such as the column scanning, the flow measurement using the dilution method, the simultaneous monitoring rotational movement of piston rings and the optimization of a waste water treatment facility, and the technologies were successfully demonstrated in the local industrial. The stripper of RFCC reactor has been examined to find an unwanted structure in it by imminent request from the industry. Related to the development of nucleonic control system, the state of art report on the technology has been written and an equipment for the analysis of asphalt content has been developed. (author)

  10. TracerLPM (Version 1): An Excel® workbook for interpreting groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    TracerLPM is an interactive Excel® (2007 or later) workbook program for evaluating groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data by using lumped parameter models (LPMs). Lumped parameter models are mathematical models of transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configurations that account for effects of hydrodynamic dispersion or mixing within the aquifer, well bore, or discharge area. Five primary LPMs are included in the workbook: piston-flow model (PFM), exponential mixing model (EMM), exponential piston-flow model (EPM), partial exponential model (PEM), and dispersion model (DM). Binary mixing models (BMM) can be created by combining primary LPMs in various combinations. Travel time through the unsaturated zone can be included as an additional parameter. TracerLPM also allows users to enter age distributions determined from other methods, such as particle tracking results from numerical groundwater-flow models or from other LPMs not included in this program. Tracers of both young groundwater (anthropogenic atmospheric gases and isotopic substances indicating post-1940s recharge) and much older groundwater (carbon-14 and helium-4) can be interpreted simultaneously so that estimates of the groundwater age distribution for samples with a wide range of ages can be constrained. TracerLPM is organized to permit a comprehensive interpretive approach consisting of hydrogeologic conceptualization, visual examination of data and models, and best-fit parameter estimation. Groundwater age distributions can be evaluated by comparing measured and modeled tracer concentrations in two ways: (1) multiple tracers analyzed simultaneously can be evaluated against each other for concordance with modeled concentrations (tracer-tracer application) or (2) tracer time-series data can be evaluated for concordance with modeled trends (tracer-time application). Groundwater-age estimates can also be obtained for samples with a single tracer measurement at one

  11. Partitioning Gas Tracer Technology for Measuring Water in Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briening, M. L.; Jakubowitch, A.; Imhoff, P. T.; Chiu, P. C.; Tittlebaum, M. E.

    2002-12-01

    Unstable landfills can result in significant environmental contamination and can become a risk to public health. To reduce this risk, water may be added to landfills to ensure that enough moisture exists for biodegradation of organic wastes. In this case risks associated with future breaks in the landfill cap are significantly reduced because organic material is degraded more rapidly. To modify moisture conditions and enhance biodegradation, leachate is typically collected from the bottom of the landfill and then recirculated near the top. It is difficult, though, to know how much leachate to add and where to add it to achieve uniform moisture conditions. This situation is exacerbated by the heterogeneous nature of landfill materials, which is known to cause short circuiting of infiltrating water, a process that has been virtually impossible to measure or model. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. In this research we are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. In this methodology two gas tracers are injected into a landfill. One tracer is non-reactive with landfill materials, while the second partitions into and out of free water trapped within the pore space of the solid waste. Chromatographic separation of the tracers occurs

  12. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  13. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  14. Multitracer Field Fluorometry: Accounting for Temperature and Turbidity Variability During Stream Tracer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaen, Phillip J.; Brekenfeld, Nicolai; Comer-Warner, Sophie; Krause, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    The use of multitracer field fluorometry is increasing in the hydrological sciences. However, obtaining high-quality fluorescence measurements is challenging given the variability in environmental conditions within stream ecosystems. Here, we conducted a series of stream tracer tests to examine the degree to which multitracer field fluorometry produces reliable estimates of tracer concentrations under realistic field conditions. Using frequently applied examples of conservative (Uranine) and reactive (Resazurin-Resorufin) fluorescent tracers, we show that in situ measurements of tracer breakthrough curves can deviate markedly from corresponding samples analyzed under laboratory conditions. To investigate the effects of key environmental variables on fluorescence measurements, we characterized the response of field fluorometer measurements to changes in temperature, turbidity, and tracer concentration. Results showed pronounced negative log-linear effects of temperature on fluorescence measurements for all tracers, with stronger effects observed typically at lower tracer concentrations. We also observed linear effects of turbidity on fluorescence measurements that varied predictably with tracer concentration. Based on our findings, we present methods to correct field fluorometer measurements for variation in these parameters. Our results show how changing environmental conditions can introduce substantial uncertainties in the analysis of fluorescent tracer breakthrough curves, and highlight the importance of accounting for these changes to prevent incorrect inferences being drawn regarding the physical and biogeochemical processes underpinning observed patterns.

  15. Use of radioactive tracers in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Karol

    1975-01-01

    Manufacture of the semiconductor materials comprises production and purification of the raw materials (GeC14 or SiHC13), purification of the elemental semiconductors by metallurgical methods (including zone melting), production and doping of single crystals, dividing the crystals into slices of suitable size, formation of p-n junctions and fabrication of the finished semiconductor devices. In the sequence of operations, the behavior of very small quantities of an element must be monitored, and radioactive tracers are often used to solve these problems. Examples are given of the use of radioactive tracers in the semiconductor industry

  16. Application of the 15N tracer method to study the effect of pyrolysis temperature and atmosphere on the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhongxin; Ye, Zhixiong; Zhang, Limei; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2018-05-01

    Biochar nitrogen is key to improving soil fertility, but the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system is still unclear. To provide clarity, the 15 N tracer method was utilised to study the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biochar both before and after its addition to the soil. The results can be summarised as follows. 1) The retention rate of 15 N in biochar decreases from 45.23% to 20.09% with increasing pyrolysis temperature from 400 to 800°C in a CO 2 atmosphere. 2) The retention rate of 15 N in biochar prepared in a CO 2 atmosphere is higher than that prepared in a N 2 atmosphere when the pyrolysis temperature is below 600°C. 3) Not only can biochar N slowly facilitate the adsorption of N by plants but the addition of biochar to the soil can also promote the supply of soil nitrogen to the plant; in contrast, the direct return of wheat straw biomass to the soil inhibits the absorption of soil N by plants. 4) In addition, the distribution of nitrogen was clarified; that is, when biochar was prepared by the pyrolysis of wheat straw at 400°C in a CO 2 atmosphere, the biochar retained 45.23% N, and after the addition of this biochar to the soil, 39.99% of N was conserved in the biochar residue, 4.55% was released into the soil, and 0.69% was contained in the wheat after growth for 31days. Therefore, this study very clearly shows the distribution of nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The radioactive tracers in industry and earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaine, J.L.; Margrita, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since the radioisotopes marketing at the beginning of the fifties, CEA developed outstanding and original investigation methods and means. Actually the proper specificities of the radioisotopes allow their use as ''tracers'', they are perfectly fitted to matter transfer study between the various partitions of the most diverse natural or artificial systems

  18. The Copenhagen tracer experiments: Reporting of measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    2002-01-01

    This is the comprehensive data report from a series of tracer experiment carried out in the Copenhagen area in 1978/79 under neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. The report contains sulphurhexafluoride of tracer concentrations and meteorologicalmeasurements The tracer was released without...... buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 meters and then collected 2-3 meters above ground-level at positions in up to three crosswind arcs of tracer sampling units, positioned 2-6 km from the point of release. Three consecutive 20 min averaged tracer concentrations were measured, allowing for a total...... sampling time of 1 hour. The site was mainly residential having a roughness length of 0.6 m. The meteorological measurements performed during the experimentsincluded standard measurements along the tower of tracer release as well as the three-dimensional wind velocity fluctuations at the height of release....

  19. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Gravel tracers are usually inserted and transported on top of the riverbed, before they disperse vertically and laterally due to periods of intense bedload, the passage of bed forms, lateral channel migration and storage on bars. Buried grains have a lower probability of entrainment, resulting in a reduction of overall mobility, and, on average, in a deceleration of the particles with distance downstream. As a consequence, the results derived from tracer experiments and their significance for gravel transport may depend on the time scale of the investigation period, complicating the comparison of results from different experiments. We developed a regression method, which establishes a direct link between the transport velocity and the unsteady flow variables to yield an 'unsteady' virtual velocity, while considering the tracer slowdown with distance downstream in the regression. For that purpose, the two parameters of a linear excess shear velocity formula (the critical shear velocity u*c and coefficient a) were defined as functions of the travelled distance since the tracer's insertion. Application to published RFID tracer data from the Mameyes River, Puerto Rico, showed that during the investigation period the critical shear velocity u*c of tracers representing the median bed particle diameter (0.11 m) increased from 0.36 m s-1 to 0.44 m s-1, while the coefficient a decreased from the dimensionless value of 4.22 to 3.53, suggesting a reduction of the unsteady virtual velocity at the highest shear velocity in the investigation period from 0.40 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1. Consideration of the tracer slowdown improved the root mean square error of the calculated mean displacements of the median bed particle diameter from 8.82 m to 0.34 m. As in previous work these results suggest the need of considering the history of transport when deriving travel distances and travel velocities, depending on the aim of the tracer study. The introduced method now allows estimating the

  20. EGS in sedimentary basins: sensitivity of early-flowback tracer signals to induced-fracture parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shyamal; Ghergut, Julia; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Artificial-fracture design, and fracture characterization during or following stimulation treatment is a central aspect of many EGS ('enhanced' or 'engineered' geothermal system) projects. During the creation or stimulation of an EGS, the injection of fluids, followed by flowback and production stages offers the opportunity for conducting various tracer tests in a single-well (SW) configuration, and given the typical operational and time limitations associated with such tests, along with the need to assess treatment success in real time, investigators mostly favour using short-time tracer-test data, rather than awaiting long-term 'tailings' of tracer signals. Late-time tracer signals from SW injection-flowback and production tests have mainly been used for the purpose of multiple-fracture inflow profiling in multi-layer reservoirs [1]. However, the potential of using SW short-term tracer signals for fracture characterization [2, 3] remained little explored as yet. Dealing with short-term flowback signals, we face a certain degree of parameter interplay, leading to ambiguity in fracture parameter inversion from the measured signal of a single tracer. This ambiguity can, to a certain extent, be overcome by - combining different sources of information (lithostratigraphy, and hydraulic monitoring) in order to constrain the variation range of hydrogeologic parameters (matrix and fracture permeability and porosity, fracture size), - using different types of tracers, such as conservative tracer pairs with contrasting diffusivity, or tracers pairs with contrasting sorptivity onto target surfaces. Fracture height is likely to be constrained by lithostratigraphy, while fracture length is supposed to be determinable from hydraulic monitoring (pressure recordings); the flowback rate can be assumed as a known (measurable) quantity during individual-fracture flowback. This leaves us with one or two unknown parameters to be determined from tracer signals: - the transport

  1. Development of a method for assessing the relative contribution of waterborne and dietary exposure to zinc bioaccumulation in Daphnia magna by using isotopically enriched tracers and ICP-MS detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcaen, Lieve I.L.; Moens, Luc; Vanhaecke, Frank [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Schamphelaere, Karel A.C. de; Janssen, Colin R. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    In order to study the effect of anthropogenic substances on freshwater and marine ecosystems and to develop methods to derive water-quality criteria, ecotoxicological testing is required. While toxicity assessments are traditionally based on dissolved metal concentrations, assuming that toxicity is caused by waterborne metal only, it was recently pointed out that also the dietary exposure route should be carefully considered and interpreted in regulatory assessments of zinc. In this context, the aim of this experimental study was to develop a method which allows the uptake of waterborne and dietary zinc by Daphnia magna and the interaction between both exposure routes to be studied. Therefore, the setup of a dual isotopic tracer study was required. During several days, daphnids were exposed to {sup 67}Zn and {sup 68}Zn via the dietary and the waterborne routes, respectively, and after several time intervals the daphnids were sampled and subjected to isotopic analysis by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In order to obtain reliable and accurate results for zinc, special care was taken to prevent contamination and to deal with the spectral interferences traditionally hindering the determination of zinc. The figures of merit of both a quadrupole-based ICP-MS instrument equipped with a dynamic reaction cell, and a sector field ICP-MS unit were studied, and it was concluded that by using a sector field mass spectrometer operated at medium mass resolution all interferences could be overcome adequately. Although the set-up of the exposure experiments seems to be rather simple at first sight, it was shown in this work that several (dynamic) variables can have an influence on the results obtained and on the subsequent data interpretation. The importance of these confounding factors was examined, and on the basis of preliminary calculations it became clear that not only the isotopic composition of the daphnids has to be studied - adequate

  2. Principles and techniques of gamma ray tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, K.T.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive tracer techniques provide a very sensitive means of studying physical and chemical processes in a whole variety of different media. Some of the techniques and principles of radioactive tracers and their application to practical engineering systems are discussed. Information which has been found useful in the design of high temperature liquid sodium facilities employing radio-tracers, is presented. The report deals solely with the use of gamma-emitting species as the tracer. These find particular application for in-situ studies on engineering systems where the highly penetrating properties of gamma rays are needed for detection through strongly absorbent media such as stainless steel pepe walls. (author)

  3. Use of artificial tracers in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The IAEA has convened an Advisory Group Meeting with the following objectives: To define the role of artificial radioactive tracers for water tracing in comparison with other non-radioactive tracers. To evaluate the real needs of artificial radioactive tracers in hydrology. To identify the fields for which artificial radioactive tracers are useful as well as those in which they can be substituted by other tracers. To discuss the strategy to be adopted to overcome the difficulties derived from the restrictions on the use of radioactive tracers in hydrology. The meeting was held at IAEA Headquarters from 19 to 22 March 1990, and was attended by 30 participants from 15 Member States. The conclusions and recommendations are that the use of artificial radioactive tracers should be restricted to cases where other tracers cannot be used or do not provide the same quality of information. Tritium, iodine-131, bromine-82, chromium-51 in the form of Cr-EDTA, technetium-99m obtained from 99 Mo-generators and gold-198 as an adsorbable tracer are, practically, the only radionuclides used for water tracing. The use of other radionuclides for this purpose does not appear to be necessary, possible and/or convenient. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design (Ehtd) Program (2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  5. Determination of the Isotopic Enrichment of13C- and2H-Labeled Tracers of Glucose Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Application to Dual- and Triple-Tracer Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trötzmüller, Martin; Triebl, Alexander; Ajsic, Amra; Hartler, Jürgen; Köfeler, Harald; Regittnig, Werner

    2017-11-21

    Multiple-tracer approaches for investigating glucose metabolism in humans usually involve the administration of stable and radioactive glucose tracers and the subsequent determination of tracer enrichments in sampled blood. When using conventional, low-resolution mass spectrometry (LRMS), the number of spectral interferences rises rapidly with the number of stable tracers employed. Thus, in LRMS, both computational effort and statistical uncertainties associated with the correction for spectral interferences limit the number of stable tracers that can be simultaneously employed (usually two). Here we show that these limitations can be overcome by applying high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The HRMS method presented is based on the use of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer operated at a mass resolution of 100 000 to allow electrospray-generated ions of the deprotonated glucose molecules to be monitored at their exact masses. The tracer enrichment determination in blood plasma is demonstrated for several triple combinations of 13 C- and 2 H-labeled glucose tracers (e.g., [1- 2 H 1 ]-, [6,6- 2 H 2 ]-, [1,6- 13 C 2 ]glucose). For each combination it is shown that ions arising from 2 H-labeled tracers are completely differentiated from those arising from 13 C-labeled tracers, thereby allowing the enrichment of a tracer to be simply calculated from the observed ion intensities using a standard curve with curve parameters unaffected by the presence of other tracers. For each tracer, the HRMS method exhibits low limits of detection and good repeatability in the tested 0.1-15.0% enrichment range. Additionally, due to short sample preparation and analysis times, the method is well-suited for high-throughput determination of multiple glucose tracer enrichments in plasma samples.

  6. Focal tracer uptake in the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zahry, Mai R; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Focal tracer uptake in the jaw during conventional bone scintigraphy is a quite frequent finding usually due to dental disease and seldom to other diseases including malignant disease. Methylene diphosphonate-technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-MDP) 3-phase bone scan is considered the most sensitive imaging method for the detection of jaw osteonecrosis at an early stage. This finding can also but seldom be seen in patients undergoing palliative radionuclide treatment for bone metastases. In conclusion, focal jaw lesions are usually benign and of dental origin. In a small percentage of cancer patients of about 4.3%, jaw lesions as diagnosed among 347 cases of various carcinomas may be due to malignancy. Unfortunately, the number of studies is small, most of them are retrospective and few show biopsy results.

  7. New SPECT and PET dementia tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, J.; Chalon, S.; Emond, P.; Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Vergote, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Pappata, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are techniques to study in vivo neurotransmitter systems, neuro inflammation and amyloid deposits in normal human brain and in dementia. These methods used to explore the integrity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic systems in Alzheimer's disease and in other dementias allowed to understand how the neurotransmission was modified in these disorders. Progress in the understanding of pathophysiological and clinical signs of dementia requires an evolution of the radioligands used to carry out an increasingly early and differential diagnosis in addition to monitoring the progression of disease and the effects of therapies. New emerging radiotracers for neuro inflammation or amyloid deposits are essential. In this article, new SPECT and PET tracers are presented. (authors)

  8. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  10. Relative distance between tracers as a measure of diffusivity within moving aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2018-02-01

    Tracking of particles, be it a passive tracer or an actively moving bacterium in the growing bacterial colony, is a powerful technique to probe the physical properties of the environment of the particles. One of the most common measures of particle motion driven by fluctuations and random forces is its diffusivity, which is routinely obtained by measuring the mean squared displacement of the particles. However, often the tracer particles may be moving in a domain or an aggregate which itself experiences some regular or random motion and thus masks the diffusivity of tracers. Here we provide a method for assessing the diffusivity of tracer particles within mobile aggregates by measuring the so-called mean squared relative distance (MSRD) between two tracers. We provide analytical expressions for both the ensemble and time averaged MSRD allowing for direct identification of diffusivities from experimental data.

  11. Oral Treatment of Rodents with Insecticides for Control of Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the Fluorescent Tracer Technique (FTT) as a Tool to Evaluate Potential Sand Fly Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    S132 Journal of Vector Ecology March 2011 Oral treatment of rodents with insecticides for control of sand flies ( Diptera : Psychodidae) and the...insecticides for control of sand flies ( Diptera : Psychodidae) and the fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) as a tool to evaluate potential sand fly control... attractiveness of different sugar baits to sand flies. DISCUSSION Survival of sand fly larvae was greatly reduced when they were fed feces of

  12. Tracer filamentation at an unstable ocean front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yen Chia; Mahadevan, Amala; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Yecko, Philip

    2017-11-01

    A front, where two bodies of ocean water with different physical properties meet, can become unstable and lead to a flow with high strain rate and vorticity. Phytoplankton and other oceanic tracers are stirred into filaments by such flow fields, as can often be seen in satellite imagery. The stretching and folding of a tracer by a two-dimensional flow field has been well studied. In the ocean, however, the vertical shear of horizontal velocity is typically two orders of magnitude larger than the horizontal velocity gradient. Theoretical calculations show that vertical shear alters the way in which horizontal strain affects the tracer, resulting in thin, sloping structures in the tracer field. Using a non-hydrostatic ocean model of an unstable ocean front, we simulate tracer filamentation to identify the effect of vertical shear on the deformation of the tracer. In a complementary laboratory experiment, we generate a simple, vertically sheared strain flow and use dye and particle image velocimetry to quantify the filamentary structures in terms of the strain and shear. We identify how vertical shear alters the tracer filaments and infer how the evolution of tracers in the ocean will differ from the idealized two-dimensional paradigm. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is acknowledged.

  13. A volatile tracer-assisted headspace analytical technique for determining the swelling capacity of superabsorbent polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Jiang, Ran; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on a new method for the determination of swelling capacity of superabsorbent polymers by a volatile tracer-assisted headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). Toluene was used as a tracer and added to the solution for polymers swelling test. Based on the differences of the tracer partitioned between the vapor and hydrogel phase before and after the polymer's swelling capacity, a transition point (corresponding to the material swelling capacity) can be observed when plotting the GC signal of toluene vs. the ratio of solution added to polymers. The present method has good precision (RSDpolymers at the elevated temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reactive Tracers for Characterizing Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Adam J.

    Multi-component tracer tests were conducted at a 10 x 10 m well field located in the Altona Flat Rocks of northern New York. Temperature advancement between two wells separated by 14 m was monitored throughout the well field during progressive heating of the reservoir over 6 d. Multiple approaches to predicting heat transport were applied to field data and compared to temperature rise recorded during reservoir heat-up. Tracer analysis incorporated both an analytical one-dimensional model and a two-dimensional numerical model for non-uniform fractures experiencing "flow-channeling." Modeling efforts demonstrated that estimating heat transfer surface area using a combined inert/adsorbing tracer (cesium-iodide) could provide accurate forecasting of premature thermal breakthrough. In addition, thermally degrading tracer tests were used to monitor inter-well temperature during progressive reservoir heating. Inert tracers alone were, in general, inadequate in forecasting thermal performance. In fact, moment analysis shows that, mathematically, thermal breakthrough is independent of parameters that primarily influence inert tracers. The most accurate prediction of thermal breakthrough using inert tracer alone was produced by treating hydrodynamic dispersion as a truly Fickian process with known and accurate mathematical models. Under this assumption, inert tracer data was matched by solving an inverse problem for non-uniform fracture aperture. Early arrival of the thermal front was predicted at the production, but was less accurate than using a combined inert/adsorbing tracer test. The spatial distribution of fluid flow paths in the plane of the fracture were identified using computational models, Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS), and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging of saline tracer flow paths in the target fracture. Without exception, fluid flow was found to be concentrated in a roughly 1 m wide flow channel directly between the two wells. The

  15. Transuranic and tracer simulant resuspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1977-07-01

    Plutonium resuspension results are summarized for experiments conducted at Rocky Flats, onsite on the Hanford reservation, and for winds blowing from offsite onto the Hanford reservation near the Prosser barricade boundary. In each case, plutonium resuspension was shown by increased airborne plutonium concentrations as a function of either wind speed or as compared to fallout levels. All measured airborne concentrations were below maximum permissible concentrations (MPC). Both plutonium and cesium concentrations on airborne soil were normalized by the quantity of airborne soil sampled. Airborne radionuclide concentrations in μCi/g were related to published values for radionuclide concentrations on surface soils. For this ratio of radionuclide concentration per gram on airborne soil divided by that for ground surface soil, there are eight orders of magnitude uncertainty from 10 -4 to 10 4 . Horizontal plutonium fluxes on airborne nonrespirable soils at all three sites were bracketed within the same three to four orders of magnitude from 10 -7 to 10 -3 μCi/(m 2 day) for plutonium-239 and 10 -8 to 10 -5 μCi/(m 2 day) for plutonium-238. These are the entire experimental base for nonrespirable airborne plutonium transport. Airborne respirable plutonium-239 concentrations increased with wind speed for a southeast wind direction coming from offsite near the Hanford reservation Prosser barricade. Airborne plutonium fluxes on nonrespirable particles had isotopic ratios, 240 Pu/ 239+240 Pu, similar to weapons grade plutonium rather than fallout plutonium. Resuspension rates were summarized for controlled inert particle tracer simulant experiments. Wind resuspension rates for tracers increased with wind speed to about the fifth power

  16. Aluminum-26 as a biological tracer using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flarend, Richard Edward

    1997-06-01

    The development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided a practical method of detection for the only isotope of aluminum suitable as a tracer, 26Al. The use of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum has made possible the study of aluminum metabolism and the pharmacokinetics of aluminum-containing drugs at physiological levels. An overview of the various advantages of using 26Al as a tracer for aluminum and a general description of the AMS technique as applied to bio-medical applications is given. To illustrate the versatility of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum, 26Al studies of the past several years are discussed briefly. In addition, Two novel investigations dealing with 26Al-labeled drugs will be presented in more detail. In one of these studies, it was found that 26Al from aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate vaccine adjuvants appeared in the blood just one hour after intramuscular injection. This is a surprising result since the currently held theory of how adjuvants work assumes that adjuvants remain insoluble and hold the antigen at the injection site for a long period of time. In another project, 26Al-labeled antiperspirants are being characterized by combining AMS with traditional analytical and chromatographic techniques. Future directions for this and other possible studies are discussed.

  17. General circulation and tracers: studies in the Western Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamous, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The main question addressed in this thesis is how to best use the information obtained from hydro-biogeochemical tracer data, to study the oceanic general circulation in the Western Indian Ocean. First, a principal component analysis is performed on a historical data set. The tracers considered are temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, phosphate and silica. The method reduces the amount of data to be considered by a factor of 5. It reproduces correctly and efficiently the large-scale distributions of these oceanic properties. The analysed data are then used in a finite-difference nonlinear inverse model. The grid has a resolution of 4 deg. by 4 deg.. Dynamical as well as tracer conservation constraints are used. These constraints are well satisfied by the obtained solutions but the associated errors remain large. Additional constraints would be required in order to discuss the different solutions in more detail. Finally, a qualitative study is done on the deep distribution of helium-3. The data show several important features linked to hydrothermal input in the Gulf of Aden and on the Central Indian Ridge, and to the origin of water masses and deep circulation characteristics. However additional data are required in order to clarify the distribution of this tracer in other key areas. (author) [fr

  18. Suitable activated carbon-13 tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weicheng; Peng Xiuru; Wang Yuhua

    1995-12-01

    Feasibility and applicability studies of the proton induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) have been performed. The graphite was firstly bombarded at various proton energies to determine gamma ray yield (and, thus, sensitivities) for the reaction of interest. The accuracy for the determination of 13 C abundance was checked, and the precision with which this value and ratios 13 C/ 12 C may be obtained was established by repetitive analysis samples. The performance of different standards in this determination was assessed. The mathematical treatment was developed for the determination of 13 C abundance in tracer studies, and to derive the equations that govern this method of analysis from first principles, to arrive finally at a simple expression by virtue of the observed regularities. The system was calibrated by measuring the gamma ray yield form the 12 C (p, γ) 13 N and 13 C(p,γ) 14 N reaction as a function of known 13 C enrichment. Using this experimentally determined calibration curve, unknown materials can be assayed. This technique is applicable to the analysis of samples with 13 C enrichments between 0.1% and 90%. The samples of human breath natural samples were analyzed against graphite and Cylinder CO 2 standards. Relative standard deviations were 13 C abundance, an increase in 13 C per cent isotopic abundance from the natural 1.11% (average) to only 1.39% may be ascertained. Finally, PIGE is compared with more classical techniques for analysis of 13 C tracer experiments. Ease and speed are important advantages of this technique over mass spectrometry, and its error is compatible with the natural variation of biological results. (9 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs.)

  19. Well installation, single-well testing, and particle-size analysis for selected sites in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin, north-central Colorado, 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2011-01-01

    This report describes results from a groundwater data-collection program completed in 2003-2004 by the U.S. Geological Survey in support of the South Platte Decision Support System and in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Two monitoring wells were installed adjacent to existing water-table monitoring wells. These wells were installed as well pairs with existing wells to characterize the hydraulic properties of the alluvial aquifer and shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin. Single-well tests were performed in the 2 newly installed wells and 12 selected existing monitoring wells. Sediment particle size was analyzed for samples collected from the screened interval depths of each of the 14 wells. Hydraulic-conductivity and transmissivity values were calculated after the completion of single-well tests on each of the selected wells. Recovering water-level data from the single-well tests were analyzed using the Bouwer and Rice method because test data most closely resembled those obtained from traditional slug tests. Results from the single-well test analyses for the alluvial aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.8 x 10-5 feet per second and geometric mean hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.4 x 10-5 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values in the alluvial aquifer were 8.6 x 10-4 feet squared per second and 4.9 x 10-4 feet squared per second, respectively. Single-well test results for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 5.4 x 10-6 feet per second and geometric mean value of 4.9 x 10-6 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer were 4.0 x 10-5 feet squared per second and 5.9 x 10-5 feet squared per second, respectively. Hydraulic-conductivity values for the alluvial aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated

  20. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can

  1. Predictive value of tracer studies for 131I treatment in hyperthyroid cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.; Hays, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    In 76 cats with hyperthyroidism, peak thyroidal radioiodine ( 131 I) uptakes and effective half-lives were determined after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of 131 I. In 6 additional hyperthyroid cats, only peak thyroidal uptakes after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of 131 I were determined. Good correlation was found between peak thyroidal uptakes of tracer and therapeutic 131 I; however, only fair correlation was observed between effective half-lives. In 79% of the cats, the effective half-life for therapeutic 131 I was longer than that for tracer 131 I. After administration of therapeutic activity of 131 I, monoexponential and biphasic decay curves were observed in 51 and 16 cats, respectively. Using therapeutic kinetic data, radiation doses to the thyroid gland were calculated retrospectively on the basis of 2 methods for determining the activity of 131 I administered: (1) actual administration of tracer-compensated activity and (2) hypothetic administration of uniform activity (3 mCi). Because of the good predictive ability of tracer kinetic data for the therapeutic kinetic data, the tracer-compensated radiation doses came significantly (P = 0.008) closer to the therapeutic goal than did the uniform-activity doses. In addition, the use of tracer kinetic information reduced the extent of the tendency for consistently high uniform-activity doses. A manual method for acquiring tracer kinetic data was developed and was an acceptable alternative to computerized techniques. Adoption of this method gives individuals and institutions with limited finances the opportunity to characterize the iodine kinetics in cats before proceeding with administration of therapeutic activities of 131 I

  2. Elevated source SF6-tracer dispersion experiments in the Copenhagen area. Preliminary results II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryning, S.E.; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    The results from 10 experiments, performed in neutral to unstable meteorological conditions, are reported from an ongoing series of elevated-source, urban-scale tracer dispersion experiments in the Copenhagen area. The tracer is released at a height of 115 m from the TV-tower in GLADSAXE, a suburb of Copenhagen, with tracer sampling units positioned at ground-level in 1 to 3 crosswind series, 2 to 6 km downwind of the tower. The lateral dispersion parameter, sigma(y), was estimated from the measured tracer concentration distribution and compared with values of sigma(y), computed by 1) methods based on wind variance measured during the experiments and 2) methods based on a stability classification of the atmospheric conditions. The wind-variance based methods proved superior in predicting the variation of sigma(y) compared with the stability based methods. Moreover, some of the former methods produced significantly biased estimates of sigma(y). The measured tracer concentration distributions were also crosswind integrated, chi(CWI). Estimates of chi(CWI) were computed using sigma (z) -values derived from the aforementioned computations assuming a Gaussian-type vertical tracer concentration distribution. A comparison is measured and calculated values of chi(CWI) showed no significant differences in the ability of the methods to predict the variation of chi(CWI). Only one method, the EPA, came out with a mean fractional error outside the range +-20% which constitutes the uncertainty in the absolute tracer concentration associated with the calibration of the gas chromatograph for tracer analysis

  3. Determination of ketone body kinetics using a D-(-)-3-hydroxy[4,4,4-2H3]butyrate tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougneres, P.F.; Balasse, E.O.; Ferre, P.; Bier, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In studies where D-(-)-3-hydroxy[4,4,4- 2 H 3 ]butyrate is employed as isotopic tracer in vivo, we have described a selected ion monitoring, gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry micromethod which measures [ 2 H 3 ] tracer enrichment in 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate from 300-microliters blood samples. For plasma samples in the physiologic range, intra- and interassay precisions for each ketone averaged better than +/- 1% and +/- 2%, respectively. The use of the method was validated by comparing kinetic data obtained with the above tracer with simultaneous flux data obtained with conventional D-(-)-3-hydroxy[3- 14 C]butyrate tracer in five fasted rats

  4. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H.; Binderup, Tina

    2014-01-01

    64Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET...... of another 64Cu-DOTA peptide-based tracer, 64Cu-DOTA-TATE, and underwent same procedure as just described. The human dosimetry estimates were then compared with observed human dosimetry estimate recently found in a first-in-man study using 64Cu-DOTA-TATE. ResultsHuman estimates of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 revealed...

  5. Thiocyanate use as radioactive tracer in a petroleum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Elaine Henriques Teixeira; Souza, Fabiane Ferreira de; Pinto, Amenonia Maria Ferreira; Moreira, Rubens Martins

    2002-01-01

    Currently, most of the oil exploration in reservoirs is made out if the assistance of the injection of different fluids, waters in particular, to increase production. For this reason it has been largely spread the application of chemical and/or radioactive tracers in the study of the characteristics of transport of the injected fluid between injection and production wells. K 35 SCN is considered a good tracer due to its higher solubility in water and low adsorption. This work presents a brief review of the methods described in literature for obtain S-35. It was found out to be the most appropriate method the synthesis of thiocyanate starting from the reaction of KCN and S-35. It was also investigated the efficiency of the reaction for the obtention of KSCN. (author)

  6. The accurate particle tracer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulei; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Yao, Yicun

    2017-11-01

    The Accurate Particle Tracer (APT) code is designed for systematic large-scale applications of geometric algorithms for particle dynamical simulations. Based on a large variety of advanced geometric algorithms, APT possesses long-term numerical accuracy and stability, which are critical for solving multi-scale and nonlinear problems. To provide a flexible and convenient I/O interface, the libraries of Lua and Hdf5 are used. Following a three-step procedure, users can efficiently extend the libraries of electromagnetic configurations, external non-electromagnetic forces, particle pushers, and initialization approaches by use of the extendible module. APT has been used in simulations of key physical problems, such as runaway electrons in tokamaks and energetic particles in Van Allen belt. As an important realization, the APT-SW version has been successfully distributed on the world's fastest computer, the Sunway TaihuLight supercomputer, by supporting master-slave architecture of Sunway many-core processors. Based on large-scale simulations of a runaway beam under parameters of the ITER tokamak, it is revealed that the magnetic ripple field can disperse the pitch-angle distribution significantly and improve the confinement of energetic runaway beam on the same time.

  7. Development of Radioisotope Tracer Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Hee; Jin, Joon Ha; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Jin Seop; Kim, Jae Jo; Park, Soon Chul; Lim, Don Soon; Choi, Byung Jong; Jang, Dong Soon; Kim, Hye Sook

    2007-06-01

    The project is aimed to develop the radiotracer technology for process optimization and trouble-shooting to establish the environmental and industrial application of radiation and radioisotopes. The advanced equipment and software such as high speed data acquisition system, RTD model and high pressure injection tool have developed. Based on the various field application to the refinery/petrochemical industries, the developed technology was transfer to NDT company for commercial service. For the environmental application of radiotracer technology, injector, detector sled, core sampler, RI and GPS data logging system are developed and field tests were implemented successfully at Wolsung and Haeundae beach. Additionally tracer technology were also used for the performance test of the clarifier in a wastewater treatment plant and for the leak detection in reservoirs. From the experience of case studies on radiotracer experiment in waste water treatment facilities, 'The New Excellent Technology' is granted from the ministry of environment. For future technology, preliminary research for industrial gamma transmission and emission tomography which are new technology combined with radioisotope and image reconstruction are carried out

  8. Compartmental modeling and tracer kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David H

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with mathematical aspects of compartmental an­ alysis. In particular, linear models are closely analyzed since they are fully justifiable as an investigative tool in tracer experiments. The objective of the monograph is to bring the reader up to date on some of the current mathematical prob­ lems of interest in compartmental analysis. This is accomplished by reviewing mathematical developments in the literature, especially over the last 10-15 years, and by presenting some new thoughts and directions for future mathematical research. These notes started as a series of lectures that I gave while visiting with the Division of Applied ~1athematics, Brown University, 1979, and have developed in­ to this collection of articles aimed at the reader with a beginning graduate level background in mathematics. The text can be used as a self-paced reading course. With this in mind, exercises have been appropriately placed throughout the notes. As an aid in reading the material, the e~d of a ...

  9. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Dual-Tracer Receptor Concentration Imaging in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzei, Nazanin; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Holt, Robert W; Gunn, Jason R; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Molecular differences between cancerous and healthy tissue have become key targets for novel therapeutics specific to tumor receptors. However, cancer cell receptor expression can vary within and amongst different tumors, making strategies that can quantify receptor concentration in vivo critical for the progression of targeted therapies. Recently a dual-tracer imaging approach capable of providing quantitative measures of receptor concentration in vivo was developed. It relies on the simultaneous injection and imaging of receptor-targeted tracer and an untargeted tracer (to account for non-specific uptake of the targeted tracer). Early implementations of this approach have been structured on existing “reference tissue” imaging methods that have not been optimized for or validated in dual-tracer imaging. Using simulations and mouse tumor model experimental data, the salient findings in this study were that all widely used reference tissue kinetic models can be used for dual-tracer imaging, with the linearized simplified reference tissue model offering a good balance of accuracy and computational efficiency. Moreover, an alternate version of the full two-compartment reference tissue model can be employed accurately by assuming that the K1s of the targeted and untargeted tracers are similar to avoid assuming an instantaneous equilibrium between bound and free states (made by all other models). PMID:25414912

  10. Combining tracer flux ratio methodology with low-flying aircraft measurements to estimate dairy farm CH4 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daube, C.; Conley, S.; Faloona, I. C.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Roscioli, J. R.; Morris, M.; Curry, J.; Arndt, C.; Herndon, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Livestock activity, enteric fermentation of feed and anaerobic digestion of waste, contributes significantly to the methane budget of the United States (EPA, 2016). Studies question the reported magnitude of these methane sources (Miller et. al., 2013), calling for more detailed research of agricultural animals (Hristov, 2014). Tracer flux ratio is an attractive experimental method to bring to this problem because it does not rely on estimates of atmospheric dispersion. Collection of data occurred during one week at two dairy farms in central California (June, 2016). Each farm varied in size, layout, head count, and general operation. The tracer flux ratio method involves releasing ethane on-site with a known flow rate to serve as a tracer gas. Downwind mixed enhancements in ethane (from the tracer) and methane (from the dairy) were measured, and their ratio used to infer the unknown methane emission rate from the farm. An instrumented van drove transects downwind of each farm on public roads while tracer gases were released on-site, employing the tracer flux ratio methodology to assess simultaneous methane and tracer gas plumes. Flying circles around each farm, a small instrumented aircraft made measurements to perform a mass balance evaluation of methane gas. In the course of these two different methane quantification techniques, we were able to validate yet a third method: tracer flux ratio measured via aircraft. Ground-based tracer release rates were applied to the aircraft-observed methane-to-ethane ratios, yielding whole-site methane emission rates. Never before has the tracer flux ratio method been executed with aircraft measurements. Estimates from this new application closely resemble results from the standard ground-based technique to within their respective uncertainties. Incorporating this new dimension to the tracer flux ratio methodology provides additional context for local plume dynamics and validation of both ground and flight-based data.

  11. Radioisotope tracers in industrial flow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easey, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of radioisotope tracer work carried out by ANSTO has involved most sectors of Australian industry including iron and steel coal, chemical, petrochemical, natural gas, metallurgical, mineral, power generation, liquified air plant, as well as port authorities, water and sewerage instrumentalities, and environmental agencies. A major class of such studies concerns itself with flow and wear studies involving industrial equipment. Some examples are discussed which illustrate the utility of radioisotope tracer techniques in these applications

  12. Improving Marine Ecosystem Models with Biochemical Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Choy, C. Anela; Polovina, Jeffrey J.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Empirical data on food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions underpin ecosystem models, which are increasingly used to support strategic management of marine resources. These data have traditionally derived from stomach content analysis, but new and complementary forms of ecological data are increasingly available from biochemical tracer techniques. Extensive opportunities exist to improve the empirical robustness of ecosystem models through the incorporation of biochemical tracer data and derived indices, an area that is rapidly expanding because of advances in analytical developments and sophisticated statistical techniques. Here, we explore the trophic information required by ecosystem model frameworks (species, individual, and size based) and match them to the most commonly used biochemical tracers (bulk tissue and compound-specific stable isotopes, fatty acids, and trace elements). Key quantitative parameters derived from biochemical tracers include estimates of diet composition, niche width, and trophic position. Biochemical tracers also provide powerful insight into the spatial and temporal variability of food web structure and the characterization of dominant basal and microbial food web groups. A major challenge in incorporating biochemical tracer data into ecosystem models is scale and data type mismatches, which can be overcome with greater knowledge exchange and numerical approaches that transform, integrate, and visualize data.

  13. Analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted in an unsaturated fractured-clay formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Michelle A; Brusseau, Mark L

    2007-03-20

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confining layer for the underlying regional aquifer. Three suites of three tracers were injected into wells located 14, 24, and 24 m from a single, central extraction well. The tracers comprised noble gases (traditionally thought to be nonsorbing), alkanes (primarily water partitioning), perfluorides (primarily NAPL partitioning), and halons (both NAPL and water partitioning). Observations of vacuum response were consistent with flow in a fractured system. The halon tracers exhibited the greatest amount of retardation, and helium and the perfluoride tracers the least. The alkane tracers were unexpectedly more retarded than the perfluoride tracers, indicating low NAPL saturations and high water saturations. An NAPL saturation of 0.01, water saturation of 0.215, and gas saturation of 0.775 was estimated based on analysis of the suite of tracers comprising helium, perfluoromethylcyclohexane and dibromodifluoromethane, which was considered to be the most robust set. The estimated saturations compare reasonably well to independently determined values.

  14. Trends and open questions in industrial tracer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding from the distinction between methodology, technology, and nuclear technology an outline of the tracer technology is given in order to define the matter of the subject. The following items are discussed in detail: trends in tracer theory, tracer technolgy, tracer applications, and open questions

  15. Strategies to improve performance od SW-SAGD (Single Well-Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage); Estrategias para melhor desempenho do SW-SAGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Richard Douglas Ribeiro [Norse Energy do Brasil S/A, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Trevisan, Osvair Vidal [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The present work presents an extensive numerical study, using a commercial reservoir simulator, on the recovery of heavy oil by steam injection assisted by gravity drainage in single horizontal wells. The goal is to study several strategies to improve performance of the Single Well - Steam Assisted Drainage Gravity (SW-SAGD), a new but promising thermal recovery technique aimed at exploitation of heavy oils. The strategies are basically made up of two measures: cyclic steam injection prior to the main injection-production process; and well bore splitting into injection and production zones by packer settings. The measures are scrutinized when used separately or together. Cyclic injection is varied according to cycle duration. Comparisons are made between the performance of oil recovery for the developed strategies and the performance of the traditional dual well SAGD technique with similar operating parameters and field conditions. The results point out the best strategy regarding key parameters such as the oil recovery factor and the steam oil ratio. Results were also verified for variations of rock and fluid properties in the range of a typical heavy oil reservoir. As a result, a new strategy for the SW-SAGD process is presented, providing oil recovery, which is higher than that yielded by the equivalent DW-SAGD. (author)

  16. A simplified fracture network model for studying the efficiency of a single well semi open loop heat exchanger in fractured crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Bour, Olivier; Thierion, Charlotte; Ausseur, Jean-Yves; Lesuer, Hervé; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the complexity of fractured media. The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, a simplified numerical model of fractured media is considered with few fractures. Here we present the different steps for building the model and for achieving the sensitivity analysis. First, an analytical and dimensional study on the equations has been achieved to highlight the main parameters that control the optimization of the system. In a second step, multiphysics software COMSOL was used to achieve numerical simulations in a very simplified model of fractured media. The objective was to test the efficiency of such a system to store and recover thermal energy depending on i) the few parameters controlling fracture network geometry (size and number of fractures) and ii) the frequency of cycles used to store and recover thermal energy. The results have then been compared to reference shallow geothermal systems already set up for porous media. Through this study, relationships between structure, heat exchanges and storage may be highlighted.

  17. Scintigraphy of inflammation with nanometer-sixed colloidal tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Schrijver, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes a novel approach to the scintigraphy of inflammatory processes of the extremities. It presents a method specially developed to bring this diagnostic modality whithin the reach of every nuclear medicine centre without requiring a special infrastructure or extensively trained personnel. The author revieuws the existing nuclear medicine techniques and critically analyses their relative advantages and pitfalls before proceeding to a detailed account of the use of a colloidal tracer for detecting and monitoring inflammation. The author identifies the pathophysiological basis of his concept and gives extensive preclinical data prior to discussing a number of comparative clinical studies with the new technique. Additional benefits are brought by the book's emphasis on the importance of a solid radiopharmacological foundation to the medically used tracers and demonstrates with a few suprising examples how shortcomings at this level may lead to misleading findings in the daily practive of nuclear medicine, even with routinely used radiopharmaceuticals. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  18. In-situ fracture mapping using geotomography and brine tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deadrick, F.J.; Ramirez, A.L.; Lytle, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently assessing the capabilities of high resolution geophysical methods to characterize geologic sites for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. A successful experiment has recently been performed in which salt water tracers and high frequency electromagnetic waves were utilized to map rock mass fracture zones in-situ. Multiple cross-borehole EM transmissions were used to generate a tomographic image of the fractured rock region between two boreholes. The tomographs obtained correlate well with conventional wireline geophysical logs which can be used to infer the location of fractured zones in the rock mass. This indirect data suggests that the geotomography and brine tracer technique may have merit in mapping fractured zones between boreholes

  19. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  20. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  1. Boron isotopes as an artificial tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Konrad W; Lansey, Kevin; Arnold, Robert; Bassett, Randy L; Rincon, Martha

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted using a combination of intrinsic and artificial tracers to estimate travel times and dilution during transport of infiltrate from a reclaimed water infiltration basin to nearby monitoring wells. A major study objective was to validate boric acid enriched in (10)B as an artificial tracer. Basin 10E at the Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Whittier, California, was the site of the test. The basin normally receives a mixture of treated municipal waste water, purchased State Project water, and local runoff from the San Gabriel River. Approximately 3.5 kg of (10)B-enriched boric acid was dispersed among 2.05 x 10(5) m(3) of basin water to initiate the experiment. The resultant median delta(11)B in the infiltration basin was -71 per thousand. Prior to tracer addition, the basin water had an intrinsic delta(11)B of +2 per thousand. Local monitoring wells that were used to assess travel times had delta(11)B values of +5 per thousand and +8 per thousand at the time of tracer addition. Analytic results supported an assumption that boron is conserved during ground water transport and that boron enriched in (10)B is a useful artificial tracer. Several intrinsic tracers were used to reinforce the boric acid tracer findings. These included stable isotopes of oxygen (delta(18)O) and hydrogen (deltaD), sulfate concentration, and the boron to chloride ratio. Xenon isotopes, (136)Xe and (124)Xe, also supported boron isotope results. Xenon isotopes were added to the recharge basin as dissolved gases by investigators from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. Graphical Analysis of PET Data Applied to Reversible and Irreversible Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jean

    1999-11-18

    Graphical analysis refers to the transformation of multiple time measurements of plasma and tissue uptake data into a linear plot, the slope of which is related to the number of available tracer binding sites. This type of analysis allows easy comparisons among experiments. No particular model structure is assumed, however it is assumed that the tracer is given by bolus injection and that both tissue uptake and the plasma concentration of unchanged tracer are monitored following tracer injection. The requirement of plasma measurements can be eliminated in some cases when a reference region is available. There are two categories of graphical methods which apply to two general types of ligands--those which bind reversibly during the scanning procedure and those which are irreversible or trapped during the time of the scanning procedure.

  3. Transfer function analysis of positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutgen, N.; Matsuhashi, S.; Mizuniwa, C.; Ito, T.; Fujimura, T.; Ishioka, N.S.; Watanabe, S.; Sekine, T.; Uchida, H.; Hashimoto, S.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the two-dimensional image data obtained with the positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS) for plant physiology has been carried out using a transfer function analysis method. While a cut leaf base of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum Rottler) or a cut stem of soybean (Glycine max L.) was immersed in an aqueous solution containing the [ 18 F] F - ion or [ 13 N]NO 3 - ion, tracer images of the leaf of Chinese chive and the trifoliate of soybean were recorded with PETIS. From the time sequence of images, the tracer transfer function was estimated from which the speed of tracer transport and the fraction moved between specified image positions were deduced

  4. Estimation of Recharge from Long-Term Monitoring of Saline Tracer Transport Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Binley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The movement of a saline tracer added to the soil surface was monitored in the unsaturated zone using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and subjected to natural rainfall conditions. The ERT data were inverted and corrected for subsurface temperature changes, and spatial moment...... methods. In September 2011, a saline tracer was added across a 142-m2 area at the surface at an application rate mimicking natural infiltration. The movement of the saline tracer front was monitored using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT); data were collected on a daily to weekly...... located only meters away from the cross-borehole ERT array. This suggests that long-term automated ERT monitoring of a surface-applied tracer is a promising technique for estimating groundwater recharge....

  5. Comparative evaluation of two sediment tracers in a rainfall simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Peter; Guzman, Gema; Mentler, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The use of sediment tracers tries to contribute to solving problems of traditional soil erosion measurements such as allocation of erosional and depositional areas. A number of different tracing approaches have already been established however, as none of available techniques are able to fully satisfy all the requirements for being an ideal tracer the search for alternative methods continues. Clays tagged with quaternary ammonium compounds are widely used in industry and are easy to incorporate into soils for sediment tracing experiments. To explore the potential of these clays a laboratory experiment was carried out in order to characterize their behaviour as compared to the well-established sediment tracer magnetic iron oxide. The experiment consisted of a simulated rainfall event of 60 mm/h in a box laboratory flume divided in two ridge-furrow subplots (200 x 57 cm). In order to evaluate transport and redistribution of soil from the ridges to the furrow and to measure the dynamic behaviour of the tracers during the rainfall a dense grid of soil samples was taken before and after the experiment (140 samples in total). Runoff and sediment were collected and all samples were analysed for both tracers. Results indicate the general suitability of organophilic clays to monitor soil redistribution by water erosion. The average relative contributions from shoulders and furrow to total sediment export determined by both tracers were similar and indicated a higher contribution from ridges. A key advantage of using organophilic clays is that the detection limit of organophilic clays is extremely low and the background concentration is zero. Despite the inherent differences between both tracers such as way of bounding, sediment enrichment or analytical technique, this experimental comparison of an established and more novel tracer method underscores the potential suitability of the latter for soil erosion studies.

  6. FormTracer. A mathematica tracing package using FORM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrol, Anton K.; Mitter, Mario; Strodthoff, Nils

    2017-10-01

    We present FormTracer, a high-performance, general purpose, easy-to-use Mathematica tracing package which uses FORM. It supports arbitrary space and spinor dimensions as well as an arbitrary number of simple compact Lie groups. While keeping the usability of the Mathematica interface, it relies on the efficiency of FORM. An additional performance gain is achieved by a decomposition algorithm that avoids redundant traces in the product tensors spaces. FormTracer supports a wide range of syntaxes which endows it with a high flexibility. Mathematica notebooks that automatically install the package and guide the user through performing standard traces in space-time, spinor and gauge-group spaces are provided. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/7rd29h4p3m.1 Licensing provisions: GPLv3 Programming language: Mathematica and FORM Nature of problem: Efficiently compute traces of large expressions Solution method: The expression to be traced is decomposed into its subspaces by a recursive Mathematica expansion algorithm. The result is subsequently translated to a FORM script that takes the traces. After FORM is executed, the final result is either imported into Mathematica or exported as optimized C/C++/Fortran code. Unusual features: The outstanding features of FormTracer are the simple interface, the capability to efficiently handle an arbitrary number of Lie groups in addition to Dirac and Lorentz tensors, and a customizable input-syntax.

  7. Tracer Equivalent Latitude: A Diagnostic Tool for Isentropic Transport Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Douglas R.; Nakamura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    Area equivalent latitude based on potential vorticity (PV) is a widely used diagnostic for isentropic transport in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Here, an alternate method for calculating equivalent latitude is explored, namely, a numerical synthesis of a PV-like tracer from a long-term integration of the advection-diffusion equation on isentropic surfaces. It is found that the tracer equivalent latitude (TrEL) behaves much like the traditional PV equivalent latitude (PVEL) despite the simplified governing physics; this is evidenced by examining the kinematics of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex. Yet in some cases TrEL performs markedly better as a coordinate for long-lived trace species such as ozone. These instances include analysis of lower stratospheric ozone during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) campaign and three-dimensional reconstruction of total column ozone during November-December 1999 from fitted ozone-equivalent latitude relationship. It is argued that the improvement is due to the tracer being free from the diagnostic errors and certain diabatic processes that affect PV. The sensitivity of TrEL to spatial and temporal resolution, advection scheme, and driving winds is also examined.

  8. Use of Helium-3 and Tritium tracers in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrie, Chantal

    1987-01-01

    As tritium considered as a transient tracer has become one of the most promising tool for the study of oceanic circulation and of the ocean capacity to absorb anthropogenic carbon, and as the simultaneous use of its radioactive descendant, Helium-3, brings an additional information (together, these tracers build up a clock in the study of water masses), and as all helium-3 and tritium measurements are made by mass spectroscopy, this research thesis addresses the analytical process, the detection limit, and the method reproducibility associated with this use of both tracers. The author reports and discusses helium-3 data obtained during a measurement campaign which allowed the localisation of an active source and the evidence of an intermediate back current, and tritium data obtained during another measurement campaign which allowed the description of the high time variability of convection processes, and an assessment of water renewal delays and of some deep water circulations. He also reports and discusses the simultaneous use of helium-3 data and tritium data to localize areas where convection processes occur. A theoretical approach to this simultaneous use is proposed which uses a mixing model which distinguishes the venting transit time. Measurement campaigns were performed in Red Sea, western Mediterranean Sea, and north-eastern Atlantic Ocean [fr

  9. Tracers of air-sea gas exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liss, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    The flux of gas across the air-sea interface is determined by the product of the interfacial concentration difference driving the exchange and a rate constant, often termed the transfer velocity. The concentration-difference term is generally obtained by direct measurement, whereas more indirect approaches are required to estimate the transfer velocity and its variation as a function of controlling parameters such as wind and sea state. Radioactive tracers have proved particularly useful in the estimation of air-sea transfer velocities and, recently, stable purposeful tracers have also started to be used. In this paper the use of the following tracers to determine transfer velocities at the sea surface is discussed: natural and bomb-produced 14 C, dissolved oxygen, 222 Rn and sulphur hexafluoride. Other topics covered include the relation between transfer velocity and wind speed as deduced from tracer and wind-tunnel studies, and the discrepancy between transfer velocities determined by using tracers and from eddy correlation measurements in the atmosphere. (author)

  10. Estimation of the dilution field near a marine outfall by using effluent turbidity as an environmental tracer and comparison with dye tracer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecly, José Otavio Goulart

    2018-01-01

    The alternative use of effluent turbidity to determine the dilution field of a domestic marine outfall located off the city of Rio de Janeiro was evaluated through field work comprising fluorescent dye tracer injection and tracking with simultaneous monitoring of sea water turbidity. A preliminary laboratory assessment was carried out with a sample of the outfall effluent whose turbidity was measured by the nephelometric method before and during a serial dilution process. During the field campaign, the dye tracer was monitored with field fluorometers and the turbidity was observed with an optical backscattering sensor interfaced to an OEM data acquisition system. About 4,000 samples were gathered, covering an area of 3 km × 3 km near the outfall diffusers. At the far field - where a drift towards the coastline was observed - the effluent plume was adequately labeled by the dye tracer. The turbidity plume was biased due to the high and variable background turbidity of sea water. After processing the turbidity dataset with a baseline detrending method, the plume presented high correlation with the dye tracer plume drawn on the near dilution field. However, dye tracer remains more robust than effluent turbidity.

  11. Design and utilisation of protocols to characterise dynamic PET uptake of two tracers using basis pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher; Puttick, Simon; Rose, Stephen; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Imaging using more than one biological process using PET could be of great utility, but despite previously proposed approaches to dual-tracer imaging, it is seldom performed. The alternative of performing multiple scans is often infeasible for clinical practice or even in research studies. Dual-tracer PET scanning allows for multiple PET radiotracers to be imaged within the same imaging session. In this paper we describe our approach to utilise the basis pursuit method to aid in the design of dual-tracer PET imaging experiments, and later in separation of the signals. The advantage of this approach is that it does not require a compartment model architecture to be specified or even that both signals are distinguishable in all cases. This means the method for separating dual-tracer signals can be used for many feasible and useful combinations of biology or radiotracer, once an appropriate scanning protocol has been decided upon. Following a demonstration in separating the signals from two consecutively injected radionuclides in a controlled experiment, phantom and list-mode mouse experiments demonstrated the ability to test the feasibility of dual-tracer imaging protocols for multiple injection delays. Increases in variances predicted for kinetic macro-parameters V D and K I in brain and tumoral tissue were obtained when separating the synthetically combined data. These experiments confirmed previous work using other approaches that injections delays of 10-20 min ensured increases in variance were kept minimal for the test tracers used. On this basis, an actual dual-tracer experiment using a 20 min delay was performed using these radio tracers, with the kinetic parameters (V D and K I) extracted for each tracer in agreement with the literature. This study supports previous work that dual-tracer PET imaging can be accomplished provided certain constraints are adhered to. The utilisation of basis pursuit techniques, with its removed need to specify a model

  12. Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.J.; Kurihara, M.; White, M.D.; Moridis, G.J.; Wilson, S.J.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Gaddipati, M.; Masuda, Y.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Narita, H.; Rose, K.; Boswell, R.

    2011-01-01

    salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3-3.9 ??C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, Timothy S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly; Boswell, Ray

    2011-02-01

    water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3–3.9 °C). Finally, this paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

  14. Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Tumor Imaging With F-FDG and Secondary Shorter-Lived Tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Noel F; McJames, Scott; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2009-10-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET, where two to three PET tracers are rapidly scanned with staggered injections, can recover certain imaging measures for each tracer based on differences in tracer kinetics and decay. We previously showed that single-tracer imaging measures can be recovered to a certain extent from rapid dual-tracer (62)Cu - PTSM (blood flow) + (62)Cu - ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging. In this work, the feasibility of rapidly imaging (18)F-FDG plus one or two of these shorter-lived secondary tracers was evaluated in the same tumor model. Dynamic PET imaging was performed in four dogs with pre-existing tumors, and the raw scan data was combined to emulate 60 minute long dual- and triple-tracer scans, using the single-tracer scans as gold standards. The multi-tracer data were processed for static (SUV) and kinetic (K(1), K(net)) endpoints for each tracer, followed by linear regression analysis of multi-tracer versus single-tracer results. Static and quantitative dynamic imaging measures of FDG were both accurately recovered from the multi-tracer scans, closely matching the single-tracer FDG standards (R > 0.99). Quantitative blood flow information, as measured by PTSM K(1) and SUV, was also accurately recovered from the multi-tracer scans (R = 0.97). Recovery of ATSM kinetic parameters proved more difficult, though the ATSM SUV was reasonably well recovered (R = 0.92). We conclude that certain additional information from one to two shorter-lived PET tracers may be measured in a rapid multi-tracer scan alongside FDG without compromising the assessment of glucose metabolism. Such additional and complementary information has the potential to improve tumor characterization in vivo, warranting further investigation of rapid multi-tracer techniques.

  15. Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Tumor Imaging With 18F-FDG and Secondary Shorter-Lived Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET, where two to three PET tracers are rapidly scanned with staggered injections, can recover certain imaging measures for each tracer based on differences in tracer kinetics and decay. We previously showed that single-tracer imaging measures can be recovered to a certain extent from rapid dual-tracer 62Cu – PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu — ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging. In this work, the feasibility of rapidly imaging 18F-FDG plus one or two of these shorter-lived secondary tracers was evaluated in the same tumor model. Dynamic PET imaging was performed in four dogs with pre-existing tumors, and the raw scan data was combined to emulate 60 minute long dual- and triple-tracer scans, using the single-tracer scans as gold standards. The multi-tracer data were processed for static (SUV) and kinetic (K1, Knet) endpoints for each tracer, followed by linear regression analysis of multi-tracer versus single-tracer results. Static and quantitative dynamic imaging measures of FDG were both accurately recovered from the multi-tracer scans, closely matching the single-tracer FDG standards (R > 0.99). Quantitative blood flow information, as measured by PTSM K1 and SUV, was also accurately recovered from the multi-tracer scans (R = 0.97). Recovery of ATSM kinetic parameters proved more difficult, though the ATSM SUV was reasonably well recovered (R = 0.92). We conclude that certain additional information from one to two shorter-lived PET tracers may be measured in a rapid multi-tracer scan alongside FDG without compromising the assessment of glucose metabolism. Such additional and complementary information has the potential to improve tumor characterization in vivo, warranting further investigation of rapid multi-tracer techniques. PMID:20046800

  16. Biological tracer for waste site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong-Gunderson, J.

    1995-01-01

    Remediating hazardous waste sites requires detailed site characterization. In groundwater remediation, characterizing the flow paths and velocity is a major objective. Various tracers have been used for measuring groundwater velocity and transport of contaminants, colloidal particles, and bacteria and nutrients. The conventional techniques use dissolved solutes, dyes. and gases to estimate subsurface transport pathways. These tracers can provide information on transport and diffusion into the matrix, but their estimates for groundwater flow through fractured regions are very conservative. Also, they do not have the same transport characteristics as bacteria and suspended colloid tracers, both of which must be characterized for effective in-place remediation. Bioremediation requires understanding bacterial transport and nutrient distribution throughout the acquifer, knowledge of contaminants s mobile colloidal particles is just essential

  17. A study plan for determining recharge rates at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.M.; Szercsody, J.E.; Phillips, S.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents a study plan for estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, 36 Cl, 3 H, and 2 H/ 18 O. Atmospheric levels of 36 Cl and 3 H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting ''bomb pulse'' or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resulted in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, 129 I, and 99 Tc. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Six tracer techniques (total chloride, 36 Cl, 3 H, nitrate, 129 I, and 99 Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden silt loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers works best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial variability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other arid sites. 166 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M; Walther, Jason L; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-11-01

    (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled (13)C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-(13)C]glucose and [3-(13)C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-(13)C]glucose. [U-(13)C(5)]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for the analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of (13)C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture.

  19. Optimization of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Jason L; Metallo, Christian M; Zhang, Jie; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian cells consume and metabolize various substrates from their surroundings for energy generation and biomass synthesis. Glucose and glutamine, in particular, are the primary carbon sources for proliferating cancer cells. While this combination of substrates generates static labeling patterns for use in (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA), the inability of single tracers to effectively label all pathways poses an obstacle for comprehensive flux determination within a given experiment. To address this issue we applied a genetic algorithm to optimize mixtures of (13)C-labeled glucose and glutamine for use in MFA. We identified tracer combinations that minimized confidence intervals in an experimentally determined flux network describing central carbon metabolism in tumor cells. Additional simulations were used to determine the robustness of the [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose/[U-(13)C(5)]glutamine tracer combination with respect to perturbations in the network. Finally, we experimentally validated the improved performance of this tracer set relative to glucose tracers alone in a cancer cell line. This versatile method allows researchers to determine the optimal tracer combination to use for a specific metabolic network, and our findings applied to cancer cells significantly enhance the ability of MFA experiments to precisely quantify fluxes in higher organisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiopharmaceutical Tracers for Neural Progenitor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangner, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The Technical Report summarizes the results of the synthesis and microPET animal scanning of several compounds labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in normal, neonatal and kainic acid treated (seizure induced) rats as potential PET tracers to image the process of neurogenesis using positron emission tomography (PET). The tracers tested were 3'-deoxy-3'-[F-18]fluorothymidine ([F-18]FLT) and 5'-benzoyl-FTL, 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-[F-18]fluoro-B-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-bromouracil (FBAU) and 3',5'-dibenzoyl-FBAU, N-[F-18]fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine (FLAG) and tetraacetyl-FLAG, and L-[1-C-11]leucine

  1. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, R.D.; Tyner, C.E.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included

  2. SIMULASI JARINGAN KOMPUTER MENGGUNAKAN CISCO PACKET TRACER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mufadhol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan jaringan komputer saat ini begitu pesat, monitoring jaringan komputer akan menjadi suatu hal yang sulit dan rumit. Koneksi jaringan komputer merupakan suatu hal yang mendasar dalam suatu jaringan, karena bila koneksi itu bermasalah maka semua jenis aplikasi yang dijalankan melalui jaringan komputer tidak dapat digunakan. Cisco packet tracer dapat digunakan untuk simulasi yang mencerminkan arsitektur dan juga model dari jaringan komputer pada sistem jaringan yang digunakan. Dengan menggunakan aplikasi cisco packet tracer, simulasi mengenai jaringan dapat dimanfaatkan menjadi informasi tentang keadaan koneksi komputer dalam suatu jaringan.

  3. Stable isotopes as tracers for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, A.; Bartolo, D. de; Cantone, M.C.; Zilker, T.; Greim, H.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of internal dose after incorporation of radionuclides requires as input data the knowledge of the uptake into the systemic circulation, the distribution and retention in selected organs, the excretion pathways. Realistic biokinetic models are needed for reliable estimates, correct interpretation of bioassay measurements, appropriate decision-making in radiological emergencies. For many radionuclides, however, the biokinetic models currently recommended are often generic, with very few specific parameters, due to the lack of experimental human data. The use of stable isotopes as tracers enables to determine important biokinetic parameters such as the fractional uptake, the clearance from the transfer compartment, the excretion patterns under experimentally controlled conditions. The subjects investigated are not exposed to any radiation risk, so this technique enables to obtain biokinetic information also for sensitive groups of the population, such as children or pregnant women, and to determine age- and gender-specific model parameters. Sophisticated analytical method, able to discriminate and quantitate different isotopes of the same element in complex matrices such as biological fluids, have to be purposely developed and optimized. Activation analysis and mass spectrometry are the most proper techniques of choice. Experiments were conducted with molybdenum, tellurium, ruthenium and zirconium. Activation analysis with protons, thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled mass spectrometry were employed for the determination of stable isotopes of these elements in blood plasma and urine samples. Several deviations from the predictions of the ICRP models were observed. For example, modifications to the current model for molybdenum have been suggested on the basis of these results. The dose coefficients to the target regions calculated with this proposed model are even of one order of magnitude different than the ICRP estimates

  4. Characterization of Anomalous Contaminant Transport via Push-Pull Tracer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Push-pull (single-well-injection-withdrawal) tracer tests are widely used as an economical means of characterizing field-scale solute transport properties such as sorption and dispersion. Typically, these are analyzed by means of analytic solutions that assume transport obeys the radial advection-dispersion equation. We revisit this approach as: (1) Recognition of the ubiquity of anomalous transport and its impact on contaminant remediation necessitates the use of new methods to characterize it, and (2) Improved computational power and numerical methods have rendered reliance on analytical solutions obsolete. Here, we present a technique for characterizing diffusion-driven anomalous transport (i.e., anomalous transport driven by a "trapping" process whose trapping and release statistics are independent of the groundwater flow velocity). Examples include diffusion into low permeability zones, kinetic sorption, and matrix diffusion. Using field observations, we simultaneously calibrate an exponential probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the mobile domain and a truncated power law probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the immobile domain via a stochastic global optimization technique. The calibrated distributions, being independent of the flow regime, are applicable to the same domain under any flow conditions, including linear flow. In the context of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), one may simply define a transition to represent a single trap-and-release cycle, and directly compute the spatiotemporal transition distribution that defines the CTRW from the two calibrated distributions and the local seepage velocity (so that existing CTRW transport theory applies). A test of our methodology against a push-pull test from the MADE site demonstrated fitting performance comparable to that of a 3-D MODFLOW/MT3DMS model with a variety of hydraulic conductivity zones and explicit treatment of mobile-immobile mass

  5. Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Tumor Imaging With 18F-FDG and Secondary Shorter-Lived Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET, where two to three PET tracers are rapidly scanned with staggered injections, can recover certain imaging measures for each tracer based on differences in tracer kinetics and decay. We previously showed that single-tracer imaging measures can be recovered to a certain extent from rapid dual-tracer 62Cu – PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu — ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging. In this work, the feasibility of rapidly imaging 18F-FDG plus one or two of these shorter-lived secondary trac...

  6. Fractal tracer distributions in turbulent field theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. Lundbek; Bohr, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    We study the motion of passive tracers in a two-dimensional turbulent velocity field generated by the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. By varying the direction of the velocity-vector with respect to the field-gradient we can continuously vary the two Lyapunov exponents for the particle motion and t...

  7. Nanoparticle tracers in calcium carbonate porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2014-07-15

    Tracers are perhaps the most direct way of diagnosing subsurface fluid flow pathways for ground water decontamination and for natural gas and oil production. Nanoparticle tracers could be particularly effective because they do not diffuse away from the fractures or channels where flow occurs and thus take much less time to travel between two points. In combination with a chemical tracer they can measure the degree of flow concentration. A prerequisite for tracer applications is that the particles are not retained in the porous media as the result of aggregation or sticking to mineral surfaces. By screening eight nanoparticles (3-100 nm in diameter) for retention when passed through calcium carbonate packed laboratory columns in artificial oil field brine solutions of variable ionic strength we show that the nanoparticles with the least retention are 3 nm in diameter, nearly uncharged, and decorated with highly hydrophilic polymeric ligands. The details of these column experiments and the tri-modal distribution of zeta potential of the calcite sand particles in the brine used in our tests suggests that parts of the calcite surface have positive zeta potential and the retention of negatively charged nanoparticles occurs at these sites. Only neutral nanoparticles are immune to at least some retention. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  8. Numerical Implementation and Computer Simulation of Tracer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical Implementation and Computer Simulation of Tracer Experiments in a Physical Aquifer Model. ... African Research Review ... A sensitivity analysis showed that the time required for complete source depletion, was most dependent on the source definition and the hydraulic conductivity K of the porous medium.

  9. A Multiple-Tracer Approach for Identifying Sewage Sources to an Urban Stream System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kenneth Edward

    2007-01-01

    sampling approach, 149 sites were sampled at least one time for indicator tracers; 52 of these sites also were sampled for confirmatory tracers at least one time. Through the analysis of multiple-tracer levels in the synoptic samples, three major sewage sources to the Accotink Creek stream network were identified, and several other minor sewage sources to the Accotink Creek system likely deserve additional investigation. Near the end of the synoptic sampling activities, three additional sampling methods were used to gain better understanding of the potential for sewage sources to the watershed. These additional sampling methods included optical brightener monitoring, intensive stream sampling using automated samplers, and additional sampling of several storm-drain networks. The samples obtained by these methods provided further understanding of possible sewage sources to the streams and a better understanding of the variability in the tracer concentrations at a given sampling site. Collectively, these additional sampling methods were a valuable complement to the synoptic sampling approach that was used for the bulk of this study. The study results provide an approach for local authorities to use in applying a relatively simple and inexpensive collection of tracers to locate sewage sources to streams. Although this multiple-tracer approach is effective in detecting sewage sources to streams, additional research is needed to better detect extremely low-volume sewage sources and better enable local authorities to identify the specific sources of the sewage once it is detected in a stream reach.

  10. Nitrous oxide as a tracer gas in the ASHRAE 110-1995 Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Martin; Wong, Larry; Gonzales, Ben A; Knutson, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 110 provides a quantitative method for testing the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Through release of a known quantity (4.0 Lpm) of a tracer gas, and subsequent monitoring of the tracer gas concentration in the "breathing zone" of a mannequin positioned in front of the hood, this method allows for evaluation of laboratory hood performance. Standard 110 specifies sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) as the tracer gas; however, suitable alternatives are allowed. Through three series of performance tests, this analysis serves to investigate the use of nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternate tracer gas for hood performance testing. Single gas tests were performed according to ASHRAE Standard 110-1995 with each tracer gas individually. These tests showed identical results using an acceptance criterion of AU 0.1 with the sash half open, nominal 18 inches (0.46m) high, and the face velocity at a nominal 60 fpm (0.3 m/s). Most data collected in these single gas tests, for both tracer gases, were below the minimum detection limit, thus two dual gas tests were developed for simultaneous sampling of both tracer gases. Dual gas dual ejector tests were performed with both tracer gases released simultaneously through two ejectors, and the concentration measured with two detectors using a common sampling probe. Dual gas single ejector tests were performed with both tracer gases released though a single ejector, and the concentration measured in the same manner as the dual gas dual ejector tests. The dual gas dual ejector tests showed excellent correlation, with R typically greater than 0.9. Variance was observed in the resulting regression line for each hood, likely due to non-symmetry between the two challenges caused by variables beyond the control of the investigators. Dual gas single ejector tests resulted in exceptional correlation, with R>0.99 typically for the consolidated data, with a slope of 1.0. These data indicate equivalent results for ASHRAE 110

  11. Accurate Blood Flow Measurements: Are Artificial Tracers Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelma, Christian; Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend P.; Westerweel, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented. PMID:23028878

  12. Application of radioactive tracers to processes on a large scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Selecki, A.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of using radioactive tracers for studying industrial scale processes and of interpreting the results are discussed. Results of investigations on flow dynamics and mixing carried out with 82 Br, 140 La, 131 I, 51 Cr, and 32 P in a waste water treatment plant are presented. With the aid of 24 Na and 82 Br cascade flow dynamics has been investigated in a phosphoric acid production plant. As a third example the results of measurements performed on the basis of 24 Na application in a steam calciner for soda production are given and the mixing coefficients are mathematically described using the diffusion model. (author)

  13. Using REE tracers to measure sheet erosion changing to rill erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Puling; Xue Yazhou; Song Wei; Wang Mingyi; Ju Tongjun

    2004-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different rare earth elements of different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amounts increase with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4-5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amounts. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands. (authors)

  14. Simulation and interpretation of inter-well tracer tests

    OpenAIRE

    Dugstad Øyvind; Viig Sissel; Sagen Jan; Huseby Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In inter-well tracer tests (IWTT), chemical compounds or radioactive isotopes are used to label injection water and gas to establish well connections and fluid patterns in petroleum reservoirs. Tracer simulation is an invaluable tool to ease the interpretation of IWTT results and is also required for assisted history matching application of tracer data. In this paper we present a new simulation technique to analyse and interpret tracer results. Laboratory results are used to establish and tes...

  15. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and13C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    13 C-Metabolic flux analysis ( 13 C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by 13 C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for 13 C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly 13 C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6- 13 C]glucose, [5,6- 13 C]glucose and [1,2- 13 C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6- 13 C]glucose and [1,2- 13 C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6- 13 C]glucose and [1,2- 13 C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1- 13 C]glucose +20% [U- 13 C]glucose. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of rapid dual-tracer (62)Cu-PTSM + (62)Cu-ATSM PET in dogs with spontaneously occurring tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Noel F; McJames, Scott; Rust, Thomas C; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2008-01-07

    We are developing methods for imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan with staggered injections, where imaging measures for each tracer are separated and recovered using differences in tracer kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, signal separation performance for rapid dual-tracer (62)Cu-PTSM (blood flow) + (62)Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging was evaluated in a large animal model. Four dogs with pre-existing tumors received a series of dynamic PET scans with (62)Cu-PTSM and (62)Cu-ATSM, permitting evaluation of a rapid dual-tracer protocol designed by previous simulation work. Several imaging measures were computed from the dual-tracer data and compared with those from separate, single-tracer imaging. Static imaging measures (e.g. SUV) for each tracer were accurately recovered from dual-tracer data. The wash-in (k(1)) and wash-out (k(2)) rate parameters for both tracers were likewise well recovered (r = 0.87-0.99), but k(3) was not accurately recovered for PTSM (r = 0.19) and moderately well recovered for ATSM (r = 0.70). Some degree of bias was noted, however, which may potentially be overcome through further refinement of the signal separation algorithms. This work demonstrates that complementary information regarding tumor blood flow and hypoxia can be acquired by a single dual-tracer PET scan, and also that the signal separation procedure works effectively for real physiologic data with realistic levels of kinetic model mismatch. Rapid multi-tracer PET has the potential to improve tumor assessment for image-guide therapy and monitoring, and further investigation with these and other tracers is warranted.

  17. Evaluation of Rapid Dual-Tracer 62Cu-PTSM + 62Cu-ATSM PET in Dogs with Spontaneously-Occurring Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Rust, Thomas C.; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    We are developing methods for imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan with staggered injections, where imaging measures for each tracer are separated and recovered using differences in tracer kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, signal-separation performance for rapid dual-tracer 62Cu-PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging was evaluated in a large animal model. Four dogs with pre-existing tumors received a series of dynamic PET scans with 62Cu-PTSM and 62Cu-ATSM, permitting evaluation of a rapid dual-tracer protocol designed by previous simulation work. Several imaging measures were computed from the dual-tracer data and compared with those from separate, single-tracer imaging. Static imaging measures (e.g. SUV) for each tracer were accurately recovered from dual-tracer data. The wash-in (k1) and wash-out (k2) rate parameters for both tracers were likewise well recovered (r = 0.87 – 0.99), but k3 was not accurately recovered for PTSM (r = 0.19) and moderately well recovered for ATSM (r = 0.70). Some degree of bias was noted, however, which may potentially be overcome through further refinement of the signal-separation algorithms. This work demonstrates that complementary information regarding tumor blood flow and hypoxia can be acquired by a single dual-tracer PET scan, and also that the signal-separation procedure works effectively for real physiologic data with realistic levels of kinetic model-mismatch. Rapid multi-tracer PET has the potential to improve tumor assessment for image-guide therapy and monitoring, and further investigation with these and other tracers is warranted. PMID:18182698

  18. Evaluation of rapid dual-tracer 62Cu-PTSM + 62Cu-ATSM PET in dogs with spontaneously occurring tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Rust, Thomas C.; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing methods for imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan with staggered injections, where imaging measures for each tracer are separated and recovered using differences in tracer kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, signal separation performance for rapid dual-tracer 62Cu-PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging was evaluated in a large animal model. Four dogs with pre-existing tumors received a series of dynamic PET scans with 62Cu-PTSM and 62Cu-ATSM, permitting evaluation of a rapid dual-tracer protocol designed by previous simulation work. Several imaging measures were computed from the dual-tracer data and compared with those from separate, single-tracer imaging. Static imaging measures (e.g. SUV) for each tracer were accurately recovered from dual-tracer data. The wash-in (k1) and wash-out (k2) rate parameters for both tracers were likewise well recovered (r = 0.87-0.99), but k3 was not accurately recovered for PTSM (r = 0.19) and moderately well recovered for ATSM (r = 0.70). Some degree of bias was noted, however, which may potentially be overcome through further refinement of the signal separation algorithms. This work demonstrates that complementary information regarding tumor blood flow and hypoxia can be acquired by a single dual-tracer PET scan, and also that the signal separation procedure works effectively for real physiologic data with realistic levels of kinetic model mismatch. Rapid multi-tracer PET has the potential to improve tumor assessment for image-guide therapy and monitoring, and further investigation with these and other tracers is warranted.

  19. Performance evaluation testing of wells in the gradient control system at a federally operated Confined Disposal Facility using single well aquifer tests, East Chicago, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, David C.; Unthank, Michael D.

    2016-12-08

    values from the initial air slug test during the 2015 testing period for MW–11A and MW–14A are an order of magnitude less than those derived from the final test during the 2014 testing period indicating the development of a low conductivity skin between the final test of the 2014 testing period and the beginning of the 2015 testing period that created a decrease in the connection of the monitoring well screen to the surrounding aquifer material.Repeated step drawdown and recovery testing of the extraction wells tested during this study provided results that indicate a slight increase in the development of a skin and a decrease in the connectivity of the extraction wells with the Calumet aquifer. Hydraulic conductivity values obtained from the test results were relatively similar in EW–4B and EW–14A but were substantially lower for EW–11C. This difference may be due to the presence of finer grained silt deposits in the area surrounding well nest 11. Skin factors calculated during the step drawdown and recovery analysis were lowest in EW–11C and relatively similar in EW–4B and EW–14A. Calculated skin factors increased slightly in the analysis of data collected in 2015 from that collected in 2014.Comparisons of the specific-capacity values calculated from well development data collected following extraction well installation to those calculated during the single well aquifer tests at EW–4B, EW–14A and EW–11C indicate that the productivity of extraction wells on the CDF property has diminished since 2008. Values calculated for monitoring wells MW–4A, MW–11A, and MW–14A were used to evaluate the decrease in air slug derived hydraulic conductivity for monitoring wells within the groundwater cutoff wall between testing in 2014 and 2015.Results from testing by this study indicate that implementation of an air slug testing regimen of the monitoring wells that control the gradient control system at the CDF throughout the course of a year may help

  20. New radioactive tracers can help find cause of jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrard, G.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for the investigation of a condition known as persistent jaundice of the newborn, have been designed, prepared and tested at ANSTO. The tracers are chemical compounds of the radioactive elements gallium-67 and indium-111. They given lower radiation doses than the conventional radioactive tracer, iodine-131, used in these studies

  1. Methodology for quantitative rapid multi-tracer PET tumor characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Hoffman, John M

    2013-10-04

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can image a wide variety of functional and physiological parameters in vivo using different radiotracers. As more is learned about the molecular basis for disease and treatment, the potential value of molecular imaging for characterizing and monitoring disease status has increased. Characterizing multiple aspects of tumor physiology by imaging multiple PET tracers in a single patient provides additional complementary information, and there is a significant body of literature supporting the potential value of multi-tracer PET imaging in oncology. However, imaging multiple PET tracers in a single patient presents a number of challenges. A number of techniques are under development for rapidly imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan, where signal-recovery processing algorithms are employed to recover various imaging endpoints for each tracer. Dynamic imaging is generally used with tracer injections staggered in time, and kinetic constraints are utilized to estimate each tracers' contribution to the multi-tracer imaging signal. This article summarizes past and ongoing work in multi-tracer PET tumor imaging, and then organizes and describes the main algorithmic approaches for achieving multi-tracer PET signal-recovery. While significant advances have been made, the complexity of the approach necessitates protocol design, optimization, and testing for each particular tracer combination and application. Rapid multi-tracer PET techniques have great potential for both research and clinical cancer imaging applications, and continued research in this area is warranted.

  2. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  3. Industrial tracer application in people's republic of china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Maoyi

    1987-01-01

    A number of important applications of radioisotopes and their compounds used as tracers in petroleum industry, metallurgical industry, mechanical industry, chemical industry, electronic industry, hydrology and water conservancy in China are introduced in this paper. And the tracer technique applied to entomology is also mentioned. The industrial tracer applications are successful and beneficial in People's Republic of China from the examples given. (author)

  4. Tracer dispersion in two-dimensional rough fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazer, G; Koplik, J

    2001-05-01

    Tracer diffusion and hydrodynamic dispersion in two-dimensional fractures with self-affine roughness are studied by analytic and numerical methods. Numerical simulations were performed via the lattice-Boltzmann approach, using a boundary condition for tracer particles that improves the accuracy of the method. The reduction in the diffusive transport, due to the fractal geometry of the fracture surfaces, is analyzed for different fracture apertures. In the limit of small aperture fluctuations we derive the correction to the diffusive coefficient in terms of the tortuosity, which accounts for the irregular geometry of the fractures. Dispersion is studied when the two fracture surfaces are simply displaced normally to the mean fracture plane and when there is a lateral shift as well. Numerical results are analyzed using the Lambda parameter, related to convective transport within the fracture, and simple arguments based on lubrication approximation. At very low Péclet number, in the case where fracture surfaces are laterally shifted, we show using several different methods that convective transport reduces dispersion.

  5. Total methane loss from biogas plants, determined by tracer dispersion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Methane losses from biogas plants are problematic, since methane emitted into the atmosphere contributes to global warming, and any losses may thus reduce the environmental benefits of biogas production. A tracer gas dispersion method was used to measure total methane emissions from seven biogas ...... the detection and quantification of individual leaks at the plants require other methods....

  6. Determination of ''226Ra by Alpha Spectrometry by Using ''225Ra as Yield Tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, M. T.; Oller, O.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the determination of low-level ''226 Ra in environmental and geological samples by alpha spectrometry is described. The method is based on the use of ''225 Ra from ''229 Th as yield tracer and has been developed to analyze U, Th and Ra in the same sample. (Author) 12 refs

  7. Quantitative Visualization of Dynamic Tracer Transportation in the Extracellular Space of Deep Brain Regions Using Tracer-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Quan, Xianyue; Liang, Wen; Li, Zhiming; Chen, Deji; Han, Hongbin

    2017-09-03

    BACKGROUND This study assessed an innovative tracer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to visualize the dynamic transportation of tracers in regions of deep brain extracellular space (ECS) and to measure transportation ability and ECS structure. MATERIAL AND METHODS Gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was the chosen tracer and was injected into the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Real-time dynamic transportation of Gd-DTPA in ECS was observed and the results were verified by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Using Transwell assay across the blood-brain barrier, a modified diffusion equation was further simplified. Effective diffusion coefficient D* and tortuosity λ were calculated. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the extracellular matrix contributing to ECS structure. RESULTS Tracers injected into the caudate nucleus were transported to the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortices away from the injection points, while both of them injected into the thalamus were only distributed on site. Although the caudate nucleus was closely adjacent to the thalamus, tracer transportation between partitions was not observed. In addition, D* and the λ showed statistically significant differences between partitions. ECS was shown to be a physiologically partitioned system, and its division is characterized by the unique distribution territory and transportation ability of substances located in it. Versican and Tenascin R are possible contributors to the tortuosity of ECS. CONCLUSIONS Tracer-based MRI will improve our understanding of the brain microenvironment, improve the techniques for local delivery of drugs, and highlight brain tissue engineering fields in the future.

  8. Quantitative Visualization of Dynamic Tracer Transportation in the Extracellular Space of Deep Brain Regions Using Tracer-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Quan, Xianyue; Liang, Wen; Li, Zhiming; Han, Hongbin; Chen, Deji

    2017-01-01

    Background This study assessed an innovative tracer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to visualize the dynamic transportation of tracers in regions of deep brain extracellular space (ECS) and to measure transportation ability and ECS structure. Material/Methods Gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was the chosen tracer and was injected into the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Real-time dynamic transportation of Gd-DTPA in ECS was observed and the results were verified by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Using Transwell assay across the blood-brain barrier, a modified diffusion equation was further simplified. Effective diffusion coefficient D* and tortuosity λ were calculated. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the extracellular matrix contributing to ECS structure. Results Tracers injected into the caudate nucleus were transported to the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortices away from the injection points, while both of them injected into the thalamus were only distributed on site. Although the caudate nucleus was closely adjacent to the thalamus, tracer transportation between partitions was not observed. In addition, D* and the λ showed statistically significant differences between partitions. ECS was shown to be a physiologically partitioned system, and its division is characterized by the unique distribution territory and transportation ability of substances located in it. Versican and Tenascin R are possible contributors to the tortuosity of ECS. Conclusions Tracer-based MRI will improve our understanding of the brain microenvironment, improve the techniques for local delivery of drugs, and highlight brain tissue engineering fields in the future. PMID:28866708

  9. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test

  10. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  11. Partitioning gas tracer tests for measurement of water in municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Paul T; Jakubowitch, Andrew; Briening, Michele L; Chiu, Pei C

    2003-11-01

    A key component in the operation of almost all bioreactor landfills is the addition of water to maintain optimal moisture conditions. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, in situ methods are required to measure water within solid waste. Existing technologies often result in measurements of unknown accuracy, because of the variability of solid waste materials and time-dependent changes in packing density, both of which influence most measurement methods. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone--the partitioning gas tracer test--was tested. In this technology, the transport behavior of two gas tracers within solid waste is used to measure the fraction of the void space filled with water. One tracer is conservative and does not react with solids or liquids, while a second tracer partitions into the water and is separated from the conservative tracer during transport. This technology was tested in four different solid waste packings and was capable of determining the volumetric water content to within 48% of actual values, with most measurement errors less than 15%. This technology and the factors that affect its applicability to landfills are discussed in this paper.

  12. Evaluation of Rapid Dual-Tracer 62Cu-PTSM + 62Cu-ATSM PET in Dogs with Spontaneously-Occurring Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Rust, Thomas C.; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing methods for imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan with staggered injections, where imaging measures for each tracer are separated and recovered using differences in tracer kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, signal-separation performance for rapid dual-tracer 62Cu-PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging was evaluated in a large animal model. Four dogs with pre-existing tumors received a series of dynamic PET scans with 62Cu-PTSM and 62Cu-ATSM,...

  13. Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Groundwater Age Using Synoptic Surveys of Environmental Tracers in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    A model which simulates tracer concentration in surface water as a function the age distribution of groundwater discharge is used to characterize groundwater flow systems at a variety of spatial scales. We develop the theory behind the model and demonstrate its application in several groundwater systems of local to regional scale. A 1-D stream transport model, which includes: advection, dispersion, gas exchange, first-order decay and groundwater inflow is coupled a lumped parameter model that calculates the concentration of environmental tracers in discharging groundwater as a function of the groundwater residence time distribution. The lumped parameters, which describe the residence time distribution, are allowed to vary spatially, and multiple environmental tracers can be simulated. This model allows us to calculate the longitudinal profile of tracer concentration in streams as a function of the spatially variable groundwater age distribution. By fitting model results to observations of stream chemistry and discharge, we can then estimate the spatial distribution of groundwater age. The volume of groundwater discharge to streams can be estimated using a subset of environmental tracers, applied tracers, synoptic stream gauging or other methods, and the age of groundwater then estimated using the previously calculated groundwater discharge and observed environmental tracer concentrations. Synoptic surveys of SF6, CFC's, 3H and 222Rn, along with measured stream discharge are used to estimate the groundwater inflow distribution and mean age for regional scale surveys of the Berland River in west-central Alberta. We find that groundwater entering the Berland has observable age, and that the age estimated using our stream survey is of similar order to limited samples from groundwater wells in the region. Our results show that the stream can be used as an easily accessible location to constrain the regional scale spatial distribution of groundwater age.

  14. Dual-tracer background subtraction approach for fluorescent molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W.; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Leblond, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse fluorescence tomography requires high contrast-to-background ratios to accurately reconstruct inclusions of interest. This is a problem when imaging the uptake of fluorescently labeled molecularly targeted tracers in tissue, which can result in high levels of heterogeneously distributed background uptake. We present a dual-tracer background subtraction approach, wherein signal from the uptake of an untargeted tracer is subtracted from targeted tracer signal prior to image reconstruction, resulting in maps of targeted tracer binding. The approach is demonstrated in simulations, a phantom study, and in a mouse glioma imaging study, demonstrating substantial improvement over conventional and homogenous background subtraction image reconstruction approaches. PMID:23292612

  15. Quantifying rates of glucose production in vivo following an intraperitoneal tracer bolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Ping; Zhou, Dan; Yao, Zuliang; Satapati, Santhosh; Chen, Ying; Daurio, Natalie A; Petrov, Aleksandr; Shen, Xiaolan; Metzger, Daniel; Yin, Wu; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Eiermann, George J; Hwa, Joyce; Fancourt, Craig; Miller, Corin; Herath, Kithsiri; Roddy, Thomas P; Slipetz, Deborah; Erion, Mark D; Previs, Stephen F; Kelley, David E

    2016-12-01

    Aberrant regulation of glucose production makes a critical contribution to the impaired glycemic control that is observed in type 2 diabetes. Although isotopic tracer methods have proven to be informative in quantifying the magnitude of such alterations, it is presumed that one must rely on venous access to administer glucose tracers which therein presents obstacles for the routine application of tracer methods in rodent models. Since intraperitoneal injections are readily used to deliver glucose challenges and/or dose potential therapeutics, we hypothesized that this route could also be used to administer a glucose tracer. The ability to then reliably estimate glucose flux would require attention toward setting a schedule for collecting samples and choosing a distribution volume. For example, glucose production can be calculated by multiplying the fractional turnover rate by the pool size. We have taken a step-wise approach to examine the potential of using an intraperitoneal tracer administration in rat and mouse models. First, we compared the kinetics of [U- 13 C]glucose following either an intravenous or an intraperitoneal injection. Second, we tested whether the intraperitoneal method could detect a pharmacological manipulation of glucose production. Finally, we contrasted a potential application of the intraperitoneal method against the glucose-insulin clamp. We conclude that it is possible to 1) quantify glucose production using an intraperitoneal injection of tracer and 2) derive a "glucose production index" by coupling estimates of basal glucose production with measurements of fasting insulin concentration; this yields a proxy for clamp-derived assessments of insulin sensitivity of endogenous production. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Radiopharmaceutical Tracers for Neural Progenitor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangner, Thomas J.

    2006-09-29

    The Technical Report summarizes the results of the synthesis and microPET animal scanning of several compounds labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in normal, neonatal and kainic acid treated (seizure induced) rats as potential PET tracers to image the process of neurogenesis using positron emission tomography (PET). The tracers tested were 3'-deoxy-3'-[F-18]fluorothymidine ([F-18]FLT) and 5'-benzoyl-FTL, 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-[F-18]fluoro-B-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-bromouracil (FBAU) and 3',5'-dibenzoyl-FBAU, N-[F-18]fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine (FLAG) and tetraacetyl-FLAG, and L-[1-C-11]leucine.

  17. Tracing salmon to their birthplace by activable tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Activable tracer technique was applied to trace the recurrent migration of white salmons, as a typical example of employing radioactivation analysis to the study of agricultural and marinefields. Europium was adopted because it is easy to use technically with less influence on fish body and easy to detect, and its remaining time is very long. Artificially hatched young white salmons were stocked in the Saibetsu River after being raised for a month with europium-containing feed. These stocked fish were labeled by fin-cutting method. Recurrent salmons (fin cutting-labeled fish) were then collected and dissected. The fishes were divided into otoliths, scales, flesh, internal organs, gills, bones, etc., and irradiated for 5 min in JRR-2 reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Europium was detected from the scales and otoliths of 3 to 4 year stocked adult fishes by γ-spectrometry of Eu. This proved the availability of activable tracer method for tracing the recurrent migration of salmons. (Kobatake, H.)

  18. Tracer techniques in plant breeding programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, F.G.H.

    1975-01-01

    Tracer techniques may be used as a tool in plant breeding programmes either to help in the choice of parental combinations with complementary advantages or in the selection of desirable plants within the segregating populations. The second application is, however, of little practical application as the techniques involved are mostly too tedious to be used on the large populations with which the plant breeder must deal, and frequently involve unacceptable destructive sampling of his material. The physiological analysis of potential parents is of considerable importance, particularly in the improvement of crops to be grown in more fully developed countries with advanced agricultural systems. Techniques using radioactive tracers and radiation-emitting sources such as the neutron probe have played a considerable part in this work. They have been used by cereal breeders to measure photosynthesis either of individual leaves, or of undisturbed crop canopies, and by breeders of many crops in the study of the translocation of the products of photosynthesis within the plant. They have also been used in studies of the effects of plant diseases on translocation patterns, thus identifying limiting factors for which the breeder should select. Radioactive tracers have also been used in estimating varietal differences in root growth and distribution, but the results obtained from such experiments have indicated that environmental differences are greater than those between genotypes. Differences in water uptake have, however, been demonstrated using the neutron probe, though these differences appear to be much influenced by differences in the water economy of the aerial parts. (author)

  19. Commercial applications of perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, R.N.

    1991-06-01

    Tracer technology can be successfully applied to many leak-checking and monitoring evaluations of operating systems (e.g., building HVACs), manufacturing processes and products (e.g., air conditioners), and subsurface components and systems (e.g., underground storage tanks). Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology is the most sensitive of all tracer technologies because the ambient background levels of the five (5) routinely-used PFTs are in the range of parts per 10 15 parts of air (i.e., parts per quadrillion-ppq) and this technology's instrumentation can measure down to those levels. The effectiveness of this technology is achieved both in terms of cost (very little PFT need to be used) and detectability; for example, very small leaks can be rapidly detected. The PFT compounds, which are environmentally and biologically safe to use, are commercially available as are the sampling and analysis instrumentation. This presentation concerns (1) the steps being taken to commercialize this technology, (2) new applications of processes currently under study, and (3) applications in areas of use that will be particularly beneficial to the environment. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J.; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M.; Klaesner, B.

    2011-01-01

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [ 18 F]Fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [ 18 F]Fluoromisonidazole ([ 18 F]FMISO) and [ 18 F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([ 18 F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [ 18 F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([ 18 F]FET) and [ 11 C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [ 68 Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [ 18 F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  1. Flexible tools for interpreting tracer measurements and recent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, M.; Stewart, M.

    2012-04-01

    Steady increase of groundwater abstraction and nitrate concentrations in groundwater due to agricultural and industrial practices is a major concern for groundwater availability and deterioration of groundwater quality in New Zealand. Studies on groundwater in the Waimea Plains (for example) have shown effects of nitrate input from both diffuse and point sources since 1940. Groundwaters in gravel aquifers under Christchurch have also been studied since 1970 to characterise their flowpaths and recharge sources. In these and other cases, the mixing of waters from different recharge sources following different flow paths can be determined with the use of various tracers and the future course of nitrate concentration in the groundwaters predicted. The input of radionuclides to hydrological systems from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s revealed that outflows from such systems often comprise mixtures of water with very wide ranges of ages. Many authors have described methods of deconvolving such outputs with the use of lumped parameter models (LPMs). LPMs are evaluated using specialized software or Excel spreadsheets to compute simulations to measurements of system outputs and therefore estimate parameters of the age distribution. Excel allows easy modification of the code to enable application to individual hydrological features and for a variety of isotopes and chemicals. For the New Zealand studies, Excel spreadsheets with coded Visual Basic functions are used to deduce age distributions based on stable isotope, SF6, CFCs, 3H and 14C data (in order of ages). In particular, 3H is becoming increasingly useful as an age tracer due to the decrease of ambiguity from nuclear testing provided that the measurements can be made with high accuracy (Stewart et al., 2012).These age distributions allow us to derive the input histories of chemicals (e.g. nitrate) and the groundwater recharge sources. In addition, recent developments in modelling groundwater flow and

  2. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of surface evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote geographic sources of surface evaporation for precipitation, based on the implementation of three-dimensional constituent tracers of regional water vapor sources (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. The major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In the WVT approach, each tracer is associated with an evaporative source region for a prognostic three-dimensional variable that represents a partial amount of the total atmospheric water vapor. The physical processes that act on a WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be predicted within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional sources, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In most North American continental regions, the local source of precipitation is

  3. Properties of an ideal PET perfusion tracer: new PET tracer cases and data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddahi, Jamshid

    2012-02-01

    An ideal positron emission tomography (PET) tracer should be highly extractable by the myocardium and able to provide high-resolution images, should enable quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF), should be compatible with both pharmacologically induced and exercise-induced stress imaging, and should not require an on-site cyclotron. The PET radionuclides nitrogen-13 ammonia and oxygen-15 water require an on-site cyclotron. Rubidium-82 may be available locally due to the generator source, but greater utilization is limited because of its relatively low myocardial extraction fraction, long positron range, and generator cost. Flurpiridaz F 18, a novel PET tracer in development, has a high-extraction fraction, short positron range, and relatively long half-life (as compared to currently available tracers), and may be produced at regional cyclotrons. Results of early clinical trials suggest that both pharmacologically and exercise-induced stress PET imaging protocols can be completed more rapidly and with lower patient radiation exposure than with single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) tracers. As compared to SPECT images in the same patients, flurpiridaz F 18 PET images showed better defect contrast. Flurpiridaz F 18 is a potentially promising tracer for assessment of myocardial perfusion, measurement of absolute MBF, calculation of coronary flow reserves, and assessment of cardiac function at the peak of the stress response.

  4. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-10-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error pixel-by-pixel normalization of tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach.

  5. Tracking tracer breakthrough in the hyporheic zone using time‐lapse DC resistivity, Crabby Creek, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Jonathan E.; Toran, Laura; Fang, Allison C.; Ryan, Robert J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the hyporheic zone is of critical importance for understanding stream ecology, contaminant transport, and groundwater‐surface water interaction. A salt water tracer test was used to probe the hyporheic zone of a recently re‐engineered portion of Crabby Creek, a stream located near Philadelphia, PA. The tracer solution was tracked through a 13.5 meter segment of the stream using both a network of 25 wells sampled every 5–15 minutes and time‐lapse electrical resistivity tomographs collected every 11 minutes for six hours, with additional tomographs collected every 100 minutes for an additional 16 hours. The comparison of tracer monitoring methods is of keen interest because tracer tests are one of the few techniques available for characterizing this dynamic zone, and logistically it is far easier to collect resistivity tomographs than to install and monitor a dense network of wells. Our results show that resistivity monitoring captured the essential shape of the breakthrough curve and may indicate portions of the stream where the tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone. Time‐lapse resistivity measurements, however, represent time averages over the period required to collect a tomographic data set, and spatial averages over a volume larger than captured by a well sample. Smoothing by the resistivity data inversion algorithm further blurs the resulting tomograph; consequently resistivity monitoring underestimates the degree of fine‐scale heterogeneity in the hyporheic zone.

  6. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach. PMID:25360349

  7. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  8. Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) applied to tracer studies and isotope dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Heck, H.d'A.; McReynolds, J.H.; St John, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The nonfragmenting nature of field ionization mass spectrometry makes it a preferred technique for the isotopic analysis of multilabeled organic compounds. The possibility of field ionization of nonvolatile thermolabile materials significantly extends the potential uses of this technique beyond those of conventional ionization methods. Multilabeled tracers may be studied in biological systems with a sensitivity comparable to that of radioactive tracers. Isotope dilution analysis may be performed reliably by this technique down to picogram levels. These techniques will be illustrated by a number of current studies using multilabeled metabolites and drugs. The scope and limitations of the methodology are discussed

  9. Dependence of tracer diffusion on atomic size in amorphous Ni-Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Averback, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Tracer diffusion coefficients for several impurities and Ni self-atoms were measured in amorphous (a-) Ni/sub 50/Zr/sub 50/ at 573 K using secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and radioactive tracer methods. The results showed that atomic mobility in the a-Ni-Zr alloy depends strongly on atomic size, decreasing rapidly with increasing atomic radius. This diffusion behavior is similar to that in α-Zr and α-Ti and is suggestive of an interstitial-like mechanism of diffusion. The consequences of these results for solid-state amorphization transformations are discussed

  10. Microscopic lymph node tumor burden quantified by macroscopic dual-tracer molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Barth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node biopsy (LNB) is employed in many cancer surgeries to identify metastatic disease and stage the cancer, yet morbidity and diagnostic delays associated with LNB could be avoided if non-invasive imaging of nodal involvement was reliable. Molecular imaging has potential in this regard; however, variable delivery and nonspecific uptake of imaging tracers has made conventional approaches ineffective clinically. A method of correcting for non-specific uptake with injection of a second untargeted tracer is presented, allowing tumor burden in lymph nodes to be quantified. The approach was confirmed in an athymic mouse model of metastatic human breast cancer targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, a cell surface receptor overexpressed by many cancers. A significant correlation was observed between in vivo (dual-tracer) and ex vivo measures of tumor burden (r = 0.97, p < 0.01), with an ultimate sensitivity of approximately 200 cells (potentially more sensitive than conventional LNB). PMID:25344739

  11. A risk index for characterising flow pattern in soils using dye tracer distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlather, Martin; Huwe, Bernd

    2005-09-01

    A novel risk index for the vulnerability of groundwater by pollutants is defined as the form parameter of the Pareto distribution and estimated from dye tracer experiments. The Pareto distribution appears as the limit distribution of the extreme value theory, which has been applied to an idealized model of drops that run along a path. The properties of the risk index are investigated by a Monte Carlo study, where the paths are modelled by means of Gaussian random fields. The method is applied to three profiles obtained from Brilliant Blue tracer experiments of the soil physics group at ETH Zurich. It is shown that a single profile can be rather well characterised by the risk index. However, due to the high variability of the dye tracer profiles, an estimated number of at least 15 profile pictures are necessary to characterise a soil.

  12. New tracers developed in positron emission tomography: a possible second breath in targeting tumour hypoxia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillet, G.; Groheux, D.; Barre, E.; Toubert, M.E.; Dechaud, C.; Teyton, P.; Moretti, J.L.; Le Beau de Hemricourt, E.

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing interest for targeting of tumor hypoxia and our paper aimed to emphasize the main points of this topic. We review new insights at cellular level and focus on the leading part of hypoxia inducible factor one alpha and its connections with angio genesis. We shortly describe different methods to assess tissue hypoxia then zoom on to positron emission tomography and its acknowledged tracers 18 F-fluoro misonidazole and 18 F-fluoro-erythro-nitroimidazole. Recent studies concerning two new promising tracers Cu(II)-di-acetyl-bis(N(4)-methyl-thio-semicarbazone) and FAZA are reviewed, and the respective value of the tracers is discussed. (N.C.)

  13. Development of Radon-222 as Natural Tracer for Monitoring the Remediation of NAPL in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian M. Davis; Lewis Semprini; Jonathan Istok

    2003-02-27

    Naturally occurring 222-radon in ground water can potentially be used as an in situ partitioning tracer to characterize dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) saturations. The static method involves comparing radon concentrations in water samples from DNAPL-contaminated and non-contaminated portions of an aquifer. During a push-pull test, a known volume of test solution (radon-free water containing a conservation tracer) is first injected (''pushed'') into a well; flow is then reversed and the test solution/groundwater mixture is extracted (''pulled'') from the same well. In the presence of NAPL radon transport is retarded relative to the conservative tracer. Assuming linear equilibrium partitioning, retardation factors for radon can be used to estimate NAPL saturations.The utility of this methodology was evaluated in laboratory and field settings.

  14. Atlantic Coast Unique Regional Atmospheric Tracer Experiment (ACURATE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.F.; Heffter, J.L.; Mead, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    The Atlantic Coast Unique Regional Atmospheric Tracer Experiment (ACURATE) is a program designed to obtain data necessary to evaluate atmospheric transport and diffusion models used to calculate regional population doses caused by nuclear facility emissions to the atmosphere. This experiment will significantly improve the basis for evaluating the cost effectiveness of different methods of managing airborne nuclear wastes. During the period from March 1982 through September 1982, twice daily air samples have been collected at each of five sampling stations located on a radial from the SRP to Murray Hill, NJ (1000 km). Kr-85 emitted from the F and H area chemical separations facilities is being used as a tracer to determine the transport and diffusion of atmospheric releases from the SRP. The Kr-85 concentrations in the air samples will be compared with the calculated concentrations as predicted by the transport and diffusion models. The Kr-85 data and the meteorological data are being archived and will be made available to the modeling community

  15. Simplification of complex kinetic models used for the quantitative analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance or radioactive tracer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, R.; Schuster, S.; Holzhuetter, H.-G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for simplifying the mathematical models describing the dynamics of tracers (e.g. 13 C, 31 P, 14 C, as used in NMR studies or radioactive tracer experiments) in (bio-)chemical reaction systems is presented. This method is appropriate in the cases where the system includes reactions, the rates of which differ by several orders of magnitude. The basic idea is to adapt the rapid-equilibrium approximation to tracer systems. It is shown with the aid of the Perron-Frobenius theorem that for tracer systems, the conditions for applicability of this approximation are satisfied whenever some reactions are near equilibrium. It turns out that the specific enrichments of all of the labelled atoms that are connected by fast reversible reactions can be grouped together as 'pool variables'. The reduced system contains fewer parameters and can, thus, be fitted more easily to experimental data. Moreover, the method can be employed for identifying non-equilibrium and near-equilibrium reactions from experimentally measured specific enrichments of tracer. The reduction algorithm is illustrated by studying a model of the distribution of 13 C-tracers in the pentose phosphate pathway. (author)

  16. Dual-TRACER: High resolution fMRI with constrained evolution reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuesong; Ma, Xiaodong; Li, Lyu; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xue; Tong, Yan; Wang, Lihong; Sen Song; Guo, Hua

    2018-01-01

    fMRI with high spatial resolution is beneficial for studies in psychology and neuroscience, but is limited by various factors such as prolonged imaging time, low signal to noise ratio and scarcity of advanced facilities. Compressed Sensing (CS) based methods for accelerating fMRI data acquisition are promising. Other advanced algorithms like k-t FOCUSS or PICCS have been developed to improve performance. This study aims to investigate a new method, Dual-TRACER, based on Temporal Resolution Acceleration with Constrained Evolution Reconstruction (TRACER), for accelerating fMRI acquisitions using golden angle variable density spiral. Both numerical simulations and in vivo experiments at 3T were conducted to evaluate and characterize this method. Results show that Dual-TRACER can provide functional images with a high spatial resolution (1×1mm 2 ) under an acceleration factor of 20 while maintaining hemodynamic signals well. Compared with other investigated methods, dual-TRACER provides a better signal recovery, higher fMRI sensitivity and more reliable activation detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetics of exchange of a tracer in soil and clay samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, J.C.; Facetti, J.F.

    1971-01-01

    The kinetics of exchange of a Na tracer in soil and clay samples, provides with a reliable and convenient method for the determination of the different soil fraction ahd their CEC values, In addition, the analysis of the exchanges curves can be used for the identification of the clay present in the soil

  18. Stability in time of iodinated tracers for Testosterone, Progesterone and cortisol radiommunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisembaum Alas, A.T.; Machado Curbelo, A.J.; Diaz Castro, D.; Chape Puertas, A.; Santander Lopez, A.M.; Cabrera Oliva, V.

    1996-01-01

    Stability in time of three iodihistamine derivates for steroid hormone radioimmunoassays (RIAs): Testosterone-3, Carboximetilxomine-histamine- 125I , Progesterone-11 Hemisuccinate-histamine- 125I and Cortisol-21 Hemisuccinate histamine- 125I produced in the National Institute of Endocrinology, Havana, Cuba was tested. Iodinated tracers were prepared according to Nars and Hunters's method, modifying in the purifying

  19. Double isotope method for the determination of catecholamines, serotonin, and other amines in the picomole range as their dansyl derivatives. [/sup 14/C and /sup 3/H tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recasens, M.; Zwiller, J.; Mack, G.; Zanetta, J.P.; Mandel, P.

    1977-09-01

    A method based on thin-layer chromatographic separation of radioactive products is described for the determination and the quantification of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), normetanephrine (NMN), and serotonin (5HT) in small samples of brain tissue. In this method the amines are converted to (/sup 14/C)dansyl derivatives by reaction with (/sup 14/C)dansyl chloride (/sup 14/C)Dans-Cl) and /sup 3/H-labeled amines are used as internal standards to determine variations in yield.

  20. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  1. Preparation of Plant 41Ca Tracer Samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Qing-zhang1;JANG Ping-ping3;LIN De-yu4;YANG Xian-lin1;DOU Liang1;PANG Yi-jun1;WANG Xiao-ming1;ZHANG Hui1,5;YANG Xu-ran1;WU Shao-yong1;GAO Dong-sheng2;LI Ling2;WANG Lei2;SUN Ke-peng2;ZHOU Jun2;DONG Ke-jun1;HE Ming1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the metabolism of plants and animals. In this paper, the preparation method of plant 41Ca for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS measurement was developed for the first time in China. AMS, with its advantages of high sensitivity, small dose of radioactivity, high accuracy, large measuring range, and long tracer cycle, can be used to measure cosmogenic nuclide 41Ca , which has long half-life. The intensity of the beam in ion source is an important parameter for the sensitivity of AMS measurement. The high beam current can improve the sensitivity of AMS. The preparation methods of plant samples of 41Ca tracer were systematically studied to obtain high beam current using wet, dry and a combining method with wet and dry re-fluoride. A reliable preparation procedure of plant samples for 41Ca tracer and its optimization parameters were determined by testing beam currents of various samples and lay a foundation for the 41Ca-AMS technology at plant tracer applications.

  2. Fourier analysis of multi-tracer cosmological surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Abramo, L. Raul; Secco, Lucas F.; Loureiro, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    We present optimal quadratic estimators for the Fourier analysis of cosmological surveys that detect several different types of tracers of large-scale structure. Our estimators can be used to simultaneously fit the matter power spectrum and the biases of the tracers - as well as redshift-space distortions (RSDs), non-Gaussianities (NGs), or any other effects that are manifested through differences between the clusterings of distinct species of tracers. Our estimators reduce to the one by Feld...

  3. Investigation of the sources and seasonal variations of secondary organic aerosols in PM2.5 in Shanghai with organic tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jialiang; Li, Man; Zhang, Pan; Gong, Shiyi; Zhong, Mian; Wu, Minghong; Zheng, Mei; Chen, Changhong; Wang, Hongli; Lou, Shengrong

    2013-11-01

    One hundred and forty seasonal PM2.5 samples were collected from January 2010 to January 2011 at one urban site and one suburban site simultaneously in a Chinese megacity, Shanghai, to study the concentrations and seasonal variation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Concentrations of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were determined together with organic and elemental carbons. Thirteen organic tracers, including the tracer for biomass burning and tracers for SOA from isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene and toluene, were measured. EC-based method, WSOC-based method, tracer-based method and PMF modeling were used to estimate the seasonal contributions of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in Shanghai, and the results from the different methods were compared and evaluated. Biomass burning was the major contributor to the measured WSOC in the autumn sampling period, while SOA was the major contributor in the other seasons. The concentrations of the SOA tracers in summer were obviously higher than that in other seasons. It was found that SOC estimated with the tracer-based method accounted for only a small part of the SOC from the WSOC-based method in Shanghai, especially for the winter and spring sampling periods. PMF results showed that a large part of the SOC was associated with sulfate and nitrate but not with the SOA tracers.

  4. Tracer Migration in a Radially Divergent Flow Field: Longitudinal Dispersivity and Anionic Tracer Retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, J.C., P.M. Bertsch, M. Wilson, J. Singer, F. Majs and S.A. Aburime

    2007-01-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion, the combined effects of chemical diffusion and differences in solute path length and flow velocity, is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive three-dimensional datasets exist for critically evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion, and the conservative nature of several commonly used groundwater tracers is still in question. Therefore, we conducted a series of field-scale experiments using tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sup 1}HO), bromide (Br{sup -}), and two fluorobenzoates (2,4 Di-FBA, 2,6 Di-FBA) as tracers in the water-table aquifer on the USDOE's Savannah River Site (SRS), located on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 h (56.7 L min{sup -1}) to establish a steady-state forced radial gradient before the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, which lasted from 256 to 560 min, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using nonlabeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using six multilevel monitoring wells, radially spaced at approximate distances of 2.0, 3.0, and 4.5 m from the central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were pumped continuously ({approx}0.1 L min{sup -1}) throughout the course of the experiments. Longitudinal dispersivity ({alpha}{sub L}) and travel times for {sup 3}H{sup 1}HO breakthrough were estimated by fitting the field data to analytical approximations of the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) for uniform and radial flow conditions. Dispersivity varied greatly between wells located at similar transport distances and even between zones within a given well, which we attributed to variability in the hydraulic conductivity at the study site. The radial flow equation generally described tritium breakthrough better than the

  5. Performance Testing of Tracer Gas and Tracer Aerosol Detectors for use in Radionuclide NESHAP Compliance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lattin, Rebecca Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-28

    The Rad-NESHAP program, part of the Air Quality Compliance team of LANL’s Compliance Programs group (EPC-CP), and the Radiation Instrumentation & Calibration team, part of the Radiation Protection Services group (RP-SVS), frequently partner on issues relating to characterizing air flow streams. This memo documents the most recent example of this partnership, involving performance testing of sulfur hexafluoride detectors for use in stack gas mixing tests. Additionally, members of the Rad-NESHAP program performed a functional trending test on a pair of optical particle counters, comparing results from a non-calibrated instrument to a calibrated instrument. Prior to commissioning a new stack sampling system, the ANSI Standard for stack sampling requires that the stack sample location must meet several criteria, including uniformity of tracer gas and aerosol mixing in the air stream. For these mix tests, tracer media (sulfur hexafluoride gas or liquid oil aerosol particles) are injected into the stack air stream and the resulting air concentrations are measured across the plane of the stack at the proposed sampling location. The coefficient of variation of these media concentrations must be under 20% when evaluated over the central 2/3 area of the stack or duct. The instruments which measure these air concentrations must be tested prior to the stack tests in order to ensure their linear response to varying air concentrations of either tracer gas or tracer aerosol. The instruments used in tracer gas and aerosol mix testing cannot be calibrated by the LANL Standards and Calibration Laboratory, so they would normally be sent off-site for factory calibration by the vendor. Operational requirements can prevent formal factory calibration of some instruments after they have been used in hazardous settings, e.g., within a radiological facility with potential airborne contamination. The performance tests described in this document are intended to demonstrate the reliable

  6. Tracer tests on furnaces at Metalloys Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Wedepohl, A.

    1983-01-01

    During 1980, thirteen double tests were carried out with five radioactive isotopes on three furnaces at Metalloys Limited, near Meyerton. Each double test involved the introduction of a sample of coke impregnated with lanthanum and a sample of irradiated manganese ore ( 54 Mn or 59 Fe), irradiated quartzite ( 46 Sc), or irradiated coal ( 46 Sc, 59 Fe, and 60 Co). The tests were conducted on the three large furnaces for the production of high-carbon ferromanganese, viz M10, M11, and M12. The radioactivity of samples of the metal and the slag leaving the furnace was measured by the Isotopes and Activation Division of the Atomic Energy Board (AEB). Response curves and computer analyses are presented on the elution of the tracers from the furnaces. The response curves for the tracers, which were inserted close to the electrodes, are discussed so that the salient differences between their passage through the three furnaces can be established. The results obtained give support to the findings of a dig-out carried out on furnace M10 during 1977. The metal and slag products of furnace M12 were subjected to mineralogical investigation so that the major phases in the furnace products could be determined. Details of the calculation of the mean residence time for material in furnace M12 are given in an appendix

  7. The ATLAS DDM Tracer monitoring framework

    CERN Document Server

    ZANG, D; The ATLAS collaboration; BARISITS, M; LASSNIG, M; Andrew STEWART, G; MOLFETAS, A; BEERMANN, T

    2012-01-01

    The DDM Tracer Service is aimed to trace and monitor the atlas file operations on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. The volume of traces has increased significantly since the service started in 2009. Now there are about ~5 million trace messages every day and peaks of greater than 250Hz, with peak rates continuing to climb, which gives the current service structure a big challenge. Analysis of large datasets based on on-demand queries to the relational database management system (RDBMS), i.e. Oracle, can be problematic, and have a significant effect on the database's performance. Consequently, We have investigated some new high availability technologies like messaging infrastructure, specifically ActiveMQ, and key-value stores. The advantages of key value store technology are that they are distributed and have high scalability; also their write performances are usually much better than RDBMS, all of which are very useful for the Tracer service. Indexes and distributed counters have been also tested to improve...

  8. Analysis of Cell Metabolism Using LC-MS and Isotope Tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Gillian M; Zheng, Liang; van den Broek, Niels J F; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Here we discuss our methods to analyze small polar compounds involved in central carbon metabolism using LC-MS. Methods described include sample extraction procedures for cells and medium, as well as for plasma/serum, urine, CSF, and tissue samples. Different extraction solvents are assessed. Our methods for using (13)C stable isotope tracers to examine the kinetics and distributions of mass isotopologues of many metabolites are discussed. Quantification methods are described for (13)C stable isotope tracer experiments as well as for unlabeled experiments. These methods were applied in a fumarate hydratase deficient cell model to show how isotope tracing can demonstrate shifts in metabolic pathways and, together with metabolite exchange rates, can be used to gain insights into changes in cell metabolism. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tracer gas evaluations of push-pull ventilation system performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A push-pull ventilation system is effective for hazardous material exhaustion. Although a push-pull ventilation system has advantages over a local exhaust hood, some laborious adjustments are required. The pertinence of the adjustments is uncertain because it is difficult to evaluate the performance of a push-pull ventilation system quantitatively. In this study, a measurement of the capture efficiency of a push-pull ventilation system was carried out by means of a tracer gas method. The capture efficiency decreased to 39.3-78.5% when blockage material, a dummy worker and a cross draft, were set in the ventilation zone, but the efficiency was 95.1-97.9% when the cross draft was stopped. The results suggest that the uniform flow of a push-pull ventilation system will detour a blockage and the performance of the system will not be reduced unless a cross draft disturbs the uniform flow.

  10. Investigation of coal hydrogenation using dueterium as an isopic tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showronski, R.P.; Heredy, L.A.; Ratto, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanisms of coal hydrogenation are described which were investigated by using a deuterium tracer method. A hydrogenation index and exchange index were formulated to measure the amount of deuterium incorporated due to hydrogenation and exchange reactions. In the coal-deuterium system, deuterium incorporation was found to vary both with product fraction and with structural position. The deuterium contents of the fractions from donor solvent experiments were essentially uniform, but did show preferential deuterium incorporation with respect to structural position. Important information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanism in the donor solvent system. Results indicate that not only hydrogen donation but also hydrogen exchange involving the alpha-positions of tetralin can have a significant role in stabilizing the fragments that form during the thermal decomposition of the coal. Evidence was obtained that there is also a direct route for deuterium incorporation into the coal products from the gas phase without the participation of tetralin

  11. Varying dilaton as a tracer of classical string interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Matthew; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2017-09-01

    We analyze tree-level string amplitudes in a linear dilaton background, motivated by its use as a gauge-invariant tracer of string interactions in scattering experiments and its genericity among simple perturbative string theory limits. A simple case is given by a lightlike dependence for the dilaton. The zero mode of the embedding coordinate in the direction of dilaton variation requires special care. Employing Gaussian wave packets and a well-defined modification of the dilaton profile far from the dominant interaction region, we obtain finite results which explicitly reproduce the interaction time scales expected from joining and splitting interactions involving oscillating strings in simple string scattering processes. There is an interesting interplay between the effects of the linear dilaton and the i ɛ prescription. In more general circumstances this provides a method for tracing the degree of nonlocality in string interactions, and it gives a basis for further studies of perturbative supercritical string theory at higher loop order.

  12. Tracer gas dispersion in ducts-study of a new compact device using arrays of sonic micro jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.R. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial (INETI), Lisboa (Portugal); Afonso, C.F. [Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto Departmento de Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Porto (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    One of the most feasible ways to measure duct airflows is by tracer gas techniques, especially for complex situations when the duct lengths are short as well as their access, which makes extremely difficult or impossible other methods to be implemented. One problem associated with the implementation of tracer gas technique when the ducts lengths are short is due to the impossibility of achieving complete mixing of the tracer with airflow and its sampling. In this work, the development of a new device for the injection of tracer gas in ducts is discussed as well as a new tracer-sampling device. The developed injection device has a compact tubular shape, with magnetic fixation to be easy to apply in duct walls. An array of sonic micro jets in counter current direction, with the possibility of angular movement according to its main axle ensures a complete mixing of the tracer in very short distances. The tracer-sampling device, with a very effective integration function, feeds the sampling system for analysis. Both devices were tested in a wind tunnel of approximately 21 m total length. The tests distances between injection and integration device considered were: X/Dh = 22; X/Dh = 4; X/Dh 2; and X/Dh = 1. For very short distances of X/Dh = 2 and X/Dh = 1, semi-empirical expressions were needed. A good reproducibility of airflow rate values was obtained. These preliminary tests showed that the practical implementation of tracer gas techniques in HVAC systems for measuring airflow rates with a very short mixing distance is possible with the devices developed. (author)

  13. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Eric D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Barrow, James C; Williams, David L; Hargreaves, Richard J; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J

    2011-11-01

    An (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood-brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with (18)F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. [(18)F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC(50)=10.5±1.3 nM). [(18)F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radioiodinated cholesteryl ester analogs as residualizing tracers of lipoproteins disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeForge, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the importance of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, efforts were made to incorporate 125 I-cholesteryl iopanoate ( 125 I-CI), a residualizing cholesteryl ester (CE) analog, into the lipid core of LDL. This preparation is potentially useful as a scintigraphically detectable tracer of LDL uptake into atheroma and tissues such as the adrenal and liver. Initial studies using a cholesterol-fed rabbit model of atherosclerosis validated the use of 125 I-CI as a tracer of CE deposition. However, scintigraphy revealed considerable nonspecific 125 I-CI uptake due to tissue cholesterol loading. An alternative animal model was the guinea pig, which responds moderately to cholesterol feeding and carries the plasma cholesterol predominantly as LDL. Dietary fat and cholesterol, coupled with chronic aortic injury caused by an indwelling catheter, resulted in lipid containing, smooth muscle cell proliferative lesions in many animals. However, further studies are necessary to fully characterize this model. In additional studies, in vitro methods for incorporating 125 I-CI into LDL were examined. These included a reconstitution procedure described by Krieger et al. and a procedure involving incubation of detergent (Tween 20)-solubilized 125 I-CI with plasma. Although both LDL preparations were taken up normally by cultured fibroblasts, the plasma clearance rate of reconstituted LDL was markedly abnormal in guinea pigs. In contrast, LDL labeled by the detergent method cleared from the plasma identically to a radioiodinated LDL control. Therefore, this latter procedure was also used to incorporate two novel radioiodinated cholesteryl ether analogs 125 I-CI cholesteryl m-iodobenzyl ether [ 125 I-CIDE] and 125 I-cholesteryl 12-(miodophenyl)dodecyl ether [ 125 I-CIDE] into LDL

  15. On the linearity of tracer bias around voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollina, Giorgia; Hamaus, Nico; Dolag, Klaus; Weller, Jochen; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro

    2017-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe can be observed only via luminous tracers of the dark matter. However, the clustering statistics of tracers are biased and depend on various properties, such as their host-halo mass and assembly history. On very large scales, this tracer bias results in a constant offset in the clustering amplitude, known as linear bias. Towards smaller non-linear scales, this is no longer the case and tracer bias becomes a complicated function of scale and time. We focus on tracer bias centred on cosmic voids, I.e. depressions of the density field that spatially dominate the Universe. We consider three types of tracers: galaxies, galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei, extracted from the hydrodynamical simulation Magneticum Pathfinder. In contrast to common clustering statistics that focus on auto-correlations of tracers, we find that void-tracer cross-correlations are successfully described by a linear bias relation. The tracer-density profile of voids can thus be related to their matter-density profile by a single number. We show that it coincides with the linear tracer bias extracted from the large-scale auto-correlation function and expectations from theory, if sufficiently large voids are considered. For smaller voids we observe a shift towards higher values. This has important consequences on cosmological parameter inference, as the problem of unknown tracer bias is alleviated up to a constant number. The smallest scales in existing data sets become accessible to simpler models, providing numerous modes of the density field that have been disregarded so far, but may help to further reduce statistical errors in constraining cosmology.

  16. Development of [18F]afatinib as new TKI-PET tracer for EGFR positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobbe, Paul; Windhorst, Albert D.; Walsum, Marijke Stigter-van; Schuit, Robert C.; Smit, Egbert F.; Niessen, Heiko G.; Solca, Flavio; Stehle, Gerd; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van; Poot, Alex J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Afatinib is an irreversible ErbB family blocker that was approved for the treatment of EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer in 2013. Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18 labeled afatinib provides a means to obtain improved understanding of afatinib tumor disposition in vivo. PET imaging with [ 18 F]afatinib may also provide a method to select treatment responsive patients. The aim of this study was to label afatinib with fluorine-18 and evaluate its potential as TKI-PET tracer in tumor bearing mice. Methods: A radiochemically novel coupling, using peptide coupling reagent BOP, was explored and optimized to synthesize [ 18 F]afatinib, followed by a metabolite analysis and biodistribution studies in two clinically relevant lung cancer cell lines, xenografted in nude mice. Results: A reliable [ 18 F]afatinib radiosynthesis was developed and the tracer could be produced in yields of 17.0 ± 2.5% calculated from [ 18 F]F − and >98% purity. The identity of the product was confirmed by co-injection on HPLC with non-labeled afatinib. Metabolite analysis revealed a moderate rate of metabolism, with >80% intact tracer in plasma at 45 min p.i. Biodistribution studies revealed rapid tumor accumulation and good retention for a period of at least 2 hours, while background tissues showed rapid clearance of the tracer. Conclusion: We have developed a method to synthesize [ 18 F]afatinib and related fluorine-18 labeled 4-anilinoquinazolines. [ 18 F]Afatinib showed good stability in vivo, justifying further evaluation as a TKI-PET tracer

  17. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  18. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  19. Sci-Fri AM: Imaging - 09: Serial estimation of cross-talk for correction in dual-isotope imaging with dynamic tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R G; Lockwood, J; Wei, L; Duan, D; Fernando, P; Bensimon, C; Ruddy, T D

    2012-07-01

    The recent radioisotope shortage has led to interest in non-Tc99m-based tracers. We have developed a novel I-123-labelled myocardial perfusion imaging tracer. We compare the I123-tracer to the clinical standard of Tc99m tetrofosmin in vivo in a rat model using a small-animal SPECT/CT camera. SPECT distinguishes different isotopes based on the different energies of the emitted gamma rays and thus allows simultaneous comparison of two tracer distributions in the same animal. Dual-isotope imaging is complicated by cross-talk between the energy windows of the isotopes. Standard energy-window-based correction methods are difficult to employ because of the proximity in energy of Tc99m (140keV) and I123 (159keV). Imaging the second tracer's energy window prior to its injection provides an estimate of the cross-talk. However, this estimate is only accurate if the tracer distribution is static. We use serial imaging prior to the introduction of the second tracer to estimate the dynamics of the first tracer and interpolate the cross-talk images to provide a more accurate correction. We used rat models of myocardial disease (n=3). I123 tracer was injected and imaged for one hour at 20min intervals. The Tc99m tetrofosmin was then injected and 30min later, a dual-isotope image was obtained. The impact of this approach is assessed by comparing the differences in the Tc99m-tetrofosmin image using this method with correction by simple correction for physical decay. The interpolative approach improves the accuracy of the correction by 2%-5% and thereby enhances the comparison of the two tracers. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  1. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling radioactive tracer material to use protective gloves and, if required by the license, other protective clothing and...

  2. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  3. Lymphatic mapping with tracer administration into the primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieweg, O. E.; Estourgie, S. H.; Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Rutgers, E. J. Th; Hoefnagel, C. A.; Kroon, B. B. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate over the best tracer injection technique in lymphatic mapping for breast cancer. The technique of low tracer volume administration into the primary breast cancer is presented. The reasons that led to this approach are explained as well as its advantages. Excision of

  4. Urban Pollutant Transport and Infiltration into Buildings Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Matthews

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available People spend the majority of their time indoors and therefore the quality of indoor air is worthy of investigation; indoor air quality is affected by indoor sources of pollutants and from pollutants entering buildings from outdoors. In this study, unique perfluorocarbon tracers were released in five experiments at a 100 m and ~2 km distance from a large university building in Manchester, UK and tracer was also released inside the building to measure the amount of outdoor material penetrating into buildings and the flow of material within the building itself. Air samples of the tracer were taken in several rooms within the building, and a CO2 tracer was used within the building to estimate air-exchange rates. Air-exchange rates were found to vary between 0.57 and 10.90 per hour. Indoor perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were paired to outdoor tracer concentrations, and in-out ratios were found to vary between 0.01 and 3.6. The largest room with the lowest air-exchange rate exhibited elevated tracer concentrations for over 60 min after the release had finished, but generally had the lowest concentrations, the room with the highest ventilation rates had the highest concentration over 30 min, but the peak decayed more rapidly. Tracer concentrations indoors compared to outdoors imply that pollutants remain within buildings after they have cleared outside, which must be considered when evaluating human exposure to outdoor pollutants.

  5. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  6. Atmospheric tracer experiments for regional dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffter, J.L.; Ferber, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tracer experiments are being conducted to verify atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations at distances from tens to hundreds of km from pollutant sources. In one study, a 2 1/2 year sampling program has been carried out at 13 sites located 30 to 140 km from a source of 85 Kr at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Average weekly concentrations as well as twice-daily concentrations were obtained. Sampling data and meteorological data, including surface, tower, and rawinsonde observations are available on magnetic tape for model verification studies. Some verification results for the Air Resources Laboratories Atmospheric Transort and Dispersion Model (ARL-ATAD) are shown for averaging periods from one week to two years

  7. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-01-01

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H - , H + , and D + ). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H - cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes

  8. Rate equations for tracer studies in recirculatinng reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The employment of isotopic tracers is a useful technique for gaining insight into the rate controlling steps of a complex chemical reaction such as is frequently encountered in heterogeneous catalysis. An effective procedure has been to superpose tracer transfer on a reaction which is occurring under steady state conditions. If tracer transfer is employed in this fashion it is often possible to assess the individual step velocities in an assumed reaction mechanism. If transient transfer of tracer is now introduced it is possible in addition to estimate surface concentrations of chemisorbed species. The purpose of the present paper is to present the mathematical relationships involved when transfer of the tracer is not differential in the investigation. For this purpose a simple example is chosen to illustrate the various possibilities involved. (auth.)

  9. 3-D migration experiment - report 2: Instrumentation and tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelin, H.; Birgersson, L.; Gidlund, J.

    1987-11-01

    This report is one of the four reports describing the Stripa 3D experiment where water and tracer flow has been monitored in a specially excavated drift in the Stripa mine. The experiment was performed in a specially excavated drift at the 360 m level in granite. The whole ceiling and upper part of the walls were covered with more than 350 individual plastic sheets where the water flow into the drift could be collected. 11 different tracers were injected at distances between 11 and 50 m from the ceiling of the drift. The flow rate and tracer monitoring was kept up for more than two years. The tracer breakthrough curves and flow rate distributions were used to study the flow paths, velocities, hydraulic conductivities, dispersivities and channeling effects in the rock. The report describes the instrumentation developed and used as well as the tracers that were tested and used in the experiment. (orig.)

  10. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  11. Dual tracer imaging of SPECT and PET probes in living mice using a sequential protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sarah E; Diener, Justin M; Sasser, Todd A; Correcher, Carlos; González, Antonio J; Avermaete, Tony Van; Leevy, W Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, multimodal imaging strategies have motivated the fusion of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) scans with an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image to provide anatomical information, as well as a framework with which molecular and functional images may be co-registered. Recently, pre-clinical nuclear imaging technology has evolved to capture multiple SPECT or multiple PET tracers to further enhance the information content gathered within an imaging experiment. However, the use of SPECT and PET probes together, in the same animal, has remained a challenge. Here we describe a straightforward method using an integrated trimodal imaging system and a sequential dosing/acquisition protocol to achieve dual tracer imaging with (99m)Tc and (18)F isotopes, along with anatomical CT, on an individual specimen. Dosing and imaging is completed so that minimal animal manipulations are required, full trimodal fusion is conserved, and tracer crosstalk including down-scatter of the PET tracer in SPECT mode is avoided. This technique will enhance the ability of preclinical researchers to detect multiple disease targets and perform functional, molecular, and anatomical imaging on individual specimens to increase the information content gathered within longitudinal in vivo studies.

  12. Tracers for fluorescence-guided surgery: how elongation of the polymethine chain in cyanine dyes alters the pharmacokinetics of a (bimodal) c[RGDyK] tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van Willigen, Danny M; Spa, Silvia J; Hensbergen, Albertus W; van der Wal, Steffen; de Korne, Clarize M; Welling, Mick M; van der Poel, Henk G; Hardwick, James C H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2018-02-15

    Objectives: The potential of (receptor-mediated) fluorescence-based image-guided surgery tracers is generally linked to the near-infrared emission profile and good manufacturing production (GMP) availability of fluorescent dyes. Surprisingly, little is known about the critical interaction between the structural composition of the dye and the pharmacokinetics of the tracers. In this study, a bimodal/hybrid tracer design was used to systematically and quantitatively evaluate the influence of elongation of the polymethine chain in a fluorescent cyanine (Cy) dye on the imaging potential of a targeted (RGD-based) tracer. Methods: As model system, the integrin marker ανβ3 was targeted using c[RGDyK] vectors functionalized with a ( 111 In-)DTPA chelate and a fluorescent dye (Cy3-(SO3)Methyl-COOH (λem 580nm), Cy5-(SO3)Methyl-COOH (λem 680nm), or Cy7-(SO3)Methyl-COOH (λem 780nm)). Tracers were analyzed for differences in (photo-) physical properties, serum protein binding, chemical/optical stability and signal penetration through tissue. Receptor affinities (KD) were evaluated using saturation and competition experiments. In vivo biodistribution (SPECT imaging and percentage injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g)) was assessed in tumor-bearing mice and complimented with in- and ex vivo fluorescence images obtained using a clinical grade multispectral fluorescence laparoscope. Results: Two carbon-atom-step variations in the polymethine chain of the fluorescent Cy-dyes were shown to significantly influence the chemical and photophysical characteristics e.g. stability, brightness and tissue penetration of the hybrid RGD-tracers. Herein DTPA-Cy5-(SO3)Methyl-COOH-c[RGDyK] systematically outperformed its Cy3- and Cy7- derivatives. Radioactivity-based evaluation of in vivo tracer pharmacokinetics yielded the lowest non-specific uptake and highest tumor-to-background ratio (T/B) for DTPA-Cy5-(SO3)Methyl-COOH-c[RGDyK] (13.2 ± 1.7), with the Cy3- and Cy7- analogs trailing at

  13. Contribution of natural tracers for understanding transfers through argillaceous formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensenouci, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study is part of a research programme conducted by IRSN on the safety of deep geological disposal of high level and intermediate long-lived radioactive wastes. It more especially concerns the geological medium considered as a full component of the multi-barrier concept proposed by Andra for a deep repository. Indeed, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of the Paris Basin, in the east of France, is being investigated by Andra as a potential host rock for this repository. Performance assessment of this natural barrier is based on the knowledge of its confinement properties and therefore on phenomena possibly involved in the mass transport of radionuclides. In this context, this work aimed at studying the distribution of tracers naturally present in pore waters obtained from boreholes having crossed Mesozoic sedimentary series involving impervious and compacted clay rocks in the East (Andra borehole, EST433) and south of France (IRSN boreholes). Radial diffusion and vapour exchange methods were used to calculate the concentrations and diffusion parameters of the studied tracers. In Tournemire formations, the different profiles describe a curved shapes attributed to a diffusive exchange between the argillite pore water and the surrounding aquifers. Concerning the Mesozoic formations crossed by EST433, the study of the different profiles confirms the diffusion as the dominant transport mechanism in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, and permits identifying the transport processes in the whole studied column from the Oxfordian formations down to the Liassic one. This study also helps to identify the Liassic formations as a major source of salinity of the Dogger aquifer

  14. Tracer migration experiments in the Stripa mine 1980-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, L.; Widen, H.; Aagren, T.; Neretnieks, I.

    1992-05-01

    During more than 10 years, tracer experiments have been performed in the Stripa mine as part of the Stripa project to investigate the properties of both 'average' fractured rock and fracture zones. Experiments have been performed that have ranged from a few decimeters, to examine the diffusion into the rock matrix, up to tracer migration to a drift more than 50 meters from the injection point. This report compiles the results and experience that have been gained from all these tracer experiments. The experiments that are described in this report are: * The in-situ diffusion experiment where simultaneous flow and diffusion of tracers in undisturbed rock were studied over more than 3 years to validate diffusivities obtained under laboratory conditions. * Migration in a single fracture where water flow distribution and tracer transport were studied using both conservative and sorbing tracers over migration distances up to 10 meters. * The 3-D migration experiment where water inflow and tracer transport to a drift covered with 350 plastic sheet were investigated to get information on flow porosity, dispersion and channeling. The transport distances were between 10 and 56 meters from the injection points to the drift. * The channeling experiments in which the aim was to examine the channeling properties of single fractures in detail. Pressure pulse tests and tracer experiments were performed over a distances of 2 meters. * The tracer migration experiment in the validation drift where the tracer were injected mainly in a fracture zone and the collection was inside both a drift covered with plastic sheets similar to in the 3-D experiment as well as in a borehole. The distances between injection and sampling location were between 10 and 25 meters. (57 refs.) (au)

  15. Imaging regional renal function parameters using radionuclide tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yi

    A compartmental model is given for evaluating kidney function accurately and noninvasively. This model is cast into a parallel multi-compartment structure and each pixel region (picture element) of kidneys is considered as a single kidney compartment. The loss of radionuclide tracers from the blood to the kidney and from the kidney to the bladder are modelled in great detail. Both the uptake function and the excretion function of the kidneys can be evaluated pixel by pixel, and regional diagnostic information on renal function is obtained. Gamma Camera image data are required by this model and a screening test based renal function measurement is provided. The regional blood background is subtracted from the kidney region of interest (ROI) and the kidney regional rate constants are estimated analytically using the Kuhn-Pucker multiplier method in convex programming by considering the input/output behavior of the kidney compartments. The detailed physiological model of the peripheral compartments of the system, which is not available for most radionuclide tracers, is not required in the determination of the kidney regional rate constants and the regional blood background factors within the kidney ROI. Moreover, the statistical significance of measurements is considered to assure the improved statistical properties of the estimated kidney rate constants. The relations between various renal function parameters and the kidney rate constants are established. Multiple renal function measurements can be found from the renal compartmental model. The blood radioactivity curve and the regional (or total) radiorenogram determining the regional (or total) summed behavior of the kidneys are obtained analytically with the consideration of the statistical significance of measurements using convex programming methods for a single peripheral compartment system. In addition, a new technique for the determination of 'initial conditions' in both the blood compartment and the kidney

  16. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning; Welche neuen PET-Tracer braucht die Strahlentherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Klaesner, B. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [{sup 18}F]Fluorothymidine ([{sup 18}F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [{sup 18}F]Fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO) and [{sup 18}F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([{sup 18}F]FET) and [{sup 11}C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [{sup 18}F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  17. Isotopic tracers of sources, wells and of CO2 reactivity in geological reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assayag, N.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this research works consisted in studying the behaviour of the carbonate system (dissolved inorganic carbon: DIC) following a CO 2 injection (artificial or natural), in geological reservoirs. One part of the study consisted in improving an analytical protocol for the measurement of δ 13 C DIC and DIC, using a continuous flow mass spectrometer. As a first study, we have focused our attention on the Pavin Lake (Massif Central, France). Owing to its limnologic characteristics (meromictic lake) and a deep volcanic CO 2 contribution, it can be viewed as a natural analogue of reservoir storing important quantities of CO 2 in the bottom part. Isotopic measurements (δ 18 O, δ 13 C DIC) allowed to better constrain the dynamics of the lake (stratification, seasonal variations), the magnitudes of biological activities (photosynthesis, organic matter decay, methane oxidation, methano-genesis), carbon sources (magmatic, methano-genetic), and the hydrological budgets (sub-lacustrine inputs). The second study was conducted on the Lamont-Doherty test well site (NY, USA). It includes an instrumental borehole which cuts through most of the section of the Palisades sill and into the Newark Basin sediments. Single well push-pull tests were performed: a test solution containing conservative tracers and a reactive tracer (CO 2 ) was injected at a permeable depth interval located in basaltic and meta sedimentary rocks. After an incubation period, the test solution/groundwater mixture was extracted from the hydraulically isolated zone. Isotopic measurements (δ 18 O, δ 13 C DIC) confronted to chemical data (major elements) allowed to investigate the extent of in-situ CO 2 -water-rock interactions: essentially calcite dissolution and at a lesser extend silicate dissolution...and for one of the test, CO 2 degassing. (author)

  18. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 2. Tracer tests in the block scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peter; Byegaard, Johan; Winberg, Anders

    2002-05-01

    The tracer test programme of the TRUE Block Scale Project involved 14 tracer tests campaigns, including performance of 32 tracer injections in 16 different combinations of source and sink sections (flow paths) varying in length between 10 to 130 metres, and involving one or more structures. Average, travel times varied between 1.5 and >2000 hours. Tracer dilution tests performed in conjunction with cross-hole hydraulic pumping tests were found to be a very important part of the pre-tests, where the results were used to identify and screen among possible injection points, and to verify the hydrostructural model valid at a given time. The main problem faced in the block scale tests was to select a test geometry, which gave a sufficiently high mass recovery, and at the same time enabled performance of cross-hole sorbing tracer tests within reasonable time frames. Three different injection methods were applied during the test programme; decaying pulse, finite pulse and forced pulse (unequal dipole). During the later phases of the tracer test programme it was identified that forced injection had to be employed in order to enable detection of tracer at the sink due to strong dilution, and also to avoid problems with artificially induced tailing in the injection signal. Sorbing (reactive) tracers were selected among the radioactive isotopes of the alkali and alkaline earth metals previously used in the TRUE- 1 experiments. It was decided that at least one slightly sorbing tracer and one strongly sorbing tracer should be used in each injection. Non-sorbing tracers were used for conservative reference, e.g., 82 Br - , 186 ReO 4 , HTO (tritiated water) and 131 I - . In two of the injections the radioactive non-sorbing tracers were rather short-lived and Uranine and Naphthionate were used as complementary conservative tracers. Surface distribution coefficients, K a , were evaluated from TRUE-1 and TRUE Block Scale data, making use of the retardation noted in the injection

  19. Analysis of anthropogenic CO2 signal in ICARTT using a regional chemical transport model and observed tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.E.; Carmichael, G.R.; Tang, Y.; Chai, T.; Stanier, C.O.; Schnoor, J.L.; Vay, S.A.; Choi, Y.H.; Sachse, G.W.; Singh, H.B.; Woo, J.; Vukovich, J.M.; Streets, D.G.; Huey, L.G.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 inversion studies infer surface sources and sinks from observations and models. These studies usually require determination of the fossil fuel component of the observation, which can be estimated using anthropogenic tracers such as CO. The objective of this study is to demonstrate a new CO tracer method that accounts for overlapping forest fire and photochemical CO influences, and to quantify several aspects of the uncertainty in the CO tracer technique. Photochemistry model results and observations from the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation experiment are used to quantify changes in the fossil fuel CO 2 prediction from the CO tracer method with and without the inclusion of CO from biomass burning and photochemistry. Although the chemical sources and sinks tend to offset each other, there are regions where the chemical reactions change fossil fuel CO 2 predictions by up to ±4 ppm. Including biomass burning lowers fossil fuel CO 2 by an average of 12 ppm in plumes heavily influenced by long-range transport of forest fire CO. An alternate fossil fuel CO 2 calculation is done in a power plant plume using SO 2 as a tracer, giving a change in 20 ppm from the CO method, indicative of uncertainty in the assumed CO:CO 2 ratio

  20. Nontargeted elucidation of metabolic pathways using stable-isotope tracers and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M; Kelleher, Joanne K; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2010-08-01

    Systems level tools for the quantitative analysis of metabolic networks are required to engineer metabolism for biomedical and industrial applications. While current metabolomics techniques enable high-throughput quantification of metabolites, these methods provide minimal information on the rates and connectivity of metabolic pathways. Here we present a new method, nontargeted tracer fate detection (NTFD), that expands upon the concept of metabolomics to solve the above problems. Through the combined use of stable isotope tracers and chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, our computational analysis enables the quantitative detection of all measurable metabolites derived from a specific labeled compound. Without a priori knowledge of a reaction network or compound library, NTFD provides information about relative flux magnitudes into each metabolite pool by determining the mass isotopomer distribution for all labeled compounds. This novel method adds a new dimension to the metabolomics tool box and provides a framework for global analysis of metabolic fluxes.

  1. Principles of the tracer method in assessing regional blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potchen, E.J.; Siegel, B.; Meidinger, R.

    1972-01-01

    The standard brain scan is abnormal when there is relative increase in blood volume or when there is an abnormal permeability to substances which normally cannot enter the brain tissue. The usual mechanism of abnormal permeability is based upon neovascularity in tissues which do not maintain the tight junctions one sees in the normal brain endothelium. These tight junctions prohibit the leakage of materials from the intra- to extravascular space, and when they are not available many materials can readily transit into the abnormal tissue substance and can therefore be discerned on a standard brain scan. In many instances, however, there is no gross breakdown in this blood-brain barrier, but more subtle derangement may be detected by determining changes in regional brain blood volume or the relative volume of distribution of various labeled materials. We have studied whether or not we can discern differences in brain spaces of two isotopes in experimental situations where the brain scan would be normal. For these models, we have used water-induced brain edema and triethyl-tin-induced brain edema in the experimental animal. In water intoxication, there is no difference in the microvascular anatomy or change in the 99 /sup m/Tc pertechnetate space, but it is apparent from our studies that the brain swells at the expense of brain blood volume and by measuring brain blood volume against brain mass, i.e., transit of 131 I antipyrine versus 51 Cr labeled red cells, one can detect brain edema in a situation where the brain scan would be normal. It is these approaches with cameras and computers using dual energies that may afford a more simplified estimation of altered regional brain function than is now available with the internal carotid injection technique. (U.S.)

  2. Quantitative extraction of organic tracer compounds from ambient particulate matter collected on polymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinyue; Alexandrova, Olga A; Herckes, Pierre; Allen, Jonathan O

    2009-05-15

    Organic compounds in ambient particulate matter (PM) samples are used as tracers for PM source apportionment. These PM samples are collected using high volume samplers; one such sampler is an impactor in which polyurethane foam (PUF) and polypropylene foam (PPF) are used as the substrates. The polymer substrates have the advantage of limiting particle bounce artifacts during sampling; however these substrates may contain background organic additives. A protocol of two extractions with isopropanol followed by three extractions with dichloromethane (DCM) was developed for both substrate precleaning and analyte extraction. Some residual organic contaminants were present after precleaning; expressed as concentrations in a 24-h ambient PM sample, the residual amounts were 1 microg m(-3) for plasticizers and antioxidants, and 10 ng m(-3) for n-alkanes with carbon number lower than 26. The quantification limit for all other organic tracer compounds was approximately 0.1 ng m(-3) in a 24-h ambient PM sample. Recovery experiments were done using NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) Urban Dust (1649a); the average recoveries for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from PPF and PUF substrates were 117+/-8% and 107+/-11%, respectively. Replicate extractions were also done using the ambient samples collected in Nogales, Arizona. The relative differences between repeat analyses were less than 10% for 47 organic tracer compounds quantified. After the first extraction of ambient samples, less than 7% of organic tracer compounds remained in the extracted substrates. This method can be used to quantify a suite of semi- and non-polar organic tracer compounds suitable for source apportionment studies in 24-h ambient PM samples.

  3. Simultaneous extraction and concentration of water pollution tracers using ionic-liquid-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Teresa B V; Passos, Helena; Lima, Diana L D; Sousa, Ana C A; Coutinho, João A P; Esteves, Valdemar I; Freire, Mara G

    2017-07-29

    Human activities are responsible for the release of innumerous substances into the aquatic environment. Some of these substances can be used as pollution tracers to identify contamination sources and to prioritize monitoring and remediation actions. Thus, their identification and quantification are of high priority. However, due to their presence in complex matrices and at significantly low concentrations, a pre-treatment/concentration step is always required. As an alternative to the currently used pre-treatment methods, mainly based on solid-phase extractions, aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of ionic liquids (ILs) and K 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 are here proposed for the simultaneous extraction and concentration of mixtures of two important pollution tracers, caffeine (CAF) and carbamazepine (CBZ). An initial screening of the IL chemical structure was carried out, with extraction efficiencies of both tracers to the IL-rich phase ranging between 95 and 100%, obtained in a single-step. These systems were then optimized in order to simultaneously concentrate CAF and CBZ from water samples followed by HPLC-UV analysis, for which no interferences of the ABS phase-forming components and other interferents present in a wastewater effluent sample have been found. Based on the saturation solubility data of both pollution tracers in the IL-rich phase, the maximum estimated concentration factors of CAF and CBZ are 28595- and 8259-fold. IL-based ABS can be thus envisioned as effective pre-treatment techniques of environmentally-related aqueous samples for a more accurate monitoring of mixtures of pollution tracers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of mixing quality in biogas plant digesters using tracer tests and computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luděk Kamarád

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total electricity demand of investigated biogas plants (BGP makes up 7–8 % of the total electricity produced. Nearly 40 % of this energy is consumed just for mixing in digesters and the energy demand for mixing in some biogas plants can be even higher. Therefore, optimal mixing in anaerobic digesters is a basic condition for efficient plant operation and biogas production. The use of problematic substrates (e.g. grass silage or other fibrous substrates, installation of unsuitable mixing systems or inconvenient mixing intervals may lead to mixing problems. Knowledge about mixing in biogas digesters is still insufficient, so the objective of this study was to fill the information gaps in the literature by determining the minimal retention time of substrates fed into anaerobic digesters and to describe substrate distribution and washing out rates from investigated digesters. Two full-scale biogas plant digesters (2000 m3 and 1500 m3 using different mixing systems and substrates were investigated. To characterize the substrate distribution, lithium hydroxide monohydrate solutions were used for tracer tests at concentrations of 47.1 mg Li+ / kg TS and 46.6 mg Li+ / kg TS in digester. The tracer concentration in the digester effluents was measured during two hydraulic retention times and compared. Although the tracer was detected in the digester effluent at nearly the same time in both cases, the tracer tests showed very different distribution curves. The tracer concentration in effluent B grew much slower than in effluent A and no significant short circuiting streams were detected. Although the data calculated by computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD showed a very good agreement with the full scale results, full comparison was not possible.

  5. pH dependence and unsuitability of fluorescein dye as a tracer for pesticide mobility studies in acid soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Peterson

    2009-01-01

    The mobility of fluorescein and bromide used as tracers in packed soil columns was investigated.Five different soils were used in two application methods: soil surface application and soil incorporation, both of which simulate accepted methods of soil application of termiticides to prevent structural infestation. The...

  6. Lysozyme as diffusion tracer for measuring aqueous solution viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S; Muschol, Martin

    2009-11-01

    Measuring tracer diffusion provides a convenient approach for monitoring local changes in solution viscosity or for determining viscosity changes in response to multiple solution parameters including pH, temperature, salt concentrations or salt types. One common limitation of tracer diffusion in biologically relevant saline solutions is the loss of colloidal stability and aggregation of the tracer particles with increasing ionic strength. Using dynamic light scattering to measure tracer diffusion, we compared the performance of two different types of tracer particles, polystyrene nanobeads vs. the small protein lysozyme, for viscosity measurements of saline solutions. Polystyrene beads provide reliable values for water viscosity, but begin flocculating at ionic strengths exceeding about 100mM. Using lysozyme, in contrast, we could map out viscosity changes of saline solutions for a variety of different salts, for salt concentrations up to 1M, over a wide range of pH values, and over the temperature range most relevant for biological systems (5-40 degrees C). Due to its inherently high structural and colloidal stability, lysozyme provides a convenient and reliable tracer particle for all these measurements, and its use can be readily extended to other optical approaches towards localized measurements of tracer diffusion such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

  7. Fractal continuum model for tracer transport in a porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Hernández, E C; Coronado, M; Hernández-Coronado, H

    2013-12-01

    A model based on the fractal continuum approach is proposed to describe tracer transport in fractal porous media. The original approach has been extended to treat tracer transport and to include systems with radial and uniform flow, which are cases of interest in geoscience. The models involve advection due to the fluid motion in the fractal continuum and dispersion whose mathematical expression is taken from percolation theory. The resulting advective-dispersive equations are numerically solved for continuous and for pulse tracer injection. The tracer profile and the tracer breakthrough curve are evaluated and analyzed in terms of the fractal parameters. It has been found in this work that anomalous transport frequently appears, and a condition on the fractal parameter values to predict when sub- or superdiffusion might be expected has been obtained. The fingerprints of fractality on the tracer breakthrough curve in the explored parameter window consist of an early tracer breakthrough and long tail curves for the spherical and uniform flow cases, and symmetric short tailed curves for the radial flow case.

  8. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    each, from July 1998 through September 1999, to assess background conditions and monitor tracer movement. During the test, 644 samples were analyzed for fluorescein, 617 samples were analyzed for bromide with an ion-selective electrode, 213 samples were analyzed for bromide with colorimetric methods, and 603 samples were analyzed for sulfur hexafluoride, including samples collected prior to tracer injection to determine background concentrations. Additional samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (96 samples) and methane (37 samples) to determine the distribution of these contaminants and the extent of methanogenic conditions within the tracer array; however, these data were not used for the analysis of the test. During the tracer test, the fluorescein dye, bromide, and sulfur hexafluoride were transported predominantly in the upward direction, although all three tracers also moved outward in all directions from the injection point, and it is likely that some tracer mass moved beyond the lateral edges of the array. An analysis of the tracer-test data was performed through the use of breakthrough curves and isoconcentration contour plots. Results show that movement of the fluorescein dye, a non-conservative tracer, was retarded compared to the other two tracers, likely as a result of sorption onto the wetland sediments. Suspected loss of tracer mass along the lateral edges of the array prevented a straightforward quantitative analysis of tracer transport and ground-water velocity from the bromide and sulfur-hexafluoride data. In addition, the initial density of the bromide/sulfur hexafluoride solution (calculated to be 1.097 grams per milli2 Ground-Water Tracer Test, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD liter) could have caused the solution to sink below the injection point before undergoing dilution and moving back up into the array. For these reasons, the data analysis in this report was performed largely through qualitative method

  9. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Olivier; Luxen, André; Chatal, Jean-François; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-08-01

    2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes "generalist" tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of "specific" tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell hypoxia or

  10. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-Francois [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Hotel Dieu, CHU, Nantes (France); Luxen, Andre [Centre de Recherche du Cyclotron, University of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Vuillez, Jean-Philippe [Division of Nuclear Medicine, CHU, Grenoble (France); Rigo, Pierre [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Hopital Princesse Grace, Monte Carlo (Monaco); Hustinx, Roland [Division of Nuclear Medicine, CHU, Liege (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of{sup 18}F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes ''generalist'' tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of ''specific'' tracers for receptor

  11. A tracer diffusion model derived from microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, Jarmo; Muurinen, Arto; Olin, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Numerous attempts have been made to explain the tracer diffusion of various solutes in compacted clays. These attempts have commonly suffered from an inability to describe the diffusion of uncharged and charged solutes with a single unified model. Here, an internally consistent approach to describing the diffusion of solutes in a heterogeneous porous medium, such as compacted bentonite, in terms of its microstructure is presented. The microstructure is taken to be represented by a succession of unit cells, which consist of two consecutive regions (Do, 1996). In the first region, the diffusion is viewed to occur in two parallel paths: one through microcrystalline units (micropores) and the other through meso-pores between the microcrystalline units. Solutes exiting these two paths are then joined together to continue diffusing through the second, disordered, region, connecting the two adjacent microcrystalline units. Adsorption (incl. co-ion exclusion) is thought to occur in the micropores, whereas meso-pores and the disordered region accommodate free species alone. Co-ions are also assumed to experience transfer resistance into and out of the micropores, which is characterized in the model by a transmission coefficient. Although the model is not new per se, its application to compacted clays has never been attempted before. It is shown that in the limit of strong adsorption, the effective diffusivity is limited from above only by the microstructural parameters of the model porous medium. As intuitive and logical as this result may appear, it has not been proven before. In the limit of vanishing disordered region, the effective diffusivity is no longer explicitly constrained by any of the model parameters. The tortuosity of the diffusion path, i.e. the quotient of the actual diffusion path length in the porous-medium coordinates and the characteristic length of the laboratory frame

  12. Evaluating the Effects of Tracer Choice and End-Member Definitions on Hydrograph Separation Results Across Nested, Seasonally Cold Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansah, Samuel; Ali, Genevieve

    2017-11-01

    Isotope-based hydrograph separation (IHS) is a widely used method in studies of runoff generation and streamflow partitioning. Challenges in choosing and characterizing appropriate tracers and end-members have, however led to presumably highly uncertain IHS results. Here we tested the effects of end-member definitions and tracer choices on IHS results in nested Prairie watersheds of varying size and landscape characteristics. Specifically, the consideration of eight potential "new" water end-members, eight potential "old" water end-members, and two stable water isotope tracers led to 80 potential IHS results for each stream water sample. IHS-related uncertainty was evaluated using a Gaussian error propagation method. Results show that choosing an appropriate "new" water end-member is most challenging during the freshet: highly variable "old" water fractions associated with high uncertainties were attributed to changing conditions from melting snow only to rain-on-snow. In summer and fall, it was rather the choice of an appropriate "old" water end-member that was most problematic. IHS results obtained using δ18O versus δ2H as a tracer were significantly different except in the flattest and most wind-sheltered watersheds examined. Overall, δ2H-based IHS results were more uncertain than their δ18O-based counterparts. Recommendations are therefore made toward careful selection of a tracer and a sampling strategy aimed at characterizing the most appropriate end-members for IHS, especially when dealing with seasonally cold watersheds.

  13. A data sheet for the simultaneous assessment of dual radioactive tracer uptake in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium takes up two major substrates: glucose and fatty acids, and various methods have been used to evaluate this uptake. Despite extensive study of radiotracer uptake-based methods, however, an easily applicable datasheet has not previously been provided. In this manuscript, an example of a method involving an easily modified data sheet based on dual tracer methods is presented. This method, with its data sheet: •Is applicable to all radiotracers, regardless of decay time•Is useful, simple, and modifiable; and•Is applicable to small animal studies.

  14. Positron emission tomography with additional γ-ray detectors for multiple-tracer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Tomonori; Okauchi, Takashi; Shigeta, Mika; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2017-06-01

    the field of view. Dual-radionuclide imaging of the point sources and rod phantom revealed that our system maintained PET's intrinsic spatial resolution and quantitative nature for the second tracer. We also successfully acquired simultaneous double- and triple-coincidence events from a mouse containing 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose and 22 Na dissolved in water. The dual-tracer distributions in the mouse obtained by our MI-PET were reasonable from the viewpoints of physiology and pharmacokinetics. This study demonstrates the feasibility of multiple-tracer imaging using PET with additional γ-ray detectors. This method holds promise for enabling the reconstruction of quantitative multiple-tracer images and could be very useful for analyzing multiple-molecular dynamics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Reservoir sizing using inert and chemically reacting tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.A.; Tester, J.W.; Brown, L.F.

    1984-01-01

    Non-reactive tracer tests in prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs indicate multiple fracture flow paths that show increases in volume due to energy extraction. Tracer modal volumes correlate roughly with estimated reservoir heat-transfer capacity. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed which will map the rate of advance of the cooled region of an HDR reservoir, providing advanced warning of thermal drawdown. Critical parameters are examined using a simplified reservoir model for screening purposes. Hydrolysis reactions are a promising class of reactions for this purpose.

  16. Contamination tracer testing with seabed drills: IODP Expedition 357

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, Beth N.; Bergenthal, Markus; Freudenthal, Tim; Smith, David; Lilley, Marvin D.; Schnieders, Luzie; Green, Sophie; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.

    2017-11-01

    IODP Expedition 357 utilized seabed drills for the first time in the history of the ocean drilling program, with the aim of collecting intact sequences of shallow mantle core from the Atlantis Massif to examine serpentinization processes and the deep biosphere. This novel drilling approach required the development of a new remote seafloor system for delivering synthetic tracers during drilling to assess for possible sample contamination. Here, we describe this new tracer delivery system, assess the performance of the system during the expedition, provide an overview of the quality of the core samples collected for deep biosphere investigations based on tracer concentrations, and make recommendations for future applications of the system.

  17. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H.; Binderup, Tina

    2014-01-01

    64Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET...... studies in mice to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution and estimate human dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105. MethodsFive mice received iv tail injection of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 and were PET/CT scanned 1, 4.5 and 22h post injection. Volume-of-interest (VOI) were manually drawn on the following organs: heart, lung......Favorable dosimetry estimates together with previously reported uPAR PET data fully support human testing of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105....

  18. Laboratory studies into the use of the scandium-46-EDTA complex as a tracer for groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Nixon, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma ray emitting metal radionuclides, when complexed with an appropriate complexing agent, provide a wide choice of water tracers particularly for groundwater studies where a radionuclide of appropriate half-life suited to the particular study can be selected. Scandium-46 has easily detectable gamma emission and a suitable half-life (84 days) for medium term studies. It has been widely and successfully used as a tracer in studies of sediment movement but has not yet been introduced as a groundwater tracer. In our experiments the chemical aspects of the preparation of Sc-46-EDTA were studied in some detail and its behaviour in various mineralogical environments was evaluated with reference to the standard tracer, tritiated water. The experimental results have shown that the scandium cation can be easily complexed with EDTA to form soluble SC-EDTA. The complex is very stable in a wide range of pH; the adsorptive properties of Sc-EDTA in the batch studies and the retardation and recovery in the column tests in comparison with tritiated water are quite satisfactory. In general Sc-46-EDTA is a promising tracer for groundwater studies. In the report the appropriate conditions, procedures and some rational and efficient methods for testing the purity of Sc-46-EDTA in the preparation of the tracer solution of Sc-46-EDTA are described. In addition, it has been found that the formation of the metal hydroxide colloids is the major reason for the great loss in groundwater aquifers of most trivalent metal nuclide tracers in the cationic form including scandium-46. (author). 29 refs, 11 figs, 12 tabs

  19. Estimation of time-variable fast flow path chemical concentrations for application in tracer-based hydrograph separation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Scott C.; Capel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Mixing models are a commonly used method for hydrograph separation, but can be hindered by the subjective choice of the end-member tracer concentrations. This work tests a new variant of mixing model that uses high-frequency measures of two tracers and streamflow to separate total streamflow into water from slowflow and fastflow sources. The ratio between the concentrations of the two tracers is used to create a time-variable estimate of the concentration of each tracer in the fastflow end-member. Multiple synthetic data sets, and data from two hydrologically diverse streams, are used to test the performance and limitations of the new model (two-tracer ratio-based mixing model: TRaMM). When applied to the synthetic streams under many different scenarios, the TRaMM produces results that were reasonable approximations of the actual values of fastflow discharge (±0.1% of maximum fastflow) and fastflow tracer concentrations (±9.5% and ±16% of maximum fastflow nitrate concentration and specific conductance, respectively). With real stream data, the TRaMM produces high-frequency estimates of slowflow and fastflow discharge that align with expectations for each stream based on their respective hydrologic settings. The use of two tracers with the TRaMM provides an innovative and objective approach for estimating high-frequency fastflow concentrations and contributions of fastflow water to the stream. This provides useful information for tracking chemical movement to streams and allows for better selection and implementation of water quality management strategies.

  20. Kinetic analysis of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone as a deposited myocardial flow tracer: Comparison to thallium-201.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Robert C.; Powers-Risius, Patricia; Reutter, Bryan W.; O' Neil, James P.; La Belle, Michael; Huesman, Ronald H.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2004-03-01

    The goal of this investigation was to assess the accuracy of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone (18F-FDHR) as a new deposited myocardial flow tracer and compare the results to those for 201Tl. Methods. The kinetics of these flow tracers were evaluated in 22 isolated, erythrocyte- and albumin-perfused rabbit hearts over a flow range encountered in patients. The two flow tracers plus a vascular reference tracer (131I-albumin) were introduced as a bolus through a port just above the aortic cannula. Myocardial extraction, retention, washout, and uptake parameters were computed from the venous outflow curves using the multiple indicator dilution technique and spectral analysis. Results. The mean initial extraction fractions of 18F-FDHR (0.85 +- 0.07) and 201Tl (0.87 +- 0.05) were not significantly different, although the initial extraction fraction for 18F-FDHR declined with flow (P < 0.0001), whereas the initial extraction fraction of 201Tl did not. Washout of 201Tl was faster (P < 0.001) and more affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 18F-FDHR washout. Except for initial extraction fraction, 18F-FDHR retention was greater (P < 0.001) and less affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 201Tl retention. Reflecting its superior retention, net uptake of 18F-FDHR was better correlated with flow than 201Tl uptake at both one and fifteen minutes after tracer introduction (P < 0.0001 for both comparisons). Conclusion. The superior correlation of 18F-FDHR uptake with flow indicates that it is a better flow tracer than 201Tl in the isolated rabbit heart. Compared to the other currently available positron-emitting flow tracers (82Rb, 13N-ammonia, and 15O-water), 18F-FDHR has the potential of providing excellent image resolution without the need for an on-site cyclotron.

  1. Plutonium as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yihong [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Qiao, Jixin [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Pan, Shaoming, E-mail: span@nju.edu.cn [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hou, Xiaolin, E-mail: xiho@dtu.dk [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Xi' an AMS Center, SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, CAS, Xi' an 710075 (China); Roos, Per [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Cao, Liguo [School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and agricultural problems faced by human society. Assessing intensity is an important issue for controlling soil erosion and improving eco-environmental quality. The suitability of the application of plutonium (Pu) as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China was investigated by comparing with that of {sup 137}Cs. Here we build on preliminary work, in which we investigated the potential of Pu as a soil erosion tracer by sampling additional reference sites and potential erosive sites, along the Liaodong Bay region in northeast China, for Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratios in all samples were approximately 0.18, which indicated that the dominant source of Pu was the global fallout. Pu showed very similar distribution patterns to those of {sup 137}Cs at both uncultivated and cultivated sites. {sup 239+240}Pu concentrations in all uncultivated soil cores followed an exponential decline with soil depth, whereas at cultivated sites, Pu was homogenously distributed in plow horizons. Factors such as planted crop types, as well as methods and frequencies of irrigation and tillage were suggested to influence the distribution of radionuclides in cultivated land. The baseline inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs were 88.4 and 1688 Bq m{sup −2} respectively. Soil erosion rates estimated by {sup 239+240}Pu tracing method were consistent with those obtained by the {sup 137}Cs method, confirming that Pu is an effective tracer with a similar tracing behavior to that of {sup 137}Cs for soil erosion assessment. - Highlights: • The potential for the use of Pu as a soil erosion tracer was investigated. • Pu would be a good tracer given its long half-life. • Depth profiles of Pu in soils were systematically studied and compared to {sup 137}Cs. • Pu is an effective soil erosion tracer with behavior similar to that of {sup 137}Cs. • Thus, Pu provides a means of

  2. Positron emitting tracers for studies of cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Yu, D.W.; Dewey, S.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Bendriem, B.; Logan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The use of PET to study the behavior and mechanism of action of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse can be approached from a number of perspectives. The most common approach is to measure the effect of a drug on some aspect of metabolism and requires well characterized radiotracers whose behavior in vivo can be related to a discrete biochemical transformation. A second approach is to study the labeled drug itself. This provides information on the drug's regional distribution and kinetics as well as its pharmacological profile and metabolism. Cocaine has been labeled in different positions with carbon-11 and with fluorine-18 and the stereoisomers of cocaine have also been labeled to characterize its binding and metabolism in human and baboon brain. Regional cocaine binding as measured by PET is consistent with reversible binding to striatal dopamine reuptake sites and its time course parallels the behavioral activation of cocaine. The behaviorally inactive enantiomer (+)-cocaine is rapidly metabolized in serum preventing its entry into the brain. These PET tracers are useful in understanding the neurochemical basis of cocaine's action

  3. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  4. Isotope and chemical tracers in groundwater hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, C.; Stewart, M.K.; Morgenstern, U.; Trompetter, V.

    1999-01-01

    The course sessions cover: session 1, Fundamentals of stable and radioactive isotopes; session 2, Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in hydrology: background, examples, sampling strategy; session 3, Catchment studies using oxygen and hydrogen isotopes: background - the hydrologic water balance, evapotranspiration - the lion's share, runoff generation - new water/old water fractions, groundwater recharge - the crumbs; session 4, Isotopes in catchment hydrology: survey of applications, future developments; session 5, Applications of tritium in hydrology: background and measurement, interpretation, examples; session 6, Case studies using mixing models: Hutt Valley groundwater system, an extended mixing model for simulating tracer transport in the unsaturated zone; session 7, Groundwater dating using CFC concentrations: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 8, Groundwater dating with carbon-14: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 9, NZ case studies: Tauranga warm springs, North Canterbury Plains groundwater; session 10, Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes: background and examples, biological applications of C-N-S isotopes; session 11, New developments in isotope hydrology: gas isotopes, compound specific applications, age dating of sediments etc; session 12, NZ case studies: North Canterbury Plains groundwater (continued), Waimea Plains groundwater. (author). refs., figs

  5. Sedimentary radioactive tracers and diffusive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.; Lerche, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the underlying assumptions and consequences of applying a steady-state equation to sediment profiles of radioactive tracers in order to deconvolute sedimentation from bioturbation processes modelled as a diffusive type process. Several factors follow immediately from this investigation: (i)if the observed radioactive concentration increases with depth over any finite depth range then the proposed steady-state, constant flux equation is not applicable. Any increase in radioactive concentration with depth implies a negative mixing coefficient which is a physical impossibility; (ii)when the radioactive concentration systematically decreases with increasing sedimentary depth then solutions to the steady-state conservation equation exist only when either the constant solid state flux to the sediment surface is small enough so that a positive mixing coefficient results or when the mixing coefficient is small enough so that a positive flux results. If the radioactive concentration, porosity and/or density of the solid phase are such that the proposed equation is inappropriate (because no physically acceptable solution exists) then one must abandon the proposed steady-state equation. Further: if the flux of solid sediment to the sediment surface varies with time then, of course, a steady-state conservation equation is also inappropriate. Simple examples illustrate that the assumption of steady-state restricts the applicability of this modelling approach to a relatively small sub-set of expected situations in the real world.

  6. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propo