WorldWideScience

Sample records for single-sided natural ventilation

  1. Single-Sided Natural Ventilation through a Velux Roof Window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Fransson, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the single-sided natural ventilation through a VELUX centre pivot roof window under natural weather conditions. The aim of the investigation is to develop an empirical formulation for air flow rate through a roof window based on CFD and tracer gas decay measurement methods...

  2. Single-sided natural ventilation through a centre-pivot roof window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Nielsen, Peter V.; Gunner, Amalie

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of centre pivot roof windows for wind driven single-sided ventilation has not been studied before. These types of windows are dominating roof windows in Europe. Knowledge of flow characteristics of this kind of window is essential for accurate designing of natural ventilation...... systems. In this study, numerical methods were used to characterise a centre-pivot roof window for wind-driven single-sided ventilation. A 1:20 scale model house of the Energy Flex House (Denmark) was used in this study. The roof slope was 36o. It was found that the single-sided ventilation through...

  3. Calculation methods for single-sided natural ventilation - simplified or detailed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Plesner, Christoffer; Leprince, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    A great energy saving potential lies within increased use of natural ventilation, not only during summer and midseason periods, where it is mainly used today, but also during winter periods, where the outdoor air holds a great cooling potential for ventilative cooling if draft problems can...... be handled. This paper presents a newly developed simplified calculation method for single-sided natural ventilation, which is proposed for the revised standard FprEN 16798-7 (earlier EN 15242:2007) for design of ventilative cooling. The aim for predicting ventilative cooling is to find the most suitable......, while maintaining an acceptable correlation with measurements on average and the authors consider the simplified calculation method well suited for the use in standards such as FprEN 16798-7 for the ventilative cooling effects from single-sided natural ventilation The comparison of different design...

  4. Single-sided natural ventilation driven by wind pressure and temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    -scale wind tunnel experiments have been made with the aim of making a new expression for calculation of the airflow rate in single-sided natural ventilation. During the wind tunnel experiments it was found that the dominating driving force differs between wind speed and temperature difference depending......Even though opening a window for ventilation of a room seems very simple, the flow that occurs in this situation is rather complicated. The amount of air going through the window opening will depend on the wind speed near the building, the temperatures inside and outside the room, the wind...

  5. Single-sided Natural Ventilation Driven by a Combination of Wind Pressure and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when ventilation systems for buildings are designed. The ventilation can either be obtained by automatically controlled openings in the building envelope, or it can just be the simple action of opening a door or a window to let the fresh air in...

  6. Air flow distribution in and around a single-sided naturally ventilated room

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanovic-Halburd, Ljiljana; Eftekhari, M. M.; Pinnock, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the initial findings of the EPSRC project on rule-based control in naturally ventilated buildings which led to Marjanovic's PhD thesis, supervised by Eftekhari. Marjanovic is the second author.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Inter-Flat Air Cross-Contamination under the Condition of Single-Sided Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Niu, Jianlei; Perino, Marco

    2008-01-01

    ventilated room, the renormalization group based k-ε model, together with carbon dioxide used as a tracer, is chosen to reveal this air cross-contamination. The simulation results are in agreement with our prior on-site tracer-gas measurements, revealing that the windows flush with a flat fa ade can...... be a major route of the air cross-contamination in high-rise residential buildings. Finally, an assessment index is proposed to evaluate the potential infection risks associated with this inter-flat air flow occurring in high-rise residential buildings....... the two sides, each of which has a flat fa ade with openable windows. When the wind speed is extremely low, with doors closed and windows opened, the flats become single-sided naturally ventilated driven by buoyancy effects. The air pollutants can travel from a lower flat to a vertically adjacent upper...

  8. Experimental investigation on single-sided transient natural ventilation driven by buoyancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadugapalayam Rangasamy Lenin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in building sector plays a major role in hot climate for space cooling. In this view of equipment energy consumption reduction on building space cooling, top vent and window operation-based natural ventilation model is developed in reduced scale. In this study, the performance of rectangular top vent arrangement along with window opening configuration with respect to temperature distribution and air flow pattern is investigated experimentally. The results depicted that the heat generated from the indoor element with vent and window opening configuration showed a greater influence in vertical temperature difference. For both the case of window opened and closed with vent, the time taken to attain the steady-state is shorter for larger vent compared to smaller vent. Increasing the top vent area reduces the indoor air temperature at various levels. When windows in open condition, there is significant reduction in indoor air temperature upto window level for all vent areas. Air flow pattern of the in-door air is validated through smoke visualization test.

  9. Air flow distribution in and around a single-sided naturally ventilated room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftekhari, M.M.; Marjanovic, L.D.; Pinnock, D.J. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this research is to compare calculated and measured air flow distributions inside a test room which is naturally ventilated. The test room is situated in a relatively sheltered location and to visualise the resultant local wind pattern around the room for all prevailing wind directions, wind tunnel trials were carried out. Both the wind tunnel and full-scale measurements show that the wind direction at the test cell was generally restricted to either a westerly or an easterly direction. To investigate air flow inside the room, the air pressures and velocities across the openings together with indoor air temperature and velocity at four locations and six different levels are measured. The experimental results demonstrate that for both winter and summer the air was entering the test room at bottom and leaving at the top louvre. Separate air flow and thermal modelling programs are used to predict the spatial distribution of the air flow and thermal comfort. The air flow distribution was predicted using a network air flow program. The predicted flow showed similar trends and the simulation results were in agreement with the measured data. An explicit finite-difference thermal modeling simulation package was used to predict the thermal comfort indices.(author)

  10. Wind-induced single-sided natural ventilation in buildings near a long street canyon: CFD evaluation of street configuration and envelope design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Z.T.; Mak, C.M.

    2018-01-01

    an urban context, this study investigates the wind-induced single-sided natural ventilation in buildings near a long street canyon under a perpendicular wind direction using CFD method. Four aspect ratios (AR) of the street canyon, from 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 to 6.0, are investigated to examine the influence...

  11. Short-term airing by natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perino, Marco; Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates traditio......The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates...... traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates...... that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ....

  12. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions...

  13. Natural Ventilation in Atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Heiselberg, Per; Hendriksen, Ole Juhl

    This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions.......This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions....

  14. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula ratio are presented. In some cases the measured airflow rates fit quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  15. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  16. Short Term Airing by Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Perino, M.

    2010-01-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies...... that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working...... airflow rate, ventilation efficiency, thermal comfort and dynamic temperature conditions. A suitable laboratory test rig was developed to perform extensive experimental analyses of the phenomenon under controlled and repeatable conditions. The results showed that short-term window airing is very effective...

  17. Harnessing natural ventilation benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, John

    2013-04-01

    Making sure that a healthcare establishment has a good supply of clean fresh air is an important factor in keeping patients, staff, and visitors, free from the negative effects of CO2 and other contaminants. John O'Leary of Trend Controls, a major international supplier of building energy management solutions (BEMS), examines the growing use of natural ventilation, and the health, energy-saving, and financial benefits, that it offers.

  18. Evaluation of single-sided natural ventilation using a simplified and fair calculation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Christoffer; Larsen, Tine Steen; Leprince, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    the scope of standards and regulations in the best way. This has been done by comparing design expressions using parameter variations, comparison to wind-tunnel experiments and full-scale outdoor measurements. A modified De Gids & Phaff method showed to be a simplified and fair calculation method that would...

  19. Single-sided NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Single-Sided NMR describes the design of the first functioning single-sided tomograph, the related measurement methods, and a number of applications. One of the key advantages to this method is the speed at which the images are obtained.

  20. Natural ventilation for free stall dairy barns

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, Susan Wood

    2009-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a result of a combination good construction, correct temperature, humidity control, air exchange. This publication discusses how to achieve natural ventilation in your structure.

  1. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples.......For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation...

  2. Wind Extraction for Natural Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Tadeu; Yaghoobian, Neda; Kumar, Rajan; Ordonez, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the depletion of energy resources and the environmental impact of pollution and unsustainable energy resources, energy consumption has become one of the main concerns in our rapidly growing world. Natural ventilation, a traditional method to remove anthropogenic and solar heat gains, proved to be a cost-effective, alternative method to mechanical ventilation. However, while natural ventilation is simple in theory, its detailed design can be a challenge, particularly for wind-driven ventilation, which its performance highly involves the buildings' form, surrounding topography, turbulent flow characteristics, and climate. One of the main challenges with wind-driven natural ventilation schemes is due to the turbulent and unpredictable nature of the wind around the building that impose complex pressure loads on the structure. In practice, these challenges have resulted in founding the natural ventilation mainly on buoyancy (rather than the wind), as the primary force. This study is the initial step for investigating the physical principals of wind extraction over building walls and investigating strategies to reduce the dependence of the wind extraction on the incoming flow characteristics and the target building form.

  3. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2000-01-01

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples.

  4. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The bidirectional air flow rate was measured using constant injection tracer gas technique. Smoke visualizations showed that the air flow patterns are highly transient, unstable and complex, and ...

  5. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening......, respectively. The bidirectional air flow rate was measured using constant injection tracer gas technique. Smoke visualizations showed that the air flow patterns are highly transient, unstable and complex, and that air flow rates oscillate with time. Correlations between the Froude number Fr and the L/D ratio...

  6. Short-term airing by natural ventilation - modeling and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, M; Heiselberg, P

    2009-10-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and IAQ control. However, in order to promote a wider applications of these systems, an improvement in the knowledge of their working principles and the availability of new design and simulation tools is necessary. In this context, the paper analyses and presents the results of a research that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ. Practical Implications Numerical and experimental analyses have proved that short-term airing by intermittent ventilation is an effective measure to satisfactorily control IAQ. Different control strategies have been investigated to optimize the capabilities of the systems. The proposed zonal model has provided good performances and could be adopted as a design tool, while CFD simulations can be profitably used for detailed studies of the pollutant concentration distribution in a room and to address local discomfort problems.

  7. Short-term airing by natural ventilation - implication on IAQ and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, P; Perino, M

    2010-04-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected airflow rate, ventilation efficiency, thermal comfort and dynamic temperature conditions. A suitable laboratory test rig was developed to perform extensive experimental analyses of the phenomenon under controlled and repeatable conditions. The results showed that short-term window airing is very effective and can provide both acceptable IAQ and thermal comfort conditions in buildings. Practical Implications This study gives the necessary background and in-depth knowledge of the performance of window airing by single-sided natural ventilation necessary for the development of control strategies for window airing (length of opening period and opening frequency) for optimum IAQ and thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings.

  8. Implementation of natural ventilation in pig houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, van 't C.E.

    1994-01-01

    A description of experimental work and discussion on implementation of natural ventilation in pig houses is given. A literature review describes the state of the art, animal growth data are given. It includes characterization of ventilation openings, a technique to estimate the ventilation

  9. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building,...

  10. Mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Bjerg, Bjarne; Batzanas, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings are reviewed and influences on discharge and pressure coefficients are discussed. Compared to studies conducted on buildings for human occupation and industrial buildings which focus on thermal comfort, ventilation systems......, indoor air quality, building physics and energy etc., our understanding of the mechanisms involved in natural ventilation of livestock buildings are still limited to the application of the orifice equation. It has been observed that the assumptions made for application of the orifice equation...... are not valid for wind-induced cross ventilation through large openings. This review identifies that the power balance model, the concept of stream tube and the local dynamic similarity model has helped in the fundamental understanding of wind-induced natural ventilation in buildings for human occupation...

  11. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV) in shop......The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...

  12. The fluid mechanics of natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Natural ventilation of buildings is the flow generated by temperature differences and by the wind. Modern buildings have extreme designs with large, tall open plan spaces and large cooling requirements. Natural ventilation offers a means of cooling these buildings and providing good indoor air quality. The essential feature of ventilation is an exchange between an interior space and the external ambient. Recent work shows that in many circumstances temperature variations play a controlling feature on the ventilation since the directional buoyancy force has a large influence on the flow patterns within the space and on the nature of the exchange with the outside. Two forms of buoyancy-driven ventilation are discussed: mixing ventilation in which the interior is at approximately uniform temperature and displacement ventilation where there is strong internal stratification. The dynamics of these flows are considered and the effects of wind on them are examined both experimentally and theoretically. The aim behind this work is to give designers rules and intuition on how air moves within a building and the research shows a fascinating branch of fluid mechanics.

  13. Design of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  14. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  15. Characterizing the chaotic nature of ocean ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGilchrist, Graeme A.; Marshall, David P.; Johnson, Helen L.; Lique, Camille; Thomas, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Ventilation of the upper ocean plays an important role in climate variability on interannual to decadal timescales by influencing the exchange of heat and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and ocean. The turbulent nature of ocean circulation, manifest in a vigorous mesoscale eddy field, means that pathways of ventilation, once thought to be quasi-laminar, are in fact highly chaotic. We characterize the chaotic nature of ventilation pathways according to a nondimensional "filamentation number," which estimates the reduction in filament width of a ventilated fluid parcel due to mesoscale strain. In the subtropical North Atlantic of an eddy-permitting ocean model, the filamentation number is large everywhere across three upper ocean density surfaces—implying highly chaotic ventilation pathways—and increases with depth. By mapping surface ocean properties onto these density surfaces, we directly resolve the highly filamented structure and confirm that the filamentation number captures its spatial variability. These results have implications for the spreading of atmospherically-derived tracers into the ocean interior.

  16. Achieving Natural and Hybrid Ventilation in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddament, Martin; Axley, James; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Case studies provide essential evidence about the performance of buildings. They also illustrate the methods by which a technology can be implemented as well as highlighting problems. Various case study buildings (both new and retrofit) that incorporate mixed mode, natural ventilation and low ene...

  17. Boundary conditions for natural supply ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.W.L.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Wit, de M.H.; Zeiler, W.; Seppänen, O.; Säteri, J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of an air jet from a controlled natural ventilation grill for different outdoor conditions is studied. Extensive laboratory measurements are taken in different situations, while the air flow rate through the grill is kept constant. The grill setting and supply temperature are varied.

  18. Design guidelines for natural ventilation systems in tertiary sector buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Van Moeseke, Geoffrey; Bruyère, Isabelle; De Herde, André; CISBAT 2005: Renewables in a changing climate

    2005-01-01

    Parameters determining efficiency of natural ventilation systems are numerous. The most important are architecture and system design. This article get onto both but focuses on system design. Through dynamic simulations it shows that natural ventilation management has a large impact on energy saving but most of all on thermal comfort. Natural ventilation techniques are also weighted against hybrid solutions and high efficiency mechanical cooling solutions. Natural ventilation techniques show t...

  19. 33 CFR 183.630 - Standards for natural ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for natural ventilation... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.630 Standards for natural ventilation. (a) For the purpose of § 183.620, “natural ventilation” means an airflow in a compartment in a...

  20. Numerical analysis of passive strategies for energy retrofit of existing buildings in Mediterranean climate: thermal mass and natural ventilation combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcerano Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the potential of coupling natural ventilation and thermal storage systems to improve hygrothermal comfort and reduce energy consumption during summer season in an existing building in the Mediterranean. It aims at bridging the knowledge gap between designers, researchers and building scientists, fostering a multidisciplinary approach and promoting numerical simulation of the energy performance of buildings within architectural professional practice. The study analyses the interaction between six natural ventilation systems (single sided ventilation through facade openings; cross ventilation through facade openings, inlet wind tower, thermal chimney, evaporative cool tower, earth pipes and with two thermal storage typology (heavy and medium-light within four strategic Italian location (Rome, Naples, Messina and Catania. For each interaction we perform a numerical dynamic simulation of indoor comfort, indoor air quality and energy consumption during the summer period, on a reference building model corresponding to the most common Italian typology. Results show that the use of the chosen systems ensures significant reductions of discomfort hours and energy consumption in all configurations. The study also highlights the high efficiency of non invasive systems (single-sided and cross ventilation with automatic control present discomfort hours reduction and energy consumption reduction above 68% for all combinations and the significant influence of the daily thermal range value on the performance of systems without air pre-treatment.

  1. Natural ventilation for reducing airborne infection in hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Hua [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Yuguo; Ching, W.H.; Sun, H.Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Seto, W.H.; Ching, Patricia [Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-03-15

    High ventilation rate is shown to be effective for reducing cross-infection risk of airborne diseases in hospitals and isolation rooms. Natural ventilation can deliver much higher ventilation rate than mechanical ventilation in an energy-efficient manner. This paper reports a field measurement of naturally ventilated hospital wards in Hong Kong and presents a possibility of using natural ventilation for infection control in hospital wards. Our measurements showed that natural ventilation could achieve high ventilation rates especially when both the windows and the doors were open in a ward. The highest ventilation rate recorded in our study was 69.0 ACH. The airflow pattern and the airflow direction were found to be unstable in some measurements with large openings. Mechanical fans were installed in a ward window to create a negative pressure difference. Measurements showed that the negative pressure difference was negligible with large openings but the overall airflow was controlled in the expected direction. When all the openings were closed and the exhaust fans were turned on, a reasonable negative pressure was created although the air temperature was uncontrolled. The high ventilation rate provided by natural ventilation can reduce cross-infection of airborne diseases, and thus it is recommended for consideration of use in appropriate hospital wards for infection control. Our results also demonstrated a possibility of converting an existing ward using natural ventilation to a temporary isolation room through installing mechanical exhaust fans. (author)

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of displacement natural ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yingchun

    2005-01-01

    Natural ventilation is widely recognised as contributing towards low-energy building design. The requirement to reduce energy usage in new buildings has rejuvenated interest in natural ventilation. This thesis deals with computer modelling of natural displacement ventilation driven either by buoyancy or buoyancy combined with wind forces. Two benchmarks have been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to evaluate the accuracy with which CFD is able to mo...

  3. Application of fuzzy control in naturally ventilated buildings for summer conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftekhari, M.M. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Department of Civil and Building Engineering; Marjanovic, L.D. [University of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a fuzzy controller for naturally ventilated buildings. Approximate reasoning has proven to be in many cases more successful control strategy than classically designed controlled scheme. In this paper the process of designing a supervisory control to provide thermal comfort and adequate air distribution inside a single-sided naturally ventilated test room is described. The controller is based on fuzzy logic reasoning and sets of linguistic rules in forms of IF-THEN rules are used. The inputs to the controller are the outside wind velocity, direction, outside and inside temperatures. The output is the position of the opening. A selection of membership functions for input and output variables are described and analysed. The control strategy consisting of the expert rules is then validated using experimental data from a naturally ventilated test room. The test room is located in a sheltered area and air flow inside the room, the air pressures and velocities across the openings together with indoor air temperature and velocity at four locations and six different levels were measured. Validation of the controller is performed in the test room by measuring the air distribution and thermal comfort inside the room with no control action. These data are then compared to the air temperature and velocity with the controller in action. The initial results are presented here, which shows that the controller is capable of providing better thermal comfort inside the room. (author)

  4. NATURAL BASEMENT VENTILATION AS A RADON MITIGATION TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report documents a study of natural basement ventilation in two research houses during both the summer cooling season and the winter heating season. NOTE: Natural basement ventilation has always been recommended as a way to reduce radon levels in houses. However, its efficacy...

  5. Natural ventilation for the prevention of airborne contagion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escombe, A Roderick; Oeser, Clarissa C; Gilman, Robert H; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Pan, William; Martínez, Carlos; Chacaltana, Jesus; Rodríguez, Richard; Moore, David A J; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A

    2007-02-01

    Institutional transmission of airborne infections such as tuberculosis (TB) is an important public health problem, especially in resource-limited settings where protective measures such as negative-pressure isolation rooms are difficult to implement. Natural ventilation may offer a low-cost alternative. Our objective was to investigate the rates, determinants, and effects of natural ventilation in health care settings. The study was carried out in eight hospitals in Lima, Peru; five were hospitals of "old-fashioned" design built pre-1950, and three of "modern" design, built 1970-1990. In these hospitals 70 naturally ventilated clinical rooms where infectious patients are likely to be encountered were studied. These included respiratory isolation rooms, TB wards, respiratory wards, general medical wards, outpatient consulting rooms, waiting rooms, and emergency departments. These rooms were compared with 12 mechanically ventilated negative-pressure respiratory isolation rooms built post-2000. Ventilation was measured using a carbon dioxide tracer gas technique in 368 experiments. Architectural and environmental variables were measured. For each experiment, infection risk was estimated for TB exposure using the Wells-Riley model of airborne infection. We found that opening windows and doors provided median ventilation of 28 air changes/hour (ACH), more than double that of mechanically ventilated negative-pressure rooms ventilated at the 12 ACH recommended for high-risk areas, and 18 times that with windows and doors closed (p ventilation than modern naturally ventilated rooms (40 versus 17 ACH; p natural ventilation exceeded mechanical (p ventilated rooms 39% of susceptible individuals would become infected following 24 h of exposure to untreated TB patients of infectiousness characterised in a well-documented outbreak. This infection rate compared with 33% in modern and 11% in pre-1950 naturally ventilated facilities with windows and doors open. Opening windows and

  6. Natural ventilation of buildings: opposing wind and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Paul; Hunt, Gary

    1998-11-01

    The use of natural ventilation in buildings is an attractive way to reduce energy usage thereby reducing costs and CO2 emissions. Generally, it is necessary to remove excess heat from a building and the designer can use the buoyancy forces associated with the above ambient temperatures within the building to drive a flow - 'stack' ventilation. The most efficient mode is displacement ventilation where warm air accumulates near the top of the building and flows out through upper level vents and cooler air flows in at lower levels. Ventilation will also be driven between these lower and upper openings by the wind. We report on laboratory modeling and theory which investigates the effects of an opposing wind on stack ventilation driven by a constant source of heat within a space under displacement ventilation. We show that there is a critical wind speed, expressed in dimensionless terms as a critical Froude number, above which displacement ventilation is replaced by (less efficient) mixing ventilation with reversed flow. Below this critical speed, displacement ventilation, in which the interior has a two-layer stratification, is maintained. The criterion for the change in ventilation mode is derived from general considerations of mixing efficiencies in stratified flows. We conclude that even when wind effects might appear to be dominant, the inhibition of mixing by the stable stratification within the space ensures that stack ventilation can operate over a wide range of apparently adverse conditions.

  7. Reducing the ingress of urban noise through natural ventilation openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, D J; de Salis, M H; Sharples, S

    2004-01-01

    For buildings in busy urban areas affected by high levels of road traffic noise the potential to use natural ventilation can be limited by excessive noise entering through ventilation openings. This paper is concerned with techniques to reduce noise ingress into naturally ventilated buildings while minimizing airflow path resistance. A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the interaction of airflow and sound transmission through ventilators for natural ventilation applications is described. A key element of the investigation has been the development of testing facilities capable of measuring the airflow and sound transmission losses for a range of ventilation noise control strategies. It is demonstrated that a combination of sound reduction mechanisms -- one covering low frequency sound and another covering high frequency sound -- is required to attenuate effectively noise from typical urban sources. A method is proposed for quantifying the acoustic performance of different strategies to enable comparisons and informed decisions to be made leading to the possibility of a design methodology for optimizing the ventilation and acoustic performance of different strategies. The need for employing techniques for combating low frequency sound in tandem with techniques for reducing high frequency sound in reducing the ingress of noise from urban sources such as road traffic to acceptable levels is demonstrated. A technique is proposed for enabling the acoustic and airflow performance of apertures for natural ventilation systems to be designed simultaneously.

  8. Solar chimney for natural ventilation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhrubo, Abir Ahsan; Alam, Chowdhury Sadid; Rahman, Md. Mustafizur; Islam, A. K. M. Sadrul

    2017-06-01

    In the 21st century the talk of the time has been proper use of renewable energy sources due to the continuous depletion of non-renewable energy sources and global warming as a result of combustion of fossil fuels. The energy situation in the 3rd world countries is even worse. The continuous industrial development in the 1st world countries is hugely responsible for global temperature increase and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions which badly affect the countries like Bangladesh. As of April 2016, the electricity generation capacity of Bangladesh was 12,399 MW to which only 60% of the total population have access to. The shortage of electricity during the summer season makes life very difficult. Cooling of buildings requires a large quantity of energy in the summer. An alternative cooling system can reduce the dependency on electricity. This paper specially deals with a passive cooling system that reduces pressure on the electricity supply and focuses on renewable energy sources. Here a different process engineering has been discussed which incorporates Earth-to-Air Heat Exchangers with solar collector enhanced solar chimney system. In this study natural ventilation of buildings, using solar chimney system is reviewed extensively. Experimentally it has already been observed that sufficient temperature drop takes place 2-3 m within the undisturbed ground, which can work as a heat sink for ambient air if passed through and can lead to attaining comfort zone at a confined location. During peak hours of summer this kind of system may work as a very efficient cooling system and reduces extra load on electricity supply.

  9. Characteristics of rain penetration through a gravity ventilator used for natural ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyeung; Lee, Dong Ho; Ahn, Kwangseog; Ha, Hyunchul; Park, Heechang; Piao, Cheng Xu; Li, Xiaoyu; Seo, Jeoungyoon

    2008-01-01

    Gravity ventilators rely simply on air buoyancy to extract air and are widely used to exhaust air contaminants and heat from workplaces using minimal energy. They are designed to maximize the exhaust flow rate, but the rain penetration sometimes causes malfunctioning. In this study, the characteristics of rain penetration through a ventilator were examined as a preliminary study to develop a ventilator with the maximum exhaust capacity while minimizing rain penetration. A model ventilator was built and exposed to artificial rain and wind. The paths, intensities and amounts of penetration through the ventilator were observed and measured in qualitative and quantitative fashions. In the first phase, the pathways and intensities of rain penetration were visually observed. In the second phase, the amounts of rain penetration were quantitatively measured under the different configurations of ventilator components that were installed based on the information obtained in the first-phase experiment. The effects of wind speed, grill direction, rain drainage width, outer wall height, neck height and leaning angle of the outer wall from the vertical position were analyzed. Wind speed significantly affected rain penetration. Under the low crosswind conditions, the rain penetration intensities were under the limit of detection. Under the high crosswind conditions, grill direction and neck height were the most significant factors in reducing rain penetration. The installation of rain drainage was also important in reducing rain penetration. The experimental results suggest that, with proper configurations of its components, a gravity ventilator can be used for natural ventilation without significant rain penetration problems.

  10. Single side Emitting Transparent OLED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Verschuren, C.A.; Bruls, D.M.; Tanase, C.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent OLEDs offer great potential for novel applications. Preferably, the light should be emitted from one side only. This can bedone to some extent by modifying electrode thicknesses, but at the cost of reduced transparency. Here, we demonstrate a new approach tomake single side emissive

  11. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Cold Conditions Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the energy performance of natural ventilation as a passive cooling method of buildings within houses located in temperate countries using Denmark as a case study. The method consists in running simulations with a thermal-airflow program of a household...... the simulations are validated with measured data, and by applying a new assessment method presented in this article as the cooling rate due to natural ventilation instead of a constant mechanical ventilation rate in the thermal balance within the dwelling, the energy saving is calculated. Results show...... ventilation rather mechanical one on large-scale scenarios located in temperate conditions. Finally, as a practical implication example, an assessment for Denmark is carried out....

  12. Architectural design of an advanced naturally ventilated building form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomas, K.J. [De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom). Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development

    2007-02-15

    Advanced stack-ventilated buildings have the potential to consume much less energy for space conditioning than typical mechanically ventilated or air-conditioned buildings. This paper describes how environmental design considerations in general, and ventilation considerations in particular, shape the architecture of advanced naturally ventilated (ANV) buildings. The attributes of simple and advanced naturally ventilated buildings are described and a taxonomy of ANV buildings presented. Simple equations for use at the preliminary design stage are presented. These produce target structural cross section areas for the key components of ANV systems. The equations have been developed through practice-based research to design three large educational buildings: the Frederick Lanchester Library, Coventry, UK; the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London, UK; the Harm A. Weber Library, Elgin, near Chicago, USA. These buildings are briefly described and the sizes of the as-built ANV features compared with the target values for use in preliminary design. The three buildings represent successive evolutionary stages: from advanced natural ventilation, to ANV with passive downdraught cooling, and finally ANV with HVAC support. Hopefully the guidance, simple calculation tools and case study examples will give architects and environmental design consultants confidence to embark on the design of ANV buildings. (author)

  13. Characterization of natural ventilation in wastewater collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew; Corsi, Richard; Morton, Robert; Knapp, Tom; Apgar, Dirk; Quigley, Chris; Easter, Chris; Witherspoon, Jay; Pramanik, Amit; Parker, Wayne

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize natural ventilation in full-scale gravity collection system components while measuring other parameters related to ventilation. Experiments were completed at four different locations in the wastewater collection systems of Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts, Los Angeles, California, and the King County Wastewater Treatment District, Seattle, Washington. The subject components were concrete gravity pipes ranging in diameter from 0.8 to 2.4 m (33 to 96 in.). Air velocity was measured in each pipe using a carbon-monoxide pulse tracer method. Air velocity was measured entering or exiting the components at vents using a standpipe and hotwire anemometer arrangement. Ambient wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity; headspace temperature and relative humidity; and wastewater flow and temperature were measured. The field experiments resulted in a large database of measured ventilation and related parameters characterizing ventilation in full-scale gravity sewers. Measured ventilation rates ranged from 23 to 840 L/s. The experimental data was used to evaluate existing ventilation models. Three models that were based upon empirical extrapolation, computational fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics, respectively, were evaluated based on predictive accuracy compared to the measured data. Strengths and weaknesses in each model were found and these observations were used to propose a concept for an improved ventilation model.

  14. Natural Ventilation Driven by Wind and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when buildings are being ventilated. It can be controlled by openings in the building envelope, which open or close depending on the need of air inside the building. It can also be the simple action of just opening a door or a window to let the fresh...... driving forces are still wind pressure and temperature differences as with cross-ventilation, but here the turbulence in the wind and the pulsating flow near the opening also affect the flow through the opening. From earlier work, some design expressions already exist, but none of these include...... the incidence angle of the wind, which is an important parameter in this type of ventilation. Several wind tunnel experiments are made and from the results of these, a new design expression is made which includes the wind pressure, temperature difference, incidence angle of the wind and the fluctuations...

  15. Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Svendsen, Sv Aa Højgaard

    1999-01-01

    The note concerns ventilation in residential buildings. Describes components in ventilation systems, electric energy consumption and different ventilation systems with heat exchanger.......The note concerns ventilation in residential buildings. Describes components in ventilation systems, electric energy consumption and different ventilation systems with heat exchanger....

  16. Investigation of Indoor Climate in a Naturally Ventilated Office Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2008-01-01

    A measuring program in a naturally ventilated office building in Copenhagen was carried out to document the indoor climate and ventilation system performance during a year. It included a questionnaire regarding the perceived indoor environmental quality and physical measurements of thermal comfort...... to a combination of poor control of solar shading and a very high local heat load that was above the Danish recommendations for naturally ventilated office buildings. Both measured and perceived indoor air quality in the building was in general very high. The measured air flow rates was relatively high due...... to the need for cooling in the office building, while the level of infiltration was quite low indicating an airtight construction....

  17. Energy Saving Potential by Utilizing Natural Ventilation under Warm Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to show the potential of natural ventilation as a passive cooling method within the residential sector of countries which are located in warm conditions using Mexico as a case study. The method is proposed as performing, with a simplified ventilation model, thermal......–airflow simulations of 27 common cases of dwellings (considered as one thermal zone) based on the combination of specific features of the building design, occupancy and climate conditions. The energy saving potential is assessed then by the use of a new assessment method suitable for large-scale scenarios using...... the actual number of air-conditioned dwellings distributed among the 27 cases. Thereby, the energy saving is presented as the difference in the cooling demand of the dwelling during one year without and with natural ventilation, respectively. Results indicate that for hot-dry conditions, buildings with high...

  18. Environmental performance of a naturally ventilated city centre library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausse, Birgit; Cook, Malcolm; Lomas, Kevin [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, Queens Building, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    To tackle climate change it is essential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. To this end, it is important to reduce the energy demands of non-domestic buildings. Naturally ventilated buildings can have low energy demands but the strategy is difficult to implement in deep plan, urban locations. The Frederick Lanchester Library at Coventry University, UK, incorporates natural ventilation, daylighting and passive cooling strategies. By using lightwells and perimeter stacks to supply and exhaust air, it can be ventilated by natural means despite its deep plan form and sealed facade. This paper describes the building and presents the energy consumption and the internal temperatures and CO{sub 2} levels recorded in 2004/2005. The building's performance is compared to the original design criteria and good practice guidelines. Recommendations for the design of such buildings are made and the likely performance in other UK cities is assessed. It is concluded that the building uses under half the energy of a standard air-conditioned building and yet, in summer, can keep the interior comfortable and up to 5 deg C below ambient. The design would perform equally well in the typical weather conditions experienced at 13 other UK cities, but not in London. It is concluded that deep-plan, naturally ventilated buildings with sealed facades, if well designed, could maintain thermal comfort in all but a very few UK locations, whilst consuming much less energy than even good practice standards. (Author)

  19. Design and simulation of a fuzzy controller for naturally ventilated buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjanovic, L. [De Montfort Univ., IESD, Leicester (United Kingdom); Eftekhari, M. [Loughborough Univ., Civil and Building Engineering Dept., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2004-03-01

    In this paper the design and validation process of a supervisory control for a single-sided naturally ventilated test room is described. The controller is based on fuzzy logic reasoning and sets of linguistic rules in the form of IF-THEN rules are used. The inputs to the controller are the outside wind speed, outside and inside temperatures. The output is the position of the opening. The basis of any fuzzy rule system is the inference engine responsible for the input's fuzzification, fuzzy processing of the rule base and defuzzification of the output. The choice of the inference engine, starting with the selection of input and output variables and their membership functions. Three rule bases of different complexity were developed and are presented and analysed here. Validation through simulation offers possibility of testing the controller under extreme conditions regardless of physical limitations of an experimental test cell. Simulations were performed for different typical levels of input parameters and also for extreme fictitious conditions. Simulations were carefully designed to allow simultaneous comparison of different controllers' performances. Simulation results have shown that all three controllers are capable of responding to the changes in outside conditions by adjusting the opening positions. They satisfy security requirements due to strong wind and successfully, in a stable manner respond to sudden changes in wind velocity and outdoor temperature. A controller with more membership functions and therefore a larger number of IF-THEN rules was more responsive to the changes in outside conditions. (Author)

  20. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Naturally Ventilated Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elashmawy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, heat transfer and fluid flow in naturally ventilated greenhouses are studied numerically for tow configuration according to the number and positions of the opening. The equations governing the phenomenon are developed using the stream function-vorticity formalism and solved using the finite volume method. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence airflow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr=0.71. Results are reported in terms of stream function, isotherms and average Nusselt number. It is found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and the number of openings. Also, that using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross-airflow inside the greenhouse.

  1. Research of CO2 concentration in naturally ventilated lecture room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Marta; Dudkiewicz, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings especially dedicated for educational purposes need to be design to achieve required level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality. It is crucial in terms of both: health and productivity of the room users. Higher requirements of indoor environment are important due to the level of students concentration, their ability to acquire new knowledge and willingness to interact with the lecturer. The article presents the results of experimental study and surveys undertaken in naturally ventilated lecture room. The data is analysed in terms of CO2 concentration and its possible influence on users. Furthermore the outcome of the research is compared with the CO2 concentration models available in the literature.

  2. Thermal Comfort in a Naturally-Ventilated Educational Building

    OpenAIRE

    David Mwale Ogoli

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive study of thermal comfort in a naturally ventilated education building (88,000 ft2) in a Chicago suburb will be conducted with 120 student subjects in 2007. This paper discusses some recent trends in worldwide thermal comfort studies and presents a proposal of research for this building through a series of questionnaire tables. Two research methods used inthermal comfort studies are field studies and laboratory experiments in climate-chambers. The various elements that constitu...

  3. Passive Design Strategies to Enhance Natural Ventilation in Buildings "Election of Passive Design Strategies to Achieve Natural Ventilation in Iraqi Urban Environment with Hot Arid Climate"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada M.Ismael Abdul Razzaq Kamoona

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available the natural ventilation in buildings is one of effective strategies for achieving energy efficiency in buildings by employing methods and ways of passive design, as well as its efficiency in providing high ranges of thermal comfort for occupants in buildings and raises their productivity. Because the concept of natural ventilation for many people confined to achieve through the windows and openings only, become necessary to provide this research to demonstrate the various passive design strategies for natural ventilation. Then, research problem: Insufficient knowledge about the importance and mechanism of the application of passive design strategies for natural ventilation in buildings. The research objective is: Analysis of passive design strategies to achieve natural ventilation in buildings, for the purpose of the proper selection of them to Iraqi urban environment. Accordingly, the research included two parts: First, the theoretical part, which dealt with the conceptual framework of natural ventilation and deriving the most important aspects in it, in order to adopted as a base for the practical part of the research. Second: the practical part, which analyzed examples of buildings projects that employed various design strategies for natural ventilation, according to the theoretical framework that has been drawn. The main conclusion is, Necessity to adopt various passive design strategies for natural ventilation in Iraqi urban environment with hot dry climate, as they have a significant impact in reducing the energy consumption for the purposes of ventilation and cooling, as well as for its efficiency in improving air quality in indoor environments of buildings.

  4. Sonic anemometry to measure natural ventilation in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Valera, Diego Luis; Molina-Aiz, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The present work has developed a methodology for studying natural ventilation in Mediterranean greenhouses by means of sonic anemometry. In addition, specific calculation programmes have been designed to enable processing and analysis of the data recorded during the experiments. Sonic anemometry allows us to study the direction of the airflow at all the greenhouse vents. Knowing through which vents the air enters and leaves the greenhouse enables us to establish the airflow pattern of the greenhouse under natural ventilation conditions. In the greenhouse analysed in this work for Poniente wind (from the southwest), a roof vent designed to open towards the North (leeward) could allow a positive interaction between the wind and stack effects, improving the ventilation capacity of the greenhouse. The cooling effect produced by the mass of turbulent air oscillating between inside and outside the greenhouse at the side vents was limited to 2% (for high wind speed, u(o) ≥ 4 m s(-1)) reaching 36.3% when wind speed was lower (u(o) = 2 m s(-1)).

  5. Estimating wind frequency limits for natural ventilation at remote sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, B.; Aynsley, R.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed wind data are collected at a limited number of sites, usually at airports. When a building is sited remote from the nearest wind data collection site, estimating wind frequency is more complex. The techniques involved come from the discipline of wind engineering. Where there is a relatively flat terrain between the wind data-recording site and the building site, simple computations can be made to account for the wind velocities over intervening terrain roughness. Where significant topographic features such as hills or mountains are present between the wind data-recording site and the building site, then boundary layer wind tunnel studies will be necessary to determine the influence of such features on wind speed and direction. Rough estimates can be calculated using factors used in some wind loading codes. When buildings are to be designed to take advantage of the energy efficiency offered by natural ventilation, it is important to estimate the actual potential for such ventilation. The natural ventilation potential can be estimated in terms of the percentage of time when wind exceeds some minimum value. For buildings near airports this is a relatively simple procedure. Such estimates are important as they also indicate the likely percentage of time when fans or other energy consuming devices will be needed to maintain indoor thermal comfort. This paper identifies the wind engineering techniques that can be used for such estimates and gives examples of such calculations

  6. Thermal Comfort in a Naturally-Ventilated Educational Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mwale Ogoli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of thermal comfort in a naturally ventilated education building (88,000 ft2 in a Chicago suburb will be conducted with 120 student subjects in 2007. This paper discusses some recent trends in worldwide thermal comfort studies and presents a proposal of research for this building through a series of questionnaire tables. Two research methods used inthermal comfort studies are field studies and laboratory experiments in climate-chambers. The various elements that constitute a “comfortable” thermal environment include physical factors (ambient air temperature, mean radiant temperature, air movement and humidity, personal factors(activity and clothing, classifications (gender, age, education, etc. and psychological expectations (knowledge, experience, psychological effect of visual warmth by, say, a fireplace. Comparisons are made using data gathered from Nairobi, Kenya.Keywords: Comfort, temperature, humidity and ventilation

  7. Natural Ventilation with Heat Recovery: A Biomimetic Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In temperate countries, heat recovery is often desirable through mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR. Drawbacks of MVHR include use of electric power and complex ducting, while alternative passive heat recovery systems in the form of roof or chimney-based solutions are limited to low rise buildings. This paper describes a biomimetic concept for natural ventilation with heat recovery (NVHR. The NVHR system mimics the process of water/mineral extraction from urine in the Loop of Henle (part of human kidney. Simulations on a facade-integrated Chamber successfully imitated the geometry and behaviour of the Loop of Henle (LoH. Using a space measuring 12 m2 in area and assuming two heat densities of 18.75 W/m2 (single occupancy or 30 W/m2 (double occupancy, the maximum indoor temperatures achievable are up to 19.3 °C and 22.3 °C respectively. These come with mean relative ventilation rates of 0.92 air changes per hour (ACH or 10.7 L·s−1 and 0.92 ACH (11.55 L·s−1, respectively, for the month of January. With active heating and single occupant, the LoH Chamber consumes between 65.7% and 72.1% of the annual heating energy required by a similar naturally ventilated space without heat recovery. The LoH Chamber could operate as stand-alone indoor cabinet, benefitting refurbishment of buildings and evading constraints of complicated ducting, external aesthetic or building age.

  8. Assessment of Natural Ventilation Potential for Residential Buildings across Different Climate Zones in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijing Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural ventilation potential of residential buildings was numerically investigated based on a typical single-story house in the three most populous climate zones in Australia. Simulations using the commercial simulation software TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation Tool were performed for all seasons in three representative cities, i.e., Darwin for the hot humid summer and warm winter zone, Sydney for the mild temperate zone, and Melbourne for the cool temperate zone. A natural ventilation control strategy was generated by the rule-based decision-tree method based on the local climates. Natural ventilation hour (NVH and satisfied natural ventilation hour (SNVH were employed to evaluate the potential of natural ventilation in each city considering local climate and local indoor thermal comfort requirements, respectively. The numerical results revealed that natural ventilation potential was related to the local climate. The greatest natural ventilation potential for the case study building was observed in Darwin with an annual 4141 SNVH out of 4728 NVH, while the least natural ventilation potential was found in the Melbourne case. Moreover, summer and transition seasons (spring and autumn were found to be the optimal periods to sustain indoor thermal comfort by utilising natural ventilation in Sydney and Melbourne. By contrast, natural ventilation was found applicable over the whole year in Darwin. In addition, the indoor operative temperature results demonstrated that indoor thermal comfort can be maintained only by utilising natural ventilation for all cases during the whole year, except for the non-natural ventilation periods in summer in Darwin and winter in Melbourne. These findings could improve the understanding of natural ventilation potential in different climates, and are beneficial for the climate-conscious design of residential buildings in Australia.

  9. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.; Heiselberg, Per; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HV AC). There is a need for the understanding and development of theories and tools related to the design, operation and control of natural ventilation systems.

  10. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating......, ventilation and air-conditioning (HV AC). There is a need for the understanding and development of theories and tools related to the design, operation and control of natural ventilation systems....

  11. Characteristics of Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang

    through horizontal openings. Two cases of full-scale measurements of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings are performed: one horizontal opening and one horizontal opening combined with one vertical opening. For the case of one horizontal opening, the measurements are made....... Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to study these two air flow cases. The air flow rate and air flow pattern are predicted and compared with the full-scale measurements. The measurement data are used to compare two CFD models: standard k- ε model and large eddy simulation (LES) model. The cases...... transient, unstable and complex, and the air flow rates oscillate with time. Correlations between the Froude number Fr and the opening ratio L/D are obtained, which is reasonable agreement with Epstein's formula derived from brine-water measurements, but the obtained Fr values show considerable deviations...

  12. Mine ventilation engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This book on mine ventilation covers psychometrics, airflow through roadways and ducts, natural ventilation, fans, instruments, ventilation surveys, auxiliary ventilation, air quality, and planning and economics.

  13. The influence of wind direction on natural ventilation: application to a large semi-enclosed stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural ventilation is still a commonly applied way in building engineering to ensure a healthy and comfortable indoor climate. In this paper CFD simulations of the natural ventilation of a large semi-enclosed stadium in the Netherlands during the summer are described. Simulations are performed to

  14. BSim models for 2 case-studies of naturally and mechanically ventilated daycare institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyanova, O.; Heiselberg, P.

    2009-06-15

    The report intends to provide complete information necessary for evaluation of assumptions made in the models and conclusions derived from the results of simulation of two different institutions in various operational modes. Thermal models are prepared for two day-care buildings, one which is mechanically ventilated and one which is naturally ventilated. All simulations were preformed in BSim, and all the models are simulated in the current version og BSim which is version 6,8,9,8. The results of the simulations showed that it is possible to reduce energy use for ventilation, both in mechanically and naturally ventilated child care center without compromising indoor air quality. (ln)

  15. Natural ventilation of large multi-span greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de T.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis the ventilation of large multi-span greenhouses caused by wind and temperature effects is studied. Quantification of the ventilation is important to improve the control of the greenhouse climate.

    Knowledge of the flow characteristics of the one-side-mounted windows of

  16. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings in Maceio, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamila, Harimi

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results from thermal comfort survey carried out in classrooms over two different seasons in Maceio, Brazil. The secondary data were collected from thermal comfort field study conducted in naturally ventilated classrooms. Objective and subjective parameters were explored to evaluate thermal comfort conditions. The potential effect of air movement on subjects' vote under neutrality was evaluated. Overall, the indoor climate of the surveyed location was classified warm and humid. Conflicting results were depicted when analyzing the effect of air movements on subjects' vote. The mean air temperature for subjects feeling hot was found to be lower than those feeling warm. A reasonable approach to tackle these two unpredictable results was suggested. Correlation matrix between selected thermal comfort variables was developed. Globe temperature recorded the highest correlation with subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale. The correlation was significant at the 0.01 level. On the other hand, the correlation between air movement and subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale was weak but significant. Further field studies on the current topic were recommended.

  17. Use of natural basement ventilation to control radon in single family dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    Natural basement ventilation has always been recommended as a means of reducing radon levels in houses. However, its efficacy has never been documented. In these experiments, natural ventilation has for the first time been studied systematically in two research houses during both the summer cooling season and the winter heating season. Ventilation rates, environmental and house operating parameters, as well as radon levels, have been monitored. It can be definitely concluded from radon entry rate calculations that natural ventilation can reduce radon levels in two ways. The first is by simple dilution. The second is by reducing basement depressurization and thus the amount of radon-contaminated soil gas drawn into the structure. Therefore, basement ventilation can be an effective mitigation strategy under some circumstances. It might be especially useful in houses with low radon concentrations (of the order of 370 Bq m -1 ) or those with low levels and which cannot be mitigated cost-effectively with conventional technology. (Author)

  18. Analysis of Natural Ventilation in a Passive House Located in Cold Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    in Vejle during cooling season, in the months of June, July and August. The dwelling belongs to a Danish project of passive houses denominated Komfort Husene, where its occupants claim there is no thermal comfort in summer time. The results show that the use of natural ventilation helps to reduce......This article shows the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive method of cooling buildings that are located in cold climate countries using Denmark as a case study. The energy saving potential of natural ventilation is found by performing thermal simulations of a household located...

  19. Natural ventilation: it's as easy as opening the windows, or is it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebein, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The research consisted of an evaluation of the existing technologies available for passive cooling with an emphasis on strategies related to the use of natural ventilation. A preliminary data base for the study was established by three major efforts: 1. An extensive literature search of the architectural press was undertaken to ascertain the degree to which passive cooling strategies in general and natural ventilation in particular are designed into buildings at the present time. 2. An investigation of existing building stock profiles was undertaken to identify the existing and potential obstacles or advantages to the implementation of natural ventilation as a passive cooling strategy. The EIA Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey and two previous PNL studies were reviewed. 3. Components 1 and 2 were followed up with telephone interviews and site visits with the architects, building owners and operators of selected buildings from 1 and 2 above to gain more specific insights into the problems and pleasures typically associated with natural ventilation.

  20. Design and performance of a rule-based controller in a naturally ventilated room

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanovic-Halburd, Ljiljana; Angelov, P.; Eftekhari, M. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reflects the final phase of the EPSRC project, and the PhD work of Marjanovic, on rule-based control in naturally ventilated buildings. Marjanovic is the second author. Eftekhari was her PhD supervisor.

  1. The simulation of naturally ventilated residential buildings in semi-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiabaklou, Z.; Ballinger, J.A.; Prasad, D.K. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). Solar Architecture Research Unit

    1995-12-31

    The most important consideration in hot arid and semi-arid zones is to reduce the internal day temperature and to maintain the interior spaces of buildings in a comfortable condition. An important contributor to errors in the thermal analysis of naturally ventilated buildings is inaccurate airflow predictions. These predictions are important for designers in regions where most buildings are naturally ventilated. Passive cooling by day and night natural ventilation in a single story residential building in Wagga Wagga, a semi-arid location in New South Wales has been compared and analyzed theoretically. A modified version of the computer simulation program CHEETAH, has been used to consider a building with continuous natural ventilation to simulate indoor air temperature. The aim of the study was to investigate the thermal behaviour of the building with continuous ventilation (24 hour/day) and the same building with only night time ventilation. Using night time ventilation in high mass buildings in such a climate, leads to a considerable decrease in room air temperature. Simulation results showed that increasing the effective area of windows is effective only when the wind blows. Using a steady averaged air change per hour can also cause a reduction in room air temperatures which results in different temperatures than the actual air changes per hour. (author). 3 figs., 4 refs.

  2. In vitro growth and leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana (Gardner, 1839 grown in natural ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bortolotti da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation system facilitates gaseous exchanges in in vitro plants promoting changes in the leaf tissue, which can be evaluated through the leaf anatomy, and it allows a cultivation closer to the photoautrophic micropropagation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects on in vitro growth and on the leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana grown in natural and conventional ventilation system with different concentrations of sucrose (0; 15; 30 and 45 L-1 combined with different cultivation systems (conventional micropropagation and natural ventilation system. The culture medium was composed of MS salts, solidified with 7 g L-1 of agar and pH adjusted to 5.8. Forty milliliters of culture medium were distributed in 250 mL flasks, autoclaved at 120 ºC for 20 minutes. The greater plant growth, as well as the greater thickness of the mesophyll was observed with the use of 20 g L-1 sucrose in natural ventilation system. Plants grown in natural ventilation system showed a thicker leaf mesophyll, which is directly related to photoautotrophic crops. The natural ventilation system induced more elliptical stomata and probably more functional formats.

  3. Natural ventilation in organic poultry houses in cold weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    This topic was suggested as a way to address concerns with winter ventilation and temperature control. The suggestion came with a request that the presentation cover “proper management in cooler ambient temps. The broad issue is most organic egg production is brown and these birds have an easy abil...

  4. The Effects of Void on Natural Ventilation Performance in Multi-Storey Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhriah Muhsin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing natural ventilation performance in multi-storey housing is very important for the living environment in terms of health and thermal comfort purposes. One of the most important design strategies to enhance natural ventilation in multi-storey housing is through the provision of voids. A void is a passive architectural feature, which is located in the middle of deep plan buildings. It is very crucial to consider the configurations of voids in the buildings for enhancing natural ventilation, especially for multi-storey housing. In this study, Malaysian Medium Cost Multi-Storey Housing (MMCMSH, which is an example of multi-storey housing located in a suburban area, has been selected in this study. This study aims to investigate the potential of void for enhancing natural ventilation performance in multi-storey housing by the comparison of two different void configurations. Field measurement of MMCMSH has been conducted to validate Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD model and Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL is an important parameter for setting up the CFD Model’s domain. Ventilation rate (Q, which is necessary for comfort and health reasons, is an important parameter for the comparison of the different void configurations. This study revealed that the provision of void can enhance natural ventilation performance in multi-storey housing with an increase in the value of Q, from 3.44% to 40.07%, by enlarging the void’s width by 50% compared to the existing void.

  5. Application of Breathing Architectural Members to the Natural Ventilation of a Passive Solar House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soon Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficient operation of a passive solar house requires an efficient ventilation system to prevent the loss of energy and provide the required ventilation rates. This paper proposes the use of “breathing architectural members” (BAMs as passive natural ventilation devices to achieve much improved ventilation and insulation performance compared to mechanical ventilation. Considering the importance of evaluating the ventilation and insulation performances of the members, we also propose numerical models for predicting the heat and air movements afforded by the members. The numerical model was validated by comparison with experimental results. The effectiveness of the BAMs was also verified by installation in houses located in an area with warm climate. For this purpose, chamber experiments were performed using samples of the BAMs, as well as numerical simulations to assess natural ventilation and heat load. The main findings of the study are as follows: (1 the one-dimensional chamber experiments confirmed the validity of the numerical models for predicting the heat and air movements afforded by the BAMs. Comparison of the experimental and calculated values for the temperature of air that flowed into the room from outside revealed a difference of less than 5%; (2 observations of the case studies in which BAMs were installed in the ceilings and exterior walls of Tokyo model houses revealed good annual ventilation and energy-saving effects. When BAMs with an opening area per unit area of A = 0.002 m2/m2 were applied to three surfaces, the required ventilation rate was 0.5 ACH (air changes per hour, and this was achieved consistently. Compared to a house with general insulation and conventional mechanical ventilation, heating load was reduced by 15.3%–40.2% depending on the BAM installation points and the differing areas of the house models.

  6. Change-over natural and mechanical ventilation system energy consumption in single-family buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Maria; Szulgowska-Zgrzywa, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The parameters of the outside air in Poland cause that in winter it is reasonable to use a mechanical ventilation equipped with a heat recovery exchanger. The time of spring, autumn, summer evenings and nights are often characterized by the parameters of the air, which allow for a natural ventilation and reduce the electricity consumption. The article presents the possibilities of energy consumption reduction for three energy standards of buildings located in Poland, ventilated by a change-over hybrid system. The analysis was prepared on the assumption that the air-to-water heat pump is the heat source for the buildings.

  7. Numerical investigation of airborne infection in naturally ventilated hospital wards with central-corridor type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Qian, Hua; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    Natural ventilation is believed to control airborne infection due to high ventilation rates while an undesired flow pattern may cause infection transmission in hospital wards. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the impact of airflow pattern....... The results not only give direct evidence to strongly support World Health Organization’s recommendation but also suggest required amendment of the Chinese standard GB 51039-2014 to improve ventilation arrangement in general hospital wards in China. Our findings are useful for improving the future design...... of general hospital wards for airborne infection control....

  8. Unified double- and single-sided homogeneous Green's function representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees; van der Neut, Joost; Slob, Evert

    2016-06-01

    In wave theory, the homogeneous Green's function consists of the impulse response to a point source, minus its time-reversal. It can be represented by a closed boundary integral. In many practical situations, the closed boundary integral needs to be approximated by an open boundary integral because the medium of interest is often accessible from one side only. The inherent approximations are acceptable as long as the effects of multiple scattering are negligible. However, in case of strongly inhomogeneous media, the effects of multiple scattering can be severe. We derive double- and single-sided homogeneous Green's function representations. The single-sided representation applies to situations where the medium can be accessed from one side only. It correctly handles multiple scattering. It employs a focusing function instead of the backward propagating Green's function in the classical (double-sided) representation. When reflection measurements are available at the accessible boundary of the medium, the focusing function can be retrieved from these measurements. Throughout the paper, we use a unified notation which applies to acoustic, quantum-mechanical, electromagnetic and elastodynamic waves. We foresee many interesting applications of the unified single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation in holographic imaging and inverse scattering, time-reversed wave field propagation and interferometric Green's function retrieval.

  9. Cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness and tinnitus suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Jourdan T; O'Connell, Brendan; Hedley-Williams, Andrea; Wanna, George

    To quantify the potential effectiveness of cochlear implantation for tinnitus suppression in patients with single-sided deafness using the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. The study included 12 patients with unilateral tinnitus who were undergoing cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory was administered at the patient's cochlear implant candidacy evaluation appointment prior to implantation and every cochlear implant follow-up appointment, except activation, following implantation. Patient demographics and speech recognition scores were also retrospectively recorded using the electronic medical record. A significant reduction was found when comparing Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score preoperatively (61.2±27.5) to the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score after three months of cochlear implant use (24.6±28.2, p=0.004) and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score beyond 6months of CI use (13.3±18.9, p=0.008). Further, 45% of patients reported total tinnitus suppression. Mean CNC word recognition score improved from 2.9% (SD 9.4) pre-operatively to 40.8% (SD 31.7) by 6months post-activation, which was significantly improved from pre-operative scores (p=0.008). The present data is in agreement with previously published studies that have shown an improvement in tinnitus following cochlear implantation for the large majority of patients with single-sided deafness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Likeness between respiratory responses on CO2 in conditions of natural breathing and voluntary-controlled mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogodin, M A; Granstrem, M P; Dimitrienko, A I

    2007-04-01

    We did Read CO2 rebreathing tests in 8 adult males. Both at natural breathing, and at self-controlled mechanical ventilation, volunteers increased ventilation proportionally to growth end-tidal PCO2. Inside individual distinctions of responses to CO2 during controlled mechanical ventilation are result of the voluntary motor control.

  11. Measurement and Modelling of Air Flow Rate in a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2008-01-01

    Air flow rate in a naturally ventilated double skin façade (DSF) is extremely difficult to measure due to the stochastic nature of wind, and as a consequence non-uniform and dynamic flow conditions. This paper describes the results of two different methods to measure the air flow in a full...... by the thermal simulation program, BSim, based on measured weather boundary conditions are compared to the measured air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity. The results show that it is possible to predict the temperature distribution and airflow in the DSF although some......-scale outdoor test facility with a naturally ventilated double skin façade. Although both methods are difficult to use under such dynamic air flow conditions, they show reasonable agreement and can be used for experimental validation of numerical models of natural ventilation air flow in DSF. Simulations...

  12. A CFD study for evaluating the effects of natural ventilation on indoor comfort conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mora-Pérez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in improving energy efficiency in buildings due to the increased awareness about environmental impact and energy cost. Natural ventilation is an environmentally friendly technique which has become more attractive way for reducing energy use while it also provides acceptable comfort conditions. The research shows a case study building in which the natural ventilation effect due to wind-driven forces on indoor comfort conditions is evaluated. Moreover, the architectural solutions selected during the building design phase to improve the natural ventilation behaviour are successfully validated in a full-scale building. The indoor comfort conditions are evaluated through contrasted performance indicators: draught risk (DR, predicted percentage of dissatisfied people (PPD and predicted mean vote (PMV indexes. The results show that air movement due to natural ventilation allows increasing indoor air temperature maintaining the initial comfort conditions. Therefore, the mechanical air conditioning use can be postponed until the indoor air temperature is high and would, consequently, reduce the total building energy consumption. Thereby, a proper natural ventilation focus during the initial design stage could improve the building energy efficiency without compromising the indoor comfort conditions.

  13. Ventilation and internal structure effects on naturally induced flows in a static aircraft wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Daithi; Newport, David; Egan, Vanessa; Lacarac, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    The ventilation performance within an aircraft wing leading edge is investigated for a number of enclosure and ventilation configurations. The natural convection regime present is found to be highly sensitive to enclosure conditions, particularly the introduction of a partition. The presence of a partition reduced the overall heat exhausted from the cavity by up to 60%. The optimum ventilation strategy is also changed from a forward biased vent orientation (found for the unpartitioned case), to one where both the rear and front vents within the enclosure had the same open area. Cylinder plume effects dominate within the enclosure and were the main driver of the convective regime, with steady-state enclosure conditions highly dependent upon cylinder placement and plume orientation. An externally heated enclosure with internal heat source, combined with ventilation and an internal structure produced a complex natural convection regime which is sensitive to enclosure conditions. Hence an adequate knowledge of such conditions is necessary in order to fully appreciate the convective regime. - Highlights: → Optimum ventilation strategy changed between unpartitioned and partitioned cases. → Flow path and plume orientation are important to consider when analysing ventilation. → Bleed duct placement significantly alters flow path and temperature distribution. → Enclosure partitioning reduced heat exhaustion by 60%.

  14. Evaluation of Discharge Coefficients for Window Openings in Wind Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Sandberg, Mats

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation...... cannot be regarded as a constant and it is very difficult to estimate correct values resulting in less accuracy of prediction of natural ventilation.......This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation......, and therefore, the classical approach is not appropriate for prediction of airflow through large openings in buildings in the cross ventilation case. Using the approach for real openings and estimating the discharge coefficient for window openings has also not been very successful. The discharge coefficient...

  15. A First Approach to Natural Thermoventilation of Residential Buildings through Ventilation Chimneys Supplied by Solar Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Salata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of natural ventilation is a good solution to improve buildings from an energetic point of view and to fulfill the requirements demanded by the thermohygrometric comfort and the air quality in enclosed spaces. Some past researches demonstrated how some devices, useful to this purpose, follow the principles of solar chimneys and are able to move air masses while exploiting the Archimedes thrust. The natural ventilation must be supplied by a flow moving upward, generated by a heat source performing at temperatures slightly higher than the one present in the environment. To have a minimum energetic effect, the heat can be extracted from solar ponds; solar ponds are able to collect and store solar energy in the geographical regions characterized by sufficient values of solar radiation. Thus it is possible, in summer, to provoke a nocturnal natural ventilation useful for the air change in indoor spaces (in those climatic areas where, during the night, there is a temperature gradient.

  16. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  17. Effectiveness of horizontal air flow fans supporting natural ventilation in a Mediterranean multi-span greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    López, Alejandro; Valera, Diego Luis; Molina-Aiz, Francisco Domingo; Peña, Araceli

    2013-01-01

    Natural ventilation is the most important method of climate control in Mediterranean greenhouses. In this study, the microclimate and air flow inside a Mediterranean greenhouse were evaluated by means of sonic anemometry. Experiments were carried out in conditions of moderate wind (≈ 4.0 m s-1), and at low wind speed (≈ 1.8 m s-1) the natural ventilation of the greenhouse was supplemented by two horizontal air flow fans. The greenhouse is equipped with a single roof vent opening t...

  18. The influence of an estimated energy saving due to natural ventilation on the Mexican energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the impacts of the extensive use of NV (natural ventilation) in the Mexican residential sector on the Mexican energy system. By integrating a thermal-airflow simulation programme with an energy systems analysis model, the impact on the Mexican energy system of replacing air...... conditioning, in particular, with natural ventilation to cool residential buildings is determined. It is shown that when, as in Mexico, there is a relatively simple connection between supply and electricity demand, NV creates savings which could be used to reduce either the fossil-fuel-based generation...

  19. Natural-basement ventilation as a radon-mitigation technique. Final report Jun 89-Feb 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.

    1992-04-01

    The report documents a study of natural basement ventilation in two research houses during both the summer cooling season and the winter heating season. (NOTE: Natural basement ventilation has always been recommended as a way to reduce radon levels in houses. However, its efficacy has never been documented. It has generally been assumed to be a very inefficient mitigation strategy since it was believed that dilution was the mechanism by which radon levels were reduced.) Ventilation rates, environmental and house operating parameters, and radon levels have been monitored; it can be concluded that natural ventilation can reduce radon levels two ways: (1) by simple dilution, and (2) although less obvious, by providing a pressure break that reduces basement depressurization and thus the amount of radon-contaminated soil gas drawn into the house. Thus, basement ventilation can be a much more effective mitigation strategy than was previously believed. It might be especially useful in houses with low radon concentrations (of the order of 10 pCi/L) or those with low levels that cannot be mitigated cost-effectively with conventional technology

  20. Enhancement of natural ventilation in buildings using a thermal chimney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Ho [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, Richard K. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A new module was developed for and implemented in the EnergyPlus program for the simulation and determination of the energy impact of thermal chimneys. This paper describes the basic concepts, assumptions, and algorithms implemented into the EnergyPlus program to predict the performance of a thermal chimney. Using the new module, the effects of the chimney height, solar absorptance of the absorber wall, solar transmittance of the glass cover and the air gap width are investigated under various conditions. Chimney height, solar absorptance and solar transmittance turned out to have more influence on the ventilation enhancement than the air gap width. The potential energy impacts of a thermal chimney under three different climate conditions are also investigated. It turned out that significant building cooling energy saving can be achieved by properly employing thermal chimneys and that they have more potential for cooling than for heating. In addition, the performance of a thermal chimney was heavily dependent on the climate of the location. (author)

  1. Computational Analysis of Natural Ventilation Flows in Geodesic Dome Building in Hot Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Soleimani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, dome roofs were used in traditional houses in hot regions such as the Middle East and Mediterranean basin due to its thermal advantages, structural benefits and availability of construction materials. This article presents the computational modelling of the wind- and buoyancy-induced ventilation in a geodesic dome building in a hot climate. The airflow and temperature distributions and ventilation flow rates were predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations were solved using the CFD tool ANSYS FLUENT15. The standard k-epsilon was used as turbulence model. The modelling was verified using grid sensitivity and flux balance analysis. In order to validate the modelling method used in the current study, additional simulation of a similar domed-roof building was conducted for comparison. For wind-induced ventilation, the dome building was modelled with upper roof vents. For buoyancy-induced ventilation, the geometry was modelled with roof vents and also with two windows open in the lower level. The results showed that using the upper roof openings as a natural ventilation strategy during winter periods is advantageous and could reduce the indoor temperature and also introduce fresh air. The results also revealed that natural ventilation using roof vents cannot satisfy thermal requirements during hot summer periods and complementary cooling solutions should be considered. The analysis showed that buoyancy-induced ventilation model can still generate air movement inside the building during periods with no or very low wind.

  2. A Particle Swarm Optimization of Natural Ventilation Parameters in a Greenhouse with Continuous Roof Vents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhafid HASNI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although natural ventilation plays an important role in the affecting greenhouse climate, as defined by temperature, humidity and CO2 concentration, particularly in Mediterranean countries, little information and data are presently available on full-scale greenhouse ventilation mechanisms. In this paper, we present a new method for selecting the parameters based on a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm which optimize the choice of parameters by minimizing a cost function. The simulator was based on a published model with some minor modifications as we were interested in the parameter of ventilation. The function is defined by a reduced model that could be used to simulate and predict the greenhouse environment, as well as the tuning methods to compute their parameters. This study focuses on the dynamic behavior of the inside air temperature and humidity during ventilation. Our approach is validated by comparison with some experimental results. Various experimental techniques were used to make full-scale measurements of the air exchange rate in a 400 m2 plastic greenhouse. The model which we propose based on natural ventilation parameters optimized by a particle swarm optimization was compared with the measurements results.

  3. Naturally ventilated double-skin façade in modeling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dama, Alessandro; Angeli, Diego; Larsen, Olena Kalyanova

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •An experimental validation of a model, developed for integration of DSF in Building Simulation tools, is given. •The validation was based on heat removed by natural ventilation, which is the main parameter in passive cooling systems. •A good degree of correlation was found between the...

  4. Optimization of air-curtain sealing efficiency with respect to heat transfer in naturally ventilated buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khayrullina, A.; Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.; van Heijst, G.J.F.; Sun, Y.; Pei, J.; Zhao, X

    This study presents results of coupled 3D steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of an isolated naturally-ventilated building with the application of an air curtain to prevent heat transfer across a doorway. The considered parameters include air

  5. Dynamic model to tune a climate control algorithm in pig houses with natural ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, van 't C.E.; Bontsema, J.; Salomons, L.

    1995-01-01

    Algorithms for environmental control in livestock buildings have to be tuned for optimum response of actuators. For tuning, a simple, but dynamic, climate model for a pig house was formulated and validated to predict the
    environmental changes in a pig house with natural ventilation under varying

  6. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Model of natural ventilation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model of natural ventilation of buildings at the stage of design and a consequence of the behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is made by coupling multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others...

  8. Occupant Time Period of Thermal Adaption to Change of Outdoor Air Temperature in Naturally Ventilated Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Wargocki, Pawel; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The present work proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption of occupants in naturally ventilated building, based on the relationship between their neutral temperatures and running mean outdoor air temperature. Based on the data of the field investigation, the subjects’ time...

  9. Experimental and numerical study on natural ventilation performance of various multi-opening wind catchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montazeri, H.

    2011-01-01

    Wind catcher as a natural ventilation system is increasingly used in modern buildings to minimize the consumption of non-renewable energy and reduce the harmful emissions. Height, cross section of the air passages and also place and the number of openings are the main factors which affect the

  10. Bed Microenvironment in Hospital Patient Rooms with Natural or Mechanical Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Li, Yuguo; Georgiev, Emanuil

    2012-01-01

    We studied how to provide patients in bed with thermally comfortable microenvironment in both naturally and mechanically ventilated hospital rooms for both winter and summer seasons. A climate chamber was used to resemble a hospital room and thermal manikin to simulate a patient lying in a bed...

  11. Relationship of Indoor and Outdoor Air Pollutants in a Naturally Ventilated Historical Building Envelope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Aparicio, S.; Smolík, Jiří; Mašková, Ludmila; Součková, M.; Grøntoft, T.; Ondráčková, Lucie; Stankiewicz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 7 (2011), s. 1460-1468 ISSN 0360-1323 Grant - others:MF NF(CZ) A/CZ0046/2/0001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : indoor/outdoor ration * natural ventilation * ammonia Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.400, year: 2011

  12. Influence of wind direction and urban surroundings on natural ventilation of a large football stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, CFD simulations of the natural ventilation of a large semi-enclosed stadium in the Netherlands during summer conditions are described. The simulations are performed to assess the air exchange rate for eight wind directions. The CFD model consists of both the complex stadium geometry

  13. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications. Natural ventilation is often limited to window-based designs whose dilution/mixing effectiveness are subject to constraints of wind speed, cross ventilation, and in the case of hospital wards, proximity of patients to external walls. A buoyancy-driven natural ventilation system capable of achieving dilution/mixing was shown to be feasible in a preceding study of novel system called natural personalised ventilation (NPV. This system combined both architecture and airflow engineering principles of space design and buoyancy and was tested and validated (salt-bath experiment for a single bed ward. This research extends the previous work and is proof-of-concept on the feasibility of NPV system for multi-bed wards. Two different four-bed ward types were investigated of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations under wind-neutral conditions. Results predict that NPV system could deliver fresh air to multiple patients, including those located 10 m away from external wall, with absolute flow rates of between 32 L·s−1 and 54 L·s−1 for each patient/bed. Compared to same wards simulated using window design, ingress of airborne contaminants into patients’ breathing zone and summer overheating potential were minimised, while overall ward dilution was maximised. Findings suggest the NPV has potentials for enabling architects and building service engineers to decouple airflow delivery from the visualisation and illumination responsibilities placed upon windows.

  14. Natural ventilation of the Romance churches. Prophylaxis and constructive security; Ventilacion natural de las iglesias romanicas. Profilaxis y seguridad constructiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroba, M.; Grau, J.; Alanon, P.; Diez-Pastor, C.; Garcia, J.

    2008-07-01

    As part of an investigation project on three medieval churches of Segovia, financed by the Junta de Castilla y Leon, a study of hygrometric behaviour of these three buildings was carried out. The analysis of natural ventilation is essential, not only as an eliminator of pollutants but also as a reducer of the infiltrated water that could deteriorate structures. The appearance in these buildings of a series of openings or, in their case, fissures-that allows the infiltration of air (the combination provides perfect sweeping of the interior of the buildings), can only be justified by ventilation necessities, and not for the requirements of interior illumination. (Author)

  15. BSim Models for 2 Case-studies of Naturally and Mechanically Ventilated Daycare Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Olena Kalyanova; Heiselberg, Per

    and conclusions derived from the results of simulation of two different institutions in various operational modes. Thermal models are prepared for two buildings, which are: SFO Nymarken in Kerterminde and SFO Spirehuset in Hirtshals. The main operational principles in these buildings are significantly different......, as SFO Nymarken is mechanically ventilated and SFO Spirehuset is naturally ventilated. All of the simulations were carried in BSim, and all of the models are simulated in the current version of BSim, which is version 6,8,9,8....

  16. Preliminary study of ammonia emissions from naturally ventilated fattening pig houses in the south-east China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K.; Ye, Z.; Li, H. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou City (China). School of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on an experimental simulation in which ammonia emissions from naturally ventilated pig houses were monitored and the ventilation airflow rate was estimated. Two identical pig houses and the same number of pigs were used in the study. Natural ventilation was used in the experimental pig house while the reference pig house had mechanical ventilation. Both houses had the same air temperature and relative humidity. The ventilation airflow rate of the experimental pig house was estimated by calculating the ventilation airflow rate in the reference pig house. The ventilation airflow rate of the experimental pig house was also estimated based on heat pressure theory. The room air temperature and relative humidity were found to be related to inlet air temperature and relative humidity for both ventilation systems. After 19 days, the average air temperature in the room with mechanical ventilation was about 4.1 degrees C higher than inlet air temperature, but the relative humidity was lower by 7.1 per cent. In the room with natural ventilation, the average air temperature after 19 days was about 3.9 degrees C higher than inlet air temperature, but the relative humidity was lower by 4.3 per cent.

  17. Ventilation of carbon monoxide from a biomass pellet storage tank--a study of the effects of variation of temperature and cross-ventilation on the efficiency of natural ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emhofer, Waltraud; Lichtenegger, Klaus; Haslinger, Walter; Hofbauer, Hermann; Schmutzer-Roseneder, Irene; Aigenbauer, Stefan; Lienhard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Wood pellets have been reported to emit toxic gaseous emissions during transport and storage. Carbon monoxide (CO) emission, due to the high toxicity of the gas and the possibility of it being present at high levels, is the most imminent threat to be considered before entering a pellet storage facility. For small-scale (ventilation, preferably natural ventilation utilizing already existing openings, has become the most favored solution to overcome the problem of high CO concentrations. However, there is little knowledge on the ventilation rates that can be reached and thus on the effectiveness of such measures. The aim of the study was to investigate ventilation rates for a specific small-scale pellet storage system depending on characteristic temperature differences. Furthermore, the influence of the implementation of a chimney and the influence of cross-ventilation on the ventilation rates were investigated. The air exchange rates observed in the experiments ranged between close to zero and up to 8 m(3) h(-1), depending largely on the existing temperature differences and the existence of cross-ventilation. The results demonstrate that implementing natural ventilation is a possible measure to enhance safety from CO emissions, but not one without limitations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. Data on the natural ventilation performance of windcatcher with anti-short-circuit device (ASCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Payam; Calautit, John Kaiser; Majid, Muhd Zaimi Abd; Hughes, Ben Richard; Jomehzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-12-01

    This article presents the datasets which were the results of the study explained in the research paper 'Anti-short-circuit device: a new solution for short-circuiting in windcatcher and improvement of natural ventilation performance' (P. Nejat, J.K. Calautit, M.Z. Abd. Majid, B.R. Hughes, F. Jomehzadeh, 2016) [1] which introduces a new technique to reduce or prevent short-circuiting in a two-sided windcatcher and also lowers the indoor CO2 concentration and improve the ventilation distribution. Here, we provide details of the numerical modeling set-up and data collection method to facilitate reproducibility. The datasets includes indoor airflow, ventilation rates and CO2 concentration data at several points in the flow field. The CAD geometry of the windcatcher models are also included.

  19. An Attempt to Design a Naturally Ventilated Tower in Subtropical Climate of the Developing Country; Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Maha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of the world’s population resides in developing countries where there is a lack of rigorous studies in designing energy efficient buildings. This study is a step in designing a naturally ventilated high rise residential building in a tropical climatic context of the developing country, Pakistan. Karachi, the largest city of Pakistan, lies in the subtropical hot desert region with constant high temperature of average 32 °C throughout the summer and no particular winter season. The Design Builder software package is used to design a 25 storey high rise residential building relying primarily on natural ventilation. A final conceptual design is proposed after optimization of massing, geometry, orientation, and improved building envelope design including extensive shading devices in the form of trees. It has been observed that a reduction of 8 °C in indoor ambient temperature is possible to achieve with passive measures and use of night time ventilation. A fully naturally ventilated building can reduce the energy consumption for cooling and heating by 96 % compared to a building using air conditioning systems.

  20. A Natural Ventilation Alternative to the Passivhaus Standard for a Mild Maritime Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sassi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the need in mild maritime climates, such as the southern areas of the UK, for mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR as required by the German Passivhaus standard. It considers the comfort, air quality and energy impacts of MVHR versus natural ventilation and reviews the post-occupancy monitoring data of two flats in Cardiff designed to Passivhaus standards, one of which had been operated as a naturally ventilated building rather than with MVHR. The energy consumption of this free-running flat was significantly lower (36 kWh primary energy/m²a than the Passivhaus Planning Package modeling had predicted (93 kWh primary energy/m²a with no adverse effects on occupant comfort, air quality or excessive humidity, and advantages of lower capital cost and maintenance. The paper concludes that in climates with mild winters and cool summers the use of MVHR could be omitted without compromising comfort levels and achieving at least equivalent energy savings resulting from adopting the Passivhaus model and at a lower capital cost. This suggests the potential for a naturally ventilated, ultra-low energy model with lower capital investment requirements and lower disruption when applied to retrofit that would facilitate its mainstream adoption.

  1. An Attempt to Design a Naturally Ventilated Tower in Subtropical Climate of the Developing Country; Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Maha

    2017-12-01

    A large proportion of the world's population resides in developing countries where there is a lack of rigorous studies in designing energy efficient buildings. This study is a step in designing a naturally ventilated high rise residential building in a tropical climatic context of the developing country, Pakistan. Karachi, the largest city of Pakistan, lies in the subtropical hot desert region with constant high temperature of average 32 °C throughout the summer and no particular winter season. The Design Builder software package is used to design a 25 storey high rise residential building relying primarily on natural ventilation. A final conceptual design is proposed after optimization of massing, geometry, orientation, and improved building envelope design including extensive shading devices in the form of trees. It has been observed that a reduction of 8 °C in indoor ambient temperature is possible to achieve with passive measures and use of night time ventilation. A fully naturally ventilated building can reduce the energy consumption for cooling and heating by 96 % compared to a building using air conditioning systems.

  2. Natural Frequency of Oscillating Gaseous Bubbles in Ventilated Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ning

    2017-07-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 51506051, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No JB2015RCY04, and the Incubation Project for Young Talents of Chinese Society for Electrical Engineering under Grant No JLB-2016-68.

  3. Effects of window position on natural cross ventilation in vernacular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the most effective architectures is vernacular architecture of Mazandaran whose incorporation in nature is so delicate that appears to be an essential part of it. Paying more attention to vernacular architecture and promoting it can be helpful in reducing energy consumption. Increasing use of fossil fuels in heating and ...

  4. CFD model of air movement in ventilated facade: comparison between natural and forced air flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Perez, Miguel; Lopez Patino, Gonzalo; Lopez Jimenez, P. Amparo [Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering Department, Universitat Politècnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    This study describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of ventilated facade. Ventilated facades are normal facade but it has an extra channel between the concrete wall and the (double skin) facade. Several studies found in the literature are carried out with CFD simulations about the behavior of the thermodynamic phenomena of the double skin facades systems. These studies conclude that the presence of the air gap in the ventilated facade affects the temperature in the building skin, causing a cooling effect, at least in low-rise buildings. One of the most important factors affecting the thermal effects of ventilated facades is the wind velocity. In this contribution, a CFD analysis applied on two different velocity assumptions for air movement in the air gap of a ventilated facade is presented. A comparison is proposed considering natural wind induced velocity with forced fan induced velocity in the gap. Finally, comparing temperatures in the building skin, the differences between both solutions are described determining that, related to the considered boundary conditions, there is a maximum height in which the thermal effect of the induced flow is significantly observed.

  5. Simulation comparison between natural and hybrid ventilation by fans at night time for severe hot climate (Aswan, Egypt)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizk, A. [Department of Architectural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); El-Deberky, A. [Department of Architecture, Faculty of Fine Arts, Minya University, Minya (Egypt); Guirguis, N. M. [Housing and Building Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-07-01

    During the summer in Aswan, Egypt, indoor temperatures rise to a level exceeding thermal comfort. Due to the lag time of the building's envelope, temperature at night is higher inside than outside during the overheated period. The aim of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of ceiling and wall falls in lowering indoor air temperature at night. Computer simulations were carried out with ANSYS FLOTRAN computational fluid dynamic on a single room; 3 models were studied: natural ventilation, hybrid ventilation with a wall fan and hybrid ventilation with a ceiling fan. Results showed that hybrid ventilation fan is more effective in decreasing the temperature than natural cross ventilation alone and it was found that a wall fan is better than a ceiling fan. This study demonstrated that using hybrid ventilation with a side fan is the best option to reduce the air temperature in a room in Aswan, Egypt.

  6. Single side damage simulations and detection in beam-like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yun-Lai; Perera, R; Wahab, M Abdel; Maia, N; Sampaio, R; Figueiredo, E

    2015-01-01

    Beam-like structures are the most common components in real engineering, while single side damage is often encountered. In this study, a numerical analysis of single side damage in a free-free beam is analysed with three different finite element models; namely solid, shell and beam models for demonstrating their performance in simulating real structures. Similar to experiment, damage is introduced into one side of the beam, and natural frequencies are extracted from the simulations and compared with experimental and analytical results. Mode shapes are also analysed with modal assurance criterion. The results from simulations reveal a good performance of the three models in extracting natural frequencies, and solid model performs better than shell while shell model performs better than beam model under intact state. For damaged states, the natural frequencies captured from solid model show more sensitivity to damage severity than shell model and shell model performs similar to the beam model in distinguishing damage. The main contribution of this paper is to perform a comparison between three finite element models and experimental data as well as analytical solutions. The finite element results show a relatively well performance. (paper)

  7. Measurement of Air Flow Rate in a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    Air flow rate in a naturally ventilated space is extremely difficult to measure due to the stochastic nature of wind, and as a consequence non-uniform and dynamic flow conditions. This paper describes three different methods to measure the air flow in a full-scale outdoor test facility...... with a naturally ventilated double skin façade. In the first method, the air flow in the cavity is estimated on the basis of six measured velocity profiles. The second method is represented by constant injection of tracer gas and in the third method a measured relation in the laboratory is used to estimate...... the flow rate on the basis of continues measurement of the pressure difference between the surface pressure at the opening and inside pressure of the double skin façade. Although all three measurement methods are difficult to use under such dynamic air flow conditions, two of them show reasonable agreement...

  8. Natural Ventilation Effectiveness of Round Wall-Mounted Vent Caps in Residential Kitchens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pin Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effect of different numbers of wall-mounted vent caps and their installation locations on the indoor air environment in residential kitchens, for which limited information is available. Wind tunnel tests were performed to study the induced ventilation rates of a vent cap, and the impact of vent caps on the natural ventilation efficiency in residential kitchens was examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD numerical simulations. The results were then applied to determine the appropriate quantity of vent caps and their proper installation location. The wind tunnel test results indicated that outdoor winds with speeds of 0–6 m/s that flow parallel to the wall with a vent cap induce indoor air to exit through the cap with ventilation rates of 0–20 m3/h; when the wind blows perpendicular to the wall, outdoor air with 0–31.9 m3/h flows indoors. CFD numerical simulations showed that the installation of kitchen vent caps can reduce the average carbon monoxide concentration in the cook’s breathing zone. A sufficient quantity of vent caps and the proper installation location are required to ensure the natural ventilation effectiveness of wall-mounted vent caps.

  9. Buoyancy and Pressure Driven Flow of Hot Gases in Vertical Shafts with Natural and Forced Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Gunnar; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2003-11-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on the buoyancy and pressure induced flow of hot gases in vertical shafts, in order to simulate the propagation of combustion products in elevator shafts due to fire in multilevel buildings. Various geometrical configurations are studied, with regard to natural and forced ventilation imposed at the top or bottom of the vertical shaft. The aspect ratio is taken at a fixed value of 6 and the inflow conditions for the hot gases, at a vent near the bottom, are varied in terms of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers. Temperature measurements within the shaft allow a detailed study of the steady state thermal fields, from which optimal means for smoke alleviation in high-rise building fires may be developed. Flow visualization is also used to study the flow characteristics. The results obtained indicate a wall plume as the primary transport mechanism. Flow recirculation dominates at high Grashof number flows, while increased Reynolds numbers gives rise to greater mixing in the shaft. The development and stability of the flow and its effect on the spread of smoke and hot gases are assessed for the different shaft configurations and inlet conditions. It is found that the fastest smoke removal and lowest shaft temperatures occur for a configuration with natural ventilation at the top and forced ventilation up from the shaft bottom. It is also shown that forced ventilation can be used to arrest smoke spread, as well as to dilute the effects of the fire.

  10. Transient natural ventilation of a room with a distributed heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of the transient flows which develop as a naturally ventilated room adjusts from one temperature to another. We focus on a room heated from below by a uniform heat source, with both high- and low-level ventilation openings. Depending on the initial temperature of the room relative to (i) the final equilibrium temperature and (ii) the exterior temperature, three different modes of ventilation may develop. First, if the room temperature lies between the exterior and the equilibrium temperature, the interior remains well-mixed and gradually heats up to the equilibrium temperature. Secondly, if the room is initially warmer than the equilibrium temperature, then a thermal stratification develops in which the upper layer of originally hot air is displaced upwards by a lower layer of relatively cool inflowing air. At the interface, some mixing occurs owing to the effects of penetrative convection. Thirdly, if the room is initially cooler than the exterior, then on opening the vents, the original air is displaced downwards and a layer of ambient air deepens from above. As this lower layer drains, it is eventually heated to the ambient temperature, and is then able to mix into the overlying layer of external air, and the room becomes well-mixed. For each case, we present new laboratory experiments and compare these with some new quantitative models of the transient flows. We conclude by considering the implications of our work for natural ventilation of large auditoria.

  11. Continuous monitoring of natural ventilation pressure at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, I.M.; Wallace, K.G.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate the permanent, safe disposal of US defense-generated transuranic waste. The waste storage horizon is 655 m (2150 ft) below surface in bedded salt. To date the WIPP project has not emplaced any waste. There are three intake shafts used to supply air to the underground. All air is exhausted through a single return shaft. The total design airflow during normal operations is 200 m 3 /s (424,000 cfm). The ventilation system is designed to provide separate air splits to construction, experimental, and storage activities. Separation is achieved by isolating the storage circuit from the construction or experimental circuits with bulkheads. Any air leakage must be towards the storage area of the facility. Field studies have shown that the pressure differential necessary to maintain the correct leakage direction is susceptible to the effects of natural ventilation; therefore, extensive studies and analyses have been conducted to quantify the natural ventilation effects on the WIPP underground airflow system. A component of this work is a monitoring system designed to measure the air properties necessary for calculation of the natural ventilation pressure (NVP). This monitoring system consists of measuring dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure at strategic location on surface and underground. The psychometric parameters of the air are measured every fifteen minutes. From these data, trends can be determined showing the impact of NVP on the ventilation system during diurnal variations in surface climate. Both summer and winter conditions have been studied. To the author's knowledge this is the first reported instance of automatic and continuous production of time and temperature variant NVPs. This paper describes the results of the initial monitoring study

  12. Roles of sunlight and natural ventilation for controlling infection: historical and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobday, R A; Dancer, S J

    2013-08-01

    Infections caught in buildings are a major global cause of sickness and mortality. Understanding how infections spread is pivotal to public health yet current knowledge of indoor transmission remains poor. To review the roles of natural ventilation and sunlight for controlling infection within healthcare environments. Comprehensive literature search was performed, using electronic and library databases to retrieve English language papers combining infection; risk; pathogen; and mention of ventilation; fresh air; and sunlight. Foreign language articles with English translation were included, with no limit imposed on publication date. In the past, hospitals were designed with south-facing glazing, cross-ventilation and high ceilings because fresh air and sunlight were thought to reduce infection risk. Historical and recent studies suggest that natural ventilation offers protection from transmission of airborne pathogens. Particle size, dispersal characteristics and transmission risk require more work to justify infection control practices concerning airborne pathogens. Sunlight boosts resistance to infection, with older studies suggesting potential roles for surface decontamination. Current knowledge of indoor transmission of pathogens is inadequate, partly due to lack of agreed definitions for particle types and mechanisms of spread. There is recent evidence to support historical data on the effects of natural ventilation but virtually none for sunlight. Modern practice of designing healthcare buildings for comfort favours pathogen persistence. As the number of effective antimicrobial agents declines, further work is required to clarify absolute risks from airborne pathogens along with any potential benefits from additional fresh air and sunlight. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy saving potential of natural ventilation in China: The impact of ambient air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Zheming; Chen, Yujiao; Malkawi, Ali; Liu, Zhu; Freeman, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Natural ventilation potential is affected largely by ambient air pollution in China. • NV hours of 76 Chinese cities based on weather and ambient air quality are estimated. • Cooling energy savings and carbon reductions of 35 major Chinese cities are estimated. • 8–78% of the cooling energy usage can be potentially reduced by NV. • Our findings provide guidelines to improve energy policies in China. - Abstract: Natural ventilation (NV) is a key sustainable solution for reducing the energy use in buildings, improving thermal comfort, and maintaining a healthy indoor environment. However, the energy savings and environmental benefits are affected greatly by ambient air pollution in China. Here we estimate the NV potential of all major Chinese cities based on weather, ambient air quality, building configuration, and newly constructed square footage of office buildings in the year of 2015. In general, little NV potential is observed in northern China during the winter and southern China during the summer. Kunming located in the Southwest China is the most weather-favorable city for natural ventilation, and reveals almost no loss due to air pollution. Building Energy Simulation (BES) is conducted to estimate the energy savings of natural ventilation in which ambient air pollution and total square footage at each city must be taken into account. Beijing, the capital city, displays limited per-square-meter saving potential due to the unfavorable weather and air quality for natural ventilation, but its largest total square footage of office buildings makes it become the city with the greatest energy saving opportunity in China. Our analysis shows that the aggregated energy savings potential of office buildings at 35 major Chinese cities is 112 GWh in 2015, even after allowing for a 43 GWh loss due to China’s serious air pollution issue especially in North China. 8–78% of the cooling energy consumption can be potentially reduced by natural

  14. The Impact of Single-Sided Deafness upon Music Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sarah; Hough, Elizabeth A; Crundwell, Gemma; Knappett, Rachel; Smith, Mark; Baguley, David M

    2017-05-01

    Many of the world's population have hearing loss in one ear; current statistics indicate that up to 10% of the population may be affected. Although the detrimental impact of bilateral hearing loss, hearing aids, and cochlear implants upon music appreciation is well recognized, studies on the influence of single-sided deafness (SSD) are sparse. We sought to investigate whether a single-sided hearing loss can cause problems with music appreciation, despite normal hearing in the other ear. A tailored questionnaire was used to investigate music appreciation for those with SSD. We performed a retrospective survey of a population of 51 adults from a University Hospital Audiology Department SSD clinic. SSD was predominantly adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss, caused by a variety of etiologies. Analyses were performed to assess for statistical differences between groups, for example, comparing music appreciation before and after the onset of SSD, or before and after receiving hearing aid(s). Results demonstrated that a proportion of the population experienced significant changes to the way music sounded; music was found to sound more unnatural (75%), unpleasant (71%), and indistinct (81%) than before hearing loss. Music was reported to lack the perceptual qualities of stereo sound, and to be confounded by distortion effects and tinnitus. Such changes manifested in an altered music appreciation, with 44% of participants listening to music less often, 71% of participants enjoying music less, and 46% of participants reporting that music played a lesser role in their lives than pre-SSD. Negative effects surrounding social occasions with music were revealed, along with a strong preference for limiting background music. Hearing aids were not found to significantly ameliorate these effects. Results could be explained in part through considerations of psychoacoustic changes intrinsic to an asymmetric hearing loss and impaired auditory scene analysis. Given the prevalence of

  15. Spatial variability of mixing ratios of ammonia and tracer gases in a naturally ventilated dairy cow barn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, Luciano B.; Edouard, Nadège; Ogink, Nico W.M.; Dooren, van Hendrik Jan C.; Fátima F. TinÔco, de Ilda; Mosquera Losada, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The use of the tracer gas ratio method to estimate emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) livestock barns excludes the need of monitoring ventilation rates. However, it requires accurate measurement of tracer release rate (QT) and a representative estimate of the mixing ratio between

  16. Influence of the urban environment on the effectiveness of natural night-ventilation of an office building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramponi, R.; Gaetani, I.; Angelotti, A.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of natural night-ventilation in the urban environment depends on local climate characteristics, but also on solar shading and wind shielding effects of the surrounding buildings. However, the impact of the latter factors on the effectiveness of night-ventilation is often

  17. Energy Performance of a Novel System Combining Natural Ventilation with Diffuse Ceiling Inlet and Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao

    and thermally activated building systems (TABS) for cooling and ventilation in future Danish office buildings. The new solution would have the special potential of using natural ventilation all year round even in the extremely cold seasons without any draught risk. The main focuses of this study are the energy...

  18. Prediction of the diffuse-field transmission loss of interior natural-ventilation openings and silencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, Chris; Hodgson, Murray

    2017-01-01

    The work reported here, part of a study on the performance and optimal design of interior natural-ventilation openings and silencers ("ventilators"), discusses the prediction of the acoustical performance of such ventilators, and the factors that affect it. A wave-based numerical approach-the finite-element method (FEM)-is applied. The development of a FEM technique for the prediction of ventilator diffuse-field transmission loss is presented. Model convergence is studied with respect to mesh, frequency-sampling and diffuse-field convergence. The modeling technique is validated by way of predictions and the comparison of them to analytical and experimental results. The transmission-loss performance of crosstalk silencers of four shapes, and the factors that affect it, are predicted and discussed. Performance increases with flow-path length for all silencer types. Adding elbows significantly increases high-frequency transmission loss, but does not increase overall silencer performance which is controlled by low-to-mid-frequency transmission loss.

  19. Augmenting natural ventilation using solar heat and free cool energy for residential buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In many urban buildings ventilation is not sufficient that will increase the temperature and also create unhealthy atmosphere inside the room. In such buildings artificially induced ventilation through freely available energy promote comfort conditions by reducing the temperature by 2 to 3°C and also creating good circulation of fresh air inside the room. In the present work the concept of improving the ventilation by excess hot energy available during summer days from the solar flat plate collector and by storing cool energy available during the early morning hour in the Phase Change Material (PCM based storage system is attempted. An experimental setup is made to study the effect of improvement in natural ventilation and the results are reported. A visible reduction in temperature is observed through circulation of air from the bottom side of the room to the roof of the house using the stored hot and cool energy. A CFD analysis is also carried out using ANSYS-CFX software to simulate and evaluate the mass flow of air at the inlet and at the selected RTD location by matching the transient temperature profile of the simulated result with the experimental results at the selected RTD location.

  20. Occupants’ Utilization of Natural Ventilation: A Study of Selected Terrace House Designs in Hot-humid Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibiyeye AI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With increased time spent indoors and demand for enhanced comfort levels, energy consumption in homes is rising mostly for cooling, particularly in hot-humid regions. Natural ventilation is seen as an alternative to mechanical cooling as it is totally independent on energy and has been reported to be of high potential. However, little information is available on the utilization of natural ventilation in individual living spaces in different house designs. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate occupants’ utilization of natural ventilation in living spaces under different terrace house designs in hot-humid climate and also the relationship between the openings and occupants’ satisfaction with natural ventilation. Five (5 different terrace house types in Putrajaya, Malaysia with different opening design characteristics were selected for the study. A total of 298 households from these house types were surveyed and results show that occupants mostly open their windows during the daytime to capture breeze from outside despite the fact that they owned air-conditioners. In terms of occupants’ level of satisfaction with indoor ventilation when utilizing natural ventilation, majority rated neither satisfied nor unsatisfied. Further regression analysis reveals that this level of satisfaction is significantly related to opening sizes that are in accordance with the law, duration of opening windows and AC ownership. Findings from this study will shed more light on behavioural pattern of occupants of residential buildings towards natural ventilation provisions and highlight the importance of conforming to the law governing them.

  1. Evaluation of naturally ventilated dairy barn management by a thermographic method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knížková, I.; Kunc, P.; Koubková, M.; Flusser, Jan; Doležal, O.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 77, 2/3 (2002), s. 349-353 ISSN 0301-6226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/99/1489 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : natural ventilation * dairy cattle * body surface temperature Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 1.117, year: 2002 http://library.utia.cas.cz/prace/20020202.pdf

  2. Effectiveness of horizontal air flow fans supporting natural ventilation in a Mediterranean multi-span greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation is the most important method of climate control in Mediterranean greenhouses. In this study, the microclimate and air flow inside a Mediterranean greenhouse were evaluated by means of sonic anemometry. Experiments were carried out in conditions of moderate wind (≈ 4.0 m s-1, and at low wind speed (≈ 1.8 m s-1 the natural ventilation of the greenhouse was supplemented by two horizontal air flow fans. The greenhouse is equipped with a single roof vent opening to the windward side and two side vents, the windward one being blocked by another greenhouse close to it, while the leeward one is free of obstacles. When no fans are used, air enters through the roof vent and exits through both side vents, thus flowing contrary to the thermal effect which causes hot air to rise and impairing the natural ventilation of the greenhouse. Using fans inside the greenhouse helps the air to circulate and mix, giving rise to a more homogeneous inside temperature and increasing the average value of normalized air velocity by 365 %. These fans also increase the average values of kinetic turbulence energy inside the greenhouse by 550 % compared to conditions of natural ventilation. As the fans are placed 4 m away from the side vents, their effect on the entrance of outside air is insufficient and they do not help to reduce the inside temperature on hot days with little wind. It is therefore recommended to place the fans closer to the side vents to allow an additional increase of the air exchange rate of greenhouses.

  3. Characteristics of Buoyant Flow from Open Windows in Naturally Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Dam, Henrik; Sørensen, Lars C.

    An important element in the natural ventilation design procedure is the flow-pressure characteristics of a window with a -given opening area. The flow in the room is another important element that is often ignored in the design phase due to lack of relevant information on the air movement....... This paper shows the outcome of experiments with the room air distribution. The results show that the velocity distribution in the occupied zone can be described by a semiempirical model....

  4. Experimental analysis of single sided ventilation through a centre pivot roof window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Afshari, Alireza; Heiselberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    . Leakages through the experimental space were estimated using the blower door tests. Air-change rates increased with increase in the window sash opening angle. When the window was open all the way, with an average wind speed of 4 m/s, the average air-change rate was 2. Flow factor was used to characterise...

  5. An analysis of natural ventilation techniques to achieve indoor comfort in Wal-Mart express

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Shona

    Despite global efforts to reduce world fossil fuel dependency the world still obtains 81% of its energy from fossil fuels (IEA,2009). Modern renewable alternatives have been around since the mid twentieth century these alternatives have not been integrated into electrical grid systems at the exponential rate required to eradicate fossil fuels dependency. The problem, world energy demand, is too large to be satisfied by anything other than the energy-dense fossil fuels used today. We must change our energy intensive processes in order to conserve energy and hence reduce the demands that alternatives must satisfy. This research aims to identify sustainable design opportunities through the application of innovative technologies for the largest retailer in the US with the view that a viable conservative design measure could be applied to the store model, which is replicated across the country, causing a cumulative and hence larger impact on the company energy consumption as a whole. This paper will present the literature available on the 'big box' industry and Wal-Mart, comfort, natural ventilation and building simulation software and then perform an analysis into the viability of naturally ventilating the Wal-Mart Express sales zone using Monodraught natural ventilation windcatcher products

  6. Contribution of natural ventilation in a double skin envelope to heating load reduction in winter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu-Min; Sohn, Jang-Yeul [Department of Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Soo-Young [Department of Housing and Interior Design, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Shin, Sung-Woo [Department of Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    This study examined the contribution of a double skin envelope (DSE) to the heating energy savings brought about by natural ventilation in office buildings. A DSE was applied to the east- and west-facing walls on an actual three-floor building. Field measurements and computer simulations were performed in winter. The results implied that the DSE on the west-facing wall contributed to energy savings when natural ventilation was supplied from the cavity to the indoor space. The DSE facing east was not recommended for energy savings by natural ventilation because of its smaller exposure to solar irradiance. Multiple linear regression models were developed based on field measurements to predict the temperature variation in the cavities, and effective control logics will be discussed in a future study. Of all variables, the outdoor air temperature was the most significant factor influencing the air temperature in the cavity. Computer simulation indicated that the air in the cavity was heated to the required temperature without consuming additional energy when the ratio of the diffused irradiance to global irradiance was smaller than 0.69. The cavity in the DSE worked as a thermal buffer zone and contributed to reducing heating energy consumption by 14.71% in January. (author)

  7. Simulation of thermal environment in a three-layer vinyl greenhouse by natural ventilation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tea-Hwan; Shin, Ki-Yeol; Yoon, Si-Won; Im, Yong-Hoon; Chang, Ki-Chang

    2017-11-01

    A high energy, efficient, harmonious, ecological greenhouse has been highlighted by advanced future agricultural technology recently. This greenhouse is essential for expanding the production cycle toward growth conditions through combined thermal environmental control. However, it has a negative effect on farming income via huge energy supply expenses. Because not only production income, but operating costs related to thermal load for thermal environment control is important in farming income, it needs studies such as a harmonious ecological greenhouse using natural ventilation control. This study is simulated for energy consumption and thermal environmental conditions in a three-layered greenhouse by natural ventilation using window opening. A virtual 3D model of a three-layered greenhouse was designed based on the real one in the Gangneung area. This 3D model was used to calculate a thermal environment state such as indoor temperature, relative humidity, and thermal load in the case of a window opening rate from 0 to 100%. There was also a heat exchange operated for heating or cooling controlled by various setting temperatures. The results show that the cooling load can be reduced by natural ventilation control in the summer season, and the heat exchange capacity for heating can also be simulated for growth conditions in the winter season.

  8. Experimental and CFD evidence of multiple solutions in a naturally ventilated building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, P; Li, Y; Andersen, A; Bjerre, M; Chen, Z

    2004-02-01

    This paper considers the existence of multiple solutions to natural ventilation of a simple one-zone building, driven by combined thermal and opposing wind forces. The present analysis is an extension of an earlier analytical study of natural ventilation in a fully mixed building, and includes the effect of thermal stratification. Both computational and experimental investigations were carried out in parallel with an analytical investigation. When flow is dominated by thermal buoyancy, it was found experimentally that there is thermal stratification. When the flow is wind-dominated, the room is fully mixed. Results from all three methods have shown that the hysteresis phenomena exist. Under certain conditions, two different stable steady-state solutions are found to exist by all three methods for the same set of parameters. As shown by both the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental results, one of the solutions can shift to another when there is a sufficient perturbation. These results have probably provided the strongest evidence so far for the conclusion that multiple states exist in natural ventilation of simple buildings. Different initial conditions in the CFD simulations led to different solutions, suggesting that caution must be taken when adopting the commonly used 'zero initialization'.

  9. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Baez, Maite; Barrios-Padura, Ángela; Molina-Huelva, Marta; Chacartegui, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  10. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4°C and 17.6-30.0°C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7°C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  11. Simulation of thermal environment in a three-layer vinyl greenhouse by natural ventilation control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Tea-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A high energy, efficient, harmonious, ecological greenhouse has been highlighted by advanced future agricultural technology recently. This greenhouse is essential for expanding the production cycle toward growth conditions through combined thermal environmental control. However, it has a negative effect on farming income via huge energy supply expenses. Because not only production income, but operating costs related to thermal load for thermal environment control is important in farming income, it needs studies such as a harmonious ecological greenhouse using natural ventilation control. This study is simulated for energy consumption and thermal environmental conditions in a three-layered greenhouse by natural ventilation using window opening. A virtual 3D model of a three-layered greenhouse was designed based on the real one in the Gangneung area. This 3D model was used to calculate a thermal environment state such as indoor temperature, relative humidity, and thermal load in the case of a window opening rate from 0 to 100%. There was also a heat exchange operated for heating or cooling controlled by various setting temperatures. The results show that the cooling load can be reduced by natural ventilation control in the summer season, and the heat exchange capacity for heating can also be simulated for growth conditions in the winter season.

  12. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD. The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes. Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form. PMID:26512583

  13. The integration of engineering and architecture: A perspective on natural ventilation for the new San Francisco Federal Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConahey, Erin; Haves, Philip; Christ, Tim

    2002-01-01

    A description of the in-progress design of a new Federal Office Building for San Francisco is used to illustrate a number of issues arising in the design of large, naturally ventilated office buildings. These issues include the need for an integrated approach to design involving the architects, mechanical and structural engineers, lighting designers and specialist simulation modelers. In particular, the use of natural ventilation, and the avoidance of air-conditioning, depends on the high degree of exposed thermal mass made possible by the structural scheme and by the minimization of solar heat gains while maintaining the good daylighting that results from optimization of the facade. Another issue was the need for a radical change in interior space planning in order to enhance the natural ventilation; all the individual enclosed offices are located along the central spine of each floorplate rather than at the perimeter. The role of integration in deterring the undermining of the design through value engineering is discussed. The comfort criteria for the building were established based on the recent extension to the ASHRAE comfort standard based on the adaptive model for naturally ventilated buildings. The building energy simulation program EnergyPlus was used to compare the performance of different natural ventilation strategies. The results indicate that, in the San Francisco climate, wind-driven ventilation provides sufficient nocturnal cooling to maintain comfortable conditions and that external chimneys do not provide significant additional ventilation at times when it when it would be beneficial

  14. Methane emission from naturally ventilated livestock buildings can be determined from gas concentration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B; Zhang, Guoqiang; Madsen, J

    2012-01-01

    Determination of emission of contaminant gases as ammonia, methane, or laughing gas from natural ventilated livestock buildings with large opening is a challenge due to the large variations in gas concentration and air velocity in the openings. The close relation between calculated animal heat pr...... to investigate the influence of feed composition on methane emission in a relative large number of operating cattle buildings and consequently it can support a development towards reduced greenhouse gas emission from cattle production.......Determination of emission of contaminant gases as ammonia, methane, or laughing gas from natural ventilated livestock buildings with large opening is a challenge due to the large variations in gas concentration and air velocity in the openings. The close relation between calculated animal heat...... ventilated, 150 milking cow building. The results showed that the methane emission can be determined with much higher precision than ammonia or laughing gas emissions, and, for methane, relatively precise estimations can be based on measure periods as short as 3 h. This result makes it feasible...

  15. Numerical Simulation of Air Temperature and Velocity in a Naturally Ventilated Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shodiya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical simulation of air velocity and air temperature distribution in an office room of Computer Engineering Department of University of Maiduguri which is naturally ventilated. The office room under investigation with the dimension 5 m × 5 m × 4 m has a door in the East direction, and two windows, one in the East direction and the other in the South direction. For cost effectiveness, numerical solutions of steady-state airflow and heat transfer were done using a complete two-dimensional model. The results showed that the windows and the door could not undertake indoor heat load that can make the occupants to be thermally comfortable. In activity area where people sit and stand, the air velocity is moderate, this is about 0.98 m/s on the average. In addition, the temperature in this area is relatively high of about 302 K (29 °C on the average. Based on the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE standard for comfort environment in summer (air temperature: 293 – 299 K (20 – 26 °C; air velocity: 0.5 – 0.8 m/s, the natural ventilation for the office room cannot give a thermal comfort for the inhabitant of the room. However, a window, if installed opposite the door could improve the ventilation of the office.

  16. A preliminary investigation of indoor air quality in a naturally ventilated house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrani, S.; Ahmed, A.Z.; Abdul Rahman, S.

    2006-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of indoor air quality was conducted in a naturally ventilated Malaysian house. CO 2 , CO, temperature and relative air humidity measurements were performed in the bathroom, bedroom, family room, kitchen and living room at 15-minute intervals over a 24-hour monitoring period. The measurement data were supplemented with time activity diaries detailing the occupants time of occupancy in each room, activities undertaken in each room and cooling and/or ventilation techniques used in each room. Indoor air quality was found to be generally satisfactory in all five rooms. However, levels of CO in the family room exceeded the USEPA, WHO and Singapore guidelines. Additionally, levels of relative humidity in the kitchen, living room and family room temperature in all five rooms exceeded the ASHRAE and Singapore guidelines, and suggest the like hood of condensation and mould growth

  17. Experimental research on the indoor temperature and humidity fields in radiant ceiling air-conditioning system under natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Xiang, Yutong; Wang, Yonghong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the indoor temperature and humidity fields of the air in a metal ceiling radiant panel air conditioning system with fresh air under natural ventilation were researched. The temperature and humidity distributions at different height and different position were compared. Through the computation analysis of partial pressure of water vapor, the self-recovery characteristics of humidity after the natural ventilation was discussed.

  18. Animal welfare in cross-ventilated, compost-bedded pack, and naturally ventilated dairy barns in the upper Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobeck, K M; Endres, M I; Shane, E M; Godden, S M; Fetrow, J

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this cohort study was to investigate animal welfare in 2 newer dairy housing options in the upper Midwest, cross-ventilated freestall barns (CV) and compost-bedded-pack barns (CB), compared with conventional, naturally ventilated freestall barns (NV). The study was conducted on 18 commercial dairy farms, 6 of each housing type, in Minnesota and eastern South Dakota. The primary breed in all farms was Holstein; 1 CV and 1 NV herd had approximately 30% Jersey-Holstein crossbreds. All freestall herds used sand for bedding. Farms were visited 4 times (once in each season) between January and November 2008, and approximately 93% of all animals in each pen were visually scored on each visit. Outcome-based measurements of welfare (locomotion, hock lesions, body condition score, hygiene, respiration rates, mortality, and mastitis prevalence) were collected on each farm. Lameness prevalence (proportion of cows with locomotion score ≥3 on a 1 to 5 scale, where 1=normal and 5=severely lame) in CB barns (4.4%) was lower than that in NV (15.9%) and CV (13.1%) barns. Lameness prevalence was similar between CV and NV barns. Hock lesion prevalence (proportion of cows with a lesion score ≥2 on a 1 to 3 scale, where 1=normal, 2=hair loss, and 3=swelling) was lower in CB barns (3.8%) than in CV (31.2%) and NV barns (23.9%). Hygiene scores (1 to 5 scale, where 1=clean and 5=very dirty) were higher for CB (3.18) than CV (2.83) and NV (2.77) barns, with no differences between CV and NV barns. Body condition scores, respiration rates, mastitis prevalence, culling, and mortality rates did not differ among housing systems. The CV and NV barns were evaluated using the cow comfort index (proportion of cows lying down in a stall divided by all animals touching a stall) and the stall usage index (proportion of cows lying divided by all animals in the pen not eating). The CV barns tended to have greater cow comfort index (85.9%) than the NV barns (81.4%) and had greater

  19. Study of natural convection heat transfer characteristics. (1) Influence of ventilation duct height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamatsu, Mitsuo; Iwaki, Chikako; Ikeda, Tatsumi; Morooka, Shinichi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nakada, Kotaro; Masaki, Yoshikazu

    2008-01-01

    Natural cooling system has been investigated in waste storage. It is important to evaluate the flow by natural draft enough to removal the decay heat from the waste. In this study, we carried out the fundamental experiment of ventilation duct height effect for natural convection on vertical cylindrical heater in atmospheric air. The scale of test facility is about 4m height with single heater. The heating value is varied in the range of 33-110W, where Rayleigh number is over 10 10 . Natural convection flow rate were calculated by measured velocity with thermo anemometer in the inlet duct. The temperature of the cylindrical heater wall and fluid were measured with thermocouples. It was found that the heat transfer coefficient difference between long duct and short duct is small in this experiment. (author)

  20. Radon-222 signatures of natural ventilation regimes in an underground quarry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick; Crouzeix, Catherine; Morat, Pierre; Le Mouël, Jean Louis

    2004-01-01

    Radon-222 activity concentration has been monitored since 1999 in an underground limestone quarry located in Vincennes, near Paris, France. It is homogeneous in summer, with an average value of 1700 Bq m(-3), and varies from 730 to 1450 Bq m(-3) in winter, indicating natural ventilation with a rate ranging from 0.5 to 2.4 x 10(-6) s(-1) (0.04-0.22 day(-1)). This hypothesis is supported by measurements in the vertical access pit where, in winter, a turbulent air current produces a stable radon profile, smoothly decreasing from 700 Bq m(-3) at 20 m depth to 300 Bq m(-3) at surface. In summer, a thermal stratification is maintained in the pit, but the radon-222 concentration jumps repeatedly between 100 and 2000 Bq m(-3). These jumps are due to atmospheric pressure pumping, which induces ventilation in the quarry at a rate of about 0.1 x 10(-6) s(-1) (0.009 day(-1)). Radon-222 monitoring thus provides a dynamical characterisation of ventilation regimes, which is important for the assessment of the long-term evolution of underground systems.

  1. Numerical analysis of natural ventilation system in a studio apartment in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Hasan, Md. Rakibul; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2017-07-01

    The study of temperature and air flow for natural ventilation system has been investigated numerically. A finite element model for studio apartment was developed with the aim of achieving detail energy allocation in the real buildings during the transient process in the walls and internal air. A tool of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is employed to assist the process. In the tropical regions most of the energy is consumed by the heating, cooling and ventilation appliances. Therefore, the optimize ventilation system will be a suitable and valid option for the saving of energy from the household sector to increase cooling performance and ensuring thermal comfort as well. A mathematical exploration is carried out on full scale dwelling and small scale model and indication is given on the relevance of such a comparison. Calculations are carried out with household heat sources for calm and windy period, but without any human. As expected, for windy periods, the wind is the main driving force behind the internal air flow. However, in calm periods for unsteady flow the internal airflow looks like more complexes through observation.

  2. Ammonia emissions from a naturally and a mechanically ventilated broiler house in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano B. Mendes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the aim of monitoring NH3 emissions from a mechanically and a naturally ventilated broiler house (MVB and NVB, respectively and calculate their ammonia emission factors (fNH3. Bird stocking density was 13.5 and 11.1 birds m-2 for the MVB and NVB, respectively. The marketing age was 43 days and bedding consisted of dried coffee husks in its first time of use. Ventilation rates were calculated with the metabolic carbon dioxide mass balance method. Values of fNH3 were 0.32 ± 0.10 and 0.27 ± 0.07 g bird-1 d-1 for the MVB and NVB, respectively, and are in agreement to what was presented in other studies performed under similar conditions. The fNH3 estimated on yearly basis was 58 g bird-place-1 year-1. It was concluded that the different types of ventilation system between the studied broiler barns did not significantly affect emissions in the modeling process. The results obtained help providing reliable methodology for the determination of a solid database on NH3 emission factors for tropical conditions that can be used for future inventories, when performed in a sufficient number of barns that is representative for the Brazilian scenario.

  3. Natural ventilation reduces high TB transmission risk in traditional homes in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygizos, Melissa; Shenoi, Sheela V; Brooks, Ralph P; Bhushan, Ambika; Brust, James C M; Zelterman, Daniel; Deng, Yanhong; Northrup, Veronika; Moll, Anthony P; Friedland, Gerald H

    2013-07-01

    Transmission of drug susceptible and drug resistant TB occurs in health care facilities, and community and households settings, particularly in highly prevalent TB and HIV areas. There is a paucity of data regarding factors that may affect TB transmission risk in household settings. We evaluated air exchange and the impact of natural ventilation on estimated TB transmission risk in traditional Zulu homes in rural South Africa. We utilized a carbon dioxide decay technique to measure ventilation in air changes per hour (ACH). We evaluated predominant home types to determine factors affecting ACH and used the Wells-Riley equation to estimate TB transmission risk. Two hundred eighteen ventilation measurements were taken in 24 traditional homes. All had low ventilation at baseline when windows were closed (mean ACH = 3, SD = 3.0), with estimated TB transmission risk of 55.4% over a ten hour period of exposure to an infectious TB patient. There was significant improvement with opening windows and door, reaching a mean ACH of 20 (SD = 13.1, p ventilation conditions (windows/doors open) and window to volume ratio. Expanding ventilation increased the odds of achieving ≥12 ACH by 60-fold. There is high estimated risk of TB transmission in traditional homes of infectious TB patients in rural South Africa. Improving natural ventilation may decrease household TB transmission risk and, combined with other strategies, may enhance TB control efforts.

  4. Numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple three-storey atrium building and thermal comfort evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Oosthuizen, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation and thermal comfort evaluation in a simple three-storey atrium building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy was undertaken using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model. The Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) modeling approach with the SST-k–ω turbulence model and the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM) was used for the numerical investigations. The steady-state governing equations were solved using a commercial solver FLUENT©. Various flow situations of the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in the building during day and night time were examined. The numerical results obtained for the airflow rates, airflow patterns and temperature distributions inside the building are presented in this paper. Using the numerical results, the well-known thermal comfort indices PMV (predicted mean vote) and PPD (predicted percentage of dissatisfied) were calculated for the evaluation of the thermal comfort conditions in the occupied regions of the building. It was noticed that thermal conditions prevailing in the occupied areas of the building as a result of using the buoyancy-driven ventilation were mostly in comfort zone. From the study of the night time ventilation, it was found that hot water (80 °C) circulation (heated by solar collectors during daytime) along the chimney walls during night time and heat sources present in the building can be useful in inducing night ventilation airflows in the building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy. -- Highlights: • A simple three-storey atrium building. • Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven ventilation flow in the building. • Effect of solar intensity and geographical location on ventilation. • CFD predictions were used to calculate thermal comfort indices. • Evaluation of thermal comfort conditions for the occupants

  5. Identification of Natural Ventilation Parameters in a Greenhouse with Continuous Roof Vents, Using a PSO and GAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhafid HASNI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although natural ventilation plays an important role in the affecting greenhouse climate, as defined by temperature, humidity and CO2 concentration, particularly in Mediterranean countries, little information and data are presently available on full-scale greenhouse ventilation mechanisms. In this paper, we present a new method for selecting the parameters based on a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm and a genetic algorithm (GA which optimize the choice of parameters by minimizing a cost function. The simulator was based on a published model with some minor modifications as we were interested in the parameter of ventilation. The function is defined by a reduced model that could be used to simulate and predict the greenhouse environment, as well as the tuning methods to compute their parameters. This study focuses on the dynamic behavior of the inside air temperature and humidity during ventilation. Our approach is validated by comparison with some experimental results. Various experimental techniques were used to make full-scale measurements of the air exchange rate in a 400 m2 plastic greenhouse. The model which we propose based on natural ventilation parameters optimized by a particle swarm optimization was compared with the measurements results. Furthermore, the PSO and the GA are used to identify the natural ventilation parameters in a greenhouse. In all cases, identification goal is successfully achieved using the PSO and compared with that obtained using the GA. For the problem at hand, it is found that the PSO outperforms the GA.

  6. A naturally ventilated accumulator for integrating measurements of radon flux from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Weihai; Furukawa, Masahide; Tokonami, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    For long-term and large-scale measurements of the averaged 222 Rn fluxes from soils in the general environmental conditions, a simple measuring method was developed. 222 Rn exhaling from soils is accumulated by a naturally ventilated accumulator (NVA) and its concentration is measured with passive 222 Rn monitors set inside the NVA. The ventilation rate of the NVA is about 0.26 h -1 and it is hardly affected by the changes of meteorological conditions during field measurements. The air and soil conditions inside and outside of the NVA are nearly the same throughout the measurements. It indicates that the natural conditions of soils will not be significantly disturbed by the NVA. Field measurements confirmed that soil 222 Rn fluxes measured by the new method were in general agreement with the results measured by another commonly used method and theoretical estimations. As no electric power is needed as well as the operation and maintenance are easy, the low-cost system offers a promise as an improved technique for long-term measurements of soil 222 Rn fluxes in the general environmental conditions. (author)

  7. Airborne microorganisms cultivable on naturally ventilated document repositories of the National Archive of Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Sofía; Perdomo, Ivette

    2016-02-01

    The quality of the indoor air can provide very useful information for the artwork conservation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the microbial concentration inside six document repositories of the National Archive of the Republic of Cuba in two months of 1 year. The repositories are large, high, and have a natural cross-ventilation system. The microbial sampling was done in July 2010 (summer or rainy month) and February 2011 (winter or dry month) using the SAS Super 100 biocollector at 100 L/min. An appropriate selective culture media were used to isolate fungi and bacteria. A high total microbial concentration on the north side of the building in two studied months was observed. The fungal concentrations were significantly higher in July 2010 in all repositories, while the bacterial concentrations were significantly higher mostly in February 2011 only in repositories located on the first and second floor of the building. Eight fungal genera in the indoor air of all environments were isolated. Regardless of the side of the analyzed building, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium were the predominant genera. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were the species isolated in almost all of the analyzed repositories in the studied months. Gram-positive bacteria prevailed among bacterial groups isolated from indoor air repositories, and some percentages corresponded to the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. In Cuba, the temperature and relative humidity are high during the whole year but the natural ventilation plays an important role in retarding microbial growth on materials.

  8. Novel approach for evaluation of air change rate in naturally ventilated occupied spaces based on metabolic CO2 time variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Markov, Detelin G.

    2014-01-01

    IAQ in many residential buildings relies on non-organized natural ventilation. Accurate evaluation of air change rate (ACR) in this situation is difficult due to the nature of the phenomenon - intermittent infiltration-exfiltration periods of mass exchange between the room air and the outdoor air...... at low rate. This paper describes a new approach for ACR evaluation in naturally ventilated occupied spaces. Actual metabolic CO2 time variation record in an interval of time is compared with the computed variation of metabolic CO2 for the same time interval under reference conditions: sleeping occupants...

  9. A concept of external aerodynamic elements in improving the performance of natural smoke ventilation in wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyński, Wojciech; Krajewski, Grzegorz; Kimbar, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a proposal of a new device that may be used as a component of natural smoke ventilation systems - an external aerodynamic baffle used to limit the wind effect at the most adverse angle. Natural ventilation is not only affected by the external wind, but also dependent on the angle of wind attack. It has been proven, that at angles between 45° to 60° the performance of such device is the lowest. This is the reason why additional device is proposed - external baffle that could hypothetically increase the performance at chosen angles. The purpose of this paper is to explore this idea by numerical modelling of such external elements on a validated natural ventilator model, with use of ANSYS® Fluent® CFD model.

  10. The effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.; Socolow, R.

    1992-01-01

    In contradiction to the widely held assumption that ventilation is ineffective as a means of reducing indoor radon concentrations, experiments in a research house have shown that the basement radon level can be reduced by a factor of 5-10 using only natural ventilation. Measurements of the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the radon entry rate show that this unexpectedly large reduction in indoor radon levels is caused by two complementary physical processes. The first mechanism is the obvious one: dilution. Radon concentrations are lowered by the addition of uncontaminated outdoor air. The second mechanism is less evident: an open basement window reduces basement depressurisation. This decreases the rate at which radon-laden soil gas is drawn into the house. It was also found that the radon entry rate is a linear function of basement depressurisation up to a differential pressure of about 4 Pa, as would be expected for laminar soil gas flow; opening two basement windows approximately doubles the building air exchange rate and reduces the radon entry rate by up to a factor of 5. (author)

  11. The Impact of Roof Pitch and Ceiling Insulation on Cooling Load of Naturally-Ventilated Attics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxia Gu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A 2D unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD model is employed to simulate buoyancy-driven turbulent ventilation in attics with different pitch values and ceiling insulation levels under summer conditions. The impacts of roof pitch and ceiling insulation on the cooling load of gable-roof residential buildings are investigated based on the simulation of turbulent air flow and natural convection heat transfer in attic spaces with roof pitches from 3/12 to 18/12 combined with ceiling insulation levels from R-1.2 to R-40. The modeling results show that the air flows in the attics are steady and exhibit a general streamline pattern that is qualitatively insensitive to the investigated variations of roof pitch and ceiling insulation. Furthermore, it is predicted that the ceiling insulation plays a control role on the attic cooling load and that an increase of roof pitch from 3/12 to 8/12 results in a decrease in the cooling load by around 9% in the investigated cases. The results suggest that the increase of roof pitch alone, without changing other design parameters, has limited impact on attics cooling load and airflow pattern. The research results also suggest both the predicted ventilating mass flow rate and attic cooling load can be satisfactorily correlated by simple relationships in terms of appropriately defined Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers.

  12. An analytical and numerical study of solar chimney use for room natural ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassiouny, Ramadan; Koura, Nader S.A. [Department of Mechanical Power Engineering and Energy, Minia University, Minia 61111 (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The solar chimney concept used for improving room natural ventilation was analytically and numerically studied. The study considered some geometrical parameters such as chimney inlet size and width, which are believed to have a significant effect on space ventilation. The numerical analysis was intended to predict the flow pattern in the room as well as in the chimney. This would help optimizing design parameters. The results were compared with available published experimental and theoretical data. There was an acceptable trend match between the present analytical results and the published data for the room air change per hour, ACH. Further, it was noticed that the chimney width has a more significant effect on ACH compared to the chimney inlet size. The results showed that the absorber average temperature could be correlated to the intensity as: (T{sub w} = 3.51I{sup 0.461}) with an accepted range of approximation error. In addition the average air exit velocity was found to vary with the intensity as ({nu}{sub ex} = 0.013I{sup 0.4}). (author)

  13. A numerical study on the influence of slope and curvature on smoke flow in special section tunnel with natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhou; Zhou, Xianping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Ya; Liu, Wanfu; Hong, Li

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a special section tunnel model was established by using FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). The influences of lope and curvature on smoke flow under natural ventilation have been studied. The results showed that under the condition of natural ventilation, the slope has some influences on the smoke flow in special section tunnel. The smoke spreading speed is accelerated along the upstream direction and decrease along the downstream direction due to buoyancy effect of slope. The steeper the tunnel, the more obvious the buoyancy effect. The curvature has little effect on the flow of flue gas.

  14. Feedback effect of human physical and psychological adaption on time period of thermal adaption in naturally ventilated building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Huangfu, Hao; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This study proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption for occupants in naturally ventilated building, and analyzed the synergistic and separate feedback effect of the physical and psychological adaption modes on the time period of thermal adaption. Using the method, the values...... of the time period of thermal adaption were obtained on the basis of the data from a long-term field survey conducted in two typical naturally ventilated offices located in Changsha, China. The results showed that the occupants need to take 4.25 days to fully adapt to a step-change in outdoor air temperature...

  15. Natural ventilation without air breathing in the top openings of highway tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sike; Jin, Jiali; Gong, Yanfeng

    2017-05-01

    A number of urban shallow-buried highway tunnels have been built in China. Despite much better internal air quality compared to the traditional tunnels, there is no sufficient theoretical ground or experimental support for the construction of such tunnels. Most researchers hold that natural ventilation in such tunnels depends on air breathing in the top openings, but some others are skeptical about this conclusion. By flow visualization technology on a tunnel experiment platform, we tested the characteristics of airflow in the top openings of highway tunnels. The results showed that air always flowed from outside to inside in all top openings above a continuous traffic stream, and the openings did not breathe at all. In addition, intake air in the top openings reached its maximum velocity at the tunnel entrance, and then gradually slowed down with tunnel depth increasing.

  16. Environmental performance of a naturally ventilated city centre library; Milieuprestatie van een natuurlijk geventileerde stadsbibliotheek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausse, B.; Cook, M.; Lomas, K.

    2008-03-15

    To tackle climate change it is essential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. To this end, it is important to reduce the energy demands of nondomestic buildings. Naturally ventilated buildings can have low energy demands but the strategy is difficult to implement in deep plan, urban sites. The Frederick Lanchester Library at Coventry University, UK, incorporates natural ventilation, daylighting and passive cooling strategies. By using lightwells and perimeter stacks to supply and exhaust air, it can be ventilated by natural means despite its deep plan form and sealed facade. This paper describes the building and presents the energy consumption and the internal temperatures and CO2 levels recorded in 2004/2005. The building's performance is compared to the original design criteria and good practice guidelines. Recommendations for the design of such buildings are made and the likely performance in other UK cities is assessed. It is concluded that the building uses under half the energy of a standard airconditioned building and yet, in summer, can keep the interior comfortable and up to 5C below ambient. The design would perform equally well in the typical weather conditions experienced at 13 other UK cities, but not in London. It is concluded that deep-plan, naturally ventilated buildings with sealed facades, if well designed, could maintain thermal comfort in all but a very few UK sites, whilst consuming much less energy than even good practice standards. [Dutch] Natuurlijk geventileerde gebouwen kunnen een lage energievraag hebben. Het is echter moeilijk om deze strategie te implementeren in gebouwen in stedelijke gebieden met een, in verhouding, diepe plattegrond. De Frederick Lanchester Bibliotheek op de Coventry Universiteit in het Verenigd Koninkrijk brengt natuudijke ventilatie, daglicht en passieve koeling samen tot een geheel. Door gebruik te maken van een atrium en ventilatieschachten voor de toevoer en afvoer van lucht, kan er op een natuurlijke wijze

  17. The effects of uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation: a clinical experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluhan, Ahmet; Şalvız, Mehti; Bozdemir, Kazım; Kanbak, Orhan; Ulu, Mustafa; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Bilgen, Akif Sinan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of uncinectomy without sinusotomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation in chronic rhinosinusitis. Twenty patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients with uncinectomy (n = 10), while group 2 was made up of patients treated with natural ostial dilatation (n = 10). The CO(2) tension and pressure levels of the maxillary sinus during inspiration and expiration phases were obtained and compared before and after the procedures within and between the groups. The mean CO(2) tension levels in both groups were significantly decreased after the procedures. The mean maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration was significantly decreased to a negative value after uncinectomy; however, no significant change was observed during expiration. There were no significant changes in maxillary sinus pressures after natural ostial dilatation procedure. Both uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation seem to be equally effective in decreasing maxillary sinus pCO(2) levels. The effects of decreased maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration after uncinectomy on mucociliary clearance and development mechanisms of chronic rhinosinusitis seem to be worth investigating.

  18. A Review on Natural Ventilation-enabling Façade Noise Control Devices for Congested High-Rise Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Keung Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current status of the research and development of natural ventilation-enabling noise control devices for use on the façades of high-rise residential buildings in congested cities. These devices are important for a sustainable urbanized city, as they are supposed to offer good acoustical protection to citizens, allowing for an acceptable level of natural ventilation inside residential units; energy for mechanical ventilation can then be saved. From the information presented in the existing literature, it is concluded that protrusive devices, such as lintels and balconies, are not effective noise screening devices, even if they are installed with sound absorbers and/or reflectors, under the effect of city reverberation. On the contrary, plenum windows and similar structures, which are plenum structures with a staggered air inlet and outlet, are interesting alternatives that are worth rigorous considerations.

  19. Occupant Interactions and Effectiveness of Natural Ventilation Strategies in Contemporary New Housing in Scotland, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Tim; Farren, Paul; Howieson, Stirling; Tuohy, Paul; McQuillan, Jonathan

    2015-07-21

    The need to reduce carbon emissions and fuel poverty has led to increased building envelope air tightness, intended to reduce uncontrolled ventilation heat losses. Ventilation strategies in dwellings still allow the use of trickle ventilators in window frames for background ventilation. The extent to which this results in "healthy" Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) in recently constructed dwellings was a concern of regulators in Scotland. This paper describes research to explore this. First a review of literature was conducted, then data on occupant interactions with ventilation provisions (windows, doors, trickle vents) gathered through an interview-based survey of 200 recently constructed dwellings, and measurements made on a sample of 40 of these. The main measured parameter discussed here is CO2 concentration. It was concluded after the literature review that 1000 ppm absolute was a reasonable threshold to use for "adequate" ventilation. The occupant survey found that there was very little occupant interaction with the trickle ventilators e.g., in bedrooms 63% were always closed, 28% always open, and in only 9% of cases occupants intervened to make occasional adjustments. In the measured dwellings average bedroom CO2 levels of 1520 ppm during occupied (night time) hours were observed. Where windows were open the average bedroom CO2 levels were 972 ppm. With windows closed, the combination of "trickle ventilators open plus doors open" gave an average of 1021 ppm. "Trickle ventilators open" gave an average of 1571 ppm. All other combinations gave averages of 1550 to 2000 ppm. Ventilation rates and air change rates were estimated from measured CO2 levels, for all dwellings calculated ventilation rate was less than 8 L/s/p, in 42% of cases calculated air change rate was less than 0.5 ach. It was concluded that trickle ventilation as installed and used is ineffective in meeting desired ventilation rates, evidenced by high CO2 levels reported across the sampled dwellings

  20. On the effect of wind direction and urban surroundings on natural ventilation of a large semi-enclosed stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Natural ventilation of buildings refers to the replacement of indoor air with outdoor air due to pressure differences caused by wind and/or buoyancy. It is often expressed in terms of the air change rate per hour (ACH). The pressure differences created by the wind depend – among others – on the wind

  1. Use of CO2 feedback as a retrofit solution for improving air quality in naturally ventilated classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Faria Da Silva, Nuno Alexandre

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors that provide a green/yellow/red visual indication were installed in pairs of naturally ventilated classrooms during normal school operation. During a two-week period in the heating and the cooling season, teachers and students were instructed to open the windows in re...

  2. Methods for measuring gas emissions from naturally ventilated livestock buildings: Developments over the last decade and perspectives for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogink, N.W.M.; Mosquera Losada, J.; Calvet, S.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are: 1) to give an overview of the development of methods for measuring emission rates from naturally ventilated livestock buildings over the last decade, 2) to identify and evaluate strengths and weaknesses, 3) to summarise and conclude the current state-of-art of

  3. Ultrafine and fine particle formation in a naturally ventilated office as a result of reactions between ozone and scented products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Dijken, F. v.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafine and fine particle formation as a result of chemical reactions between ozone and four different air fresheners and a typical lemon-scented domestic cleaner was studied in a fully furnished, naturally ventilated office. The study showed that under conditions representative of those...

  4. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions...

  5. Optimization of a solar chimney design to enhance natural ventilation in a multi-storey office building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontikaki, M.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Hoes, P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural ventilation of buildings can be achieved with solar-driven, buoyancy-induced airflow through a solar chimney channel. Research on solar chimneys has covered a wide range of topics, yet study of the integration in multi-storey buildings has been performed in few numerical studies, where

  6. Numerical analysis of the performance of a venturi-shaped roof for natural ventilation : influence of building width

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Aanen, L.; Bronsema, B.

    2012-01-01

    A numerical analysis with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is performed to investigate the influence of building width on the performance of a venturi-shaped roof (called Ventec roof) for natural ventilation. The specific roof configuration is intended to create an underpressure in the narrowest

  7. Indoor air quality and occupant satisfaction in five mechanically and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelgaard, J.; Juhl, P.; Saebjornsson, K.O.

    2007-01-01

    Occupant responses and indoor environment characteristics were recorded and compared in five mechanically and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings by using a simple approach that enabled us to survey many buildings simultaneously. All occupant responses were obtained during one...

  8. Design Principles for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system -Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and - principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  9. On buoyancy-driven natural ventilation of a room with a heated floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Charlotte; Woods, Andrew W.

    2001-08-01

    The natural ventilation of a room, both with a heated floor and connected to a cold exterior through two openings, is investigated by combining quantitative models with analogue laboratory experiments. The heated floor generates an areal source of buoyancy while the openings allow displacement ventilation to operate. When combined, these produce a steady state in which the air in the room is well-mixed, and the heat provided by the floor equals the heat lost by displacement. We develop a quantitative model describing this process, in which the advective heat transfer through the openings is balanced with the heat flux supplied at the floor. This model is successfully tested with observations from small-scale analogue laboratory experiments. We compare our results with the steady-state flow associated with a point source of buoyancy: for a given applied heat flux, an areal source produces heated air of lower temperature but a greater volume flux of air circulates through the room. We generalize the model to account for the effects of (i) a cooled roof as well as a heated floor, and (ii) an external wind or temperature gradient. In the former case, the direction of the flow through the openings depends on the temperature of the exterior air relative to an averaged roof and floor temperature. In the latter case, the flow is either buoyancy dominated or wind dominated depending on the strength of the pressure associated with the wind. Furthermore, there is an intermediate multiple-solution regime in which either flow regime may develop.

  10. Non-destructive characterization of materials by single-sided NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goga, Nicolae-Octavian

    2007-01-01

    The experiments conducted in this work demonstrate the efficiency and sensitivity of single-sided NMR for investigating macromolecular materials on large time and length scales. Elastomers can readily be characterized by unilateral NMR of protons in terms of a variety of parameters, which correlate with the overall molecular mobility. In this way information about the cross-link density, state of cure and strain, the effects of aging and product heterogeneity can obtained. For these purposes, the NMR-MOUSE was used to optimize product development and to monitor product and production quality on-line. The sensor is also suitable for nondestructive probing of the mechanical deformation in cross-linked elastomers. A special magnet design that fits a stress-strain device has been used for complementary investigation of a series of different rubber stripes during mechanical testing. The profile NMR-MOUSE was found to be a unique tool for the characterization of changes induced by the UV irradiation in natural rubber. The aging profiles were interpreted for the first time based on a novel model in which the radiation absorption coefficient depends on the depth in the sample. (orig.)

  11. Non-destructive characterization of materials by single-sided NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goga, Nicolae-Octavian

    2007-08-20

    The experiments conducted in this work demonstrate the efficiency and sensitivity of single-sided NMR for investigating macromolecular materials on large time and length scales. Elastomers can readily be characterized by unilateral NMR of protons in terms of a variety of parameters, which correlate with the overall molecular mobility. In this way information about the cross-link density, state of cure and strain, the effects of aging and product heterogeneity can obtained. For these purposes, the NMR-MOUSE was used to optimize product development and to monitor product and production quality on-line. The sensor is also suitable for nondestructive probing of the mechanical deformation in cross-linked elastomers. A special magnet design that fits a stress-strain device has been used for complementary investigation of a series of different rubber stripes during mechanical testing. The profile NMR-MOUSE was found to be a unique tool for the characterization of changes induced by the UV irradiation in natural rubber. The aging profiles were interpreted for the first time based on a novel model in which the radiation absorption coefficient depends on the depth in the sample. (orig.)

  12. The Sound Quality of Cochlear Implants: Studies With Single-sided Deaf Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Michael F; Natale, Sarah Cook; Butts, Austin M; Zeitler, Daniel M; Carlson, Matthew L

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to assess the sound quality of a cochlear implant for single-sided deaf (SSD) patients fit with a cochlear implant (CI). One of the fundamental, unanswered questions in CI research is "what does an implant sound like?" Conventional CI patients must use the memory of a clean signal, often decades old, to judge the sound quality of their CIs. In contrast, SSD-CI patients can rate the similarity of a clean signal presented to the CI ear and candidate, CI-like signals presented to the ear with normal hearing. For Experiment 1 four types of stimuli were created for presentation to the normal hearing ear: noise vocoded signals, sine vocoded signals, frequency shifted, sine vocoded signals and band-pass filtered, natural speech signals. Listeners rated the similarity of these signals to unmodified signals sent to the CI on a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being a complete match to the CI signal. For Experiment 2 multitrack signal mixing was used to create natural speech signals that varied along multiple dimensions. In Experiment 1 for eight adult SSD-CI listeners, the best median similarity rating to the sound of the CI for noise vocoded signals was 1.9; for sine vocoded signals 2.9; for frequency upshifted signals, 1.9; and for band pass filtered signals, 5.5. In Experiment 2 for three young listeners, combinations of band pass filtering and spectral smearing lead to ratings of 10. The sound quality of noise and sine vocoders does not generally correspond to the sound quality of cochlear implants fit to SSD patients. Our preliminary conclusion is that natural speech signals that have been muffled to one degree or another by band pass filtering and/or spectral smearing provide a close, but incomplete, match to CI sound quality for some patients.

  13. Environmental Noise Exposure On Occupants In Naturally Ventilated Open-Plan Offices Case Of Selected Offices In Kumasi Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koranteng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of buildings in public educational institutions in Ghana predominantly adopts open-plan offices that are naturally ventilated with the aid of operable windows for reasons such as achieving adaptable spaces improved social climate and effective ventilation. However adoption of open-plan naturally ventilated offices in these educational institutions expose occupants to noise that emanates indoors and from outdoor sources which can interfere with and impede work performance. The study aimed at assessing noise exposure levels and occupants satisfaction with noise level in selected naturally ventilated open-plan offices in Ghana. The study employed an empirical assessment of the noise levels in and around three of the office buildings using a PCE222 Digital Sound Level Meter and a survey involving interviews to assess workers satisfaction of noise levels of the open-plan offices at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi. The results show that mean outdoor noise levels for offices ranged from 11 per cent below to 5 per cent above the WHO permissible limits while mean indoor noise levels exceeded the limit by between 20-40 per cent during the course of the day. In spite of the high levels of noise occupants generally considered the overall noise level in their offices as acceptable. Likewise the results indicate that there are no significant differences in occupants exposure to noise from their various sitting positions in an office space and floor levels in an office building. The paper recommends strategies to manage and improve ambient noise quality within naturally ventilated open-plan office spaces in Ghana. The study will be of relevance as a useful guide to organizations and policy makers concerned with built environmental issues.

  14. The Impact of an Extensive Usage of Controlled Natural Ventilation in the Residential Sector on Large-Scale Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan

    The energy situation in the world is becoming alarming. The demand of electricity continues to grow whereas the means of production remain limited. In addition, the electricity generation in the world is mostly based on fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas. Only a small share of the total...... to the atmosphere. On the other hand, the efficiency of the end-use energy consumption is also fundamental to decrease the electricity production thus to lower the emission of greenhouse gases. Thereby, the building sector is a very important target because it consumes approximately one quarter of the total annual...... be reflected in the reduction of the electricity production. The objective of the thesis is to show realistic benefits of utilizing natural ventilation at an extensive manner onto large-scale scenarios such as a national scenario by using a model of natural ventilation developed here. To do so, a building...

  15. Occupant Interactions and Effectiveness of Natural Ventilation Strategies in Contemporary New Housing in Scotland, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Sharpe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The need to reduce carbon emissions and fuel poverty has led to increased building envelope air tightness, intended to reduce uncontrolled ventilation heat losses. Ventilation strategies in dwellings still allow the use of trickle ventilators in window frames for background ventilation. The extent to which this results in “healthy” Indoor Air Quality (IAQ in recently constructed dwellings was a concern of regulators in Scotland. This paper describes research to explore this. First a review of literature was conducted, then data on occupant interactions with ventilation provisions (windows, doors, trickle vents gathered through an interview-based survey of 200 recently constructed dwellings, and measurements made on a sample of 40 of these. The main measured parameter discussed here is CO2 concentration. It was concluded after the literature review that 1000 ppm absolute was a reasonable threshold to use for “adequate” ventilation. The occupant survey found that there was very little occupant interaction with the trickle ventilators e.g., in bedrooms 63% were always closed, 28% always open, and in only 9% of cases occupants intervened to make occasional adjustments. In the measured dwellings average bedroom CO2 levels of 1520 ppm during occupied (night time hours were observed. Where windows were open the average bedroom CO2 levels were 972 ppm. With windows closed, the combination of “trickle ventilators open plus doors open” gave an average of 1021 ppm. “Trickle ventilators open” gave an average of 1571 ppm. All other combinations gave averages of 1550 to 2000 ppm. Ventilation rates and air change rates were estimated from measured CO2 levels, for all dwellings calculated ventilation rate was less than 8 L/s/p, in 42% of cases calculated air change rate was less than 0.5 ach. It was concluded that trickle ventilation as installed and used is ineffective in meeting desired ventilation rates, evidenced by high CO2 levels reported

  16. Diesel oil pool fire characteristic under natural ventilation conditions in tunnels with roof openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfu; Jiang, Juncheng; Zhu, Dezhi

    2009-07-15

    In order to research the fire characteristic under natural ventilation conditions in tunnels with roof openings, full-scale experiment of tunnel fire is designed and conducted. All the experimental data presented in this paper can be further applied for validation of numerical simulation models and reduced-scale experimental results. The physical model of tunnel with roof openings and the mathematical model of tunnel fire are presented in this paper. The tunnel fire under the same conditions as experiment is simulated using CFD software. From the results, it can be seen that most smoke is discharged directly off the tunnel through roof openings, so roof openings are favorable for exhausting smoke. But along with the decrease of smoke temperatures, some smoke may backflow and mix with the smoke-free layer below, which leads to fall in visibility and is unfavorable for personnel evacuation. So it is necessary to research more efficient ways for improving the smoke removal efficiency, such as early fire detection systems, adequate warning signs and setting tunnel cap.

  17. NATURAL VENTILATION: A PASSIVE DESIGN STRATEGY IN DESIGNING HOTEL LOBBIES – CASES FROM TROPICAL MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Malik Abdul Rahman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available When the Malaysian government increased electricity tariff by up to 12% in early 2006 and also another increase in early July 2008, most commercial buildings were affected by the move. The hardest hit would be the hotel industry as they are among the economic forefronts of the nation. Already burdened with the rigorous efforts of filling their rooms with guests, they now have to re-strategize to sustain business. Energy bills to pay for cooling have always been the biggest burden. Cooling the air is an intangible and a never-ending wasteful activity. Cold room for food is on for 24 hours for obvious reasons. To overcome this, one strategy was considered to be part and parcel of the overall building design so as to contribute to the reduction of the high dependency of energy consumption for cooling. The challenge here is to reduce electricity consumption without compromising the comfort of the guests and also reduce the overhead costs to give a more competitive edge in hotel room rates. Among other passive design elements this paper considers two natural ventilation occurrences and locations that can be relied upon for Malaysian hotel designs.

  18. Synergic effects of thermal mass and natural ventilation on the thermal behaviour of traditional massive buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A.; Nocera, F.; Patania, F.; Moschella, A.; Detommaso, M.; Evola, G.

    2016-05-01

    The energy policies about energy efficiency in buildings currently focus on new buildings and on existing buildings in case of energy retrofit. However, historic and heritage buildings, that are the trademark of numerous European cities, should also deserve attention; nevertheless, their energy efficiency is nowadays not deeply investigated. In this context, this study evaluates the thermal performance of a traditional massive building situated in a Mediterranean city. Dynamic numerical simulations were carried out on a yearly basis through the software DesignBuilder, both in free-running conditions and in the presence of an air-conditioning (AC) system. The results highlight that the massive envelope of traditional residential buildings helps in maintaining small fluctuations of the indoor temperature, thus limiting the need for AC in the mid-season and in summer. This feature is highly emphasised by exploiting natural ventilation at night, which allows reducing the building energy demand for cooling by about 30%.The research also indicates that, for Mediterranean climate, the increase in thermal insulation does not always induce positive effects on the thermal performance in summer, and that it might even produce an increase in the heat loads due to the transmission through the envelope.

  19. Implications of natural occlusion of ventilated racks on ammonia and sanitation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Michelle A; Petty, Joann; Martin, Tara; Bergdall, Valerie; Hickman-Davis, Judy M

    2014-03-01

    Examination of ventilated rat racks prior to semiannual sanitation revealed silicone nozzles and ventilation ports that were partially or completely occluded with granular debris. We subsequently sought to document performance standards for rack sanitation and investigate the effect of ventilation port occlusion on rack function and animal husbandry practices. We hypothesized that individually ventilated cages with occluded airflow would require more frequent cage changes, comparable to those for static cages (that is, every 3 to 4 d). Sprague-Dawley rats were housed under one of 4 conditions: no airflow occlusion, occluded air-supply inlet, occluded air-exhaust outlet, and occlusion of both inlet and outlet. Cages were changed when daily ammonia concentration exceeded 20 ppm or after 14 d had elapsed. Most cages with unoccluded or partial airflow occlusion remained below the 20 ppm limit until day 12 or 13. Cages with occlusion of both inlet and outlet exceeded 20 ppm ammonia by as early as day 5. Airflow was significantly lower in cages with occlusion of both inlet and outlet airflow. Weekly inspection revealed that occlusion of ventilation ports was detectable by 3 mo after semiannual sanitation. This study demonstrates that silicone nozzles should be removed prior to rack sanitation to improve the effectiveness of cleaning ventilation ports and nozzles. While the rack is in use, silicone nozzles and ventilation ports should be inspected regularly to identify occlusion that is likely to diminish environmental quality in the cage. Intracage ammonia levels are significantly higher when both inlet and outlet airflow are occluded.

  20. The role of natural ventilation in the exposure to radon in the Postojna Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, A.; Smerajec, M.; Vaupotič, J.

    2012-04-01

    Postojna Cave is the biggest of 21 show caves in Slovenia and one of present day's most visited show caves in the world. Long and branched out cave system, large entrances at different levels, inflow of the Pivka river, and large variation of the outdoor air temperature and precipitation, make the Postojna Cave also a very complex climatic system in which each part shows different conditions. The cave is only naturally ventilated and it is therefore characterised by high radon concentration, which depends on the ventilation regime in different seasons, resulting in typical annual cycles of radon levels in the cave air. Postojna Cave is a typical horizontal cave, where the difference between outside and cave air temperature represents the main driving force for air circulation. In winter, when the cave temperature is higher than outside, cave air is released from the cave into the outdoor atmosphere due to the air draught caused by the 'chimney effect', thus allowing fresh and cold outdoor air to enter the cave through low lying openings. This effect is not operative in summer, when the outside temperature is higher than in the cave, and air draught is minimal or reversed. In addition, air circulation can be locally altered due to other processes, like changing level of Pivka river during the rainy season and local geomorphologic characteristics of cave passages. High radon concentration in the Postojna Cave is the reason for thorough studies of the methodology for dose estimates of the personnel working in the cave. Due to high relative humidity and low air circulation, the cave air is characterised by very low particle concentration, which play an important role in radon dosimetry. Therefore parallel monitoring of radioactive aerosols of radon decay products (RnDP) and general (non-radioactive) aerosols in the particle size range of 10-1100 nm was performed in the air of Postojna Cave at the lowest point of tourist path in summer, winter and both transitional

  1. CFD evaluation of natural ventilation of indoor environments by the concentration decay method : CO2 gas dispersion from a semi-enclosed stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can be used to assess indoor natural ventilation by solving the interaction between the urban wind flow and the indoor airflow. The air exchange rate (ACH) can be obtained from the simulated volume flow rates through the ventilation openings or by the

  2. Natural Ventilation: A Mitigation Strategy to Reduce Overheating In Buildings under Urban Heat Island Effect in South American Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Massimo; Carrasco, Claudio; Ángel Gálvez, Miguel; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Urban heat island effect often produces an increase of overheating sensation inside of buildings. To evacuate this heat, the current use of air conditioning increases the energy consumption of buildings. As a good alternative, natural ventilation is one of the best strategies to obtain indoor comfort conditions, even in summer season, if buildings and urban designs are appropriated. In this work, the overheating risk of a small house is evaluated in four South American cities: Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso, with and without considering the UHI effect. Then, natural ventilation is assessed in order to understand the capability of this passive strategy to assure comfort inside the house. Results show that an important portion of the indoor heat can be evacuated, however the temperature rising (especially during the night) due to UHI can generate a saturation effect if appropriate technical solutions, like the increase in the air speed that can be obtained with good urban design, are not considered.

  3. Effects of air conditioning, dehumidification and natural ventilation on indoor concentrations of 222Rn and 220Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Thomas K.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2000-01-01

    A bedroom was selected for detailed measurements on 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental parameters including CO 2 concentration, temperature and relative humidity. To simulate different sealing conditions, five conditions were artificially created in the sampling period of 25 consecutive days. It was concluded that natural ventilation is the most efficient way to lower the 222 Rn levels, while air conditioning is the next. Dehumidification provides only a marginal reduction of 222 Rn levels. The 220 Rn concentrations are not affected by natural ventilation, air conditioner or dehumidification, and were all around 10 Bq m -3 . There are no significant correlations between the 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental conditions such as CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity and pressure

  4. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental study on the dynamic performance of a novel system combining natural ventilation with diffuse ceiling inlet and TABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Lei, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Dynamic experiments are performed to study energy performance of a new HVAC system. • Designed control strategies show good utilization of natural ventilation cooling. • TABS work well with the diffuse ceiling in the dynamic measurements. • No local thermal comfort problem is found...... even in the extreme winter case. • Designed control strategies can be used in the future application of this system....

  6. Single-sided sheet-to-tube spot welding investigated by 3D numerical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine; Zhang, Wenqi

    The single-sided resistance spot welding process is analyzed by a 3D numerical study of sheet-to-tube joining. Finite element simulations are carried out in SORPAS® 3D. Two levels of electrode force and five levels of welding current are simulated. The overall effects of changing current and force...

  7. Building envelope design for renewal of air by natural ventilation in moderate climates. Proposition of a designing methodology; Conception des enveloppes de batiments pour le renouvellement d'air par ventilation naturelle en climats temperes. Proposition d'une methodologie de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The subject of this research is to produce methods and methodological tools for the architects to support the integration of natural ventilation systems in the building envelope design. Our research is situated to the interface between the architectural practice and the physical research on natural ventilation. We are interested in phenomena that can influence or force the strategy of ventilation. A morphological analysis of naturally ventilated buildings concerning the integration modes of natural ventilation systems is done permitting US to propose a typology and a topology of ventilation systems. We define criteria in relation to the thermal comfort, to the quality of air and the economy of energy to assess air renewal techniques. In complement of the sizing tool, we elaborate a methodology of conception for the integration of passives ventilation systems. Design guidelines permit US to conclude on an effective natural ventilation system which is well adapted to collective habitat. (author)

  8. [Experimental study on the influence of natural and artificial ventilation on indoor radon concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remetti, R; Gigante, G E

    2010-01-01

    The study presents the results of a campaign of measurements on the daily radon concentration using a Genitron Alpha Guard spectrometer. All the measurements have been intended to highlight the radon concentration variability during the 24 hours of the day and trying to find correlations with other ambient parameters such as temperature and pressure or local conditions such as the presence or not of a forced ventilation system. The main part of the measurements have been carried in the area of the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of the Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering of "Sapienza" University of Rome. Results show a rapid rise of radon concentration in the night, when the artificial ventilation system was off and with door and windows closed. In the morning, after the opening of door and windows, the concentration falls down abruptly. With artificial ventilation system in function concentration never reaches significant values.

  9. Effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Rept. for Apr 90-Sep 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.; Socolow, R.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses the effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Contradicting the widely held assumption that ventilation is ineffective in reducing indoor radon concentrations, experiments in a research house have shown that the basement radon level can be reduced by a factor of 5 to 10 using only natural ventilation. Measurement of the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the radon entry rate shows that this unexpectedly large reduction in indoor radon levels is caused by two complementary physical processes: (1) the obvious one, dilution, which lowers radon concentrations by adding uncontaminated outdoor air; and (2) although less evident, introducing a pressure break in the system through an open basement window which, in turn, reduces the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the rate at which radon-laden soil gas is drawn into the house. The radon entry rate was found to be a linear function of basement depressurization up to a differential pressure of about 4 Pa, as would be expected for laminar soil gas flow; opening two basement windows approximately doubled the building air exchange rate and reduced the radon entry rate by up to a factor of 5

  10. Natural ventilation in an enclosure induced by a heat source distributed uniformly over a vertical wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.D.; Li, Y.; Mahoney, J. [CSIRO Building, Construction and Engineering, Advanced Thermo-Fluids Technologies Lab., Highett, VIC (Australia)

    2001-05-01

    A simple multi-layer stratification model is suggested for displacement ventilation in a single-zone building driven by a heat source distributed uniformly over a vertical wall. Theoretical expressions are obtained for the stratification interface height and ventilation flow rate and compared with those obtained by an existing model available in the literature. Experiments were also carried out using a recently developed fine-bubble modelling technique. It was shown that the experimental results obtained using the fine-bubble technique are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. (Author)

  11. : ventilators for noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauroux , Brigitte; Leroux , Karl; Desmarais , Gilbert; Isabey , Daniel; Clément , Annick; Lofaso , Frédéric; Louis , Bruno

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of all the ventilators proposed for home noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in children in France. The ventilators (one volume-targeted, 12 pressure-targeted and four dual) were evaluated on a bench which simulated six different paediatric ventilatory patterns. For each ventilator, the quality of the inspiratory and expiratory trigger and the ability to reach and maintain the preset pre...

  12. EFFECTS OF NATURAL AND FORCED BASEMENT VENTILATION ON RADON LEVELS IN SINGLE FAMILY DWELLINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives, for the first time, results of an extensive study of the effect of ventilation on radon concentrations and radon entry rate in a single-family dwelling. Measurements of radon concentrations, building dynamics, and environmental parameters made in Princeton Unive...

  13. Characterization of the Airflow from a Bottom Hung Window under Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This paper describes the results of laboratory measurements of the airflow from a bottom hung window mounted near the ceiling of a ventilated room. In the laboratory set-up it was possible to control the temperature difference and the airflow rate through the window. The pressure drop through...

  14. The influence of opening windows and doors on the natural ventilation rate of a residential building

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analysis of air exchange rates due to intentional window and door openings in a research test house located in a residential environment is presented. These data inform the development of ventilation rate control strategies as building envelopes are tightened to improve the e...

  15. Single-sided magnetic resonance profiling in biological and materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Single-sided NMR was inspired by the oil industry that strived to improve the performance of well-logging tools to measure the properties of fluids confined downhole. This unconventional way of implementing NMR, in which stray magnetic and radio frequency fields are used to recover information of arbitrarily large objects placed outside the magnet, motivated the development of handheld NMR sensors. These devices have moved the technique to different scientific disciplines. The current work gives a review of the most relevant magnets and methodologies developed to generate NMR information from spatially localized regions of samples placed in close proximity to the sensors. When carried out systematically, such measurements lead to 'single-sided depth profiles' or one-dimensional images. This paper presents recent and most relevant applications as well as future perspectives of this growing branch of MRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical bistability in a single-sided cavity coupled to a quantum channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payravi, M.; Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Nafar, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the long wavelength optical reflection and bistable behavior of an InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure coupled to a single-sided cavity. It is found that due to the presence of a strong coupling field, the reflection coefficient can be controlled at long wavelength, which is essential for adjusting the threshold of reflected optical bistability. Moreover, the phase shift features of the reflection pulse inside an electromagnetically induced transparency window are also discussed.

  17. Cochlear implant effectiveness in postlingual single-sided deaf individuals: what's the point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Mareike; Bönitz, Hanna; Lyxell, Björn; Illg, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    By extending the indication criteria for cochlear implants (CI), the population of CI candidates increased in age, as well as range and type of hearing loss. This qualitative study identified factors that contributed to seek CI treatment in single-sided deaf individuals and gained insights how single-sided deafness (SSD) and hearing with a CI affect their lives. An open-ended questionnaire and a standardised inventory (IOI-HA) were used. Qualitative data reflecting the reasons to seek CI treatment and the individual experiences after CI switch-on were collected. A total of 19 postlingually deafened single-sided deaf CI users. Participants use their CI daily and stated that their life satisfaction increased since CI activation. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed four core categories: sound localisation, tinnitus and noise sensitivity, fear to lose the second ear and quality of life. Our results show how strongly and diversely quality of hearing and quality of life is affected by acquired SSD and improved after CI activation. Our data suggest that the fear of hearing loss (HL) on the normal hearing (NH) ear is an important but so far neglected reason to seek treatment with a CI in individuals with postlingual SSD.

  18. Unified double- and single-sided homogeneous Green’s function representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Neut, Joost; Slob, Evert

    2016-01-01

    In wave theory, the homogeneous Green’s function consists of the impulse response to a point source, minus its time-reversal. It can be represented by a closed boundary integral. In many practical situations, the closed boundary integral needs to be approximated by an open boundary integral because the medium of interest is often accessible from one side only. The inherent approximations are acceptable as long as the effects of multiple scattering are negligible. However, in case of strongly inhomogeneous media, the effects of multiple scattering can be severe. We derive double- and single-sided homogeneous Green’s function representations. The single-sided representation applies to situations where the medium can be accessed from one side only. It correctly handles multiple scattering. It employs a focusing function instead of the backward propagating Green’s function in the classical (double-sided) representation. When reflection measurements are available at the accessible boundary of the medium, the focusing function can be retrieved from these measurements. Throughout the paper, we use a unified notation which applies to acoustic, quantum-mechanical, electromagnetic and elastodynamic waves. We foresee many interesting applications of the unified single-sided homogeneous Green’s function representation in holographic imaging and inverse scattering, time-reversed wave field propagation and interferometric Green’s function retrieval. PMID:27436983

  19. A single-sided representation for the homogeneous Green's function of a unified scalar wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees

    2017-06-01

    A unified scalar wave equation is formulated, which covers three-dimensional (3D) acoustic waves, 2D horizontally-polarised shear waves, 2D transverse-electric EM waves, 2D transverse-magnetic EM waves, 3D quantum-mechanical waves and 2D flexural waves. The homogeneous Green's function of this wave equation is a combination of the causal Green's function and its time-reversal, such that their singularities at the source position cancel each other. A classical representation expresses this homogeneous Green's function as a closed boundary integral. This representation finds applications in holographic imaging, time-reversed wave propagation and Green's function retrieval by cross correlation. The main drawback of the classical representation in those applications is that it requires access to a closed boundary around the medium of interest, whereas in many practical situations the medium can be accessed from one side only. Therefore, a single-sided representation is derived for the homogeneous Green's function of the unified scalar wave equation. Like the classical representation, this single-sided representation fully accounts for multiple scattering. The single-sided representation has the same applications as the classical representation, but unlike the classical representation it is applicable in situations where the medium of interest is accessible from one side only.

  20. Natural history of dental plaque accumulation in mechanically ventilated adults: a descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Munro, Cindy L; Grap, Mary Jo

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of dental plaque accumulation in mechanically ventilated adults. Accumulation of dental plaque and bacterial colonisation of the oropharynx is associated with a number of systemic diseases including ventilator associated pneumonia. Data were collected from mechanically ventilated critically ill adults (n=137), enrolled within 24 hours of intubation. Dental plaque, counts of decayed, missing and filled teeth and systemic antibiotic use was assessed on study days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Dental plaque averages per study day, tooth type and tooth location were analysed. Medical respiratory, surgical trauma and neuroscience ICU's of a large tertiary care centre in the southeast United States. Plaque: all surfaces >60% plaque coverage from day 1 to day 7; molars and premolars contained greatest plaque average >70%. Systemic antibiotic use on day 1 had no significant effect on plaque accumulation on day 3 (p=0.73). Patients arrive in critical care units with preexisting oral hygiene issues. Dental plaque tends to accumulate in the posterior teeth (molars and premolars) that may be hard for nurses to visualise and reach; this problem may be exacerbated by endotracheal tubes and other equipment. Knowing accumulation trends of plaque will guide the development of effective oral care protocols. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Experimental Study of a natural ventilation strategy in a Full-Scale Enclosure Under Meteorological Conditions: A Buoyancy-Driven Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Miguel Chen; Bruneau, Denis; Sempey, Alain; Mora, Laurent; Sommier, Alain

    2018-01-01

    The performance of a natural ventilation strategy, in a full-scale enclosure under meteorological conditions is studied through an experimental study, a buoyancy-driven approach, by means of the estimation of the air exchange rate per hour and ventilation power. A theoretical and an empirical model are proposed based on the airflow theory in buildings and blower-door tests. A preliminary validation, by comparing our results with standards in air leakage rate determination, is made. The experi...

  2. Ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossler

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with - controlled area ventilation systems - ventilation systems for switchgear-building and control-room - other ventilation systems for safety equipments - service systems for ventilation systems. (orig./RW)

  3. Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventilation is a life support treatment. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that helps people breathe when ... to breathe enough on their own. The mechanical ventilator is also called a ventilator , respirator, or breathing ...

  4. Incorporating single-side sparing in models for predicting parotid dose sparing in head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Lulin; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, David; Jiang, Yuliang; Ge, Yaorong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Sparing of single-side parotid gland is a common practice in head-and-neck (HN) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. It is a special case of dose sparing tradeoff between different organs-at-risk. The authors describe an improved mathematical model for predicting achievable dose sparing in parotid glands in HN IMRT planning that incorporates single-side sparing considerations based on patient anatomy and learning from prior plan data. Methods: Among 68 HN cases analyzed retrospectively, 35 cases had physician prescribed single-side parotid sparing preferences. The single-side sparing model was trained with cases which had single-side sparing preferences, while the standard model was trained with the remainder of cases. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the best criterion that separates the two case groups using the physician's single-side sparing prescription as ground truth. The final predictive model (combined model) takes into account the single-side sparing by switching between the standard and single-side sparing models according to the single-side sparing criterion. The models were tested with 20 additional cases. The significance of the improvement of prediction accuracy by the combined model over the standard model was evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Using the ROC analysis, the best single-side sparing criterion is (1) the predicted median dose of one parotid is higher than 24 Gy; and (2) that of the other is higher than 7 Gy. This criterion gives a true positive rate of 0.82 and a false positive rate of 0.19, respectively. For the bilateral sparing cases, the combined and the standard models performed equally well, with the median of the prediction errors for parotid median dose being 0.34 Gy by both models (p = 0.81). For the single-side sparing cases, the standard model overestimates the median dose by 7.8 Gy on average, while the predictions by the combined

  5. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation and entropy generation in a prismatic greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Walid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational analysis of the natural ventilation process and entropy generation in 3-D prismatic greenhouse was performed using CFD. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence air-flow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse having lower level opening in its right heated façade and also upper level opening near the roof top in the opposite cooled façade. The bot-tom and all other walls are assumed to be perfect thermal insulators. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr = 0.71. Results are reported in terms of particles trajectories, iso-surfaces of temperature, mean Nusselt number, and entropy generation. It has been found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and that heat transfer increases with increasing this parameter. Also, it have been noticed that, using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross air-flow (low-level supply and upper-level extraction inside the greenhouse.

  6. Influence of input data on airflow network accuracy in residential buildings with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krzysztof Arendt; Marek Krzaczek; Jacek Tejchman

    2017-01-01

    The airflow network (AFN) modeling approach provides an attractive balance between the accuracy and computational demand for naturally ventilated buildings. Its accuracy depends on input parameters such as wind pressure and opening discharge coefficients. In most cases, these parameters are obtained from secondary sources which are solely representative for very simplified buildings, i.e. for buildings without facade details. Although studies comparing wind pressure coefficients or discharge coefficients from different sources exist, the knowledge regarding the effect of input data on AFN is still poor. In this paper, the influence of wind pressure data on the accuracy of a coupled AFN-BES model for a real building with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation was analyzed. The results of 8 computation cases with different wind pressure data from secondary sources were compared with the measured data. Both the indoor temperatures and the airflow were taken into account. The outcomes indicated that the source of wind pressure data had a significant influence on the model performance.

  7. Quantifying the impact of traffic-related air pollution on the indoor air quality of a naturally ventilated building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zheming; Chen, Yujiao; Malkawi, Ali; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Spengler, John D

    2016-01-01

    Improper natural ventilation practices may deteriorate indoor air quality when in close proximity to roadways, although the intention is often to reduce energy consumption. In this study, we employed a CFD-based air quality model to quantify the impact of traffic-related air pollution on the indoor air quality of a naturally ventilated building. Our study found that the building envelope restricts dispersion and dilution of particulate matter. The indoor concentration in the baseline condition located 10m away from the roadway is roughly 16-21% greater than that at the edge of the roadway. The indoor flow recirculation creates a well-mixed zone with little variation in fine particle concentration (i.e., 253nm). For ultrafine particles (building, particle size, wind condition, and window size and location. A break-even point is observed at D'~2.1 (normalized distance from the roadway by the width of the road). The indoor particle concentration is greater than that at the highway where D'building planning, the distance from the roadway and the ambient wind condition need to be considered at the early design stage whereas the size and location of the window openings, the interior layout, and the placement of fresh air intakes are important to the indoor air quality of existing buildings adjacent to roadways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Single Sided Edge Marking Method for Detecting Pectoral Muscle in Digital Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Toz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the computer-assisted diagnosis of breast cancer, the removal of pectoral muscle from mammograms is very important. In this study, a new method, called Single-Sided Edge Marking (SSEM technique, is proposed for the identification of the pectoral muscle border from mammograms. 60 mammograms from the INbreast database were used to test the proposed method. The results obtained were compared for False Positive Rate, False Negative Rate, and Sensitivity using the ground truth values pre-determined by radiologists for the same images. Accordingly, it has been shown that the proposed method can detect the pectoral muscle border with an average of 95.6% sensitivity.

  9. Wind tunnel study of natural ventilation of building integrated photovoltaics double skin façade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudişteanu Sebastian Valeriu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a wind tunnel experimental analysis of a small-scale building model (1:30. The objective of the study is to determine the wind influence on the ventilation of a double skin façade channel (DSF and the cooling effect over integrated photovoltaic panels. The tests were achieved by conceiving and implementation of an experimental program using a wind tunnel with atmospheric boundary layer. The effect of the wind over the ventilation of the horizontal channels of double skin façades is evaluated for different incident velocities. The results are generalized for the average steady state values of the velocities analysed. The experimental results put in evidence the correlation between the reference wind velocity and the dynamics of the air movement inside the double skin façade. These values are used to determine the convective heat transfer and the cooling effect of the air streams inside the channel upon the integrated photovoltaic panels. The decrease of the photovoltaic panels temperature determines a raise of 11% in efficiency and power generated.

  10. Wind tunnel study of natural ventilation of building integrated photovoltaics double skin façade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudişteanu, Sebastian Valeriu; Popovici, Cătălin George; Cherecheş, Nelu-Cristian

    2018-02-01

    The paper presents a wind tunnel experimental analysis of a small-scale building model (1:30). The objective of the study is to determine the wind influence on the ventilation of a double skin façade channel (DSF) and the cooling effect over integrated photovoltaic panels. The tests were achieved by conceiving and implementation of an experimental program using a wind tunnel with atmospheric boundary layer. The effect of the wind over the ventilation of the horizontal channels of double skin façades is evaluated for different incident velocities. The results are generalized for the average steady state values of the velocities analysed. The experimental results put in evidence the correlation between the reference wind velocity and the dynamics of the air movement inside the double skin façade. These values are used to determine the convective heat transfer and the cooling effect of the air streams inside the channel upon the integrated photovoltaic panels. The decrease of the photovoltaic panels temperature determines a raise of 11% in efficiency and power generated.

  11. Use of computational fluid dynamics in optimization of natural smoke ventilation from a historical shopping mall - Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Grzegorz; Wegrzyński, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the Authors present results of a complex case study, in which a natural smoke ventilation system was introduced into a historical mall Koszyki Market Hall located in the centre of Warsaw. As historical authorities protected the building, the only solution possible was to use a natural system - known for deficient performance in façade applications. To maximise the performance of the smoke control system, a Computational Wind Engineering exercise was performed. The goal was to find the most difficult wind attack angles, and optimise the performance at these conditions. Once the wind influence was known, a transient analysis was performed that included the growth of the fire within the building, as well as a numerical evacuation study. The resulting system was immune to the wind effects, and provided safe evacuation to users of the building, even in difficult wind conditions.

  12. Seasonal variations of natural ventilation and radon-222 exhalation in a slightly rising dead-end tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick; Gautam, Umesh; Tiwari, Dilli Ram; Shrestha, Prithvi; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2007-01-01

    The concentration activity of radon-222 has been monitored, with some interruptions, from 1997 to 2005 in the end section of a slightly rising, dead-end, 38-m long tunnel located in the Phulchoki hill, near Kathmandu, Nepal. While a high concentration varying from 6 x 10(3) Bq m(-3) to 10 x 10(3) Bq m(-3) is observed from May to September (rainy summer season), the concentration remains at a low level of about 200 Bq m(-3) from October to March (dry winter season). This reduction of radon concentration is associated with natural ventilation of the tunnel, which, contrary to expectations for a rising tunnel, takes place mainly from October to March when the outside air temperature drops below the average tunnel temperature. This interpretation is supported by temperature measurements in the atmosphere of the tunnel, a few meters away from the entrance. The temporal variations of the diurnal amplitude of this temperature indeed follow the ventilation rate deduced from the radon measurements. In the absence of significant ventilation (summer season), the radon exhalation flux at the rock surface into the tunnel atmosphere can be inferred; it exhibits a yearly variation with additional transient reductions associated with heavy rainfall, likely to be due to water infiltration. No effect of atmospheric pressure variations on the radon concentration is observed in this tunnel. This experiment illustrates how small differences in the location and geometry of a tunnel can lead to vastly different behaviours of the radon concentration versus time. This observation has consequences for the estimation of the dose rate and the practicability of radon monitoring for tectonic purposes in underground environments.

  13. Diurnal and seasonal variations of greenhouse gas emissions from a naturally ventilated dairy barn in a cold region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dandan; Guo, Huiqing

    2018-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were quantified for a naturally ventilated free-stall dairy barn in the Canadian Prairies climate through continuous measurements for a year from February 2015 to January 2016, with ventilation rate estimated by a CO2 mass balance method. The results were categorized into seasonal emission profiles with monthly data measured on a typical day, and diurnal profiles in cold (January), warm (July), and mild seasons (October) of all three gases. Seasonal CO2, CH4, and N2O concentrations greatly fluctuated within ranges of 593-2433 ppm, 15-152 ppm, and 0.32-0.40 ppm, respectively, with obviously higher concentrations in the cold season. Emission factors of the three gases were summarized: seasonal N2O emission varied between 0.5 and 10 μg s-1 AU-1 with lower emission in the cold season, while seasonal CO2 and CH4 emissions were within narrow ranges of 112-119 mg s-1 AU-1 and 2.5-3.5 mg s-1 AU-1. The result suggested a lower enteric CH4 emission for dairy cows than that estimated by Environment Canada (2014). Significant diurnal effects (P 0.05), but obvious diurnal variations in all seasons. In comparison with previous studies, it was found that the dairy barn in a cold region climate with smaller vent openings had relatively higher indoor CO2 and CH4 concentrations, but comparable CO2 and CH4 emissions to most previous studies. Besides, ventilation rate, temperature, and relative humidity all significantly affected the three gas concentrations with the outdoor temperature being the most relevant factor (P < 0.01); however, they showed less or no statistical relations to emissions.

  14. Indoor-outdoor concentrations of RSPM in classroom of a naturally ventilated school building near an urban traffic roadway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Radha; Khare, Mukesh

    2009-12-01

    A study on indoor-outdoor RSPM (PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 1.0) mass concentration monitoring has been carried out at a classroom of a naturally ventilated school building located near an urban roadway in Delhi City. The monitoring has been planned for a year starting from August 2006 till August 2007, including weekdays (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) and weekends (Saturday and Sunday) from 8:0 a.m. to 2:0 p.m., in order to take into account hourly, daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal variations in pollutant concentrations. Meteorological parameters, including temperature, rH, pressure, wind speed and direction, and traffic parameters, including its type and volume has been monitored simultaneously to relate the concentrations of indoor-outdoor RSPM with them. Ventilation rate has also been estimated to find out its relation with indoor particulate concentrations. The results of the study indicates that RSPM concentrations in classroom exceeds the permissible limits during all monitoring hours of weekdays and weekends in all seasons that may cause potential health hazards to occupants, when exposed. I/O for all sizes of particulates are greater than 1, which implies that building envelop does not provide protection from outdoor pollutants. Further, a significant influence of meteorological parameters, ventilation rate and of traffic has been observed on I/O. Higher I/O for PM 10 is indicating the presence of its indoor sources in classroom and their indoor concentrations are strongly influenced by activities of occupants during weekdays.

  15. Single Side Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID) Grinding with Lapping Kinematics of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshaim, Ahmed Bakr

    The demand for Silicon Carbide ceramics (SiC) has increased significantly in the last decade due to its reliable physical and chemical properties. The silicon carbide is widely used for aerospace segments in addition to many uses in the industry. Sometimes, a single side grinding is preferable than conventional grinding, for it has the ability to produce flat ceramics. However, the manufacturing cost is still high because of the high tool wear and long machining time. Part of the solution is to use electrolytic in process dressing (ELID) to reduce the processing time. The study on ELID single side grinding of ceramics has never been attempted before. The study involves four variables with three levels each. One of the variables, which is the eccentricity, is being investigated for the first time on ceramics. A full factorial design, for both the surface roughness and material removal rate, guides to calculate mathematical models that can predict future results. Three grinding wheel mesh sizes are used. An investigation of the influence of different grain size on the results can then be evaluated. The kinematics of the process was studied based on eccentricity in order to optimize the pattern of the diamond grains. The experiment is performed with the assist of the proposed specialized ELID fluid, TRIM C270E.

  16. Hydrodynamics of magnetizable suspensions in a traveling magnetic field of a single-sided inductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorov, M.M.; Tsebers, A.O.

    1979-01-01

    A few qualitative tests are described which validate the basic concepts about the behavior of magnetic fluids in a traveling field of a single-sided inductor. In the experiment small droplets of a magnetic fluid were deposited on both sides of a transparent plate. With the traveling field turned on, one could observe the motion of these droplets in opposite directions: the droplets on the inductor side of the plate moving in the direction of the traveling field. This pattern of motion can be explained by the action of antisymmetric stresses due to rotation of ferromagnetic particles, in the traveling field, on the surface of a droplet. On the basis of present results, it is concluded that accounting for the antisymmetric stresses in the selection of an adequate model of magnetic relaxation makes it possible to correctly describe the motion of a magnetic fluid in a traveling field of a single-sided inductor. An adequate model for describing the motion of a colloidal suspension of cobalt ferrite is magnetic relaxation of rigid dipoles. 10 refs

  17. Design and experimental validation of Unilateral Linear Halbach magnet arrays for single-sided magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Ashvin; Li, Matthew; Cima, Michael J

    2018-07-01

    Single-sided NMR has the potential for broad utility and has found applications in healthcare, materials analysis, food quality assurance, and the oil and gas industry. These sensors require a remote, strong, uniform magnetic field to perform high sensitivity measurements. We demonstrate a new permanent magnet geometry, the Unilateral Linear Halbach, that combines design principles from "sweet-spot" and linear Halbach magnets to achieve this goal through more efficient use of magnetic flux. We perform sensitivity analysis using numerical simulations to produce a framework for Unilateral Linear Halbach design and assess tradeoffs between design parameters. Additionally, the use of hundreds of small, discrete magnets within the assembly allows for a tunable design, improved robustness to variability in magnetization strength, and increased safety during construction. Experimental validation using a prototype magnet shows close agreement with the simulated magnetic field. The Unilateral Linear Halbach magnet increases the sensitivity, portability, and versatility of single-sided NMR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulations of the impacts of building height layout on air quality in natural-ventilated rooms around street canyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Zhong, Ke; Chen, Yonghang; Kang, Yanming

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of building height ratio (i.e., HR, the height ratio of the upstream building to the downstream building) on the air quality in buildings beside street canyons, and both regular and staggered canyons were considered for the simulations. The results show that the building height ratio affects not only the ventilation fluxes of the rooms in the downstream building but also the pollutant concentrations around the building. The parameter, outdoor effective source intensity of a room, is then proposed to calculate the amount of vehicular pollutants that enters into building rooms. Smaller value of this parameter indicates less pollutant enters the room. The numerical results reveal that HRs from 2/7 to 7/2 are the favorable height ratios for the regular canyons, as they obtain smaller values than the other cases. While HR values of 5/7, 7/7, and 7/5 are appropriate for staggered canyons. In addition, in terms of improving indoor air quality by natural ventilation, the staggered canyons with favorable HR are better than those of the regular canyons.

  19. Overheating risk assessment of naturally ventilated classroom under the influence of climate change in hot and humid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Tsang

    2013-04-01

    Natural ventilation (NV) is considered one of the passive building strategies used for reducing cooling energy demand. The utilization of nature wind for cooling down indoor thermal environment to reach thermal comfort requires knowledge of adequately positioning the building fenestrations, designing inlet-outlet related opening ratios, planning unobstructed cross ventilation paths, and, the most important, assessing the utilization feasibility base on local climatic variables. Furthermore, factors that influence the indoor thermal condition include building envelope heat gain, indoor air velocity, indoor heat gain (e.g. heat discharges from occupant's body, lighting fixture, electrical appliances), and outdoor climate. Among the above, the indoor thermal performance of NV building is significantly dependent to outdoor climate conditions. In hot and humid Taiwan, under college school classrooms are usually operated in natural ventilation mode and are more vulnerable to climate change in regard to maintain indoor thermal comfort. As climate changes in progress, NV classrooms would expect to encounter more events of overheating in the near future, which result in more severe heat stress, and would risk the utilization of natural ventilation. To evaluate the overheating risk under the influence of recent climate change, an actual top floor elementary school classroom with 30 students located at north Taiwan was modeled. Long-term local hourly meteorological data were gathered and further constructed into EnergyPlus Weather Files (EPWs) format for building thermal dynamic simulation to discuss the indoor thermal environmental variation during the period of 1998 to 2012 by retrospective simulation. As indoor thermal environment is an overall condition resulting from a series combination of various factors, sub-hourly building simulation tool, EnergyPlus, coupled with the above fifteen years' EPWs was adopted to predict hourly indoor parameters of mean radiant

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Tracer Gas Methodology in the Case of a Naturally Cross-Ventilated Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolopoulos, Nikos; Nikolopoulos, Aristeidis; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation of a naturally cross – ventilated building using both experimental and numerical methods with the parameters being the free-stream and the incidence angle of the wind to the openings of the building. The experimental methodology calculates the air change rate......, focusing on the time dependent character of the induced flow field. The numerical results are compared with corresponding experimental data for the three aforementioned experimental methodologies in the case of a full scale building inside a wind-tunnel. The numerical investigation reveals that for large...... based either on measurements of the inlet velocity profile, the outlet velocity profile or the descending rate of the tracer gas concentration using the decay method. The numerical investigation is based on the solution of the governing Navier-Stokes equations in their full three dimensional expression...

  1. Comparative analysis of modified PMV models and SET models to predict human thermal sensation in naturally ventilated buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Yi; Wargocki, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a comparative analysis was performed on the human thermal sensation estimated by modified predicted mean vote (PMV) models and modified standard effective temperature (SET) models in naturally ventilated buildings; the data were collected in field study. These prediction models were....../s, the expectancy factors for the extended PMV model and the extended SET model were from 0.770 to 0.974 and from 1.330 to 1.363, and the adaptive coefficients for the adaptive PMV model and the adaptive SET model were from 0.029 to 0.167 and from-0.213 to-0.195. In addition, the difference in thermal sensation...... between the measured and predicted values using the modified PMV models exceeded 25%, while the difference between the measured thermal sensation and the predicted thermal sensation using modified SET models was approximately less than 25%. It is concluded that the modified SET models can predict human...

  2. EFFECT OF THE FILL VENTILATION WINDOW ON PERFORMANCE OF A NATURAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER SUBJECTED TO CROSS-WINDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various aerodynamic design elements and technics (wind deflectors, wind walls, etc. are utilized for improvement of the thermal efficiency of the natural draft cooling towers, particularly in conditions of cross wind. One of the technical methods, proposed by engineers of Belarus Academy of Sciences, is installation of the ventilation window in the center of the fill. This method is substantiated by the fact that the flow of cooling gas obtains maximum temperature and humidity near the center of the under-fill space of cooling tower and, as a consequence, performs minimal heat exchange. The influence of the fill ventilation window and wind deflectors in the inlet windows of the cooling tower on its thermal performance in condition of cross-wind is investigated in the paper numerically. The cooling tower of the “Woo-Jin” power plant (China 150 m of the height and 114 m of the base diameter was taken as a prototype. The analogy (equivalence between the heat and mass transfer was taken into consideration, which enabled us to consider single-phase flow and perform complicated 3D simulation by using modern personal computers. Heat transfer coefficient for the fill and its hydrodynamic resistance were defined by using actual data on total flow rate in the cooling tower. The numerical model and computational methods were tested and verified in numerous previous works. The non-linear dependence of the thermal performance of the cooling tower on wind velocity (with the minimum in vicinity of Ucr ~ 8 m/s for the simulated system was demonstrated. Calculations show that in the condition of the average wind speed the fill ventilation window doesn’t improve, but slightly decrease (by 3–7 % performance of the cooling tower. Situation changes in the condition of strong winds Ucw > 12 m/s, which are not typical for Belarus. Utilization of airflow deflectors at the inlet windows of cooling tower, conversely, increases thermal performance of the

  3. Analytical and numerical study concerning the behaviour of single-sided bonded patch repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghi OPATCHI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonded joints are used in the assembling of structural parts, especially of those which are made from dissimilar materials. Lightweight fibre reinforced polymer composites and other adhesive bonded components represent a major proportion of a modern aircraft. Bonded patch repair technology has been widely used to repair cracked thin-walled structures to extend their service life, because a correctly executed repair significantly enhances the structural performance.In practice, the single-sided bonded patch repair is the most used because a good solution like the double-sided repair may not be an option if the access to the structure is only available from one side.This paper presents a relatively simple and effective design procedure for the single strapped bonded joints. Also, the influence of various geometrical parameters of the joint is evaluated. The analytical development is validated based on nonlinear finite element analyses.

  4. Comparisons between designs for single-sided linear electric motors: Homopolar synchronous and induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondahl, T. A.; Richter, E.

    1980-09-01

    A design study of two types of single sided (with a passive rail) linear electric machine designs, namely homopolar linear synchronous machines (LSM's) and linear induction machines (LIM's), is described. It is assumed the machines provide tractive effort for several types of light rail vehicles and locomotives. These vehicles are wheel supported and require tractive powers ranging from 200 kW to 3735 kW and top speeds ranging from 112 km/hr to 400 km/hr. All designs are made according to specified magnetic and thermal criteria. The LSM advantages are a higher power factor, much greater restoring forces for track misalignments, and less track heating. The LIM advantages are no need to synchronize the excitation frequency precisely to vehicle speed, simpler machine construction, and a more easily anchored track structure. The relative weights of the two machine types vary with excitation frequency and speed; low frequencies and low speeds favor the LSM.

  5. Cochlear Implantation and Single-sided Deafness: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral Junior, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Current data show that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral hearing, specifically in the understanding of speech in noisy environments. Furthermore, unilateral hearing reduce onés ability to localize sound. Objectives This study provides a systematic review of recent studies to evaluate the outcomes of cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD with regards to speech discrimination, sound localization and tinnitus suppression. Data Synthesis We performed a search in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs databases to assess studies related to cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness. After critical appraisal, eleven studies were selected for data extraction and analysis of demographic, study design and outcome data. Conclusion Although some studies have shown encouraging results on cochlear implantation and SSD, all fail to provide a high level of evidence. Larger studies are necessary to define the tangible benefits of cochlear implantation in patients with SSD.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging of the auditory nerve in patients with acquired single-sided deafness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vos, Sjoerd; Haakma, Wieke; Versnel, Huib

    2015-01-01

    following cochlear hair cell loss, and the amount of degeneration may considerably differ between the two ears, also in patients with bilateral deafness. A measure that reflects the nerve's condition would help to assess the best of both nerves and decide accordingly which ear should be implanted......A cochlear implant (CI) can restore hearing in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss by direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. Therefore, the viability of the auditory nerve is vitally important in successful hearing recovery. However, the nerve typically degenerates...... single-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A specialized acquisition protocol was designed for a 3 T MRI scanner to image the small nerve bundle. The nerve was reconstructed using fiber tractography and DTI metrics - which reflect the nerve's microstructural properties - were computed per tract. Comparing...

  7. Effects of natural and forced basement ventilation on radon levels in single-family dwellings. Final report, May 90-Aug 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.

    1992-06-01

    The report gives, for the first time, results of an extensive study of the effect of ventilation on radon concentrations and radon entry rate in a single-family dwelling. Measurements of radon concentrations, building dynamics, and environmental parameters made in Princeton University research houses over several seasons and under different building operating conditions show the functional dependence of radon entry rate on basement depressurization. The work clarifies the role of natural ventilation in reducing indoor radon concentrations. The work shows conclusively that natural ventilation can decrease radon levels two ways: (1) by simple dilution, and (2) by providing a pressure break (defined as any opening in the building shell that reduces the outdoor/indoor differential pressure). This reduces building depressurization and thus the amount of radon-contaminated soil gas that is drawn into the building

  8. Measurement of the Rise-Time in a Single Sided Ladder Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    In this note we report on the measurement of the preamplifier output rise time for a SVXII chip mounted on a D0 single sided ladder. The measurements were performed on the ladder 001-883-L, using the laser test stand of Lab D. The rise time was measured for different values of the response (or bandwidth) of the preamplifier. As a bigger bandwidth results in longer rise times and therefore in less noise, the largest possible bandwidth consistent with the time between bunch crossings should be chosen to operate the detectors. The rise time is defined as the time elapsed between 10% and 90% of the charge is collected. It is also interesting to measure the time for full charge collection and the percentage of charge collected in 132 ns and 396 ns. The results are shown in table 1, for bandwidths between 2 and 63 (binary numbers). The uncertainty on the time measurement is considered to be ∼ 10 ns. Figure 1 schematically defines the four quantities measured: rise time, time of full charge collection, and percentage of charge collected in 132 ns and 396 ns. Figures 2 to 8 are the actual measurements for bandwidths of 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32 and 63. Figure 9 is a second measurement for BW=24, used as a consistency check of the system and the time measurement performed on the plots. The data indicate that the single sided ladders can be operated at BW=63 for 396 ns and BW=12 for 132 ns, achieving full charge collection. This will result in smaller noise than originally anticipated.

  9. Transient effects of sudden changes of heat load in a naturally ventilated room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Bower, D. J.; Fitzgerald, S.; Woods, A. W.

    2006-11-01

    Using reduced numerical models and small-scale laboratory experiments, we investigate the transient effects of changing isolated heat loads discontinuously within a large, ventilated space. We consider the emptying filling box (with high and low openings) driven by a single isolated source of buoyancy. The original steady state consists of a buoyant layer, whose depth (for the simplest case of a point source plume) is determined by the geometric properties of the room alone. When the buoyancy flux of the source is increased, a new layer `fills' the room from the top with a more buoyant layer. The original layer disappears due to entrainment by the rising plume. The behaviour is qualitatively different when the source buoyancy flux is decreased. In this case, the rising plume fluid is now relatively dense, and so it inevitably collapses back to `intrude' below the original layer. In this case, the original layer disappears due to both draining through the upper opening, and penetrative entrainment by the dense plume. We compare the predictions of three numerical models using different penetrative entrainment parametrizations to a sequence of laboratory experiments. This entrainment reduces the density of the intruding layer, and so the rising plume eventually stalls, and no longer reaches the (draining) original layer. We demonstrate that it is necessary to consider the transient effects of penetrative entrainment when the reduction in source buoyancy flux is sufficiently small.

  10. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish K Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV. PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  11. Anaesthesia ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-09-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  12. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  13. Anaesthesia ventilators

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bello...

  14. Natural Ventilation of Buildings through Light Shafts. Design-Based Solution Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel Padilla-Marcos, Miguel; Meiss, Alberto; Feijó-Muñoz, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    This work analyses how the built environment affects the quality of the air to be introduced into buildings from light shafts. Several factors such as urban environment and building design intervene in the ability of the light shaft to produce its air change process. Urban areas continuously pollute the air in cities which affects the human health and the environment sustainability. Poor air quality outside buildings supposes a big energy waste to promote an acceptable air quality inside buildings. That requires a large flow rate to maintain the indoor air quality which is translated to an energy efficiency term. The main objective focuses on the impact of standardized architecture design in the quality of the indoor air dependent on the air change in the light shaft. The air change capacity of the outdoor space is numbered analysed using the concept of air change efficiency (ACE). ACE is determined by the built environment, the wind conditions and the design of the building containing light shafts. This concept is comparatively evaluated inside a control domain virtually defined to obtain the mean age of the air for a known air volume. The longer the light shaft in the wind direction is, the better the ACE is compared with other options. Light shafts up to 12 metres high are the most suitable in order to obtain acceptable efficiency results. Other studied cases verify that assumption. Different simplified tools for the technicians to evaluate the design of buildings containing light shafts are proposed. Some strategies of architectural design of buildings with light shafts to be used for ventilation are presented.

  15. Full-scale measurements of indoor environmental conditions and natural ventilation in a large semi-enclosed stadium : possibilities and limitations for CFD validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to study complex physical processes in the built environment requires model validation by means of reduced-scale or full-scale experimental data. CFD studies of natural ventilation of buildings in urban areas should be validated concerning both the wind

  16. Coupled urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation modelling on a high-resolution grid: A case study for the Amsterdam ArenA stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Wind flow in urban environments is an important factor governing the dispersion of heat and pollutants from streets, squares and buildings. This paper presents a coupled CFD modelling approach for urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation. A specific procedure is used to efficiently and

  17. Design of Energy Efficient Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The focus in the development has for both systems been to minimise energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable and healthy indoor environment. The natural next step in this development is to develop ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system......[Mechanical and natural ventilation] into a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation....

  18. Single-side electron multipacting at the photocathode in rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hui Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple electron impacting (multipacting can take place in rf fields when the rf components are composed of materials with a secondary electron yield greater than one. In rf gun cavities, multipacting may change the properties of the vacuum components or even damage them. First systematic measurements of the multipacting occurring in a photocathode rf gun were made at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory in 2000. The multipacting properties were found to depend on the cathode material and the solenoid field configuration. In this study, we measure the multipacting properties in more detail and model the secondary electron generation for numerical simulation. Measurements and simulations for the photoinjectors at Fermilab and DESY are compared. The multipacting takes place at the photocathode in rf guns and is categorized as single-side multipacting. In a low rf field, the electrons emitted from the cathode area do not leave the gun cavity within one rf cycle and have an opportunity to travel back and hit the cathode. The solenoid field distribution in the vicinity of the cathode changes the probability of electron bombardment of the cathode and makes a major contribution to the multipacting behavior.

  19. End effect braking force reduction in high-speed single-sided linear induction machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiri, Abbas; Shoulaie, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new analytical equation to model the end effect braking force of SLIM is derived. ► Equations for efficiency, power factor and output thrust are analytically derived. ► The effect of design variables on the performance of the motor is analyzed. ► An optimization method is employed to minimize the end effect braking force (EEBF). ► The results show that EEBF is minimized by appropriate selection of motor parameters. - Abstract: Linear induction motors have been widely employed in industry because of their simple structure and low construction cost. However, they suffer from low efficiency and power factor. In addition, existence of so called end effect influences their performance especially in high speeds. The end effect deteriorates the performance of the motor by producing braking force. So, in this paper, by using Duncan equivalent circuit model, a new analytical equation is proposed to model end effect braking force. Employing the proposed equation and considering all phenomena involved in the single-sided linear induction motor, a simple design procedure is presented and the effect of different design variables on the performance of the motor is analyzed. A multi-objective optimization method based on genetic algorithm is introduced to maximize efficiency and power factor, as well as to minimize the end effect braking force, simultaneously. Finally, to validate the optimization results, 2D finite element method is employed.

  20. Right Ear Advantage of Speech Audiometry in Single-sided Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Vincent G; Probst, Rudolf

    2018-04-01

    Postlingual single-sided deafness (SSD) is defined as normal hearing in one ear and severely impaired hearing in the other ear. A right ear advantage and dominance of the left hemisphere are well established findings in individuals with normal hearing and speech processing. Therefore, it seems plausible that a right ear advantage would exist in patients with SSD. The audiometric database was searched to identify patients with SSD. Results from the German monosyllabic Freiburg word test and four-syllabic number test in quiet were evaluated. Results of right-sided SSD were compared with left-sided SSD. Statistical calculations were done with the Mann-Whitney U test. Four hundred and six patients with SSD were identified, 182 with right-sided and 224 with left-sided SSD. The two groups had similar pure-tone thresholds without significant differences. All test parameters of speech audiometry had better values for right ears (SSD left) when compared with left ears (SSD right). Statistically significant results (p right and 97.5 ± 4.7% left, p right and 93.9 ± 9.1% left, p right and 63.8 ± 11.1 dB SPL left, p right ear advantage of speech audiometry was found in patients with SSD in this retrospective study of audiometric test results.

  1. Progress with the single-sided module prototypes for the ATLAS tracker upgrade stave

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, P P; Wiik, L; Dressnandt, N; Matheson, J; Li, Z; Viehhauser, G; Gallop, B; Jones, T J; Dwuznik, M; Greenall, A; Eklund, L; Maddock, P; Pernecker, S; Wright, J; Puldon, D; Jakobs, K; Holt, R; Sevilla, S G; Koffeman, E; Dabrowski, W; Gilchriese, M; Wastie, R; Gibson, M; Robinson, D; Fadeyev, V; Gerling, M; Betancourt, C; Dawson, N; Bates, R; French, R; Kierstead, J; Anghinolfi, F; Weidberg, A; Martinez-McKinney, F; Paganis, S; Sutcliffe, P; Maunu, R; Newcomer, M; Weber, M; Parzefall, U; Clark, A; Colijn, A P; Xu, D; la Marra, D; Buttar, C; Grillo, A A; Schamberger, D; DeWilde, B; Poltorak, K; Affolder, A A; Tsionou, D; Hessey, N P; Casse, G; Fox, H; Ferrere, D; Villani, E G; Seiden, A; Tyndel, M; Sadrozinski, H F W; Wiimut, I; Carter, J R; Lacasta, C; Chilingarov, A; Santoyo, D; Lynn, D; Garcia, C; Haber, C H; Hommels, L B A; Dhawan, S; Lindgren, S; Farthouat, P; Nickerson, R; Chen, H; Kohler, M; Sattari, S; Civera, J V; McCarthy, R; Phillips, P; Unno, Y; Kaplon, J; Swientek, K; Wormald, M; Goodrick, M; Von Wilpert, J; Mahboubi, K

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for the planned luminosity upgrade of the LHC (the super-luminous LHC or sLHC) with a programme of development for tracking able to withstand an order of greater magnitude radiation fluence and much greater hit occupancy rates than the current detector. This has led to the concept of an all-silicon tracker with an enhanced performance pixel-based inner region and short-strips for much of the higher radii. Both sub-systems employ many common technologies, including the proposed ``stave{''} concept for integrated cooling and support. For the short-strip region, use of this integrated stave concept requires single-sided modules mounted on either side of a thin central lightweight support. Each sensor is divided into four rows of 23.82 mm length strips; within each row, there are 1280 strips of 74.5 mu m pitch. Well over a hundred prototype sensors are being delivered by Hamamatsu Photonics (HPK) to Japan, Europe and the US. We present results of the first 20 chip ABCN25 ASIC hyb...

  2. Constructions of secure entanglement channels assisted by quantum dots inside single-sided optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jino; Kang, Min-Sung; Hong, Chang-Ho; Choi, Seong-Gon; Hong, Jong-Phil

    2017-08-01

    We propose quantum information processing schemes to generate and swap entangled states based on the interactions between flying photons and quantum dots (QDs) confined within optical cavities for quantum communication. To produce and distribute entangled states (Bell and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger [GHZ] states) between the photonic qubits of flying photons of consumers (Alice and Bob) and electron-spin qubits of a provider (trust center, or TC), the TC employs the interactions of the QD-cavity system, which is composed of a charged QD (negatively charged exciton) inside a single-sided cavity. Subsequently, the TC constructs an entanglement channel (Bell state and 4-qubit GHZ state) to link one consumer with another through entanglement swapping, which can be realized to exploit a probe photon with interactions of the QD-cavity systems and single-qubit measurements without Bell state measurement, for quantum communication between consumers. Consequently, the TC, which has quantum nodes (QD-cavity systems), can accomplish constructing the entanglement channel (authenticated channel) between two separated consumers from the distributions of entangled states and entanglement swapping. Furthermore, our schemes using QD-cavity systems, which are feasible with a certain probability of success and high fidelity, can be experimentally implemented with technology currently in use.

  3. Displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Mundt, Elisabeth

    The aim of this Guidebook is to give the state-of-the art knowledge of the displacement ventilation technology, and to simplify and improve the practical design procedure. The Guidebook discusses methods of total volume ventilation by mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation and it gives...... insights of the performance of the displacement ventilation. It also shows practical case studies in some typical applications and the latest research findings to create good local micro-climatic conditions....

  4. Modelling natural convection in a heated vertical channel for room ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.M.; Canha da Piedade, A.; Lahellec, A.; Grandpeix, J.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Solar-air collectors installed on the south-facing walls of school buildings have been tried out in Portugal as a passive means of improving indoor air quality without prejudice to thermal comfort requirements. A numerical investigation of the behaviour of these systems, typified as vertical channels opened at both ends, is presented for typical geometries and outdoor conditions. The study is carried out with natural convection and assumes that the induced flow is turbulent and two-dimensional. The fully averaged equations of motion and energy, added to a two-equation turbulence model, are discretized and solved following the concepts of TEF (Transfer Evolution Formalism) using a finite volume method. Flow and temperature fields are produced and results presented in terms of temperature and velocity distributions at the exit section of the duct. These enable a better understanding of the developing flow and can be helpful in the design phase of this type of system. (author)

  5. Influence of radiation on predictive accuracy in numerical simulations of the thermal environment in industrial buildings with buoyancy-driven natural ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xiaojing; Wang, Yi; Liu, Tiening; Xing, Xiao; Cao, Yingxue; Zhao, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in numerical simulations were studied. • A scaled experimental model with a high-temperature heat source was set up. • Simulation results were discussed considering with and without radiation model. • The buoyancy force and the ventilation rate were investigated. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in the numerical simulations of industrial buildings. A scaled experimental model with a high-temperature heat source is set up and the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation performance is presented. Besides predicting ventilation performance in an industrial building, the scaled model in this paper is also used to generate data to validate the numerical simulations. The simulation results show good agreement with the experiment data. The effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in the numerical simulations are studied for both pure convection model and combined convection and radiation model. Detailed results are discussed regarding the temperature and velocity distribution, the buoyancy force and the ventilation rate. The temperature and velocity distributions through the middle plane are presented for the pure convection model and the combined convection and radiation model. It is observed that the overall temperature and velocity magnitude predicted by the simulations for pure convection were significantly greater than those for the combined convection and radiation model. In addition, the Grashof number and the ventilation rate are investigated. The results show that the Grashof number and the ventilation rate are greater for the pure convection model than for the combined convection and radiation model.

  6. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  7. Restoration of spatial hearing in adult cochlear implant users with single-sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovsky, Ruth Y; Moua, Keng; Godar, Shelly; Kan, Alan; Misurelli, Sara M; Lee, Daniel J

    2018-04-14

    In recent years, cochlear implants (CIs) have been provided in growing numbers to people with not only bilateral deafness but also to people with unilateral hearing loss, at times in order to alleviate tinnitus. This study presents audiological data from 15 adult participants (ages 48 ± 12 years) with single sided deafness. Results are presented from 9/15 adults, who received a CI (SSD-CI) in the deaf ear and were tested in Acoustic or Acoustic + CI hearing modes, and 6/15 adults who are planning to receive a CI, and were tested in the unilateral condition only. Testing included (1) audiometric measures of threshold, (2) speech understanding for CNC words and AzBIO sentences, (3) tinnitus handicap inventory, (4) sound localization with stationary sound sources, and (5) perceived auditory motion. Results showed that when listening to sentences in quiet, performance was excellent in the Acoustic and Acoustic + CI conditions. In noise, performance was similar between Acoustic and Acoustic + CI conditions in 4/6 participants tested, and slightly worse in the Acoustic + CI in 2/6 participants. In some cases, the CI provided reduced tinnitus handicap scores. When testing sound localization ability, the Acoustic + CI condition resulted in improved sound localization RMS error of 29.2° (SD: ±6.7°) compared to 56.6° (SD: ±16.5°) in the Acoustic-only condition. Preliminary results suggest that the perception of motion direction, whereby subjects are required to process and compare directional cues across multiple locations, is impaired when compared with that of normal hearing subjects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of placement and height of high-rise buildings on wind pressure distribution and natural ventilation of low- and medium-rise buildings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Butova, A.; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, 3/4 (2016), s. 253-266 ISSN 1473-3315 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12892S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : natural ventilation * high-rise building s * low- and medium-rise building s * wind pressure coefficient * wind tunnel tests Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.391, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14733315.2016.1214396

  9. VENTILATION MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Chipman

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses

  10. Solar chimney for the natural ventilation of buildings: simulation and mediation; Chimenea solar para la ventilacion natural de edificios: simulacion y mediacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanceta, D.; Llorente, J.

    2008-07-01

    In this article, the first part of a research project about the modelling of a solar chimney is presented. In this first part, the average ventilation flows measured in an experimental installation have been compared to the results obtained by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations. In order to do so, a solar chimney with a cross-section of 0.78 m x 0.156 m, height 3,6 m, has been constructed. The chimney consists of a glass surface oriented towards the south. The internal (absorber) surface is made of a copper plate, which has been painted black in order to increase the solar absorption. The chimney is connected to a room measuring 5 m x 2.5 m x 2.5 m, from where it extracts air. The comparison of the results obtained by measurements with those obtained by CFD simulations show that computational tools are accurate enough to predict the behaviour of natural buoyancy in this kind of installations. (Author)

  11. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) application to investigate potential use of natural ventilation in new building designs in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayata, Tahir; Cam, Ertugrul; Yildiz, Osman [Kirikkale University, Faculty of Engineering, 71451, Campus, Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    Natural ventilation in living and working places provides both circulation of clear air and a decrease of indoor temperature, especially during hot summer days. In addition to openings, the dimension ratio and position of buildings play a significant role to obtain a uniform indoor air velocity distribution. In this study, the potential use of natural ventilation as a passive cooling system in new building designs in Kayseri, a midsize city in Turkey, was investigated. First, indoor air velocity distributions with respect to changing wind direction and magnitude were simulated by the FLUENT package program, which employs finite element methods. Then, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) model was employed to predict indoor average and maximum air velocities using the simulated data by FLUENT. The simulation results suggest that natural ventilation can be used to provide a thermally comfortable indoor environment during the summer season in the study area. Also, the ANFIS model can be proposed for estimation of indoor air velocity values in such studies. (author)

  12. [Anesthesia ventilators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otteni, J C; Beydon, L; Cazalaà, J B; Feiss, P; Nivoche, Y

    1997-01-01

    To review anaesthesia ventilators in current use in France by categories of ventilators. References were obtained from computerized bibliographic search. (Medline), recent review articles, the library of the service and personal files. Anaesthesia ventilators can be allocated into three groups, depending on whether they readminister expired gases or not or allow both modalities. Contemporary ventilators provide either constant volume ventilation, or constant pressure ventilation, with or without a pressure plateau. Ventilators readministering expired gases after CO2 absorption, or closed circuit ventilators, are either of a double- or a single-circuit design. Double-circuit ventilators, or pneumatical bag or bellows squeezers, or bag-in-bottle or bellows-in-bottle (or box) ventilators, consist of a primary, or driving circuit (bottle or box) and a secondary or patient circuit (including a bag or a bellows or membrane chambers). Bellows-in-bottle ventilators have either standing bellows ascending at expiration, or hanging bellows, descending at expiration. Ascending bellows require a positive pressure of about 2 cmH2O throughout exhalation to allow the bellows to refill. The expired gas volume is a valuable indicator for leak and disconnection. Descending bellows generate a slight negative pressure during exhalation. In case of leak or disconnection they aspirate ambient air and cannot act therefore as an indicator for integrity of the circuit and the patient connection. Closed circuit ventilators with a single-circuit (patient circuit) include a insufflating device consisting either in a bellows or a cylinder with a piston, operated by a electric or pneumatic motor. As the hanging bellows of the double circuit ventilators, they generate a slight negative pressure during exhalation and aspirate ambient air in case of leak or disconnection. Ventilators not designed for the readministration of expired gases, or open circuit ventilators, are generally stand

  13. Ventilation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaret, Eimund

    Calculation procedures, used in the design of ventilating systems, which are especially suited for displacement ventilation in addition to linking it to mixing ventilation, are addressed. The two zone flow model is considered and the steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Different methods of supplying air are discussed, and different types of air flow are considered: piston flow, plane flow and radial flow. An evaluation model for ventilation systems is presented.

  14. Indoor and outdoor particulate matter in primary school classrooms with fan-assisted natural ventilation in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ailu; Gall, Elliott T; Chang, Victor W C

    2016-09-01

    We conducted multiday continuous monitoring of indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM) in classrooms with fan-assisted natural ventilation (NV) at five primary schools in Singapore. We monitored size-resolved number concentration of PM with diameter 0.3-10 μm at all schools and alveolar deposited surface area concentrations of PM with diameter 0.01-1.0 μm (SA0.01-1.0) at two schools. Results show that, during the monitoring period, schools closer to expressways and in the downtown area had 2-3 times higher outdoor PM0.3-1.0 number concentrations than schools located in suburban areas. Average indoor SA0.01-1.0 was 115-118 μm(2) cm(-3) during periods of occupancy and 72-87 μm(2) cm(-3) during unoccupied periods. There were close indoor and outdoor correlations for fine PM during both occupied and unoccupied periods (Pearson's r = 0.84-1.0) while the correlations for coarse PM were weak during the occupied periods (r = 0.13-0.74). Across all the schools, the size-resolved indoor/outdoor PM ratios (I/O ratios) were 0.81 to 1.58 and 0.61 to 0.95 during occupied and unoccupied periods, respectively, and average infiltration factors were 0.64 to 0.94. Average PM net emission rates, calculated during periods of occupancy in the classrooms, were lower than or in the lower range of emission rates reported in the literature. This study also reveals that indoor fine and submicron PM predominantly come from outdoor sources, while indoor sources associated with occupancy may be important for coarse PM even when the classrooms have high air exchange rates.

  15. Effect of nature-based sounds' intervention on agitation, anxiety, and stress in patients under mechanical ventilator support: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Zayeri, Farid; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie

    2013-07-01

    Few studies have been conducted to investigate the effect of nature-based sounds (N-BS) on agitation, anxiety level and physiological signs of stress in patients under mechanical ventilator support. Non-pharmacological nursing interventions such as N-BS can be less expensive and efficient ways to alleviate anxiety and adverse effects of sedative medications in patients under mechanical ventilator support. This study was conducted to identify the effect of the nature-based sounds' intervention on agitation, anxiety level and physiological stress responses in patients under mechanical ventilation support. A randomized placebo-controlled trial design was used to conduct this study. A total of 60 patients aged 18-65 years under mechanical ventilation support in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to the control and experimental groups. The patients in the intervention group received 90 min of N-BS. Pleasant nature sounds were played to the patients using media players and headphones. Patients' physiological signs were taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th, 60th, 90th minutes and 30 min after the procedure had finished. The physiological signs of stress assessed were heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure. Data were collected over eight months from Oct 2011 to June 2012. Anxiety levels and agitation were assessed using the Faces Anxiety Scale and Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale, respectively. The experimental group had significantly lower systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, anxiety and agitation levels than the control group. These reductions increased progressively in the 30th, 60th, 90th minutes, and 30 min after the procedure had finished indicating a cumulative dose effect. N-BS can provide an effective method of decreasing potentially harmful physiological responses arising from anxiety in mechanically ventilated patients. Nurses can incorporate N-BS intervention as a non-pharmacologic intervention into the

  16. Design Procedure for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Tjelflaat, Per Olaf

    Mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately during many years. The natural next step in this development is development of ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system into a new type of ventilation system - Hybrid Ventilation....... Buildings with hybrid ventilation often include other sustainable technologies and an energy optimisation requires an integrated approach in the design of the building and its mechanical systems. Therefore, the hybrid ventilation design procedure differs from the design procedure for conventional HVAC....... The first ideas on a design procedure for hybrid ventilation is presented and the different types of design methods, that is needed in different phases of the design process, is discussed....

  17. Industrial ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, H. D.

    Industrial ventilation design methodology, using computers and using fluid dynamic models, is considered. It is noted that the design of a ventilation system must be incorporated into the plant design and layout at the earliest conceptual stage of the project. A checklist of activities concerning the methodology for the design of a ventilation system for a new facility is given. A flow diagram of the computer ventilation model shows a typical input, the initialization and iteration loop, and the output. The application of the fluid dynamic modeling techniques include external and internal flow fields, and individual sources of heat and contaminants. Major activities for a ventilation field test program are also addressed.

  18. Universal quantum gates on electron-spin qubits with quantum dots inside single-side optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-13

    We present some compact quantum circuits for a deterministic quantum computing on electron-spin qubits assisted by quantum dots inside single-side optical microcavities, including the CNOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates. They are constructed by exploiting the giant optical Faraday rotation induced by a single-electron spin in a quantum dot inside a single-side optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Our universal quantum gates have some advantages. First, all the gates are accomplished with a success probability of 100% in principle. Second, our schemes require no additional electron-spin qubits and they are achieved by some input-output processes of a single photon. Third, our circuits for these gates are simple and economic. Moreover, our devices for these gates work in both the weak coupling and the strong coupling regimes, and they are feasible in experiment.

  19. Influence of directionality and maximal power output on speech understanding with bone anchored hearing implants in single sided deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Krempaska, Silvia; Koval, Juraj; Schmid, Christoph; Pfiffner, Flurin; Kurz, Anja; Kompis, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) are routinely used to alleviate the effects of the acoustic head shadow in single-sided sensorineural deafness (SSD). In this study, the influence of the directional microphone setting and the maximum power output of the BAHI sound processor on speech understanding in noise in a laboratory setting were investigated. Eight adult BAHI users with SSD participated in this pilot study. Speech understanding in noise was measured using a new Slovak speech-in-noi...

  20. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, A., E-mail: Alina.Adams@itmc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Piechatzek, A.; Schmitt, G. [Institut für Instandhaltung und Korrosionsschutztechnik gGmbH, Kalkofen 4, 58638 Iserlohn (Germany); Siegmund, G. [ExxonMobil Production Germany, Riethorst 12, 30659 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-08-05

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials. - Highlights: • The changes in PEX exposed to sour media were quantified for the first time. • The strongest morphological changes in PEX were detected under exposure to hydrocarbon media. • The chain mobility measured truly non-destructively by single-sided NMR showed the highest sensitivity to the aging process. • A universal linear correlation curve was found between the chain mobility and the tensile strength. • Single-sided NMR was validated as a condition monitoring tool.

  1. Laboratory Performance of the Single-Sided E-A-R (registered trademark) Combat Arms Hearing Protective Earplug

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Research article / Article de recherche LABORATORY PERFORMANCE OF THE SINGLE-SIDED EAR® COMBAT ARMS HEARING PROTECTIVE EARPLUG Sharon M. Abel and...external microphones for enhanced L:. -communication-? ;‘ V SOMMAIRE. Le but de cet article est de comparer 1 effet du port de bouchons conventionnels a...MA. Bekesy audiometry and loudness balance testing. In: Katz, J, editor. Handbook of clinical audiology . 3rd ed. Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore; 1985

  2. Visualized study on specific points on demand curves and flow patterns in a single-side heated narrow rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junfeng; Huang Yanping; Wang Yanlin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Specific points on the demand curve and flow patterns are visually studied. → Bubbly, churn, and annular flows were observed. → Onset of flow instability and bubbly-churn transition occurs at the same time. → The evolution of specific points and flow pattern transitions were examined. - Abstract: A simultaneous visualization and measurement study on some specific points on demand curves, such as onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of significant void (OSV), onset of flow instability (OFI), and two-phase flow patterns in a single-side heated narrow rectangular channel, having a width of 40 mm and a gap of 3 mm, was carried out. New experimental approaches were adopted to identify OSV and OFI in a narrow rectangular channel. Under experimental conditions, the ONB could be predicted well by the Sato and Matsumura model. The OSV model of Bowring can reasonably predict the OSV if the single-side heated condition is considered. The OFI was close to the saturated boiling point and could be described accurately by Kennedy's correlation. The two-phase flow patterns observed in this experiment could be classified into bubbly, churn, and annular flow. Slug flow was never observed. The OFI always occurred when the bubbles at the channel exit began to coalesce, which corresponded to the beginning of the bubbly-churn transition in flow patterns. Finally, the evolution of specific points and flow pattern transitions were examined in a single-side heated narrow rectangular channel.

  3. Natural upward cross-ventilation potential of a leeward sawtooth roof for a single zone building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peren Montero, J.I.; Ramponi, R.; van Hooff, T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Leite, B.C.C.; Schlünzen, H.

    2014-01-01

    The ventilation potential of four leeward sawtooth roof shapes (B1, C1, D1 and E1) is evaluated under normal wind incidence angle (θ = 0°). 3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed in combination with five turbulence models and the

  4. Indoor particle dynamics in a school office: determination of particle concentrations, deposition rates and penetration factors under naturally ventilated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, X C; Zhao, J J; Jing, Z; Wang, Q G; Ni, P F

    2018-05-09

    Recently, the problem of indoor particulate matter pollution has received much attention. An increasing number of epidemiological studies show that the concentration of atmospheric particulate matter has a significant effect on human health, even at very low concentrations. Most of these investigations have relied upon outdoor particle concentrations as surrogates of human exposures. However, considering that the concentration distribution of the indoor particulate matter is largely dependent on the extent to which these particles penetrate the building and on the degree of suspension in the indoor air, human exposures to particles of outdoor origin may not be equal to outdoor particle concentration levels. Therefore, it is critical to understand the relationship between the particle concentrations found outdoors and those found in indoor micro-environments. In this study, experiments were conducted using a naturally ventilated office located in Qingdao, China. The indoor and outdoor particle concentrations were measured at the same time using an optical counter with four size ranges. The particle size distribution ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 μm, and the experimental period was from April to September, 2016. Based on the experimental data, the dynamic and mass balance model based on time was used to estimate the penetration rate and deposition rate at air exchange rates of 0.03-0.25 h -1 . The values of the penetration rate and deposition velocity of indoor particles were determined to range from 0.45 to 0.82 h -1 and 1.71 to 2.82 m/h, respectively. In addition, the particulate pollution exposure in the indoor environment was analyzed to estimate the exposure hazard from indoor particulate matter pollution, which is important for human exposure to particles and associated health effects. The conclusions from this study can serve to provide a better understanding the dynamics and behaviors of airborne particle entering into buildings. And they will also highlight

  5. Noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatin, J T; Gay, P C

    1999-08-01

    Noninvasive ventilation refers to the delivery of assisted ventilatory support without the use of an endotracheal tube. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) can be delivered by using a volume-controlled ventilator, a pressure-controlled ventilator, a bilevel positive airway pressure ventilator, or a continuous positive airway pressure device. During the past decade, there has been a resurgence in the use of noninvasive ventilation, fueled by advances in technology and clinical trials evaluating its use. Several manufacturers produce portable devices that are simple to operate. This review describes the equipment, techniques, and complications associated with NPPV and also the indications for both short-term and long-term applications. NPPV clearly represents an important addition to the techniques available to manage patients with respiratory failure. Future clinical trials evaluating its many clinical applications will help to define populations of patients most apt to benefit from this type of treatment.

  6. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  8. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    Displacement ventilation is an interesting new type of air distribution principle which should be considered in connection with design of comfort ventilation in both smal1 and large spaces. Research activities on displacement ventilation are large all over the world and new knowledge of design...... methods appears continuously. This book gives an easy introduction to the basis of displacement ventilation and the chapters are written in the order which is used in a design procedure. The main text is extended by five appendices which show some of the new research activities taking place at Aalborg...

  9. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  10. Demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  11. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. Design... vans shall be provided with natural ventilation sufficient to maintain the inside air temperature below... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.10-25 Section 194.10-25 Shipping COAST...

  12. Spatiotemporal variation of radon and carbon dioxide concentrations in an underground quarry: coupled processes of natural ventilation, barometric pumping and internal mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Radon-222 and carbon dioxide concentrations have been measured during several years at several points in the atmosphere of an underground limestone quarry located at a depth of 18 m in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Both concentrations showed a seasonal cycle. Radon concentration varied from 1200 to 2000 Bq m(-3) in summer to about 800-1400 Bq m(-3) in winter, indicating winter ventilation rates varying from 0.6 to 2.5 x 10(-6) s(-1). Carbon dioxide concentration varied from 0.9 to 1.0% in summer, to about 0.1-0.3% in winter. Radon concentration can be corrected for natural ventilation using temperature measurements. The obtained model also accounts for the measured seasonal variation of carbon dioxide. After correction, radon concentrations still exhibit significant temporal variation, mostly associated with the variation of atmospheric pressure, with coupling coefficients varying from -7 to -26 Bq m(-3) hPa(-1). This variation can be accounted for using a barometric pumping model, coupled with natural ventilation in winter, and including internal mixing as well. After correction, radon concentrations exhibit residual temporal variation, poorly correlated between different points, with standard deviations varying from 3 to 6%. This study shows that temporal variation of radon concentrations in underground cavities can be understood to a satisfactory level of detail using non-linear and time-dependent modelling. It is important to understand the temporal variation of radon concentrations and the limitations in their modelling to monitor the properties of natural or artificial underground settings, and to be able to assess the existence of new processes, for example associated with the preparatory phases of volcanic eruptions or earthquakes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatiotemporal variation of radon and carbon dioxide concentrations in an underground quarry: coupled processes of natural ventilation, barometric pumping and internal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, Frederic; Richon, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Radon-222 and carbon dioxide concentrations have been measured during several years at several points in the atmosphere of an underground limestone quarry located at a depth of 18 m in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Both concentrations showed a seasonal cycle. Radon concentration varied from 1200 to 2000 Bq m -3 in summer to about 800-1400 Bq m -3 in winter, indicating winter ventilation rates varying from 0.6 to 2.5 x 10 -6 s -1 . Carbon dioxide concentration varied from 0.9 to 1.0% in summer, to about 0.1-0.3% in winter. Radon concentration can be corrected for natural ventilation using temperature measurements. The obtained model also accounts for the measured seasonal variation of carbon dioxide. After correction, radon concentrations still exhibit significant temporal variation, mostly associated with the variation of atmospheric pressure, with coupling coefficients varying from -7 to -26 Bq m -3 hPa -1 . This variation can be accounted for using a barometric pumping model, coupled with natural ventilation in winter, and including internal mixing as well. After correction, radon concentrations exhibit residual temporal variation, poorly correlated between different points, with standard deviations varying from 3 to 6%. This study shows that temporal variation of radon concentrations in underground cavities can be understood to a satisfactory level of detail using non-linear and time-dependent modelling. It is important to understand the temporal variation of radon concentrations and the limitations in their modelling to monitor the properties of natural or artificial underground settings, and to be able to assess the existence of new processes, for example associated with the preparatory phases of volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  14. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-un...

  15. Behovstyret ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Heiselberg, Per; Reinhold, Claus

    2010-01-01

    I en nylig afsluttet undersøgelse er der udført en række målinger på otte udvalgte børneinstitutioner. Fire af disse med mekanisk ventilation og fire med naturlig ventilation. Formålet er at udvide den erfaringsbaserede viden om funktionen af naturlige og mekaniske ventilationsløsninger i...

  16. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future

  17. Single-Sided Deafness: Impact of Cochlear Implantation on Speech Perception in Complex Noise and on Auditory Localization Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Julia; Baumann, Uwe; Weissgerber, Tobias; Rader, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    To assess auditory localization accuracy and speech reception threshold (SRT) in complex noise conditions in adult patients with acquired single-sided deafness, after intervention with a cochlear implant (CI) in the deaf ear. Nonrandomized, open, prospective patient series. Tertiary referral university hospital. Eleven patients with late-onset single-sided deafness (SSD) and normal hearing in the unaffected ear, who received a CI. All patients were experienced CI users. Unilateral cochlear implantation. Speech perception was tested in a complex multitalker equivalent noise field consisting of multiple sound sources. Speech reception thresholds in noise were determined in aided (with CI) and unaided conditions. Localization accuracy was assessed in complete darkness. Acoustic stimuli were radiated by multiple loudspeakers distributed in the frontal horizontal plane between -60 and +60 degrees. In the aided condition, results show slightly improved speech reception scores compared with the unaided condition in most of the patients. For 8 of the 11 subjects, SRT was improved between 0.37 and 1.70 dB. Three of the 11 subjects showed deteriorations between 1.22 and 3.24 dB SRT. Median localization error decreased significantly by 12.9 degrees compared with the unaided condition. CI in single-sided deafness is an effective treatment to improve the auditory localization accuracy. Speech reception in complex noise conditions is improved to a lesser extent in 73% of the participating CI SSD patients. However, the absence of true binaural interaction effects (summation, squelch) impedes further improvements. The development of speech processing strategies that respect binaural interaction seems to be mandatory to advance speech perception in demanding listening situations in SSD patients.

  18. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  19. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  20. A DANREF certified reference plastic for measurement of overall migration into the food simulant olive oil by single sided testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, K. H.; Lillemark, L.; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    2000-01-01

    A reference material for the determination of overall migration from a plastic coextrudate into the fatty food simulant olive oil was produced and certified in an interlaboratory study. The analyses were carried out according to the ENV 1186 standard from the European Committee for Standardization...... (CEN) [1, 2, 3] with exposure of the coextrudate to olive oil for 10 days at 40 degrees C. After an initial preliminary interlaboratory study eight laboratories participated in the certification round, and two different methods were used to obtain single sided exposure of the plastic to the oil...

  1. On the determination of the overall heat transmission coefficient and soil heat flux for a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse: Analysis of radiation and convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Kozai, Toyoki

    2006-01-01

    A physical model for analyzing the radiative and convective heat transfer in a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse was developed for estimating the overall heat transmission coefficient based on the conduction, convection and thermal radiation heat transfer coefficients and for predicting the soil heat flux. The contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the emission and absorption of thermal radiation was determined. Measurements of the outside and inside greenhouse environments to be used in the analysis were conducted around solar noon (12:19-13:00) on a hot sunny day to provide the maximum solar radiation transmission into the greenhouse. The net solar radiation flux measured at the greenhouse floor showed a reasonable agreement with the predicted value. The net fluxes were estimated around noon. The average net radiation (solar and thermal) at the soil surface was 220.0 W m -2 , the average soil heat flux was 155.0 W m -2 and the average contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the thermal radiation was 22.0 W m -2 . The average overall heat transmission coefficient was 4.0 W m -2 C -1 and was in the range between 3.0 W m -2 C -1 and 6.0 W m -2 C -1 under the different hot summer conditions between the inside and outside of the naturally ventilated, fog cooled greenhouse

  2. Consequences of Stimulus Type on Higher-Order Processing in Single-Sided Deaf Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Mareike; Sandmann, Pascale; Bönitz, Hanna; Kral, Andrej; Büchner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Single-sided deaf subjects with a cochlear implant (CI) provide the unique opportunity to compare central auditory processing of the electrical input (CI ear) and the acoustic input (normal-hearing, NH, ear) within the same individual. In these individuals, sensory processing differs between their two ears, while cognitive abilities are the same irrespectively of the sensory input. To better understand perceptual-cognitive factors modulating speech intelligibility with a CI, this electroencephalography study examined the central-auditory processing of words, the cognitive abilities, and the speech intelligibility in 10 postlingually single-sided deaf CI users. We found lower hit rates and prolonged response times for word classification during an oddball task for the CI ear when compared with the NH ear. Also, event-related potentials reflecting sensory (N1) and higher-order processing (N2/N4) were prolonged for word classification (targets versus nontargets) with the CI ear compared with the NH ear. Our results suggest that speech processing via the CI ear and the NH ear differs both at sensory (N1) and cognitive (N2/N4) processing stages, thereby affecting the behavioral performance for speech discrimination. These results provide objective evidence for cognition to be a key factor for speech perception under adverse listening conditions, such as the degraded speech signal provided from the CI. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Dual-function photonic integrated circuit for frequency octo-tupling or single-side-band modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hall, Trevor J

    2015-06-01

    A dual-function photonic integrated circuit for microwave photonic applications is proposed. The circuit consists of four linear electro-optic phase modulators connected optically in parallel within a generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architecture. The photonic circuit is arranged to have two separate output ports. A first port provides frequency up-conversion of a microwave signal from the electrical to the optical domain; equivalently single-side-band modulation. A second port provides tunable millimeter wave carriers by frequency octo-tupling of an appropriate amplitude RF carrier. The circuit exploits the intrinsic relative phases between the ports of multi-mode interference couplers to provide substantially all the static optical phases needed. The operation of the proposed dual-function photonic integrated circuit is verified by computer simulations. The performance of the frequency octo-tupling and up-conversion functions is analyzed in terms of the electrical signal to harmonic distortion ratio and the optical single side band to unwanted harmonics ratio, respectively.

  4. Numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple atrium building and its effect on the thermal comfort conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Oosthuizen, Patrick H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study use of solar-assisted buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple atrium building is explored numerically with particular emphasis on the thermal comfort conditions in the building. Initially various geometric configurations of the atrium space were considered in order to investigate airflows and temperature distributions in the building using a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) modelling approach with the SST-k–ω turbulence model and the Discrete Transfer Radiation Model (DTRM) was used for the investigations. The steady-state governing equations were solved using a commercial CFD solver FLUENT © . From the numerical results obtained, it was noted that an atrium space integrated with a solar chimney would be a relatively better option to be used in an atrium building. In the geometry selected, the performance of the building in response to various changes in design parameters was investigated. The produced airflows and temperature distributions were then used to evaluate indoor thermal comfort conditions in terms of the thermal comfort indices, i.e. the well-known predicted mean vote (PMV) index, its modifications especially for natural ventilation, predicted percent dissatisfied (PPD) index and Percent dissatisfied (PD) factor due to draft. It was found that the thermal conditions in the occupied areas of the building developed as a result of the use of solar-assisted buoyancy-driven ventilation for the particular values of the design parameters selected are mostly in the comfortable zone. Finally, it is demonstrated that the proposed methodology leads to reliable thermal comfort predictions, while the effect of various design variables on the performance of the building is easily recognized. - Highlights: ► Numerical investigations were carried for the use of buoyancy-driven displacement ventilation in a simple atrium building. ► Effect of various atrium

  5. 46 CFR 98.25-75 - Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... shall be fitted with efficient natural or mechanical ventilation. (b) Enclosed compartments in which... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 98.25-75 Section 98.25-75 Shipping COAST... Ventilation. (a) All enclosed spaces containing cargo tanks fitted with bottom outlet connections shall be...

  6. Ventilation strategies and indoor environment in classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other building types, the school building has much higher occupancy density and ventilation demand. In Demark, most of the school buildings are ventilated by natural manner. There is a risk of poor indoor environment associated with the lack of ventilation system or insufficient...

  7. A Synoptic View of the Ventilation and Circulation of Antarctic Bottom Water from Chlorofluorocarbons and Natural Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkey, Sarah G.; Smethie, William M.; Gebbie, Geoffrey; Gordon, Arnold L.; Sonnerup, Rolf E.; Warner, Mark J.; Bullister, John L.

    2018-01-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is the coldest, densest, most prolific water mass in the global ocean. AABW forms at several distinct regions along the Antarctic coast and feeds into the bottom limb of the meridional overturning circulation, filling most of the global deep ocean. AABW has warmed, freshened, and declined in volume around the globe in recent decades, which has implications for the global heat and sea level rise budgets. Over the past three decades, the use of tracers, especially time-varying tracers such as chlorofluorocarbons, has been essential to our understanding of the formation, circulation, and variability of AABW. Here, we review three decades of temperature, salinity, and tracer data and analysis that have led to our current knowledge of AABW and how the southern component of deep-ocean ventilation is changing with time.

  8. On the influence of viaduct and ground heating on pollutant dispersion in 2D street canyons and toward single-sided ventilated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper employs Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations to investigate the influence of ground heating intensities and viaduct configurations on gaseous and particle dispersion within two-dimensional idealized street canyons (typical aspect ratio H/W=1) and their transpo...

  9. The operation of a single-sided linear induction motor with squirrel-cage and solid-steel reaction rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, A. R.; Katz, R. M.

    1980-09-01

    Two test programs have been conducted to evaluate the performance of a single-sided linear induction motor with a squirrel-cage reaction rail and with a solid steel reaction rail. A 1.73-m-long six-pole stator interacted with the rails mounted on the rim of a 7.6-m-diam wheel. A 64-channel data acquisition system allowed tests to be performed over a wide range of operating conditions at speeds up to 20 m/sec. Typical test results which compare and contrast the mechanical, electrical and magnetic behavior of the SLIMs are presented. The test data are being used to assess the SLIM as an integrated suspension/propulsion system and for other transportation applications.

  10. Optical trapping and binding of particles in an optofluidic stable Fabry-Pérot resonator with single-sided injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Noha; Malak, Maurine; Marty, Frédéric; Angelescu, Dan E; Richalot, Elodie; Bourouina, Tarik

    2014-07-07

    In this article, microparticles are manipulated inside an optofluidic Fabry-Pérot cylindrical cavity embedding a fluidic capillary tube, taking advantage of field enhancement and multiple reflections within the optically-resonant cavity. This enables trapping of suspended particles with single-side injection of light and with low optical power. A Hermite-Gaussian standing wave is developed inside the cavity, forming trapping spots at the locations of the electromagnetic field maxima with a strong intensity gradient. The particles get arranged in a pattern related to the mechanism affecting them: either optical trapping or optical binding. This is proven to eventually translate into either an axial one dimensional (1D) particle array or a cluster of particles. Numerical simulations are performed to model the field distributions inside the cavity allowing a behavioral understanding of the phenomena involved in each case.

  11. Ventilation of radioactive enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caminade, F.; Laurent, H.

    1957-01-01

    Mechanical, physical and chemical manipulations on radioactive products must be carried out in properly ventilated enclosed places. The air extracted can only be discharged into the atmosphere after a correct filtration. The power of the ventilation systems is a function of the dimensions and purpose of the enclosure? The choice of types of filter is determined by the physical state and chemical nature of the radioactive materials to be manipulated. This study deals with the individual equipment of small installations: glove boxes, manipulation boxes with outside control and, if necessary, production chambers (maximum useful volume: 5 m 3 ). The performances of three types of 'ventilators', and the modifications provided by the addition of filters, are measured and compared. (author) [fr

  12. Liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported.

  13. Dual-sided reading versus single-sided reading: comparison of image quality and radiation dose between the two computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Shaojuan; Qi Hengtao; Zhao Yongxia; Jiao Fanglian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the difference in image quality and exposure dose between single-sided reading image plate (IP) and dual-sided reading IP. Methods: A contrast-detail phantom CDRAD 2.0 was exposed by single-sided and dual-sided reading IP with different mAs sets. The entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. Images were then presented to two radiologists on a high resolution monitor of diagnosis workstation. The image quality figure (IQF) was measured for each image. Statistical analysis was performed using Spearman's correlation test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test to compare the difference in image quality and exposure dose between single-sided IP and dual-sided reading IP. Results: With different tube current dosage of 5.6, 12.0, 20.0, 25.0, and 40.0 mAs, IQF values of single-sided reading IP were 47.95, 37.68, 34.31, 28.61, and 24.65, respectively, while those of dual- sided reading IP were 38.83, 29.81, 29.65, 25.16, and 21.43, respectively. The IQF difference between them showed statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion: Image quality of dual-sided reading IP has been proved to be far superior to that of single-sided reading IP, in particular for low contrast detail. The image quality of single-sided reading IP is similar to that of dual-sided reading IP only at high dose levels. The clinical application of dual-sided reading IP will reduce the exposure dose by about 25% compared with single-sided reading IP. (authors)

  14. Efeito da ventilação natural e mecânica sobre o desempenho de porcas em lactação Effect of natural and mechanical ventilation on performance of lactation sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cláudio Perdomo

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available O controle efetivo da ventilação é fundamental para maximizar o bem-estar, o desempenho e a saúde dos suínos. Este trabalho avaliou o efeito de sistemas de ventilação natural através de janelas basculantes (com e sem exaustor eólico e mecânica, dimensionados para a retirada da carga térmica incidente, nas condições de verão, sobre o condicionamento ambiental e desempenho de porcas em lactação, em Concórdia, SC, no período de 1991/92. Embora tenha sido observado efeito da estação do ano (P0,05. O condicionamento térmico no verão foi considerado estressante em todos os sistemas, com temperaturas (Ti elevadas (> 22,0°C, taxas de ventilação (Vi deficientes (13 dias, em comparação com as observadas no inverno: Ti (Air movement has been shown to influence performance of confined swine, and that appropriate air flow is fundamental to better animal comfort, and to minimize sanitary problems. The effect of window with and without aeolic exhaustion and mechanical ventilation designed only for hot season was evaluated at Concordia, SC, Brazil, during 1991/92. Although effect of season (P0.05. The hot season environment was stressing for animals, due to higher environment temperature (Ti (>22.0°C, low air velocity (Vi (13 days during the hot season as compared to cold season: Ti (<19.0°C, Vi (<0.1 m/s, CR (<4.57 kg/day and IDC (<7 days, respectively. In conclusion, ventilation systems based only on natural openings are sufficient for cold season, but are not for hot season due to increase in the ventilation needs.

  15. Personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This paper reviews...... existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analyzed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  16. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Mattsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Mats

    Full-scale experiments were made in a displacement ventilated room with two breathing thermal manikins to study the effect of movements and breathing on the vertical contaminant distribution, and on the personal exposure of occupants. Concentrations were measured with tracer gas equipment...

  17. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  18. A clinical protocol for predicting outcomes with an implantable prosthetic device (Baha) in patients with single-sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Hillary A; Fabry, David A; Telischi, Fred F; Arheart, Kristopher L; Angeli, Simon I

    2010-01-01

    The Baha implant is increasingly becoming a common form of treatment for individuals with single-sided deafness (SSD). However, evidence-based guidelines for determining candidacy in these patients are not yet established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical utility of speech-in-noise testing as a part of the preoperative evaluation of the Baha device in patients with SSD. The study design was a prospective cohort of 24 English-speaking adults comparing preoperative results on speech-in-noise measures using the Baha Cordelle II headband stimulator to postoperative results using the patient's external Baha processor. Outcome measures included signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss as measured by the QuickSIN™ and scores of self-reported disability questionnaires. Wilcoxon signed-rank test resulted in no significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative methods for measuring benefit on listening in noise tasks. Passing Bablok regression analysis showed the preoperative and postoperative results to be statistically equivalent, which suggests that postoperative results can be predicted during preoperative testing. Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed significant improvements in self-reported disability postoperatively. The results support the use of speech-in-noise measures as an accurate predictor of overall benefit in patients with SSD prior to implantation. American Academy of Audiology.

  19. Performance Test Results of a Single-sided Silicon Strip Detector with a Radioactive Source and a Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Y. I.; Kah, D. H.; Son, D. H.; Kang, H. D.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Bae, J. B.; Ryu, S.; Park, H.; Kim, K. R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to high intrinsic precision and high speed properties of a silicon material, the silicon detector has been used in various applications such as medical imaging detector, radiation detector, positioning detectors in space science and experimental particle physics. High technology, modern equipment, and deep expertise are required to design and fabricate good quality of silicon sensors. Only few facilities in the world can develop silicon sensors which meet requirements of sensor performances. That is one of main reasons that the silicon sensor is so expensive and it takes time to purchase the silicon sensor once it is ordered. We designed and fabricated AC-coupled single-sided silicon strip sensors and developed front-end electronics and DAQ system to read out sensor signals. The silicon strip sensors were fabricated on a 5-in. n-type silicon wafer which has an orientation, high resistivity (>5 kΩ · cm) and a thickness of 380 μm. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each channel by using a radioactive source and a 45 MeV proton beam from the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS) in Seoul. We present the measurement results of the SNRs of the silicon strip sensor with a proton beam and radioactive sources

  20. Using aided cortical assessment as an objective tool to evaluate cochlear implant fitting in users with single-sided deafness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Távora-Vieira

    Full Text Available To assess the use of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs to verify, and if necessary, optimize the cochlear implant (CI fitting of adult CI users with postlingual single-sided deafness (SSD.Sound field cortical responses to the speech tokens /m/, /g/, /t/, and /s/ were recorded from input to the CI while the normal hearing ear was masked. Responses were evaluated by visual inspection and classified as presence or absence of the CAEPs components P1, N1, P2. In case of an absence fitting was adjusted accordingly. After fitting, subjects were asked to use their new setting for 2-3 weeks for acclimatization purposes and then return for retesting. At retesting, new CAEP recordings were performed to objectively ensure that the new fitting maps effectively activated the auditory cortex.In 14/19 subjects, as per visual inspection, clear CAEPs were recorded by each speech token and were, therefore, not refit. In the other 5 subjects, CAEPs could not be evoked for at least one speech token. The fitting maps in these subjects were adjusted until clear CAEPs were evoked for all 4 speech tokens.CAEP can be used to quickly and objectively verify the suitability of CI fitting in experienced adult CI users with SSD. If used in the early post-implantation stage, this method could help CI users derive greater benefit for CI use and, therefore, be more committed to auditory training.

  1. Tinnitus Suppression by Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation in Single Sided Deafness - A Prospective Clinical Trial: Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remo A G J Arts

    Full Text Available Earlier studies show that a Cochlear Implant (CI, capable of providing intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, appears to suppress tinnitus at least for minutes. The current main objective is to compare the long-term suppressive effects of looped (i.e. repeated electrical stimulation (without environmental sound perception with the standard stimulation pattern of a CI (with environmental sound perception. This could open new possibilities for the development of a "Tinnitus Implant" (TI, an intracochlear pulse generator for the suppression of tinnitus.Ten patients with single sided deafness suffering from unilateral tinnitus in the deaf ear are fitted with a CI (MED-EL Corporation, Innsbruck, Austria. Stimulation patterns are optimized for each individual patient, after which they are compared using a randomized crossover design, with a follow-up of six months, followed by a 3 month period using the modality of patient's choice.Results show that tinnitus can be suppressed with intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, even long term. No significant difference in tinnitus suppression was found between the standard clinical CI and the TI.It can be concluded that coding of environmental sounds is no requirement for tinnitus suppression with intracochlear electrical stimulation. It is therefore plausible that tinnitus suppression by CI is not solely caused by an attention shift from the tinnitus to environmental sounds. Both the standard clinical CI and the experimental TI are potential treatment options for tinnitus. These findings offer perspectives for a successful clinical application of the TI, possibly even in patients with significant residual hearing.TrialRegister.nl NTR3374.

  2. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Johannes Hermanus Agterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  3. No auditory experience, no tinnitus: Lessons from subjects with congenital- and acquired single-sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yeon; Nam, Dong Woo; Koo, Ja-Won; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Song, Jae-Jin

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have adopted the Bayesian brain model to explain the generation of tinnitus in subjects with auditory deafferentation. That is, as the human brain works in a Bayesian manner to reduce environmental uncertainty, missing auditory information due to hearing loss may cause auditory phantom percepts, i.e., tinnitus. This type of deafferentation-induced auditory phantom percept should be preceded by auditory experience because the fill-in phenomenon, namely tinnitus, is based upon auditory prediction and the resultant prediction error. For example, a recent animal study observed the absence of tinnitus in cats with congenital single-sided deafness (SSD; Eggermont and Kral, Hear Res 2016). However, no human studies have investigated the presence and characteristics of tinnitus in subjects with congenital SSD. Thus, the present study sought to reveal differences in the generation of tinnitus between subjects with congenital SSD and those with acquired SSD to evaluate the replicability of previous animal studies. This study enrolled 20 subjects with congenital SSD and 44 subjects with acquired SSD and examined the presence and characteristics of tinnitus in the groups. None of the 20 subjects with congenital SSD perceived tinnitus on the affected side, whereas 30 of 44 subjects with acquired SSD experienced tinnitus on the affected side. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between tinnitus characteristics and the audiometric characteristics of the SSD. In accordance with the findings of the recent animal study, tinnitus was absent in subjects with congenital SSD, but relatively frequent in subjects with acquired SSD, which suggests that the development of tinnitus should be preceded by auditory experience. In other words, subjects with profound congenital peripheral deafferentation do not develop auditory phantom percepts because no auditory predictions are available from the Bayesian brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. To Investigate the Influence of Building Envelope and Natural Ventilation on Thermal Heat Balance in Office Buildings in Warm and Humid Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Pradeep G.; Garg, Naresh Kumar; Kamath, Kiran

    2017-07-01

    India’s commercial building sector is witnessing robust growth. India continues to be a key growth market among global corporates and this is reflective in the steady growth in demand for prime office space. A recent trend that has been noted is the increase in demand for office spaces not just in major cities but also in smaller tier II and Tier III cities. Growth in the commercial building sector projects a rising trend of energy intensive mechanical systems in office buildings in India. The air conditioning market in India is growing at 25% annually. This is due to the ever increasing demand to maintain thermal comfort in tropical regions. Air conditioning is one of the most energy intensive technologies which are used in buildings. As a result India is witnessing significant spike in energy demand and further widening the demand supply gap. Challenge in India is to identify passive measures in building envelope design in office buildings to reduce the cooling loads and conserve energy. This paper investigates the overall heat gain through building envelope components and natural ventilation in warm and humid climate region through experimental and simulation methods towards improved thermal environmental performance.

  5. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ventilation system unless natural ventilation in all ordinary weather conditions is satisfactory to the OCMI... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.600 Ventilation of...

  6. A refined protocol for calculating air flow rate of naturally-ventilated broiler barns based on co2 mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Barreto-Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio se realizó para evaluar protocolos relativamente simples para el monitoreo de la tasa de ventilación (TV en instalaciones pecuarias con ventilación natural (ENV. Los protocolos de ensayo se aplicaron primero a una instalación de pollos de engorde mecánicamente ventilada (EMV, donde TV se estimó con mayor precisión y luego se utilizaron para calcular la TV en la ENV. Las concentraciones de CO2 se midieron con dos esquemas de muestreo diferentes: (S1 la media de las mediciones al interior y a lo largo de la longitud de la instalación a dos alturas de 0,5 m y 1,5 m del suelo; y (S2 igual que la anterior pero con las mediciones de concentración fueron realizadas únicamente a 0,5 m del suelo. La tasa de producción de CO2 metabólico dinámico de las aves se predijo con dos algoritmos diferentes: (A1 el mantenimiento constante durante los periodos de luz y oscuridad, y (A2 que varía con la actividad de los animales sobre una base horaria. Los resultados demostraron que la combinación de S2 con A1 o A2 presentó la mejor estimación de TV en el ENV.

  7. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration

  8. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  9. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free...

  10. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Compared with conventional ventilation systems, diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk due to the low...

  11. Control of Airborne Infectious Diseases in Ventilated Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to a room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air...... to have high ventilation effectiveness. Furthermore, personalized ventilation may reduce the risk of cross-infection, and in some cases, it can also reduce the source of infection. Personalized ventilation can especially be used in hospital wards, aircraft cabins and, in general, where people are in fixed...

  12. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  13. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options

  14. 46 CFR 169.315 - Ventilation (other than machinery spaces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... section is satisfied, a vessel having only a natural ventilation system must satisfy the following: V/A≥1... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation (other than machinery spaces). 169.315... SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Hull Structure § 169.315 Ventilation (other than machinery...

  15. 9 CFR 354.226 - Lighting and ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Facilities § 354.226 Lighting and ventilation. There shall be ample light, either natural or artificial or both, of good quality and well distributed, and sufficient ventilation for all rooms and compartments... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lighting and ventilation. 354.226...

  16. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  17. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Ventilation systems with vertical displacement flow have been used in industrial areas with extensive heat loads for many years. Hot and contaminant air is carried directly from the occupied zone towards the ceiling by hot processes and other activities which create a natural convection flow....

  18. Contaminants in ventilated filling boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, D. T.; Linden, P. F.

    While energy efficiency is important, the adoption of energy-efficient ventilation systems still requires the provision of acceptable indoor air quality. Many low-energy systems, such as displacement or natural ventilation, rely on temperature stratification within the interior environment, always extracting the warmest air from the top of the room. Understanding buoyancy-driven convection in a confined ventilated space is key to understanding the flow that develops with many of these modern low-energy ventilation schemes. In this work we study the transport of an initially uniformly distributed passive contaminant in a displacement-ventilated space. Representing a heat source as an ideal sourced of buoyancy, analytical and numerical models are developed that allow us to compare the average efficiency of contaminant removal between traditional mixing and modern low-energy systems. A set of small-scale analogue laboratory experiments was also conducted to further validate our analytical and numerical solutions.We find that on average traditional and low-energy ventilation methods are similar with regard to pollutant flushing efficiency. This is because the concentration being extracted from the system at any given time is approximately the same for both systems. However, very different vertical concentration gradients exist. For the low-energy system, a peak in contaminant concentration occurs at the temperature interface that is established within the space. This interface is typically designed to sit at some intermediate height in the space. Since this peak does not coincide with the extraction point, displacement ventilation does not offer the same benefits for pollutant flushing as it does for buoyancy removal.

  19. Patient-Ventilator Dyssynchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira-Markela Antonogiannaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In mechanically ventilated patients, assisted mechanical ventilation (MV is employed early, following the acute phase of critical illness, in order to eliminate the detrimental effects of controlled MV, most notably the development of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction. Nevertheless, the benefits of assisted MV are often counteracted by the development of patient-ventilator dyssynchrony. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony occurs when either the initiation and/or termination of mechanical breath is not in time agreement with the initiation and termination of neural inspiration, respectively, or if the magnitude of mechanical assist does not respond to the patient’s respiratory demand. As patient-ventilator dyssynchrony has been associated with several adverse effects and can adversely influence patient outcome, every effort should be made to recognize and correct this occurrence at bedside. To detect patient-ventilator dyssynchronies, the physician should assess patient comfort and carefully inspect the pressure- and flow-time waveforms, available on the ventilator screen of all modern ventilators. Modern ventilators offer several modifiable settings to improve patient-ventilator interaction. New proportional modes of ventilation are also very helpful in improving patient-ventilator interaction.

  20. Magnetic field modeling and optimal operational control of a single-side axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-T.; Lee, S.-C.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed approach for analyzing magnetic field distributions of a single-sided axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles will be provided. Based on the devised flux model, the related position-dependent torque and axial force of the motor can be systematically developed. By incorporating adequate control designs, the optimal operational performance of the motor system can be conveniently achieved. Results showed that not only the motor structure is suitable for related military and transportation applications, but also the magnetic field model can provide appropriate mathematical basis for relative operational realizations

  1. Ventilation of radioactive enclosures; Ventilation des enceintes radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminade, F; Laurent, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    Mechanical, physical and chemical manipulations on radioactive products must be carried out in properly ventilated enclosed places. The air extracted can only be discharged into the atmosphere after a correct filtration. The power of the ventilation systems is a function of the dimensions and purpose of the enclosure? The choice of types of filter is determined by the physical state and chemical nature of the radioactive materials to be manipulated. This study deals with the individual equipment of small installations: glove boxes, manipulation boxes with outside control and, if necessary, production chambers (maximum useful volume: 5 m{sup 3}). The performances of three types of 'ventilators', and the modifications provided by the addition of filters, are measured and compared. (author) [French] Les manipulations oceaniques, physiques et chimiques sur des produits radioactifs doivent s'effectuer dans des enceintes convenablement ventilees. L'air extrait ne peut etre rejete dans l'atmosphere qu'apres une filtration correcte. La puissance des installations de ventilation est fonction des dimensions de l'enceinte et de son utilisation. Le choix des types de filtres est determine par l'etat physique et la nature ehimique des corps radioactifs manipules. Notre etude porte sur l'equipement individuel d'installations de petites dimensions: boites a gants, boites a pinces et, a la rigueur, enceintes de production (volume maximum utilisable 5 m{sup 3}). Nous mesurons et comparons les performances de trois types de 'ventilateurs' et les modifications apportees par l'adjonction de filtres. (auteur)

  2. Mechanical ventilator - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007240.htm Mechanical ventilator - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that assists with breathing. ...

  3. Learning about ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000458.htm Learning about ventilators To use the sharing features on this page, ... fixed or changed. How Does Being on a Ventilator Feel? A person receives medicine to remain comfortable ...

  4. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... unless natural ventilation in all ordinary weather conditions is satisfactory to the OCMI. (d) An exhaust... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed...

  5. 46 CFR 92.15-15 - Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided, passenger spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. However, vessels which... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-15 Ventilation for crew...

  6. 46 CFR 190.15-15 - Ventilation for living spaces and quarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. By a... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for living spaces and quarters. 190.15-15... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-15 Ventilation for living spaces and quarters...

  7. 46 CFR 72.15-20 - Ventilation for crew quarters and passenger spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. However, vessels which trade regularly in... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for crew quarters and passenger spaces. 72... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-20 Ventilation for crew quarters and passenger...

  8. Improved Performance With Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ellison; Lee, Seung Jae; Karn, Ashish; Hong, Jiarong; Arndt, Roger

    2013-11-01

    Drag reduction and/or speed augmentation of marine vehicles by means of supercavitation is a topic of great interest. During the initial launch of a supercavitating vehicle, ventilation is required to supply an artificial cavity until conditions at which a natural supercavity can be sustained are reached. Various aspects of the flow physics of a supercavitating vehicle have been under investigation for several years at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Both steady flow and simulated flow below a wave train have been studied. Using a high speed camera and the proper software, it is possible to synchronize cavity dimensions with pressure measurements taken inside the cavity to permit an in-depth study of unsteadiness. It was found that flow unsteadiness caused a decrease in the overall length of the supercavity while having only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter. Results regarding supercavity shape, ventilation demand, cavitation parameters and closure methods are reviewed in light of new studies that focused on various closure mechanisms. Sponsored by ONR.

  9. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  10. Ventilation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In this work an examination is made of ventilation problems in nuclear installations, of the fuel cycle or the handling of radioactive compounds. The study covers the detection of radioactive aerosols, purification, iodine trapping, ventilation equipment and its maintenance, engineering, safety of ventilation, fire efficiency, operation, regulations and normalization [fr

  11. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  12. Ventilation and ventilation/perfusion ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valind, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    The thesis is based on five different papers. The labelling of specific tracer compounds with positron emitting radionuclides enables a range of structural, physiological and biochemical parameters in the lung to be measured non-invasively, using positron emission tomography. This concept affords a unique opportunity for in vivo studies of different expressions of pulmonary pathophysiology at the regional level. The present thesis describes the application of positron emission tomography to the measurements of ventilation and ventilation/perfusion ratios using inert gas tracers, neon-19 and nitrogen-13 respectively. The validity of the methods applied was investigated with respect to the transport of inert gas tracers in the human lung. Both ventilation and the ventilation/perfusion ratio may be obtained with errors less than 10 % in the normal lung. In disease, however, errors may increase in those instances where the regional ventilation is very low or the intra-regional gas flow distribution is markedly nonuniform. A 2-3 fold increase in ventilation was demonstrated in normal nonsmoking subjects going from ventral to dorsal regions in the supine posture. These large regional differences could be well explained by the intrinsic elastic properties of lung tissue, considering the gravitational gradient in transpulmonary pressure. In asymptomatic smokers substantial regional ventilatroy abnormalities were found whilst the regional gas volume was similar in smokers and nonsmokers. The uncoupling between ventilation and gas volume probably reflects inflammatory changes in the airways. The regional differences in dV/dt/dQ/dt were relatively small and blood flow was largely matched to ventilation in the supine posture. However, small regions of lung with very low ventilation, unmatched by blood flow commonly exists in the most dependent parts of the lung in both smokers and nonsmokers. (29 illustrations, 7 tables, 113 references)

  13. Ventilation effectiveness : health benefits of heat recovery ventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Studies have shown that the installation of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) in homes in northern Canada could improve indoor air quality and the respiratory health of inhabitants. Low ventilation rates are common in many homes in the North because the climate is severe, homes are smaller and lack basements, and occupancies are higher, leading to unhealthy indoor air quality. Northern communities also have a high rate of respiratory infections. HRVs recover much of the energy used to ventilate, which is desirable in cold regions with high heating costs. For the study, the test sample was divided into two types of houses, notably houses with active HRVs and those with control HRVs that were installed and operated but that did not function. The study results showed that HRVs provided increased ventilation. Complaints by residents about HRV noise, discomfort, or low humidity were common but equally spread between those with active and placebo HRVs. The study showed that the system design needs to be improved to better suit the needs of Inuit families. The nature of northern housing presents installation and maintenance challenges. It is hard to retrofit HRV ducting inside small, existing houses, and building supplies arrive infrequently, so detailed planning and careful take-offs of all supplies and materials must be done well in advance of construction. In addition, contractors are hard to locate and have variable expertise, and there is little technical follow-up. Robust technical support by local contractors and housing authorities is therefore important. 2 refs.

  14. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  15. Development and evaluation of a practical method to measure the Depth of Interaction function for a single side readout PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stringhini, G.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2016-01-01

    In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners, the knowledge of depth of interaction (DOI) of the gamma ray along the main axis of the scintillator is a fundamental information in order to avoid parallax error and to achieve high performances in terms of spatial resolution. Recently we developed a new method to obtain the DOI function for a single side readout PET module, recirculating the scintillation light in the matrix by means of a mirror placed on top of the module. In a complete PET scanner, periodical DOI calibrations have to be performed to prevent time dependent miscalibrations and performance degradations. The current DOI calibration relies on a coincidence system between the module and an external scintillator to provide a priori the DOI information and it is clearly not feasible in a real system without unpractical disassemblies of the scanner. In this paper we develop instead a fast and precise calibration method based on uniform irradiation of the scintillators. Three irradiation modalities ...

  16. Evaluation of ventilators for mouthpiece ventilation in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Delord, Vincent; Leroux, Karl; Lofaso, Frédéric; Hautot, Solène; Toussaint, Michel; Orlikowski, David; Louis, Bruno; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2014-09-01

    Daytime mouthpiece ventilation is a useful adjunct to nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with neuromuscular disease. The aims of the study were to analyze the practice of mouthpiece ventilation and to evaluate the performance of ventilators for mouthpiece ventilation. Practice of mouthpiece ventilation was assessed by a questionnaire, and the performance of 6 home ventilators with mouthpiece ventilation was assessed in a bench test using 24 different conditions per ventilator: 3 mouthpieces, a child and an adult patient profile, and 4 ventilatory modes. Questionnaires were obtained from 30 subjects (mean age 33 ± 11 y) using NIV for 12 ± 7 y. Fifteen subjects used NIV for > 20 h/day, and 11 were totally ventilator-dependent. The subject-reported benefits of mouthpiece ventilation were a reduction in dyspnea (73%) and fatigue (93%) and an improvement in speech (43%) and eating (27%). The bench study showed that none of the ventilators, even those with mouthpiece ventilation software, were able to deliver mouthpiece ventilation without alarms and/or autotriggering in each condition. Alarms and/or ineffective triggering or autotriggering were observed in 135 of the 198 conditions. The occurrence of alarms was more common with a large mouthpiece without a filter compared to a small mouthpiece with a filter (P ventilator. Subjects are satisfied with mouthpiece ventilation. Alarms are common with home ventilators, although less common in those with mouthpiece ventilation software. Improvements in home ventilators are needed to facilitate the expansion of mouthpiece ventilation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Surgical treatment of choanal atresia with transnasal endoscopic approach with stentless single side-hinged flap technique: 5 year retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Saraniti

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Choanal atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the nasal cavity characterized by the complete obliteration of the posterior choanae. In 67% of cases choanal atresia is unilateral, affecting mainly (71% the right nasal cavity. In contrast to the unilateral form, bilateral choanal atresia is a life-threatening condition often associated with respiratory distress with feeding and intermittent cyanosis exacerbated by crying. Surgical treatment remains the only therapeutic option. Objective: To report our experience in the use of a transnasal endoscopic approach with stentless single side-hinged flap technique for the surgical management of choanal atresia. Methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of surgical outcomes of 18 patients treated for choanal atresia with a transnasal technique employing a single side-hinged flap without stent placement. All subjects were assessed preoperatively with a nasal endoscopy and a Maxillofacial computed tomography scan. Results: Ten males and eight females with a mean age at the time of surgery of 20.05 ± 11.32 years, underwent surgery for choanal atresia. Fifteen subjects (83.33% had a bony while 3 (26.77% a mixed bony-membranous atretic plate. Two and sixteen cases suffered from bilateral and unilateral choanal atresia respectively. No intra- and/or early postoperative complications were observed. Between 2 and 3 months after surgery two cases (11.11% of partial restenosis were found. Only one of these presented a relapse of the nasal obstruction and was subsequently successfully repaired with a second endoscopic procedure. Conclusion: The surgical technique described follows the basic requirements of corrective surgery and allows good visualization, evaluation and treatment of the atretic plate and the posterior third of the septum, in order to create the new choanal opening. We believe that the use of a stent is not necessary, as recommended in case of other surgical techniques

  18. Ventilation System Strategy for a Prospective Korean Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki

    2005-01-01

    In the stage of conceptual design for the construction and operation of the geologic repository for radioactive wastes, it is important to consider a repository ventilation system which serves the repository working environment, hygiene and safety of the public at large, and will allow safe maintenance like moisture content elimination in repository for the duration of the repositories life, construction/operation/closure, also allowing safe waste transportation and emplacement. This paper describes the possible ventilation system design criteria and requirements for the prospective Korean radioactive waste repositories with emphasis on the underground rock cavity disposal method in the both cases of low and medium-level and high-level wastes. It was found that the most important concept is separate ventilation systems for the construction (development) and waste emplacement (storage) activities. In addition, ventilation network system modeling, natural ventilation, ventilation monitoring systems and real time ventilation simulation, and fire simulation and emergency system in the repository are briefly discussed.

  19. Protective garment ventilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ventilating a protective garment, space suit system, and/or pressure suits to maintain a comfortable and nontoxic atmosphere within is described. The direction of flow of a ventilating and purging gas in portions of the garment may be reversed in order to compensate for changes in environment and activity of the wearer. The entire flow of the ventilating gas can also be directed first to the helmet associated with the garment.

  20. Ventilation rates and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundell, Jan; Levin, H; Nazaroff, W W

    2011-01-01

    and health effects to inform the relationship. Consistency was found across multiple investigations and different epidemiologic designs for different populations. Multiple health endpoints show similar relationships with ventilation rate. There is biological plausibility for an association of health outcomes...... studies of the relationship between ventilation rates and health, especially in diverse climates, in locations with polluted outdoor air and in buildings other than offices. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ventilation with outdoor air plays an important role influencing human exposures to indoor pollutants...

  1. Ventilation of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Y.; Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Dumas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the authors describe the ventilation of French mines in terms of the primary ventilation system, which brings the outside air close to the working places using the overall structure of the mine to form the airways, and the secondary ventilation system, which is for the distribution of the primary air or for the ventilation of the development drifts and blind tunnels. Brief mention is made of the French regulations on the ventilation of mines in general and uranium mines in particular. The authors describe the equipment used and discuss the installed capacities and air flow per man and per working place. The difficulties encountered in properly ventilating various types of working places are mentioned, such as sub-level development drifts, reinforced stopes, and storage chambers with an artificial crown. The second part of the paper is devoted to computer calculations of the primary ventilation system. It is explained why the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has found it necessary to make these calculations. Without restating the mathematical theories underlying the methods employed, the authors demonstrate how simple measuring instruments and a small-size computer can be used to solve the ventilation problems arising in French mines. Emphasis is given to the layout of the ventilation system and to air flow and negative pressure measurements at the base of the mine. The authors show how calculations can be applied to new heading operations, a change in resistance, the replacement or addition of a ventilator, and a new air inlet or outlet. The authors come to the conclusion that since ventilation is at present the most reliable way of avoiding the pollution of mines, a thorough knowledge of the capabilities in this respect can often help improve working conditions. Despite the progress made, however, constant surveillance of the ventilation systems in uranium mines by a separate team with no responsibility for production problems is

  2. Ventilation of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Y.; Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Dumas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the authors describe the ventilation of French mines in terms of the primary ventilation system, which brings the outside air close to the working places using the overall structure of the mine to form the airways, and the secondary ventilation system, which is for the distribution of the primary air or for the ventilation of the development drifts and blind tunnels. Brief mention is made of the French regulations on the ventilation of mines in general and uranium mines in particular. The authors describe the equipment used and discuss the installed capacities and air flow per man and per working place. The difficulties encountered in properly ventilating various types of working places are mentioned, such as sublevel development drifts, reinforced stopes, and storage chambers with an artificial crown. The second part of the paper is devoted to computer calculations of the primary ventilation system. It is explained why the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has found it necessary to make these calculations. Without restating the mathematical theories underlying the methods employed, the authors demonstrate how simple measuring instruments and a small-size computer can be used to solve the ventilation problems arising in French mines. Emphasis is given to the layout of the ventilation system and to air flow and negative pressure measurements at the base of the mine. The authors show how calculations can be applied to new heading operations, a change in resistance, the replacement or addition of a ventilator, and a new air inlet or outlet. The authors come to the conclusion that since ventilation is at present the most reliable way of avoiding the pollution of mines, a thorough knowledge of the capabilities in this respect can often help improve working conditions. Despite the progress made, however, constant surveillance of the ventilation systems in uranium mines by a separate team with no responsibility for production problems is

  3. REVERSIBLE VENTILATION SYSTEM FOR ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Yu. Kravchuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives To consider the possibility of applying the principle of reversing air flows for a centralised ventilation system; to develop a specific scheme for air exchange reversible ventilation, which will take into account the peculiarities of the microclimate of administrative buildings; to select the type of filling of the air-permeable element and justify this choice; to determine the conditions for changing the direction of air movement in the ventilation system and the area of its application; to form a list of equipment necessary for the operation of such a system; to consider the influence of supply and exhaust devices on the heat and humidity regime of claddings. Methods  To achieve this goal, the published thematic material was reviewed and a patent search carried out using Russian and European databases. Data on mathematical modelling of filtration in porous media and experimental results were used. A method for ventilating rooms in administrative building using the reversal of movement of supply and exhaust air streams along the same channels was applied. Results  Schemas for reversible ventilation systems are presented and their modes of operation considered. It is established that the idea of reversing ventilation flows has not yet been applied in the development of centralised ventilation systems. Based on these published materials, it was concluded that the proposed design of supply and exhaust devices can be used in practice. An original air exchange scheme for the ventilation of administrative buildings and design of supply and exhaust devices for this system are proposed. The conditions for changing the operating modes of the system and the scope of its application are determined. Conclusion The use of the proposed ventilation system allows normative air exchange to be provided without using a supply unit during the cold season. This application of airflow reversal allows the potential of natural forces to be used

  4. Note on protection offered by ventilation systems in the event of a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, J.R.; McGrath, P.E.

    1976-05-01

    A brief review of the protection offered by natural and forced ventilation systems in buildings to an atmospheric release of radioactive material is given. The protection to be gained by using the internal ventilation system is estimated

  5. Tracheostomy and invasive mechanical ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: decision-making factors and survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-04-28

    Invasive and/or non-invasive mechanical ventilation are most important options of respiratory management in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We evaluated the frequency, clinical characteristics, decision-making factors about ventilation and survival analysis of 190 people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients from 1990 until 2013. Thirty-one percentage of patients underwent tracheostomy invasive ventilation with the rate increasing more than the past 20 years. The ratio of tracheostomy invasive ventilation in patients >65 years old was significantly increased after 2000 (25%) as compared to before (10%). After 2010, the standard use of non-invasive ventilation showed a tendency to reduce the frequency of tracheostomy invasive ventilation. Mechanical ventilation prolonged median survival (75 months in tracheostomy invasive ventilation, 43 months in non-invasive ventilation vs natural course, 32 months). The life-extending effects by tracheostomy invasive ventilation were longer in younger patients ≤65 years old at the time of ventilation support than in older patients. Presence of partners and care at home were associated with better survival. Following factors related to the decision to perform tracheostomy invasive ventilation: patients ≤65 years old: greater use of non-invasive ventilation: presence of a spouse: faster tracheostomy: higher progression rate; and preserved motor functions. No patients who underwent tracheostomy invasive ventilation died from a decision to withdraw mechanical ventilation. The present study provides factors related to decision-making process and survival after tracheostomy and help clinicians and family members to expand the knowledge about ventilation.

  6. Styret naturlig ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, S.; Strøm, J.S.

    Publikationen præsenterer et generelt dimensioneringsgrundlag for naturlig ventilation i husdyrstalde. Det er kontrolleret ved forsøg i slagtesvinestalde, hvor det ligeledes er undersøgt hvilken temperaturstabilitet, der kan opnås ved naturlig ventilation, samt produktions- og adfærdsmæssige...

  7. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, D. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  8. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    As a novel air distribution system, diffuse ceiling ventilation combines the suspended acoustic ceiling with ventilation supply. Due to the low-impulse supply from the large ceiling area, the system does not generate draught when supplying cold air. However, heat sources play an important role...

  9. Pulmonary perfusion ''without ventilation''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.N.; Sziklas, J.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Rosenberg, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    An 88-yr-old man, with prior left upper lobectomy and phrenic nerve injury, had a ventilation/perfusion lung image. Both wash-in and equilibrium ventilation images showed no radioactive gas in the left lung. Nevertheless, the left lung was perfused. A similar result was obtained on a repeat study 8 days later. Delayed images, during washout, showed some radioactive gas in the left lung. Nearly absent ventilation (but continued perfusion) of that lung might have been related to altered gas dynamics brought about by the prior lobectomy, a submucosal bronchial lesion, phrenic nerve damage, and limited motion of the left part of the diaphragm. This case raises the issue of the degree of ventilation (and the phase relationship between the lungs) required for the entry of radioactive gas into a diseased lung, and the production of a ''reversed ventilation/perfusion mismatch.''

  10. Realtime mine ventilation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Windows based, interactive mine ventilation simulation software program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To enhance the operation of the underground ventilation system, Westinghouse Electric Corporation developed the program called WIPPVENT. While WIPPVENT includes most of the functions of the commercially available simulation program VNETPC and uses the same subroutine to calculate airflow distributions, the user interface has been completely rewritten as a Windows application with screen graphics. WIPPVENT is designed to interact with WIPP ventilation monitoring systems through the sitewise Central monitoring System. Data can be continuously collected from the Underground Ventilation Remote Monitoring and Control System (e.g., air quantity and differential pressure) and the Mine Weather Stations (psychrometric data). Furthermore, WIPPVENT incorporates regulator characteristic curves specific to the site. The program utilizes this data to create and continuously update a REAL-TIME ventilation model. This paper discusses the design, key features, and interactive capabilities of WIPPVENT

  11. 46 CFR 32.55-1 - Ventilation of tank vessels constructed on or after July 1, 1951-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... natural ventilation, with at least one duct extending to immediately below the floor plates will be... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of tank vessels constructed on or after July... VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Ventilation and Venting § 32.55-1 Ventilation...

  12. Nanomolar detection of rutin based on adsorptive stripping analysis at single-sided heated graphite cylindrical electrodes with direct current heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sun, Jian-Jun; Zhang, De-Feng; Lin, Zhi-Bin; Nie, Fa-Hui; Qiu, He-Yuan; Chen, Guo-Nan [Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, 523 Gong Ye Road, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2008-09-20

    A single-sided heated graphite cylindrical electrode (ss-HGCE) was designed. Compared to previous alternative current (AC) heating, much simpler and cheaper direct current (DC) heating supplier was adopted for the first time to perform adsorptive accumulation of rutin at ss-HGCE at elevated electrode temperature. This offers great promise for low cost, miniaturization and high compatibility with portability. The square wave voltammetry (SWV) stripping peak current was enhanced with increasing the electrode temperature only during preconcentration step. This enhancement was contributed to the forced thermal convection induced by heating the electrode rather than the bulk solution, which is able to improve mass transfer and facilitate adsorption hence enhance stripping response. A detection limit of 1.0 x 10{sup -9} M (S/N = 3) could be obtained at an electrode temperature of 48 C during 5 min accumulation, one magnitude lower than that at 28 C (room temperature). This is the lowest value at carbon-based electrodes for rutin determination as we know. Such novel method was also successfully used to determine rutin in pharmaceutical tablets. (author)

  13. Development and evaluation of a practical method to measure the Depth of Interaction function for a single side readout PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringhini, G.; Auffray, E.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Paganoni, M.; Stojkovic, A.

    2016-01-01

    In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners, the knowledge of depth of interaction (DOI) of the gamma ray along the main axis of the scintillator is a fundamental information in order to avoid parallax error and to achieve high performances in terms of spatial resolution. Recently we developed a new method to obtain the DOI function for a single side readout PET module, recirculating the scintillation light in the matrix by means of a mirror placed on top of the module. In a complete PET scanner, periodical DOI calibrations have to be performed to prevent time dependent miscalibrations and performance degradations. The current DOI calibration relies on a coincidence system between the module and an external scintillator to provide a priori the DOI information and it is clearly not feasible in a real system without unpractical disassemblies of the scanner. In this paper we develop instead a fast and precise calibration method based on uniform irradiation of the scintillators. Three irradiation modalities are presented, in particular one where the source is placed on top of the module, one with the source placed on one side of the module and one that exploits the internal radioactivity of the scintillator. The three different procedures are evaluated and the calibration method is validated by comparing the information provided by the coincidence setup.

  14. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  15. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  16. Natural history and risk stratification of patients undergoing non-invasive ventilation in a non-ICU setting for severe COPD exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainaghi, Pier Paolo; Colombo, Davide; Re, Azzurra; Bellan, Mattia; Sola, Daniele; Balbo, Piero Emilio; Campanini, Mauro; Della Corte, Francesco; Navalesi, Paolo; Pirisi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) delivered in an intensive care unit (ICU) has become the cornerstone in the treatment of patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. A trend towards managing these patients in non-ICU setting has emerged in recent years, although out-of-hospital survival by this approach and how to prognosticate it is unknown. We aimed to investigate these issues. We consecutively recruited 100 patients (49 males; median age 82 years) who received NIV treatment for acute respiratory failure due to COPD exacerbation in non-ICU medical wards of our hospital, between November 2008 and July 2012. We assessed survival (both in-hospital and out-of-hospital) of all these patients, and analyzed baseline parameters in a Cox proportional hazards model to develop a prognostic score. The median survival in the study population was 383 days (240-980). Overall survival rates were 71.0, 65.3, and 52.7 % at 1, 3, and 12 months, respectively. Age >85 years, a history of heart disorders and a neutrophil count ≥10 × 10(9) were associated with higher mortality at Cox's analysis (χ (2) = 35.766, p = 0.0001), and were used to build a prognostic score (NC85). The presence of two or more factors determined the deepest drop in survival (when NC85 ≥2, mortality at 1, 3, and 12 was 60.7, 70.4, and 77.2 %, respectively, while when NC85 = 0 were 4.0, 4.0, and 14.0 %). A simple model, based on three variables (age, neutrophil count and history of heart disease), accurately predicts survival of COPD patients receiving NIV in a non-ICU setting.

  17. Ventilation-air conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi.

    1991-01-01

    Heretofore, in ventilation-air conditioning systems in a nuclear power plant, exhaust gases from each of the ventilation-air conditioning systems of a reactor building, a turbine building, a waste processing building are joined and they are released into atmosphere from the top of a high main exhaustion stack. In order to build such a high main exhaustion stack, a considerable construction cost is required and, in addition, there is a worry of lacking balance with surrounding scenery. Then, in the present invention, exhaust gases are heated by waste heat in a turbine during their introduction from the ventilation-air conditioning facility in the building of a power plant to the main exhaust stack. With such a constitution, since the exhaust gases are heated and their temperature is elevated, they uprise by natural convection when they are released from the top of the main exhaustion stack to the atmosphere. Accordingly, they are released to a level higher than the conventional case in view of the volume of the blower which sends the exhaust gases under pressure, to diffuse them to the atmosphere more sufficiently compared with a conventional case. Further, the height of the main exhaustion stack can be reduced, enabling to minimize the cost for moving the blower. (T.M.)

  18. EVALUATION TOOL OF CLIMATE POTENTIAL FOR VENTILATIVE COOLING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belleri, Annamaria; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2015-01-01

    . Within IEA Annex 62 project, national experts are working on the development of a climate evaluation tool, which aims at assessing the potential of ventilative cooling by taking into account also building envelope thermal properties, internal gains and ventilation needs. The analysis is based on a single......-zone thermal model applied to user-input climatic data on hourly basis. The tool identifies the percentage of hours when natural ventilation can be exploited to assure minimum air change rates required by state of the art research, standards and regulations and the percentage of hours when direct ventilative...

  19. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  20. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outd...

  1. The impacts of balanced and exhaust mechanical ventilation on indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, W.J.; Mowris, R.J.

    1987-02-01

    Models for estimating radon entry rates, indoor radon concentrations, and ventilation rates in houses with a basement or a vented crawl-space and ventilated by natural infiltration, mechanical exhaust ventilation, or balanced mechanical ventilation are described. Simulations are performed for a range of soil and housing characteristics using hourly weather data for the heating season in Spokane, WA. For a house with a basement, we show that any ventilation technique should be acceptable when the soil permeability is less than approximately 10 -12 m 2 . However, exhaust ventilation leads to substantially higher indoor radon concentrations than infiltration or balanced ventilation with the same average air exchange rate when the soil permeability is 10 -10 m 2 or greater. For houses with a crawl-space, indoor radon concentrations are lowest with balanced ventilation, intermediate with exhaust ventilation, and highest with infiltration

  2. Why We Ventilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  3. What Is a Ventilator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who are on ventilators for shorter periods. The advantage of this tube is that it can be ... other disease or condition. VAP is treated with antibiotics. You may need special antibiotics if the VAP ...

  4. Uranium mine ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katam, K.; Sudarsono

    1982-01-01

    Uranium mine ventilation system aimed basically to control and decreasing the air radioactivity in mine caused by the radon emanating from uranium ore. The control and decreasing the air ''age'' in mine, with adding the air consumption volume, increasing the air rate consumption, closing the mine-out area; using closed drainage system. Air consumption should be 60m 3 /minute for each 9m 2 uranium ore surfaces with ventilation rate of 15m/minute. (author)

  5. Fire, safety and ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-02-01

    Correct ventilation in tunnel environments is vital for the comfort and safety of the people passing through. This article gives details of products from several manufacturers of safety rescue and fire fighting equipment, fire and fume detection equipment, special fire resistant materials, fire resistant hydraulic oils and fire dampers, and ventilation systems. Company addresses and fax numbers are supplied. 4 refs., 5 tabs., 10 photos.

  6. Monolithic Composite “Pressure + Acceleration + Temperature + Infrared” Sensor Using a Versatile Single-Sided “SiN/Poly-Si/Al” Process-Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a newly developed design/fabrication module with low-cost single-sided “low-stress-silicon-nitride (LS-SiN/polysilicon (poly-Si/Al” process for monolithic integration of composite sensors for sensing-network-node applications. A front-side surface-/bulk-micromachining process on a conventional Si-substrate is developed, featuring a multifunctional SiN/poly-Si/Al layer design for diverse sensing functions. The first “pressure + acceleration + temperature + infrared” (PATIR composite sensor with the chip size of 2.5 mm × 2.5 mm is demonstrated. Systematic theoretical design and analysis methods are developed. The diverse sensing components include a piezoresistive absolute-pressure sensor (up to 700 kPa, with a sensitivity of 49 mV/MPa under 3.3 V supplied voltage, a piezoresistive accelerometer (±10 g, with a sensitivity of 66 μV/g under 3.3 V and a −3 dB bandwidth of 780 Hz, a thermoelectric infrared detector (with a responsivity of 45 V/W and detectivity of 3.6 × 107 cm·Hz1/2/W and a thermistor (−25–120 °C. This design/fabrication module concept enables a low-cost monolithically-integrated “multifunctional-library” technique. It can be utilized as a customizable tool for versatile application-specific requirements, which is very useful for small-size, low-cost, large-scale sensing-network node developments.

  7. On the influence of the ventilation rate to the radiation burden in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations on the influence of the ventilation rate to the concentration of radon in dwellings from radioactive material of natural origin in building material are completed with a few examples of measurements. In addition, the optimization of the ventilation rate and the consequences of poorly ventilated dwellings are reported briefly. (author)

  8. 46 CFR 182.465 - Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... furnish natural or powered supply and exhaust ventilation. The total inlet area and the total outlet area... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery. 182... Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery. (a) A space containing diesel machinery must be fitted with...

  9. The normally expressed kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene repertoire and somatic mutations studied by single-sided specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR); frequent occurrence of features often assigned to autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, L; Hougs, L; Andersen, V

    1997-01-01

    The expressed human kappa light chain gene repertoire utilized by healthy individuals was studied by two different single-sided specific PCR techniques to avoid bias for certain V genes. A total of 103 rearranged kappa sequences from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals were...

  10. Demand Controlled Ventilation in a Combined Ventilation and Radiator System

    OpenAIRE

    Hesaraki, Arefeh; Holmberg, Sture

    2013-01-01

    With growing concerns for efficient and sustainable energy treatment in buildings there is a need for balanced and intelligent ventilation solutions. This paper presents a strategy for demand controlled ventilation with ventilation radiators, a combined heating and ventilation system. The ventilation rate was decreased from normal requirements (per floor area) of 0.375 l·s-1·m-2 to 0.100 l·s-1·m-2 when the residence building was un-occupied. The energy saving potential due to decreased ventil...

  11. A numerical simulated model of the impact of the surrounding vegetation on the natural ventilation of the factory buildings%植被对厂房自然通风影响的数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孔清; 邹声华

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulated model for the influence of the surrounding vegetation on the three-dimensional natural ventilation of the factory buildings, which consist of equations for momentum, turbulence energy and its dissipation rate, and temperature . The influence of the vegetation on the air ventilation is generally considered by the source (or sink) terms added to the momentum and standard k-E model and the energy equation. The source (or sink) terms for the turbulent energy and its dissipation rate are adopted from the works of Foudhil which is based on the numerical integration of neutral atmospheric current equations for the energy-dissipating closure and over a domain that may include vegetation layers. The source (or sink) terms being added to the energy equation include the sensible and latent heat transfer between the air and the vegetation which can be worked out on the basis of temperature difference between the local air mass and the vegetation leaves. Then, it is possible to set up the closure of the energy equation, and the implicit e-quation of the energy balance model for the canopy by using the Newton- Kaphson method. All in all, what our research is aimed at is to build a statistical device to predict the flow field over the landscape characterized by the heterogeneous vegetation cover so as to find how the outdoor vegetation affects the indoor temperature of the buildings. For the validation of the method, it is necessary to simulate an industrial building with a micro-forest upwind. The simulation results of underlying surface temperature, air temperature, and vegetation-leaf' s temperature are in good agreement with the measured data and fully reflect the actual temperature distribution trends. Thus, it can be concluded that being accurate, the suggested model we have developed can be used in the research of building natural ventilation affected by the outdoor vegetation. In so ding, the temperature feeling of the workers in

  12. Ventilation of nuclear rooms and operators' protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavasseur, C.

    1985-01-01

    Ventilation systems are designed to guarantee air replacement in rooms so as to evacuate gases, odors and aerosols liable to be produced therein. This air is conditioned, filtered, heated, and the relative humidity checked. At the outlet, a filtration system adapted to the type of effluent prevents the external dispersion of toxic substances. Ventilation is defined by the air change time. A comfort rule recommends reducing the velocities reaching the person present in less than 0.2 m/sec. This reduction is achieved by adjusting the natural property of the jets, induction, by means of diffusers placed at the vents

  13. Clinical challenges in mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligher, Ewan C; Ferguson, Niall D; Brochard, Laurent J

    2016-04-30

    Mechanical ventilation supports gas exchange and alleviates the work of breathing when the respiratory muscles are overwhelmed by an acute pulmonary or systemic insult. Although mechanical ventilation is not generally considered a treatment for acute respiratory failure per se, ventilator management warrants close attention because inappropriate ventilation can result in injury to the lungs or respiratory muscles and worsen morbidity and mortality. Key clinical challenges include averting intubation in patients with respiratory failure with non-invasive techniques for respiratory support; delivering lung-protective ventilation to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury; maintaining adequate gas exchange in severely hypoxaemic patients; avoiding the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction; and diagnosing and treating the many pathophysiological mechanisms that impair liberation from mechanical ventilation. Personalisation of mechanical ventilation based on individual physiological characteristics and responses to therapy can further improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical ventilation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszler, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Although only a small proportion of full term and late preterm infants require invasive respiratory support, they are not immune from ventilator-associated lung injury. The process of lung damage from mechanical ventilation is multifactorial and cannot be linked to any single variable. Atelectrauma and volutrauma have been identified as the most important and potentially preventable elements of lung injury. Respiratory support strategies for full term and late preterm infants have not been as thoroughly studied as those for preterm infants; consequently, a strong evidence base on which to make recommendations is lacking. The choice of modalities of support and ventilation strategies should be guided by the specific underlying pathophysiologic considerations and the ventilatory approach must be individualized for each patient based on the predominant pathophysiology at the time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Ventilator associated pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, S; Nesci, M; Celotto, S; Lampati, L; Lucchini, A

    2003-04-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection that ensues in critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. The reported incidence of VAP varies between 9% and 68% with a mortality ranging between 33% and 71%. Two key factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of VAP: bacterial colonization of the upper digestive-respiratory tract and aspiration of oral secretions into the trachea. Preventive measurements are advocated to reduce the incidence of VAP, such as selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD), supraglottic aspiration and positioning. Prompt recognition and treatment of established VAP has also been demostrated to affect outcome. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors associated with the development of VAP and the implementation of strategies to prevent, diagnose and treat VAP are mainstems in the nursing of mechanically ventilated patients.

  16. CFD and Ventilation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part...... of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize...... the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest on-going needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical...

  17. Auxiliary mine ventilation manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workplace Safety North

    2010-01-01

    An adequate ventilation system is needed for air quality and handling in a mine and is comprised of many different pieces of equipment for removing contaminated air and supplying fresh air and thereby provide a satisfactory working environment. This manual highlights auxiliary ventilation systems made up of small fans, ducts, tubes, air movers, deflectors and additional air flow controls which distribute fresh air delivered by the primary system to all areas. A review of auxiliary ventilation is provided. Design, operation and management issues are discussed and guidelines are furnished. This manual is limited to underground hard rock operations and does not address directly other, specific auxiliary systems, either in underground coal mines or uranium mines.

  18. Auxiliary mine ventilation manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workplace Safety North

    2010-07-01

    An adequate ventilation system is needed for air quality and handling in a mine and is comprised of many different pieces of equipment for removing contaminated air and supplying fresh air and thereby provide a satisfactory working environment. This manual highlights auxiliary ventilation systems made up of small fans, ducts, tubes, air movers, deflectors and additional air flow controls which distribute fresh air delivered by the primary system to all areas. A review of auxiliary ventilation is provided. Design, operation and management issues are discussed and guidelines are furnished. This manual is limited to underground hard rock operations and does not address directly other, specific auxiliary systems, either in underground coal mines or uranium mines.

  19. Effects of types of ventilation system on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S; Jee, N-Y; Jeong, J-W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the influence of ventilation systems on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings. Fifteen occupied, single-family apartments were selected from three sites. The three sites have three different ventilation systems: unbalanced mechanical ventilation, balanced mechanical ventilation, and natural ventilation. Field measurements were conducted between April and June 2012, when outdoor air temperatures were comfortable. Number concentrations of particles, PM2.5 and CO2 , were continuously measured both outdoors and indoors. In the apartments with natural ventilation, I/O ratios of particle number concentrations ranged from 0.56 to 0.72 for submicron particles, and from 0.25 to 0.60 for particles larger than 1.0 μm. The daily average indoor particle concentration decreased to 50% below the outdoor level for submicron particles and 25% below the outdoor level for fine particles, when the apartments were mechanically ventilated. The two mechanical ventilation systems reduced the I/O ratios by 26% for submicron particles and 65% for fine particles compared with the natural ventilation. These results showed that mechanical ventilation can reduce exposure to outdoor particles in residential buildings. Results of this study confirm that mechanical ventilation with filtration can significantly reduce indoor particle levels compared with natural ventilation. The I/O ratios of particles substantially varied at the naturally ventilated apartments because of the influence of variable window opening conditions and unsteadiness of wind flow on the penetration of outdoor air particles. For better prediction of the exposure to outdoor particles in naturally ventilated residential buildings, it is important to understand the penetration of outdoor particles with variable window opening conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Factors defining value and direction of thermal pressure between the mine shafts and impact of the general mine natural draught on ventilation process of underground mining companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A. V.; Alymenko, N. I.; Kamenskikh, A. A.; Alymenko, D. N.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Petrov, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The article specifies measuring data of air parameters and its volume flow in the shafts and on the surface, collected in BKPRU-2 (Berezniki potash plant and mine 2) («Uralkali» PJSC) in normal operation mode, after shutdown of the main mine fan (GVU) and within several hours. As a result of the test it has been established that thermal pressure between the mine shafts is active continuously regardless of the GVU operation mode or other draught sources. Also it has been discovered that depth of the mine shafts has no impact on thermal pressure value. By the same difference of shaft elevation marks and parameters of outer air between the shafts, by their different depth, thermal pressure of the same value will be active. Value of the general mine natural draught defined as an algebraic sum of thermal pressure values between the shafts depends only on the difference of temperature and pressure of outer air and air in the shaft bottoms on condition of shutdown of the air handling system (unit-heaters, air conditioning systems).

  1. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...... and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain...

  2. Behovstyret ventilation til enfamiliehuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Drivsholm, Christian; Hansen, Mads Peter Rudolph

    Muligheden for behovsstyret ventilation i enfamiliehuse er undersøgt. To strategier er afprøvet i praksis: En relativ simpel og billig strategi og en relativ avanceret og dyr strategi. Den simple strategi regulerer luftskiftet ensartet for alle rum mellem et lavt eller højt niveau. Den avancerede...... ventilation efter gældende krav. Desuden kræver den simple regulering kun få sensorer og er således væsentlig billigere og enklere at implementere end den avancerede strategi....

  3. Bench performance of ventilators during simulated paediatric ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M A J; Freebairn, R C; Gomersall, C D

    2013-05-01

    This study compares the accuracy and capabilities of various ventilators using a paediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome lung model. Various compliance settings and respiratory rate settings were used. The study was done in three parts: tidal volume and FiO2 accuracy; pressure control accuracy and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) accuracy. The parameters set on the ventilator were compared with either or both of the measured parameters by the test lung and the ventilator. The results revealed that none of the ventilators could consistently deliver tidal volumes within 1 ml/kg of the set tidal volume, and the discrepancy between the delivered volume and the volume measured by the ventilator varied greatly. The target tidal volume was 8 ml/kg, but delivered tidal volumes ranged from 3.6-11.4 ml/kg and the volumes measured by the ventilator ranged from 4.1-20.6 ml/kg. All the ventilators maintained pressure within 20% of the set pressure, except one ventilator which delivered pressures of up to 27% higher than the set pressure. Two ventilators maintained PEEP within 10% of the prescribed PEEP. The majority of the readings were also within 10%. However, three ventilators delivered, at times, PEEPs over 20% higher. In conclusion, as lung compliance decreases, especially in paediatric patients, some ventilators perform better than others. This study highlights situations where ventilators may not be able to deliver, nor adequately measure, set tidal volumes, pressure, PEEP or FiO2.

  4. Demand controlled ventilation; Behovsstyrt ventilasjon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Henning Holm

    2006-07-01

    The terms CAV and VAV have been known terms for many years in the ventilation business. The terms are also included in building regulations, but the time is now right to focus on demand controlled ventilation (DCV). The new building regulations and the accompanying energy framework underline the need for a more nuanced thinking when it comes to controlling ventilation systems. Descriptions and further details of the ventilation systems are provided (ml)

  5. 46 CFR 32.55-5 - Ventilation of tank vessels constructed between November 10, 1936, and July 1, 1951-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... actuated gas ejectors or blowers or ventilators fitted with heads for natural ventilation, will be approved... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of tank vessels constructed between November... HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Ventilation and Venting...

  6. Battery life of portable home ventilators: effects of ventilator settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaize, Line; Leroux, Karl; Prigent, Hélène; Louis, Bruno; Khirani, Sonia; Orlikowski, David; Fauroux, Brigitte; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    The battery life (BL) of portable home ventilator batteries is reported by manufacturers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ventilator mode, breathing frequency, PEEP, and leaks on the BL of 5 commercially available portable ventilators. The effects of the ventilator mode (volume controlled-continuous mandatory ventilation [VC-CMV] vs pressure support ventilation [PSV]), PEEP 5 cm H2O, breathing frequency (10, 15, and 20 breaths/min), and leaks during both volume-targeted ventilation and PSV on the BL of 5 ventilators (Elisée 150, Monnal T50, PB560, Vivo 50, and Trilogy 100) were evaluated. Each ventilator was ventilated with a test lung at a tidal volume of 700 ml and an inspiratory time of 1.2 s in the absence of leaks. Switching from PSV to VC-CMV or the addition of PEEP did not significantly change ventilator BL. The increase in breathing frequency from 10 to 20 breaths/min decreased the BL by 18 ± 11% (P = .005). Leaks were associated with an increase in BL during the VC-CMV mode (18 ± 20%, P = .04) but a decrease in BL during the PSV mode (-13 ± 15%, P = .04). The BL of home ventilators depends on the ventilator settings. BL is not affected by the ventilator mode (VC-CMV or PSV) or the addition of PEEP. BL decreases with an increase in breathing frequency and during leaks with a PSV mode, whereas leaks increase the duration of ventilator BL during VC-CMV. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Hybrid Ventilation Air Flow Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    The scope of this annex is therefore to obtain better knowledge of the use of hybrid ventilation technologies. The annex focus on development of control strategies for hybrid ventilation, on development of methods to predict hybrid ventilation performance in office buildings and on implementation...

  8. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  9. How to Plan Ventilation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Ventilation systems for factory safety demand careful planning. The increased heat loads and new processes of industry have introduced complex ventilation problems in--(1) ventilation supply, (2) duct work design, (3) space requirements, (4) hood face velocities, (5) discharge stacks, and (6) building eddies. This article describes and diagrams…

  10. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, P.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The main objective of ventilation is to provide good air quality for the occupants. For this purpose the necessary ventilating air change rate must be determined. Within displacement ventilation the estimation is closely related to the air flow rate in the thermal plumes when an air quality based...

  11. The amazing Minivent ventilator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia is co-published by Medpharm Publications, NISC (Pty) Ltd and Cogent, ... Respiratory rate was obtained by counting the clicking noise ... was appointed as a part-time lecturer to the University of the ... The Minivent became the first of three miniature ventilators that.

  12. Omnidirectional ventilated acoustic barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-long; Zhu, Yi-fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-11-01

    As an important problem in acoustics, sound insulation finds applications in a great variety of situations. In the existing schemes, however, there has always been a trade-off between the thinness of sound-insulating devices and their ventilating capabilities, limiting their potentials in the control of low-frequency sound in high ventilation environments. Here, we design and experimentally implement an omnidirectional acoustic barrier with a planar profile, subwavelength thickness ( 0.18 λ ), yet high ventilation. The proposed mechanism is based on the interference between the resonant scattering of discrete states and the background scattering of continuous states which induces a Fano-like asymmetric transmission profile. Benefitting from the binary-structured design of the coiled unit and hollow pipe, it maximally simplifies the design and fabrication while ensuring the ventilation for all the non-resonant units with open tubes. The simulated and measured results agree well, showing the effectiveness of our proposed mechanism to block low frequency sound coming from various directions while allowing 63% of the air flow to pass. We anticipate our design to open routes to design sound insulators and to enable applications in traditionally unattainable cases such as those calling for noise reduction and cooling simultaneously.

  13. Mechanical ventilation of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarte, L. A.; Zuurbier, C. J.; Ince, C.

    2000-01-01

    Due to growing interest in murine functional genomics research, there is an increasing need for physiological stable in vivo murine models. Of special importance is support and control of ventilation by artificial respiration, which is difficult to execute as a consequence of the small size of the

  14. Lavt elforbrug til ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagemar, L.; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    Rapporten giver gode råd om mulige energibesparelser og praktiske projekteringshensyn, som er forbundet med udformning af energieffektiv ventilation i ikke blot kontorbygninger, men i alle bygninger med komfortventilationsanlæg. I forbindelse med projektering af ventilationsanlæg har interessen...

  15. Understanding mechanical ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatburn, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    The respiratory care academic community has not yet adopted a standardized system for classifying and describing modes of ventilation. As a result, there is enough confusion that patient care, clinician education and even ventilator sales are all put at risk. This article summarizes a ventilator mode taxonomy that has been extensively published over the last 15 years. Specifically, the classification system has three components: a description of the control variables within breath; a description of the sequence of mandatory and spontaneous breaths; and a specification for the targeting scheme. This three-level specification provides scalability of detail to make the mode description appropriate for the particular need. At the bedside, we need only refer to a mode briefly using the first or perhaps first and second components. To distinguish between similar modes and brand names, we would need to include all components. This taxonomy uses the equation of motion for the respiratory system as the underlying theoretical framework. All terms relevant to describing modes of mechanical ventilation are defined in an extensive appendix.

  16. Human response to ductless personalized ventilation coupled with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Veselý, Michal; Melikov, Arsen K.

    2012-01-01

    A human subject experiment was carried out to investigate the extent to which ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation can improve perceived air quality (PAQ) and thermal comfort at elevated room air temperature in comparison with displacement ventilation...... alone. The experimental conditions comprised displacement ventilation alone (room air temperature of 23 °C, 26 °C, 29 °C) and DPV with displacement ventilation (26 °C, 29 °C), both operating at supply air temperatures 3, 5 or 6K lower than room air temperature, as well as mixing ventilation (23 °C, 3 K......). During one hour exposure participants answered questionnaires regarding PAQ and thermal comfort. PAQ was significantly better with DPV than without DPV at the same background conditions. Thermal comfort improved when DPV was used. Combining DPV with displacement ventilation showed the potential...

  17. Nunavut housing ventilation research 2003-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fugler, D.

    2005-11-15

    Inuit children in Alaska and Nunavut have high rates of severe lower respiratory tract infections, with hospitalization rates of 300 per year for each 1000 infants. The aim of this research report was to summarize the findings of a pilot project measuring the indoor air quality (IAQ) in 20 Cape Dorset houses as well as a study measuring the ventilation rates of 100 house from 4 communities in Nunavut. The 20 house pilot study included a respiratory questionnaire; a detailed home inspection and data collection; a blower door airtightness test; 7 day measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nicotine, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), relative humidity and temperature; a natural air change rate testing using Brookhaven tracer gas technology; and settled floor dust and bed dust collection followed by biological analysis. The 100 house study recorded 3 to 5 days of house temperatures, relative humidity and CO{sub 2}. The Brookhaven tracer gas technique was used to establish house air change rate. A questionnaire was used to assess ventilation devices. A medical questionnaire was administered and an evaluation of hospitalization data was carried out. Results indicated that a large number of Nunavut houses were not adequately ventilated. In the 20 house study, a third of the houses showed air change rates that would be considered low by any ventilation standards, and that were very low when considering the high occupancy of the houses. In the hundred house study, almost all houses indicated a mean CO{sub 2} level over 1000 ppm, and peaks exceeded 2000 ppm in approximately half the houses. The concentrations were far higher than those seen in southern Canadian homes. It was concluded that the development and promotion of energy-efficient ventilation devices could help to resolve ventilation deficiencies in Nunavut. 2 figs.

  18. Ventilation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madoyan, A.A.; Vlasik, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    Foundations and calculation methods of ventilation of rooms with different degree of heat and gas release with the change of operation mode of NPP main equipment, as well as problems of NPP site and adjoining area aerodynamics, have been presented. Systems of air ventilation and conditioning, cooling equipment, are considered. The main points of designing are described and determination of economic efficiency of the ventilation systems are made. Technical characteristics of the ventilators, conditioners, filters and air heaters used, are presented. Organization of adjustment, tests, operation and maintenance of the ventilation systems of NPP with RBMK and WWER-type reactors, is described

  19. Outcome-based ventilation: A framework for assessing performance, health, and energy impacts to inform office building ventilation decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackes, A; Ben-David, T; Waring, M S

    2018-04-23

    This article presents an outcome-based ventilation (OBV) framework, which combines competing ventilation impacts into a monetized loss function ($/occ/h) used to inform ventilation rate decisions. The OBV framework, developed for U.S. offices, considers six outcomes of increasing ventilation: profitable outcomes realized from improvements in occupant work performance and sick leave absenteeism; health outcomes from occupant exposure to outdoor fine particles and ozone; and energy outcomes from electricity and natural gas usage. We used the literature to set low, medium, and high reference values for OBV loss function parameters, and evaluated the framework and outcome-based ventilation rates using a simulated U.S. office stock dataset and a case study in New York City. With parameters for all outcomes set at medium values derived from literature-based central estimates, higher ventilation rates' profitable benefits dominated negative health and energy impacts, and the OBV framework suggested ventilation should be ≥45 L/s/occ, much higher than the baseline ~8.5 L/s/occ rate prescribed by ASHRAE 62.1. Only when combining very low parameter estimates for profitable impacts with very high ones for health and energy impacts were all outcomes on the same order. Even then, however, outcome-based ventilation rates were often twice the baseline rate or more. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the

  1. Ventilation in Sewers Quantified by Measurements of CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Emil Dietz; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and quantifying ventilation in sewer systems is a prerequisite to predict transport of odorous and corrosive gasses within the system as well as their interaction with the urban atmosphere. This paper studies ventilation in sewer systems quantified by measurements of the natural...... occurring compound CO2. Most often Danish wastewater is supersaturated with CO2 and hence a potential for stripping is present. A novel model was built based on the kinetics behind the stripping process. It was applied to simulate ventilation rates from field measurements of wastewater temperature, p...

  2. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  3. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    cooling capacity, energy saving, low investment cost and low noise level; while the limitations include condensation risk and the limit on the room geometry. Furthermore, the crucial design parameters are summarized and their effects on the system performance are discussed. In addition to the stand...... is not well structured with this system. These become the motivations in developing the design guide. This design guide aims to establish a systematic understanding of diffuse ceiling ventilation and provide assistance in designing of such a system. The guide is targeted at design engineers, architects...... and manufacturers and the users of diffuse ceiling technology. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation. It provides an overview of potential benefit and limitations of this technology. The benefits include high thermal comfort, high...

  4. Purge ventilation operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marella, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    A determination of minimum requirements for purge exhaust ventilation system operability has been performed. HLWE and HLW Regulatory Program personnel have evaluated the various scenarios of equipment conditions and HLWE has developed the requirements for purge exhaust systems. This report is provided to document operability requirements to assist Tank Farm personnel to determine whether a system is operable/inoperable and to define required compensatory actions

  5. Ventilation i industrien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valbjørn, O.

    I en række afsnit belyses problemer med træk, kulde, varme, og luftforurening på industriens arbejdspladser, og hvordan man ved ventilation og bygningsudformning kan bekæmpe disse gener. Hvert afsnit kan i princippet læses for sig, og anvisningen kan derfor bruges som håndbog, både af de der er...

  6. Ventilation in nuclear facilities. Organisation of nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhet, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Having defined safety and analysis of safety, the nature and significance of nuclear hazards are indicated, highlighting the importance of ventilation for safety. The authorization procedure for the creation and commissioning of an installation is also indicated. The list of safety organizations in France is given. Mention is then made of the general technical regulations, their aim and working out. To conclude, normalization and its application to the ventilation of nuclear installations is examined [fr

  7. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Al Ashry, Haitham S.; Modrykamien, Ariel M.

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evo...

  8. Effect of ventilation type on radon concentration at places of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, E.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations were measured at 76 child care facilities and 36 schools in southern Finland. The buildings had three different types of ventilation systems: mechanical air supply and exhaust, mechanical exhaust, and natural ventilation, the first being most common. The effect of the ventilation type on the long-term radon concentration was studied in child care facilities. The radon concentrations were highest in the naturally ventilated buildings. The mechanical air supply and exhaust system maintained the lowest values in cold wintertime. In school buildings both the long-term radon concentration and short-term radon and daughter concentrations were measured. The correlation of the ventilation type and the radon concentration was not obvious in this group of measurements, but the radon concentrations and the equilibrium factors were highest in buildings with natural ventilation. Radon concentrations were generally lower during the working hours than during the one-month period, as expected. (author)

  9. Noninvasive Ventilation in Premature Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Keri Ann

    2016-04-01

    The use of noninvasive ventilation is a constantly evolving treatment option for respiratory disease in the premature infant. The goals of these noninvasive ventilation techniques are to improve gas exchange in the premature infant's lungs and to minimize the need for intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. The goals of this article are to consider various uses of nasal interfaces, discuss skin care and developmental positioning concerns faced by the bedside nurse, and discuss the medical management aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality. This article explores the nursing role, the advances in medical strategies for noninvasive ventilation, and the team approach to noninvasive ventilation use in this population. Search strategy included a literature review on medical databases, such as EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PubMed, and NeoReviews. Innovative products, nursing research on developmental positioning and skin care, and advanced medical management have led to better and safer outcomes for premature infants requiring noninvasive ventilation. The medical focus of avoiding long-term mechanical ventilation would not be possible without the technology to provide noninvasive ventilation to these premature infants and the watchful eye of the nurse in terms of careful positioning, preventing skin breakdown and facial scarring, and a proper seal to maximize ventilation accuracy. This article encourages nursing-based research to quantify some of the knowledge about skin care and positioning as well as research into most appropriate uses for noninvasive ventilation devices.

  10. Performance evaluation of ventilation radiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myhren, Jonn Are; Holmberg, Sture

    2013-01-01

    A ventilation radiator is a combined ventilation and heat emission unit currently of interest due to its potential for increasing energy efficiency in exhaust-ventilated buildings with warm water heating. This paper presents results of performance tests of several ventilation radiator models conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. The purpose of the study was to validate results achieved by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in an earlier study and identify possible improvements in the performance of such systems. The main focus was on heat transfer from internal convection fins, but comfort and health aspects related to ventilation rates and air temperatures were also considered. The general results from the CFD simulations were confirmed; the heat output of ventilation radiators may be improved by at least 20% without sacrificing ventilation efficiency or thermal comfort. Improved thermal efficiency of ventilation radiators allows a lower supply water temperature and energy savings both for heating up and distribution of warm water in heat pumps or district heating systems. A secondary benefit is that a high ventilation rate can be maintained all year around without risk for cold draught. -- Highlights: ► Low temperature heat emitters are currently of interest due to their potential for increasing energy efficiency. ► A ventilation radiator is a combined ventilation and heat emission unit which can be adapted to low temperature heating systems. ► We examine how ventilation radiators can be made to be more efficient in terms of energy consumption and thermal comfort. ► Current work focuses on heat transfer mechanisms and convection fin configuration of ventilation radiators

  11. Pretest Predictions for Ventilation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun; H. Yang; H.N. Kalia

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, concrete pipe walls, and insulation that will be developed during the ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as input to the following three areas: (1) Decisions regarding testing set-up and performance. (2) Assessing how best to scale the test phenomena measured. (3) Validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the ventilation tests, and develop and describe numerical methods that can be used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. Sensitivity studies to assess the impact of variation of linear power densities (linear heat loads) and ventilation air flow rates are included. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only

  12. On analysis of operating efficiency of autonomous ventilation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostuganov Arman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the causes and consequences of malfunctioning of natural and mechanical ventilation systems in civil buildings of Russia. Furthermore it gives their classification and analysis based on the literature review. On the basis of the analysis technical solutions for improving the efficiency of ventilation systems in civil buildings are summarized and the field of their application is specified. Among the offered technical solutions the use of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery is highlighted as one of the most promising and understudied. Besides it has a wide range of applications. The paper reviews and analyzes the main Russian and foreign designs of ventilation systems with heat recovery that are mostly used in practice. Three types of such systems: UVRK-50, Prana-150, ТеFо are chosen for consideration. The sequence of field tests of selected autonomous ventilation systems have been carried out in order to determine the actual air exchange and efficiency of heat recovery. The paper presents the processed results of the research on the basis of which advantages and disadvantages of the tested ventilation systems are identified and recommendations for engineering and manufacturing of new design models of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery are formulated.

  13. A hybrid energy efficient building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calay, Rajnish Kaur; Wang, Wen Chung

    2013-01-01

    The present paper presents a high performance cooling/heating ventilation system using a rotary heat exchanger (RHE), together with a reverse-cycle heat pump (RCHP) that can be integrated with various heat sources. Energy consumption in the building sector is largely dominated by the energy consumed in maintaining comfortable conditions indoors. For example in many developed countries the building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems consume up to 50% of the total energy consumed in buildings. Therefore energy efficient HVAC solutions in buildings are critical for realising CO 2 targets at local and global level. There are many heating/cooling concepts that rely upon renewable energy sources and/or use natural low temperature heat sources in the winter and heat sinks in the summer. In the proposed system, waste energy from the exhaust air stream is used to precondition the outdoor air before it is supplied into the building. The hybrid system provides heating in the winter and cooling in the summer without any need for additional heating or cooling devices as required in conventional systems. Its performance is better than a typical reheat or air conditioning system in providing the same indoor air quality (IAQ) levels. It is shown that an energy saving up to 60% (heat energy) is achieved by using the proposed hybrid system in building ventilation applications. -- Highlights: • Hybrid ventilation system: the hybrid ventilation system uses a rotating regenerator and a reversible heat pump. • Heat recovery: heat recovery from exhaust air stream by rotary wheel type heat exchanger. • Reversible cycle heat pump (RCHP): additional heating or cooling of the supply air is provided by the RCHP. • Energy efficiency: energy savings of up to 60% using the proposed system are achievable

  14. Mechanical ventilation in neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Goyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation significantly affects cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood flow through changes in arterial carbon dioxide levels. Neurosurgical patients might require mechanical ventilation for correction and maintenance of changes in the pulmonary system that occur either due to neurosurgical pathology or following surgery during the acute phase. This review discusses the basics of mechanical ventilation relevant to the neurosurgeon in the day-to-day management of neurosurgical patient requiring artificial support of the respiration.

  15. Mechanical Ventilation and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszler, Martin; Sant'Anna, Guilherme

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important potentially modifiable risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Effective use of noninvasive respiratory support reduces the risk of lung injury. Lung volume recruitment and avoidance of excessive tidal volume are key elements of lung-protective ventilation strategies. Avoidance of oxidative stress, less invasive methods of surfactant administration, and high-frequency ventilation are also important factors in lung injury prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Migration of Aerosol Particles inside a Two-Zone Apartment with Natural Ventilation: A Multi-Zone Validation of the Multi-Compartment and Size-Resolved Indoor Aerosol Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mølgaard, B.; Ondráček, Jakub; Šťávová, P.; Džumbová, Lucie; Barták, M.; Hussein, T.; Smolík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 5 (2014), s. 742-756 ISSN 1420-326X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1361 Grant - others:AF FCEP(FI) 1118615 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : ventilation rate * penetration factor * tracer gas Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.225, year: 2014

  17. 46 CFR 42.15-45 - Ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilators. 42.15-45 Section 42.15-45 Shipping COAST... Conditions of Assignment of Freeboard § 42.15-45 Ventilators. (a) Ventilators in position 1 or 2 to spaces... any ventilator exceeds 351/2 inches in height it shall be specially supported. (b) Ventilators passing...

  18. Naturlig ventilation i enfamiliehuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsøe, N.C.

    Meddelelsen beskriver resultaterne af en række beregninger foretaget ved anvendelse af et computerprogram. Beregningerne har til formål at belyse forskellige parametres indvirkning på funktionen af et naturligt ventilationssystem. Blandt andet belyses systemets afhængighed af aftrækskanalernes di...... dimension, udeluftventilarealet og placeringen af aftrækskanalernes udmunding i tagfladen. Derudover gengives i kortfattet form de væsentligste konklusioner af udvalgte publikationer, som behandler særlige forhold vedrørende naturlig ventilation i praksis....

  19. Radioaerosol ventilation imaging in ventilator-dependent patients. Technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezina, W.; Chamberlain, M.; Vinitski, S.; King, M.; Nicholson, R.; Morgan, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The differentiation of pulmonary embolism (PE) from regional ventilatory abnormalities accompanied by reduced perfusion requires contemporary perfusion and ventilation studies. Distinguishing these conditions in ventilator-dependent patients is aided by administering a Tc-99m aerosol to characterize regional ventilation, and by performing a conventional Tc-99m MAA perfusion study. The technique uses a simple in-house constructed apparatus. Simple photographic techniques suffice, but computer subtraction of perfusion from the combined perfusion-ventilation image renders interpretation easier if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging. Multiple defects can be examined in a single study. Excluding normal or near-normal perfusion studies, PE was thought to be present in eight of 16 patients after perfusion imaging alone, but in only one of eight after added aerosol imaging. Angiography confirmed the diagnosis in that patient. Of the eight patients who had abnormal perfusion but were thought unlikely to have PE from the perfusion study alone, two had normal ventilation, and subsequently were shown to have PE by angiography. Because angiography was only performed on patients who were thought to have a high probability of PE on sequential perfusion-ventilation imaging, the true incidence of PE may have been higher. Aerosol ventilation imaging is a useful adjunct to perfusion imaging in patients on ventilators. It requires an efficient delivery system, particularly if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging, as it does in this study

  20. Plane Stratified Flow in a Room Ventilated by Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Nickel, J.; Baron, D. J. G.

    2004-01-01

    The air movement in the occupied zone of a room ventilated by displacement ventilation exists as a stratified flow along the floor. This flow can be radial or plane according to the number of wall-mounted diffusers and the room geometry. The paper addresses the situations where plane flow...

  1. Operational experience at RCD and FCD laboratories during various ventilation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, S.; Ashok Kumar, P.; Thanamani, M.; Rath, D.P.; Sapkal, J.A.; Raman, Anand

    2007-01-01

    Radiochemistry and Fuel Chemistry wing of Radiological Laboratory facility has various radio-chemical operations on isotopes of plutonium and trans-plutonium elements, carried out under containment and safe operational conditions. The ventilation provided to the facility is a Once - through system. The ventilation system is designed with separate headers for laboratory and glove box exhausts. There is scheduled periodic shut down of ventilation system for maintenance during non-occupancy hours/week ends. The buildup of natural α - emitters activity due to ventilation shut down, observed to be prevailing on stack air sample filter papers after the ventilation startup, is studied. The paper describes the operational experience gained over a period during ventilation shut down and suggests the course of remedial action for reducing the internal exposure due to build up of natural α - emitters and their progenies. (author)

  2. Dependence of radon level on ventilation systems in residences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotti, H.

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of indoor radon and radon entry from soil into a house are expected to increase with increasing radon concentration in soil pores, and indoor radon concentration is expected to decrease with increasing ventilation rate. Depressurization, which can be caused by the stack effect, by wind and by unbalanced ventilation, creates different pressure conditions in a house and in the soil beneath it. To reveal the possible differences in radon removal and entry resulting from different ventilation systems, radon concentrations were determined in three similar slab-on-grade buildings provided with mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, mechanical exhaust or natural ventilation. To limitate the effect of differences in soil parameters, the houses were constructed on the same gravel esker in Kuopio. Thus, the variation in radon entry as a result of different depressurisation of the houses (caused by unbalanced mechanical ventilation systems) could also be observed. In addition, the effect of pressurisation on living rooms could be determined in five slab-on-grade houses constructed on the same esker in Hollola. Mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation system controlled by measured indoor-outdoor pressure difference, was installed in the six houses. The seasonal variation with and without controlled pressure conditions were followed in a slab-on-grade house constructed on a gravel esker in Rekola. Long-term radon concentrations were observed to correlate negatively with air exchange rates. However, the removal effect of ventilation was found to be disturbed by negative pressure due to the stack effect and/or to unbalanced mechanical ventilation. (91 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.)

  3. [Lung protective ventilation. Ventilatory modes and ventilator parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Dirk; Weiler, Norbert

    2008-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation has a considerable potential for injuring the lung tissue. Therefore, attention has to be paid to the proper choice of ventilatory mode and settings to secure lung-protective ventilation whenever possible. Such ventilator strategy should account for low tidal volume ventilation (6 ml/kg PBW), limited plateau pressure (30 to 35 cm H2O) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). It is unclear whether pressure controlled or volume controlled ventilation with square flow profile is beneficial. The adjustment of inspiration and expiration time should consider the actual breathing mechanics and anticipate the generation of intrinsic PEEP. Ventilatory modes with the possibility of supporting spontaneous breathing should be used as soon as possible.

  4. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael Jan

    2005-05-01

    This review summarises some of the notable papers on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) from January 2003 to October 2004. Ventilator-associated pneumonia remains an important drain on hospital resources. All population groups are affected, but patients with VAP are more likely to be older, sicker, and male, with invasive medical devices in situ. Early VAP diagnosis is desirable to reduce VAP mortality and to retard emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. This may be possible using preliminary culture results or intracellular organism in polymorphonuclear cells. In most intensive care units, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are the commonest organisms isolated in VAP. However, causative organisms vary between and within hospitals. Consequently, individual intensive care units should develop empirical antibiotic policies to target the pathogenic bacteria prevalent in their patient populations. Preventative strategies aimed at reducing aerodigestive tract colonisation by pathogenic organisms, and also their subsequent aspiration, are becoming increasingly important. Educating medical staff about these simple measures is therefore pertinent. To reduce the occurrence of multidrug-resistant organisms, limiting the duration of antibiotic treatment to 8 days and antimicrobial rotation should be contemplated. Empirical therapy with antipseudomonal penicillins plus beta-lactamase inhibitors should be considered. If methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus VAP is a possibility, linezolid may be better than vancomycin. Prevention remains the key to reducing VAP prevalence.

  5. Free Convection Personalized Ventilation (FCPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Normally we supply fresh air to a room with a diffuser, and this air is distributed in the room according to different principles as: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation etc. That means we have to supply a very large amount of air to the whole room, although a person in the room totally ...

  6. Innovation in home mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Patients on home mechanical ventilation (HMV) are ventilator dependent, usually for the rest of their lives. In the past decades, the number of patients on HMV increased to nearly 3,000 in 2016 in the Netherlands. Current indications for HMV are patients diagnosed with either neuromuscular disease,

  7. Reverse ventilation--perfusion mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmaz, J.C.; Barnett, C.A.; Reich, S.B.; Krumpe, P.E.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Patients having lobar airway obstruction or consolidation usually have decreases of both ventilation and perfusion on lung scans. We report three patients in whom hypoxic vasoconstriction was apparently incomplete, resulting in a ''reversed'' ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Perfusion of the hypoxic lobe on the radionuclide scan was associated with metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary venous and pulmonary arterial hypertension in these patients

  8. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  9. Scheme for secure swapping two unknown states of a photonic qubit and an electron-spin qubit using simultaneous quantum transmission and teleportation via quantum dots inside single-sided optical cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jino [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min-Sung [Center for Quantum Information, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Ho [National Security Research Institute, P.O.Box 1, Yuseong, Daejeon, 34188 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Gon [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong-Phil, E-mail: jongph@cbnu.ac.kr [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a scheme for swapping two unknown states of a photon and electron spin confined to a charged quantum dot (QD) between two users by transferring a single photon. This scheme simultaneously transfers and teleports an unknown state (electron spin) between two users. For this bidirectional quantum communication, we utilize the interactions between a photonic and an electron-spin qubits of a QD located inside a single-sided optical cavity. Thus, our proposal using QD-cavity systems can obtain a certain success probability with high fidelity. Furthermore, compared to a previous scheme using cross-Kerr nonlinearities and homodyne detections, our scheme (using QD-cavity systems) can improve the feasibility under the decoherence effect in practice. - Highlights: • Design of Simultaneous quantum transmission and teleportation scheme via quantum dots and cavities. • We have developed the experimental feasibility of this scheme compared with the existing scheme. • Analysis of some benefits when our scheme is experimentally implemented using quantum dots and single-sided cavities.

  10. Ventilation of an hydrofoil wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Roger; Lee, Seung Jae; Monson, Garrett

    2013-11-01

    Ventilation physics plays a role in a variety of important engineering applications. For example, hydroturbine ventilation is used for control of vibration and cavitation erosion and more recently for improving the dissolved oxygen content of the flow through the turbine. The latter technology has been the focus of an ongoing study involving the ventilation of an hydrofoil wake to determine the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). The data are compared with previous studies of ventilated flow. The theoretical results of Hinze suggest that a scaling relationship is possible that can lead to developing appropriate design parameters for a ventilation system. Sponsored by ONR and DOE.

  11. [Oesophagitis during mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastinne, H; Canard, J M; Pillegand, B; Voultoury, J C; Catanzano, A; Claude, R; Gay, R

    1982-10-16

    Twenty-one patients whose condition required mechanical ventilation with nasogastric intubation were investigated for oesophagitis before the 3rd day and on the 15th day of treatment, including endoscopy and biopsy. Lesions of oesophagitis were detected in 14 cases during the initial examination and in 19 cases on the second endoscopy. The course of the lesions varied from one patient to another and appeared to be unrelated to the course of the primary disease. Oesophagitis in these patients is probably due to frequent episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux encouraged by cough, impaired consciousness and the presence of a tube. Reflux may also be the cause of inapparent and recurrent lung aspiration.

  12. Cardiac gated ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart

  13. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  14. CFD Simulations to Improve Ventilation in Low-Income Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rosemond; Gorle, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Quality of housing plays an important role in public health. In Dhaka, Bangladesh, the leading causes of death include tuberculosis, lower respiratory infections, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, so improving home ventilation could potentially mitigate these negative health effects. The goal of this project is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the relative effectiveness of different ventilation strategies for Dhaka homes. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD model of a standard Dhaka home with apertures of different sizes and locations was developed to predict air exchange rates. Our initial focus is on simulating ventilation driven by buoyancy-alone conditions, which is often considered the limiting case in natural ventilation design. We explore the relationship between ventilation rate and aperture area to determine the most promising configurations for optimal ventilation solutions. Future research will include the modeling of wind-driven conditions, and extensive uncertainty quantification studies to investigate the effect of variability in the layout of homes and neighborhoods, and in local wind and temperature conditions. The ultimate objective is to formulate robust design recommendations that can reduce risks of respiratory illness in low-income housing.

  15. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  16. Modeling ventilation and radon in new dutch dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, M.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were estimated for various ventilation conditions, the differences being mainly related to the airtightness of the dwelling and the ventilation behavior of its occupants. The estimations were aimed at describing the variation in air change rates and radon concentrations to be expected in the representative newly built Dutch dwellings and identifying the most important parameters determining air change rate and indoor radon concentration. The model estimations were compared with measurements. Most of the air was predicted to enter the model dwelling through leaks in the building shell, independent of the ventilation conditions of the dwelling. Opening the air inlets was shown to be an efficient way to increase infiltration and thus to decrease radon concentration. The effect of increasing the mechanical ventilation rate was considerably less than opening the air inlets. The mechanical ventilation sets the lower limit to the air change rate of the dwelling, and is effective in reducing the radon concentration when natural infiltration is low. Opening inside doors proved to be effective in preventing peak concentrations in poorly ventilated rooms. As the airtightness of newly built dwellings is still being improved, higher radon concentrations are to be expected in the near future and the effect of occupant behavior on indoor radon concentrations is likely to increase. According to the model estimations soil-borne radon played a moderate role, which is in line with measurements. (au)

  17. Ventilation system in the RA reactor building - design specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badrljica, R.

    1984-09-01

    Protective role of the ventilation system of nuclear facilities involve construction of ventilation barriers which prevent release of radioactive particulates or gases, elimination od radioactive particulates and gases from the air which is released from contaminated zones into the reactor environment. Ventilation barriers are created by dividing the building into a number of ventilation zones with different sub pressure compared to the atmospheric pressure. The RA reactor building is divided into four ventilation zones. First zone is the zone of highest risk. It includes reactor core with horizontal experimental channels, underground rooms of the primary coolant system (D 2 O), helium system, hot cells and the space above the the reactor core. Second zone is the reactor hall and the room for irradiated fuel storage. The third zone includes corridors in the basement, ground floor and first floor where the probability of contamination is small. The fourth zone includes the annex where the contamination risk is low. There is no have natural air circulation in the reactor building. Ventilators for air input and outlet maintain the sub pressure in the building (pressure lower than the atmospheric pressure). This prevents release of radioactivity into the atmosphere [sr

  18. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEPventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  20. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  1. Effect of ventilation rate on concentrations of indoor radon and its progenies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunhong; Liu Yanyang; Liu Fudong; Liu Senlin; Chen Ling

    2012-01-01

    To study concentrations of indoor radon and its progenies, ventilation rates and their corresponding concentrations of indoor radon and its progenies were measured using tracer-gas dilution method. Results show that both ventilation rates and concentrations of indoor radon varied insignificantly and radon concentration were higher than the outdoor environment while doors and windows were all closed with air-conditioner on and off respectively; the concentrations declined and close to the outdoor level when doors and windows were all open with ventilators in operation. Accordingly, in modern life, especially in summer, people's preference for air-conditioners but natural ventilation would result in an increase of indoor radon concentration. (authors)

  2. Lecture Notes on Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The main task of the ventilation system or the air-conditioning system is to supply· and remove air and airborne materials and to supply or remove heat from a room. The necessary level of fresh air will be supplied to· a room by a ventilation system, and heat from equipment or solar radiation can...... be removed by an air-conditioning system. An industrial ventilation system may both take care of the occupants' comfort and the industrial processes in the area....

  3. Indoor Environmental Quality in Mechanically Ventilated, Energy-Efficient Buildings vs. Conventional Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Tappler, Peter; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Shelton, Janie F; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-06

    Energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, there are concerns that inadequate mechanical ventilation may lead to impaired indoor air quality. Using a semi-experimental field study, we investigated if exposure of occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) differs with regard to indoor air pollutants and climate factors. We investigated living and bedrooms in 123 buildings (62 highly energy-efficient and 61 conventional buildings) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in Austria (mainly Vienna and Lower Austria). Measurements of indoor parameters (climate, chemical pollutants and biological contaminants) were conducted twice. In total, more than 3000 measurements were performed. Almost all indoor air quality and room climate parameters showed significantly better results in mechanically ventilated homes compared to those relying on ventilation from open windows and/or doors. This study does not support the hypothesis that occupants in mechanically ventilated low energy houses are exposed to lower indoor air quality.

  4. Contaminant Distribution Around Persons in Rooms Ventilated by Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    An optimal design of the ventilation system needs a proper prediction of the velocity, temperature and contaminant distribution in the room. Traditionally this is done either by the use of simplified models or by a somewhat more comprehensive CFD-simulation. Common to both methods is usually...... the lack of consideration for the persons present in the room. This paper deals with some of the effects of persons present in a displacement ventilated room, especially the effect on the contaminant distribution....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a patient...

  6. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  7. 46 CFR 45.131 - Ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilators. 45.131 Section 45.131 Shipping COAST GUARD....131 Ventilators. (a) Ventilators passing through superstructures other than enclosed superstructures must have coamings of steel or equivalent material at the freeboard deck. (b) Ventilators in position 1...

  8. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must...

  9. The role of ventilation. 2 v. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The 78 papers which constitute the proceedings of the conference are presented in two volumes. The papers in the first volume cover sessions dealing with the following broad topics: ventilation strategies; indoor air quality; energy impact of ventilation; building design for optimum ventilation; ventilation and energy. Volume 2 also covers ventilation strategies and ventilation and energy, and in addition: calculation, measurement and design tools; measurement and modelling. Separate abstract have been prepared for 4 papers in Volume 1 which deal with the role of ventilation in mitigating the hazard of radon in buildings. (UK)

  10. Newer nonconventional modes of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional modes of ventilation suffer many limitations. Although they are popularly used and are well-understood, often they fail to match the patient-based requirements. Over the years, many small modifications in ventilators have been incorporated to improve patient outcome. The ventilators of newer generation respond to patient′s demands by additional feedback systems. In this review, we discuss the popular newer modes of ventilation that have been accepted in to clinical practice. Various intensive care units over the world have found these modes to improve patient ventilator synchrony, decrease ventilator days and improve patient safety. The various modes discusses in this review are: Dual control modes (volume assured pressure support, volume support, Adaptive support ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, mandatory minute ventilation, Bi-level airway pressure release ventilation, (BiPAP, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist and NeoGanesh. Their working principles with their advantages and clinical limitations are discussed in brief.

  11. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  12. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted......, with an average of 1.1 kJ/m3. The yearly mean SFP based on estimated runtime is approx. 0.8 kJ/m3. The case shows the unlocked potential that lies within mechanical ventilation for nearzero energy consuming buildings....

  13. Pulsed ventilation in mines. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, D

    1975-06-01

    Using test results, an attempt is made to determine the form of the free jet and to derive design data for pulsed fans. The most suitable placing of these fans for the ventilation of headings is discussed.

  14. ENERGY STAR Certified Ventilating Fans

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Ventilating Fans that are effective as of...

  15. TS LOOP ALCOVE VENTILATION ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.M. Lahnalampi

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis is to examine the existing, constructor installed, physical ventilation installations located in each of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Topopah Springs (TS) Loop Alcoves No.1, No.2, No.3, No.4, No.6, and No.7. Alcove No.5 is excluded from the scope of this analysis since it is an A/E design system. Each ventilation installation will be analyzed for the purpose of determining if requirements for acceptance into the A/E design technical baseline have been met. The ventilation installations will be evaluated using Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards and Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements (ESFDR) (YMP 1997) requirements. The end product will be a technical analysis that will define ventilation installation compliance issues, any outstanding field changes, and use-as-is design deviations that are required to bring the ventilation installations into compliance with requirements for acceptance into the A/E design technical baseline. The analysis will provide guidance for alcove ventilation component design modifications to be developed to correct any deficient components that do not meet minimum requirements and standards

  16. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, V.

    2003-01-01

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity

  17. Mechanical ventilation for severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, James

    2015-06-01

    Acute exacerbations of asthma can lead to respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Noninvasive ventilation may prevent the need for endotracheal intubation in selected patients. For patients who are intubated and undergo mechanical ventilation, a strategy that prioritizes avoidance of ventilator-related complications over correction of hypercapnia was first proposed 30 years ago and has become the preferred approach. Excessive pulmonary hyperinflation is a major cause of hypotension and barotrauma. An appreciation of the key determinants of hyperinflation is essential to rational ventilator management. Standard therapy for patients with asthma undergoing mechanical ventilation consists of inhaled bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and drugs used to facilitate controlled hypoventilation. Nonconventional interventions such as heliox, general anesthesia, bronchoscopy, and extracorporeal life support have also been advocated for patients with fulminant asthma but are rarely necessary. Immediate mortality for patients who are mechanically ventilated for acute severe asthma is very low and is often associated with out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest before intubation. However, patients who have been intubated for severe asthma are at increased risk for death from subsequent exacerbations and must be managed accordingly in the outpatient setting.

  18. Effects of vehicle ventilation system, fuel type, and in-cabin smoking on the concentration of toluene and ethylbenzene in Pride cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rismanchian

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The ventilation condition, fuel type, and in-cabin smoking were not significantly impressive on the toluene and ethylbenzene concentrations inside the cars. However, simultaneous usage of the vehicle ventilation system and natural ventilation (windows could lead to little decrease in toluene concentration levels inside the car, while smoking consumption by passengers can increase them.

  19. Instrumentation of air conditioning and ventilation system - R-5 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.B.; Naik, C.D.; Narasingha Rao, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed account of instrumentation proposed for airconditioning and ventilation system in the R-5, 100 MW thermal research reactor, under construction is presented. Controls and instrumentation provided in this system are electronic, pneumatic and hydraulic in nature depending on the application. They cater to the accurate operation of the system and maintain the conditions strictly within desired tolerances. (S.K.K.)

  20. Impact of Fire Ventilation on General Ventilation in the Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender-Świercz, Ewa; Telejko, Marek

    2017-10-01

    The fire of building is a threat to its users. The biggest threat is generation, during lifetime of fire, hot gases and smoke. The purpose of quick and efficient evacuation from the area covered by the fire, at first step the escape routes have to be secured from smokiness. The smoke ventilation systems are used for this purpose. The proper design and execution of smoke ventilation is important not only because of the safety, but also of the maintenance of comfort in the building at a time when there is no fire. The manuscript presents the effect of incorrectly realized smoke ventilation in the stairwell of the medium building. The analysis shows that the flaps of smoke ventilation located in the stairwell may have a significant impact on the proper functioning of mechanical ventilation in the period when there is no fire. The improperly installed or incorrect insulated components cause perturbation of air flow and they change pressure distribution in the building. The conclusion of the analysis is the need to include the entire technical equipment of the building during the design and realization of its individual elements. The impact of various installations at each other is very important, and the omission of any of them can cause disturbances in the proper work of another.

  1. A dynamic ventilation model for gravity sewer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y C; Nobi, N; Nguyen, T; Vorreiter, L

    2012-01-01

    To implement any effective odour and corrosion control technology in the sewer network, it is imperative that the airflow through gravity sewer airspaces be quantified. This paper presents a full dynamic airflow model for gravity sewer systems. The model, which is developed using the finite element method, is a compressible air transport model. The model has been applied to the North Head Sewerage Ocean Outfall System (NSOOS) and calibrated using the air pressure and airflow data collected during October 2008. Although the calibration is focused on forced ventilation, the model can be applied to natural ventilation as well.

  2. Assessment of ventilation and indoor air pollutants in nursery and elementary schools in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canha, N; Mandin, C; Ramalho, O; Wyart, G; Ribéron, J; Dassonville, C; Hänninen, O; Almeida, S M; Derbez, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and ventilation in French classrooms. Various parameters were measured over one school week, including volatile organic compounds, aldehydes, particulate matter (PM2.5 mass concentration and number concentration), carbon dioxide (CO2 ), air temperature, and relative humidity in 51 classrooms at 17 schools. The ventilation was characterized by several indicators, such as the air exchange rate, ventilation rate (VR), and air stuffiness index (ICONE), that are linked to indoor CO2 concentration. The influences of the season (heating or non-heating), type of school (nursery or elementary), and ventilation on the IAQ were studied. Based on the minimum value of 4.2 l/s per person required by the French legislation for mechanically ventilated classrooms, 91% of the classrooms had insufficient ventilation. The VR was significantly higher in mechanically ventilated classrooms compared with naturally ventilated rooms. The correlations between IAQ and ventilation vary according to the location of the primary source of each pollutant (outdoor vs. indoor), and for an indoor source, whether it is associated with occupant activity or continuous emission. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mitigation of indoor radon using balanced mechanical ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellford, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    Previous research has shown that, for a given source strength, the concentration of Rn 222 in the home is inversely proportional to the ventilation rate. Further reductions in the concentration of the decay products of radon can be achieved due to the decrease in residence time of the parent gas as well as increased plate-out of the progeny. Natural and mechanical ventilation can affect the distribution of pressure across the building envelope potentially increasing the flow of radon bearing soil gas into the home gas into the home and/or promoting mixing of areas of higher and lower concentration. Balanced heat recovery ventilation systems were installed in ten homes in the Boyertown, Pennsylvania area. Ventilation was restricted initially to the basement area. Five installations were later modified to introduce supply air to upstairs living spaces while continuing to exhaust from the basement. An independent contractor measured Rn 222 concentrations and decay product activity in the basement and first floor living area before and after installation or modification of the heat recovery ventilation system. Additional experiments to evaluate the effect of house tightening techniques and positive pressurization of the basement were conducted. With balanced ventilation of the basement only, the mean reduction in Working Level was 92.8% with a high of 98% and a low of 76%. Mean reduction of radon gas concentration was 79.1%. When modified to supply air upstairs, mean reduction in Working Level in the living area was 90%. House tightening measures to reduce stack effect were observed to reduce radon concentration. Results indicate that balanced ventilation is an effective strategy for radon mitigation and can be expected to achieve recommended levels in a majority of homes. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  4. Trigger performance of mid-level ICU mechanical ventilators during assisted ventilation: a bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Chipman, Daniel W; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2008-09-01

    To compare the triggering performance of mid-level ICU mechanical ventilators with a standard ICU mechanical ventilator. Experimental bench study. The respiratory care laboratory of a university-affiliated teaching hospital. A computerized mechanical lung model, the IngMar ASL5000. Ten mid-level ICU ventilators were compared to an ICU ventilator at two levels of lung model effort, three combinations of respiratory mechanics (normal, COPD and ARDS) and two modes of ventilation, volume and pressure assist/control. A total of 12 conditions were compared. Performance varied widely among ventilators. Mean inspiratory trigger time was ventilators. The mean inspiratory delay time (time from initiation of the breath to return of airway pressure to baseline) was longer than that for the ICU ventilator for all tested ventilators except one. The pressure drop during triggering (Ptrig) was comparable with that of the ICU ventilator for only two ventilators. Expiratory Settling Time (time for pressure to return to baseline) had the greatest variability among ventilators. Triggering differences among these mid-level ICU ventilators and with the ICU ventilator were identified. Some of these ventilators had a much poorer triggering response with high inspiratory effort than the ICU ventilator. These ventilators do not perform as well as ICU ventilators in patients with high ventilatory demand.

  5. Tidal ventilation distribution during pressure-controlled ventilation and pressure support ventilation in post-cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, P; VAN DER Kreeft, S M; Gommers, D

    2014-09-01

    Inhomogeneous ventilation is an important contributor to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, this study examines homogeneity of lung ventilation by means of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements during pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) using the same ventilation pressures. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were studied after cardiac surgery. On arrival at the intensive care unit, ventilation distribution was measured with EIT just above the diaphragm for 15 min. After awakening, PCV was switched to PSV and EIT measurements were again recorded. Tidal impedance variation, a measure of tidal volume, increased during PSV compared with PCV, despite using the same ventilation pressures (P = 0.045). The distribution of tidal ventilation to the dependent lung region was more pronounced during PSV compared with PCV, especially during the first half of the inspiration. An even distribution of tidal ventilation between the dependent and non-dependent lung regions was seen during PCV at lower tidal volumes (tidal volumes (≥ 8 ml/kg). In addition, the distribution of tidal ventilation was predominantly distributed to the dependent lung during PSV at low tidal volumes. In post-cardiac surgery patients, PSV showed improved ventilation of the dependent lung region due to the contribution of the diaphragm activity, which is even more pronounced during lower assist levels. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Humidification during mechanical ventilation in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Modrykamien, Ariel M

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  7. Improved air ventilation rate estimation based on a statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabec, M.; Jilek, K.

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to air ventilation rate estimation from CO measurement data is presented. The approach is based on a state-space dynamic statistical model, allowing for quick and efficient estimation. Underlying computations are based on Kalman filtering, whose practical software implementation is rather easy. The key property is the flexibility of the model, allowing various artificial regimens of CO level manipulation to be treated. The model is semi-parametric in nature and can efficiently handle time-varying ventilation rate. This is a major advantage, compared to some of the methods which are currently in practical use. After a formal introduction of the statistical model, its performance is demonstrated on real data from routine measurements. It is shown how the approach can be utilized in a more complex situation of major practical relevance, when time-varying air ventilation rate and radon entry rate are to be estimated simultaneously from concurrent radon and CO measurements

  8. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  9. An Evaluation of a Proposed Ventilation System for Melbourne's CH2 Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aye

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of ventilation requirements in commercial buildings has been significantly revised in the last 10-15 years. A link between health, productivity and increased fresh air use has been established by some research and this understanding underpins the ventilation philosophy adopted for the CH2 building. The ventilation system design for CH2 that has been evaluated in this paper envisages a mechanically driven system during the day, using the displacement technique to distribute filtered air. All introduced air will be drawn from outside and no recycling of air will occur. Natural ventilation will be employed at night using the stack effect, enhanced by turbine ventilators. This paper critiques the proposed ventilation system in the light of international experience and the particular conditions of the building's location. The evidence suggests that natural ventilation sometimes may be inadequate to achieve the desired objectives. Minimization of indoor pollutants, adequate filtration and high levels of ventilation should, however, ensure satisfactory air quality during occupied hours.

  10. Air Distribution in a Furnished Room Ventilated by Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, June Richter; Nielsen, Peter V.; Svidt, Kjeld

    Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations of the furnit......Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations...

  11. Demand controlled ventilation in a bathroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Topp, Claus

    2008-01-01

    consumption during periods where the demand for ventilation is low and poor indoor climate during periods where the demand for ventilation is high. Controlling the ventilation rate by demand can improve the energy performance of the ventilation system and the indoor climate. This paper compares the indoor...... climate and energy consumption of a Constant Air Volume (CAV) system and a Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) system for two different bathroom designs. The air change rate of the CAV system corresponded to 0.5h-1. The ventilation rate of the DCV system was controlled by occupancy and by the relative...

  12. Basement depressurization using dwelling mechanical exhaust ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collignan, B.; O'Kelly, P.; Pilch, E.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical ventilation exhaust system is commonly used in France to generate air renewal into building and especially into dwelling. It consists of a permanent mechanical air extraction from technical rooms (kitchen, bathrooms and toilets) using a unique fan connected to exhaust ducts. Natural air inlets in living room and bed rooms ensure an air flow from living spaces towards technical rooms. To fight against radon into building, the most recognised efficient technique is the Soil Depressurization System (S.D.S.) consisting in depressurizing the house basement. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the dwelling mechanical ventilation system to depressurize the basement in conjunction with air renewal of a house. For that purpose, a S.D.S. has been installed in an experimental house at CSTB during its construction. At first, tests undertaken with a variable velocity fan connected to the S.D.S. have characterised the permeability of the basement. It is shown that basement can be depressurized adequately with a relatively low air flow rate. At a second stage, S.D.S. has been connected to the exhaust ventilation fan used for the mechanical ventilation of the house. Results obtained show the ability of such ventilation system to generate sufficient depressurization in the basement and to ensure simultaneously adequate air change rate in the dwelling. (author)

  13. Air ventilation/controlling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1997-12-12

    When all electricity supply from the outside of a power plant are lost, a power generator directly connected to an emergency steam turbine which is driven by steams introduced from a nuclear reactor is driven to supply electricity required in the power plant. Cool water prepared by a refrigerator is used as cooling water in an air ventilation/controlling facility of a room equipped with the power generating facility. As the refrigerator, a refrigerator of an existent emergency air cooling water system for an auxiliary air ventilation/controlling equipment is used. This can extend the period of time till the temperature of the room where the power generator is disposed exceeds the temperature range capable of keeping the integrity of the power generator even when all the AC power supply are lost to inactivate the function of the air ventilation/controlling system. (I.S.)

  14. [Pressure support ventilation and proportional assist ventilation during weaning from mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bermeo, H; Bottiroli, M; Italiano, S; Roche-Campo, F; Santos, J A; Alonso, M; Mancebo, J

    2014-01-01

    To compare tolerance, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) and clinical outcomes during weaning from MV in patients subjected to either pressure support ventilation (PSV) or proportional assist ventilation (PAV). A prospective, observational study was carried out. Intensive Care Unit. A total of 40 consecutive subjects were allocated to either the PSV or the PAV group until each group contained 20 patients. Patients were included in the study when they met the criteria to begin weaning and the attending physician decided to initiate the weaning process. The physician selected the modality and set the ventilatory parameters. None. Demographic data, respiratory mechanics, ventilatory parameters, duration of MV, and clinical outcomes (reintubation, tracheostomy, mortality). Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. No significant differences were observed between the PSV and PAV groups in terms of the total duration of MV (10 [5-18] vs. 9 [7-19] days; P=.85), reintubation (5 [31%] vs. 3 [19%]; P=.69), or mortality (4 [20%] vs. 5 [25%] deaths; P=1). Eight patients (40%) in the PSV group and 6 patients (30%) in the PAV group (P=.74) required a return to volume assist-control ventilation due to clinical deterioration. Tolerance, duration of MV and clinical outcomes during weaning from mechanical ventilation were similar in PSV and PAV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane modules for building ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistler, K.R.; Cussler, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Hollow fibre and flat sheet membranes with an interfacially polymerized coating of polyamide have a permeance for water vapour of about 0.16 m sec{sup -1}. These membranes can serve as a basis for building ventilation which provides fresh air while recovering about 70% of the specific heat and 60% of the latent heat. Because these membranes are selective for water vapour, the air is exhausted with internal pollutants like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and radon. The expense of the ventilator should be recovered in reduced heating costs in about three years. (Author)

  16. Limiting volume with modern ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Thomas J; Haan, Lutana; Ashworth, Lonny J; Anderson, Jeff

    2015-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) network low tidal-volume study comparing tidal volumes of 12 ml/kg versus 6 ml/kg was published in 2000. The study was stopped early as data revealed a 22% relative reduction in mortality rate when using 6 ml/kg tidal volume. The current generation of critical care ventilators allows the tidal volume to be set during volume-targeted, assist/control (volume A/C); however, some ventilators include options that may prevent the tidal volume from being controlled. The purpose of this bench study was to evaluate the delivered tidal volume, when these options are active, in a spontaneously breathing lung model using an electronic breathing simulator. Four ventilators were evaluated: CareFusion AVEA (AVEA), Dräger Evita® XL (Evita XL), Covidien Puritan Bennett® 840(TM) (PB 840), and Maquet SERVO-i (SERVO-i). Each ventilator was connected to the Hans Rudolph Electronic Breathing Simulator at an amplitude of 0 cm H2O and then 10 cm H2O. All four ventilators were set to deliver volume A/C, tidal volume 400 ml, respiratory rate 20 bpm, positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cm H2O, peak flowrate 60 L/min. The displayed tidal volume was recorded for each ventilator at the above settings with additional options OFF and then ON. The AVEA has two options in volume A/C: demand breaths and V-sync. When activated, these options allow the patient to exceed the set tidal volume. When using the Evita XL, the option AutoFlow can be turned ON or OFF, and when this option is ON, the tidal volume may vary. The PB 840 does not have any additional options that affect volume delivery, and it maintains the set tidal volume regardless of patient effort. The SERVO-i's demand valve allows additional flow if the patient's inspiratory flowrate exceeds the set flowrate, increasing the delivered tidal volume; this option can be turned OFF with the latest software upgrade. Modern ventilators have an increasing number of optional settings. These settings may

  17. Human versus Computer Controlled Selection of Ventilator Settings: An Evaluation of Adaptive Support Ventilation and Mid-Frequency Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are modes of mechanical ventilation that can select ventilator settings with computer controlled algorithms (targeting schemes. Two examples are adaptive support ventilation (ASV and mid-frequency ventilation (MFV. We studied how different clinician-chosen ventilator settings are from these computer algorithms under different scenarios. Methods. A survey of critical care clinicians provided reference ventilator settings for a 70 kg paralyzed patient in five clinical/physiological scenarios. The survey-derived values for minute ventilation and minute alveolar ventilation were used as goals for ASV and MFV, respectively. A lung simulator programmed with each scenario’s respiratory system characteristics was ventilated using the clinician, ASV, and MFV settings. Results. Tidal volumes ranged from 6.1 to 8.3 mL/kg for the clinician, 6.7 to 11.9 mL/kg for ASV, and 3.5 to 9.9 mL/kg for MFV. Inspiratory pressures were lower for ASV and MFV. Clinician-selected tidal volumes were similar to the ASV settings for all scenarios except for asthma, in which the tidal volumes were larger for ASV and MFV. MFV delivered the same alveolar minute ventilation with higher end expiratory and lower end inspiratory volumes. Conclusions. There are differences and similarities among initial ventilator settings selected by humans and computers for various clinical scenarios. The ventilation outcomes are the result of the lung physiological characteristics and their interaction with the targeting scheme.

  18. Decisional responsibility for mechanical ventilation and weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Louise; Blackwood, Bronagh; Egerod, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Optimal management of mechanical ventilation and weaning requires dynamic and collaborative decision making to minimize complications and avoid delays in the transition to extubation. In the absence of collaboration, ventilation decision making may be fragmented, inconsistent, and delayed. Our...

  19. Perioperative lung protective ventilation in obese patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Hashimoto, Soshi; Serpa Neto, Ary; Moine, Pierre; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Repine, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The perioperative use and relevance of protective ventilation in surgical patients is being increasingly recognized. Obesity poses particular challenges to adequate mechanical ventilation in addition to surgical constraints, primarily by restricted lung mechanics due to excessive adiposity, frequent

  20. The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES) package is a tool to help school designers assess the potential financial payback and indoor humidity control benefits of Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV) systems for school applications.