WorldWideScience

Sample records for single-target molecule detection

  1. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Isolation and detection of small RNA molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulneček, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2007), s. 451-455 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/1432 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : small RNA molecules * electrophoresis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  4. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  5. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  6. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  7. Detecting and identifying small molecules in a nanopore flux capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Samuel; McClure, Ethan; Zhang, Guigen

    2016-02-19

    A new method of molecular detection in a metallic-semiconductor nanopore was developed and evaluated with experimental and computational methods. Measurements were made of the charging potential of the electrical double layer (EDL) capacitance as charge-carrying small molecules translocated the nanopore. Signals in the charging potential were found to be correlated to the physical properties of analyte molecules. From the measured signals, we were able to distinguish molecules with different valence charge or similar valence charge but different size. The relative magnitude of the signals from different analytes was consistent over a wide range of experimental conditions, suggesting that the detected signals are likely due to single molecules. Computational modeling of the nanopore system indicated that the double layer potential signal may be described in terms of disruption of the EDL structure due to the size and charge of the analyte molecule, in agreement with Huckel and Debye's analysis of the electrical atmosphere of electrolyte solutions.

  8. Detection of quorum sensing molecules from Vibrio harveyi and use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the extraction and detection processes of quorum sensing molecules such as N-aceyl homoserine lactone compounds (AHL) from marine Vibrio harveyi. The spent culture of V. harveyi was solvent partitioned for AHL, rotary evaporated and re-suspended in 50% acetonitrile then detected with reporter ...

  9. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  10. Rationale for single molecule detection by means of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, S.V.; Guzatov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    A consistent quantum electrodynamical description is proposed of Raman scattering of light by a molecule in a medium with a modified photon density of states. Enhanced local density of states near a metal nanobody is shown to increase a scattering rate by several orders of magnitude, thus providing a rationale for experimental detection of single molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy. For an ellipsoidal particle 10 14 -fold enhancement of the Raman scattering cross-section is obtained. (authors)

  11. Single-molecule imaging towards precise detection of individual photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Mashimo, Kei; Tachibana, Fumi; Horiuchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    We present our recent study of single fluorescent molecules with specific structure, i.e. tetramethylrhodamine derivative linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface. For fluorescent reagent in its synthesis, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers, which provides a sample with single molecules photophysically different each other even if chemically the same. The isomeric structural difference so introduced in the molecules will provide rather small but probably distinctive photophysical difference, for example, in non-radiative relaxation rates, which we try to detect out with our improved single-molecule microscope imaging technique. To make clear the detectability of such weak inter- or intra-molecular interactions microscopically is significant for versatile applications of single-molecule detections in life science. Our present observation at room temperatures shows so far that such decoupled contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the intensities of the observed fluorescent spots as broader but separated multi-component structures in the distribution under specific experimental configurations. We will discuss some of the prerequisite for such detections; suitable spatio-temporal resolutions with sufficient S/N ratio, algorithms for data analysis, etc. but also precise sample operations are inevitable

  12. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  13. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  14. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  15. Detection of individual gas molecules adsorbed on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, F; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Hill, E W; Blake, P; Katsnelson, M I; Novoselov, K S

    2007-09-01

    The ultimate aim of any detection method is to achieve such a level of sensitivity that individual quanta of a measured entity can be resolved. In the case of chemical sensors, the quantum is one atom or molecule. Such resolution has so far been beyond the reach of any detection technique, including solid-state gas sensors hailed for their exceptional sensitivity. The fundamental reason limiting the resolution of such sensors is fluctuations due to thermal motion of charges and defects, which lead to intrinsic noise exceeding the sought-after signal from individual molecules, usually by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that micrometre-size sensors made from graphene are capable of detecting individual events when a gas molecule attaches to or detaches from graphene's surface. The adsorbed molecules change the local carrier concentration in graphene one by one electron, which leads to step-like changes in resistance. The achieved sensitivity is due to the fact that graphene is an exceptionally low-noise material electronically, which makes it a promising candidate not only for chemical detectors but also for other applications where local probes sensitive to external charge, magnetic field or mechanical strain are required.

  16. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  17. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size.

  18. Nanopore detection of DNA molecules in magnesium chloride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Lei; Sha, Jingjie; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-05-01

    High translocation speed of a DNA strand through a nanopore is a major bottleneck for nanopore detection of DNA molecules. Here, we choose MgCl2 electrolyte as salt solution to control DNA mobility. Experimental results demonstrate that the duration time for straight state translocation events in 1 M MgCl2 solution is about 1.3 ms which is about three times longer than that for the same DNA in 1 M KCl solution. This is because Mg2+ ions can effectively reduce the surface charge density of the negative DNA strands and then lead to the decrease of the DNA electrophoretic speed. It is also found that the Mg2+ ions can induce the DNA molecules binding together and reduce the probability of straight DNA translocation events. The nanopore with small diameter can break off the bound DNA strands and increase the occurrence probability of straight DNA translocation events.

  19. Detection of quorum-sensing-related molecules in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel Kathrin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication (also referred to as quorum sensing based on N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs is a widespread response to environmental change in Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs seem to be highly variable, both in terms of the acyl chain length and in the chemical structure of the radicals. Another quorum sensing pathway, the autoinducer-2-based system, is present both in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study the presence of signal molecules belonging to both quorum sensing signalling pathways was analysed in the marine symbiotic species Vibrio scophthalmi. Results Three AHL-like signal molecules were detected in V. scophthalmi supernatants with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens sensor assay. This observation was further supported by the decrease in the presence of these signal molecules after cloning and expression of lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus in the V. scophthalmi strains. One of the signal molecules was identified as N-(3-hydroxy dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. V. scophthalmi was also shown to carry a functional LuxS synthase. The coding sequence for a luxS-like gene was obtained showing a maximum similarity of 78% with Vibrio vulnificus. Analysis of the translated sequence revealed that the sequenced luxS gene carried the conserved domain, which is common to luxS sequences found in other species, and which is essential for LuxS enzymatic activity. Conclusion The data are consistent with the presence of quorum-sensing signal molecules from both AHL- and autoinducer 2-based quorum sensing systems in V. scophthalmi, which are homologous to others previously described in various Vibrio species. How this bacterium interacts with other bacteria and eukaryotic cells to compete ecologically with other intestinal bacteria present in the fish Scophthalmus maximus warrants further investigation.

  20. A new microcavity design for single molecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Stupperich, C.; Failla, A.V.; Hartschuh, A.; Meixner, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new microcavity design which allows for efficient detection of single molecules by measuring the molecular fluorescence emission coupled into a resonant cavity mode. The Fabry-Perot-type microresonator consists of two silver mirrors separated by a thin polymer film doped with dye molecules in ultralow concenctration. By slightly tilting one of the mirrors different cavity lengths can be selected within the same sample. Locally, on a μm scale, the microcavity still acts as a planar Fabry-Perot resonator. Using scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, single emitters on resonance with a single mode of the microresonator can be spatially addressed. Our microcavity is demonstrated to be well-suited for investigating the coupling mechanism between single quantum emitters and single modes of the electromagnetic field. The microcavity layout could be integrated in a lab-on-a-microchip design for ultrasensitive microfluidic analytics and can be considered as an important improvement for single photon sources based on single molecules operating at room temperature

  1. Few molecule SERS detection using nanolens based plasmonic nanostructure: application to point mutation detection

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind

    2016-10-27

    Advancements in nanotechnology fabrication techniques allow the possibility to design and fabricate a device with a minimum gap (<10 nm) between the composing nanostructures in order to obtain better control over the creation and spatial definition of plasmonic hot-spots. The present study is intended to show the fabrication of nanolens and their application to single/few molecules detection. Theoretical simulations were performed on different designs of real structures, including comparison of rough and smooth surfaces. Various molecules (rhodamine 6G, benzenethiol and BRCA1/BRCT peptides) were examined in this regard. Single molecule detection was possible for synthetic peptides, with a possible application in early detection of diseases. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Fluorescence detection of organic molecules in the Jovian atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J S; Rogowski, R S

    1975-07-01

    A search for fluorescent emission due to the presence of possible organic molecules in the Jovian atmosphere is described. We first consider natural Jovian fluorescent emission excited by precipitating auroral particles. Due to our lack of knowledge of the Jovian precipitation particle energies and fluxes we next consider fluorescent emission excited by a laser system aboard a Jupiter spacecraft. Laser-induced fluorescence is routinely used to monitor trace constituents and pollutants in the terrestrial atmosphere. Several spacecraft laser systems are currently under development. Our calculations indicate that laser-induced fluorescent detection is approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than rocket ultraviolet measurements of possible Jovian absorption features at 2600 A that have been attributed to the presence of adenine or benzene.

  3. Singlet oxygen: photosensitized generation, detection and reaction with organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Hari Mohan; Bajaj, P.N.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P.; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-10-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is an excited state of molecular oxygen, having antiparallel spin in the same π antibonding orbital. The study of singlet oxygen production and reactivity has emerged as a rich and diverse area, with implication in diverse fields, such as synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry, photodynamic therapy, etc. There are several known methods to produce singlet oxygen, and also various techniques employed to detect it. Out of these, photosensitization method is the most popular one. In this article, photosensitized production of singlet oxygen from triplet oxygen and photosensitizers in presence of light, and its detection by the infrared luminescence at 1270 nm have been presented. Further, some results using different types of photosensitizers, effect of solvent on singlet oxygen quantum yields and lifetime have been discussed. The quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen have been determined with different types of organic molecules such as derivatives of thiourea and its analogues, hydroxy indoles and antioxidants and the results have been presented. (author)

  4. Methods for the selective detection of alkyne-presenting molecules and related compositions and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carlos A.; Vu, Alexander K.

    2017-10-17

    Provided herein are methods for selectively detecting an alkyne-presenting molecule in a sample and related detection reagents, compositions, methods and systems. The methods include contacting a detection reagent with the sample for a time and under a condition to allow binding of the detection reagent to the one or more alkyne-presenting molecules possibly present in the matrix to the detection reagent. The detection reagent includes an organic label moiety presenting an azide group. The binding of the azide group to the alkyne-presenting molecules results in emission of a signal from the organic label moiety.

  5. A simple hydrazine based molecule for selective detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    certain diseases like osteoporosis, osteosclerosis, dental fluorosis and skeletal fluorosis. In recent times, the sci- entific community is looking for chemoreceptors which can detect F. − in both chromogenic and photolumines- cent way, which is less expensive than the existing phys- ical methods for detection of fluoride and ...

  6. Successful Noninvasive Trisomy 18 Detection Using Single Molecule Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Johansson, Lennart F.; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F.; Hoffer, Mariette J. V.; Sinke, Richard J.; Bakker, Egbert; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Boon, Elles M. J.

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive trisomy 21 detection performed by use of massively parallel sequencing is achievable with high diagnostic sensitivity and low false-positive rates. Detection of fetal trisomy 18 and 13 has been reported as well but seems to be less accurate with the use of this approach. The

  7. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors for Space Molecule Detection and Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie

    2001-01-01

    Both space molecule detection and clinical molecule diagnostics need to develop ultra sensitive biosensors for detection of less than attomole molecules such as amino acids for DNA. However all the electrode sensor systems including those fabricated from the existing carbon nanotubes, have a background level of nA (nanoAmp). This has limited DNA or other molecule detection to nA level or molecules whose concentration is, much higher than attomole level. A program has been created by NASA and NCI (National Cancer Institute) to exploit the possibility of carbon nanotube based biosensors to solve this problem for both's interest. In this talk, I will present our effort on the evaluation and novel design of carbon nanotubes as electrode biosensors with strategies to minimize background currents while maximizing signal intensity.The fabrication of nanotube electrode arrays, immobilization of molecular probes on nanotube electrodes and in vitro biosensor testing will also be discussed.

  8. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.

    2017-09-12

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  9. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria [Los Alamos, NM; Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos, NM; Olazabal, Virginia [Los Alamos, NM; Hoffbauer, Mark A [Los Alamos, NM; Akhadov, Elshan A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  10. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Akhadov, Elshan A.

    2017-10-31

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  11. Nanofabrication of SERS Substrates for Single/Few Molecules Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Melino, Gianluca

    2015-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy is among the most widely employed methods to investigate the properties of materials in several fields of study. Evolution in materials science allowed us to fabricate suitable substrates, at the nanoscale, capable to enhance the electromagnetic field of the signals coming from the samples which at this range turn out to be in most cases singles or a few molecules. This particular variation of the classical technique is called SERS (Surface Enanched Raman Spectroscopy). In this work, the enhancement of the electromagnetic field is obtained by manipulation of the optical properties of metals with respect to their size. By using electroless deposition (bottom up technique), gold and silver nanoparticles were deposited in nanostructured patterns obtained on silicon wafers by means of electron beam lithography (top down technique). Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at extremely low concentration (10-8 M) was absorbed on the resultant dimers and the collection of the Raman spectra demonstrated the high efficiency of the substrates.

  12. Detection of a single enzyme molecule based on a solid-state nanopore sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, ShengWei; Gu, DeJian; Liu, Hang; Liu, QuanJun

    2016-04-15

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect a single molecule in a solution. In the present study, relatively large silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopores with diameters of ∼28 and ∼88 nm were fabricated successfully using a focused Ga ion beam. We have used solid-state nanopores with various sizes to detect the single horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecule and for the first time analyzed single HRP molecular translocation events. In addition, a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction and a translocation of the product of enzyme catalysis substrates were investigated by using a Si3N4 nanopore. Our nanopore system showed a high sensitivity in detecting single enzyme molecules and a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction. This method could also be significant for studying gene expression or enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.

  13. SISGR: Room Temperature Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging by Stimulated Emission Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-03-13

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has made considerable impact on many disciplines including chemistry, physics, and biology. To date, most single-molecule spectroscopy work is accomplished by detecting fluorescence. On the other hand, many naturally occurring chromophores, such as retinal, hemoglobin and cytochromes, do not have detectable fluorescence. There is an emerging need for single-molecule spectroscopy techniques that do not require fluorescence. In the last proposal period, we have successfully demonstrated stimulated emission microscopy, single molecule absorption, and stimulated Raman microscopy based on a high-frequency modulation transfer technique. These first-of-a- kind new spectroscopy/microscopy methods tremendously improved our ability to observe molecules that fluorescence weakly, even to the limit of single molecule detection for absorption measurement. All of these methods employ two laser beams: one (pump beam) excites a single molecule to a real or virtual excited state, and the other (probe beam) monitors the absorption/emission property of the single. We extract the intensity change of the probe beam with high sensitivity by implementing a high-frequency phase-sensitive detection scheme, which offers orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over direct absorption/emission measurement. However, single molecule detection based on fluorescence or absorption is fundamentally limited due to their broad spectral response. It is important to explore other avenues in single molecule detection and imaging which provides higher molecular specificity for studying a wide variety of heterogeneous chemical and biological systems. This proposal aimed to achieve single-molecule detection sensitivity with near resonance stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. SRS microscopy was developed in our lab as a powerful technique for imaging heterogeneous samples based on their intrinsic vibrational contrasts, which provides much higher molecular

  14. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  15. Conventional, molecular methods and biomarkers molecules in detection of septicemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arabestani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients worldwide and based on studies, 30-40% of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock results from the blood stream infections (BSIs. Identifying of the disease, performing laboratory tests, and consequently treatment are factors that required for optimum management of BSIs. In addition, applying precise and immediate identification of the etiologic agent is a prerequisite for specific antibiotic therapy of pathogen and thereby decreasing mortality rates. The diagnosis of sepsis is difficult because clinical signs of sepsis often overlap with other noninfectious cases of systemic inflammation. BSIs are usually diagnosed by performing a series of techniques such as blood cultures, polymerase chain reaction-based methods, and biomarkers of sepsis. Extremely time-consuming even to take up to several days is a major limitation of conventional methods. In addition, yielding false-negative results due to fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms and also in case of antibiotic pretreated samples are other limitations. In comparison, molecular methods are capable of examining a blood sample obtained from suspicious patient with BSI and gave the all required information to prescribing antimicrobial therapy for detected bacterial or fungal infections immediately. Because of an emergency of sepsis, new methods are being developed. In this review, we discussed about the most important sepsis diagnostic methods and numbered the advantage and disadvantage of the methods in detail.

  16. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  17. Detection of a branched alkyl molecule in the interstellar medium: iso-propyl cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloche, Arnaud; Garrod, Robin T; Müller, Holger S P; Menten, Karl M

    2014-09-26

    The largest noncyclic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) are organic with a straight-chain carbon backbone. We report an interstellar detection of a branched alkyl molecule, iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN), with an abundance 0.4 times that of its straight-chain structural isomer. This detection suggests that branched carbon-chain molecules may be generally abundant in the ISM. Our astrochemical model indicates that both isomers are produced within or upon dust grain ice mantles through the addition of molecular radicals, albeit via differing reaction pathways. The production of iso-propyl cyanide appears to require the addition of a functional group to a nonterminal carbon in the chain. Its detection therefore bodes well for the presence in the ISM of amino acids, for which such side-chain structure is a key characteristic. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  19. Detection of Individual Molecules and Ions by Carbon Nanotube-Based Differential Resistive Pulse Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ran; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Li, Dongqing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of sensing single molecules and cations by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based differential resistive pulse sensing (RPS) technique on a nanofluidic chip. A mathematical model for multichannel RPS systems is developed to evaluate the CNT-based RPS signals. Individual cations, rhodamine B dye molecules, and ssDNAs are detected successfully with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Differentiating ssDNAs with 15 and 30 nucleotides are achieved. The experimental results also show that translocation of negatively charged ssDNAs through a CNT decreases the electrical resistance of the CNT channel, while translocation of positively charged cations and rhodamine B molecules increases the electrical resistance of the CNT. The CNT-based nanofluidic device developed in this work provides a new avenue for single-molecule/ion detection and offers a potential strategy for DNA sequencing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Detection of gas molecules on single Mn adatom adsorbed graphyne: a DFT-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhansheng; Lv, Peng; Ma, Dongwei; Yang, Xinwei; Li, Shuo; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-02-01

    As one of the prominent applications in intelligent systems, gas sensing technology has attracted great interest in both industry and academia. In the current study, the pristine graphyne (GY) without and with a single Mn atom is investigated to detect the gas molecules (CO, CH4, CO2, NH3, NO and O2). The pristine GY is promising to detect O2 molecules because of its chemical adsorption on GY with large electron transfer. The great stability of the Mn/GY is found, and the Mn atom prefers to anchor at the alkyne ring as a single atom. Upon single Mn atom anchoring, the sensitivity and selectivity of GY based gas sensors is significantly improved for various molecules, except CH4. The recovery time of the Mn/GY after detecting the gas molecules may help to appraise the detection efficiency for the Mn/GY. The current study will help to understand the mechanism of detecting the gas molecules, and extend the potentially fascinating applications of GY-based materials.

  1. Mass amplifying probe for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy detection of small molecules in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liang; Zou, Yuan; Lin, Ninghang; Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-07-03

    Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is a reliable and excellent choice for fluorescence sensing. One of the key factors influencing the FA value for any molecule is the molar mass of the molecule being measured. As a result, the FA method with functional nucleic acid aptamers has been limited to macromolecules such as proteins and is generally not applicable for the analysis of small molecules because their molecular masses are relatively too small to produce observable FA value changes. We report here a molecular mass amplifying strategy to construct anisotropy aptamer probes for small molecules. The probe is designed in such a way that only when a target molecule binds to the probe does it activate its binding ability to an anisotropy amplifier (a high molecular mass molecule such as protein), thus significantly increasing the molecular mass and FA value of the probe/target complex. Specifically, a mass amplifying probe (MAP) consists of a targeting aptamer domain against a target molecule and molecular mass amplifying aptamer domain for the amplifier protein. The probe is initially rendered inactive by a small blocking strand partially complementary to both target aptamer and amplifier protein aptamer so that the mass amplifying aptamer domain would not bind to the amplifier protein unless the probe has been activated by the target. In this way, we prepared two probes that constitute a target (ATP and cocaine respectively) aptamer, a thrombin (as the mass amplifier) aptamer, and a fluorophore. Both probes worked well against their corresponding small molecule targets, and the detection limits for ATP and cocaine were 0.5 μM and 0.8 μM, respectively. More importantly, because FA is less affected by environmental interferences, ATP in cell media and cocaine in urine were directly detected without any tedious sample pretreatment. Our results established that our molecular mass amplifying strategy can be used to design aptamer probes for rapid, sensitive, and selective

  2. Improving Precision of Proximity Ligation Assay by Amplified Single Molecule Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Rongqin; Nong, Rachel Yuan; Fredriksson, Simon; Landegren, Ulf; Nilsson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Proximity ligation assay (PLA) has been proven to be a robust protein detection method. The technique is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity, but the assay precision is probably limited by the PCR readout. To investigate this potential limitation and to improve precision, we developed a digital proximity ligation assay for protein measurement in fluids based on amplified single molecule detection. The assay showed significant improvements in precision, and thereby also detection...

  3. Detection of Quorum Sensing Molecules and Biofilm Formation in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J Shiva; Umesha, S; Prasad, K Shiva; Niranjana, P

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria use small diffusible signaling molecules to communicate each other termed as quorum sensing (QS). Most Gram-negative bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) as QS signal molecules. Using these signaling molecules, bacteria are able to express specific genes in response to population density. This work aimed to detect the production of QS signal molecules and biofilm formation in Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from various diseased tomato plants with symptoms of bacterial wilt. A total of 30 R. solanacearum strains were investigated for the production of QS signal molecules using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 (pZLR4) biosensor systems. All 30 bacterial isolates from various bacterial wilt-affected tomato plants produced AHL molecules that induced the biosensor. The microtiter plate assay demonstrated that of the 30 bacterial isolates, 60 % formed biofilm, among which four isolates exhibited a higher degree of biofilm formation. The biofilm-inducing factor was purified from these four culture supernatants. The structure of the responsible molecule was solved using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and was determined to be 2-hydroxy-4-((methylamino)(phenyl)methyl) cyclopentanone (HMCP), which was confirmed by chemical synthesis and NMR. The Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed well-developed biofilm architecture of bacteria when treated with HMCP. The knowledge we obtained from this study will be useful for further researcher on the role of HMCP molecule in biofilm formation.

  4. On-nylon membrane detection of nucleic acid molecules by rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhui; Zhang, Beibei; Gan, Ping; Wu, Jian; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Jinke

    2017-09-15

    Positively-charged nylon membrane (NM) is a general solid-phase support for nucleic acid detection due to its convenient immobilization of nucleic acid materials by direct electrostatic adherence and simple UV crosslinking. Rolling circle amplification (RCA) is a widely used isothermal DNA amplification technique for nucleic acid detection. Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) is a new fluorescence technique with high sensitivity due to low background. This study developed a simple method for detecting nucleic acid molecules by combining the advantages of NM, RCA and NIRF, named NIRF-based solid phase RCA on nylon membrane (NM-NIRF-sRCA). The detection system of this method only need two kinds of nucleic acid molecules: target-specific probes with a RCA primer (P) at their 3' end and a rolling circle (RC). The detection procedure consists of four steps: (1) immobilizing detected nucleic acids on NM by UV crosslinking; (2) hybridizing NM with specific probes and RC; (3) amplifying by a RCA reaction containing biotin-dUTP; (4) incubating NM with NIRF-labeled streptavidin and imaging with a NIRF imager. The method was fully testified by detecting oligonucleotides, L1 fragments of various HPV subtypes cloned in plasmid, and E.coli genomic DNA. This study thus provides a new facile method for detecting nucleic acid molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  6. Detecting and characterizing N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules by thin-layer chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Paul D.; Ping, Gao; Daly, Sean L.; Cha, Chung; Cronan, John E.; Rinehart, Kenneth L.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1997-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria regulate gene expression in response to their population size by sensing the level of acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules which they produce and liberate to the environment. We have developed an assay for these signals that couples separation by thin-layer chromatography with detection using Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring lacZ fused to a gene that is regulated by autoinduction. With the exception of N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, the reporter detected acyl-homoserine lactones with 3-oxo-, 3-hydroxy-, and 3-unsubstituted side chains of all lengths tested. The intensity of the response was proportional to the amount of the signal molecule chromatographed. Each of the 3-oxo- and the 3-unsubstituted derivatives migrated with a unique mobility. Using the assay, we showed that some bacteria produce as many as five detectable signal molecules. Structures could be assigned tentatively on the basis of mobility and spot shape. The dominant species produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci chromatographed with the properties of N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, a structure that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. An isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens produced five detectable species, three of which had novel chromatographic properties. These were identified as the 3-hydroxy- forms of N-hexanoyl-, N-octanoyl-, and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. The assay can be used to screen cultures of bacteria for acyl-homoserine lactones, for quantifying the amounts of these molecules produced, and as an analytical and preparative aid in determining the structures of these signal molecules. PMID:9177164

  7. Single-molecule detection of dihydroazulene photo-thermal reaction using break junction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Jevric, Martyn; Borges, Anders; Olsen, Stine T.; Hamill, Joseph M.; Zheng, Jue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Rudnev, Alexander; Baghernejad, Masoud; Broekmann, Peter; Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Wandlowski, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Solomon, Gemma C.; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-05-01

    Charge transport by tunnelling is one of the most ubiquitous elementary processes in nature. Small structural changes in a molecular junction can lead to significant difference in the single-molecule electronic properties, offering a tremendous opportunity to examine a reaction on the single-molecule scale by monitoring the conductance changes. Here, we explore the potential of the single-molecule break junction technique in the detection of photo-thermal reaction processes of a photochromic dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene system. Statistical analysis of the break junction experiments provides a quantitative approach for probing the reaction kinetics and reversibility, including the occurrence of isomerization during the reaction. The product ratios observed when switching the system in the junction does not follow those observed in solution studies (both experiment and theory), suggesting that the junction environment was perturbing the process significantly. This study opens the possibility of using nano-structured environments like molecular junctions to tailor product ratios in chemical reactions.

  8. Single-molecule detection of dihydroazulene photo-thermal reaction using break junction technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Cancan; Jevric, Martyn; Borges, Anders Christian

    2017-01-01

    a quantitative approach for probing the reaction kinetics and reversibility, including the occurrence of isomerization during the reaction. The product ratios observed when switching the system in the junction does not follow those observed in solution studies (both experiment and theory), suggesting......Charge transport by tunnelling is one of the most ubiquitous elementary processes in nature. Small structural changes in a molecular junction can lead to significant difference in the single-molecule electronic properties, offering a tremendous opportunity to examine a reaction on the single......-molecule scale by monitoring the conductance changes. Here, we explore the potential of the single-molecule break junction technique in the detection of photo-thermal reaction processes of a photochromic dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene system. Statistical analysis of the break junction experiments provides...

  9. Spins of adsorbed molecules investigated by the detection of Kondo resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-12-01

    Surface magnetism has been one of the platforms to explore the magnetism in low dimensions. It is also a key component for the development of quantum information processes, which utilizes the spin degree of freedom. The Kondo resonance is a phenomenon that is caused by an interaction between an isolated spin and conduction electrons. First observed in the 1930s as an anomalous increase in the low-temperature resistance of metals embedded with magnetic atoms, the Kondo physics mainly studied the effects of bulk magnetic impurities in the resistivity. In the last 15 years it has undergone a revival by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) which enables the measurement of the Kondo resonance at surfaces using an atomic scale point contact. The detection of the Kondo resonance can be a powerful tool to explore surface magnetism. In this article, I review recent studies of the surface spin of adsorbed molecules by the detection of the Kondo resonance. Researches on metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and porphyrin molecules will be examined. In addition, the Kondo resonance for double-decker lanthanoide Pc molecules will be discussed. Some of the double-decker Pc molecules show single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, which attracts attention as a material for electronic devices. For both classes, the ligand plays a crucial role in determining the parameters of the Kondo resonance, such as the Kondo temperature and the change of the shape from peak to Fano-dip. In addition, the spin in delocalized molecular orbital forms the Kondo resonance, which shows significant differences from the Kondo resonance formed by the metal spins. Since molecular orbital can be tuned in a flexible manner by the design of the molecule, the Kondo resonance formed by delocalized molecular orbital might expand the knowledge of this field.

  10. Magnesium Sulfate as a Key Mineral for the Detection of Organic Molecules on Mars Using Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Cabane, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis of soil or rock samples is the preferred preparation technique used on Mars to search for organic molecules up today. During pyrolysis, oxichlorines present in the soil of Mars release oxidant species that alter the organic molecules potentially contained in the samples collected by the space probes.This process can explain the difficulty experienced by in situ exploration probes to detect organic materials in Mars soil samples until recently. Within a few months, the Curiosity rover should reach and analyze for the first time soils rich in sulfates which could induce a different behavior of the organics during the pyrolysis compared with the types of soils analyzed up today. For this reason, we systematically studied the pyrolysis of organic molecules trapped in magnesium sulfate, in the presence or absence of calcium perchlorate. Our results show that organics trapped in magnesium sulfate can undergo some oxidation and sulfuration during the pyrolysis. But these sulfates are also shown to protect organics trapped inside the crystal lattice and/or present in fluid inclusions from the oxidation induced by the decomposition of calcium perchlorate and probably other oxychlorine phases currently detected on Mars. Trapped organics may also be protected from degradation processes induced by other minerals present in the sample, at least until these organics are released from the pyrolyzed sulfate mineral (700C in our experiment). Hence, we suggest magnesium sulfate as one of the minerals to target in priority for the search of organic molecules by the Curiosity and ExoMars 2018 rovers.

  11. Marangoni Convection Assisted Single Molecule Detection with Nanojet Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Wei; Wang, Xinhao; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Liu, Gang Logan; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-25

    Many single-molecule (SM) label-free techniques such as scanning probe microscopies (SPM) and magnetic force spectroscopies (MFS) provide high resolution surface topography information, but lack chemical information. Typical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) systems provide chemical information on the analytes, but lack spatial resolution. In addition, a challenge in SERS sensors is to bring analytes into the so-called "hot spots" (locations where the enhancement of electromagnetic field amplitude is larger than 10 3 ). Previously described methods of fluid transport around hot spots like thermophoresis, thermodiffusion/Soret effect, and electrothermoplasmonic flow are either too weak or detrimental in bringing new molecules to hot spots. Herein, we combined the resonant plasmonic enhancement and photonic nanojet enhancemnet of local electric field on nonplanar SERS structures, to construct a stable, high-resolution, and below diffraction limit platform for single molecule label-free detection. In addition, we utilize Marangoni convection (mass transfer due to surface tension gradient) to bring new analytes into the hotspot. An enhancement factor of ∼3.6 × 10 10 was obtained in the proposed system. Rhodamine-6G (R6G) detection of up to a concentration of 10 -12 M, an improvement of two orders of magnitude, was achieved using the nanojet effect. The proposed system could provide a simple, high throughput SERS system for single molecule analysis at high spatial resolution.

  12. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-09-25

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule–silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the \\'Internet of Nano-Things\\'.

  13. Blu-ray based optomagnetic aptasensor for detection of small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Pinto, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    the hydrodynamic size distribution of MNPs and their clusters. A commercial Blu-ray optical pickup unit is used for optical signal acquisition, which enables the establishment of a low-cost and miniaturized biosensing platform. Experimental results show that the degree of MNP clustering correlates well......This paper describes an aptamer-based optomagnetic biosensor for detection of a small molecule based on target binding-induced inhibition of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clustering. For the detection of a target small molecule, two mutually exclusive binding reactions (aptamer-target binding...... and aptamer-DNA linker hybridization) are designed. An aptamer specific to the target and a DNA linker complementary to a part of the aptamer sequence are immobilized onto separate MNPs. Hybridization of the DNA linker and the aptamer induces formation of MNP clusters. The target-to-aptamer binding on MNPs...

  14. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Cheng, Mark M C; Chen, Pai-Yen; Le, Khai Q

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule–silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the ‘Internet of Nano-Things’. (paper)

  15. Experimental Detection of Branching at a Conical Intersection in a Highly Fluorescent Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazard, Johanna; Bizimana, Laurie A; Gellen, Tobias; Carbery, William P; Turner, Daniel B

    2016-01-07

    Conical intersections are molecular configurations at which adiabatic potential-energy surfaces touch. They are predicted to be ubiquitous, yet condensed-phase experiments have focused on the few systems with clear spectroscopic signatures of negligible fluorescence, high photoactivity, or femtosecond electronic kinetics. Although rare, these signatures have become diagnostic for conical intersections. Here we detect a coherent surface-crossing event nearly two picoseconds after optical excitation in a highly fluorescent molecule that has no photoactivity and nanosecond electronic kinetics. Time-frequency analysis of high-sensitivity measurements acquired using sub-8 fs pulses reveals phase shifts of the signal due to branching of the wavepacket through a conical intersection. The time-frequency analysis methodology demonstrated here on a model compound will enable studies of conical intersections in molecules that do not exhibit their diagnostic signatures. Improving the ability to detect conical intersections will enrich the understanding of their mechanistic role in molecular photochemistry.

  16. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  17. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  18. Nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for in vitro detection of small molecule metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites secreted by pathological processes can act as molecular biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. In vitro detection of the metabolites such as glucose and reactive oxygen species is of great significance for precise screening, monitoring and prognosis of metabolic disorders and relevant diseases such as cancer, and has been under intense research and development in clinical chemistry and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize recent developments in nanomaterial based electrochemical (bio)sensors for in vitro detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species and the progress in utilizing lightweight and flexible electrodes and micro/nanoscale electrodes for flexible and miniaturized sensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-07

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ∼7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection.

  1. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  2. Putting prions into focus: application of single molecule detection to the diagnosis of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, A; Bieschke, J; Eigen, M; Kretzschmar, H A

    2000-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the cerebral deposition of an aggregated pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) which constitutes the principal component of the transmissible agent termed prion. In order to develop a highly sensitive method for the detection of PrP(Sc) aggregates in biological samples such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we used a method based on Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), a technique which allows detection of single fluorescently labeled molecules in solution. Within the FCS setup, fluorescent photons emitted by molecules passing an open volume element defined by the beam of an excitation laser focussed into a diffraction-limited spot are imaged confocally onto a single photon counting detector. Aggregates of PrP(Sc) could be labeled by co-aggregation of probe molecules such as monomeric recombinant PrP or PrP-specific antibodies tagged with a fluorescent dye. In addition to slow diffusion, labeled aggregates are characterized by high fluorescence intensity, which allows detection and quantification by analysis of fluorescence intensity distribution. To improve detection of rare target particles, the accessible volume element was increased by scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). To further improve sensitivity and specificity, two different probes were used simultaneously in a two-color setup. In a diagnostic model system of CSF spiked with purified prion rods, dual-color SIFT was more sensitive than Western blot analysis. In addition, a PrP(Sc)-specific signal was also detected in a number of CSF samples derived from CJD patients but not in controls.

  3. Photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules: Production, detection, and rotational depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Suits, Arthur G.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We describe the product polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules. ► The polarization is written in terms of the anisotropy transforming coefficients. ► We studied the role of the angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation. ► We present a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal. - Abstract: We present the fully quantum mechanical distribution of the photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of an isotropic ensemble of symmetric top molecules. The distribution is written in terms of the recently established anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K (P.S. Shternin, O.S. Vasyutinskii, Chem. Phys. 128 (2008) 194314) which contain all dynamical information on the photolysis dynamics and can be either determined from experiment, or calculated from theory. Explicit expressions for the coefficients c k d q k K for the case of photolysis of symmetric top molecules were obtained within the full quantum mechanical approach and then simplified using the quasiclassical approximation in the high-J limit. The role of the photofragment angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation was analyzed for three important particular cases: photolysis of diatomic molecules, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of atomic photofragments are detected, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of molecular photofragments are detected. The obtained rotation factors were compared with the results of previous studies. The paper also presents a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal which can be used for direct determination of the coefficients c k d q k K from experiment. A comparison was made between the anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K and the polarization parameters A q K introduced very recently by (T.P. Rakitzis, A.J. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys

  4. Enhanced NMR signal detection of imino protons in RNA molecules containing 3' dangling nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amborski, Andrew N.; Johnson, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for improving the quality of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra involving exchangeable protons near the base of the stem of RNA hairpin molecules. NMR spectra of five different RNA hairpins were compared. These hairpins consisted of a native RNA structure and four molecules each having different unpaired, or dangling, nucleotides at the 3' end. NMR experiments were acquired in water for each construct and the quality of the imino proton spectral regions were examined. The imino resonances near the base of the stem of the wild type RNA structure were not observed due to breathing motions. However, a significant increase in spectral quality for molecules with dangling 3' adenosine or guanosine nucleotides was observed, with imino protons detected in these constructs that were not observed in the wild type construct. A modest improvement in spectral quality was seen for the construct with a 3' unpaired uridine, whereas no significant improvement was observed for a 3' unpaired cytidine. This improvement in NMR spectral quality mirrors the increased thermodynamic stability observed for 3' unpaired nucleotides which is dependant on the stacking interactions of these nucleotides against the base of the stem. The use of a dangling 3' adenosine nucleotide represents an easy method to significantly improve the quality of NMR spectra of RNA molecules

  5. On the Detectability of CO Molecules in the Interstellar Medium via X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachimi, Katerine; Gatuzz, Efrain; Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the detectability of CO molecules in the Galactic interstellar medium using high-resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. We analysed 10 bright low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) to study the CO contribution in their line of sights. A total of 25 observations were fitted with the ISMabs X-ray absorption model which includes photoabsorption cross-sections for Oi, Oii, Oiii and CO. We performed a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation analysis of the goodness of fit in order to estimate the significance of the CO detection. We determine that the statistical analysis prevents a significant detection of CO molecular X-ray absorption features, except for the lines of sight towards XTE J1718-330 and 4U 1636-53. In the case of XTE J1817-330, this is the first report of the presence of CO along its line of sight. Our results reinforce the conclusion that molecules have a minor contribution to the absorption features in the O K-edge spectral region. We estimate a CO column density lower limit to perform a significant detection with XMM-Newton of N(CO) greater than 6 x 10(exp 16) per sq cm for typical exposure times.

  6. Supramolecular Chemistry: New chemodosimeters and hybrid materials for the chromo-fluorogenic detection of anions and neutral molecules

    OpenAIRE

    El Sayed Shehata Nasr, Sameh

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Abstract The present PhD thesis entitled "Supramolecular Chemistry: New chemodosimeters and hybrid materials for the chromo-fluorogenic detection of anions and neutral molecules" is based on the application of supramolecular chemistry and material science principles for the development of optical chemosensors for anions and neutral molecules detection. The second chapter of this PhD thesis is devoted to the preparation of chemodosimeters for the chromo-fluorogenic detection of f...

  7. Topoisomerase I as a Biomarker: Detection of Activity at the Single Molecule Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proszek, Joanna; Roy, Amit; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine

    2014-01-01

    of hTopI cleavage-religation activity at the single molecule level, may be used to detect posttranslational enzymatic differences influencing CPT response. These differences cannot be detected by analysis of hTopI gene copy number, mRNA amount, or protein amount, and only become apparent upon measuring......Human topoisomerase I (hTopI) is an essential cellular enzyme. The enzyme is often upregulated in cancer cells, and it is a target for chemotherapeutic drugs of the camptothecin (CPT) family. Response to CPT-based treatment is dependent on hTopI activity, and reduction in activity, and mutations...... in hTopI have been reported to result in CPT resistance. Therefore, hTOPI gene copy number, mRNA level, protein amount, and enzyme activity have been studied to explain differences in cellular response to CPT. We show that Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD), allowing measurement...

  8. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  9. Detection of tmRNA molecules on microarrays at low temperatures using helper oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinski, Lauris; Scheler, Ott; Parkel, Sven; Palta, Priit; Toome, Kadri; Kurg, Ants; Remm, Maido

    2010-04-28

    The hybridization of synthetic Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA on a detection microarray is slow at 34 degrees C resulting in low signal intensities. We demonstrate that adding specific DNA helper oligonucleotides (chaperones) to the hybridization buffer increases the signal strength at a given temperature and thus makes the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA more sensitive. No loss of specificity was observed at low temperatures compared to hybridization at 46 degrees C. The effect of the chaperones can be explained by disruption of the strong secondary and tertiary structure of the target RNA by the selective hybridization of helper molecules. The amplification of the hybridization signal strength by chaperones is not necessarily local; we observed increased signal intensities in both local and distant regions of the target molecule. The sensitivity of the detection of tmRNA at low temperature can be increased by chaperone oligonucleotides. Due to the complexity of RNA secondary and tertiary structures the effect of any individual chaperone is currently not predictable.

  10. Detection of tmRNA molecules on microarrays at low temperatures using helper oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palta Priit

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hybridization of synthetic Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA on a detection microarray is slow at 34°C resulting in low signal intensities. Results We demonstrate that adding specific DNA helper oligonucleotides (chaperones to the hybridization buffer increases the signal strength at a given temperature and thus makes the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA more sensitive. No loss of specificity was observed at low temperatures compared to hybridization at 46°C. The effect of the chaperones can be explained by disruption of the strong secondary and tertiary structure of the target RNA by the selective hybridization of helper molecules. The amplification of the hybridization signal strength by chaperones is not necessarily local; we observed increased signal intensities in both local and distant regions of the target molecule. Conclusions The sensitivity of the detection of tmRNA at low temperature can be increased by chaperone oligonucleotides. Due to the complexity of RNA secondary and tertiary structures the effect of any individual chaperone is currently not predictable.

  11. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  12. Numerical Study of Plasmonic Efficiency of Gold Nanostripes for Molecule Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grosges

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasmonics, the accurate computation of the electromagnetic field enhancement is necessary in determining the amplitude and the spatial extension of the field around nanostructures. Here, the problem of the interaction between an electromagnetic excitation and gold nanostripes is solved. An optimization scheme, including an adaptive remeshing process with error estimator, is used to solve the problem through a finite element method. The variations of the electromagnetic field amplitude and the plasmonic active zones around nanostructures for molecule detection are studied in this paper taking into account the physical and geometrical parameters of the nanostripes. The evolution between the sizes and number of nanostripes is shown.

  13. In Situ Detection of Organic Molecules on the Martian Surface With the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) on Exomars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Arevalo, Ricardo D., Jr.; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars rover will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. The MOMA instrument is centered around a miniaturized linear ion trap (LIT) that facilitates two modes of operation: i) pyrolysisgas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrGC-MS); and, ii) laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) at ambient Mars pressures. The LIT also enables the structural characterization of complex molecules via complementary analytical capabilities, such as multi-frequency waveforms (i.e., SWIFT) and tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS). When combined with the complement of instruments in the rovers Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds.

  14. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  15. Probing non polar interstellar molecules through their protonated form: Detection of protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agúndez, M; Cernicharo, J; de Vicente, P; Marcelino, N; Roueff, E; Fuente, A; Gerin, M; Guélin, M; Albo, C; Barcia, A; Barbas, L; Bolaño, R; Colomer, F; Diez, M C; Gallego, J D; Gómez-González, J; López-Fernández, I; López-Fernández, J A; López-Pérez, J A; Malo, I; Serna, J M; Tercero, F

    2015-07-01

    Cyanogen (NCCN) is the simplest member of the series of dicyanopolyynes. It has been hypothesized that this family of molecules can be important constituents of interstellar and circumstellar media, although the lack of a permanent electric dipole moment prevents its detection through radioastronomical techniques. Here we present the first solid evidence of the presence of cyanogen in interstellar clouds through the detection of its protonated form toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L483. Protonated cyanogen (NCCNH + ) has been identified through the J = 5 - 4 and J = 10 - 9 rotational transitions using the 40m radiotelescope of Yebes and the IRAM 30m telescope. We derive beam averaged column densities for NCCNH + of (8.6 ± 4.4) × 10 10 cm -2 in TMC-1 and (3.9 ± 1.8) × 10 10 cm -2 in L483, which translate to fairly low fractional abundances relative to H 2 , in the range (1-10) × 10 -12 . The chemistry of protonated molecules in dark clouds is discussed, and it is found that, in general terms, the abundance ratio between the protonated and non protonated forms of a molecule increases with increasing proton affinity. Our chemical model predicts an abundance ratio NCCNH + /NCCN of ~ 10 -4 , which implies that the abundance of cyanogen in dark clouds could be as high as (1-10) × 10 -8 relative to H 2 , i.e., comparable to that of other abundant nitriles such as HCN, HNC, and HC 3 N.

  16. Theoretical analysis of bimetallic nanorod dimer biosensors for label-free molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avijit; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we theoretically analyze a gold (Au) core within silver (Ag) shell (Au@Ag) nanorod dimer biosensor for label-free molecule detection. The incident light on an Au@Ag nanorod strongly couples to localized surface plasmon modes, especially around the tip region. The field enhancement around the tip of a nanorod or between the tips of two longitudinally aligned nanorods as in a dimer can be exploited for sensitive detection of biomolecules. We derive analytical expressions for the interactions of an Au@Ag nanorod dimer with the incident light. We also study the detail dynamics of an Au@Ag nanorod dimer with the incident light computationally using finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when core-shell ratio, relative position of the nanorods, and angle of incidence of light change. We find that the results obtained using the developed analytical model match well with that obtained using FDTD simulations. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of the Au@Ag nanorod dimer, i.e., shift in the resonance wavelength, when a target biomolecule such as lysozyme (Lys), human serum albumin (HSA), anti-biotin (Abn), human catalase (CAT), and human fibrinogen (Fb) protein molecules are attached to the tips of the nanorods.

  17. The Detection of Hot Cores and Complex Organic Molecules in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Charnley, Steven B.; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Oliveira, Joana M.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Ward, Jacob L.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wiseman, Jennifer; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko; Meixner, Margaret; Onishi, Toshikazu; Schilke, Peter

    2018-02-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of the complex organic molecules (COMs) dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These COMs, together with their parent species methanol (CH3OH), were detected toward two 1.3 mm continuum sources in the N 113 star-forming region in the low-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Rotational temperatures ({T}{rot}∼ 130 K) and total column densities ({N}{rot}∼ {10}16 cm‑2) have been calculated for each source based on multiple transitions of CH3OH. We present the ALMA molecular emission maps for COMs and measured abundances for all detected species. The physical and chemical properties of two sources with COMs detection, and the association with H2O and OH maser emission, indicate that they are hot cores. The fractional abundances of COMs scaled by a factor of 2.5 to account for the lower metallicity in the LMC are comparable to those found at the lower end of the range in Galactic hot cores. Our results have important implications for studies of organic chemistry at higher redshift.

  18. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimle, Timothy [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  19. High Selective Gas Detection for small molecules based on Germanium selenide monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Qun; Wang, Zeping; Ye, Huaiyu; Chen, Xianping; Fan, Xuejun; Zhang, Guoqi

    2018-03-01

    Predictive calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are used here to study the electronic and optical properties of GeSe monolayer after adsorbing gas molecules (O2, NH3, SO2, H2, CO2, H2S, NO2, CH4, H2O, NO, CO). Our results reveal that for all the gas molecules considered, only NH3 is adsorbed on GeSe monolayer by physisorption. Whereas SO2 and NO2 are chemisorbed on GeSe monolayer with strong adsorption energies. In addition, the adsorption of O2, NO and NO2 distinctly enhances the optical absorbance and broaden the absorbance range of GeSe monolayer in visible light region. Also, it is found that the adsorption of H2S, NO and NH3 can reduce the work function of the GeSe monolayer. The results indicate that GeSe monolayer is not only a promising candidate for the sensing, capture, and storage of NH3, but also an anticipated disposable gas sensor or metal-free catalyst for detecting and catalyzing SO2 and NO2. Furthermore, it has excellent potential to be applied to optical sensors, solar cells, nanoelectronics or optoelectronics devices.

  20. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  1. Aptamer/quantum dot-based simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haixia [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang Bingying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400040 (China); Xiang Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zhang Yuyong; Chai Yaqin [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-03-04

    A novel strategy for 'signal on' and sensitive one-spot simultaneous detection of multiple small molecular analytes based on electrochemically encoded barcode quantum dot (QD) tags is described. The target analytes, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cocaine, respectively, are sandwiched between the corresponding set of surface-immobilized primary binding aptamers and the secondary binding aptamer/QD bioconjugates. The captured QDs yield distinct electrochemical signatures after acid dissolution, whose position and size reflect the identity and level, respectively, of the corresponding target analytes. Due to the inherent amplification feature of the QD labels and the 'signal on' detection scheme, as well as the sensitive monitoring of the metal ions released upon acid dissolution of the QD labels, low detection limits of 30 nM and 50 nM were obtained for ATP and cocaine, respectively, in our assays. Our multi-analyte sensing system also shows high specificity to target analytes and promising applicability to complex sample matrix, which makes the proposed assay protocol an attractive route for screening of small molecules in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Methods for Detection of Families of Molecules in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Glen

    2014-06-01

    We present a high velocity resolution (0.04 km/sec) molecular line survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud in the frequency range 39 to 48 GHz with NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank telescope (GBT). The observing method and data reduction process are outlined. We describe the method of obtaining the calibrated, averaged spectral line data online. The RMS survey sensitivity was slightly different for each 200MHz frequency band, and ranged from 0.02 to 0.15 K (T_B) for the different bands. A large number of molecular lines are detected, most of which have previously been associated with already known interstellar molecules. We present a summary processes to combine a number of lines of molecular species in order to identify new species.

  3. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Resonant-Gravimetric Detection of Trace-Level Xylene Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xu, Pengcheng; Zheng, Dan; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-12-20

    As one of typical VOCs, xylene is seriously harmful to human health. Nowadays, however, there is really lack of portable sensing method to directly detect environmental xylene that has chemical inertness. Especially when the concentration of xylene is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb, people are indeed hard to be aware of and avoid this harmful vapor. Herein the metal-organic framework (MOF) of HKUST-1 is first explored for sensing to the nonpolar molecule of p-xylene. And the sensing mechanism is identified that is via host-guest interaction of MOF with xylene molecule. By loading MOFs on mass-gravimetric resonant-cantilevers, sensing experiments for four MOFs of MOF-5, HKUST-1, ZIF-8, and MOF-177 approve that HKUST-1 has the highest sensitivity to p-xylene. The resonant-gravimetric sensing experiments with our HKUST-1 based sensors have demonstrated that trace-level p-xylene of 400 ppb can be detected that is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb. We analyze that the specificity of HKUST-1 to xylene comes from Cu 2+ -induced moderate Lewis acidity and the "like dissolves like" interaction of the benzene ring. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to elucidate the adsorbing/sensing mechanism of HKUST-1 to p-xylene, where p-xylene adsorbing induced blue-shift phenomenon is observed that confirms the sensing mechanism. Our study also indicates that the sensor shows good selectivity to various kinds of common interfering gases. And the long-term repeatability and stability of the sensing material are also approved for the usage/storage period of two months. This research approves that the MOF materials exhibit potential usages for high performance chemical sensors applications.

  4. Detection, Characterization, and Biological Effect of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Molecules in Peanut-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giordano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Bradyrhizobium are able to establish a symbiotic relationship with peanut (Arachis hypogaea root cells and to fix atmospheric nitrogen by converting it to nitrogenous compounds. Quorum sensing (QS is a cell-cell communication mechanism employed by a variety of bacterial species to coordinate behavior at a community level through regulation of gene expression. The QS process depends on bacterial production of various signaling molecules, among which the N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are most commonly used by Gram-negative bacteria. Some previous reports have shown the production of QS signaling molecules by various rhizobia, but little is known regarding mechanisms of communication among peanut-nodulating strains. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize QS signals produced by peanut-nodulating bradyrhizobial strains and to evaluate their effects on processes related to cell interaction. Detection of AHLs in 53 rhizobial strains was performed using the biosensor strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4 and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 for AHLs with long and short acyl chains, respectively. None of the strains screened were found to produce AHLs with short acyl chains, but 14 strains produced AHLs with long acyl chains. These 14 AHL-producing strains were further studied by quantification of β-galactosidase activity levels (AHL-like inducer activity in NTL4 (pZLR4. Strains displaying moderate to high levels of AHL-like inducer activity were subjected to chemical identification of signaling molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. For each AHL-producing strain, we found at least four different AHLs, corresponding to N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C6, N-(3-oxodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC10, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12, and N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC14. Biological roles of 3OC10, 3OC12, and 3OC14 AHLs

  5. A magnetic nanoparticle-clustering biosensor for blu-ray based optical detection of small-molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins

    2014-01-01

    -cost instruments limit the advancement of MNP-based assays. We report here a novel MNP-clustering small-molecule assay on an optical readout platform to overcome the limitations aforementioned with the following improvements. First, a facile MNP-clustering assay applicable to diverse small-molecules was realized......In magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-clustering assays, a target molecule is bound to multiple receptors tethered onto MNPs, triggering MNP-clustering and leading to changes in the size of clusters. However, sandwich-type clustering requires multiple binding-sites on a target molecule, which is often...... unavailable for small-molecules. Furthermore, measuring magnetic properties as signals is not intrinsically selective regarding MNP-cluster size. Thus, the detection of few MNP-clusters is readily interfered by background signals from predominantly-existing single MNPs. Additionally, bulky and high...

  6. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Ott; Kaplinski, Lauris; Glynn, Barry; Palta, Priit; Parkel, Sven; Toome, Kadri; Maher, Majella; Barry, Thomas; Remm, Maido; Kurg, Ants

    2011-02-28

    We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification) amplification, for sensitivity. We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  7. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toome Kadri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification amplification, for sensitivity. Results We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. Conclusions The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  8. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scheler, Ott

    2011-02-28

    Abstract Background We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification) amplification, for sensitivity. Results We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal\\/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. Conclusions The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  9. Single Molecule Arrays for ultra-sensitive detection of rat cytokines in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Limor; Xie, Liangxia; Xylas, Mark E; Walt, David R

    2018-01-01

    Rats are used as animal models for many human diseases. Cytokines can serve as biomarkers indicative of these diseases or disease states. Techniques for measuring cytokine expression levels often do not provide the sensitivity needed to measure these biomarkers in biological fluids because the concentrations of many cytokines are below the detection limits of conventional methods. In this paper, we present ultra-sensitive digital immunoassays using Single Molecule Arrays (Simoa) for seven rat cytokines: TNF-α, IL-10, IL-17F, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-1α. These ultra-sensitive immunoassays have limits of detection (LODs) in the femtomolar range and provide the ability to measure rat cytokines in serum below the LODs of conventional immunoassays. We also measured these cytokines in healthy rat serum to obtain baseline levels. The ability to measure cytokines present at low concentrations in rat serum will facilitate future studies of disease using rats as animal models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An integrated system for optical and electrical detection of single molecules/particles inside a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Gao, Rui; Ying, Yi-Lun; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore techniques have proven to be useful tools for single-molecule detection. The combination of optical detection and ionic current measurements enables a new possibility for the parallel readout of multiple nanopores without complex nanofluidics and embedded electrodes. In this study, we developed a new integrated system for the label-free optical and electrical detection of single molecules based on a metal-coated nanopore. The entire system, containing a dark-field microscopy system and an ultralow current detection system with high temporal resolution, was designed and fabricated. An Au-coated nanopore was used to generate the optical signal. Light scattering from a single Au-coated nanopore was measured under a dark-field microscope. A lab-built ultralow current detection system was designed for the correlated optical and electrical readout. This integrated system might provide more direct and detailed information on single analytes inside the nanopore compared with classical ionic current measurements.

  11. Chemical polyglycosylation and nanolitre detection enables single-molecule recapitulation of bacterial sugar export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbing; Almond, Andrew; Bayley, Hagan; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-05-01

    The outermost protective layer of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is composed of bacterial capsular polysaccharides. Insights into the interactions between the capsular polysaccharide and its transporter and the mechanism of sugar export would not only increase our understanding of this key process, but would also help in the design of novel therapeutics to block capsular polysaccharide export. Here, we report a nanolitre detection system that makes use of the bilayer interface between two droplets, and we use this system to study single-molecule recapitulation of sugar export. A synthetic strategy of polyglycosylation based on tetrasaccharide monomers enables ready synthetic access to extended fragments of K30 oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Examination of the interactions between the Escherichia coli sugar transporter Wza and very small amounts of fragments of the K30 capsular polysaccharide substrate reveal the translocation of smaller but not larger fragments. We also observe capture events that occur only on the intracellular side of Wza, which would complement coordinated feeding by adjunct biosynthetic machinery.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Optical Detection and Recognition of Single Biological Molecules Using Coherent Dynamics of Exciton-Plasmon Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S M; Hood, B; Patty, K D; Mao, C-B

    2013-08-20

    We use quantum coherence in a system consisting of one metallic nanorod and one semi-conductor quantum dot to investigate a plasmonic nanosensor capable of digital optical detection and recognition of single biological molecules. In such a sensor the adsorption of a specific molecule to the nanorod turns off the emission of the system when it interacts with an optical pulse having a certain intensity and temporal width. The proposed quantum sensors can count the number of molecules of the same type or differentiate between molecule types with digital optical signals that can be measured with high certainty. We show that these sensors are based on the ultrafast upheaval of coherent dynamics of the system and the removal of coherent blockage of energy transfer from the quantum dot to the nanorod once the adsorption process has occurred.

  13. Single molecule upconversion-linked immunosorbent assay with extended dynamic range for the sensitive detection of diagnostic biomarkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farka, Z.; Matthias, J. M.; Hlaváček, Antonín; Skládal, P.; Gorris, H H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, NOV (2017), s. 11825-11830 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : photon upconversion * immunoassay * single molecule detection Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  14. Selective trace gas detection of complex molecules with a continuous wave optical parametric oscillator using a planar jet expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Verbraak, H.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a trace gas detection method for complex molecules using continuous cavity ring-down spectroscopy in combination with a continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (tunability wavelength: 2.8-4.8 mu m; power: 1 W) sampling a supersonic planar jet expansion (nozzle dimension: 3

  15. Single molecule upconversion-linked immunosorbent assay with extended dynamic range for the sensitive detection of diagnostic biomarkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farka, Z.; Matthias, J. M.; Hlaváček, Antonín; Skládal, P.; Gorris, H H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, NOV (2017), s. 11825-11830 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : photon upconversion * immunoassay * single molecule detection Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  16. Handling and Sensing of Single Enzyme Molecules: From Fluorescence Detection towards Nanoscale Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Chi, Qijin; Lemay, Serge G.

    2016-01-01

    advances in all-electrical single enzyme studies with a focus on recent micro- and nanofluidic tools, which offer new ways of handling and studying small numbers of molecules or even single enzyme molecules. We particularly emphasize nanofluidic devices, which enable the integration of electrochemical...

  17. Optical and Electrical Detection of Single Molecule Translocation through Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weisi; Pang, Pei; He, Jin; Lindsay, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Ion current through a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was monitored at the same time as fluorescence was recorded from charged dye molecules translocating through the SWCNT. Fluorescence bursts generally follow ion-current peaks with a delay time consistent with diffusion from the end of the SWCNT to the fluorescence collection point. The fluorescence amplitude distribution of the bursts is consistent with single molecule signals. Thus each peak in the ion current flowing through the SWCNT is associated with the translocation of a single molecule. Ion current peaks (as opposed to blockades) were produced by both positively (Rhodamine 6G) and negatively (Alexa 546) charged molecules, showing that the charge filtering responsible for the current bursts is caused by the molecules themselves. PMID:23248975

  18. Histochemical detection of acetogenins and storage molecules in the endosperm of Annona macroprophyllata Donn Sm. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna Hernández, G; Brechú-Franco, A E; De la Cruz-Chacón, I; González-Esquinca, A R

    2015-07-09

    Acetogenins (ACGs) are bioactive compounds with cytotoxic properties in different cell lines. They are antitumoural, antiparasitic, antimalarial, insecticidal, antimicrobial, antifungal and antibacterial. These secondary metabolites function in plant defence and are found in specific organelles and specific cells, thereby preventing toxicity to the plant itself and permitting site-specific defence. The aim of this work was to histochemically determine the in situ localisation of ACGs in the endosperm of Annona macroprophyllata seeds using Kedde's reagent. Additionally, the colocalisation of ACGs with other storage molecules was analysed. The seeds were analysed after 6 and 10 days of imbibition, when 1 or 2 cm of the radicle had emerged and metabolism was fully established. The seeds were then transversally cut in half at the midline and processed using different histological and histochemical techniques. Positive reactions with Kedde's reagent were only observed in fresh, unfixed sections that were preserved in water, and staining was found only in the large cells (the idioblasts) at the periphery of the endosperm. The ACGs' positive reaction with Sudan III corroborated their lipid nature. Paraffin sections stained with Naphthol Blue Black showed reactions in the endosperm parenchyma cells and stained the proteoplasts blue, indicating that they might correspond to storage sites for albumin-like proteins. Lugol's iodine, which is similar in chemical composition to Wagner's reagent, caused a golden brown reaction product in the cytoplasm of the idioblasts, which may indicate the presence of alkaloids. Based on these results, we propose that Kedde's reagent is an appropriate histochemical stain for detecting ACGs in situ in idioblasts and that idioblasts store ACGs and probably alkaloids. ACGs that are located in idioblasts found in restricted, peripheral areas of the endosperm could serve as a barrier that protects the seeds against insects and pathogen attack.

  19. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  20. Mechanochromic Fluorescent Probe Molecules for Damage Detection in Aerospace Polymers and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Ryan E.

    The detection of damage in aerospace composites can be improved by incorporation of mechanochromic fluorescent probe molecules into the polymers used in composite parts. This study focuses on a novel series of mechanochromic probes, AJNDE15 and AJNDE17, which are incorporated in structural epoxy resin DGEBA-DETA. Chapter 1 details the characterization of the DGEBA-DETA epoxy system used in this study. The important characteristics of DGEBA-DETA's response to mechanical loading will be discussed within the larger field of glassy amorphous polymer deformation. The mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of DGEBA-DETA relevant to this work will be measured using standardized techniques and instrumentation. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on the mechanochromic probes AJNDE15 and AJNDE17 in the DGEBA-DETA system. Chapter 2 presents research designed to identify the mechanism through which the probes display mechanochromism. The possible mechanochromic mechanisms are introduced in a literature review. Research on these probes in DGEBA-DETA will be presented and discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms, and the mechanism that best fits the results will be identified as a mechanochemical reaction. Chapter 3 continues the analysis of the mechanochromism of the probes in DGEBA-DETA. The kinetics of the mechanochromic reaction will be studied and compared with the current understanding of glassy polymer deformation. Possible models for the molecular interactions responsible for mechanochromism in this system will be put forward. Research will be presented to evaluate the mechanochromism kinetics and for comparison with the behavior predicted by the models.

  1. Immunological detection of small organic molecules in the presence of perchlorates: relevance to the life marker chip and life detection on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Catherine S; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2011-11-01

    The proposed ExoMars mission, due to launch in 2018, aims to look for evidence of extant and extinct life in martian rocks and regolith. Previous attempts to detect organic molecules of biological or abiotic origin on Mars have been unsuccessful, which may be attributable to destruction of these molecules by perchlorate salts during pyrolysis sample extraction techniques. Organic molecules can also be extracted and measured with solvent-based systems. The ExoMars payload includes the Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument, capable of detecting biomarker molecules of extant and extinct Earth-like life in liquid extracts of martian samples with an antibody microarray assay. The aim of the work reported here was to investigate whether the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those at the NASA Phoenix landing site, would compromise the LMC extraction and detection method. To test this, we implemented an LMC-representative sample extraction process with an LMC-representative antibody assay and used these to extract and analyze a model sample that consisted of a Mars analog sample matrix (JSC Mars-1) spiked with a representative organic molecular target (pyrene, an example of abiotic meteoritic infall targets) in the presence of perchlorate salts. We found no significant change in immunoassay function when using pyrene standards with added perchlorate salts. When model samples spiked with perchlorate salts were subjected to an LMC-representative liquid extraction, immunoassays functioned in a liquid extract and detected extracted pyrene. For the same model sample matrix without perchlorate salts, we observed anomalous assay signals that coincided with yellow coloration of the extracts. This unexpected observation is being studied further. This initial study indicates that the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those detected at the NASA Phoenix landing site, is unlikely to prevent the LMC from extracting and detecting organic molecules from

  2. Digital Microfluidics Assisted Sealing of Individual Magnetic Particles in Femtoliter-Sized Reaction Wells for Single-Molecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrop, Deborah; Ruiz, Elena Pérez; Kumar, Phalguni Tewari; Tripodi, Lisa; Kokalj, Tadej; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Digital microfluidics has emerged in the last years as a promising liquid handling technology for a variety of applications. Here, we describe in detail how to build up an electrowetting-on-dielectric-based digital microfluidic chip with unique advantages for performing single-molecule detection. We illustrate how superparamagnetic particles can be printed with very high loading efficiency (over 98 %) and single-particle resolution in the microwell array patterned in the Teflon-AF ® surface of the grounding plate of the chip. Finally, the potential of the device for its application to single-molecule detection is demonstrated by the ultrasensitive detection of the biotinylated enzyme β-Galactosidase captured on streptavidin-coated particles in the described platform.

  3. Functionalisation of the hinge region in receptor molecules for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2003-01-01

    The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Fast and efficient molecule detection in localization-based super-resolution microscopy by parallel adaptive histogram equalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Hedde, Per Niklas; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2013-06-25

    In localization-based super-resolution microscopy, individual fluorescent markers are stochastically photoactivated and subsequently localized within a series of camera frames, yielding a final image with a resolution far beyond the diffraction limit. Yet, before localization can be performed, the subregions within the frames where the individual molecules are present have to be identified-oftentimes in the presence of high background. In this work, we address the importance of reliable molecule identification for the quality of the final reconstructed super-resolution image. We present a fast and robust algorithm (a-livePALM) that vastly improves the molecule detection efficiency while minimizing false assignments that can lead to image artifacts.

  5. New Molecular Detections in TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Carbon-Chain and Aromatic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael

    2018-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles PA(N)Hs are believed to be widespread throughout the Universe, and are likely responsible for the unidentified infrared bands. However, the individual detection of aromatic molecules has been limited to a single weak absorption feature of an infrared bending mode of benzene (c-C6H6). The cold core TMC-1 has long been a source of new molecular detections, particularly for unsaturated carbon-rich molecules that are appealing potential precursors of PA(N)Hs. Through deep observations with the Green Bank Telescope of TMC-1, we report the first rotational detection of an aromatic molecule, benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN), along with 8 new isotopologues of HC5N and HC7N and an entirely new molecular family (HC5O, HC7O). These new detections provide crucial insights to the formation of PAHs and the underlying carbon-chain chemistry of dark clouds.

  6. Cathepsin G-mediated proteolytic degradation of MHC class I molecules to facilitate immune detection of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesch, David; Wagner, Johanna; Meid, Annika; Molenda, Nicole; Sienczyk, Marcin; Burkhardt, Jutta; Münch, Jan; Prokop, Lea; Stevanovic, Stefan; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Zimecki, Michal; Burster, Timo

    2016-03-01

    To mount an adaptive immune response, MHC I molecules present antigenic peptides to CTLs. Transcriptional reduction of MHC I molecules is a strategy of immune evasion, which impairs the detection of infected or tumorous cells by CTLs. Natural killer (NK) cells, on the other hand, eliminate target cells specifically in the absence of MHC I. Consequently, infected or tumorous cells partly retain their MHC I at the cell surface to avoid NK recognition. However, it remains unclear which protease degrades MHC I molecules and how these cells maintain a limited set of MHC I at the cell surface. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G (CatG), a serine protease, found in the endocytic compartment of APCs and, to a lesser extent, CatD and CatS proteolytically degrade MHC I molecules. Inhibition of CatG boosted MHC I expression at the cell surface of primary human immune cells. In contrast, human glioblastoma cells do not harbor active CatG and might have lost the ability to proteolytically degrade MHC I during tumorigenesis to avoid NK-mediated killing. Overexpression of CatG in glioblastoma cells resulted in a rapid and efficient MHC I degradation. In conclusion, CatG is an essential protease for regulating MHC I molecules and thus modulation of CatG activity might present a new avenue for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Fabrication of Chitosan-gold Nanocomposites Combined with Optical Fiber as SERS Substrates to Detect Dopamine Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jaewook; Kang, Ikjoong [Gachon Univ., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This research was aimed to fabricate an optical fiber-based SERS substrate which can detect dopamine neurotransmitters. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) were firstly anchored on the surface of optical fiber, and then gold layer was subseque N{sub T}ly deposited on the anchored chitosan NPs via electroless plating method. Finally, chitosan-gold nanocomposites combined with optical fiber reacted with dopamine molecules of 100-1500 mg/ day which is a standard daily dose for Parkinson's disease patientss. The amplified Raman signal at 1348 cm{sup -1} obtained from optical fiber-based SERS substrate was plotted versus dopamine concentrations (1-10 mM), demonstrating an approximate linearity of Y = 303.03X + 2385.8 (R{sup 2} = 0.97) with narrow margin errors. The optical fiber-based Raman system can be potentially applicable to in-vitro (or in-vivo) detection of probe molecules.

  8. Detection of single molecules with a scanning near-field optical microscope: Absorption and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakhotnik, T.V.

    1995-01-01

    An analysis is given of the absorption and emission of single molecules located in the waist of a Gaussian beam with diameter smaller than the wavelength of light or near a conducting flat screen with a round aperture. The intensity of light in the far field was determined from the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations with appropriate boundary conditions. It is shown that the intensity, shape, and position of absorption and luminescence spectral lines measured in a broad beam significantly change if a molecule is located near the waist or the aperture. If their diameter is far smaller than the wavelength of light, then the presence of a molecule that is resonant with the exciting field results in an increase in the intensity of light in the far field, i.e., in negative absorption. 19 refs., 3 figs

  9. MOCCA: A 4k-Pixel Molecule Camera for the Position- and Energy-Resolving Detection of Neutral Molecule Fragments at CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, L.; Schulz, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Kempf, S.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of MOCCA, a large-area particle detector that is developed for the position- and energy-resolving detection of neutral molecule fragments produced in electron-ion interactions at the Cryogenic Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The detector is based on metallic magnetic calorimeters and consists of 4096 particle absorbers covering a total detection area of 44.8 mathrm {mm} × 44.8 mathrm {mm}. Groups of four absorbers are thermally coupled to a common paramagnetic temperature sensor where the strength of the thermal link is different for each absorber. This allows attributing a detector event within this group to the corresponding absorber by discriminating the signal rise times. A novel readout scheme further allows reading out all 1024 temperature sensors that are arranged in a 32 × 32 square array using only 16+16 current-sensing superconducting quantum interference devices. Numerical calculations taking into account a simplified detector model predict an energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} le 80 mathrm {eV} for all pixels of this detector.

  10. Highly sensitivity adhesion molecules detection in hereditary haemochromatosis patients reveals altered expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Norris, S

    2012-02-01

    Several abnormalities in the immune status of patients with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) have been reported, suggesting an imbalance in their immune function. This may include persistent production of, or exposure to, altered immune signalling contributing to the pathogenesis of this disorder. Adhesion molecules L-, E- and P-Selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are some of the major regulators of the immune processes and altered levels of these proteins have been found in pathological states including cardiovascular diseases, arthritis and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to assess L-, E- and P-Selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in patients with HH and correlate these results with HFE mutation status and iron indexes. A total of 139 subjects were diagnosed with HH (C282Y homozygotes = 87, C282Y\\/H63D = 26 heterozygotes, H63D homozygotes = 26), 27 healthy control subjects with no HFE mutation (N\\/N), 18 normal subjects heterozygous for the H63D mutation served as age-sex-matched controls. We observed a significant decrease in L-selectin (P = 0.0002) and increased E-selectin and ICAM-1 (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0059) expression in HH patients compared with healthy controls. This study observes for the first time that an altered adhesion molecules profile occurs in patients with HH that is associated with specific HFE genetic component for iron overload, suggesting that differential expression of adhesion molecules may play a role in the pathogenesis of HH.

  11. A novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection of mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Michaelis, Monika; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2015-08-07

    We have developed a novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) capable of detecting mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with sub-nM sensitivity. The single-strand (ss) DNA aptamer used in this work is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg(2+)-T complexes in the presence of Hg(2+). The aptamer was conjugated to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe, and the adhesion force between the probe and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). The presence of Hg(2+) ions above a concentration threshold corresponding to the affinity constant of the ions for the aptamer (about 5 × 10(9) M(-1)) could be easily detected by a change of the measured adhesion force. With our chosen aptamer, we could reach an Hg(2+) detection limit of 100 pM, which is well below the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water. In addition, this aptasensor presents a very high selectivity for Hg(2+) over other metal cations, such as K(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Cd(2+). Furthermore, the effects of the ionic strength and loading rate on the Hg(2+) detection were evaluated. Its simplicity, reproducibility, high selectivity and sensitivity make our SMFS-based aptasensor advantageous with respect to other current Hg(2+) sensing methods. It is expected that our strategy can be exploited for monitoring the pollution of water environments and the safety of potentially contaminated food.

  12. Toward single-molecule detection with sensors based on propagating surface plasmons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnička, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Vala, Milan; Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2012), s. 163-165 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical biosenzor * single molecule * surface plasmon microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.385, year: 2012

  13. Detecting level crossings without solving the Hamiltonian. II. Applications to atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Raman, C.

    2007-01-01

    A number of interesting phenomena occur at points where the energy levels of an atom or a molecule (anti) cross as a function of some parameter such as an external field. In a previous paper [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140405 (2006)] we have outlined powerful mathematical techniques useful in identifying the parameter values at which such (avoided) crossings occur. In the accompanying article [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev A 75, 033405 (2007)] we have developed the mathematical basis of these algebraic techniques in some detail. In this article we apply these level-crossing methods to the spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field. In the case of atoms the final result is the derivation of a class of invariants of the Breit-Rabi Hamiltonian of magnetic resonance. These invariants completely describe the parametric symmetries of the Hamiltonian. In the case of molecules we present an indicator which can tell when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down without using any information about the molecular potentials other than the fact that they are real. We frame our discussion in the context of Feshbach resonances in the atom-pair 23 Na- 85 Rb which are of current interest

  14. Standoff Detection of Trace Molecules by Remote High Gain Backward Lasing in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-17

    lasing in air from numerous atomic species. Backward lasing may provide a high sensitivity method for the detection of greenhouse gases , gas leakage...backward lasing from natural constituents in air with the objective of developing revolutionary methods for standoff detection of trace gases . Backward...and Environment Congress, Canberra, Australia (2014), invited. 12. R. B. Miles and A. Dogariu, “"Flow Imaging and Standoff Detection by Dissociation

  15. Thermal Reactivity Of Organic Molecules With Perchlorates And The Detection Of Organics In Mars Samples With SAM Onboard Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, C.; Millan, M.; Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Guzman, M.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2017-12-01

    The search for organic molecules at the Mars surface is a key objective to assess the potential for habitability of the planet and to find biomarkers. Both the past Viking landers and the Curiosity rover of today carry onboard instruments based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with the aim to analyze the content of organics present in soil or rock samples. These instruments analyze the volatile compounds released from the samples submitted to thermal or chemical treatments. Even though these sample preparation processes are commonly used on Earth for their efficient extraction of organic materials from mineral matrixes, the presence of oxychlorines recently discovered in the Mars soil [1, 2] makes the process for space applications more complex and the results more difficult to interpret. Indeed, the release of volatile inorganic reactive molecules from oxychlorines during the sample heating process induces reactions of chlorination and oxidation of the organic molecules. For this reason, in an effort to contribute to the interpretation of the results obtained with the Viking/GCMS, and the MSL/SAM experiment our team currently operates on Mars, we started to study systematically the thermal reactivity of a series of organic molecules, of interest for Mars and life purposes, mixed with oxychlorines either detected or potentially present in the soil of Mars [3]. In this presentation, we will mainly focus on two sets of results that were obtained while studying the reactivity of calcium perchlorates with polyaromatic hydrocarbons, amino acids and carboxylic acids under pyrolytic conditions similar to those used in the SAM experiment. First of all, we will show the dependence of reactivity on the temperature of sublimation and decomposition of the individual components in the mixture and, secondly, we will discuss the detection of aromatic chlorinated species by SAM in samples collected at the Cumberland site from the results obtained in this study

  16. Capture, unfolding, and detection of individual tRNA molecules using a nanopore device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNA are the most common RNA molecules in cells and have critical roles as both translators of the genetic code and regulators of protein synthesis. As such, numerous methods have focused on studying tRNA abundance and regulation, with the most widely used methods being RNA-seq and microarrays. Though revolutionary to transcriptomics, these assays are limited by an inability to encode tRNA modifications in the requisite cDNA. These modifications are abundant in tRNA and critical to their function. Here we describe proof-of-concept experiments where individual tRNA molecules are examined as linear strands using a biological nanopore. This method utilizes an enzymatically ligated synthetic DNA adapter to concentrate tRNA at the lipid bilayer of the nanopore device and efficiently denature individual tRNA molecules as they are pulled through the α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopore. Additionally, the DNA adapter provides a loading site for ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29 DNAP, which acts as a brake on the translocating tRNA. This increases the dwell time of adapted tRNA in the nanopore, allowing us to identify the region of the nanopore signal that is produced by the translocating tRNA itself. Using adapter-modified E. coli tRNAfMet and tRNALys, we show that the nanopore signal during controlled translocation is dependent on the identity of the tRNA. This confirms that adapter-modified tRNA can translocate end-to-end through nanopores and provides the foundation for future work in direct sequencing of individual transfer RNA with a nanopore-based device.

  17. Capture, Unfolding, and Detection of Individual tRNA Molecules Using a Nanopore Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Abu-Shumays, Robin; Akeson, Mark; Bernick, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNA) are the most common RNA molecules in cells and have critical roles as both translators of the genetic code and regulators of protein synthesis. As such, numerous methods have focused on studying tRNA abundance and regulation, with the most widely used methods being RNA-seq and microarrays. Though revolutionary to transcriptomics, these assays are limited by an inability to encode tRNA modifications in the requisite cDNA. These modifications are abundant in tRNA and critical to their function. Here, we describe proof-of-concept experiments where individual tRNA molecules are examined as linear strands using a biological nanopore. This method utilizes an enzymatically ligated synthetic DNA adapter to concentrate tRNA at the lipid bilayer of the nanopore device and efficiently denature individual tRNA molecules, as they are pulled through the α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore. Additionally, the DNA adapter provides a loading site for ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29 DNAP), which acts as a brake on the translocating tRNA. This increases the dwell time of adapted tRNA in the nanopore, allowing us to identify the region of the nanopore signal that is produced by the translocating tRNA itself. Using adapter-modified Escherichia coli tRNAfMet and tRNALys, we show that the nanopore signal during controlled translocation is dependent on the identity of the tRNA. This confirms that adapter-modified tRNA can translocate end-to-end through nanopores and provide the foundation for future work in direct sequencing of individual transfer RNA with a nanopore-based device. PMID:26157798

  18. High-harmonic homodyne detection of the ultrafast dissociation of Br2 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, H J; Bertrand, J B; Corkum, P B; Villeneuve, D M

    2010-09-03

    We report the time-resolved observation of the photodissociation of Br2 using high-harmonic generation (HHG) as a probe. The simultaneous measurement of the high-harmonic and ion yields shows that high harmonics generated by the electronically excited state interfere with harmonics generated by the ground state. The resulting homodyne effect provides a high sensitivity to the excited state dynamics. We present a simple theoretical model that accounts for the main observations. Our experiment paves the way towards the dynamic imaging of molecules using HHG.

  19. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M., E-mail: m.h.m.janssen@vu.nl [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Powis, Ivan [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  20. Detection of circulating methylated opioid binding protein/cell adhesion molecule-like gene as a biomarker for ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Ma, Min; Tao, Guohua; Chen, Xiang; Xie, Wei; Wang, Ying; Cao, Xingjian

    2014-01-01

    Hypermethylation of the opioid binding protein/cell adhesion molecule-like (OPCML) gene is frequently observed in ovarian carcinoma. We evaluated the detection of circulating hypermethylated OPCML for detecting ovarian carcinoma and assessing its prognosis. We studied 85 tissue samples including 45 ovarian cancer tissues and 40 normal ovarian tissues and blood samples from 45 ovarian cancer patients and 20 healthy individuals. Bisulfite sequencing and methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-PCR (MSRE-PCR) were used to detect the frequency of OPCML hypermethylation. We detected that the frequency of OPCML hypermethylation for tissue and serum samples in ovarian carcinoma were 86.7% (39/45) and 80.0% (36/45), respectively, but none was detected in ovarian tissue and serum of healthy individuals. The frequency of OPCML hypermethylation in endometrioid carcinoma, serous cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma were 80.0%, 85.5%, 50.0%, 80.0%, and 100%, respectively (p > 0.05). The frequencies of OPCML hypermethylation in patients were also different in terms of tumor differentiation degree. We detected hypermethylated OPCML in the sera of 50% of well differentiated, 62.5% of moderately differentiated, 93.1% of poorly differentiated tumors (p ovarian carcinoma diagnosis.

  1. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  2. Flipping the switch: Tools for detecting small molecule inhibitors of staphylococcal virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Quave

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the expression of the accessory gene regulator (agr quorum sensing cascade, S. aureus is able to produce an extensive array of enzymes, hemolysins and immunomodulators essential to its ability to spread through the host tissues and cause disease. Many have argued for the discovery and development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs to augment existing antibiotics as adjuvant therapies. Here, we discuss the state-of-the-art tools that can be used to conduct screens for the identification of such QSIs. Examples include fluorescent reporters, MS-detection of autoinducing peptide (AIP production, agar plate methods for detection of hemolysins and lipase, HPLC-detection of hemolysins from supernatants, and cell-toxicity assays for detecting damage (or relief thereof against human keratinocyte (HaCat cells. In addition to providing a description of these various approaches, we also discuss their amenability to low-, medium- and high-throughput screening efforts for the identification of novel QSIs.

  3. Selective on site separation and detection of molecules in diluted solutions with super-hydrophobic clusters of plasmonic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco T.

    2014-01-01

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces are bio-inspired interfaces with a superficial texture that, in its most common evolution, is formed by a periodic lattice of silicon micro-pillars. Similar surfaces reveal superior properties compared to conventional flat surfaces, including very low friction coefficients. In this work, we modified meso-porous silicon micro-pillars to incorporate networks of metal nano-particles into the porous matrix. In doing so, we obtained a multifunctional-hierarchical system in which (i) at a larger micrometric scale, the super-hydrophobic pillars bring the molecules dissolved in an ultralow-concentration droplet to the active sites of the device, (ii) at an intermediate meso-scale, the meso-porous silicon film adsorbs the low molecular weight content of the solution and, (iii) at a smaller nanometric scale, the aggregates of silver nano-particles would measure the target molecules with unprecedented sensitivity. In the results, we demonstrated how this scheme can be utilized to isolate and detect small molecules in a diluted solution in very low abundance ranges. The presented platform, coupled to Raman or other spectroscopy techniques, is a realistic candidate for the protein expression profiling of biological fluids. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  4. Cell-based protein stabilization assays for the detection of interactions between small-molecule inhibitors and BRD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Jessica; Moosmayer, Dieter; Weiske, Joerg; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Herbst, Christopher; Jung, Marie; Haendler, Bernard; Bader, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Bromodomain protein 4 (BRD4), a member of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein family, acts as a central element in transcriptional elongation and plays essential roles in cell proliferation. Inhibition of BRD4 binding to acetylated histone tails via its two bromodomains, BD1 and BD2, with small-molecule inhibitors has been shown to be a valid strategy to prevent cancer growth. We have evaluated and established two novel assays that quantify the interaction of transfected BRD4 BD1 with chemical inhibitors inside cultured cells. Both methods are based on the principle of ligand-induced protein stabilization by which the binding of a small-molecule inhibitor stabilizes intracellular BRD4 BD1 and protects it from proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate the universal character of this principle by using two orthogonal, highly sensitive detection technologies for the quantification of BRD4 BD1 levels in cellular lysates: enzyme fragment complementation and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET). Upon optimization of both assays to a miniaturized high-throughput format, the methods were validated by testing a set of small-molecule BET inhibitors and comparing the results with those from a cell-free binding assay and a biophysical thermal shift assay. In addition, point mutations were introduced into BRD4 BD1, and the corresponding mutants were characterized in the TR-FRET stabilization assay. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  5. Data-Driven Techniques for Detecting Dynamical State Changes in Noisily Measured 3D Single-Molecule Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Calderon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical microscopes and nanoscale probes (AFM, optical tweezers, etc. afford researchers tools capable of quantitatively exploring how molecules interact with one another in live cells. The analysis of in vivo single-molecule experimental data faces numerous challenges due to the complex, crowded, and time changing environments associated with live cells. Fluctuations and spatially varying systematic forces experienced by molecules change over time; these changes are obscured by “measurement noise” introduced by the experimental probe monitoring the system. In this article, we demonstrate how the Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Switching Linear Dynamical System (HDP-SLDS of Fox et al. [IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 59] can be used to detect both subtle and abrupt state changes in time series containing “thermal” and “measurement” noise. The approach accounts for temporal dependencies induced by random and “systematic overdamped” forces. The technique does not require one to subjectively select the number of “hidden states” underlying a trajectory in an a priori fashion. The number of hidden states is simultaneously inferred along with change points and parameters characterizing molecular motion in a data-driven fashion. We use large scale simulations to study and compare the new approach to state-of-the-art Hidden Markov Modeling techniques. Simulations mimicking single particle tracking (SPT experiments are the focus of this study.

  6. Detection of trans-isomers of hydrocarbon residues of lipid molecules by IR absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhalovsky, I. S.; Samoylov, M. V.; Wileishikova, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is used for a comparative analysis of the trans-isomerization of double bonds in hydrocarbon residuals of lactic and hydrogenated lipids. The maximum of the absorption band of the trans-isomers for all the lipid samples is found to lie at 965 cm-1. An absorption band at 970 cm-1 is discovered in the spectra of the lactic lipids near the analytic band of the trans-isomers at 965 cm-1. Based on a gaussian approximation for their absorption spectral bands, the trans-isomer content in the lactic lipid samples is 10-11%. The absorption by lipid molecules at 970 cm-1 has to be taken into account when determining the trans-isomer content of fat and oil products.

  7. Single molecule Raman spectroscopic assay to detect transgene from GM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Ulhas S; Chavhan, Rahul L; Schulz, Burkhard; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    Substantial concerns have been raised for the safety of transgenics on human health and environment. Many organizations, consumer groups, and environmental agencies advocate for stringent regulations to avoid transgene products' contamination in food cycle or in nature. Here we demonstrate a novel approach using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect and quantify transgene from GM plants. We show a highly sensitive and accurate quantification of transgene DNA from multiple transgenic lines of Arabidopsis. The assay allows us to detect and quantify the transgenes as low as 0.10 pg without need for PCR-amplification. This technology is relatively cheap, quick, simple, and suitable for detection at low target concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Universal sensor based on the spectroscopy of glow discharge for the detection of traces of atoms or molecules in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atutov, S. N.; Galeyev, A. E.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Yakovlev, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    A sensitive and versatile sensor for the detection of traces of atoms or molecules in air based on the emission spectroscopy of glow discharge in air has been developed and studied. The advantages of this sensor compared to other well-known methods are that it renders the use of ultrahigh vacuum or cryogenic temperatures superfluous. The sensor is insensitive to the presence of water vapor (for example, in exhaled air) because of the absence of strong water lines in the visible spectral range. It has a high spectral selectivity limited only by Doppler broadening of the emission lines. The high selectivity of the sensor combined with a wide spectral range allows the detection of many toxic impurities, which can be present in air. Moreover, the spectral range used covers almost all biomarkers in exhaled air, making the proposed sensor extremely interesting for medical applications. To our knowledge, the proposed method is the first based on a glow discharge in air.

  9. Single-molecule detection of chaperonin dynamics through polarization rotation modulation of CdSe QD luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Araki, Daisuke; Miyashita, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Koudai; Arita, Mayuno; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment. - Highlights: • We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. • Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. • The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. • The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. • Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment

  10. Single molecule sequencing of free DNA from maternal plasma for noninvasive trisomy 21 detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Verweij, E. Joanne; van Iterson, Maarten; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Oepkes, Dick; van Lith, Jan M. M.; Hoffer, Mariëtte J. V.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Bakker, Egbert; Boon, Elles M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive fetal aneuploidy detection by use of free DNA from maternal plasma has recently been shown to be achievable by whole genome shotgun sequencing. The high-throughput next-generation sequencing platforms previously tested use a PCR step during sample preparation, which results in

  11. Exploring both sequence detection and restriction endonuclease cleavage kinetics by recognition site via single-molecule microfluidic trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weilin; Muller, Susan J

    2011-02-07

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a single-molecule microfluidic approach to both sequence detection and obtaining kinetic information for restriction endonucleases on dsDNA. In this method, a microfluidic stagnation point flow is designed to trap, hold, and linearize double-stranded (ds) genomic DNA to which a restriction endonuclease has been pre-bound sequence-specifically. By introducing the cofactor magnesium, we determine the binding location of the enzyme by the cleavage process of dsDNA as in optical restriction mapping, however here the DNA need not be immobilized on a surface. We note that no special labeling of the enzyme is required, which makes it simpler than our previous scheme using stagnation point flows for sequence detection. Our accuracy in determining the location of the recognition site is comparable to or better than other single molecule techniques due to the fidelity with which we can control the linearization of the DNA molecules. In addition, since the cleavage process can be followed in real time, information about the cleavage kinetics, and subtle differences in binding and cleavage frequencies among the recognition sites, may also be obtained. Data for the five recognition sites for the type II restriction endonuclease EcoRI on λ-DNA are presented as a model system. While the roles of the varying fluid velocity and tension along the chain backbone on the measured kinetics remain to be determined, we believe this new method holds promise for a broad range of studies of DNA-protein interactions, including the kinetics of other DNA cleavage processes, the dissociation of a restriction enzyme from the cleaved substrate, and other macromolecular cleavage processes.

  12. Detecting Darwinism from Molecules in the Enceladus Plumes, Jupiter's Moons, and Other Planetary Water Lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A

    2017-09-01

    To the astrobiologist, Enceladus offers easy access to a potential subsurface biosphere via the intermediacy of a plume of water emerging directly into space. A direct question follows: If we were to collect a sample of this plume, what in that sample, through its presence or its absence, would suggest the presence and/or absence of life in this exotic locale? This question is, of course, relevant for life detection in any aqueous lagoon that we might be able to sample. This manuscript reviews physical chemical constraints that must be met by a genetic polymer for it to support Darwinism, a process believed to be required for a chemical system to generate properties that we value in biology. We propose that the most important of these is a repeating backbone charge; a Darwinian genetic biopolymer must be a "polyelectrolyte." Relevant to mission design, such biopolymers are especially easy to recover and concentrate from aqueous mixtures for detection, simply by washing the aqueous mixtures across a polycharged support. Several device architectures are described to ensure that, once captured, the biopolymer meets two other requirements for Darwinism, homochirality and a small building block "alphabet." This approach is compared and contrasted with alternative biomolecule detection approaches that seek homochirality and constrained alphabets in non-encoded biopolymers. This discussion is set within a model for the history of the terran biosphere, identifying points in that natural history where these alternative approaches would have failed to detect terran life. Key Words: Enceladus-Life detection-Europa-Icy moon-Biosignatures-Polyelectrolyte theory of the gene. Astrobiology 17, 840-851.

  13. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  14. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China); Shi, Hanchang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Long, Feng, E-mail: longf04@ruc.edu.cn [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  15. Colorimetric sensor arrays based on pattern recognition for the detection of nitroaromatic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei; Dong, Xiao; Qiu, Lili; Yan, Zequn; Meng, Zihui; Xue, Min; He, Xuan; Liu, Xueyong

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A colorimetric sensor array based on four kinds molecularly imprinted photonic crystal (MIPC) was explored for the selective visual detection of TNT, 2,6-DNT, 2,4-DNT and 4-MNT. The color of individual sensor changed with the increasing concentration of the analytes, and a cross-responsive platform was evaluated by a “radar” pattern. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), a separate response region contained 95.25% of significant characteristics for the detection of nitroaromatics was generated, which also promised high potential for the customized visual detection system of other harmful chemicals. - Highlights: • Nitroaromatics were visually detected by molecularly imprinted photonic crystal. • The adsorption capacity was calculated. • The cross responsive platform of sensor array was established and discussed. • The discrimination capability was promoted by principal component analysis. • This system had high potential to be used in other customed visual detection. - Abstract: This research demonstrated that, in a colorimetric sensor array, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and 4-nitrotoluene (4-MNT) were identifiable through a unique pattern in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner. The adsorption capacity of the molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for their corresponding templates was 0.27 mmol TNT/g, 0.22 mmol 2,6-DNT/g, 0.31 mmol 2,4-DNT/g and 0.16 mmol 4-MNT/g, respectively. Every optical sensor utilized in the arrays contained three-dimensional molecularly imprinted photonic crystal (MIPC) sensor with different imprinted templates. The intelligent materials can display different colors from green to red to 20 mM corresponding nitroaromatics with varying diffraction red shifts of 84 nm (TNT), 46 nm (2,6-DNT), 54 nm (2,4-DNT) and 35 nm (4-MNT), respectively. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA) and rational design

  16. Colorimetric sensor arrays based on pattern recognition for the detection of nitroaromatic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei; Dong, Xiao [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Qiu, Lili, E-mail: qiulili@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yan, Zequn [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Meng, Zihui, E-mail: m_zihui@yahoo.com [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Xue, Min [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); He, Xuan; Liu, Xueyong [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Graphical abstract: A colorimetric sensor array based on four kinds molecularly imprinted photonic crystal (MIPC) was explored for the selective visual detection of TNT, 2,6-DNT, 2,4-DNT and 4-MNT. The color of individual sensor changed with the increasing concentration of the analytes, and a cross-responsive platform was evaluated by a “radar” pattern. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), a separate response region contained 95.25% of significant characteristics for the detection of nitroaromatics was generated, which also promised high potential for the customized visual detection system of other harmful chemicals. - Highlights: • Nitroaromatics were visually detected by molecularly imprinted photonic crystal. • The adsorption capacity was calculated. • The cross responsive platform of sensor array was established and discussed. • The discrimination capability was promoted by principal component analysis. • This system had high potential to be used in other customed visual detection. - Abstract: This research demonstrated that, in a colorimetric sensor array, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and 4-nitrotoluene (4-MNT) were identifiable through a unique pattern in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner. The adsorption capacity of the molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for their corresponding templates was 0.27 mmol TNT/g, 0.22 mmol 2,6-DNT/g, 0.31 mmol 2,4-DNT/g and 0.16 mmol 4-MNT/g, respectively. Every optical sensor utilized in the arrays contained three-dimensional molecularly imprinted photonic crystal (MIPC) sensor with different imprinted templates. The intelligent materials can display different colors from green to red to 20 mM corresponding nitroaromatics with varying diffraction red shifts of 84 nm (TNT), 46 nm (2,6-DNT), 54 nm (2,4-DNT) and 35 nm (4-MNT), respectively. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA) and rational design

  17. The detection of small organic molecules based on novel functionalized surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rui; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop rapid, inexpensive, and easily applied in vivo phenotyping strategies for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in biological fluids. Therefore, the accurate detection of low concentration of theophylline, which can be used as a probe for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes (e.g. CYP1A2) activity, could benefit drug-metabolizing studies. In this study, a portable, specific, and sensitive functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using polyacrylamide molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the highly specific selector is developed for the detection of low concentration theophylline in the presence of other confounding components, such as, caffeine which has a very similar chemical structure.

  18. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senesac, Larry R.; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective...... layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate...

  19. Rapid identification of bio-molecules applied for detection of biosecurity agents using rolling circle amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Göransson

    Full Text Available Detection and identification of pathogens in environmental samples for biosecurity applications are challenging due to the strict requirements on specificity, sensitivity and time. We have developed a concept for quick, specific and sensitive pathogen identification in environmental samples. Target identification is realized by padlock- and proximity probing, and reacted probes are amplified by RCA (rolling-circle amplification. The individual RCA products are labeled by fluorescence and enumerated by an instrument, developed for sensitive and rapid digital analysis. The concept is demonstrated by identification of simili biowarfare agents for bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pantoea agglomerans and spores (Bacillus atrophaeus released in field.

  20. Biomimetic Receptors for Bioanalyte Detection by Quartz Crystal Microbalances — From Molecules to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Latif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent EDCs, even at very low concentrations. A highly sensitive, selective and robust QCM sensor was fabricated for real time monitoring of 17β-estradiol in water samples by using molecular imprinted polyurethane. Optimization of porogen (pyrene and cross-linker (phloroglucinol levels leads to improved sensitivity, selectivity and response time of the estradiol sensor. Surface imprinting of polyurethane as sensor coating also allowed us to generate interaction sites for the selective recognition of bacteria, even in a very complex mixture of interfering compounds, while they were growing from their spores in nutrient solution. A double molecular imprinting approach was followed to transfer the geometrical features of natural bacteria onto the synthetic polymer to generate biomimetic bacteria. The use of biomimetic bacteria as template makes it possible to prepare multiple sensor coatings with similar sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, cell typing, e.g., differentiation of bacteria strains, bacteria growth profile and extent of their nutrition, can be monitored by biomimetic mass sensors. Obviously, this leads to controlled cell growth in bioreactors.

  1. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    infection is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that Zika virus infection is almost undetected by NK cells, as evidenced by the fact that the expression of activating ligands for NK cells is not induced following Zika infection. We identified a mechanism whereby Zika virus sensing via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway resulted in IFN-β-mediated upregulation of MHC-I molecules and inhibition of NK cell activity. Countering MHC class I upregulation and boosting NK cell activity may be employed as prophylactic measures to combat Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. A Fluorogenic Probe for the Catalyst-Free Detection of Azide-Tagged Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friscourt, Frédéric; Fahrni, Christoph J.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Fluorogenic reactions in which non- or weakly-fluorescent reagents produce highly fluorescent products can be exploited to detect a broad range of compounds including biomolecules and materials. We describe a modified dibenzocyclooctyne that under catalyst-free conditions undergoes fast strain-promoted cycloadditions with azides to yield strongly fluorescent triazoles. The cycloaddition products are more than 1000-fold brighter compared to the starting cyclooctyne, exhibit large Stokes shift, and can be excited above 350 nm, which is required for many applications. Quantum mechanical calculations indicate that the fluorescence increase upon triazole formation is due to large differences in oscillator strengths of the S0 S1 transitions in the planar C2v-symmetric starting material compared to the symmetry-broken and non-planar cycloaddition products. The new fluorogenic probe was successfully employed for labeling of proteins modified by an azide moiety. PMID:23095037

  3. Quantitative carbon detector for enhanced detection of molecules in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, flavors, and fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Connor A; Krumm, Christoph; Spanjers, Charles S; Maduskar, Saurabh; Jones, Andrew J; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-03-07

    Analysis of trace compounds, such as pesticides and other contaminants, within consumer products, fuels, and the environment requires quantification of increasingly complex mixtures of difficult-to-quantify compounds. Many compounds of interest are non-volatile and exhibit poor response in current gas chromatography and flame ionization systems. Here we show the reaction of trimethylsilylated chemical analytes to methane using a quantitative carbon detector (QCD; the Polyarc™ reactor) within a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling enhanced detection (up to 10×) of highly functionalized compounds including carbohydrates, acids, drugs, flavorants, and pesticides. Analysis of a complex mixture of compounds shows that the GC-QCD method exhibits faster and more accurate analysis of complex mixtures commonly encountered in everyday products and the environment.

  4. Analysis of gate underlap channel double gate MOS transistor for electrical detection of bio-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay; Narang, Rakhi; Saxena, Manoj; Gupta, Mridula

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for gate drain underlap channel Double-Gate Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (DG-MOSFET) for label free electrical detection of biomolecules has been proposed. The conformal mapping technique has been used to derive the expressions for surface potential, lateral electric field, energy bands (i.e. conduction and valence band) and threshold voltage (Vth). Subsequently a full drain current model to analyze the sensitivity of the biosensor has been developed. The shift in the threshold voltage and drain current (after the biomolecules interaction with the gate underlap channel region of the MOS transistor) has been used as a sensing metric. All the characteristic trends have been verified through ATLAS (SILVACO) device simulation results.

  5. Construction of a reference plasmid molecule containing eight targets for the detection of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Yang, Yalin; Tian, Fang; Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Jianhua

    2011-04-01

    A standard plasmid containing eight targets was developed for quantitative detection of genetically modified (GM) soybeans and cotton. These eight targets were joined in tandem to form the pTLE8 plasmid with a length of 3,680 bp. This plasmid contains part of the endogenous soybean Lec1 gene, the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator, the PAT gene of the soybean line A2704-12, the event-specific 5'-junction region of Roundup-Ready Soya (RRS, 35SG), the Cry1A(c) gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the endogenous cotton Sad1 gene, and a part of RRS EPSPS gene. The PCR efficiencies with pTLE8 as a calibrator ranged from 99.4% to 100.2% for the standard curves of the RRS EPSPS gene and the taxon-specific Lec1 gene (R(2)≥0.996). The limits of detection and quantification were nine and 15 copies, respectively. The standard deviation (SD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) values of repeatability were from 0.09 to 0.52 and from 0.28% to 2.11%, and those for reproducibility were from 0.12 to 1.15 and 0.42% to 3.85%, respectively. The average conversion factor (Cf) for the CRMs RRS quantification was 0.91. The RSD of the mean values for known samples ranged from 3.09% to 18.53%, and the biases were from 0.5% to 40%. These results show that our method using the pTLE8 plasmid as a reference material (RM) is reliable and feasible in the identification of GM soybeans, thus paving the way for the establishment of identification management systems for various products containing GMO components. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  6. Small-molecule fluorophores to detect cell-state switching in the context of high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Bridget K; Carrinski, Hyman A; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Gilbert, Tamara J; Fomina, Dina A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Chang, Young-Tae; Clemons, Paul A

    2008-04-02

    A small molecule capable of distinguishing the distinct states resulting from cellular differentiation would be of enormous value, for example, in efforts aimed at regenerative medicine. We screened a collection of fluorescent small molecules for the ability to distinguish the differentiated state of a mouse skeletal muscle cell line. High-throughput fluorescence-based screening of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes resulted in the identification of six compounds with the desired selectivity, which was confirmed by high-content screening in the same cell states. The compound that resulted in the greatest fluorescence intensity difference between the cell states was used as the screening agent in a pilot screen of 84 kinase inhibitors, each present in four doses, for inhibition of myogenesis. Of the kinase inhibitors, 17 resulted in reduction of fluorescence at one or more concentrations; among the "hits" included known inhibitors of myogenesis, confirming that this compound is capable of detecting the differentiated myotube state. We suggest that the strategy of screening for screening agents reported here may be extended more broadly in the future.

  7. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein in single cells using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz; Kasza, Aneta

    2015-10-01

    Although the concept of combining immunofluorescence (IF) with single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smRNA FISH) seems obvious, the specific materials used during IF and smRNA FISH make it difficult to perform these procedures simultaneously on the same specimen. Even though there are reports where IF and smRNA FISH were combined with success, these were insufficient in terms of signal intensities, staining patterns, and GFP-compatibility, and a detailed exploration of the various factors that influence IF and smRNA FISH outcome has not been published yet. Here, we report a detailed study of conditions and reagents used in classic IF and smRNA FISH that allowed us to establish an easy, robust, and GFP-compatible procedure. Our protocol enables simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein quantity as well as the subcellular distribution of these molecules in single cells by combining an RNase-free modification of the IF technique and the more recent smRNA FISH method. Using this procedure, we have shown the direct interaction of RNase MCPIP1 with IL-6 mRNA. We also demonstrate the use of our protocol in heterogeneous cell population analysis, revealing cell-to-cell differences in mRNA and protein content.

  8. Development of a graphene oxide-based assay for the sequence-specific detection of double-stranded DNA molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Giuliodori

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is a promising material for the development of cost-effective detection systems. In this work, we have devised a simple and rapid GO-based method for the sequence-specific identification of DNA molecules generated by PCR amplification. The csp genes of Escherichia coli, which share a high degree of sequence identity, were selected as paradigm DNA templates. All tested csp genes were amplified with unlabelled primers, which can be rapidly removed at the end of the PCR taking advantage of the preferential binding to GO of single-stranded versus duplex DNA molecules. The amplified DNAs (targets were heat-denatured and hybridized to a fluorescently-labelled single strand oligonucleotide (probe, which recognizes a region of the target DNAs displaying sequence variability. This interaction is extremely specific, taking place with high efficiency only when target and probe show perfect or near perfect matching. Upon GO addition, the unbound fraction of the probe was captured and its fluorescence quenched by the GO's molecular properties. On the other hand, the probe-target complexes remained in solution and emitted a fluorescent signal whose intensity was related to their degree of complementarity.

  9. Direct Determination of a Small-Molecule Drug, Valproic Acid, by an Electrically-Detected Microcantilever Biosensor for Personalized Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Sun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct, small-molecule determination of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, was investigated by a label-free, nanomechanical biosensor. Valproic acid has long been used as an antiepileptic medication, which is administered through therapeutic drug monitoring and has a narrow therapeutic dosage range of 50–100 μg·mL−1 in blood or serum. Unlike labeled and clinically-used measurement techniques, the label-free, electrical detection microcantilever biosensor can be miniaturized and simplified for use in portable or hand-held point-of-care platforms or personal diagnostic tools. A micromachined microcantilever sensor was packaged into the micro-channel of a fluidic system. The measurement of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, in phosphate-buffered saline and serum used a single free-standing, piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor in a thermally-controlled system. The measured surface stresses showed a profile over a concentration range of 50–500 μg·mL−1, which covered the clinically therapeutic range of 50–100 μg·mL−1. The estimated limit of detection (LOD was calculated to be 45 μg·mL−1, and the binding affinity between the drug and the antibody was measured at around 90 ± 21 μg·mL−1. Lastly, the results of the proposed device showed a similar profile in valproic acid drug detection with those of the clinically-used fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

  10. Detection of wood cell wall porosity using small carbohydrate molecules and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, L A; Kroese, H W; Hill, S J; Franich, R A

    2015-09-01

    A novel approach to nanoscale detection of cell wall porosity using confocal fluorescence microscopy is described. Infiltration of cell walls with a range of nitrophenyl-substituted carbohydrates of different molecular weights was assessed by measuring changes in the intensity of lignin fluorescence, in response to the quenching effect of the 4-nitrophenyl group. The following carbohydrates were used in order of increasing molecular weight; 4-nitrophenyl β-D-glucopyrano-side (monosaccharide), 4-nitrophenyl β-D-lactopyranoside (disaccharide), 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl β-D-maltotrioside (trisaccharide), and 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside (pentasaccharide). This technique was used to compare cell wall porosity in wood which had been dewatered to 40% moisture content using supercritical CO2, where cell walls remain fully hydrated, with kiln dried wood equilibrated to 12% moisture content. Infiltration of cell walls as measured by fluorescence quenching, was found to decrease with increasing molecular weight, with the pentasaccharide being significantly excluded compared to the monosaccharide. Porosity experiments were performed on blocks and sections to assess differences in cell wall accessibility. Dewatered and kiln dried wood infiltrated as blocks showed similar results, but greater infiltration was achieved by using sections, indicating that not all pores were easily accessible by infiltration from the lumen surface. In wood blocks infiltrated with 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside, quenching of the secondary wall was quite variable, especially in kiln dried wood, indicating limited connectivity of pores accessible from the lumen surface. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Computational prediction of the spectroscopic parameters of methanediol, an elusive molecule for interstellar detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrientos, Carmen; Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus Miguel Delibes, Paseo de Belén 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martínez, Henar, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Química Orgánica, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus Esgueva, Paseo del Cauce 59, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The molecular structure of methanediol has been investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations. Two conformers, corresponding to C{sub 2} and C {sub s} symmetries, respectively, were considered. The C{sub 2} conformer is found to lie about 1.7 (at 298 K) or 2.3 (at 0 K) kcal mol{sup –1} below the C {sub s} conformer. Predictions for their rotational constants, vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, and dipole moments have been provided. The lowest-lying isomer has a very low dipole moment, around 0.03 D, whereas the C {sub s} conformer has a relatively high dipole moment, namely, 2.7 D. The barrier for the C {sub s} →C{sub 2} process is predicted to be around 0.7-1 kcal mol{sup –1}. Based on the energetic results the proportion of the C{sub s} conformer is likely to be negligible under low temperature conditions, such as in the interstellar medium. Therefore, it is predicted that detection by radioastronomy of methanediol would be rather unlikely.

  12. EXOTIC METAL MOLECULES IN OXYGEN-RICH ENVELOPES: DETECTION OF AlOH (X1Σ+) IN VY CANIS MAJORIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A new interstellar molecule, AlOH, has been detected toward the envelope of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), an oxygen-rich red supergiant. Three rotational transitions of AlOH were observed using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The J = 9 → 8 and J = 7 → 6 lines at 1 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, while the J = 5 → 4 transition at 2 mm was observed with the ARO 12 m antenna on Kitt Peak. The AlOH spectra exhibit quite narrow line widths of 16-23 km s -1 , as found for NaCl in this source, indicating that the emission arises from within the dust acceleration zone of the central circumstellar outflow. From a radiative transfer analysis, the abundance of AlOH relative to H 2 was found to be ∼1 x 10 -7 for a source size of 0.26'' or 22 R * . In contrast, AlCl was not detected with f ≤ 5 x 10 -8 . AlOH is likely formed just beyond the photosphere via thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry and then disappears due to dust condensation. The AlOH/AlO abundance ratio found in VY CMa is ∼17. Therefore, AlOH appears to be the dominant gas-phase molecular carrier of aluminum in this oxygen-rich shell. Local thermodynamic equilibrium calculations predict that the monohydroxides should be the major carriers of Al, Ca, and Mg in O-rich envelopes, as opposed to the oxides or halides. The apparent predominance of aluminum-bearing molecules in VY CMa may reflect proton addition processes in H-shell burning.

  13. Ion-induced stacking of photosensitizer molecules can remarkably affect the luminescence detection of singlet oxygen in Candida albicans cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenträger, Ariane; Gonzales, Fernanda Pereira; Maisch, Tim; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Singlet oxygen (O21) is an important reactive intermediate in photodynamic reactions, particularly in antimicrobial PDT (aPDT). The detection of O21 luminescence is frequently used to elucidate the role of O21 in various environments, particularly in microorganisms and human cells. When incubating the fungus, Candida albicans, with porphyrins XF73 (5,15-bis-[4-(3-Trimethylammonio-propyloxy)-phenyl]-porphyrin) or TMPyP (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)-porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate)), the O21 luminescence signals were excellent for TMPyP. In case of XF73, the signals showed strange rise and decay times. Thus, O21 generation of XF73 was investigated and compared with TMPyP. Absorption spectroscopy of XF73 showed a change in absorption cross section when there was a change in the concentration from 1×10-6 M to 1×10-3 M indicating an aggregation process. The addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) substantially changed O21 luminescence in XF73 solution. Detailed experiments provided evidence that the PBS constituents NaCl and KCl caused the change of O21 luminescence. The results also indicate that Cl- ions may cause aggregation of XF73 molecules, which in turn enhances self-quenching of O21 via photosensitizer molecules. These results show that some ions, e.g., those present in cells in vitro or added by PBS, can considerably affect the detection and the interpretation of time-resolved luminescence signals of O21, particularly in in vitro and in vivo. These effects should be considered for any other photosensitizer used in photodynamic processes.

  14. Tunable PIE and synchronized gating detections by FastFLIM for quantitative microscopy measurements of fast dynamics of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Coskun, Ulas; Ferreon, Allan Chris; Barbieri, Beniamino; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff

    2016-03-01

    The crosstalk between two fluorescent species causes problems in fluorescence microscopy imaging, especially for quantitative measurements such as co-localization, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence cross correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). In laser scanning confocal microscopy, the lasers can be switched on and off by acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) in the microsecond scale for alternative line scanning in order to avoid the crosstalk while minimizing the time delay between two lasers on the same pixel location. In contrast, the pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) technique synchronizes two pulsed lasers of different wavelengths in the nanosecond scale to enable measuring superfast dynamics of two fluorescent species simultaneously and yet quantitatively without the crosstalk contamination. This feature is critical for many cell biology applications, e.g. accurate determination of stoichiometry in FRET measurements for studying protein-protein interactions or cell signal events, detection of weaker bindings in FCCS by eliminating the false cross correlation due to the crosstalk. The PIE has been used with the time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) electronics. Here, we describe a novel PIE development using the digital frequency domain (DFD) technique -- FastFLIM, which provides tunable PIE setups and synchronized gating detections, tailored and optimized to specific applications. A few PIE setups by FastFLIM and measurement examples are described. Combined with the sensitivity of Alba and Q2 systems, the PIE allowed us to quantitatively measure the fast dynamics of single molecules.

  15. Happy eating: the single target implicit association test predicts overeating after positive emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Peggy; Jansen, Anita; Houben, Katrijn; Roefs, Anne

    2013-08-01

    For many years, questionnaires have been considered the standard when examining emotional eating behavior. However, recently, some controversy has arisen about these questionnaires, and their usefulness in identifying emotional eaters has been questioned. The current study aimed to investigate the Single Target Implicit Association Test (ST-IAT) as a measure of emotional eating. Two ST-IATs (assessing food-positive and food-negative associations respectively) and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ) were compared in undergraduate students. A positive, negative or neutral mood was induced by means of a film clip, and milkshake consumption was measured during and after the mood induction. It was hypothesized that participants with strong emotion-food associations on the ST-IATs (i.e., IAT-emotional eaters) would consume more food in the emotion induction condition corresponding to that emotion, as compared to those with weak emotion-food associations as well as to those in the neutral condition. Participants who scored high on both the positive and negative ST-IATs ate more during a positive mood induction than during a negative mood induction. This effect did not extend to milkshake consumption after the mood induction procedure. In addition, IAT-positive emotional eaters consumed more food than IAT-non-emotional eaters. No effects of the DEBQ on milkshake consumption were found. It is concluded that the ST-IAT has potential as a measure of emotional eating. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. One Novel Multiple-Target Plasmid Reference Molecule Targeting Eight Genetically Modified Canola Events for Genetically Modified Canola Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuqing; Li, Xiang; Wang, Canhua; Song, Guiwen; Pi, Liqun; Zheng, Lan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2017-09-27

    Multiple-target plasmid DNA reference materials have been generated and utilized as good substitutes of matrix-based reference materials in the analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Herein, we report the construction of one multiple-target plasmid reference molecule, pCAN, which harbors eight GM canola event-specific sequences (RF1, RF2, MS1, MS8, Topas 19/2, Oxy235, RT73, and T45) and a partial sequence of the canola endogenous reference gene PEP. The applicability of this plasmid reference material in qualitative and quantitative PCR assays of the eight GM canola events was evaluated, including the analysis of specificity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and performance of pCAN in the analysis of various canola samples, etc. The LODs are 15 copies for RF2, MS1, and RT73 assays using pCAN as the calibrator and 10 genome copies for the other events. The LOQ in each event-specific real-time PCR assay is 20 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and PEP assays are between 91% and 97%, and the squared regression coefficients (R 2 ) are all higher than 0.99. The quantification bias values varied from 0.47% to 20.68% with relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1.06% to 24.61% in the quantification of simulated samples. Furthermore, 10 practical canola samples sampled from imported shipments in the port of Shanghai, China, were analyzed employing pCAN as the calibrator, and the results were comparable with those assays using commercial certified materials as the calibrator. Concluding from these results, we believe that this newly developed pCAN plasmid is one good candidate for being a plasmid DNA reference material in the detection and quantification of the eight GM canola events in routine analysis.

  17. A versatile method to design stem-loop primer-based quantitative PCR assays for detecting small regulatory RNA molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Czimmerer

    Full Text Available Short regulatory RNA-s have been identified as key regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. They have been involved in the regulation of both physiological and pathological processes such as embryonal development, immunoregulation and cancer. One of their relevant characteristics is their high stability, which makes them excellent candidates for use as biomarkers. Their number is constantly increasing as next generation sequencing methods reveal more and more details of their synthesis. These novel findings aim for new detection methods for the individual short regulatory RNA-s in order to be able to confirm the primary data and characterize newly identified subtypes in different biological conditions. We have developed a flexible method to design RT-qPCR assays that are very sensitive and robust. The newly designed assays were tested extensively in samples from plant, mouse and even human formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Moreover, we have shown that these assays are able to quantify endogenously generated shRNA molecules. The assay design method is freely available for anyone who wishes to use a robust and flexible system for the quantitative analysis of matured regulatory RNA-s.

  18. A dual-mode single-molecule fluorescence assay for the detection of expanded CGG repeats in Fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Brian; Pan, Cynthia; Chen, Liangjing; Hadd, Andrew G; Russell, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the leading cause of inherited mental impairment and is associated with expansions of CGG repeats within the FMR1 gene. To detect expanded CGG repeats, we developed a dual-mode single-molecule fluorescence assay that allows acquisition of two parallel, independent measures of repeat number based on (1) the number of Cy3-labeled probes bound to the repeat region and (2) the physical length of the electric field-linearized repeat region, obtained from the relative position of a single Cy5 dye near the end of the repeat region. Using target strands derived from cell-line DNA with defined numbers of CGG repeats, we show that this assay can rapidly and simultaneously measure the repeats of a collection of individual sample strands within a single field of view. With a low occurrence of false positives, the assay differentiated normal CGG repeat lengths (CGG( N ), N = 23) and expanded CGG repeat lengths (CGG( N ), N = 118), representing a premutation disease state. Further, mixtures of these DNAs gave results that correlated with their relative populations. This strategy may be useful for identifying heterozygosity or for screening collections of individuals, and it is readily adaptable for screening other repeat disorders.

  19. Mass Spectrometry in Cosmetic Science: Advanced Ionization Techniques for Detecting Trace Molecules in or on Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Akira; Kihara, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    To provide safe and effective products to customers in the cosmetic industry, mass spectrometry (MS) is an indispensable analytical tool. In addition to its outstanding sensitivity and specificity, the method is applicable to a wide variety of compounds, which makes it irreplaceable for the development of cosmetics, which requires the analysis of complex systems. Because most cosmetic products are applied directly to the skin and function as they are designed, monitoring the molecular compositions of endogenous or exogenous compounds in or on the skin is crucial to ensure the safety and efficacy of a cosmetic product. Recent advancements in MS and ionization techniques, such as MS imaging and ambient ionization, now provide access to richer and deeper molecular information with less time and effort. This brief review discusses advanced ionization techniques that are currently used in the field of cosmetic science using two examples, namely, the use of desorption electrospray ionization and zero-volt paperspray ionization to detect trace molecules in or on human skin. PMID:28959516

  20. Label-free solution-based kinetic study of aptamer-small molecule interactions by kinetic capillary electrophoresis with UV detection revealing how kinetics control equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E; Krylov, Sergey N

    2011-11-15

    Here we demonstrate a label-free solution-based approach for studying the kinetics of biopolymer-small molecule interactions. The approach utilizes kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) separation and UV light absorption detection of the unlabeled small molecule. In this proof-of-concept work, we applied KCE-UV to study kinetics of interaction between a small molecule and a DNA aptamer. From the kinetic analysis of a series of aptamers, we found that dissociation rather than binding controls the stability of the complex. Because of its label-free features and generic nature, KCE-UV promises to become a practical tool for challenging kinetic studies of biopolymer-small molecule interactions.

  1. Nanomechanical microcantilever operated in vibration modes with use of RNA aptamer as receptor molecules for label-free detection of HCV helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sang-Myung; Eom, Kilho; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Park, Jung Ho; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Tae Song

    2007-11-30

    We report the nanomechanical microcantilevers operated in vibration modes (oscillation) with use of RNA aptamers as receptor molecules for label-free detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase. The nanomechanical detection principle is that the ligand-receptor binding on the microcantilever surface induces the dynamic response change of microcantilevers. We implemented the label-free detection of HCV helicase in the low concentration as much as 100 pg/ml from measuring the dynamic response change of microcantilevers. Moreover, from the recent studies showing that the ligand-receptor binding generates the surface stress on the microcantilever, we estimate the surface stress, on the oscillating microcantilevers, induced by ligand-receptor binding, i.e. binding between HCV helicase and RNA aptamer. In this article, it is suggested that the oscillating microcantilevers with use of RNA aptamers as receptor molecules may enable one to implement the sensitive label-free detection of very small amount of small-scale proteins.

  2. MHC-like molecules in some nonmammalian vertebrates can be detected by some cross-reactive xenoantisera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross-reaction......Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross...

  3. Detection of constitutive molecules on Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts through single chain variable antibody fragments displayed in M13 phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, Rafael; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Becerril-Luján, Baltazar; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2007-06-01

    A nonimmune library, containing single chain variable fragments (scFv) of immunoglobulin human genes displayed on the surface of M13 filamentous phages, was used to recognize molecules exposed on Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts' surface, during their growth in synthetic medium. The scFv clones were checked in their consistency by Dot-ELISA using HRP/anti-M13 conjugate, and they were tested to recognize molecules on H. Capsulatum yeasts' surface by ELISA in plates. Three out of 80 scFv cones (C2, C6, and C52) reacted consistently with H. capsulatum molecules, and they recognized molecules from both H. capsulatum morphologic phases. However, C6 and C52 clones reacted better with molecules on the surface of whole yeasts, with molecules from the yeasts' cell-wall extract, and with molecules released to the supernatant of the yeast culture. Mycelial supernatants from other fungi, as well as from a Mycobacterium filtrate, were not recognized by scFv phage monoclones. Monoclones C2, C6, and C52 recognized yeast molecules irrespective of the H. capsulatum strains used; the C6 clone revealed a specific immunohistochemistry reaction when tested against homologous and heterologous fungal infected tissues. The scFv clones isolated will be a useful toll to define the role of their target molecules in the host-parasite relationship of histoplasmosis.

  4. Detection of RET (rearranged during transfection) variants and their downstream signal molecules in RET rearranged lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Oh; Shin, Jung-Young; Kim, Min Young; Son, Kyoung Hwa; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Tae-Jung; Kim, Su Young; Park, Jae Kil; Sung, Sook Whan; Bae, Sang Ju; Min, Hyun Jung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung

    2018-03-01

    We screened resected tumor tissues from patients with lung cancer for EGFR mutations, ALK rearrangements, and rearranged during transfection (RET) gene variants (including RET rearrangements and the Kinesin Family Member 5B (KIF5B)-RET fusion gene) using various methods including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), transcript assays, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also examined the protein expression of associated downstream signaling molecules to assess the effect of these variants on patient outcome. We constructed a tissue microarray (TMA) comprising 581 resected tumor tissues from patients with lung adenocarcinoma and analyzed the microarray by both FISH (using RET break-apart and KIF5B-RET SY translocation probes) and a commercial RET transcript assay. We evaluated the expression of RET and RET-related signaling molecules, including p-AKT and p-ERK, by TMA -based IHC staining. Among the 581 specimens, 51 (8.8%) specimens harbored RET rearrangements, including 12 cases (2.1%) carrying a KIF5B-RET fusion gene. Surprisingly, RET expression was lower in KIF5B-RET fusion gene-positive than in RET wild-type specimens. We detected activating EGFR mutations in 11 (21.6%) of the 51 RET variant-positive specimens. Among the KIF5B-RET fusion gene-positive specimens, p-ERK expression was significantly lower in the EGFR mutation subgroup showing RET expression than in the EGFR mutation subgroup that did not express RET. Similarly, the RET rearrangement group showed significant variation in the expression level of p-AKT (P = 0.028) and p-ERK, whose expression remarkably increased in specimens not expressing RET. The expression of p-ERK markedly increased in the RET rearrangement group regardless of RET expression. This result suggests that a combination of RET and ERK inhibitors may be an effective treatment strategy for lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring RET variants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  5. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  6. High sensitivity surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of microRNA and small molecule based on graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Qing; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Zhang, Hua; Nie, Wenyan

    2017-11-01

    A versatile and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on two layers of graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (GO-AuNPs) composites was designed for the detection of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecule adenosine. The bottom layer, which acted as a functionalized substrate on the sensor chip, provided a high specific surface area convenient for the immobilization of capture DNA molecules. The upper layer served as a signal-amplification element. By employing these two layers of GO-AuNPs composites, the dual amplification strategy was achieved so that a measurement of miRNA-141 with a detection limit of 0.1fM was obtained. Moreover, the developed SPR biosensor showed decent selectivity toward miRNA-200 family members. Especially, the SPR biosensor demonstrated its applicability for the detection of miRNA-141 in cancer cell extractions, and the results obtained were consistent with those obtained by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, small molecule adenosine could also be detected using this SPR biosensor in combination with a split aptamer. Considering the superior sensitivity, selectivity and generality, this work promised much potential for the detection of various biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. MHC-like molecules in some nonmammalian vertebrates can be detected by some cross-reactive xenoantisera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross......-reactions using these techniques, so various criteria were developed to distinguish these from true MHC-like molecules. 2) Only very small subpopulations of immunogen-specific antibodies cross-reacted with MHC-like molecules in other nonmammalian species. These subpopulations were different for each species...... and even within a species, sometimes being so limited as to behave like alloantisera. This led to a very scattered pattern of true cross-reactions that sometimes failed to reflect the properties of the bulk antibody population. 3) Antisera containing antibodies to class II beta- and class I alpha...

  8. Detection of the aromatic molecule benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN) in the interstellar medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brett A; Burkhardt, Andrew M; Kalenskii, Sergei; Shingledecker, Christopher N; Remijan, Anthony J; Herbst, Eric; McCarthy, Michael C

    2018-01-12

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles are thought to be widespread throughout the universe, because these classes of molecules are probably responsible for the unidentified infrared bands, a set of emission features seen in numerous Galactic and extragalactic sources. Despite their expected ubiquity, astronomical identification of specific aromatic molecules has proven elusive. We present the discovery of benzonitrile ( c -C 6 H 5 CN), one of the simplest nitrogen-bearing aromatic molecules, in the interstellar medium. We observed hyperfine-resolved transitions of benzonitrile in emission from the molecular cloud TMC-1. Simple aromatic molecules such as benzonitrile may be precursors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation, providing a chemical link to the carriers of the unidentified infrared bands. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Detection of the aromatic molecule benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN) in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brett A.; Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Kalenskii, Sergei; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Herbst, Eric; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2018-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles are thought to be widespread throughout the universe, because these classes of molecules are probably responsible for the unidentified infrared bands, a set of emission features seen in numerous Galactic and extragalactic sources. Despite their expected ubiquity, astronomical identification of specific aromatic molecules has proven elusive. We present the discovery of benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN), one of the simplest nitrogen-bearing aromatic molecules, in the interstellar medium. We observed hyperfine-resolved transitions of benzonitrile in emission from the molecular cloud TMC-1. Simple aromatic molecules such as benzonitrile may be precursors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation, providing a chemical link to the carriers of the unidentified infrared bands.

  10. Detection of IgE Reactivity to a Handful of Allergen Molecules in Early Childhood Predicts Respiratory Allergy in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Magnus; Lupinek, Christian; Andersson, Niklas; Belgrave, Danielle; Asarnoj, Anna; Benet, Marta; Pinart, Mariona; Wieser, Sandra; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Baar, Alexandra; Pershagen, Göran; Simpson, Angela; Kull, Inger; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Hamsten, Carl; Antó, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Custovic, Adnan; Valenta, Rudolf; van Hage, Marianne

    2017-12-01

    Sensitization in early childhood may precede respiratory allergy in adolescence. IgE reactivity against 132 allergen molecules was evaluated using the MeDALL microarray in sera obtained from a random sample of 786 children at the age of 4, 8 and 16years in a population based birth cohort (BAMSE). Symptoms were analyzed by questionnaire at ages 4, 8 and 16years. Clinically and independent relevant allergen molecules accounting for ≥90% of IgE reactivities in sensitized individuals and at all time-points were identified as risk molecules and used to predict respiratory allergy. The data was replicated in the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort by studying IgE reactivity with the use of a commercial IgE microarray. Sera were obtained from children at the ages of 3, 5, 8 and 11years (N=248) and the outcome was studied at 11years. In the BAMSE cohort 4 risk molecules could be identified, i.e.: Ara h 1 (peanut), Bet v 1 (birch), Fel d 1 (cat), Phl p 1 (grass). For MAAS the corresponding number of molecules was 5: Der p 1 (dust mite), Der f 2 (dust mite), Phl p 1 (grass), Phl p 5 (grass), Fel d 1 (cat). In BAMSE, early IgE reactivity to ≥3 of 4 allergen molecules at four years predicted incident and persistent asthma and/or rhinitis at 16years (87% and 95%, respectively). The corresponding proportions in the MAAS cohort at 16years were 100% and 100%, respectively, for IgE reactivity to ≥3 of 5 risk molecules. IgE reactivity to a few allergen molecules early in life identifies children with a high risk of asthma and/or rhinitis at 16years. These findings will be of importance for developing preventive strategies for asthma and rhinitis in children. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of thermochemolysis analysis conditions for the in situ detection of organic compounds in Martian soil with the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisson, Marietta; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Raulin, François; Stambouli, Moncef

    2017-04-01

    Martian surface is exposed to harsh radiative and oxidative conditions which are destructive for organic molecules. That is why the future ExoMars rover will examine the molecular composition of samples acquired from depths down to two meters below the Martian surface, where organics may have been protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. The samples will then be analyzed by the Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Pyr-GC-MS) operational mode of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument. To prevent thermal alteration of organic molecules during pyrolysis, thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) will extract the organics from the mineral matrix and methylate the polar functional groups, allowing the volatilization of molecules at lower temperatures and protecting the most labile chemical groups from thermal degradation. This study has been carried out on a Martian regolith analogue (JSC-Mars-1) with a high organic content with the aim of optimizing the thermochemolysis temperature within operating conditions similar to the MOMA experiment ones. We also performed Pyrolysis-GC-MS analysis as a comparison. The results show that, unlike pyrolysis alone - which mainly produces aromatics, namely thermally altered molecules - thermochemolysis allows the extraction and identification of numerous organic molecules of astrobiological interest. They also show that the main compounds start to be detectable at low thermochemolysis temperatures ranging from 400°C to 600°C. However, we noticed that the more the temperature increases, the more the chromatograms are saturated with thermally evolved molecules leading to many coelutions and making identification difficult.

  12. TiO2/Gold nanocomposite as an extremely sensitive molecule sensor for NO2 detection: A DFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali Abbasi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available First-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT have been performed to investigate the interactions of NO2 molecules with TiO2/Gold nanocomposites in order to completely exploit the adsorption properties of these nanostructures. Given the need to further comprehend the behavior of the NO2 molecules positioned between the TiO2 nanoparticle and Au monolayer, we have geometrically optimized the complex systems consisting of the NO2 molecule oriented at appropriate positions between the nanoparticle and Au monolayer. The structural properties such as bond lengths, bond angles, adsorption energies and Mulliken population analysis and the electronic properties including the density of states and molecular orbitals have been also analyzed in detail. The results indicate that the interaction between NO2 and undoped TiO2-N/Gold nanocomposites is stronger than that between gas molecules and N-doped TiO2/Gold nanocomposites, which reveals that the pristine nanocomposite can react with NO2 molecule more efficiently. Therefore, the obtained results also suggest a theoretical basis for the potential applications of TiO2/Gold nanocomposites in gas sensing, which could help in the developing of novel TiO2 based advanced sensor devices.

  13. Redox Cycling Realized in Paper-Based Biochemical Sensor for Selective Detection of Reversible Redox Molecules Without Micro/Nano Fabrication Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, So; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2018-02-28

    This paper describes a paper-based biochemical sensor that realizes redox cycling with close interelectrode distance. Two electrodes, the generator and collector electrodes, can detect steady-state oxidation and reduction currents when suitable potential is held at each electrode. The sensor has two gold plates on both sides of a piece of chromatography paper and defines the interelectrode distance by the thickness of the paper (180 μm) without any micro-fabrication processes. Our proposed sensor geometry has successfully exhibited signatures of redox cycling. As a result, the concentration of ferrocyanide as reversible redox molecules was successfully quantified under the interference by ascorbic acid as a strong irreversible reducing agent. This was possible because the ascorbic acids are completely consumed by the irreversible reaction, while maintaining redox cycling of reversible ferrocyanide. This suggests that a sensor based on the redox cycling method will be suitable for detecting target molecules at low concentration.

  14. Ultra-high-density 3D DNA arrays within nanoporous biocompatible membranes for single-molecule-level detection and purification of circulating nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Fox, K.; Karle, T. J.; Lohrmann, A.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated alumina membrane. The few nanometer-thick, yet perfect and continuous DLC-coating confers the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the sensor, allowing its direct application in biological conditions. The selective detection is based on complementary hybridization of a fluorescently-tagged circulating cancer oncomarker (a 21-mer nucleic acid) with covalently immobilized DNA on the surface of the membrane. The captured DNAs are detected in the nanoporous structure of the sensor using confocal scanning laser microscopy. The flow-through membrane sensor demonstrates broad-range sensitivity, spanning from 1015 molecules per cm2 down to single molecules, which is several orders of magnitude improvement compared to the flat DNA microarrays. Our study suggests that these flow-through type nanoporous sensors represent a new powerful platform for large volume sampling and ultrasensitive detection of different chemical biomarkers.Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated

  15. Design of a low-temperature plasma (LTP) probe with adjustable output temperature and variable beam diameter for the direct detection of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jarquín, Sandra; Winkler, Robert

    2013-03-15

    The direct detection of organic molecules by mass spectrometry requires ionization methods which are compatible with ambient conditions. A relatively new strategy is the use of a free low-temperature plasma beam for ionization. The objective is to design a safe and adjustable plasma beam to enable optimal ionization and desorption parameters for specific molecules. A plasma probe based on a dielectric barrier discharge was designed, where the plasma is guided through an internal second tube. This setup permits different beam diameter settings and the control of the plasma temperature. The ionization and desorption of pure organic compounds, as well as their direct detection from roasted coffee beans, were tested. The presented plasma probe provides improved safety with respect to arcing, ozone generation and electric shock, compared with conventional designs. The functionality of previously reported devices is expanded. A defined plasma diameter can be set by choosing the appropriate insert, while the input voltage controls the plasma temperature. The variation of measurement parameters enables the optimized direct detection of target compounds from roasted coffee beans, such as caffeine, guaiacol and vanillin. The presented low-temperature plasma probe allows the fine-tuning of ionization and desorption parameters, according to the target molecules. Possible applications include: (1) The ambient ionization and desorption of organic compounds with different volatility and (2) The direct analysis of food products such as roasted coffee beans. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Detection of IgE Reactivity to a Handful of Allergen Molecules in Early Childhood Predicts Respiratory Allergy in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Wickman

    2017-12-01

    Interpretations: IgE reactivity to a few allergen molecules early in life identifies children with a high risk of asthma and/or rhinitis at 16 years. These findings will be of importance for developing preventive strategies for asthma and rhinitis in children.

  17. [Detection of the functionally active domains in the molecule of the lethal factor of the anthrax exotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, A N; Kravchenko, T B; Noskova, V P

    1996-01-01

    Three functional domains were revealed in the molecule of the lethal factor of B. anthracis. They are located in the linear structure of the molecula as follows: the associative domain occupies the area from Lys39 to Met242, the stabilizing domain from Leu517 to Lys614, and the effector domain still further to the COOH-terminal Lys mino acid.

  18. Topography of signaling molecules as detected by electron microscopy on plasma membrane sheets isolated from non-adherent mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebduška, Pavel; Korb, Jan; Tůmová, Magda; Heneberg, Petr; Dráber, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 328, 1-2 (2007), s. 139-151 ISSN 0022-1759 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA ČR GD204/05/H023; GA ČR GA301/06/0361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : plasma membrane * electron microscopy * topography of signaling molecules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.947, year: 2007

  19. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  20. Silicon-bearing molecules in the shock L1157-B1: first detection of SiS around a Sun-like protostar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, L.; Codella, C.; Lefloch, B.; Balucani, N.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bachiller, R.; Benedettini, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Faginas-Lago, N.; Fontani, F.; Gusdorf, A.; Rosi, M.

    2017-09-01

    The shock L1157-B1 driven by the low-mass protostar L1157-mm is a unique environment to investigate the chemical enrichment due to molecules released from dust grains. IRAM-30m and Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations allow a census of Si-bearing molecules in L1157-B1. We detect SiO and its isotopologues and, for the first time in a shock, SiS. The strong gradient of the [SiO/SiS] abundance ratio across the shock (from ≥180 to ˜25) points to a different chemical origin of the two species. SiO peaks where the jet impacts the cavity walls ([SiO/H2] ˜ 10-6), indicating that SiO is directly released from grains or rapidly formed from released Si in the strong shock occurring at this location. In contrast, SiS is only detected at the head of the cavity opened by previous ejection events ([SiS/H2] ˜ 2 × 10-8). This suggests that SiS is not directly released from the grain cores but instead should be formed through slow gas-phase processes using part of the released silicon. This finding shows that Si-bearing molecules can be useful to distinguish regions where grains or gas-phase chemistry dominates.

  1. Coupling of background reduction with rolling circle amplification for highly sensitive protein detection via terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Bingying; Xie, Jiaqing; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-10-07

    In this work, by coupling background current reduction with rolling circle amplification (RCA), we describe the development of an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing method for protein detection based on a small molecule-linked DNA terminal protection strategy. Our detection platform employs a typical streptavidin (STV)-biotin interaction system. Biotin-linked single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA-biotin) is self-assembled on a gold electrode to capture the target protein, STV. The binding of STV with the biotin small molecule recognition element protects the SH-ssDNA-biotin against hydrolysis by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the unbound SH-ssDNA-biotin is effectively hydrolyzed and removed from the electrode surface. The bound STV further interacts with long, RCA-amplified biotin DNAs to facilitate the adsorption of numerous electroactive reporters, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) via electrostatic interactions, which results in significantly amplified signals for the quantitative determination of STV. Moreover, the removal of the unbound SH-ssDNA-biotin probes from the sensing electrode obviates the accumulation of RuHex and leads to a highly minimized background current. The simultaneous RCA signal amplification and background current reduction is expected to significantly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to achieve ultrahigh sensitivity. The results reveal that the developed strategy provides a low detection limit of 0.4 pM with high selectivity.

  2. Study on detection of terrestrial and marine fractions in marine organic molecules by spectrophoto- and spectrofluorometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, Violetta; Wróbel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    The sea surface is a highly productive and active interface between the sea and the atmosphere. Sea surface films are created by organic matter from sea and land sources and they dissipate due to loss of material at the sea surface, including microbial degradation, chemical and photo chemical processes, and loss due to absorption and adsorption onto particulates. However the surface microlayer is almost ubiquitous and cover most of the surface of the ocean, even under conditions of high turbulence. Surface active molecules (surfactants) present in the surface microlayer (SML) may modify the number of physical processes taking place there: among others they affect the depth of penetration of solar radiation and gas exchange. Therefore, research on the influence of surfactants on the sea surface properties become an important task, especially in coastal waters and in vicinity of the river mouths. Surfactants comprises a mixture of organic molecules rich in lipids, polymeric and humus whose proportions determine the various properties of the SML. A unique structure of the energy levels of the organic molecules results in a unique spectral distribution of the light intensity absorbed and emitted by the molecules. Hence, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of organic compounds may allow the identification of the sources of organic matter. Additionally, several absorption (E2:E3, S, SR) and fluorescence (fluorescence intensities at peaks: A, C, M, T, the ratio (M+T)/(A+C), HIX) indices help in describing the changes in molecular size and weight as well as composition of organic matter during the humification processes and caused by photobleaching and biodegradation. Investigations included the region of Gulf of Gdańsk, along a transect from the Vistula River outlet to open sea. The fluorescence and absorption measurements of the samples collected from a surface films and a subsurface layer (SS, a depth of 1 m) during three research cruises in Gulf of Gdańsk, the

  3. Exploration of Volatile Organic Molecules for Detection of the Brown Tree Snake and Other Non-Indigenous Species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nielsen, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    HQ PACAF submitted high ranked Environmental Safety and Occupational Health (ESOH) Need 1301, "Detect Brown Tree Snakes in Cargo and Craft to Prevent Spread to Other Areas of the Pacific and Mainland United States...

  4. Exploration of Volatile Organic Molecules for Detection of the Brown Tree Snake and Other Non-Indigenous Species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nielsen, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    ...." A reliable, portable, cost-effective device capable of detecting and locating the BTS in and around aircraft, ships, and cargo would greatly enhance the efforts to control the BTS and prevent...

  5. Detection and characterization of the tin dihydride (SnH2 and SnD2) molecule in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tony C.; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2018-01-01

    The SnH2 and SnD2 molecules have been detected for the first time in the gas phase by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and emission spectroscopic techniques through the à 1B1-X ˜ 1A1 electronic transition. These reactive species were prepared in a pulsed electric discharge jet using (CH3)4Sn or SnH4/SnD4 precursors diluted in high pressure argon. Transitions to the electronic excited state of the jet-cooled molecules were probed with LIF, and the ground state energy levels were measured from single rovibronic level emission spectra. The LIF spectrum of SnD2 afforded sufficient rotational structure to determine the ground and excited state geometries: r0″ = 1.768 Å, θ0″ = 91.0°, r0' = 1.729 Å, θ0' = 122.9°. All of the observed LIF bands show evidence of a rotational-level-dependent predissociation process which rapidly decreases the fluorescence yield and lifetime with increasing rotational angular momentum in each excited vibronic level. This behavior is analogous to that observed in SiH2 and GeH2 and is suggested to lead to the formation of ground state tin atoms and hydrogen molecules.

  6. Effect of α variation on a prospective experiment to detect variation of me/mp in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the influence of variation in the fine structure constant α on a promising experiment proposed by DeMille et al. to search for variation in the electron-to-proton mass ratio μ using diatomic molecules [DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 043202 (2008)]. The proposed experiment involves spectroscopically probing the splitting between two nearly degenerate vibrational levels supported by different electronic potentials. Here we demonstrate that this splitting may be equally or more sensitive to variation in α as to variation in μ. For the anticipated experimental precision, this implies that the α variation may not be negligible, as previously assumed, and further suggests that the method could serve as a competitive means to search for α variation as well.

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Comparison of Electrochemical Immunosensors and Aptasensors for Detection of Small Organic Molecules in Environment, Food Safety, Clinical and Public Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Piro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We review here the most frequently reported targets among the electrochemical immunosensors and aptasensors: antibiotics, bisphenol A, cocaine, ochratoxin A and estradiol. In each case, the immobilization procedures are described as well as the transduction schemes and the limits of detection. It is shown that limits of detections are generally two to three orders of magnitude lower for immunosensors than for aptasensors, due to the highest affinities of antibodies. No significant progresses have been made to improve these affinities, but transduction schemes were improved instead, which lead to a regular improvement of the limit of detections corresponding to ca. five orders of magnitude over these last 10 years. These progresses depend on the target, however.

  9. Raman spectroscopy as an effective screening method for detecting adulteration of milk with small nitrogen-rich molecules and sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, M K; Holroyd, S E; McGoverin, C M; Simpson, M C; Williams, D E

    2016-04-01

    Adulteration of milk for commercial gain is acknowledged as a serious issue facing the dairy industry. Several analytical techniques can be used to detect adulteration but they often require time-consuming sample preparation, expensive laboratory equipment, and highly skilled personnel. Here we show that Raman spectroscopy provides a simple, selective, and sensitive method for screening milk, specifically for small nitrogen-rich compounds, such as melamine, urea, ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and for sucrose. Univariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to determine limits of detection and quantification from Raman spectra of milk spiked with 50 to 1,000 mg/L of the N-rich compounds and 0.25 to 4% sucrose. Partial least squares (PLS) calibration provided limit of detection minimum thresholds milk for these adulterants. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Specific, sensitive, high-resolution detection of protein molecules in eukaryotic cells using metal-tagging transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina; Sanmartín-Conesa, Eva; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.; Seybold, Volker; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary More than any other methodology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has contributed to our understanding of the architecture and organization of cells. With current detection limits approaching atomic resolution, it will ultimately become possible to ultrastructurally image intracellular macromolecular assemblies in situ. Presently, however, methods to unambiguously identify proteins within the crowded environment of the cell’s interior are lagging behind. We describe a novel approach, metal-tagging TEM (METTEM) that allows detection of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells with high specificity, exceptional sensitivity and at molecular scale resolution. In live cells treated with gold salts, proteins bearing a small metal-binding tag will form 1-nm gold nanoclusters, readily detectable in electron micrographs. The applicability and strength of METTEM is demonstrated by a study of Rubella virus replicase and capsid proteins, which revealed virus-induced cell structures not seen before. PMID:22579245

  11. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a Polydiacetylene Coating to Create a Biocompatible and Stable Molecule for Use in Cancer Diagnostics and Early Detection in Molecular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shweta

    Earlier cancer detection and diagnosis is essential to prevent cancer mortality in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Fluorescence and magnetic signals provide a way for earlier detection through imaging systems. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have a superparamagnetism feature that allows them to act as contrast agents that can be detected through a magnetic resonance imaging system. These iron oxide cores have a polymer coating around them to provide stability, prevent aggregation, and allow for biocompatibility within the body. In addition, these functional coatings can have ligands and peptides for detection and therapy purposes. One functional coating is a polydiacetylene coating due to its chromatic and optical properties. When polymerized, it has the ability to change color in the visible spectrum to blue (not a fluorescent signal) and when heated, it changes to a red color (fluorescent signal). This way a strong and stable layer is formed around the iron oxide cores. These coatings are placed on the iron cores using a modified dual solvent exchange method, in which DMSO is slowly replaced by water without the use of organic solvents previous used. In addition, these nanoparticles can then be PEGylated, which provides a more stable and water soluble compound in aqueous solutions. Measurements can be taken through dynamic light scattering for size distributions and zeta potential and the Nanodrop for absorbance. Ideal sizes are about 30 nm for MNPs. Moreover, for future directions, there can be more molecules attached to the coated layers to use for molecular detection and analysis.

  12. Molecular Signature of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Simultaneous Nanomolar Detection of Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules at a Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzid, Alyah; Shang, Fengjun; Reen, F. Jerry; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó.; Clarke, Sarah L.; Zhou, Lin; Luong, John H. T.; O'Gara, Fergal; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Glennon, Jeremy D.

    2016-07-01

    Electroanalysis was performed using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for the simultaneous detection of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS), 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and pyocyanin (PYO). PQS and its precursor HHQ are two important signal molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while PYO is a redox active toxin involved in virulence and pathogenesis. This Gram-negative and opportunistic human pathogen is associated with a hospital-acquired infection particularly in patients with compromised immunity and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Early detection is crucial in the clinical management of this pathogen, with established infections entering a biofilm lifestyle that is refractory to conventional antibiotic therapies. Herein, a detection procedure was optimized and proven for the simultaneous detection of PYO, HHQ and PQS in standard mixtures, biological samples, and P. aeruginosa spiked CF sputum samples with remarkable sensitivity, down to nanomolar levels. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scans were also applicable for monitoring the production of PYO, HHQ and PQS in P. aeruginosa PA14 over 8 h of cultivation. The simultaneous detection of these three compounds represents a molecular signature specific to this pathogen.

  13. Single-molecule detection of protein efflux from microorganisms using fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita Patricia; Ando, Hiroki; Chen, Allen Y.; Cao, Jicong; Kottadiel, Vishal Isaac; Chio, Linda; Yang, Darwin; Dong, Juyao; Lu, Timothy K.; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-05-01

    A distinct advantage of nanosensor arrays is their ability to achieve ultralow detection limits in solution by proximity placement to an analyte. Here, we demonstrate label-free detection of individual proteins from Escherichia coli (bacteria) and Pichia pastoris (yeast) immobilized in a microfluidic chamber, measuring protein efflux from single organisms in real time. The array is fabricated using non-covalent conjugation of an aptamer-anchor polynucleotide sequence to near-infrared emissive single-walled carbon nanotubes, using a variable chemical spacer shown to optimize sensor response. Unlabelled RAP1 GTPase and HIV integrase proteins were selectively detected from various cell lines, via large near-infrared fluorescent turn-on responses. We show that the process of E. coli induction, protein synthesis and protein export is highly stochastic, yielding variability in protein secretion, with E. coli cells undergoing division under starved conditions producing 66% fewer secreted protein products than their non-dividing counterparts. We further demonstrate the detection of a unique protein product resulting from T7 bacteriophage infection of E. coli, illustrating that nanosensor arrays can enable real-time, single-cell analysis of a broad range of protein products from various cell types.

  14. Membrane Active Small Molecules Show Selective Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Activity with No Detectable Resistance and Eradicate Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Jiaul; Konai, Mohini M; Gonuguntla, Spandhana; Manjunath, Goutham B; Samaddar, Sandip; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-07-23

    Treating bacterial biofilms with conventional antibiotics is limited due to ineffectiveness of the drugs and higher propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Development of new classes of antibacterial therapeutics with alternative mechanisms of action has become imperative. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of novel membrane-active small molecules featuring two positive charges, four nonpeptidic amide groups, and variable hydrophobic/hydrophilic (amphiphilic) character. The biocides synthesized via a facile methodology not only displayed good antibacterial activity against wild-type bacteria but also showed high activity against various drug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Further, these biocides not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established S. aureus and E. coli biofilms. The membrane-active biocides hindered the propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Moreover, the biocides showed negligible toxicity against mammalian cells and thus bear potential to be used as therapeutic agents.

  15. Improved galvanic replacement growth of Ag microstructures on Cu micro-grid for enhanced SERS detection of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Tian-Long; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xudong; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Galvanic growth of Ag nano/micro-structures on Cu micro-grid was systematically studied for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Detailed characterizations via FE-SEM and HR-TEM showed that processing parameters, (reaction time, Ag + concentration, and PVP addition) all substantially affect thermodynamics/kinetics of the replacement reaction to yield substrates of significantly different microstructures/homogeneities and thus varied SERS performances (sensitivity, enhancement factor, and reproducibility) of the Ag substrates in the detection of R6G analyte. PVP as an additive was shown to notably alter nucleation/growth behaviors of the Ag crystals and promote the deposition of dense and uniform Ag films of nearly monodisperse polyhedrons/nanoplates through suppressing dendrites crystallization. Under optimized synthesis (50 mM of Ag + , 30 s of reaction, and 700 wt.% of PVP), Ag substrates exhibiting a high Raman signal enhancement factor of ~ 1.1 × 10 6 and a low relative standard deviation of ~ 0.13 in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G were obtained. The facile deposition and excellent performance reported in this work may allow the Ag microstructures to find wider SERS applications. Moreover, growth mechanisms of the different Ag nano/micro-structures were discussed based on extensive FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. - Highlights: • A facile synthetic technique of growing SERS active Ag substrates onto Cu micro-grid has been systematically studied. • Changing processing parameters has yielded Ag crystals of various morphologies and SERS performances. • PVP additive was observed to suppress Ag dendrite crystallization for nearly monodispersed Ag polyhedrons/nanoplates. • PVP modified SERS substrate exhibits excellent EF and RSD values in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G analyte.

  16. Improved galvanic replacement growth of Ag microstructures on Cu micro-grid for enhanced SERS detection of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian-Long; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xudong; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    Galvanic growth of Ag nano/micro-structures on Cu micro-grid was systematically studied for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Detailed characterizations via FE-SEM and HR-TEM showed that processing parameters, (reaction time, Ag(+) concentration, and PVP addition) all substantially affect thermodynamics/kinetics of the replacement reaction to yield substrates of significantly different microstructures/homogeneities and thus varied SERS performances (sensitivity, enhancement factor, and reproducibility) of the Ag substrates in the detection of R6G analyte. PVP as an additive was shown to notably alter nucleation/growth behaviors of the Ag crystals and promote the deposition of dense and uniform Ag films of nearly monodisperse polyhedrons/nanoplates through suppressing dendrites crystallization. Under optimized synthesis (50mM of Ag(+), 30s of reaction, and 700 wt.% of PVP), Ag substrates exhibiting a high Raman signal enhancement factor of ~1.1 × 10(6) and a low relative standard deviation of ~0.13 in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G were obtained. The facile deposition and excellent performance reported in this work may allow the Ag microstructures to find wider SERS applications. Moreover, growth mechanisms of the different Ag nano/micro-structures were discussed based on extensive FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection of five genetically modified rice events using a single standard reference molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Saet-Byul; Roh, Hyo-Jeong; Shin, Min-Ki; Moon, Gui-Im; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2017-07-01

    One novel standard reference plasmid, namely pUC-RICE5, was constructed as a positive control and calibrator for event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection of genetically modified (GM) rice (Bt63, Kemingdao1, Kefeng6, Kefeng8, and LLRice62). pUC-RICE5 contained fragments of a rice-specific endogenous reference gene (sucrose phosphate synthase) as well as the five GM rice events. An existing qualitative PCR assay approach was modified using pUC-RICE5 to create a quantitative method with limits of detection correlating to approximately 1-10 copies of rice haploid genomes. In this quantitative PCR assay, the square regression coefficients ranged from 0.993 to 1.000. The standard deviation and relative standard deviation values for repeatability ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and 0.10% to 0.67%, respectively. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (Korea) validated the method and the results suggest it could be used routinely to identify five GM rice events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polymerase-free measurement of microRNA-122 with single base specificity using single molecule arrays: Detection of drug-induced liver injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Rissin

    Full Text Available We have developed a single probe method for detecting microRNA from human serum using single molecule arrays, with sequence specificity down to a single base, and without the use of amplification by polymerases. An abasic peptide nucleic acid (PNA probe-containing a reactive amine instead of a nucleotide at a specific position in the sequence-for detecting a microRNA was conjugated to superparamagnetic beads. These beads were incubated with a sample containing microRNA, a biotinylated reactive nucleobase-containing an aldehyde group-that was complementary to the missing base in the probe sequence, and a reducing agent. When a target molecule with an exact match in sequence hybridized to the capture probe, the reactive nucleobase was covalently attached to the backbone of the probe by a dynamic covalent chemical reaction. Single molecules of the biotin-labeled probe were then labeled with streptavidin-β-galactosidase (SβG, the beads were resuspended in a fluorogenic enzyme substrate, loaded into an array of femtoliter wells, and sealed with oil. The array was imaged fluorescently to determine which beads were associated with single enzymes, and the average number of enzymes per bead was determined. The assay had a limit of detection of 500 fM, approximately 500 times more sensitive than a corresponding analog bead-based assay, with target specificity down to a single base mis-match. This assay was used to measure microRNA-122 (miR-122-an established biomarker of liver toxicity-extracted from the serum of patients who had acute liver injury due to acetaminophen, and control healthy patients. All patients with liver injury had higher levels of miR-122 in their serum compared to controls, and the concentrations measured correlated well with those determined using RT-qPCR. This approach allows rapid quantification of circulating microRNA with single-based specificity and a limit of quantification suitable for clinical use.

  19. N-doped graphene: an alternative carbon-based matrix for highly efficient detection of small molecules by negative ion MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Qianhao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-09-16

    Gas-phase N-doped graphene (gNG) was synthesized by a modified thermal annealing method using gaseous melamine as nitrogen source and then for the first time applied as a matrix in negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for small molecule analysis. Unlike the complicated adducts produced in positive ion mode, MS spectra obtained on gNG matrix in negative ion mode was only featured by deprotonated molecule ion peaks without matrix interference. By the gNG assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, some applications were carried out on a wide range of low-molecular weight (MW) analytes including amino acids, fatty acids, peptides, anabolic androgenic steroids as well as anticancer drugs, with an extraordinary laser desorption/ionization (LDI) efficiency over traditional α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and other carbon-based materials in the negative ion detection mode. By comparison of a series of graphene-based matrixes, two main factors of matrix gNG were unveiled to play a decisive role in assisting negative ion D/I process: a well-ordered π-conjugated system for laser absorption and energy transfer; pyridinic-doped nitrogen species functioning as deprotonation sites for proton capture on negative ionization. The good salt tolerance and high sensitivity allowed further therapeutic monitoring of anticancer drug nilotinib in the spiked human serum, a real case of biology. Signal response was definitely obtained between 1 mM and 1 μM, meeting the demand of assessing drug level in the patient serum. This work creates a new application branch for nitrogen-doped graphene and provides an alternative solution for small molecule analysis.

  20. Failure to detect variant (CRM+) plasma thromboplastin antecedent (factor XI) molecules in hereditary plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency: a study of 125 patients of several ethnic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H; Ratnoff, O D; Bouma, B N; Seligsohn, U

    1985-12-01

    Plasma samples of 125 patients from 80 kindreds with hereditary plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) deficiency were tested by factor XI radioimmunoassay (RIA) and electroimmunoassay (EIA) in an attempt to detect variant molecules. Ninety-six patients (70 kindreds) were Jewish, and 29 (10 kindreds) were of other ethnic backgrounds, namely, Japanese, black American, Korean, Arab, Indian, and English. Seventy-eight patients were homozygotes, and 47 were heterozygotes. Both non-Jewish homozygotes and heterozygotes had lower factor XI activity than respective Jewish subjects. Twenty-eight homozygotes whose factor XI clotting activities (XI:C) were 1.5% to 13% had factor XI-related antigen (XI:RAG) levels less than 10% by EIA. In 72 homozygotes, including 22 patients who were also tested with EIA, XI:C was 2.9% +/- 3.0% (mean +/- SD) and XI:RAG tested by RIA, 2.9% +/- 3.0%. In 47 heterozygotes, XI:C and XI:RAG tested by RIA were 51.9% +/- 16.6% and 51.0% +/- 16.2%, respectively. Similar results were obtained when only unrelated patients (62 homozygotes and 27 heterozygotes) were analyzed. There was a highly significant correlation between XI:C and XI:RAG (RIA) in 38 homozygotes and 47 heterozygotes (r = 0.94, n = 85, P less than 0.001). Thus, we failed to identify functionally abnormal factor XI molecules (CRM+ variant) in these patients with hereditary factor XI deficiency.

  1. Highly Efficient Electronic Sensitization of Non-oxidized Graphene Flakes on Controlled Pore-loaded WO3 Nanofibers for Selective Detection of H2S Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon–Jin; Choi, Chanyong; Kim, Sang-Joon; Cho, Hee-Jin; Hakim, Meggie; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Il–Doo

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring of semiconducting metal oxide nanostructures, which possess controlled pore size and concentration, is of great value to accurately detect various volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, which act as potential biomarkers for many health conditions. In this work, we have developed a very simple and robust route for controlling both the size and distribution of spherical pores in electrospun WO3 nanofibers (NFs) via a sacrificial templating route using polystyrene colloids with different diameters (200 nm and 500 nm). A tentacle-like structure with randomly distributed pores on the surface of electrospun WO3 NFs were achieved, which exhibited improved surface area as well as porosity. Porous WO3 NFs with enhanced surface area exhibited high gas response (Rair/Rgas = 43.1 at 5 ppm) towards small and light H2S molecules. In contrast, porous WO3 NFs with maximized pore diameter showed a high response (Rair/Rgas = 2.8 at 5 ppm) towards large and heavy acetone molecules. Further enhanced sensing performance (Rair/Rgas = 65.6 at 5 ppm H2S) was achieved by functionalizing porous WO3 NFs with 0.1 wt% non-oxidized graphene (NOGR) flakes by forming a Schottky barrier (ΔΦ = 0.11) at the junction between the WO3 NFs (Φ = 4.56 eV) and NOGR flakes (Φ = 4.67 eV), which showed high potential for the diagnosis of halitosis.

  2. A Selective Assay to Detect Chitin and Biologically Active Nano-Machineries for Chitin-Biosynthesis with Their Intrinsic Chitin-Synthase Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildgund Schrempf

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new assay system for chitin has been developed. It comprises the chitin-binding protein ChbB in fusion with a His-tag as well as with a Strep-tag, the latter of which was chemically coupled to horseradish peroxidase. With the resulting complex, minimal quantities of chitin are photometrically detectable. In addition, the assay allows rapid scoring of the activity of chitin-synthases. As a result, a refined procedure for the rapid purification of yeast chitosomes (nano-machineries for chitin biosynthesis has been established. Immuno-electronmicroscopical studies of purified chitosomes, gained from a yeast strain carrying a chitin-synthase gene fused to that for GFP (green-fluorescence protein, has led to the in situ localization of chitin-synthase-GFP molecules within chitosomes.

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  5. Wireless and simultaneous detections of multiple bio-molecules in a single sensor using Love wave biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Haekwan; Fu, Chen; Kim, Kunnyun; Lee, Keekeun

    2014-11-17

    A Love wave-based biosensor with a 440 MHz center frequency was developed for the simultaneous detection of two different analytes of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) in a single sensor. The developed biosensor consists of one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay lines on a 41° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) waveguide layer, and two different sensitive films. The Love wave biosensor was wirelessly characterized using two antennas and a network analyzer. The binding of the analytes to the sensitive layers induced a large change in the time positions of the original reflection peaks mainly due to the mass loading effect. The assessed time shifts in the reflection peaks were matched well with the predicted values from coupling of mode (COM) modeling. The sensitivities evaluated from the sensitive films were ~15 deg/µg/mL for the rabbit IgG and ~1.8 deg/ng/mL for COMP.

  6. Wireless and Simultaneous Detections of Multiple Bio-Molecules in a Single Sensor Using Love Wave Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haekwan Oh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A Love wave-based biosensor with a 440 MHz center frequency was developed for the simultaneous detection of two different analytes of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG in a single sensor. The developed biosensor consists of one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW reflective delay lines on a 41° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate, a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA waveguide layer, and two different sensitive films. The Love wave biosensor was wirelessly characterized using two antennas and a network analyzer. The binding of the analytes to the sensitive layers induced a large change in the time positions of the original reflection peaks mainly due to the mass loading effect. The assessed time shifts in the reflection peaks were matched well with the predicted values from coupling of mode (COM modeling. The sensitivities evaluated from the sensitive films were ~15 deg/µg/mL for the rabbit IgG and ~1.8 deg/ng/mL for COMP.

  7. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M., E-mail: Martin@Quack.ch; Schneider, A.; Seyfang, G. [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for all

  8. Detection of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression with USPIO-enhanced molecular MRI in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frechou, M.; Beray-Berthat, V.; Plotkine, M.; Marchand-Leroux, C.; Margaill, I.; Raynaud, J.S.; Gombert, F.; Lancelot, E.; Ballet, S.; Robert, P.; Louin, G.; Meriaux, S.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular damage plays a critical role after stroke, leading notably to edema, hemorrhages and stroke recurrence. Tools to characterize the vascular lesion are thus a real medical need. In this context, the specific nano-particular contrast agent P03011, an USPIO (ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) conjugated to a peptide that targets VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), was developed to detect this major component of the vascular inflammatory response. This study aimed to make the proof of concept of the capacity of this targeted USPIO to detect VCAM-1 with MRI after cerebral ischemia in mouse. The time course of VCAM-1 expression was first examined by immunohistochemistry in our model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. Secondly, P03011 or non-targeted USPIO P03007 were injected 5 h after ischemia (100 mmol iron kg -1 ; i.v.) and in vivo and ex vivo MRI were performed 24 h after ischemia onset. Double labeling immunofluorescence was then performed on brain slices in order to detect both USPIO and VCAM-1. VCAM-1 expression was significantly up-regulated 24 h after ischemia in our model. In animals receiving P03011, both in vivo and ex vivo MRI performed 24 h after ischemia onset showed hypointense foci which could correspond to iron particles. Histological analysis showed a co-localization of the targeted USPIO and VCAM-1. This study demonstrates that VCAM-1 detection is possible with the USPIO P03011 in a model of cerebral ischemia. This kind of contrast agent could be an interesting clinical tool to characterize ischemic lesions in terms of vascular damage. (authors)

  9. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  10. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  11. Highly sensitive detection of mutations in CHO cell recombinant DNA using multi-parallel single molecule real-time DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Joseph F; Anderson, Karin; Longworth, Joseph; Lobb, Philip; James, David C

    2018-02-10

    High-fidelity replication of biologic-encoding recombinant DNA sequences by engineered mammalian cell cultures is an essential pre-requisite for the development of stable cell lines for the production of biotherapeutics. However, immortalized mammalian cells characteristically exhibit an increased point mutation frequency compared to mammalian cells in vivo, both across their genomes and at specific loci (hotspots). Thus unforeseen mutations in recombinant DNA sequences can arise and be maintained within producer cell populations. These may affect both the stability of recombinant gene expression and give rise to protein sequence variants with variable bioactivity and immunogenicity. Rigorous quantitative assessment of recombinant DNA integrity should therefore form part of the cell line development process and be an essential quality assurance metric for instances where synthetic/multi-component assemblies are utilized to engineer mammalian cells, such as the assessment of recombinant DNA fidelity or the mutability of single-site integration target loci. Based on Pacific Biosciences (Menlo Park, CA) single molecule real-time (SMRT™) circular consensus sequencing (CCS) technology we developed a rDNA sequence analysis tool to process the multi-parallel sequencing of ∼40,000 single recombinant DNA molecules. After statistical filtering of raw sequencing data, we show that this analytical method is capable of detecting single point mutations in rDNA to a minimum single mutation frequency of 0.0042% (sequence. There was no discernable difference between the mutation frequencies of coding and non-coding DNA. The putative ratio of non-synonymous and synonymous changes within the open reading frames (ORFs) in the plasmid sequence indicates that natural selection does not impact upon the prevalence of these mutations. Here we have demonstrated the abundance of mutations that fall outside of the reported range of detection of next generation sequencing (NGS) and second

  12. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  13. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  14. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  15. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  16. Ultrahigh-sensitive detection of molecules produced in catalytic reactions by uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on solid substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumatsu, H; Fukui, N

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring catalytic activities of uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on a solid substrate. The cluster sample is prepared by irradiating a cluster-ion beam having the uni-atomic composition onto the substrate on a soft-landing condition in an ultra-high vacuum. The catalytic activity is measured by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) mass analysis. Molecules at a density as low as 3 cm −3 have been detected with an ultrahigh-sensitive TPD mass spectrometer consisting of a cylindrical electron gun, a quadrupole mass filter and a micro-channel-plate ion-detector. The high reproducibility has been achieved by careful calibration of the TPD mass spectrometer. As a benchmark example, thermal oxidation of CO catalysed on Pt 30 disks supported on a silicon surface was studied. The CO 2 products have been successfully observed at the Pt 30 density as low as 3 × 10 12 clusters in a circular area of 8 mm in diameter at the ramping rate of the sample temperature as low as 0.3 K s −1 .

  17. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Son [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Tabarin, Thibault [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Rossy, Jérémie [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Böcking, Till [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Leis, Andrew [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Gaus, Katharina, E-mail: k.gaus@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Mak, Johnson, E-mail: j.mak@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the ‘lynchpin’ for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. - Highlights: • Cell free viruses are able to receive external trigger that leads to apparent size expansion. • Virus envelope and CD4 receptor engagement is the lynchpin of virus size expansion. • Internal capsid organisation can influence receptor mediated virus size expansion. • Pre-existing virus-associated lipid membrane in cell free virus can accommodate the receptor mediated virus size expansion.

  18. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Son; Tabarin, Thibault; Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna; Rossy, Jérémie; Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex; Böcking, Till; Leis, Andrew; Gaus, Katharina; Mak, Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the ‘lynchpin’ for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. - Highlights: • Cell free viruses are able to receive external trigger that leads to apparent size expansion. • Virus envelope and CD4 receptor engagement is the lynchpin of virus size expansion. • Internal capsid organisation can influence receptor mediated virus size expansion. • Pre-existing virus-associated lipid membrane in cell free virus can accommodate the receptor mediated virus size expansion.

  19. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. [Detection and clinical value of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) mRNA positive circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Cheng, Jian-ping; Di, Li-jun; Song, Guo-hong; Ren, Jun

    2012-04-18

    To test for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) relying on epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression in metastatic breast cancer by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. In the study,47 metastatic breast cancer patients were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR for detecting EpCAM mRNA. In addition, analyses were carried out for their correlation with patients' clinicopathologic features, response, and the time to progression (TTP). The sensitivity of EpCAM mRNA in the metastatic breast cancer patients was about 40%. However, the specificity of EpCAM mRNA for 20 healthy controls was 100%. TTP was calculated, and compared with that between EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative groups. For the retrospective study, the median TTP was 7.1 months and 11.1 months (P=0.013) for patients with EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative, respectively, after the first cycle chemotherapy. Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between EpCAM mRNA and TTP in patients who underwent the first or the second-line chemotherapy (P=0.018), but there was no significance in the patients pretreated with two or more previous chemotherapy lines (P=0.471). This study provides evidence of the presence of EpCAM mRNA in approximately 40% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. There is a strong correlation between EpCAM mRNA results after the first cycle therapy and TTP in metastatic breast cancer patients, and EpCAM mRNA positive after chemotherapy may predict shorter TTP.

  3. Highlight on the indigenous organic molecules detected on Mars by SAM and potential sources of artifacts and backgrounds generated by the sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Coll, P. J.; Cabane, M.; Millan, M.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Pinnick, V. T.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Stambouli, M.; Dequaire, T.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Among the experiments which explore the martian soil aboard the Curiosity Rover, SAM experiment is mainly dedicated to the search for indigenous organic compounds. To reach its goals SAM can operate in different analysis modes: Pyrolysis-GC-MS and Pyrolysis-MS (EGA). In addition SAM includes wet chemistry experiments [1] to supports extraction of polar organic compounds from solid samples that improves their detection either by increasing the release of chemical species from solid sample matrices, or by changing their chemical structure to make compounds more amenable to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The two wet chemistry experimental capabilities of SAM provide alternatives to the nominal inert-thermal desorption/pyrolysis analytical protocol and are more aptly suited for polar components: MTBSTFA derivatization [2-3] and TMAH thermochemolysis [4-5]. Here we focus on the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment. In order to build a support used to help the interpretation of SAM results, we have investigated the artifacts and backgrounds sources generated by the all analysis process: Solid sample were heated up to approximately 840°C at a rate of 35°C/min under He flow. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (Tenax®) over a specific temperature range. Adsorbed volatiles on the GC injection trap (IT) were then released into the GC column (CLP-MXT 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25μm) by rapidly heating the IT to 300°C. Then, in order better understand the part of compounds detected coming from internal reaction we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM device: Among the sources of artifact, we test: (1) the thermal stability and the organic material released during the degradation of Tenax® and carbosieve, (2) the impact of MTBSTFA and a mixture of DMF and MTBSTFA on the adsorbent, (3) the reaction between the different adsorbents (Tenax® and Carbosieve) and calcium perchlorate and then (4) the sources

  4. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  6. Applying the tools of chemistry (mass spectrometry and covalent modification by small molecule reagents) to the detection of prions and the study of their structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prions are molecular pathogens, able to convert a normal cellular prion protein PrPC into a prion PrPSc. The information necessary for this conversion is contained in the conformation of PrPSc. Mass spectrometry and small-molecule covalent reactions have recently been used to study prions. This w...

  7. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  8. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  9. Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets as a multifunctional background-free matrix to detect small molecules and complicated samples by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Jiyun; Liu, Huihui; Xue, Jinjuan; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-07-18

    Here we report the innovation of using hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets as the first background-free matrix among the full laser pulse energy range for the analysis and imaging of small molecule metabolites and as an adsorbent for the enrichment of samples. Due to its totally free background and high efficiency as an adsorbent and matrix, h-BN has promising prospects in metabolomics, MALDI imaging, and environmental analysis.

  10. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  11. Deep K-band Observations of TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Detection of HC7O, Nondetection of HC11N, and a Search for New Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Kisiel, Z.; McGuire, B. A.; Kuan, Y.-J.

    2017-12-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope K-band (KFPA) receiver was used to perform a high-sensitivity search for rotational emission lines from complex organic molecules in the cold interstellar medium toward TMC-1 (cyanopolyyne peak), focussing on the identification of new carbon-chain-bearing species as well as molecules of possible prebiotic relevance. We report a detection of the carbon-chain oxide species HC7O and derive a column density of (7.8+/- 0.9)× {10}11 cm-2. This species is theorized to form as a result of associative electron detachment reactions between oxygen atoms and C7H-, and/or reaction of C6H2 + with CO (followed by dissociative electron recombination). Upper limits are given for the related HC6O, C6O, and C7O molecules. In addition, we obtained the first detections of emission from individual 13C isotopologues of HC7N, and derive abundance ratios HC7N/HCCC13CCCCN = 110 ± 16 and HC7N/HCCCC13CCCN = 96 ± 11, indicative of significant 13C depletion in this species relative to the local interstellar elemental 12C/13C ratio of 60-70. The observed spectral region covered two transitions of HC11N, but emission from this species was not detected, and the corresponding column density upper limit is 7.4× {10}10 {{cm}}-2 (at 95% confidence). This is significantly lower than the value of 2.8× {10}11 {{cm}}-2 previously claimed by Bell et al. and confirms the recent nondetection of HC11N in TMC-1 by Loomis et al. Upper limits were also obtained for the column densities of malononitrile and the nitrogen heterocycles quinoline, isoquinoline, and pyrimidine.

  12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  14. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  15. Expression of the C- KIT Molecule in Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Implications of the Immuno phenotypes CD117 and CD15 in the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, S.

    2001-01-01

    Study of the c-kit proto-oncogene (CD117) may be of help for the identification of phenotypic profiles that are absent or present at very low frequencies on normal human blast cells and therefore might be of great value for the detection of leukemic cells displaying such immuno phenotypes in patients in complete remission. Design and methods: Ninety patients with acute myeloid leukemias, diagnosed according to FAB criteria and immunological marker studies, were studied for the dual expression on blast cells of the CD117/CD15 immuno phenotype co expression by direct immunofluorescence assay using dual staining combination flow cytometry. Results: In 69/90 acute myeloid leukemia patients analyzed (77%), blast cells expressed the CD117 antigen. Moreover, in 38 of them (42% of acute myeloid leukemia cases), leukemic blasts co expressed the CD117 and CD15 antigens. There was no significant correlation between the FAB classification and the CD117 and CD15 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cases. Conclusions: These results suggest that immunological methods for the detection of MRD based on the existence of aberrant phenotypes could be used in the majority of AML patients. This phenotype CD117/CD15, present in acute myeloid leukemia cases at a relatively high frequency (42%), represents an aberrant phenotype, because it was not detected on normal human blast cells, suggesting that the use of these combinations of monoclonal antibodies could be of help in detecting residual leukemic blasts among normal blast cells. The use of the CD117 antigen in different monoclonal antibodies combinations may be of great help for the detection of minimal residual disease in a high proportion of acute myeloid leukemia cases, especially in those patients displaying the CD117+/CD15+ immuno phenotype, because cells co expressing both antigens in normal blasts, if present, are at very low frequencies. The simultaneous assessment of two or more markers in single cells has facilitated the

  16. A cell-based MHC stabilization assay for the detection of peptide binding to the canine classical class I molecule, DLA-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Peter; Holmes, Jennifer C; Gojanovich, Gregory S; Hess, Paul R

    2012-12-15

    Identifying immunodominant CTL epitopes is essential for studying CD8+ T-cell responses in populations, but remains difficult, as peptides within antigens typically are too numerous for all to be synthesized and screened. Instead, to facilitate discovery, in silico scanning of proteins for sequences that match the motif, or binding preferences, of the restricting MHC class I allele - the largest determinant of immunodominance - can be used to predict likely candidates. The high false positive rate with this analysis ideally requires binding confirmation, which is obtained routinely by an assay using cell lines such as RMA-S that have defective transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) machinery, and consequently, few surface class I molecules. The stabilization and resultant increased life-span of peptide-MHC complexes on the cell surface by the addition of true binders validates their identity. To determine whether a similar assay could be developed for dogs, we transfected a prevalent class I allele, DLA-88*50801, into RMA-S. In the BARC3 clone, the recombinant heavy chain was associated with murine β2-microglobulin, and importantly, could differentiate motif-matched and -mismatched peptides by surface MHC stabilization. This work demonstrates the potential to use RMA-S cells transfected with canine alleles as a tool for CTL epitope discovery in this species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  18. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  19. A Selective Assay to Detect Chitin and Biologically Active Nano-Machineries for Chitin-Biosynthesis with Their Intrinsic Chitin-Synthase Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Herasimenka, Yury; Kotasinska, Marta; Walter, Stefan; Schrempf, Hildgund

    2010-01-01

    A new assay system for chitin has been developed. It comprises the chitin-binding protein ChbB in fusion with a His-tag as well as with a Strep-tag, the latter of which was chemically coupled to horseradish peroxidase. With the resulting complex, minimal quantities of chitin are photometrically detectable. In addition, the assay allows rapid scoring of the activity of chitin-synthases. As a result, a refined procedure for the rapid purification of yeast chitosomes (nano-machineries for chitin...

  20. Single-molecule analysis of lead(II)-binding aptamer conformational changes in an α-hemolysin nanopore, and sensitive detection of lead(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Song, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Hui-Sheng; Chen, Si-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore is capable of analyzing DNA duplex and DNA aptamer as they can be electrophoretically driven into the vestibule from the cis entrance. The current study describes the competitive interaction induced by Pb 2+ that changes the secondary structure of DNA duplex in asymmetrical electrolyte solution. DNA duplex formed by the partial complementary DNA and DNA aptamer sequence produced unzipping blockages with the dwell unzipping time lasting 2.84 ± 0.7 ms. By cation-DNA interaction with Pb 2+ , the DNA duplex will unwind and then form Pb 2+ -stabilized-DNA aptamer, which will be captured and unfolded in vestibule. The pore conductance were reduced to 54 % and 94 % with mean dwell unfolding times of 165 ± 12 ms. The competitive behavior between Pb 2+ and single-strand DNA was further utilized to detect Pb 2+ in solution with a detection limit of 0.5 nM. This nanopore platform also provides a powerful tool for studying the cation-DNA interactions in DNA aptamer conformational changes. Thus, the results drawn from these studies provide insights into the applications of α-hemolysin nanopore as a molecular sieve to different DNA secondary structure in future application of nanopore analysis. (author)

  1. Single-Molecule Plasmon Sensing: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adam B; Zijlstra, Peter

    2017-08-25

    Single-molecule detection has long relied on fluorescent labeling with high quantum-yield fluorophores. Plasmon-enhanced detection circumvents the need for labeling by allowing direct optical detection of weakly emitting and completely nonfluorescent species. This review focuses on recent advances in single molecule detection using plasmonic metal nanostructures as a sensing platform, particularly using a single particle-single molecule approach. In the past decade two mechanisms for plasmon-enhanced single-molecule detection have been demonstrated: (1) by plasmonically enhancing the emission of weakly fluorescent biomolecules, or (2) by monitoring shifts of the plasmon resonance induced by single-molecule interactions. We begin with a motivation regarding the importance of single molecule detection, and advantages plasmonic detection offers. We describe both detection mechanisms and discuss challenges and potential solutions. We finalize by highlighting the exciting possibilities in analytical chemistry and medical diagnostics.

  2. Single Targeted Exon Mutation Creates a True Congenic Mouse for Competitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The C57BL/6-CD45.1STEM Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois E. Mercier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Defining the molecular regulators of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs requires in vivo functional analyses. Competitive bone marrow transplants (BMTs compare control and test HSPCs to demonstrate the functional role of a genetic change or chemical perturbation. Competitive BMT is enabled by antibodies that specifically recognize hematopoietic cells from congenic mouse strains due to variants of the cell surface protein CD45, designated CD45.1 and CD45.2. The current congenic competitor strain, B6.SJL-Ptprca Pepcb/BoyJ (CD45.1, has a substantial inherent disadvantage in competition against the C57BL/6 (CD45.2 strain, confounding experimental interpretation. Despite backcrossing, the congenic interval over which the B6.SJL-Ptprca Pepcb/BoyJ strain differs is almost 40 Mb encoding ∼300 genes. Here, we demonstrate that a single amino acid change determines the CD45.1 epitope. Further, we report on the single targeted exon mutant (STEM mouse strain, CD45.1STEM, which is functionally equivalent to CD45.2 cells in competitive BMT. This strain will permit the precise definition of functional roles for candidate genes using in vivo HSPC assays.

  3. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  4. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  5. Laboratory simulations of prebiotic molecule stability in the jarosite mineral group; end member evaluation of detection and decomposition behavior related to Mars sample return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Andrew G. Conly; Jill R. Scott

    2009-10-01

    Recently, the prebiotic amino acid glycine has been found associated with natural jarosite samples from various locations around the world. Since the discovery of jarosite on Mars, extensive research focuses on linking this mineral group with possible detection of biosignatures in the geologic record on Earth and Mars. Multiple analytical methods, including extraction and mass spectrometry techniques have identified glycine and other biomolecules in jarosite samples. The jarosite end members jarosite (sensu stricto-potassium jarosite), natrojarosite (sodium jarosite), and ammoniojarosite (ammonium jarosite) have different thermodynamic stabilities, decompose at different rates, and have potentially different susceptibilities to substitution. Planetary protection issues have led to the suggestion that samples returned from Mars would need to be heat-treated before they could be analyzed on Earth. Although heat treatment of the samples would in theory destroy any potential biosignatures, valuable information can be obtained during thermal treatment by employing gravimetric techniques. The relationship between the thermodynamic stability of the jarosite end members and the effect that glycine has on the thermal decomposition behavior of each end member was investigated using thermal gravimetric analysis. Thermal gravimetric analysis has been suggested as a method capable of providing the heat treatment necessary to provide planetary protection while still providing useful information about the original state and composition of the potentially returned materials. Introducing glycine into the synthesis procedure of the potassium, sodium and ammonium jarosite end-member has elucidated the effects that glycine has on the thermal stability of the mineral group. Potassium jarosite appears to be the least susceptible to the effects of glycine, with the sodium and ammonium end members showing marked changes in thermal decomposition behavior and decomposition rates. In

  6. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  7. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  8. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  9. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  10. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  11. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  12. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-13

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell-cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell-cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature.

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  14. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  15. Development of an Immunoperoxidase Monolayer Assay for the Detection of Antibodies against Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Based on BHK-21 Cell Line Stably Expressing the Goat Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Zhang

    Full Text Available From 2013 to 2015, peste des petits ruminants (PPR broke out in more than half of the provinces of China; thus, the application and development of diagnostic methods are very important for the control of PPR. Here, an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA was developed to detect antibodies against PPR. However, during IPMA development, we found that Vero cells were not the appropriate choice because staining results were not easily observed. Therefore, we first established a baby hamster kidney-goat signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (BHK-SLAM cell line that could stably express goat SLAM for at least 20 generations. Compared with Vero cells, the PPR-mediated cytopathic effect occurred earlier in BHK-SLAM cells, and large syncytia appeared after virus infection. Based on this cell line and recombinant PPR virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP (rPPRV-GFP, an IPMA for PPR diagnosis was developed. One hundred and ninety-eight PPR serum samples from goats or sheep were tested by the IPMA and virus neutralization test (VNT. Compared with the VNT, the sensitivity and specificity of the IPMA were 91% and 100%, respectively, and the coincidence rate of the two methods was 95.5%. The IPMA assay could be completed in 4 h, compared with more than 6 d for the VNT using rPPRV-GFP, and it is easily performed, as the staining results can be observed under a microscope. Additionally, unlike the VNT, the IPMA does not require antigen purification, which will reduce its cost. In conclusion, the established IPMA will be an alternative method that replaces the VNT for detecting antibodies against PPRV in the field.

  16. Detection of Autoantibodies against Recombinant Desmoglein 1 and 3 Molecules in Patients with Pemphigus vulgaris: Correlation with Disease Extent at the Time of Diagnosis and during Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Belloni-Fortina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent availability of cDNA clones for pemphigus antigens has allowed the production of recombinant desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 molecules and the development of an ELISA approach in order to determine levels of antibodies to them. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between autoantibodies levels and the extent of both mucosal and skin lesions in 20 patients with pemphigus vulgaris at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up. For the detection of autoantibodies by ELISA we used the recombinant proteins expressing overlapping sequences with the entire extracellular desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 domains. We showed that in presence of mucosal lesions there was a correlation between extension of mucosal involvement and autoantiboidies titres against both desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3, whereas in presence of skin lesions there was a statistically significant correlation between extension of skin lesions and autoantibodies titres against desmoglein 3, but not against desmoglein 1. A not negligible number of patients showed variations of the desmoglein 3 autoantibodies titre which did not correlate with the severity of both cutaneous and mucosal involvement. Similar results were obtained analyzing autoantibodies titres against desmoglein 1. In conclusion, we believe that the utilization of recombinant desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 proteins by ELISA should be used with caution to monitor disease severity and response to therapy, although it remains a high specific test for the initial diagnosis of pemphigus and the identification of a change in the clinical phenotype of this condition.

  17. A novel technique using DNA denaturation to detect multiply induced single-strand breaks in a hydrated plasmid DNA molecule by X-ray and 4He2+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Noguchi, M.; Urushibara, A.

    2011-01-01

    To detect multiple single-strand breaks (SSBs) produced in plasmid DNA molecules by direct energy deposition from radiation tracks, we have developed a novel technique using DNA denaturation by which irradiated DNA is analysed as single-strand DNA (SS-DNA). The multiple SSBs that arise in both strands of DNA, but do not induce a double-strand break, are quantified as loss of SS-DNA using agarose gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to X-ray and 4 He 2+ ion-irradiated samples of fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA. The fractions of both SS-DNA and closed circular DNA (CC-DNA) exponentially decrease with the increasing dose of X rays and 4 He 2+ ions. The efficiency of the loss of SS-DNA was half that of CC-DNA for both types of irradiation, indicating that one of two strands in DNA is not broken when one SSB is produced in CC-DNA by irradiation. Contrary to our initial expectation, these results indicate that SSBs are not multiply induced even by high linear energy transfer radiation distributed in both strands. (authors)

  18. Detection of mRNA molecules coding for neuropeptide hormones of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis by radioactive and non-radioactive in situ hybridization: a model study for mRNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirks, R.W.; Raap, A.K.; Van Minnen, J.; Vreugdenhil, E.; Smit, A.B.; Van der Ploeg, M.

    1989-01-01

    To develop and optimize non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques for mRNA detection, we used the neuropeptidergic system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as a biological model system. First, we investigated the in situ hybridization procedure using radioactive-labeled cDNA and synthetic oligonucleotide probes specific for egg-laying hormone (ELH) mRNA and molluscan insulin-like peptide (MIP) mRNA. The results show an intense grain deposit above the caudodorsal cells and light-green cells expressing, respectively, ELH mRNA and MIP mRNA. Good results with relation to signal strength and tissue morphology were obtained with freeze-dry paraformaldehyde vapor fixation. The necessity to perform tissue pre-treatment appeared to be dependent on the cell type of interest. The optimized in situ hybridization protocol proved to be applicable using probes that are either sulfonated/transaminated or labeled with acetylaminofluorene (AAF). In situ hybridization of such haptenized probes led to intense and specific staining of the cytoplasm of the caudodorsal cells. Egg-laying hormone mRNA appeared not to be homogeneously distributed in the cytoplasm but showed a patch-like pattern. Nuclear and axoplasmic staining for mRNA was also observed.

  19. Detection of mRNA molecules coding for neuropeptide hormones of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis by radioactive and non-radioactive in situ hybridization: a model study for mRNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, R W; Raap, A K; Van Minnen, J; Vreugdenhil, E; Smit, A B; Van der Ploeg, M

    1989-01-01

    To develop and optimize non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques for mRNA detection, we used the neuropeptidergic system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as a biological model system. First, we investigated the in situ hybridization procedure using radioactive-labeled cDNA and synthetic oligonucleotide probes specific for egg-laying hormone (ELH) mRNA and molluscan insulin-like peptide (MIP) mRNA. The results show an intense grain deposit above the caudodorsal cells and light-green cells expressing, respectively, ELH mRNA and MIP mRNA. Good results with relation to signal strength and tissue morphology were obtained with freeze-dry paraformaldehyde vapor fixation. The necessity to perform tissue pre-treatment appeared to be dependent on the cell type of interest. The optimized in situ hybridization protocol proved to be applicable using probes that are either sulfonated/transaminated or labeled with acetylaminofluorene (AAF). In situ hybridization of such haptenized probes led to intense and specific staining of the cytoplasm of the caudodorsal cells. Egg-laying hormone mRNA appeared not to be homogeneously distributed in the cytoplasm but showed a "patch-like" pattern. Nuclear and axoplasmic staining for mRNA was also observed.

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  4. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  5. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  6. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  7. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  8. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  9. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Täuber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule (SM methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC. Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  10. Single molecule studies on dynamics in liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-09-26

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  11. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  12. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  13. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  14. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  15. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  16. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    (NCS1). The NMR solution structure of NCS1, in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and mutational analysis, suggested a novel role for the C-terminal tail in regulating conformational stability. On the single-molecule level, the C-domain folded through a partially folded intermediate state....... This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical...

  17. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    . This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical......, with transition states located almost halfway between the native and unfolded states. When pulled from the N- and C-termini, both experiments and simulations suggested that the molecule populates a transition state that resembles that observed during chemical denaturation, with respect to structure and position...

  18. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2014-07-15

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  19. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2017-01-03

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  20. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  1. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  2. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  3. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  4. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  5. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  6. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  8. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  9. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  12. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  13. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  14. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  17. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  18. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  19. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  1. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  2. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    spectroscopy of formaldehyde. First, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of the A 1 A 2 1 A 1 transition of formaldehyde is performed in a room-temperature gas to extract molecular constants. These findings are used to address single rotational states of guided molecules. Since the formaldehyde molecules dissociate upon ultraviolet excitation, the laser-frequency-dependent decrease in the number of guided molecules allows to extract the population of individual rotational states in the beam. With the source temperature set to 155 K, populations of rotational states exceeding 10% are observed, which validates the theoretical model of velocity filtering. Finally, Rayleigh scattering into an optical cavity is investigated as an alternative, non-destructive detection method for cold molecules. Comparing the rate of scattering into the fundamental cavity mode to that into the same mode under free-space conditions, an enhancement by a factor of up to 38 is observed for room-temperature gases. This Purcell-like enhancement is explained by interference of electromagnetic fields scattered by a classical driven dipole oscillator in the resonator. (orig.)

  3. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  4. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  5. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  6. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  7. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  8. Our Galactic Neighbor Hosts Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the presence of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in a star-forming region outside our galaxy. This discovery has important implications for the formation and survival of complex organic compounds importantfor the formation of life in low-metallicity galaxies bothyoung and old.No Simple Picture of Complex Molecule FormationALMA, pictured here with the Magellanic Clouds above, has observed organic molecules in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. [ESO/C. Malin]Complex organic molecules (those with at least six atoms, one or more of which must be carbon) are the precursors to the building blocks of life. Knowing how and where complex organic molecules can form is a key part of understanding how life came to be on Earth and how it might arise elsewhere in the universe. From exoplanet atmospheres to interstellar space, complex organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Milky Way.In our galaxy, complex organic molecules are often found in the intense environments of hot cores clumps of dense molecular gas surrounding the sites of star formation. However, its not yet fully understood how the complex organic molecules found in hot cores come to be. One possibility is that the compounds condense onto cold dust grains long before the young stars begin heating their natal shrouds. Alternatively, they might assemble themselves from the hot, dense gas surrounding the blazing protostars.Composite infrared and optical image of the N 113 star-forming region in the LMC. The ALMA coverage is indicated by the gray line. Click to enlarge. [Sewio et al. 2018]Detecting Complexity, a Galaxy AwayUsing ALMA, a team of researchers led by Marta Sewio (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) recently detected two complex organic molecules methyl formate and dimethyl ether for the first time in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Previous searches for organic molecules in the LMC detected

  9. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  10. An open-set detection evaluation methodology applied to language and emotion recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, D.A. van; Truong, K.P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a detection methodology for recognition technologies in speech for which it is dif cult to obtain an abundance of non-target classes. An example is language recognition, where we would like to be able to measure the detection capability of a single target language without

  11. Single Molecule 3D Orientation in Time and Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Richard; Ehrlich, Nicky; Hohlbein, Johannes; Hübner, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between single molecules profoundly depend on their mutual three-dimensional orientation. Recently, we demonstrated a technique that allows for orientation determination of single dipole emitters using a polarization-resolved distribution of fluorescence into several detection

  12. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  13. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  14. Imaging and controlling proton motion in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, H.; Beaulieu, S.; Wanie, V.; Endo, T.; Wales, B.; Tong, X.-M.; Schuurman, M. S.; Sanderson, J.; Légaré, F.

    2017-11-01

    How do atoms move within a molecule? What are the paths they take? Coulomb Explosion Imaging combined with a multi-color pump probe scheme allows us to address these questions with a table top setup. Since the momentum information of molecular fragments is preserved at the moment of explosion, we can deduce the fragment's momentary position, representing the structure of the molecule. We have studied isomerization and dissociation events through the movement of protons, deuterons and electrons, taking advantage of the rich statistics this technique provides. In the case of proton migration in the acetylene cation, we were able to identify an isotope dependent to- and fro isomerization behavior [1]. Presently, we are expanding our studies on more complex processes. Aside from passively studying dynamics, we have also actively controlled the electron localization in small molecules [2] using two-color mid-infrared asymmetric laser fields. The manipulation of protons, the lightest atomic fragments in molecules, is of great interest due to the tremendous diversity of molecules containing them, in combination with the generality of how protons behave within molecules. Their detection involves certain challenges since they move extremely fast compared to heavier atoms. Here, we focus on two different proton motions which are triggered by excitation with ultrashort laser pulses and imaged with the Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) technique. First, we will discuss proton migration dynamics in the acetylene cation launched due to strong field multiphoton ionization with UV pulses in a rather simple table top approach. Second, we will concentrate on controlling electron localization - and thus proton localization - in the cation of the hydrogen molecule by using an asymmetric two color field in the mid-infrared (MIR).

  15. Prebiotic molecules and interstellar grain clumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that interstellar molecules detected by radioastronomical techniques in galactic clouds cover a wide range of types and complexities. Amongst the heaviest recently discovered is cyanodiacetylene. There have also been earlier detections of precursors to the simplest amino-acid, glycine and probably detections of polyoxymethylene polymers and co-polymers. A possible identification of organic molecules of even greater complexity is here discussed, together with implications for the commencement of biological activity. The large departures from thermodynamic equilibrium in the interstellar medium and the co-existence of solid grains, molecules, radicals, ions, and uv photons provide conditions that are ideal for production of 'exotic' molecular species. The effect of clumping of dust grains is discussed. The possible spectral identification of highly complex organic species in the interstellar medium is also discussed and reference is made to a property common to a wide class of such molecules, that is, an absorption band centered at 2,200 A. It is tempting to identify this feature with the well-known 2,200 A band of the interstellar extinction curve. It is thought that it may be tentatively concluded that the data so far obtained could be interpreted as independent new chemical evidence of the existence of composite grain clumps in the interstellar medium and in carbonaceous chondrites, and that these grain clumps probably include a significant mass fraction of highly complex organic pre-biotic molecules that could have led to the start and dispersal of biological activity on the Earth and elsewhere in the Galaxy. Processes of natural selection probably also played an important part, particularly in the production of self-replicable peptide chains. The problem of protection of pre-biotic material against external disruptive agencies, such as u/v light, is also discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Modelling the spectroscopic behaviour of hot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    At elevated temperatures the molecules absorb and emit light in a very complicated fashion which is hard to characterise on the basis of laboraroty measurement. Computed line lists of molecule transitions therefore provide a vital input for models of hot atmospheres. I will describe the calculation and use of such line lists including the BT2 water line list [1], which contains some 500 million distinct rotation-vibration transitions. This linelist proved crucial in the detection of water in extrasolar planet HD189733b and has been used extensively in atmospheric modelling. Illustrations will be given at the meeting. A new linelist for the ammonia molecule has just been completed [2] which shows that standard compilations for this molecule need to be improved. Progress on a more extensive linelist for hot ammonia and linelists for other molecules will be discussed at the meeting. [1] R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris and R.N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 368, 1087-1094 (2006) [2] S.N. Yurchenko, R.J. Barber, A. Yachmenev, W. Theil, P. Jensen and J. Tennyson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 113, 11845-11855 (2009).

  17. Playing with molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Recent philosophy of science has seen a number of attempts to understand scientific models by looking to theories of fiction. In previous work, I have offered an account of models that draws on Kendall Walton's 'make-believe' theory of art. According to this account, models function as 'props' in games of make-believe, like children's dolls or toy trucks. In this paper, I assess the make-believe view through an empirical study of molecular models. I suggest that the view gains support when we look at the way that these models are used and the attitude that users take towards them. Users' interaction with molecular models suggests that they do imagine the models to be molecules, in much the same way that children imagine a doll to be a baby. Furthermore, I argue, users of molecular models imagine themselves viewing and manipulating molecules, just as children playing with a doll might imagine themselves looking at a baby or feeding it. Recognising this 'participation' in modelling, I suggest, points towards a new account of how models are used to learn about the world, and helps us to understand the value that scientists sometimes place on three-dimensional, physical models over other forms of representation.

  18. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  19. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  20. Molecule signatures in photoluminescence spectra of transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, Maja; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Selig, Malte; Brem, Samuel; Shegai, Timur; Eigler, Siegfried; Malic, Ermin

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) show an optimal surface-to-volume ratio and are thus promising candidates for novel molecule sensor devices. It was recently predicted that a certain class of molecules exhibiting a large dipole moment can be detected through the activation of optically inaccessible (dark) excitonic states in absorption spectra of tungsten-based TMDs. In this paper, we investigate the molecule signatures in photoluminescence spectra in dependence of a number of different experimentally accessible quantities, such as excitation density, temperature, as well as molecular characteristics including the dipole moment and its orientation, molecule-TMD distance, molecular coverage, and distribution. We show that under certain optimal conditions even room-temperature detection of molecules can be achieved.

  1. Dust-forming molecules in VY Canis Majoris (and Betelgeuse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, T.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Schmidt, M. R.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Menten, K. M.; Brünken, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Winters, J. M.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    The formation of inorganic dust in circumstellar environments of evolved stars is poorly understood. Spectra of molecules thought to be most important for the nucleation, i.e. AlO, TiO, and TiO2, have been recently detected in the red supergiant VY CMa. These molecules are effectively formed in VY CMa and the observations suggest that non-equilibrium chemistry must be involved in their formation and nucleation into dust. In addition to exploring the recent observations of VY CMa, we briefly discuss the possibility of detecting these molecules in the "dust-poor" circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse.

  2. Identification and validation of bioactive small molecule target through phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-03-15

    For effective bioactive small molecule discovery and development into new therapeutic drug, a systematic screening and target protein identification is required. Different from the conventional screening system, herein phenotypic screening in combination with multi-omics-based target identification and validation (MOTIV) is introduced. First, phenotypic screening provides visual effect of bioactive small molecules in the cell or organism level. It is important to know the effect on the cell or organism level since small molecules affect not only a single target but the entire cellular mechanism within a cell or organism. Secondly, MOTIV provides systemic approach to discover the target protein of bioactive small molecule. With the chemical genomics and proteomics approach of target identification methods, various target protein candidates are identified. Then network analysis and validations of these candidates result in identifying the biologically relevant target protein and cellular mechanism. Overall, the combination of phenotypic screening and MOTIV will provide an effective approach to discover new bioactive small molecules and their target protein and mechanism identification. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  4. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  5. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  6. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  7. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce [Pullman, WA; Burke, Charles Cullen [Moscow, ID

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  8. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common Subgraph (MCS tool: SMSD (Small Molecule Subgraph Detector to overcome the issues with current heuristic approaches to small molecule similarity searches. The MCS search implemented in SMSD incorporates chemical knowledge (atom type match with bond sensitive and insensitive information while searching molecular similarity. We also propose a novel method by which solutions obtained by each MCS run can be ranked using chemical filters such as stereochemistry, bond energy, etc. Results In order to benchmark and test the tool, we performed a 50,000 pair-wise comparison between KEGG ligands and PDB HET Group atoms. In both cases the SMSD was shown to be more efficient than the widely used MCS module implemented in the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK in generating MCS solutions from our test cases. Conclusion Presently this tool can be applied to various areas of bioinformatics and chemo-informatics for finding exhaustive MCS matches. For example, it can be used to analyse metabolic networks by mapping the atoms between reactants and products involved in reactions. It can also be used to detect the MCS/substructure searches in small molecules reported by metabolome experiments, as well as in the screening of drug-like compounds with similar substructures. Thus, we present a robust tool that can be used for multiple applications, including the discovery of new drug molecules. This tool is freely available on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/SMSD/

  9. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  10. The multielectron character of the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance in the SF{sub 6} molecule studied via detection of soft X-ray emission and neutral high-Rydberg fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivimäki, A., E-mail: kivimaki@iom.cnr.it [CNR—Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR—Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Basovizza Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Miotti, P.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L. [CNR—Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Stråhlman, C. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Simone, M. de [CNR—Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Richter, R. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The soft X-ray emission spectrum of SF{sub 6} changes at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance. • The emission band around 172 eV indicates the population of the 6a{sub 1g} orbital. • Shake-up processes accompanying S 2p ionization can explain the new emissions. • Field ionization of neutral high Rydberg (HR) fragments reveals F and S atoms. • The yield of neutral HR fragments increases at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance. - Abstract: We have studied the nature of the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance in the SF{sub 6} molecule by performing two different experiments. Soft X-ray emission spectra measured at the 4e{sub g} shape resonance reveal features that do not originate from the S 2p{sup −1} states. One of the features can be assigned to the 6a{sub 1g} → S 2p transition. The 6a{sub 1g} orbital, which is empty in the molecular ground state, can be populated either in core–valence double excitations or in S 2p shake-up transitions. Both these channels are considered. We have also studied the fragmentation of SF{sub 6} molecule after the decay of the S 2p core-hole states by observing neutral fragments in high-Rydberg states, where an electron occupies an orbital with n ≥ 20 (n is the principal quantum number). Such neutral fragments become, in relative terms, more abundant at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance with respect to the S 2p → 2t{sub 2g} shape resonance, which is a pure one-electron phenomenon.

  11. NMR of dielectrically oriented molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruessink, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    General information on experimental aspects of EFNMR is given. It is shown that the complete 14 N quadrupole tensor (qct) of pyridine and pyrimidine in the liquid state is accessible to EFNMR. Information obtained about 17 O qct in liquid nitromethane, is compared with results from other techniques. The 33 S qct in liquid sulfolane is investigated. The EFNMR results, combined with those from spin-lattice relaxation time measurements and from Hartree-Fock-Slater MO calculations, allowed the complete assignment of the 33 S qct. The quadrupole coupling of both 10 B and 11 B in a carborane compound is investigated and, together with the results of spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, detailed information about the assignment of the boron qct's could be derived. EFNMR studies of apolar molecules are described. A limitation in EFNMR is the inhomogeneity (delta B) of the magnetic field, which is introduced by the use of non-spinning sample cells. A way out is the detection of zero quantum transitions, their widths being independent of delta B. The results and prospectives of this approach are shown for the simple three spin 1/2 system of acrylonitrile in which the small dipolar proton-proton couplings could be revealed via zero quantum transitions. (Auth.)

  12. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  13. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  14. Towards ultracold RbCa molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Whitson, Hayley; Parsagian, Alexandria

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold heteronuclear molecules have seen increasing interest in the scientific community over the last few years. By controlling their ro-vibrational energy levels, ultracold molecules can be used for high precision spectroscopy, to study cold collisions with rich internal dynamics, as model systems for condensed matter physics, and as qubits in quantum information processing. We study the novel combination RbCa. In addition to a permanent electric dipole moment, it also possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment. This makes it an ideal candidate to study strong long-range dipole-dipole interactions. We are currently in the process of adding a Ca MOT to our existing Rb MOT and will discuss our current and future efforts toward our goal of creating, for the first time, ultracold RbCa molecules. Molecules, once created, will be detected through resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI). We have also performed ab initio calculations to determine the electronic energy levels of RbCa, and calculated Franck-Condon factors between the ground and several excited states

  15. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  16. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  17. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Orellana, P. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  18. Success stories of natural product-based hybrid molecules for multi-factorial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shalki; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Himanshu; Singh, Harpreet; Silakari, Om

    2018-03-24

    Complex diseases comprises of highly complicated etiology resulting in limited applicability of conventional targeted therapies. Consequently, conventional medicinal compounds suffer major failure when used for such disease conditions. Additionally, development of multidrug resistance (MDR), adverse drug reactions and clinical specificity of single targeted drug therapy has increased thrust for novel drug therapy. In this rapidly evolving era, natural product-based discovery of hybrid molecules or multi-targeted drug therapies have shown promising results and are trending now a days. Historically, nature has blessed human with different sources viz. plant, animal, microbial, marine and ethnopharmaceutical sources which has given a wide variety of medicinally active compounds. These compounds from natural origin are always choice of interest of medicinal chemists because of their minimum side effects. Hybrid molecules synthesized by fusing or conjugating different active molecules obtained from these sources are reported to synergistically block different pathways which contribute in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. This review strives to encompass all natural product-derived hybrid molecules which act as multi-targeting agents striking various targets involved in different pathways of complex diseased conditions reported in literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Interstellar molecules: guides for new chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Swadhin K; Roesky, Herbert W

    2010-09-07

    Interstellar space is among the most remarkable chemical laboratories in the universe. The existence of many unstable species with low-valent main group elements in the interstellar medium inspired us to investigate the feasibility of laboratory synthesis of such unstable molecules. Particularly the lighter Group 14 element carbon plays a very important role in space astrochemistry. Low-valent carbon as well as silicon were detected in the interstellar environment. This article describes our recent efforts in developing amazing chemistry of heavier low-valent Group 14 elements. This study unravels that the disproportionation pathway of the low-valent Group 14 elements can be arrested by using a sterically protected ligand, then one can artificially generate the situation observed in the interstellar surrounding where the chance of disproportionation is very low as the molecules are extremely dilute.

  20. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    Biosensors for highly sensitive, selective, and rapid quantification of specific biomolecules make great contributions to biomedical research, especially molecular diagnostics. However, conventional methods for biomolecular assays often suffer from insufficient sensitivity and poor specificity. In some case (e.g., early disease diagnostics), the concentration of target biomolecules is too low to be detected by these routine approaches, and cumbersome procedures are needed to improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, there is an urgent need for rapid and ultrasensitive analytical tools. In this respect, single-molecule fluorescence approaches may well satisfy the requirement and hold promising potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors. Encouragingly, owing to the advances in single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy over past decades, the detection of single fluorescent molecule comes true, greatly boosting the development of highly sensitive biosensors. By in vitro/in vivo labeling of target biomolecules with proper fluorescent tags, the quantification of certain biomolecule at the single-molecule level is achieved. In comparison with conventional ensemble measurements, single-molecule detection-based analytical methods possess the advantages of ultrahigh sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid analysis time, and low sample consumption. Consequently, single-molecule detection may be potentially employed as an ideal analytical approach to quantify low-abundant biomolecules with rapidity and simplicity. In this Account, we will summarize our efforts for developing a series of ultrasensitive biosensors based on single-molecule counting. Single-molecule counting is a member of single-molecule detection technologies and may be used as a very simple and ultrasensitive method to quantify target molecules by simply counting the individual fluorescent bursts. In the fluorescent sensors, the signals of target biomolecules may be translated to the

  1. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reason, anandamide and other similar endogenous molecules are referred to as endocannabinoids, although structurally they do not have any resemblance to the cannabinoids such as THC and similar molecules isolated from the Cannabis plant. Since they mimic the activity ofTHC) which is a cannabinoid, they are said.

  2. Quantum transport through single molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Oliveros, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes three-terminal transport measurements through single molecules. The interest in this field stems from the dream that single molecules will form the building blocks for future nanoscale electronic devices. The advantages are their small size -nanometers-, and their synthetic

  3. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  4. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  5. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    focusing on protein domain-small molecule interactions, SMID is able to cluster similar interactions and detect subtle binding patterns that would not otherwise be obvious. Using SMID-BLAST, small molecule targets can be predicted for any protein sequence, with the only limitation being that the small molecule must exist in the PDB. Validation results and specific examples within illustrate that SMID-BLAST has a high degree of accuracy in terms of predicting both the small molecule ligand and binding site residue positions for a query protein.

  6. Flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) study of ion/molecule reactions in support of the detection of biogenic alcohols by medium-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooghe, F.; Amelynck, C.; Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Schoon, N.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the validation of and first measurements with a newly constructed flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument. All reactions were studied in He buffer gas at a pressure of 1.43 hPa and a temperature of 298 K. The validation consisted of the study of the gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of methanol and ethanol (M) with the reactant ions H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 0-3), MH+, M2H+, and MH+.H2O and the reactions of MH+ with H2O. Obtained results are compared with available literature data and with calculated collision rate constants. The validated FA-SIFT has subsequently been used to characterize the reactions of the unsaturated biogenic alcohols 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, 1-penten-3-ol, cis-3-hexen-1-ol and trans-2-hexen-1-ol (ROH) with H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 0-3) as well as the secondary reactions of the H3O+/ROH product ions with H2O (hydration) and ROH in view of their accurate quantification in ambient air samples with medium-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) instrumentation using H3O+ reactant ions. Whereas water elimination following proton transfer was found to be the main mechanism for all H3O+/ROH reactions studied and for the H3O+.H2O/trans-2-hexen-1-ol reaction, all other H3O+.(H2O)n/ROH (n = 1, 2) reactions proceeded by multiple reaction mechanisms. H3O+.(H2O)3 reactions proceeded mainly (C6 alcohols) or exclusively (C5 alcohols) by ligand switching followed by water elimination. Hydration of the H3O+/ROH product ions was observed whenever they contained oxygen. The secondary reactions with ROH were also found to proceed by multiple reaction pathways.

  7. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  8. Electron attachment to excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Datskos, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Studies on electron attachment to molecules rotationally/vibrationally excited thermally or via infrared-laser excitation showed that the effect of internal energy of a molecule on its electron attachment properties depends on the mode--dissociative or nondissociative--of electron attachment. They quantified the effect of the internal energy of the molecule on the rate of destruction (by autodissociation or by autodetachment) of its parent transient anion. Generally, increases in ro-vibrational molecular energy increase the cross section for dissociative electron attachment and decrease the effective cross section for parent anion formation due mainly to increased autodetachment. These findings and their understanding are discussed. A discussion is given, also, of recent investigations of electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, especially photoenhanced dissociative electron attachment to long- and short-lived excited electronic states of molecules produced directly or indirectly by laser irradiation. These studies showed that the cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to electronically excited molecules usually are many orders of magnitude larger than those for the ground-state molecules. The new techniques that have been developed for such studies are briefly described also

  9. Studies of interstellar vibrationally-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Snell, R.L.; Erickson, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several molecules thus far have been detected in the ISM in vibrationally-excited states, including H 2 , SiO, HC 3 N, and CH 3 CN. In order for vibrational-excitation to occur, these species must be present in unusually hot and dense gas and/or where strong infrared radiation is present. In order to do a more thorough investigation of vibrational excitation in the interstellar medium (ISM), studies were done of several mm-wave transitions originating in excited vibrational modes of HCN, an abundant interstellar molecule. Vibrationally-excited HCN was recently detected toward Orion-KL and IRC+10216, using a 12 meter antenna. The J=3-2 rotational transitions were detected in the molecule's lowest vibrational state, the bending mode, which is split into two separate levels, due to l-type doubling. This bending mode lies 1025K above ground state, with an Einstein A coefficient of 3.6/s. The J=3-2 line mode of HCN, which lies 2050K above ground state, was also observed toward IRC+10216, and subsequently in Orion-KL. Further measurements of vibrationally-excited HCN were done using a 14 meter telescope, which include the observations of the (0,1,0) and (0,2,0) modes towards Orion-KL, via their J=3-2 transitions at 265-267 GHz. The spectrum of the J=3-2 line in Orion taken with the 14 meter telescope, is shown, along with a map, which indicates that emission from vibrationally-excited HCN arises from a region probably smaller than the 14 meter telescope's 20 arcsec beam

  10. Application of Recognition Tunneling in Single Molecule Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan

    Single molecule identification is one essential application area of nanotechnology. The application areas including DNA sequencing, peptide sequencing, early disease detection and other industrial applications such as quantitative and quantitative analysis of impurities, etc. The recognition tunneling technique we have developed shows that after functionalization of the probe and substrate of a conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope with recognition molecules ("tethered molecule-pair" configuration), analyte molecules trapped in the gap that is formed by probe and substrate will bond with the reagent molecules. The stochastic bond formation/breakage fluctuations give insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level. The distinct time domain and frequency domain features of tunneling signals were extracted from raw signals of analytes such as amino acids and their enantiomers. The Support Vector Machine (a machine-learning method) was used to do classification and predication based on the signal features generated by analytes, giving over 90% accuracy of separation of up to seven analytes. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid Peptide/DNA sequencing and molecule identification at single molecule level.

  11. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Escuela de Física, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Rey-González, R. R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  12. Optimizing Taq polymerase concentration for improved signal-to-noise in the broad range detection of low abundance bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph Spangler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PCR in principle can detect a single target molecule in a reaction mixture. Contaminating bacterial DNA in reagents creates a practical limit on the use of PCR to detect dilute bacterial DNA in environmental or public health samples. The most pernicious source of contamination is microbial DNA in DNA polymerase preparations. Importantly, all commercial Taq polymerase preparations inevitably contain contaminating microbial DNA. Removal of DNA from an enzyme preparation is problematical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that the background of contaminating DNA detected by quantitative PCR with broad host range primers can be decreased greater than 10-fold through the simple expedient of Taq enzyme dilution, without altering detection of target microbes in samples. The general method is: For any thermostable polymerase used for high-sensitivity detection, do a dilution series of the polymerase crossed with a dilution series of DNA or bacteria that work well with the test primers. For further work use the concentration of polymerase that gave the least signal in its negative control (H(2O while also not changing the threshold cycle for dilutions of spiked DNA or bacteria compared to higher concentrations of Taq polymerase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is clear from the studies shown in this report that a straightforward procedure of optimizing the Taq polymerase concentration achieved "treatment-free" attenuation of interference by contaminating bacterial DNA in Taq polymerase preparations. This procedure should facilitate detection and quantification with broad host range primers of a small number of bona fide bacteria (as few as one in a sample.

  13. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rich molecules as an energy sourceobtained from host cell debris remains interesting. Additionally, the potential of M. tuberculosis to survive under differentstress conditions leading to its dormant state in pathogenesis remains elusive. The exact ...

  14. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  15. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  16. Photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed

  17. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  18. Smart SERS Hot Spots: Single Molecules Can Be Positioned in a Plasmonic Nanojunction Using Host-Guest Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hoon; Hwang, Wooseup; Baek, Kangkyun; Rohman, Md Rumum; Kim, Jeehong; Kim, Hyun Woo; Mun, Jungho; Lee, So Young; Yun, Gyeongwon; Murray, James; Ha, Ji Won; Rho, Junsuk; Moskovits, Martin; Kim, Kimoon

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) offers new opportunities for exploring the complex chemical and biological processes that cannot be easily probed using ensemble techniques. However, the ability to place the single molecule of interest reliably within a hot spot, to enable its analysis at the single-molecule level, remains challenging. Here we describe a novel strategy for locating and securing a single target analyte in a SERS hot spot at a plasmonic nanojunction. The "smart" hot spot was generated by employing a thiol-functionalized cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) as a molecular spacer linking a silver nanoparticle to a metal substrate. This approach also permits one to study molecules chemically reluctant to enter the hot spot, by conjugating them to a moiety, such as spermine, that has a high affinity for CB[6]. The hot spot can accommodate at most a few, and often only a single, analyte molecule. Bianalyte experiments revealed that one can reproducibly treat the SERS substrate such that 96% of the hot spots contain a single analyte molecule. Furthermore, by utilizing a series of molecules each consisting of spermine bound to perylene bisimide, a bright SERS molecule, with polymethylene linkers of varying lengths, the SERS intensity as a function of distance from the center of the hot spot could be measured. The SERS enhancement was found to decrease as 1 over the square of the distance from the center of the hot spot, and the single-molecule SERS cross sections were found to increase with AgNP diameter.

  19. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience Then and Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Margaret E

    2017-02-15

    The 16th International Conference on Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience (MMiN) was held in Gothenburg, Sweden in late spring 2016. This conference originated as a methods meeting focused on in vivo voltammetric techniques and microdialysis. Over time, however, the scope has evolved to include a number of other methods for neurochemical detection that range from single-cell fluorescence in vitro and in vivo in animal models to whole-brain imaging in humans. Overall, MMiN provides a unique forum for introducing new developments in neurochemical detection, as well as for reporting exciting neurobiological insights provided by established and novel methods. This Viewpoint includes a brief history of the meeting, factors that have contributed its evolution, and some highlights of MMiN 2016.

  20. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  1. Engineering and control of cold molecules. Making manipulating and exploiting ultra-cold polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, N.P.; Haimberger, C.; Kleinert, J.; Tscherneck, M.; Holmes, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 12 months several groups have demonstrated the use of photo association to create cold heteronuclear (polar) molecules. We report on the formation of translationally cold NaCs molecules starting from a laser-cooled atomic vapor of Na and Cs atoms. Colliding atoms are transferred into bound molecular states in a two-step photoactivated process. We find a translational temperature of T ≅ 260 mK. To increase the density and number of trapped atoms, dark-spot techniques are used on the MOT and a Zeeman slowed sodium beam is used to load the sodium atoms into the trap. Spectroscopy of these molecules is underway using time-of-flight ion detection and trap-loss. Initial REMPI measurements indicate that both singlet and triplet states are being populated by the spontaneous-decay driven process. We measure a rate constant for molecule formation of K NaCs = 7.43 · 10 15 cm 3 s -1 . (author)

  2. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  3. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Rohde, Bernhard

    2012-07-06

    Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach "Molecule Cloud". The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using

  4. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  5. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  6. Mapping the Small Molecule Interactome by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaxman, Hope A; Woo, Christina M

    2018-01-16

    Mapping small molecule interactions throughout the proteome provides the critical structural basis for functional analysis of their impact on biochemistry. However, translation of mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods to directly profile the interaction between a small molecule and the whole proteome is challenging because of the substoichiometric nature of many interactions, the diversity of covalent and noncovalent interactions involved, and the subsequent computational complexity associated with their spectral assignment. Recent advances in chemical proteomics have begun fill this gap to provide a structural basis for the breadth of small molecule-protein interactions in the whole proteome. Innovations enabling direct characterization of the small molecule interactome include faster, more sensitive instrumentation coupled to chemical conjugation, enrichment, and labeling methods that facilitate detection and assignment. These methods have started to measure molecular interaction hotspots due to inherent differences in local amino acid reactivity and binding affinity throughout the proteome. Measurement of the small molecule interactome is producing structural insights and methods for probing and engineering protein biochemistry. Direct structural characterization of the small molecule interactome is a rapidly emerging area pushing new frontiers in biochemistry at the interface of small molecules and the proteome.

  7. Physics of Complex Polymeric Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Joshua Walter

    The statistical physics of complex polymers with branches and circuits is the topic of this dissertation. An important motivation are large, single-stranded (ss) RNA molecules. Such molecules form complex ``secondary" and ``tertiary" structures that can be represented as branched polymers with circuits. Such structures are in part directly determined by the nucleotide sequence and in part subject to thermal fluctuations. The polymer physics literature on molecules in this class has mostly focused on randomly branched polymers without circuits while there has been minimal research on polymers with specific structures and on polymers that contain circuits. The dissertation is composed of three parts: Part I studies branched polymers with thermally fluctuating structure confined to a potential well as a simple model for the encapsidation of viral RNA. Excluded volume interactions were ignored. In Part II, I apply Flory theory to the study of the encapsidation of viral ss RNA molecules with specific branched structures, but without circuits, in the presence of excluded volume interaction. In Part III, I expand on Part II and consider complex polymers with specific structure including both branching and circuits. I introduce a method based on the mathematics of Laplacian matrices that allows me to calculate density profiles for such molecules, which was not possible within Flory theory.

  8. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  9. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  10. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  11. Single-molecule nanopore enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wloka, Carsten; Maglia, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Biological nanopores are a class of membrane proteins that open nanoscale water-conduits in biological membranes. When they are reconstituted in artificial membranes and a bias voltage is applied across the membrane, the ionic current passing through individual nanopores can be used to monitor chemical reactions, to recognize individual molecules and, of most interest, to sequence DNA. More recently, proteins and enzymes have started being analysed with nanopores. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with nanopores, i.e. nanopore enzymology, has the unique advantage that it allows long-timescale observations of native proteins at the single-molecule level. Here we describe the approaches and challenges in nanopore enzymology. PMID:28630164

  12. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  13. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  14. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  15. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  16. Single-molecule microscopy using silicone oil immersion objective lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microscopy techniques capable of detecting individual molecules and providing quantitative data have the potential to offer great biological insight; however, such approaches require the efficient capture of light. Here, Mark Hink explains how the use of new silicone oil immersion objective lenses

  17. Traveling-wave deceleration of SrF molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J.E.; Chirayath Mathavan, Sreekanth; Meinema, C.; Nauta, Janko; Nijbroek, T. H.; Jungmann, K.; Bethlem, H. L.; Hoekstra, S.

    We report on the production, deceleration and detection of a SrF molecular beam. The molecules are captured from a supersonic expansion and are decelerated in the X-2 Sigma(+) (v = 0, N = 1) state. We demonstrate the removal of up to 40% of the kinetic energy with a 2 m long modular traveling-wave

  18. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    Resolution describes the smallest details within a sample that can be recovered by a microscope lens system. For optical microscopes detecting visible light, diffraction limits the resolution to ∼200-250 nm. In contrast, localization measures the position of an isolated object using its image. Single fluorescent molecules can be localized with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometres, and in some cases less than one nanometre. Superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy (SRFLM) images and localizes fluorescent molecules in a sample. By controlling the visibility of the fluorescent molecules with light, it is possible to cause a sparse subset of the tags to fluoresce and be spatially separated from each other. A movie is acquired with a camera, capturing images of many sets of visible fluorescent tags over a period of time. The movie is then analysed by a computer whereby all of the single molecules are independently measured, and their positions are recorded. When the coordinates of a sufficient number of molecules are collected, an image can be rendered by plotting the coordinates of the localized molecules. The spatial resolution of these rendered images can be better than 20 nm, roughly an order of magnitude better than the diffraction limited resolution. The invention of SRFLM has led to an explosion of related techniques. Through the use of specialized optics, the fluorescent signal can be split into multiple detection channels. These channels can capture additional information such as colour (emission wavelength), orientation and three-dimensional position of the detected molecules. Measurement of the colour of the detected fluorescence can allow researchers to distinguish multiple types of fluorescent tags and to study the interaction between multiple molecules of interest. Three-dimensional imaging and determination of molecular orientations offer insight into structural organization of the sample. SRFLM is compatible with living samples and

  19. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Some Exotic Red Pigments of Plant Origin. N R Krishnaswamy C N ... Keywords. Pigments of red sandalwood; Safflower; chica red; Brazil wood; Dragon's blood; Miro wood and Kamala dye.

  20. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  1. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  2. Molecule of the Month -66 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar is with the Department of. Organic Chemistry, Indian. Institute of Science,. Banga1ore. (1). The challenging goal of making other substances with all the properties of diamond continues to be pursued, with some success. J Chandrasekhar.

  3. Microbes, molecules, maladies and man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbes, molecules, maladies and man. Adriano G Duse. Dedication: To Professor Hendrik J Koornhof, mentor, friend and man with immense knowledge, insight, wisdom and compassion, who has been a true inspiration to all those who have had the privilege to know him. The planet Earth was formed, in a molten state, ...

  4. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule. Kushal Chakraborty is a doctoral student at. Department of Life. Sciences and Biology at. Jadavpur University. Presently he is working on the stimulatory effects of various kinds of NSAIDs on different kinds of cells and isolation of that protein from those cells. Keywords. Nitric oxide ...

  5. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  6. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Sweet Stimulants of the Olfactory Nerves - Muscone, Civetone and Related Compounds. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 7 July 2013 pp 673-683 ...

  7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Hunting with Poisoned Arrows: Story of Curare. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 218-225 ...

  8. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  9. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Using a Natural Product to Catch Fish! The Chemistry of Rotenoids. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 5 May 2013 pp 428-439 ...

  10. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  11. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Colours in Flight - Pigments from Bird Feathers and Butterfly Wings. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 12-21 ...

  12. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anandamide is the trivial name given to the molecule N- arachidonylethanolamine or arachidonylethanolamide (Struc- ture 1). It is the amide formed by the condensation reaction of arachidonic acid - a 20-carbon linear-chain fatty acid contain- ing 4 unconjugated double bonds - with the amino group of 2- ethanolamine.

  13. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  14. Lighting the World with Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 8. Lighting the World with Molecules. S Ramasesha. General Article Volume 14 Issue 8 August 2009 pp 782-798. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/014/08/0782-0798. Keywords.

  15. DNA molecules and human therapeutics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors ...

  16. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  17. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  18. A simple hydrazine based molecule for selective detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Chemical Sciences. Current Issue : Vol. 129, Issue 12. Current Issue Volume 129 | Issue 12. December 2017. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  19. Biomimetic Nanosensor Arrays for Selective Small Molecule Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    long-term storage. Oligopeptides have been coated onto thin film piezoelectric crystal mass sensors to achieve selectivity to various saturated...Nanowires. Science 303, 213-217 (2004). 22. Pesenti, M. E. et al. Structural Basis of the Honey Bee PBP Pheromone and pH-Induced Conformational Change. J

  20. A simple hydrazine based molecule for selective detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Chemical Sciences. Current Issue : Vol. 130, Issue 3. Current Issue Volume 130 | Issue 3. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  1. A simple hydrazine based molecule for selective detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    Thus, a chemosensor is generated with more than one. −C=N linkage and more number of dissociable NH protons in the organic scaffold. The central phenyl ring along with two −C=N centers can be treated as the fluorogenic centre and the two NH centers as probable binding units. It is interesting to note that, presence of.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurotransmitter-Related Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Hironaka; Ueki, Satoshi; Ohno, Ken; Ohkubo, Masaki; Suzuki, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging implies the method capable of pictorially displaying distribution of target molecules and their relative concentration in space. In clinical medicine, where non-invasiveness is mandatory, diagnostic molecular imaging has been considered virtually identical to positron emission tomography (PET). However, there is another powerful, apparently underutilized molecular imaging, namely, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ( 1 H-MRSI). The technique can detect target molecules endogenous in brain in virtue of their own specific resonance frequencies (chemical shift) and can create quantitative images of each molecule. 1 H-MRSI is conventionally utilized for imaging relatively easily detectable molecules such as N-acetyl-aspartate or lactate. More recently, however, the method is extended into imaging of more challenging molecules such as glutamate or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this small review, we summarize basic concept of 1 H-MRSI and introduce an advanced technique, i.e. chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST MRI), which made realistic glutamate imaging in vivo possible.

  3. Triton - Stratospheric molecules and organic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Singh, Sushil K.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1989-01-01

    Continuous-flow plasma discharge techniques show production rates of hydrocarbons and nitriles in N2 + CH4 atmospheres appropriate to the stratosphere of Titan, and indicate that a simple eddy diffusion model together with the observed electron flux quantitatively matches the Voyager IRIS observations for all the hydrocarbons, except for the simplest ones. Charged particle chemistry is very important in Triton's stratosphere. In the more CH4-rich case of Titan, many hydrocarbons and nitriles are produced in high yield. If N2 is present, the CH4 fraction is low, but hydrocarbons and nitriles are produced in fair yield, abundances of HCN and C2H2 in Triton's stratosphere exceed 10 to the 19th molecules/sq cm per sec, and NCCN, C3H4, and other species are predicted to be present. These molecules may be detected by IRIS if the stratosphere is as warm as expected. Both organic haze and condensed gases will provide a substantial UV and visible opacity in Triton's atmosphere.

  4. Massively Parallel Single-Molecule Manipulation Using Centrifugal Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, two issues that have impeded the widespread adoption of these techniques are equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. To meet these challenges, we have developed an approach that enables massively parallel single- molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in the centrifuge force microscope, an instrument in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force- field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high- throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Currently, we are taking steps to integrate high-resolution detection, fluorescence, temperature control and a greater dynamic range in force. With significant benefits in efficiency, cost, simplicity, and versatility, single-molecule centrifugation has the potential to expand single-molecule experimentation to a wider range of researchers and experimental systems.

  5. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    Tailoring the specific magnetic properties of any material relies on the topological control of the constituent metal ion building blocks. Although this general approach does not seem to be easily applied to traditional inorganic bulk magnets, coordination chemistry offers a unique tool...... to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal is...

  6. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  7. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  8. Evolution of organic molecules under Mars-like UV radiation conditions in space and laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Rouquette, Laura; Stalport, Fabien; Cottin, Hervé; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Saiagh, Kafila; Poch, Olivier; Khalaf, Diana; Chaput, Didier; Grira, Katia; Dequaire, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The detection and identification of organic molecules at Mars are of prime importance, as some of these molecules are life precursors and components. While in situ planetary missions are searching for them, it is essential to understand how organic molecules evolve and are preserved at the surface of Mars. Indeed the harsh conditions of the environment of Mars such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation or oxidative processes could explain the low abundance and diversity of org...

  9. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  10. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  11. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  12. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  14. Electrocatalytic activation of small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, YuPing

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemsitry and electrocatalysis are useful techniques for energy conversion and energy storage applications. In this project, the electrocatalytic activation of small molecules, H₂O, methanol and ethanol, and CO₂, has been studied as potential methods for energy storage and conversion. A hexaniobate Lindqvist ion assisted Co and Ni nanostructure deposition method has been developed. Efficient catalytic activity towards water oxidation has been observed with high TOF values obtained ...

  15. DNA heterogeneity and phosphorylation unveiled by single-molecule electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Dunning, James E.; Huang, Albert P.-H.; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline A.; Branton, Daniel

    2004-09-01

    Broad-spectrum analysis of DNA and RNA samples is of increasing importance in the growing field of biotechnology. We show that nanopore measurements may be used to assess the purity, phosphorylation state, and chemical integrity of nucleic acid preparations. In contrast with gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, an unprecedented dynamic range of DNA sizes and concentrations can be evaluated in a single data acquisition process that spans minutes. Because the molecule information is quantized and digitally recorded with single-molecule resolution, the sensitivity of the system can be adjusted in real time to detect trace amounts of a particular DNA species.

  16. Integrated view of genome structure and sequence of a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; L. V. Bauer, David

    2013-01-01

    We show how a bird’s-eye view of genomic structure can be obtained at ∼1-kb resolution from long (∼2 Mb) DNA molecules extracted from whole chromosomes in a nanofluidic laboratoryon-a-chip. We use an improved single-molecule denaturation mapping approach to detect repetitive elements and known...

  17. On the stability of molecules and microorganisms in interstellar and planetary environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Alexander Philip Ari

    2007-01-01

    Many organic molecules have been detected in interstellar environments and even more are found in the solar system, for example in comets and meteorites. Some of these molecules are also found in living organisms on Earth, suggesting that there might be a connection between star dust and the origin

  18. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3′ un-translated region and 5′ upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  19. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serag, Maged F.; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  20. Rigid Molecule Docking: FPGA Reconfiguration for Alternative Force Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanCourt Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular docking is one of the primary computational methods used by pharmaceutical companies to try to reduce the cost of drug discovery. A common docking technique, used for low-resolution screening or as an intermediate step, performs a three-dimensional correlation between two molecules to test for favorable interactions between them. We extend our previous work on FPGA-based docking accelerators, using reconfigurability for customization of the physical laws and geometric models that describe molecule interaction. Our approach, based on direct summation, allows straightforward combination of multiple forces and enables nonlinear force models; the latter, in particular, are incompatible with the transform-based techniques typically used. Our approach has the further advantage of supporting spatially oriented values in molecule models, as well as the detection of multiple positions representing favorable interactions. We report performance measurements on several different models of chemical behavior and show speedups of from to over a PC.

  1. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2017-06-06

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  2. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  3. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  4. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  5. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  6. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Molecule of the Month section of the RCSB Protein Data Bank . (http://www.pdb.org) Molecule of the Month ... helices and beta sheets. Image courtesy of RCSB Protein Data Bank ( http://www.pdb.org ) Click for larger image ...

  7. INMS measures an influx of molecules from Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    In 1984, Connerney and Waite proposed water influx from Saturn's rings to explain the low electron densities measured during Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation experiments. Charge exchange with this minor species depleted the H+ ions and provided a faster path to electron recombination. With ice the primary constituent of the rings, water was the most likely in-falling molecule. During the Grand Finale orbits, Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected and quantified an influx from the rings. Unexpectedly, the primary influx molecules are CH4 and a heavier carbon-bearing species. Water was detected, but quantities were factors of ten lower than these other species. Distribution in both altitude and latitude are consistent with a ring influx. The concentration of the minor species in Saturn's atmosphere shows that they enter Saturn's atmosphere from the top. Both molecules have their highest concentrations at the highest altitudes, with concentrations >0.4% at 3,500 km altitude and only 0.02% at 2,700 km. Molecules from the rings deorbit to Saturn's atmosphere at altitudes near 4,000 km, consistent with the INMS measurements. The latitudinal dependence of the minor species indicates that their source is near the equatorial plane. At high altitudes, the minor species were observed primarily at zero latitude, where the 28u species was six times more concentrated than at 5° latitude. At lower altitudes, the peaking ratio was 1, indicating that the species had diffused and was fully mixed into Saturn's H2 atmosphere. The lighter molecule, CH4, diffuses more rapidly than the 28u species. INMS also detected both of these species during the earlier F-ring passes, finding that the neutrals were centered at the ring plane and extended 3,000 km (half width, half max) north and south.

  8. Fast recognition of single molecules based on single-event photon statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Shuangli; Huang Tao; Liu Yuan; Wang Jun; Zhang Guofeng; Xiao Liantuan; Jia Suotang

    2007-01-01

    Mandel's Q parameter, which is determined from single-event photon statistics, provides an alternative way to recognize single molecules with fluorescence detection, other than the second-order correlation function. It is shown that the Q parameter of an assumed ideal double-molecule fluorescence with the same average photon number as that of the sample fluorescence can act as the criterion for single-molecule recognition. The influence of signal-to-background ratio and the error estimates for photon statistics are also presented. We have applied this method to ascertain single Cy5 dye molecules within hundreds of milliseconds

  9. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  10. Towards single molecule biosensors using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xun; Nicovich, Philip R; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2017-07-15

    Conventional immunosensors require many binding events to give a single transducer output which represents the concentration of the analyte in the sample. Because of the requirements to selectively detect species in complex samples, immunosensing interfaces must allow immobilisation of antibodies while repelling nonspecific adsorption of other species. These requirements lead to quite sophisticated interfacial design, often with molecular level control, but we have no tools to characterise how well these interfaces work at the molecular level. The work reported herein is an initial feasibility study to show that antibody-antigen binding events can be monitored at the single molecule level using single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM). The steps to achieve this first requires showing that indium tin oxide surfaces can be used for SMLM, then that these surfaces can be modified with self-assembled monolayers using organophosphonic acid derivatives, that the amount of antigens and antibodies on the surface can be controlled and monitored at the single molecule level and finally antibody binding to antigen modified surfaces can be monitored. The results show the amount of antibody that binds to an antigen modified surface is dependent on both the concentration of antigen on the surface and the concentration of antibody in solution. This study demonstrates the potential of SMLM for characterising biosensing interfaces and as the transducer in a massively parallel, wide field, single molecule detection scheme for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Machine learning approach for single molecule localisation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabrese, Silvia; Castello, Marco; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Del Bue, Alessio

    2018-04-01

    Single molecule localisation (SML) microscopy is a fundamental tool for biological discoveries; it provides sub-diffraction spatial resolution images by detecting and localizing "all" the fluorescent molecules labeling the structure of interest. For this reason, the effective resolution of SML microscopy strictly depends on the algorithm used to detect and localize the single molecules from the series of microscopy frames. To adapt to the different imaging conditions that can occur in a SML experiment, all current localisation algorithms request, from the microscopy users, the choice of different parameters. This choice is not always easy and their wrong selection can lead to poor performance. Here we overcome this weakness with the use of machine learning. We propose a parameter-free pipeline for SML learning based on support vector machine (SVM). This strategy requires a short supervised training that consists in selecting by the user few fluorescent molecules (∼ 10-20) from the frames under analysis. The algorithm has been extensively tested on both synthetic and real acquisitions. Results are qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with the state of the art in SML microscopy and demonstrate that the introduction of machine learning can lead to a new class of algorithms competitive and conceived from the user point of view.

  12. Controlled contact to a C-60 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neel, N.; Kröger, J.; Limot, L.

    2007-01-01

    The tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is approached towards a C-60 molecule adsorbed at a pentagon-hexagon bond on Cu(100) to form a tip-molecule contact. The conductance rapidly increases to approximate to 0.25 conductance quanta in the transition region from tunneling...... the tip-molecule distance....

  13. Nanopore Device for Reversible Ion and Molecule Sensing or Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Nader (Inventor); Vilozny, Boaz (Inventor); Actis, Paolo (Inventor); Seger, R. Adam (Inventor); Singaram, Bakthan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and devices for detection of ion migration and binding, utilizing a nanopipette adapted for use in an electrochemical sensing circuit. The nanopipette may be functionalized on its interior bore with metal chelators for binding and sensing metal ions or other specific binding molecules such as boronic acid for binding and sensing glucose. Such a functionalized nanopipette is comprised in an electrical sensor that detects when the nanopipette selectively and reversibly binds ions or small molecules. Also disclosed is a nanoreactor, comprising a nanopipette, for controlling precipitation in aqueous solutions by voltage-directed ion migration, wherein ions may be directed out of the interior bore by a repulsing charge in the bore.

  14. Low energy electron attachment to the uracil molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, G.; Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a recently constructed high resolution crossed beam apparatus involving a hemispherical electron monochromator, electron attachment to the uracil molecule C 4 H 4 N 2 O 2 was studied. The electron energy range investigated was in the region between 0 and 12 eV. What will happen when slow electrons are colliding with the cellular RNA compound uracil was the objective of this investigation. The following anion fragments were detected: (C 4 H 3 N 2 O 2 ) - , OCN - , (H 2 C 3 NO) - , CN - , O - . The most important result was that within the detection efficiency any traces of the parent anion were observed. The most intense fragment anion appeared on a mass to charge ratio 111 amu., it corresponds to a uracil molecule missing one hydrogen. Another observation was whereas the parent minus H anion is observed at zero electron energy, all other fragments appear in other range. (nevyjel)

  15. Evolution of organic molecules under Mars-like UV radiation conditions in space and laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouquette, L.; Stalport, F.; Cottin, H.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Saiagh, K.; Poch, O.; Khalaf, D.; Chaput, D.; Grira, K.; Dequaire, T.

    2017-09-01

    The detection and identification of organic molecules at Mars are of prime importance, as some of these molecules are life precursors and components. While in situ planetary missions are searching for them, it is essential to understand how organic molecules evolve and are preserved at the surface of Mars. Indeed the harsh conditions of the environment of Mars such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation or oxidative processes could explain the low abundance and diversity of organic molecules detected by now [1]. In order to get a better understanding of the evolution of organic matter at the surface of Mars, we exposed organic molecules under a Mars-like UV radiation environment. Similar organic samples were exposed to the Sun radiation, outside the International Space Station (ISS), and under a UV lamp (martian pressure and temperature conditions) in the laboratory. In both experiments, organic molecules tend to photodegrade under Mars-like UV radiation. Minerals, depending on their nature, can protect or accelerate the degradation of organic molecules. For some molecules, new products, possibly photoresistant, seem to be produced. Finally, experimenting in space allow us to get close to in situ conditions and to validate our laboratory experiment while the laboratory experiment is essential to study the evolution of a large amount and diversity of organic molecules.

  16. Fighting high molecular weight in bioactive molecules with sub-pharmacophore-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Korff, Modest; Freyss, Joel; Sander, Thomas; Boss, Christoph; Ciana, Claire-Lise

    2012-02-27

    A new subpharmacophore-based virtual screening method is introduced. Subpharmacophores are derived from large active molecules to detect small bioactive molecules as seeds for starting points in medicinal chemistry programs. A large data set was assembled from the ChEMBL database to check the validity of this approach. Molecules for 133 targets with molecular weights between 450 and 850 were selected as queries. For the query molecules, the pharmacophore descriptors were calculated. Up to 56 000 subpharmacophore descriptors with five to seven pharmacophore points were derived from the query pharmacophores. The subpharmacophore descriptors were used as queries to screen 1079 test data sets, containing decoys and spike molecules. A maximum upper molecular weight limit of 400 Da was set for the test molecules. Three different chemical fingerprint descriptors were used for comparison purposes. The subpharmacophore approach detected active molecules for 85 out of 133 targets and outperformed the chemical fingerprints. This ligand-based virtual screening experiment was triggered by the needs of medicinal chemistry. Applying the subpharmacophore method in a medicinal chemistry program, where a lead molecule with a molecular weight of 800 Da was available, resulted in a new series of molecules with molecular weights below 400.

  17. Berry-phase blockade in single-molecule magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    We formulate the problem of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) in the Coulomb blockade regime taking into account topological interference effects for the tunneling of the large spin of a SMM. The interference originates from spin Berry phases associated with different tunneling paths. We show that in the case of incoherent spin states it is essential to place the SMM between oppositely spin-polarized source and drain leads in order to detect the spin tunneling in the s...

  18. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  19. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qun-Chao, Fan; Wei-Guo, Sun

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7 LiD, 7 LiH, 6 LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy–Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies D e theory , which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies D e expt . (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  1. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  2. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  3. A Mott-like State of Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, S.; Volz, T.; Syassen, N.; Bauer, D. M.; Hansis, E.; Rempe, G.

    2006-01-01

    We prepare a quantum state where each site of an optical lattice is occupied by exactly one molecule. This is the same quantum state as in a Mott insulator of molecules in the limit of negligible tunneling. Unlike previous Mott insulators, our system consists of molecules which can collide inelastically. In the absence of the optical lattice these collisions would lead to fast loss of the molecules from the sample. To prepare the state, we start from a Mott insulator of atomic 87Rb with a central region, where each lattice site is occupied by exactly two atoms. We then associate molecules using a Feshbach resonance. Remaining atoms can be removed using blast light. Our method does not rely on the molecule-molecule interaction properties and is therefore applicable to many systems

  4. PHOSPHORUS-BEARING MOLECULES IN MASSIVE DENSE CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Palau, A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-10

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s{sup −1}, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 10{sup 11–12} cm{sup −2}, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given.

  5. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  6. Electron attachment to indole and related molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelli, Alberto; Jones, Derek; Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A.

    2013-11-01

    Gas-phase formation of temporary negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0-6 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals of indoline (I), indene (II), indole (III), 2-methylen-1,3,3-trimethylindoline (IV), and 2,3,3-trimethyl-indolenine (V) was investigated for the first time by electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS). The description of their empty-level structures was supported by density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculations, using empirically calibrated linear equations to scale the calculated virtual orbital energies. Dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy (DEAS) was used to measure the fragment anion yields generated through dissociative decay channels of the parent molecular anions of compounds I-V, detected with a mass filter as a function of the incident electron energy in the 0-14 eV energy range. The vertical and adiabatic electron affinities were evaluated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level as the anion/neutral total energy difference. The same theoretical method is also used for evaluation of the thermodynamic energy thresholds for production of the negative fragments observed in the DEA spectra. The loss of a hydrogen atom from the parent molecular anion ([M-H]-) provides the most intense signal in compounds I-IV. The gas-phase DEAS data can provide support for biochemical reaction mechanisms in vivo involving initial hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen atom of the indole moiety, present in a variety of biologically important molecules.

  7. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  8. Magnetism: Molecules to Materials IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joel S.; Drillon, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic phenomena and materials are everywhere. Our understanding of magnetic behavior, once thought to be mature, has enjoyed new impetus from contributions ranging from molecular chemistry, materials chemistry and sciences to solid state physics. New phenomena are explored that open promising perspectives for commercial applications in future - carrying out chemical reactions in magnetic fields is just one of those. The spectrum spans molecule-based - organic, (bio)inorganic, and hybrid - compounds, metallic materials as well as their oxides forming thin films, nanoparticles, wires etc. Reflecting contemporary knowledge, this open series of volumes provides a much-needed comprehensive overview of this growing interdisciplinary field. Topical reviews written by foremost scientists explain the trends and latest advances in a clear and detailed way. By maintaining the balance between theory and experiment, the book provides a guide for both advanced students and specialists to this research area. It will help evaluate their own experimental observations and serve as a basis for the design of new magnetic materials. A unique reference work, indispensable for everyone concerned with the phenomena of magnetism!

  9. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  10. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  11. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  12. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  13. Astrochemically Relevant Molecules in the W-Band Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Benjamin E.; Steber, Amanda; Gruet, Sébastien; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    The interplay between laboratory spectroscopy and observational astronomy has allowed for the chemical complexity of the interstellar medium (ISM) to be explored. Our laboratory studies involve the measurement of the rotational spectra of commercially available samples in the region 75-110 GHz, thus covering a portion of Band 3 of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Up until recently, we have concentrated on medium-sized (5 to 9 heavy atoms) nitrogen- and oxygen-containing molecules and their vibrationally excited states. Examples include amino alcohols, such as alaninol (2-amino-1-propanol), and cyanides. Further, we have extended the capabilities of our segmented chirped-pulse spectrometer [1] with electrical discharge apparatus. We present here the recent results from our set-up, including the typical rotational spectra of astrochemically relevant samples and the discharge-enabled rotational spectroscopy of mixtures of simple organic molecules. These experimental results have yielded transitions that will facilitate the detection of these molecules in the ISM with ALMA, and the discharge experiments should allow us to consider formation pathways of organic molecules from smaller building blocks. [1] B.E. Arenas, S. Gruet, A.L. Steber, B.M. Giuliano, M. Schnell, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 19 (2017) 1751-1756.

  14. Radio observations of molecules in the interstellar gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1981-01-01

    Most interstellar molecules are familiar stable compounds but nearly one-fifth are ions, radicals and acetylenic carbon chains so reactive in the laboratory that before being detected in space they had rarely been observed or were entirely unknown. The heavy atom backbone of the known interstellar molecules is a linear chain of C,N,O or S; rings and branched chains are missing. The most readily observed spectral lines of most interstellar molecules are rotational transitions at millimetre wavelengths. These are generally excited by H2 collisions. Maser line emission from OH, H2O, SiO and CH3OH-extremely intense, small sources, often polarized and sometimes time-dependent - are examples of nonequilibrium excitation. A number of rare isotopic species, particularly those of C,N and O are observed in interstellar molecules. Isotopic ratios differing from those on Earth by two- or threefold apparently exist, and in all but one case can be attributed to stellar nucleosynthesis since the formation of the Solar System. Molecular clouds are important in star formation and galactic structure: it is possible that all stars form in molecular clouds, and as these are largely restricted to the spiral arms, they provide a new and highly specific tracer of the large-scale structure of the galactic system. (author)

  15. Mechanics of responsive polymers via conformationally switchable molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, Roberto; Artoni, Federico; Vernerey, Franck; Torelli, Martina; Pedrini, Alessandro; Domenichelli, Ilaria; Dalcanale, Enrico

    2018-04-01

    Active materials are those capable of giving some physical reaction under external stimuli coming from the environment such as temperature, pH, light, mechanical stress, etc. Reactive polymeric materials can be obtained through the introduction of switchable molecules in their network, i.e. molecules having two distinct stable conformations: if properly linked to the hosting polymer chains, the switching from one state to the other can promote a mechanical reaction of the material, detectable at the macroscale, and thus enables us to tune the response according to a desired functionality. In the present paper, the main aspects of the mechanical behavior of polymeric materials with embedded switchable molecules-properly linked to the polymer's chains-are presented and discussed. Starting from the micro mechanisms occurring in such active material, a continuum model is developed, providing a straightforward implementation in computational approaches. Finally, some experimental outcomes related to a switchable molecules (known as quinoxaline cavitands) added to an elastomeric PDMS under chemical stimuli, are presented and quantitatively discussed through the use of the developed mechanical framework.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  17. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  18. Stability of two-electron diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, Alejandro; Serra, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the ground state behaviour of two-electron diatomic molecules. The ground state stability diagram for diatomic molecules in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is obtained and the behaviour of the ground state near the stability line is studied. Two different cases are analysed: the homonuclear two-centre two-electron molecule with the internuclear distance as a free parameter and the diatomic two-electron molecule (in this case, the internuclear distance is determined by equilibrium conditions). Analytical and numerical results for these systems are presented

  19. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. High harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dian; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Xi; Li, Liang; Zhang, Xiaofan; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-09-18

    Axial chiral molecules, whose stereogenic element is an axis rather than a chiral center, have attracted widespread interest due to their important application, such as asymmetric synthesis and chirality transfer. We investigate high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules with bichromatic counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields. High harmonic generation from three typical molecules: (Sa)-3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol, propadiene, and (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene is simulated with time-dependent density-functional theory and strong field approximation. We found that harmonic spectra for 3D oriented axial chiral molecules exhibit obvious circular dichroism. However, the circular dichroism of High harmonic generation from an achiral molecule is much trivial. Moreover, the dichroism of high harmonic generation still exists when axial chiral molecules are 1D oriented,such as (Sa) -3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol. For a special form of axial chiral molecules with the formula abC=C=Cab (a, b are different substituents), like (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene, the dichroism discriminations disappear when the molecules are only in 1D orientation. The circular dichroism of high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules is well explained by the trajectory analysis based on the semiclassical three-step mechanism.

  1. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  2. Discovery of the First Interstellar Chiral Molecule: Propylene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brandon; McGuire, Brett A.; Loomis, Ryan; Finneran, Ian A.; Jewell, Philip; Remijan, Anthony; Blake, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Life on Earth relies on chiral molecules, that is, species not superimposable on their mirror images. This manifests itself as a reliance on a single molecular handedness, or homochirality that is characteristic of life and perhaps most readily apparent in the large enhancement in biological activity of particular amino acid and sugar enantiomers. Yet, the ancestral origin of biological homochirality remains a mystery. The non-racemic ratios in some organics isolated from primitive meteorites hint at a primordial chiral seed but even these samples have experienced substantial processing during planetary assembly, obscuring their complete histories. To determine the underlying origin of any enantiomeric excess, it is critical to understand the molecular gas from which these molecules originated. Here, we present the first extra-solar, astronomical detection of a chiral molecule, propylene oxide (CH_3CHCH_2O), in absorption toward the Galactic Center. With the detection of propylene oxide, we at last have a target for broad-ranging searches for the possible cosmic origin of the homochirality of life.

  3. Examining small molecule: HIV RNA interactions using arrayed imaging reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimayo, Wanaruk; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been the subject of intense research for more than three decades as it causes an uncurable disease: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, AIDS. In the pursuit of a medical treatment, RNAtargeted small molecules are emerging as promising targets. In order to understand the binding kinetics of small molecules and HIV RNA, association (ka) and dissociation (kd) kinetic constants must be obtained, ideally for a large number of sequences to assess selectivity. We have developed Aqueous Array Imaged Reflectometry (Aq-AIR) to address this challenge. Using a simple light interference phenomenon, Aq-AIR provides real-time high-throughput multiplex capabilities to detect binding of targets to surface-immobilized probes in a label-free microarray format. The second generation of Aq-AIR consisting of high-sensitivity CCD camera and 12-μL flow cell was fabricated. The system performance was assessed by real-time detection of MBNL1-(CUG)10 and neomycin B - HIV RNA bindings. The results establish this second-generation Aq-AIR to be able to examine small molecules binding to RNA sequences specific to HIV.

  4. Single-Molecule Transport at a Rectifying GaAs Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Brooke, Richard J; Ferri, Nicolò; Higgins, Simon J; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J

    2017-02-08

    In most single- or few-molecule devices, the contact electrodes are simple ohmic resistors. Here we describe a new type of single-molecule device in which metal and semiconductor contact electrodes impart a function, namely, current rectification, which is then modified by a molecule bridging the gap. We study junctions with the structure Au STM tip/X/n-GaAs substrate, where "X" is either a simple alkanedithiol or a conjugated unit bearing thiol/methylthiol contacts, and we detect current jumps corresponding to the attachment and detachment of single molecules. From the magnitudes of the current jumps we can deduce values for the conductance decay constant with molecule length that agree well with values determined from Au/molecule/Au junctions. The ability to impart functionality to a single-molecule device through the properties of the contacts as well as through the properties of the molecule represents a significant extension of the single-molecule electronics "tool-box".

  5. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  6. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  7. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  8. hCG - related molecules and their measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerba, Anna; Białas, Piotr; Pięta, Paweł Piotr; Jankowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) synthesized by trophoblast cells is a powerful tool of pregnancy monitoring. It was showed that similarly to pregnancy also trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic malignancies produce variety of hCG molecules. In urine and serum of both pregnant women and tumors patients a fifteen various forms of hCG, such as: regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and predominant hyperglycosylated hCG free β, were identified. These forms might be useful in order to recognize between physiological and pathological pregnancies as well as cancers. Even the presence of these different hormone variants is well documented the commercially available biochemical tests detecting hCG failed to identified and distinguish among these forms. Especially hard is to identify glycan chains linked to heterodimer. Thus, a detailed analysis of hCG-related molecules produced during physiological and pathological condition, together with a new tests development are needed.

  9. Transport through a Single Octanethiol Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kockmann, D.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Octanethiol molecules adsorbed on Pt chains are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 77 K. The head of the octanethiol binds to a Pt atom and the tail is lying flat down on the chain. Open-loop current time traces reveal that the molecule wags its tail and attaches to the

  10. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  11. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  12. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  13. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  14. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    with a kinetic energy proportional to the excess energy of that particle, subsequently called a photon. After one has recognized the quantum laws of nature, or the ... think of molecules as static entities, but Clausius had proposed a dynamic model in which molecules vibrated and rotated, in accordance with the recognition by ...

  15. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In 1912, Bjerrum published the first quantum theory of molecules, to treat the vibrational and rotational energies of diatomic molecules. That theory was incorrect but prepared the next stages of development of quantum mechanics. The first quantum theory, which appeared in 1900, is considered to involve the derivation of a ...

  16. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F. M. H.; Bethlem, H. L.; Jongma, R.T.; Meijer, G.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by

  17. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  18. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  19. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perny, G.

    1991-10-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives (f{sub mol})sup(Na{sub 2(i)})=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements. (orig.).

  20. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perny, G.

    1991-12-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives [ f mol]Na 2( i)=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements.

  1. The Amazing Molecule Race: A WebQuest for 8th Grade Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehl, Diana; Moats, S. J.; Langston, G. I.

    2009-01-01

    Did you ever wonder if life exists beyond Earth? The molecules that helped make up you and your friends are the same floating in outer space! The Race is ON to discover as many molecules in space as possible and to find the most important molecules for life: amino acids, DNA and RNA! As aspiring astronomers and astrobiologists, you will explore how these molecules are detected on Earth and in space. The `Search for Life’ is a pretty big task considering the size of the Universe. By learning how to find evidence of life forming molecules you will be able to provide conclusions that will shape policy regarding space missions, funding and technology development during your lifetime.

  2. Organic molecule fluorescence as an experimental test-bed for quantum jumps in thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Cormac; Farrow, Tristan; Dahlsten, Oscar C O; Taylor, Robert A; Vlatko, Vedral

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate with an experiment how molecules are a natural test bed for probing fundamental quantum thermodynamics. Single-molecule spectroscopy has undergone transformative change in the past decade with the advent of techniques permitting individual molecules to be distinguished and probed. We demonstrate that the quantum Jarzynski equality for heat is satisfied in this set-up by considering the time-resolved emission spectrum of organic molecules as arising from quantum jumps between states. This relates the heat dissipated into the environment to the free energy difference between the initial and final state. We demonstrate also how utilizing the quantum Jarzynski equality allows for the detection of energy shifts within a molecule, beyond the relative shift.

  3. Effect of continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy on serum malignant molecules and angiogenesis molecules in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy on serum malignant molecules and angiogenesis molecules in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: 78 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who were treated in our hospital between July 2011 and December 2015 were selected and divided into observation group and control group (n=39 according to the single-blind randomized control method. Before treatment and after 4 cycles of treatment, electrochemical luminescence immunity analyzer was used to detect serum tumor marker levels; RIA method was used to determine serum apoptosis molecule levels; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the serum angiogenesis molecule levels. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of tumor markers, apoptosis molecules and angiogenesis molecules were not statistically significant between two groups of patients (P>0.05. After 4 cycles of treatment, serum carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125, carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153, human epididymis protein 4 (HE4, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG, Bcl-2, Survivin, Bag-1, angiogenin-2 (Ang-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05 while Bax level was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy can decrease the malignant degree of advanced ovarian cancer and inhibit angiogenesis.

  4. Simple test system for single molecule recognition force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Stroh, Cordula M.; Ebner, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian; Gall, Alex A.; Romanin, Christoph; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    We have established an easy-to-use test system for detecting receptor-ligand interactions on the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this, avidin-biotin, probably the best characterized receptor-ligand pair, was chosen. AFM sensors were prepared containing tethered biotin molecules at sufficiently low surface concentrations appropriate for single molecule studies. A biotin tether, consisting of a 6 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain and a functional succinimide group at the other end, was newly synthesized and covalently coupled to amine-functionalized AFM tips. In particular, PEG 800 diamine was glutarylated, the mono-adduct NH 2 -PEG-COOH was isolated by ion exchange chromatography and reacted with biotin succinimidylester to give biotin-PEG-COOH which was then activated as N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to give the biotin-PEG-NHS conjugate which was coupled to the aminofunctionalized AFM tip. The motional freedom provided by PEG allows for free rotation of the biotin molecule on the AFM sensor and for specific binding to avidin which had been adsorbed to mica surfaces via electrostatic interactions. Specific avidin-biotin recognition events were discriminated from nonspecific tip-mica adhesion by their typical unbinding force (∼40 pN at 1.4 nN/s loading rate), unbinding length (<13 nm), the characteristic nonlinear force-distance relation of the PEG linker, and by specific block with excess of free d-biotin. The convenience of the test system allowed to evaluate, and compare, different methods and conditions of tip aminofunctionalization with respect to specific binding and nonspecific adhesion. It is concluded that this system is well suited as calibration or start-up kit for single molecule recognition force microscopy

  5. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  6. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  7. Towards witnessing quantum effects in complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, T; Taylor, R A; Vedral, V

    2015-01-01

    Whether many-body objects like organic molecules can exhibit full quantum behaviour, including entanglement, is an open fundamental question. We present a generic theoretical protocol for entangling two organic molecules, such as dibenzoterrylene in anthracene. The availability of organic dye molecules with two-level energy structures characterised by sharp and intense emission lines are characteristics that position them favourably as candidates for quantum information processing technologies involving single-photons. Quantum entanglement can in principle be generated between several organic molecules by carefully interfering their photoluminescence spectra. Major milestones have been achieved in the last 10 years showcasing entanglement in diverse systems including ions, cold atoms, superconductors, photons, quantum dots and NV-centres in diamond, but not yet in molecules.

  8. Visualizing Chemical Bonds in Synthetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura C.; Ruth, Anthony; Green, David B.; Janko, Boldizsar; Gomes, Kenjiro K.

    The use of synthetic quantum systems makes it possible to study phenomena that cannot be probed by conventional experiments. We created synthetic molecules using atomic manipulation and directly imaged the chemical bonds using tunneling spectroscopy. These synthetic systems allow us to probe the structure and electronic properties of chemical bonds in molecules, including those that would be unstable in nature, with unprecedented detail. The experimental images of electronic states in our synthetic molecules show a remarkable match to the charge distribution predicted by density functional theory calculations. The statistical analysis of the spectroscopy of these molecules can be adapted in the future to quantify aromaticity, which has been difficult to quantify universally thus far due to vague definitions. We can also study anti-aromatic molecules which are unstable naturally, to illuminate the electronic consequences of antiaromaticity.

  9. Effects of small molecules water that may retard kidney stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Pan, Jichuan; Zhang, Yue; Chang, Yangtao; Yang, Xiaoxiong; Yang, Baoyu; Mao, Xu; Wang, Zhonghui; Gao, Bing; Lu, Xiuli

    2018-02-01

    Water intake is important for preventing kidney stones. Small molecules water is a more active restructured water under magnetic field. Here, we studied the relation between small molecules water and crystal formation in the rat kidney. The small molecules water was prepared by a water machine providing a 0.8-T magnetic field. Calcium oxalate crystals were induced by 0.75% EG (ethylene glycol) in male Sprague-Dawley rats by drinking small molecules water and plain water for up to 6 weeks, respectively. Urinary ions were assayed. Osteopontin mRNA expression and urinary LDH were detected. Crystals were observed using a light microscope and a polarizing microscope. A significantly reduced urinary calcium and phosphorus excretion occurred in the 2nd and the 4th week after treatment of small molecules water. Crystals were initially detected in 40% of the experimental rats in the small molecules water group at the 6th week, later than the control group in which crystals were detected in 60% of rats at the 4th week. After 6 weeks of treatment, crystals were observed to form in renal cortex, medulla and papilla in the control group, whereas only to form in renal medulla and papilla in the small molecules water group. OPN mRNA expression significantly increased earlier in the 2nd week after treatment of the small molecules water compared to the control (P = 0.016). Small molecules water may retard crystal formation, reduce urinary calcium and phosphorus excretion and promote earlier OPN mRNA expression in the rat kidney.

  10. Aberration-accounting calibration for 3D single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabriel, Clément; Bourg, Nicolas; Dupuis, Guillaume; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    We propose a straightforward sample-based technique to calibrate the axial detection in 3D single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). Using microspheres coated with fluorescent molecules, the calibration curves of PSF-shaping- or intensity-based measurements can be obtained for any required depth range from a few hundreds of nanometers to several tens of microns. This experimental method takes into account the effect of the spherical aberration without requiring computational correction.

  11. Incipient ferroelectricity of water molecules confined to nano-channels of beryl

    OpenAIRE

    Gorshunov, B. P.; Torgashev, V. I.; Zhukova, E. S.; Thomas, V. G.; Belyanchikov, M. A.; Kadlec, C.; Kadlec, F.; Savinov, M.; Ostapchuk, T.; Petzelt, J.; Prokle?ka, J.; Tomas, P. V.; Pestrjakov, E. V.; Fursenko, D. A.; Shakurov, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Water is characterized by large molecular electric dipole moments and strong interactions between molecules; however, hydrogen bonds screen the dipole?dipole coupling and suppress the ferroelectric order. The situation changes drastically when water is confined: in this case ordering of the molecular dipoles has been predicted, but never unambiguously detected experimentally. In the present study we place separate H2O molecules in the structural channels of a beryl single crystal so that they...

  12. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of DNA Aptamers to a Small Molecule Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; McConnell, Erin M; Koudrina, Anna; Velu, Ranganathan; Mattice, Christopher; Hunt, Vernon; McKeague, Maureen; DeRosa, Maria C

    2017-12-14

    Aptamers, synthetic oligonucleotide-based molecular recognition probes, have found use in a wide array of biosensing technologies based on their tight and highly selective binding to a variety of molecular targets. However, the inherent challenges associated with the selection and characterization of aptamers for small molecule targets have resulted in their underrepresentation, despite the need for small molecule detection in fields such as medicine, the environment, and agriculture. This protocol describes the steps in the selection, sequencing, affinity characterization, and truncation of DNA aptamers that are specific for small molecule targets. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Super-Resolution Imaging of Molecular Emission Spectra and Single Molecule Spectral Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J; Curthoys, Nikki M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Carter, Sean; Hess, Samuel T

    2016-01-01

    Localization microscopy can image nanoscale cellular details. To address biological questions, the ability to distinguish multiple molecular species simultaneously is invaluable. Here, we present a new version of fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) which detects the emission spectrum of each localized molecule, and can quantify changes in emission spectrum of individual molecules over time. This information can allow for a dramatic increase in the number of different species simultaneously imaged in a sample, and can create super-resolution maps showing how single molecule emission spectra vary with position and time in a sample.

  14. Complex molecules in the hot core of the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS 4A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottinelli, S; Ceccarelli, C; Lefloch, B; Williams, JP; Castets, A; Caux, E; Cazaux, S; Maret, S; Parise, B; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of complex molecules (HCOOCH3, HCOOH, and CH3CN), signposts of a hot core like region, toward the low-mass Class 0 source NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. This is the second low-mass protostar in which such complex molecules have been searched for and reported, the other source being IRAS

  15. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Zeng, S.; Martín, S.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Armijos-Abendaño, J.; Viti, S.; Aladro, R.; Riquelme, D.; Requena-Torres, M.; Quénard, D.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.

    2018-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the essential elements for life due to its central role in biochemical processes. Recent searches have shown that P-bearing molecules (in particular PN and PO) are present in star-forming regions, although their formation routes remain poorly understood. In this letter, we report observations of PN and PO towards seven molecular clouds located in the Galactic Center, which are characterized by different types of chemistry. PN is detected in five out of seven sources, whose chemistry is thought to be shock-dominated. The two sources with PN non-detections correspond to clouds exposed to intense UV/X-rays/cosmic ray (CR) radiation. PO is detected only towards the cloud G+0.693-0.03, with a PO/PN abundance ratio of ˜1.5. We conclude that P-bearing molecules likely form in shocked gas as a result of dust grain sputtering, while are destroyed by intense UV/X-ray/CR radiation.

  16. CHEMICAL SIMULATIONS OF PREBIOTIC MOLECULES: INTERSTELLAR ETHANIMINE ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Donghui; Durr, Allison [Department of Chemistry, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475 (United States); Herbst, Eric [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Corby, Joanna F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Hassel, George [Physics and Astronomy Department, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The E- and Z- isomers of ethanimine (CH{sub 3}CHNH) were recently detected toward the star-forming region Sagittarius (Sgr) B2(N) using the Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS cm-wave spectral data, and imaged by the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Ethanimine is not reported in the hot cores of Sgr B2, but only in gas that absorbs at +64 and +82 km s{sup −1} in the foreground of continuum emission generated by H ii regions. The ethanimine isomers can serve as precursors of the amino acid alanine and may play important roles in forming biological molecules in the interstellar medium. Here we present a study of the chemistry of ethanimine using a gas-grain simulation based on rate equations, with both isothermal and warm-up conditions. In addition, the density, kinetic temperature, and cosmic ray ionization rate have been varied. For a variety of physical conditions in the warm-up models for Sgr B2(N) and environs, the simulations show reasonable agreement with observationally obtained abundances. Isothermal models of translucent clouds along the same line of sight yield much lower abundances, so that ethanimine would be much more difficult to detect in these sources despite the fact that other complex molecules have been detected there.

  17. Separation and Characterization of DNA Molecules and Intermolecular Interactions in Pressure-Driven Micro Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Sarah; Wang, Tza-Huei

    Pressure-driven flow in micron-sized diameter capillaries can be used to separate DNA molecules by size in a technique called Free Solution Hydrodynamic Separation. By coupling this technique with Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy, we have developed a highly sensitive and quantitative platform capable of separating DNA molecules by length over a large dynamic range (25 bp to 48 kbp) in a single run using only picoliters or femtograms of a DNA sample. The optical detection volume completely spans the capillary cross section, enabling highly efficient single molecule detection for enhanced sensitivity and quantification accuracy via single molecule counting. Because each DNA molecule generates its own fluorescent burst, these burst profiles can be further analyzed to individually characterize each DNA molecule's shape as it passes through the detection region. We exploit these burst profiles to visualize fluctuations in conformation under shear flow in microcapillaries, and utilizing combined mobility shift analysis, explore the complex relationship between molecular properties including length and conformation, hydrodynamic mobility, solution conditions including ion species and concentrations, and separation conditions including flow rate and capillary diameter.

  18. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  19. Lactoferrin binding molecules in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, C J; Vanderpuye, O A; McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P

    1990-10-01

    During ejaculation, the iron binding protein lactoferrin binds to sperm and forms a major component of sperm-coating antigens. Physicochemical properties of lactoferrin in seminal plasma (SP) and on sperm differ from those of purified lactoferrin. These differences have been attributed to the binding of unknown seminal macromolecules to lactoferrin. We have studied lactoferrin binding molecules in SP. The SP samples were coated onto microtiter plates and tested for binding of biotinylated lactoferrin. SP was found to specifically bind biotinylated lactoferrin. This binding was competitively inhibited by coincubation with unlabeled lactoferrin but was not affected by control incubations done with human IgG or transferrin. Lactoferrin binding molecules in SP were biochemically characterized by using SDS-PAGE and ligand blotting. Biotinylated lactoferrin bound to SP molecules of approximately 120, 60 and 30 kDa. No binding was observed with biotinylated transferrin. The presence of molecules that associate with lactoferrin in SP was further studied by using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Lactoferrin in SP immunoprecipitated as two peaks, one of which corresponded to purified lactoferrin. These results suggest that some lactoferrin molecules in SP are free and that others are associated with lactoferrin binding molecules. Binding of lactoferrin to lactoferrin binding molecules appears to change its physicochemical properties and thus could influence its biologic activity and its affinity to sperm.

  20. Radiative transfer in silylidene molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for silylidene (H2CSi in the interstellar medium, Izuha et al. (1996 recorded microwave spectrum of H2CSi in laboratory and made an unsuccessful attempt of its identification in IRC +10216, Ori KL, Sgr B2, through its 717-616 transition at 222.055 GHz. For finding out if there are other transitions of H2CSi which may help in its identification in the interstellar medium, we have considered 25 rotational levels of ortho-H2CSi connected by collisional transitions and 35 radiative transitions, and solved radiative transfer problem using the LVG approximation. We have found that the brightness temperatures of 919-818, 918-817, 101,10-919, 1019-918, 111,11-101,10, 111,10-1019 and 121,12-111,11 transition are larger than that of 717-616 transition. Thus, these transitions may help in detection of H2CSi in the interstellar medium.