WorldWideScience

Sample records for single-pulse ablation threshold

  1. Surface microstructure and chemistry of polyimide by single pulse ablation of picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qifeng; Chen, Ting; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-01

    Polyimide (PI) surface was ablated by the single pulse of picosecond laser, and the effects of laser wavelength (λ= 355 nm and 1064 nm) and fluence on surface microstructure and chemistry were explored. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis found that different surface microstructures, i.e., the concave of concentric ring and the convex of porous circular disk, were generated by 355 nm and 1064 nm picosecond laser ablation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that due to the high peak energy density of picosecond laser, oxygen and nitrogen from the ambient were incorporated into the PI surface mainly in the form of Cdbnd O and Csbnd Nsbnd C groups. Thus, both of the O/C and N/C atomic content ratios increased, but the increase caused by 1064 nm wavelength laser was larger. It inferred that the differences of PI surface microstructures and chemistry resulted from different laser parameters were related to different laser-matter interaction effects. For 355 nm picosecond laser, no obvious thermal features were observed and the probable ablation process of PI was mainly governed by photochemical effect; while for 1064 nm picosecond laser, obvious thermal feature appeared and photothermal effect was thought to be dominant.

  2. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxiang Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter, ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm2.

  3. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  4. Spot size and pulse number dependence of femtosecond laser ablation thresholds of silicon and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Naghilou, Aida [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kitzler, Markus [TU Wien, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Influence of laser spot size and pulse number on the ablation of solids. • An extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. • Successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. - Abstract: Laser spot size and pulse number are two major parameters influencing the ablation of solids. The extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. This model was successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. It is demonstrated that heat accumulation cannot describe the experimental results.

  5. A Single-Pulse Integrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1974-01-01

    A single-pulse integrator is described. It gives a relative measure of the integral of the output signal from a coil monitor on the Risø 10 MeV linear accelerator, and displays the value on a digital voltmeter. The reproduccibility is found to be better than ±1% for an accelerated pulse charge...

  6. Plasma ignition thresholds in UV laser ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, P.; Dyer, P. E.; Key, P. H.; Snelling, H. V.

    Ultraviolet (UV) laser thresholds for plasma ignition on solid targets predicted from electron-neutral collisional heating are generally much higher than those observed experimentally. This inconsistency was reconciled by Rosen, et al. [2], who showed that excited-state photoionization played a key role in long-pulse UV laser breakdown. Here we develop a related model but with emphasis on pulses of 10 ns duration. Experimental results are also reported for titanium, copper, silicon, and ferulic acid targets in vacuum, irradiated with combinations of the XeF, KrF, and ArF lasers for comparison with predictions.

  7. Supra-threshold epidermis injury from near-infrared laser radiation prior to ablation onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Peterson, Amanda M.; Lile, Lily A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Stolarski, David J.; Zohner, Justin J.; Kumru, Semih S.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    With continued advancement of solid-state laser technology, high-energy lasers operating in the near-infrared (NIR) band are being applied in an increasing number of manufacturing techniques and medical treatments. Safety-related investigations of potentially harmful laser interaction with skin are commonplace, consisting of establishing the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) thresholds under various conditions, often utilizing the minimally-visible lesion (MVL) metric as an indication of damage. Likewise, characterization of ablation onset and velocity is of interest for therapeutic and surgical use, and concerns exceptionally high irradiance levels. However, skin injury response between these two exposure ranges is not well understood. This study utilized a 1070-nm Yb-doped, diode-pumped fiber laser to explore the response of excised porcine skin tissue to high-energy exposures within the supra-threshold injury region without inducing ablation. Concurrent high-speed videography was employed to assess the effect on the epidermis, with a dichotomous response determination given for three progressive damage event categories: observable permanent distortion on the surface, formation of an epidermal bubble due to bounded intra-cutaneous water vaporization, and rupture of said bubble during laser exposure. ED50 values were calculated for these categories under various pulse configurations and beam diameters, and logistic regression models predicted injury events with approximately 90% accuracy. The distinction of skin response into categories of increasing degrees of damage expands the current understanding of high-energy laser safety while also underlining the unique biophysical effects during induced water phase change in tissue. These observations could prove useful in augmenting biothermomechanical models of laser exposure in the supra-threshold region.

  8. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes

  9. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping, E-mail: ypchen@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  10. PLASMA-OXYGEN INTERACTION DURING THIN FILMS DEPOSITION BY LASER ABLATION: DETERMINATION OF THE INTERACTION PRESSURE THRESHOLD AND EFFECT ON THE THIN FILMS PROPERTIESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lafane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we study the effect of the oxygen pressure on the plasma dynamics during the ablation of oxides materials into an oxygen gas. The study was done using fast imaging and ion probe techniques. Both techniques revealed that a threshold oxygen pressure is needed to initiate the plume oxygen interaction. This threshold oxygen pressure depends on the ablated material. A clear effect of this threshold pressure on the structural and phase composition of the deposited thin films is shown.

  11. Single-pulse electrons from a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Takeoka, Seiji; Kato, Kazushi

    1976-01-01

    The electronic circuits of a 35 MeV linear accelerator at Hiroshima University were modified to produce single-pulse electrons. Single-pulse electrons were obtained by synchronizing one of eight pulses from an electron gun modulator, 120 pps, to one of the micro-waves from a klystron, 15 pps. After single-pulse electrons were discharged, a signal was relayed to a stop-gate circuit from a binary scaler which was connected to the gun modulator. Although reproducibility of single-pulse electrons and stability of electron output per pulse were not completely satisfactory, it was possible to use for radiobiological studies. Biological effects of single-pulse electrons (energy: 25 MeV, dose rate: 10 10 rad/min) on cultured mammalian cells and on mice were nearly equal to those of multi-pulse electrons (25 MeV, 10 7 rad/min) and Co-60 γ-rays (dose rate: 100 rad/min). (auth.)

  12. Impact of pulse duration on Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy: treatment aspects on the single-pulse level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Scheib, Gabriel; Khoder, Wael; Stief, Christian G; Herrmann, Thomas; Nagele, Udo; Bader, Markus J

    2015-04-01

    Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotripsy is a multi-pulse treatment modality with stochastic effects on the fragmentation. In vitro investigation on the single-pulse-induced effects on fiber, repulsion as well as fragmentation was performed to identify potential impacts of different Ho:YAG laser pulse durations. A Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long- or short-pulse mode was tested with regard to fiber burn back, the repulsion capacity using an underwater pendulum setup and single-pulse-induced fragmentation capacity using artificial (BEGO) stones. The laser parameters were chosen in accordance with clinical application modes (laser fiber: 365 and 200 µm; output power: 4, 6 and 10 W in different combinations of energy per pulse and repetition rate). Evaluation parameters were reduction in fiber length, pendulum deviation and topology of the crater. Using the long-pulse mode, the fiber burn back was nearly negligible, while in short-pulse mode, an increased burn back could be observed. The results of the pendulum test showed that the deviation induced by the momentum of short pulses was by factor 1.5-2 higher compared to longer pulses at identical energy per pulse settings. The ablation volumes induced by single pulses either in short-pulse or long-pulse mode did not differ significantly although different crater shapes appeared. Reduced stone repulsion and reduced laser fiber burn back with longer laser pulses may result in a more convenient handling during clinical application and thus in an improved clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy.

  13. Mechanism of single-pulse ablative generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shugaev, M.V.; Gnilitskyi, I.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Zhigilei, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 20 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 205429. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S; GA MŠk LM2015086 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 739573 - HiLASE CoE Grant - others:OP VVV - HiLASE-CoE(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_006/0000674 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : molecular-dynamics simulations * metals * electron * spallation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  14. Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation to identify epileptogenic cortex : Clinical information obtained from early evoked responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, B.E.; van 't Klooster, M.A.; Keizer, D.; Hebbink, G.J.; Leijten, F.S.S.; Ferrier, C.H.; van Putten, M.J.A.M.; Zijlmans, M.; Huiskamp, G.J.M.

    Objective: Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation (SPES) probes epileptogenic cortex during electrocorticography. Two SPES responses are described: pathological delayed responses (DR, >100 ms) associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and physiological early responses (ER, <100 ms) that map cortical

  15. Catastrophic optical mirror damage in diode lasers monitored during single-pulse operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegler, M.; Tomm, J.W.; Reeber, D.

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) is analyzed for 808 nm emitting diode lasers in single-pulse operation in order to separate facet degradation from subsequent degradation processes. During each pulse, nearfield and thermal images are monitored. A temporal resolution better than 7 µs...... is achieved. The thermal runaway process is unambiguously related to the occurrence of a “thermal flash.” A one-by-one correlation between nearfield, thermal flash, thermal runaway, and structural damage is observed. The single-pulse excitation technique allows for controlling the propagation...

  16. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  17. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mahdm@iust.ac.ir

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of aluminum target by single and double pulse (∼ 5 ns delay) in ambient air and distilled water • Comparing with air, in ambient water, plasma confinement results in higher crater depth. • In comparison with single pulse laser ablation, the absorption of the laser pulse energy is higher for double pulse regime. • As a result of ablated material expansion, the crater depth is decreased if the target is placed at lower depth. - Abstract: In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  18. Broadband single-pulse CARS spectra in a fired internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klick, D; Marko, K A; Rimai, L

    1981-04-01

    The first known broadband single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements within the cylinder of a firing internal combustion engine are reported. Postcombustion temperature and carbon monoxide concentration are probed with 1-mm(3) spatial resolution and 10-nsec temporal resolution. Space- and time-resolved measurements, as presented here, are shown to be necessary for the study of fluctuating systems such as engines.

  19. Injury Thresholds for Topical Cream-Coated Skin of Hairless Guinea Pigs (Cavia Procellus) in Near Infrared Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stolarski, David J; Zohner, Justin J; Imholte, Michelle L; Chavey, Lucas J; Pocock, Ginger M; Buchanan, Kelvin C; Jindra, Nichole M; Figueroa, Manuel A; Thomas, Robert J; Rockwell, Benjamin A

    2006-01-01

    .... Hairless guinea pigs (cavia porcellus) in vivo were used to evaluate how the minimum visible lesion threshold for single-pulse laser exposure is changed with a topical agent applied to the skin...

  20. All-normal-dispersion fiber laser with NALM: power scalability of the single-pulse regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Gan; Zhang, Haitao; Li, Yuhe; Deng, Decai

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the average power scalability of all-normal-dispersion fiber integrated lasers with a nonlinear amplifying loop. This laser generates 34 ps pulses at a repetition of 8 MHz and spectral width of 30 nm when increased to the highest power. The laser operates on a single-pulse train regime and can be de-chirped as short as 200 fs. The 60 mW output power which can be maintained while operating with low Raman effect is the highest average power achieved for this type of laser in the sub-200 fs regime. The laser becomes unstable due to the strengthening of the Raman–Stokes pulse. Output pulses show great stability in testing.

  1. Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, B.-Y.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy West Virginia University Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Boyles, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy West Kentucky University Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Palliyaguru, N. [Physics and Astronomy Department Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs’ highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb–Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs’ pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623−0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839−0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.

  2. Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, B.-Y.; Boyles, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Palliyaguru, N.

    2017-05-01

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs’ highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb-Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs’ pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623-0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839-0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.

  3. Effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating prepared by micro-arc oxidation on Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun-Hua; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yan; Du, Mao-Hua; Han, Fu-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Single pulse energy remarkably influences the properties of ceramic coating prepared by MAO on Ti alloy. • The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. • The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. • Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. • The effects of single pulse energy on the micro-hardness and phase composition of ceramic coating are not as evident as those of frequency and duty cycle. - Abstract: The effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating fabricated on a Ti–6Al–4V alloy via micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in aqueous solutions containing aluminate, phosphate, and some additives are investigated. The thickness, micro-hardness, surface and cross-sectional morphology, surface roughness, and compositions of the ceramic coating are studied using eddy current thickness meter, micro-hardness tester, JB-4C Precision Surface roughness meter, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Single pulse energy remarkably influences the ceramic coating properties. The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. The sizes of oxide particles, micro-pores and micro-cracks slightly increase with impulse width and single pulse energy. The main surface conversion products generated during MAO process in aqueous solutions containing aluminate are rutile TiO 2 , anatase TiO 2 , and a large amount of Al 2 TiO 5 . The effects of single pulse

  4. Effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating prepared by micro-arc oxidation on Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun-Hua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500 (China); Wang, Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Precision/Ultra-precision Manufacturing Equipments and Control, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Du, Mao-Hua [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500 (China); Han, Fu-Zhu, E-mail: hanfuzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Precision/Ultra-precision Manufacturing Equipments and Control, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Single pulse energy remarkably influences the properties of ceramic coating prepared by MAO on Ti alloy. • The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. • The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. • Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. • The effects of single pulse energy on the micro-hardness and phase composition of ceramic coating are not as evident as those of frequency and duty cycle. - Abstract: The effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating fabricated on a Ti–6Al–4V alloy via micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in aqueous solutions containing aluminate, phosphate, and some additives are investigated. The thickness, micro-hardness, surface and cross-sectional morphology, surface roughness, and compositions of the ceramic coating are studied using eddy current thickness meter, micro-hardness tester, JB-4C Precision Surface roughness meter, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Single pulse energy remarkably influences the ceramic coating properties. The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. The sizes of oxide particles, micro-pores and micro-cracks slightly increase with impulse width and single pulse energy. The main surface conversion products generated during MAO process in aqueous solutions containing aluminate are rutile TiO{sub 2}, anatase TiO{sub 2}, and a large amount of Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}. The effects of

  5. Interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock in hypersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yanji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensing and schlieren imaging with high resolution and sensitivity are applied to the study of the interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock at Mach 5. An Nd:YAG laser operated at 1.06 μm, 100 mJ pulse energy is used to break down the hypersonic flow in a shock tunnel. Three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations are solved with an upwind scheme to simulate the interaction. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body is measured and calculated to examine the pressure variation during the interaction. Schlieren imaging is used in conjunction with the calculated density gradients to examine the process of the interaction. The results show that the experimental pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body and schlieren imaging fit well with the simulation. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body will increase when the transmission shock approaches the blunt body and decrease with the formation of the rarefied wave. Bow shock is deformed during the interaction. Quasi-stationary waves are formed by high rate laser energy deposition to control the bow shock. The pressure and temperature at the stagnation point on the blunt body and the wave drag are reduced to 50%, 75% and 81% respectively according to the simulation. Schlieren imaging has provided important information for the investigation of the mechanism of the interaction.

  6. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.; Hunt, D.; Hahn, D.; Cradick, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morgan, D. V. [National Security Technologies LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.

  7. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging.

  8. Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation to identify epileptogenic cortex: Clinical information obtained from early evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, B E; van 't Klooster, M A; Keizer, D; Hebbink, G J; Leijten, F S S; Ferrier, C H; van Putten, M J A M; Zijlmans, M; Huiskamp, G J M

    2016-02-01

    Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation (SPES) probes epileptogenic cortex during electrocorticography. Two SPES responses are described: pathological delayed responses (DR, >100 ms) associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and physiological early responses (ER, 80 Hz, in the SOZ and seizure propagation areas. We used data from 12 refractory epilepsy patients. SPES consisted of 10 pulses of 1 ms, 4-8 mA and 5s interval on adjacent electrodes pairs. Data were available at 2048 samples/s for six and 512 samples/s (22 bits) for eight patients and analyzed in the time-frequency (TF) and time-domain (TD). Electrodes with ERs were stronger associated with SOZ than non-SOZ electrodes. ERs with frequency content >80 Hz exist and are specific for SOZ channels. ERs evoked by stimulation of seizure onset electrodes were associated with electrodes involved in seizure propagation. Analysis of ERs can reveal aspects of pathology, manifested by association with seizure propagation and areas with high ER numbers that coincide with the SOZ. Not only DRs, but also ERs could have clinical value for mapping epileptogenic cortex and help to unravel aspects of the epileptic network. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating emotional top down modulation of ambiguous faces by single pulse TMS on early visual cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Adam Yaple

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Top-down processing is a mechanism in which memory, context and expectation are used to perceive stimuli. For this study we investigated how emotion content, induced by music mood, influences perception of happy and sad emoticons. Using single pulse TMS we stimulated right occipital face area (rOFA, primary visual cortex (V1 and vertex while subjects performed a face-detection task and listened to happy and sad music. At baseline, incongruent audio-visual pairings decreased performance, demonstrating dependence of emotion while perceiving ambiguous faces. However, performance of face identification decreased during rOFA stimulation regardless of emotional content. No effects were found between Cz and V1 stimulation. These results suggest that while rOFA is important for processing faces regardless of emotion, V1 stimulation had no effect. Our findings suggest that early visual cortex activity may not integrate emotional auditory information with visual information during emotion top-down modulation of faces.

  10. Laser ablation of polymer coatings allows for electromagnetic field enhancement mapping around nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    . The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  11. Surprise in simplicity: an unusual spectral evolution of a single pulse GRB 151006A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, R.; Iyyani, S.; Chand, V.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Bhattacharya, D.; Rao, A. R.; Vadawale, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of GRB 151006A, the first gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by AstroSat Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Imager (CZTI). We study the long-term spectral evolution by exploiting the capabilities of Fermi and Swift satellites at different phases, which is complemented by the polarization measurement with the CZTI. While the light curve of the GRB in different energy bands shows a simple pulse profile, the spectrum shows an unusual evolution. The first phase exhibits a hard-to-soft evolution until ∼16-20 s, followed by a sudden increase in the spectral peak reaching a few MeV. Such a dramatic change in the spectral evolution in the case of a single pulse burst is reported for the first time. This is captured by all models we used namely, Band function, blackbody+Band and two blackbodies+power law. Interestingly, the Fermi Large Area Telescope also detects its first photon (>100 MeV) during this time. This new injection of energy may be associated with either the beginning of afterglow phase, or a second hard pulse of the prompt emission itself that, however, is not seen in the otherwise smooth pulse profile. By constructing Bayesian blocks and studying the hardness evolution we find a good evidence for a second hard pulse. The Swift data at late epochs (>T90 of the GRB) also show a significant spectral evolution consistent with the early second phase. The CZTI data (100-350 keV), though having low significance (1σ), show high values of polarization in the two epochs (77-94 per cent), in agreement with our interpretation.

  12. Object-oriented identification of forested landslides with derivatives of single pulse LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Eeckhaut, Miet; Kerle, Norman; Poesen, Jean; Hervás, Javier

    2012-11-01

    In contrast to the many studies that use expert-based analysis of LiDAR derivatives for landslide mapping in forested terrain, only few studies have attempted to develop (semi-)automatic methods for extracting landslides from LiDAR derivatives. While all these studies are pixel-based, it has not yet been tested whether object-oriented analysis (OOA) could be an alternative. This study investigates the potential of OOA using only single-pulse LiDAR derivatives, such as slope gradient, roughness and curvature to map landslides. More specifically, the focus is on both LiDAR data segmentation and classification of slow-moving landslides in densely vegetated areas, where spectral data do not allow accurate landslide identification. A multistage procedure has been developed and tested in the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium). The procedure consists of (1) image binarization and multiresolution segmentation, (2) classification of landslide parts (main scarps and landslide body segments) and non-landslide features (i.e. earth banks and cropland fields) with supervised support vector machines at the appropriate scale, (3) delineation of landslide flanks, (4) growing of a landslide body starting from its main scarp, and (5) final cleaning of the inventory map. The results obtained show that OOA using LiDAR derivatives allows recognition and characterization of profound morphologic properties of forested deep-seated landslides on soil-covered hillslopes, because more than 90% of the main scarps and 70% of the landslide bodies of an expert-based inventory were accurately identified with OOA. For mountainous areas with bedrock, on the other hand, creation of a transferable model is expected to be more difficult.

  13. Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey. IV. The Period Dependence of Component Widths of Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypczak, Anna; Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan; Melikidze, George I.; Maciesiak, Krzysztof; Koralewska, Olga; Filothodoros, Alexandros

    2018-02-01

    The core component width in normal pulsars, with periods (P) > 0.1 s, measured at the half-power point at 1 GHz, has a lower boundary line (LBL) that closely follows the P ‑0.5 scaling relation. This result is of fundamental importance for understanding the emission process and requires extended studies over a wider frequency range. In this paper we have carried out a detailed study of the profile component widths of 123 normal pulsars observed in the Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey at 333 and 618 MHz. The components in the pulse profile were separated into core and conal classes. We found that at both frequencies, the core, as well as the conal component widths versus period, had a LBL that followed the P ‑0.5 relation with a similar lower boundary. The radio emission in normal pulsars has been observationally shown to arise from a narrow range of heights around a few hundred kilometers above the stellar surface. In the past the P ‑0.5 relation has been considered as evidence for emission arising from last open dipolar magnetic field lines. We show that the P ‑0.5 dependence only holds if the trailing and leading half-power points of the component are associated with the last open field line. In such a scenario we do not find any physical motivation that can explain the P ‑0.5 dependence for both core and conal components as evidence for dipolar geometry in normal pulsars. We believe the period dependence is a result of a currently unexplained physical phenomenon.

  14. Laser ablation of paint in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brygo, Francois; Semerok, Alexandre; Weulersse, Jean-Marc; Thro, Pierre-Yves; Oltra, Roland; Decobert, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear dismantling faces the challenge of paint removal on large surfaces of painted walls. The conventional methods for paint stripping on concrete walls are mainly based on mechanical grinder and lead to an important volume of aerosols and wastes. Laser ablation has been evaluated as a promising method for paint removal with a number of advantages. The method reduces considerably the waste volume as the removal of paint is selective. The ablated matter can be collected by aerosol aspiration/filtration. The automation of the process can provide a higher capacity of paint removal. Laser ablation of paint was under our extensive studies. Laser ablation with different nanosecond repetition rate lasers was comparatively studied to understand the ablation mechanisms, and to obtain the highest efficiency of paint removal. The investigations were made with three Q-Switched Nd:YAG lasers (λ = 532 nm and λ = 1.064 μm). The different pulse durations (5 ns and 100 ns) demonstrated the different ablation regimes. Ablation with long pulses (100 ns) provided the best removal efficiency while the short ones (5 ns) decreased the ablation threshold fluence. It was demonstrated that the pulse repetition rate increasing in the 20 Hz - 10 kHz range induced heat accumulation in the paint. It resulted in ablation efficiency increase with a large decrease in the ablation threshold fluence. Laser ablation in the 0 - 10 J / cm 2 fluence range was investigated. Various paints were under investigation to obtain the maximum efficiency of paint removal for each specific experimental case. The ejected matter recording with a high speed imaging system allows to analyse the laser-matter interaction. (authors)

  15. Single pulse vibrational Raman scattering by a broadband KrF excimer laser in a hydrogen-air flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, J. M.; Cheng, Tsarng-Sheng

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is produced by a broadband excimer laser at 248 nm (KrF) in a H2-air flame, and VRS spectra are recorded for lean, stoichiometric, and rich flames. Except at very lean flame conditions, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) processes interfere with VRS Stokes lines from H2, H2O, and O2. No interference is found for the N2 Stokes and N2 anti-Stokes lines. In a stoichiometric H2/air flame, single-pulse measurements of N2 concentration and temperature (by the VRS Stokes to anti-Stokes ratio) have a relative standard deviation of 7.7 and 10 percent, respectively. These single pulse measurement errors compare well with photon statistics calculations using measured Raman cross sections.

  16. A Novel Single Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Stimulates Osteogenesis of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bone Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chih-Chun; Chang, Je-Ken; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Tai, I-Chun; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been successfully applied to accelerate fracture repair since 1979. Recent studies suggest that PEMF might be used as a nonoperative treatment for the early stages of osteonecrosis. However, PEMF treatment requires a minimum of ten hours per day for the duration of the treatment. In this study, we modified the protocol of the single-pulsed electromagnetic field (SPEMF) that only requires a 3-minute daily treatment. In the in vitro study, cell proliferat...

  17. A Study of Cortical Excitability, Central Motor Conduction, and Cortical Inhibition Using Single Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Early Frontotemporal and Alzheimer's Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Nagaraju, B C; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT), central motor conduction time (CMCT), and silent period (SP) were evaluated. Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD.

  18. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, S.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2012-06-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  1. Onset and evolution of laser induced periodic surface structures on indium tin oxide thin films for clean ablation using a repetitively pulsed picosecond laser at low fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, N.; Dasgupta, P.; O’Connor, G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The onset and evolution of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is of key importance to obtain clean ablated features on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films at low fluences. The evolution of subwavelength periodic nanostructures on a 175 nm thick ITO film, using 10 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1032 nm, operating at 400 kHz, is investigated. Initially nanoblisters are observed when a single pulse is applied below the damage threshold fluence (0.45 J cm‑2) the size and distribution of nanoblisters are found to depend on fluence. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations support the hypothesis that conductive nanoblisters can enhance the local intensity of the applied electromagnetic field. The LIPSS are observed to evolve from regions where the electric field enhancement has occurred; LIPSS has a perpendicular orientation relative to the laser polarization for a small number (pulses. The LIPSS periodicity depends on nanoblister size and distribution; a periodicity down to 100 nm is observed at the lower fluence periphery of the Gaussian irradiated area where nanoblisters are smallest and more closely arranged. Upon irradiation with successive (>5) pulses, the orientation of the periodic structures appears to rotate and evolve to become aligned in parallel with the laser polarization at approximately the same periodicity. These orientation effects are not observed at higher fluence—due to the absence of the nanoblister-like structures; this apparent rotation is interpreted to be due to stress-induced fragmentation of the LIPSS structure. The application of subsequent pulses leads to clean ablation. LIPSS are further modified into features of a shorter period when laser scanning is used. Results provide evidence that the formation of conductive nanoblisters leads to the enhancement of the applied electromagnetic field and thereby can be used to precisely control laser ablation on ITO thin films.

  2. Single-pulse characteristics of the Xe(L) amplifier on the Xe35+ (3d→2p) transition array at λ ≅ 2.86 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, Alex B; Song Xiangyang; Zhang Ping; McCorkindale, John C; Khan, Shahab F; De Jonghe, Richard; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Zhao, Ji; Boyer, Keith; Rhodes, Charles K

    2006-01-01

    The triple comparison of (1) single-pulse spectral data, recorded with a CCD-equipped von Hamos spectrometer both axially and transversely; (2) axially measured time-integrated spectra registered on a film and (3) single-pulse x-ray images of the morphology of the self-trapped plasma channel, recorded simultaneously with the single-pulse spectra, establishes several leading characteristics of the saturated amplification observed on the Xe 35+ transition array at λ ≅ 2.86 A. The chief findings are (α) absolute positive correlation of amplification with the formation of a plasma channel, (β) a perfect spectral match of the amplified transitions in the comparison of axially recorded single-pulse and time-integrated film data and (γ) exact spectral correspondence of both the axially registered single-pulse and time-integrated film data with single-pulse transversely measured spectra exhibiting deep spectral hole burning at the position of the Xe 35+ array. (letter to the editor)

  3. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment

  4. Study of Laser Ablation Efficiency for an Acrylic-Based Photopolymerizing Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from study of the effi ciency (ablated mass per unit energy, mechanical recoil momentum per unit energy) of laser ablation for a light-curable polymer. A substantial difference is seen between the thresholds and indicated criteria for laser ablation effi ciency in the liquid and cured phases. The highest energy effi ciency for laser ablation (~22.6 %) is achieved when the initially liquid polymer is exposed to radiation with the wavelength optimal for photopolymerization (365 ± 15 nm).

  5. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  6. The Israeli EA-FEL Upgrade Towards Long Pulse Operation for Ultra-High Resolution Single Pulse Coherent Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A; Kanter, M; Kapilevich, B; Litvak, B; Peleg, S; Socol, Y; Volshonok, M

    2005-01-01

    The Israeli Electrostatic Accelerator FEL (EA-FEL) is now being upgraded towards long pulse (1005s) operation and ultra-high resolution (10(-6)) single pulse coherent spectroscopy. We present quantitative estimations regarding the applications of controlled radiation chirp for spectroscopic applications with pulse-time Fourier Transform limited spectral resolution. Additionally, we describe a novel extraction-efficiency-improving scheme based on increase of accelerating voltage (boosting) after saturation is achieved. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is confirmed by theoretical and numerical calculations. The latter are performed using software, based on 3D space-frequency domain model. The presentation provides an overview of the upgrade status: the high-voltage terminal is being reconfigured to accept the accelerating voltage boost system; a new broad band low-loss resonator is being manufactured; multi-stage depressed collector is assembled.

  7. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  8. Shifts in the metabolic function of a benthic estuarine microbial community following a single pulse exposure to silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri-Bravo, Virginia; Paterson, Lynn; Aspray, Thomas J.; Porter, Joanne S.; Winson, Michael K.; Thornton, Barry; Hartl, Mark G.J.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a biocidal agent and their potential accumulation in sediments may threaten non-target natural environmental bacterial communities. In this study a microcosm approach was established to investigate the effects of well characterized OECD AgNPs (NM-300) on the function of the bacterial community inhabiting marine estuarine sediments (salinity 31‰). The results showed that a single pulse of NM-300 AgNPs (1 mg L −1 ) that led to sediment concentrations below 6 mg Ag kg −1 dry weight inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant carbon substrates. As a result, the functional diversity changed, but recovered after 120 h under the experimental conditions. This microcosm study suggests that AgNPs under environmentally relevant experimental conditions can negatively affect bacterial function and provides an insight into the understanding of the bacterial community response and resilience to AgNPs exposure, important for informing relevant regulatory measures. - Highlights: • AgNPs affected the bacterial community function in estuarine marine sediments. • AgNPs inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant substrates. • Heterotrophic bacterial groups showed resilience to AgNPs after 120 h exposure. • AgNPs did not affect the bacterial community structure in sediments. - AgNPs inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant substrates and caused temporary shifts in the bacterial functional diversity in marine estuarine sediments

  9. Single-pulse observations of the Galactic Center magnetar PSR J1745-2900 at 3.1 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W. M.; Wang, N.; Manchester, R. N.; Wen, Z. G.; Yuan, J. P.

    2018-02-01

    We report on single-pulse observations of the Galactic Center magnetar PSR J1745-2900 that were made using the Parkes 64-m radio telescope with a central frequency of 3.1 GHz at five observing epochs between 2013 July and August. The shape of the integrated pulse profiles was relatively stable across the five observations, indicating that the pulsar was in a stable state between MJDs 56475 and 56514. This extends the known stable state of this pulsar to 6.8 months. Short term pulse shape variations were also detected. It is shown that this pulsar switches between two emission modes frequently and that the typical duration of each mode is about ten minutes. No giant pulses or subpulse drifting were observed. Apparent nulls in the pulse emission were detected on MJD 56500. Although there are many differences between the radio emission of magnetars and normal radio pulsars, they also share some properties. The detection of mode changing and pulse nulling in PSR J1745-2900 suggests that the basic radio emission process for magnetars and normal pulsars is the same.

  10. Dose rate effect on micronuclei induction in human blood lymphocytes exposed to single pulse and multiple pulses of electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Bhat, N N; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Sreedevi, B; Narayana, Y

    2011-05-01

    The effects of single pulses and multiple pulses of 7 MV electrons on micronuclei (MN) induction in cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were investigated over a wide range of dose rates per pulse (instantaneous dose rate). PBLs were exposed to graded doses of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 Gy of single electron pulses of varying pulse widths at different dose rates per pulse, ranging from 1 × 10(6) Gy s(-1) to 3.2 × 10(8) Gy s(-1). Different dose rates per pulse were achieved by changing the dose per electron pulse by adjusting the beam current and pulse width. MN yields per unit absorbed dose after irradiation with single electron pulses were compared with those of multiple pulses of electrons. A significant decrease in the MN yield with increasing dose rates per pulse was observed, when dose was delivered by a single electron pulse. However, no reduction in the MN yield was observed when dose was delivered by multiple pulses of electrons. The decrease in the yield at high dose rates per pulse suggests possible radical recombination, which leads to decreased biological damage. Cellular response to the presence of very large numbers of chromosomal breaks may also alter the damage.

  11. Saturated multikilovolt x-ray amplification with Xe clusters: single-pulse observation of Xe(L) spectral hole burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, Alex B; Davis, Jack; Song, Xiangyang; Koshman, Yevgeniya; Dai Yang; Boyer, Keith; Rhodes, Charles K

    2003-01-01

    Single-pulse measurements of spectral hole burning of Xe(L) 3d → 2p hollow atom transition arrays observed from a self-trapped plasma channel provide new information on the dynamics of saturated amplification in the λ ∼ 2.8-2.9 A region. The spectral hole burning on transitions in the Xe 34+ and Xe 35+ arrays reaches full suppression of the spontaneous emission and presents a corresponding width Δ h-bar ω x ∼ = 60 eV, a value adequate for efficient amplification of multikilovolt x-ray pulses down to a limiting length τ x ∼ 30 as. The depth of the suppression at 2.86 A indicates that the gain-to-loss ratio is ≥10. An independent determination of the x-ray pulse energy from damage produced on the surface of a Ti foil in the far field of the source gives a pulse energy of 20-30 μJ, a range that correlates well with the observation of the spectral hole burning and indicates an overall extraction efficiency of ∼10%. (letter to the editor)

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, P.; Mendez, C.; Garcia, A.; Arias, I.; Roso, L.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses (120 fs at 795 nm) with polymer based composites has been investigated. We have found that carbon filled polymers exhibit different ultrafast ablation behaviour depending on whether the filling material is carbon black or carbon fiber and on the polymer matrix itself. The shape and dimensions of the filling material are responsible for some geometrical bad quality effects in the entrance and inner surfaces of drilled microholes. We give an explanation for these non-quality effects in terms of fundamentals of ultrafast ablation process, specifically threshold laser fluences and material removal paths. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymers seemed particularly concerned, this could prevent the use of ultrafast ablation for microprocessing purposes of some of these materials

  13. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  14. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A. [and others

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  15. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanostructuring of ITO thin films through femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ramazan; Kabacelik, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Due to reduced thermal effects, tightly focused femtosecond laser beams can yield submicron resolution with minimal side effects. In laser direct writing applications, diffraction-free nature of the Bessel beams relaxes alignment of the sample and shortens the production time. Micron-sized central spots and long depth of focused beams can be simultaneously produced. We apply fs Bessel beam single-pulse ablation method to transparent conductive oxide films. We use laser of 1030 nm wavelength and two different axicons (base angles are 25° and 40°). Fabricated structures are characterized by optical microscope, atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. Laser beam shaping and virtues of non-diffracted Bessel beams provide periodic structures for scribing in the solar cells or high-resolution displays and reduce the process time.

  17. Simulation investigation of thermal phase transformation and residual stress in single pulse EDM of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2018-04-01

    The thermal phase transformation and residual stress are ineluctable in the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process, and they will greatly affect the working performances of the machined surface. This paper presents a simulation study on the thermal phase transformation and residual stress in single-pulse EDM of Ti-6Al-4V, which is the most popular titanium alloy in fields such as aircraft engine and some other leading industries. A multi-physics model including thermal, hydraulic, metallography and structural mechanics was developed. Based on the proposed model, the thickness and metallographic structure of the recast layer and heat affected layer (HAZ) were investigated. The distribution and characteristics of residual stress around the discharge crater were obtained. The recast layer and HAZ at the center of crater are found to be the thinnest, and their thicknesses gradually increase approaching the periphery of the crater. The recast layer undergoes a complete α‧ (martensitic) transformation, while the HAZ is mainly composed by the α  +  β  +  α‧ three-phase microstructure. Along the depth direction of crater, the Von Mises stress increases first and then decreases, reaching its maximal value near the interface of recast layer and HAZ. In the recast layer, both compressive stress component and tensile stress component are observed. ANOVA results showed that the influence of discharge current on maximal tensile stress is more significant than that of pulse duration, while the pulse duration has more significant influence on average thickness of the recast layer and the depth location of the maximal tensile stress. The works conducted in this study will help to evaluate the quality and integrity of EDMed surface, especially when the non-destructive testing is difficult to achieve.

  18. A novel single pulsed electromagnetic field stimulates osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chih-Chun; Chang, Je-Ken; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Tai, I-Chun; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been successfully applied to accelerate fracture repair since 1979. Recent studies suggest that PEMF might be used as a nonoperative treatment for the early stages of osteonecrosis. However, PEMF treatment requires a minimum of ten hours per day for the duration of the treatment. In this study, we modified the protocol of the single-pulsed electromagnetic field (SPEMF) that only requires a 3-minute daily treatment. In the in vitro study, cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated in the hBMSCs. In the in vivo study, new bone formation and revascularization were evaluated in the necrotic bone graft. Results from the in vitro study showed no significant cytotoxic effects on the hBMSCs after 5 days of SPEMF treatment (1 Tesla, 30 pulses per day). hBMSC proliferation was enhanced in the SPEMF-treated groups after 2 and 4 days of treatment. The osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs was significantly increased in the SPEMF-treated groups after 3-7 days of treatment. Mineralization also increased after 10, 15, 20, and 25 days of treatment in SPEMF-treated groups compared to the control group. The 7-day short-course treatment achieved similar effects on proliferation and osteogenesis as the 25-day treatment. Results from the in vivo study also demonstrated that both the 7-day and 25-day treatments of SPEMF increased callus formation around the necrotic bone and also increased new vessel formation and osteocyte numbers in the grafted necrotic bone at the 2nd and 4th weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the newly developed SPEMF accelerates osteogenic differentiation of cultured hBMSCs and enhances bone repair, neo-vascularization, and cell growth in necrotic bone in mice. The potential clinical advantage of the SPEMF is the short daily application and the shorter treatment course. We suggest that SPEMF may be used to treat fractures and the early stages of osteonecrosis.

  19. A novel single pulsed electromagnetic field stimulates osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and bone repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Chih Fu

    Full Text Available Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF has been successfully applied to accelerate fracture repair since 1979. Recent studies suggest that PEMF might be used as a nonoperative treatment for the early stages of osteonecrosis. However, PEMF treatment requires a minimum of ten hours per day for the duration of the treatment. In this study, we modified the protocol of the single-pulsed electromagnetic field (SPEMF that only requires a 3-minute daily treatment. In the in vitro study, cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated in the hBMSCs. In the in vivo study, new bone formation and revascularization were evaluated in the necrotic bone graft. Results from the in vitro study showed no significant cytotoxic effects on the hBMSCs after 5 days of SPEMF treatment (1 Tesla, 30 pulses per day. hBMSC proliferation was enhanced in the SPEMF-treated groups after 2 and 4 days of treatment. The osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs was significantly increased in the SPEMF-treated groups after 3-7 days of treatment. Mineralization also increased after 10, 15, 20, and 25 days of treatment in SPEMF-treated groups compared to the control group. The 7-day short-course treatment achieved similar effects on proliferation and osteogenesis as the 25-day treatment. Results from the in vivo study also demonstrated that both the 7-day and 25-day treatments of SPEMF increased callus formation around the necrotic bone and also increased new vessel formation and osteocyte numbers in the grafted necrotic bone at the 2nd and 4th weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the newly developed SPEMF accelerates osteogenic differentiation of cultured hBMSCs and enhances bone repair, neo-vascularization, and cell growth in necrotic bone in mice. The potential clinical advantage of the SPEMF is the short daily application and the shorter treatment course. We suggest that SPEMF may be used to treat fractures and the early stages of osteonecrosis.

  20. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  1. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Tian Long, E-mail: tianlong.see@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhu [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhong, Xiang Li [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 0.087 J/cm{sup 2}) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 1.576 J/cm{sup 2}), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas

  2. Ablation spot area and impulse characteristics of polymers induced by burst irradiation of 1 μm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hisashi; Dondelewski, Oskar; Katagiri, Yusuke; Wang, Bin; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2017-07-01

    The ablation spot area and impulse characteristics of various polymers were experimentally investigated against burst irradiation of Nd: YLF laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, wavelength of 1047 nm, temporal pulse width of 10 ns, and single-pulse fluence of 6.1 J/cm2 to 17.1 J/cm2. The dependences of ablation area on the pulse energy from 0.72 to 7.48 mJ and the number of pulses from 10 pulses to 1000 pulses were investigated. In order to characterize their impulse performance as a function of fluence, which should not depend on ablation material, an effective ablation spot area was defined as that obtained against aluminum, 1050 A, as the reference material. An impulse that resulted from a single burst of 200 pulses was measured with a torsion-type impulse stand. Various impulse dependences on the fluence, which were not readily predicted from the optical properties of the material without ablation, were obtained. By fitting the experimentally measured impulse performance to Phipps and Sinko's model in the vapor regime, the effective absorption coefficient with laser ablation was evaluated, thereby resulting in three to six orders of magnitude larger than that without ablation. Among the polymers examined using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the best volume absorbers, the highest momentum coupling coefficient of 66 μNs/J was obtained with an effective absorption coefficient more than six times smaller than that of the other polymers.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of silicon in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadeh, R.; Anvari, J.Z.; Mansour, N. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran)

    2009-03-15

    Laser fluence and laser shot number are important parameters for pulse laser based micromachining of silicon in liquids. This paper presents laser-induced ablation of silicon in liquids of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and the water at different applied laser fluence levels and laser shot numbers. The experimental results are conducted using 15 ns pulsed laser irradiation at 532 nm. The silicon surface morphology of the irradiated spots has an appearance as one can see in porous formation. The surface morphology exhibits a large number of cavities which indicates as bubble nucleation sites. The observed surface morphology shows that the explosive melt expulsion could be a dominant process for the laser ablation of silicon in liquids using nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation at 532 nm. Silicon surface's ablated diameter growth was measured at different applied laser fluences and shot numbers in both liquid interfaces. A theoretical analysis suggested investigating silicon surface etching in liquid by intense multiple nanosecond laser pulses. It has been assumed that the nanosecond pulsed laser-induced silicon surface modification is due to the process of explosive melt expulsion under the action of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon target and the overlying liquid. This analysis allows us to determine the effective lateral interaction zone of ablated solid target related to nanosecond pulsed laser illumination. The theoretical analysis is found in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements of silicon ablated diameter growth in the DMSO and the water interfaces. Multiple-shot laser ablation threshold of silicon is determined. Pulsed energy accumulation model is used to obtain the single-shot ablation threshold of silicon. The smaller ablation threshold value is found in the DMSO, and the incubation effect is also found to be absent. (orig.)

  4. Pulsed CO2 laser tissue ablation: measurement of the ablation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J T; Deutsch, T F

    1988-01-01

    Ablation of guinea pig skin using a CO2 laser emitting 2-mu sec-long pulses has been quantified by measuring the mass of tissue removed as a function of incident fluence per pulse. The mass-loss curves show three distinct regimes in which water evaporation, explosive tissue removal, and laser-induced plasma formation dominate. The data are fit to two models that predict that the mass removed depends either linearly or logarithmically on fluence. Although the data are best fit by a linear dependence upon fluence, plasma formation at high fluences prohibited obtaining data over a wide enough fluence range to differentiate unambiguously between the two models. Ablation efficiency, ablation thresholds, and the optical penetration depth at 10.6 micron were obtained from the measurements.

  5. XPS investigations on the UV-laser ablation mechanism of poly(ether imide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wambach, J.; Kunz, T.; Schnyder, B.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    UV-Laser ablated samples of poly(ether imide) [Kapton{sup TM}] were studied with small-spot XPS. Applying fluences above the threshold level (0.167 J/cm{sup 2}) resulted in the expected behaviour of a decline of both nitrogen and oxygen. Below the threshold level a hint for an altered ablation mechanism was found. (author) 1 fig., 5 refs.

  6. Influence of liquid environments on femtosecond laser ablation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hewei; Chen Feng; Wang Xianhua; Yang Qing; Bian Hao; Si Jinhai; Hou Xun

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-assisted ablation of solids by femtosecond laser pulses has proved to be an efficient tool for highly precise microfabrication, which evokes numerous research interests in recent years. In this paper, we systematically investigate the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with silicon wafer in water, alcohol, and as a comparison, in air. After producing a series of multiple-shot craters on a silicon wafer in the three types of environments, surface morphologies and femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures are comparatively studied via the scanning electron microscope investigations. Meanwhile, the influence of liquid mediums on ablation threshold fluence and ablation depth is also numerically analyzed. The experimental results indicate that the ablation threshold fluences of silicon are reduced by the presence of liquids (water/alcohol) and ablation depths of craters are deepened in ambient water. Furthermore, smoother surfaces tend to be obtained in alcohol-mediated ablation at smaller shot numbers. Finally, the evolution of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures in air, water and alcohol is also discussed.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  8. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  9. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was perfor......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation.......61 in vitro). We conclude that during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation lesion size differs for septal and apical left ventricular applications. Differences in convective cooling might play an important role in this respect. This is supported by our in vitro experiments, where increased...

  10. Ablation characteristics of aluminum oxide and nitride ceramics during femtosecond laser micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Jeong, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics was performed under normal atmospheric conditions (λ = 785 nm, τ p = 185 fs, repetition rate = 1 kHz), and threshold laser fluencies for single- and multi-pulse ablation were determined. The ablation characteristics of the two ceramics showed similar trends except for surface morphologies, which revealed virtually no melting in Al 2 O 3 but clear evidence of melting for AlN. Based on subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, the chemistry of these ceramics appeared to remain the same before and after femtosecond laser ablation.

  11. Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf J. Eick

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1987, radiofrequency (RF ablation has developed to become the treatment of choice for symptoms caused by atrio ventricular (AV reentrant tachycardia, isthmus related atrial flutter, AV-nodal reentrant tachycardia and to some extent also for certain types of ventricular tachycardias. The introduction of new cardiac activation mapping systems has further contributed to the successful and safe application of RF ablation for various tachyarrhythmias.

  12. A comparison of the DPSS UV laser ablation characteristic of 1024 and H10F WC-Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Chantzis, Dimitrios; Royer, Raphael; Metsios, Ioannis; Antar, Mohammad; Marimuthu, Sundar

    2017-07-01

    An investigation on ablation characteristics of 1024 and H10F cobalt cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) with a DPSS nanosecond UV laser (50 ns pulse width, 355 nm wavelength, 90 W average power and 10 kHz repetition rate) is presented. The ablation characteristic parameters such as ablation threshold, incubation effect and optical penetration depth were evaluated based on the spot ablation diameter and depth. It was observed that the ablation threshold is significantly influenced by the number of pulses (NOP) and it decreases with increase NOP which is attributed to the incubation effect. Only one ablation region is observed at low laser fluence and an additional molten ablation region is observed at high laser fluence accompanied with cracks. The cracks formation is due to the thermal induced stress and changes in WC microstructure during laser beam irradiation. The crack depth is proportional to the thickness of the molten WC region. The ablation threshold of 1024 WC-Co and H10F WC-Co were found to be Fth1 =4.32 J/cm2 and Fth1 =4.26 J/cm2 respectively. The difference in chemical composition has insignificant effect on the ablation threshold value of the material. The incubation factor and optical penetration depth values of 1024 WC-Co and H10F WC-Co were found to be ξ=0.73, α-1 =411 nm and ξ=0.75, α-1 =397 nm respectively.

  13. Specifications of nanosecond laser ablation with solid targets, aluminum, silicon rubber, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedian, Nader

    2017-09-01

    The ablation parameters such as threshold fluence, etch depth, ablation rate and the effect of material targets were investigated under the interaction of laser pulse with low intensity. The parameters of the laser system are: laser pulse energy in the range of 110-140 mJ, wavelength 1064 nm and pulse duration 20 ns. By macroscopic estimation of the outward images of the ablation and data obtained, we can conclude that the photothermal and photoionization processes have more influence for aluminum ablation. In contrast, for polymer samples, from the macroscopic observation of the border pattern at the irradiated spot, and also the data obtained from the experiment results, we deduce that both chemical change due to heating and photochemical dissociation were effective mechanisms of ablation. However, concerning the two polymer samples, apart from considering the same theoretical ablation model, it is conceived that the photomehanical specifications of PMMA are involved in the ablation parameters. The threshold fluence for an ablation rate of 30 laser shots were obtained as 12.4, 24.64, and 11.71 J cm-2, for aluminum, silicon rubber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) respectively. The ablation rate is exponentially decreased by the laser-shot number, especially for aluminum. Furthermore, the etch depth after 30 laser shots was measured as 180, 630 and 870 μm, for aluminum, silicon rubber and PMMA, respectively.

  14. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  15. Thermal activation in KrF laser ablation of CuCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, S.; Brannon, J.

    1994-07-01

    248 nm excimer abaltion of carefully prepared CuCi samples is reported, and shown to occur by a predominantly thermal mechanism. Using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor abaltion, a precise detailed plot of single-pulse mass removal versus incident fluence was obtained for fluences up to 150 mJ/sq cm. A two-parameter Arrhenius exponential function was found to fit the experimental abaltion data. Calculations of laser-induced surface heating were caried out by use of a finite-difference heating code, formulated in terms of enthalpy. Ablation was observed to commence at a fluence of 25 mJ/sq cm, where the calculated surface temperature is approximately 910 K-some 200 K above the melting point. Dynamic ablation was included in the finite-difference calculation by allowing the position of the CuCl surface Xi to vary in time. The best data fit is provided by the zeroth-order kinetic equation: d Xi/dt = (16 A/ns)exp(-38 kJ/mole)/RT(sub Xi) where T(sub Xi) is the surface temperature. A thermodynamic calculation shows the average heat of CuCl vaporization in the temperature range from 900 to 2000 K to be near the fit of value of 38 kJ/mole. From plots of the ablation depth versus time, the CuCl surface was estimated to recede during the ablation at rates up to 10 cm/s.

  16. Ablation of polymers by ultraviolet pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Benharrats, N.

    1993-08-01

    The surface modifications of different polymers treated by far UV-Excimer laser (λ = 193mn, 248, 308nm) are analysed by X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy. The main feature observed depends strongly on the absorption coefficients. For the high absorbing polymers such (PVC, PS, PI,...) the mechanism of the UV-Excimer Laser interaction appears to be governed by an ablative photodecomposition process (APD) with an APD threshold. In the other limit, i.e. low absorbing polymer the interaction leads to a photothermal process. (author). 51 refs, 24 figs, 7 tabs

  17. Effects of plasma confinement on the femtosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyun; Yao, Jianwu; Lan, Sheng; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in a confined condition by covering the surface of a silicon wafer with a glass slide. The ablation was carried out by either irradiating the focused spot with different numbers of pulses or by scanning the laser beam on the surface of the silicon wafer. The morphology of the ablated surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope. For laser fluences much larger than the ablation threshold of silicon, cylindrical holes were generated in the confined ablation, in sharp contrast to the conical holes observed in the ablation performed in open air. Accordingly, grooves with U-shaped and V-shaped cross sections were achieved in the ablations carried out in the confined condition and in open air, respectively. For laser fluences close to the ablation threshold of silicon, the difference in the morphology of micro- and nanostructures obtained by these two ablation methods became not pronounced and two-dimensional nanohole arrays were created on the surface of silicon wafer. While the period of the nanohole arrays in the direction of the laser polarization was found to be close to the laser wavelength, the period in the direction perpendicular to the laser polarization was observed to be more than two times of the laser wavelength. In addition, the distribution of erupted nanoparticles was also found to be different in the two ablation processes. A ring-shaped distribution of nanoparticles was observed in the open air ablation while a monotonic decrease of nanoparticle density along the radial direction was found in the confined ablation.

  18. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  19. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Al-Hadeethi

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX. The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  20. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  1. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    the possible thermal side-effects of the excitation light moderate. These key results facilitate means to break through the general shallow depth limit of upconverting-nanoparticle-based fluorescence techniques, necessary for a range of biomedical applications, including diffuse optical imaging, photodynamic......We have accomplished deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles at 800 nm, using millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power. This is achieved by carefully choosing the pulse parameters, derived from time-resolved rate-equation analysis, which result in higher intrinsic...... quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...

  2. Threshold quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding

  3. Single pulse two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate and an all fiber based setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Newly developed microscopy methods have the goal to give researches in bio-molecular science a better understanding of processes ongoing on a cellular level. Especially two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a readily applied and widespread modality. Compared to one photon fluorescence imaging, it is possible to image not only the surface but also deeper lying structures. Together with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which provides information on the chemical composition of a specimen, deeper insights on a molecular level can be gained. However, the need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM hinder an even wider application. In this contribution, we present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is perfectly suited for fiber delivery as typically limiting non-linear effects like self-phase or cross-phase modulation (SPM, XPM) are negligible. Furthermore, compared to the typically applied femtosecond pulses, our longer pulses produce much more fluorescence photons per single shot. In this paper, we show that this higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate our system, we acquired FLIM images of a dye solution with single exponential behavior to assess the accuracy of our lifetime determination and also FLIM images of a plant stem at a pixel rate of 1 MHz to show the speed performance of our single pulse two-photon FLIM (SP-FLIM) system.

  4. Theory of threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2002-01-01

    Theory of Threshold Phenomena in Quantum Scattering is developed in terms of Reduced Scattering Matrix. Relationships of different types of threshold anomalies both to nuclear reaction mechanisms and to nuclear reaction models are established. Magnitude of threshold effect is related to spectroscopic factor of zero-energy neutron state. The Theory of Threshold Phenomena, based on Reduced Scattering Matrix, does establish relationships between different types of threshold effects and nuclear reaction mechanisms: the cusp and non-resonant potential scattering, s-wave threshold anomaly and compound nucleus resonant scattering, p-wave anomaly and quasi-resonant scattering. A threshold anomaly related to resonant or quasi resonant scattering is enhanced provided the neutron threshold state has large spectroscopic amplitude. The Theory contains, as limit cases, Cusp Theories and also results of different nuclear reactions models as Charge Exchange, Weak Coupling, Bohr and Hauser-Feshbach models. (author)

  5. Comprehensive studies of ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tin target at terawatt power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsied, Ahmed M.; Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental properties of ultrashort laser interactions with metals using up to terawatt power were comprehensively studied, i.e., specifically mass ablation, nanoparticle formation, and ion dynamics using multitude of diagnostic techniques. Results of this study can be useful in many fields of research including spectroscopy, micromachining, thin film fabrication, particle acceleration, physics of warm dense matter, and equation-of-state determination. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system (110 mJ maximum energy, 40 fs, 800 nm, P-polarized, single pulse mode) was used, which delivered up to 3 terawatt laser power to ablate 1 mm tin film in vacuum. The experimental analysis includes the effect of the incident laser fluence on the ablated mass, size of the ablated area, and depth of ablation using white light profilometer. Atomic force microscope was used to measure the emitted particles size distribution at different laser fluence. Faraday cup (FC) detector was used to analyze the emitted ions flux by measuring the velocity, and the total charge of the emitted ions. The study shows that the size of emitted particles follows log-normal distribution with peak shifts depending on incident laser fluence. The size of the ablated particles ranges from 20 to 80 nm. The nanoparticles deposited on the wafer tend to aggregate and to be denser as the incident laser fluence increases as shown by AFM images. Laser ablation depth was found to increase logarithmically with laser fluence then leveling off at laser fluence > 400 J/cm2. The total ablated mass tends to increase logarithmically with laser fluence up to 60 J/cm2 while, increases gradually at higher fluence due to the increase in the ablated area. The measured ion emitted flux shows a linear dependence on laser fluence with two distinct regimes. Strong dependence on laser fluence was observed at fluences < 350 J/cm2. Also, a slight enhancement in ion velocity was observed with increasing laser fluence up to 350 J

  6. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1–27 J/cm 2 , power density 0.3–3.9 GW/cm 2 ). The mixed deposits consisted of W–Al–C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated

  7. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  8. Effects of Laser Energy Density on Silicon Nanoparticles Produced Using Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Chewchinda, Pattarin; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the morphology of silicon nanoparticles prepared using laser ablation in liquid through varying the energy density and laser irradiation time. Silicon nanoparticles were prepared using laser ablation in liquid. A silicon wafer was irradiated in ethanol using a laser beam (Nd: YAG/second harmonic generation, 532 nm). Crystalline silicon nanoparticles approximately 6 nm in size were observed by TEM observation. The quantity of silicon nanoparticles proportionally increased with an increase in energy density greater than the laser ablation threshold. This quantity also increased with an increase in laser irradiation time without saturation due to absorption of the nanoparticles in liquid in the light path.

  9. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  10. Femtosecond and picosecond ablation of aluminum for synthesis of nanoparticles and nanostructures and their optical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Syed; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Sreedhar, S.; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of nanoparticles and nanostructures through the interaction of ultrashort (~40 fs) and short (~2 ps) laser pulses with bulk Aluminum immersed in various liquid media of different polarity [chloroform which is polar, carbon tetrachloride which is non-polar, water which is polar, dichloromethane (DCM) which is polar, and Cyclohexane which is non-polar] using the laser ablation technique. Except water and Cyclohexane, other media showed yellow coloration after ablation took place indicating formation of nanoparticles in the solution in both fs and ps domains. The coloration of the laser exposed portion in the Al substrate was golden yellow and its closer view depicted micro-grating (~1-2 μm) and nano-ripple (period 330 nm) formation depending on the focal conditions. The investigation of polarization dependence on the ablation was performed for water media. Depending on the ablation threshold, we observed micron sized structures and nano-ripples on the surface. As the rate of ablation depends on the position of the focus on the Al substrate and beam waist parameters, we have studied the liquid level dependence of ablation with different water levels on the Al substrate and we compared these patterns obtained below, near, and above the ablation thresholds of the sample. Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), UV-Vis absorption spectra, Electron Diffraction Pattern and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were used for the characterization and comparison of products in both domains.

  11. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  12. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  13. Resistive Threshold Logic

    OpenAIRE

    James, A. P.; Francis, L. R. V. J.; Kumar, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report a resistance based threshold logic family useful for mimicking brain like large variable logic functions in VLSI. A universal Boolean logic cell based on an analog resistive divider and threshold logic circuit is presented. The resistive divider is implemented using memristors and provides output voltage as a summation of weighted product of input voltages. The output of resistive divider is converted into a binary value by a threshold operation implemented by CMOS inverter and/or O...

  14. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dou, Hong-qiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan Engineering Technical College, Deyang 618000 (China); Liao, Wei, E-mail: liaowei@caep.cn [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The fs laser ablation of borosilicate glass (K9) were investigated under 35 and 500 fs pulses. • At high fluence regime, the ablation rate at 35 fs in air increased to a plateau, and 500 fs in air and vacuum decreased. • The mechanisms of multiple-photon ionization and impact ionization were included. • The ablation morphologies of smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures were presented and illustrated. • The ablation mechanisms of non-thermal and thermal ablation were included. - Abstract: Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm{sup 2} and 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  15. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  16. Assessment of Event-Related EEG Power After Single-Pulse TMS in Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome and Minimally Conscious State Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Cavinato, Marianna; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Tonin, Paolo; Piccione, Francesco; Manganotti, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In patients without a behavioral response, non-invasive techniques and new methods of data analysis can complement existing diagnostic tools by providing a method for detecting covert signs of residual cognitive function and awareness. The aim of this study was to investigate the brain oscillatory activities synchronized by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered over the primary motor area in the time-frequency domain in patients with the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state as compared to healthy controls. A time-frequency analysis based on the wavelet transform was used to characterize rapid modifications of oscillatory EEG rhythms induced by TMS in patients as compared to healthy controls. The pattern of EEG changes in the patients differed from that of healthy controls. In the controls there was an early synchronization of slow waves immediately followed by a desynchronization of alpha and beta frequency bands over the frontal and centro-parietal electrodes, whereas an opposite early synchronization, particularly over motor areas for alpha and beta and over the frontal and parietal electrodes for beta power, was seen in the patients. In addition, no relevant modification in slow rhythms (delta and theta) after TMS was noted in patients. The clinical impact of these findings could be relevant in neurorehabilitation settings for increasing the awareness of these patients and defining new treatment procedures.

  17. Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane behind the Reflected Shock Waves in a Single Pulse Shock Tube (SPST) and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandaman, A.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Thermal reactions of Tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon were studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube (SPST) over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K and pressures varied between 10.6 and 22.8 atm. The stable products resulting from the decomposition of TMS were identified and quantified using gas chromatography and also verified with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The major reaction products are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4). The minor reaction products are ethane (C2H6) and propylene (C3H6). The initiation of mechanism in the decomposition of TMS takes plays via the Si-C bond scission by ejecting the methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The measured temperature dependent rate coefficient for the total decomposition of TMS was to be ktotal = 1.66 ×1015 exp (-64.46/RT) s-1 and for the formation of CH4 reaction channel was to be k = 2.20 × 1014 exp (-60.15/RT) s-1, where the activation energies are given in kcal mol-1. A kinetic scheme containing 17 species and 28 elementary reactions was used for the simulation using chemical kinetic simulator over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K. The agreement between the experimental and simulated results was satisfactory.

  18. Study of single pulsed-field magnetization of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk high-temperature superconductor with a split type of armature coil for rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, E; Matsuzaki, H; Kimura, Y; Ohtani, I; Ogata, H; Izumi, M; Nonaka, Y; Murakami, M; Ida, T; Sugimoto, H; Miki, M; Kitano, M

    2006-01-01

    We employed a Gd-bulk HTS as rotating field magnet poles aiming for a smaller and lighter axial-gap-type motor. The bulk was inserted in the split-type armature pulsed copper coils and cooled down to 77 K under zero field. Employing the bulk magnet to HTS rotating machinery, the number of pulsed field magnetizations should be reduced for practical use. Thereby, a single pulsed current was applied to the pulsed copper coils to magnetize the bulk. The trapped field distribution and transient flux behaviour strongly depend on the radial dimension of the armature coil with a vortex-type winding. On decreasing the diameter of the pulsed copper armature coil, the distribution of the trapped flux density on the surface of the bulk becomes close to a conical shape. In contrast to the use of a solenoid, the application of vortex-type armature coils to magnetization of Gd-bulk HTS shows a quick intervention of the external magnetic flux into the centre of the bulk. The magnetization to the bulk HTS of the vortex-type copper coils with an optimum radius is useful and may be an effective technique for applied bulk HTS for rotating machines such as motors and/or generators

  19. Towards diffractive imaging with single pulses of FEL radiation. Dynamics within irradiatied samples and their influence on the analysis of imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fenglin

    2010-08-01

    3D single particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of bioparticles (such as proteins, macromolecules and viruses) is one of the main possible applications of the new generation of light sources: free-electron lasers (FELs), which are now available at FLASH (Hamburg, Germany) and LCLS (Stanford, U.S.A.). The extremely bright and ultrashort FEL pulses potentially enable CDI to achieve high resolution down to subnanometer length scale. However, intense FEL pulses cause serious radiation damage in bioparticles, even during single shots, which may set the resolution limits for CDI with FELs. Currently, since the signal-to-noise ratio is very low for small biological particles, direct experimental study of radiation damage in the single particle imaging is fairly difficult. Single atomic (noble gas) clusters become good objects to reveal effects of radiation damage processes on CDI with FEL radiation. This thesis studies three aspects of the radiation damage problem, which are treated in three independent chapters: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations to quantitively describe radiation damage processes within irradiated atomic clusters during single pulses; (2) reconstruction analysis of single-shot CDI diffraction patterns of atomic clusters, which may potentially help to understand the radiation damage occurring in biological samples; and (3) testing the effects of coating water layers in CDI, which is supposed to minimize the radiation damage in irradiated bioparticles. (orig.)

  20. A Comparative Study of Single-pulse and Double-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy with Uranium-containing Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodzki, Patrick J; Becker, Jason R; Diwakar, Prasoon K; Harilal, Sivanandan S; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) holds potential advantages in special nuclear material (SNM) sensing and nuclear forensics, which require rapid analysis, minimal sample preparation, and stand-off distance capability. SNM, such as U, however, result in crowded emission spectra with LIBS, and characteristic emission lines are challenging to discern. It is well-known that double-pulse LIBS (DPLIBS) improves the signal intensity for analytes over conventional single-pulse LIBS (SPLIBS). This study investigates the U signal in a glass matrix using DPLIBS and compares it to signal obtained using SPLIBS. Double-pulse LIBS involves sequential firing of a 1.06 µm Nd:YAG pre-pulse and 10.6 µm TEA CO2 heating pulse in a near collinear geometry. Optimization of experimental parameters including inter-pulse delay and energy follows identification of characteristic lines for the bulk analyte Ca and the minor constituent analyte U for both DPLIBS and SPLIBS. Spatial and temporal coupling of the two pulses in the proposed DPLIBS technique yields improvements in analytical merits with a negligible increase in damage to the sample compared to SPLIBS. Subsequently, the study discusses optimum plasma emission conditions of U lines and relative figures of merit in both SPLIBS and DPLIBS. Investigation into plasma characteristics also addresses plausible mechanisms related to the observed U analyte signal variation between SPLIBS and DPLIBS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Towards diffractive imaging with single pulses of FEL radiation. Dynamics within irradiatied samples and their influence on the analysis of imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fenglin

    2010-08-15

    3D single particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of bioparticles (such as proteins, macromolecules and viruses) is one of the main possible applications of the new generation of light sources: free-electron lasers (FELs), which are now available at FLASH (Hamburg, Germany) and LCLS (Stanford, U.S.A.). The extremely bright and ultrashort FEL pulses potentially enable CDI to achieve high resolution down to subnanometer length scale. However, intense FEL pulses cause serious radiation damage in bioparticles, even during single shots, which may set the resolution limits for CDI with FELs. Currently, since the signal-to-noise ratio is very low for small biological particles, direct experimental study of radiation damage in the single particle imaging is fairly difficult. Single atomic (noble gas) clusters become good objects to reveal effects of radiation damage processes on CDI with FEL radiation. This thesis studies three aspects of the radiation damage problem, which are treated in three independent chapters: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations to quantitively describe radiation damage processes within irradiated atomic clusters during single pulses; (2) reconstruction analysis of single-shot CDI diffraction patterns of atomic clusters, which may potentially help to understand the radiation damage occurring in biological samples; and (3) testing the effects of coating water layers in CDI, which is supposed to minimize the radiation damage in irradiated bioparticles. (orig.)

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderschueren, Geert Maria Joris Michael

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of spinal and non-spinal osteoid osteomas. Furthermore, the technical requirements needed for safe radiofrequency ablation and the clinical outcome after radiofrequency

  3. Percutaneous Renal Tumor Ablation: Radiation Exposure During Cryoablation and Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEachen, James C., E-mail: james.mceachen2@gmail.com [Mayo Clinic, Division of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine (United States); Leng, Shuai; Atwell, Thomas D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Tollefson, Matthew K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Urology (United States); Friese, Jeremy L. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Wang, Zhen; Murad, M. Hassan [Mayo Clinic, Division of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine (United States); Schmit, Grant D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionOnce reserved solely for non-surgical cases, percutaneous ablation is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for a wider array of patients with small renal masses and the radiation risk needs to be better defined as this transition continues.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of our renal tumor ablation database revealed 425 patients who underwent percutaneous ablation for treatment of 455 renal tumors over a 5-year time period. Imparted radiation dose information was reviewed for each procedure and converted to effective patient dose and skin dose using established techniques. Statistical analysis was performed with each ablative technique.ResultsFor the 331 cryoablation procedures, the mean DLP was 6987 mGycm (SD = 2861) resulting in a mean effective dose of 104.7 mSv (SD = 43.5) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 558 mGy (SD = 439) resulting in a mean skin dose of 563.2 mGy (SD = 344.1). For the 124 RFA procedures, the mean DLP was 3485 mGycm (SD = 1630) resulting in a mean effective dose of 50.3 mSv (SD = 24.0) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 232 mGy (SD = 149) resulting in a mean skin dose of 233.2 mGy (SD = 117.4). The difference in patient radiation exposure between the two renal ablation techniques was statistically significant (p < 0.001).ConclusionBoth cryoablation and RFA imparted an average skin dose that was well below the 2 Gy deterministic threshold for appreciable sequela. Renal tumor cryoablation resulted in a mean skin and effective radiation dose more than twice that for RFA. The radiation exposure for both renal tumor ablation techniques was at the high end of the medical imaging radiation dose spectrum.

  4. Laboratory Simulations of Micrometeoroid Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan Williamson

    Each day, several tons of meteoric material enters Earth's atmosphere, the majority of which consist of small dust particles (micrometeoroids) that completely ablate at high altitudes. The dust input has been suggested to play a role in a variety of phenomena including: layers of metal atoms and ions, nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and ozone chemistry, and the fertilization of the ocean with bio-available iron. Furthermore, a correct understanding of the dust input to the Earth provides constraints on inner solar system dust models. Various methods are used to measure the dust input to the Earth including satellite detectors, radar, lidar, rocket-borne detectors, ice core and deep-sea sediment analysis. However, the best way to interpret each of these measurements is uncertain, which leads to large uncertainties in the total dust input. To better understand the ablation process, and thereby reduce uncertainties in micrometeoroid ablation measurements, a facility has been developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to accelerate iron particles to relevant meteoric velocities (10-70 km/s). The particles are then introduced into a chamber pressurized with a target gas, and they partially or completely ablate over a short distance. An array of diagnostics then measure, with timing and spatial resolution, the charge and light that is generated in the ablation process. In this thesis, we present results from the newly developed ablation facility. The ionization coefficient, an important parameter for interpreting meteor radar measurements, is measured for various target gases. Furthermore, experimental ablation measurements are compared to predictions from commonly used ablation models. In light of these measurements, implications to the broader context of meteor ablation are discussed.

  5. Relation between size-distribution of Si nanoparticles and oscillation-stabilization time of the mixed region produced during laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yinglong; Li Yanli; Fu Guangsheng

    2006-01-01

    Assuming Si particles and ambient atoms are elastic hard-spheres, the transportation in ambient gas of Si particles obtained by single-pulsed laser ablation is numerically simulated via Monte Carlo method to investigate the influence of the ambient species and the target-to-substrate distance on the oscillation-stabilization time (OST) of the mixed region. It is found that the ambient gas whose atomic weight is close to that of Si atom can induce the shortest OST; with increasing of the target-to-substrate distance, the OST at first decreases to its minimum, and then begins to increase. Incorporating with some experimental results on size-consistency of Si nanoparticles in pulsed laser ablation, it may be concluded that the shorter the OST of the mixed region, the more uniform the as-formed Si nanoparticles in size

  6. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  7. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteli, D.; Fernandez, S.; Molpeceres, C.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. ► The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. ► A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 °C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  8. Threshold concepts in prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie

    2017-12-01

    Curriculum documents identify key concepts within learning prosthetics. Threshold concepts provide an alternative way of viewing the curriculum, focussing on the ways of thinking and practicing within prosthetics. Threshold concepts can be described as an opening to a different way of viewing a concept. This article forms part of a larger study exploring what students and staff experience as difficult in learning about prosthetics. To explore possible threshold concepts within prosthetics. Qualitative, interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data from 18 students and 8 staff at two universities with undergraduate prosthetics and orthotics programmes were generated through interviews and questionnaires. The data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Three possible threshold concepts arose from the data: 'how we walk', 'learning to talk' and 'considering the person'. Three potential threshold concepts in prosthetics are suggested with possible implications for prosthetics education. These possible threshold concepts involve changes in both conceptual and ontological knowledge, integrating into the persona of the individual. This integration occurs through the development of memories associated with procedural concepts that combine with disciplinary concepts. Considering the prosthetics curriculum through the lens of threshold concepts enables a focus on how students learn to become prosthetists. Clinical relevance This study provides new insights into how prosthetists learn. This has implications for curriculum design in prosthetics education.

  9. Some feature of interpretation of tension single pulsed electromagnetic field of the Earth to create the model parameter fields physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokritskaya T.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic analysis of the results of different methods of obtaining and processing of information allows us to solve problems on a qualitatively different level. This is important when creating complex earth models and fields of its parameters, particularly the physical properties. Application of remote sensing methods (geophysical investigations with the registration of a single pulse intensity of the electromagnetic field of the Earth (EIEMPZ seismic profiling, is expanding. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. For the first time a methodology for assessing the state of the soil [3] applied for a joint interpretation of materials determine the field strength EMPZ, seismic profiling, and laboratory techniques. This has allowed to characterize the state of the geological environment and to build a model of inhomogeneous density distribution of fractured rocks at depth. In this paper we made a mathematical analysis of the results of research and talus deposits eluvial clay Taurian series, studied at one of the construction sites southern coast at a depth of 12.0 -25.0 m. Methods of statistical analysis, assessment of homogeneity and symmetrically distributed, rank correlation and multiple regression analysis described in [3]. The analysis of the spatial distribution of areas extrem value of EMPZ, heterogeneity of seismic rigidity. Statistical characteristics of indicators of physical properties reflect the genetic characteristics of the formation and the current state of silty-clay sediments of different genesis.It is proved that the regression model can be applied to interpret the state of the array in the construction of geodynamic model. It is established that the creation of forward-looking (dynamic models for the distribution of the physical

  10. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... energies of 2.3-12.8 mJ/microbeam and total energy levels of 4.6-640 mJ/microchannel. Histological endpoints were ablation depth (AD), coagulation zone (CZ) and ablation width (AW). Data were logarithmically transformed if required prior to linear regression analyses. Results for histological endpoints...

  11. Polymers designed for laser ablation-influence of photochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hauer, M.; Kopitkovas, G.; Langford, S.C.; Masuhara, H.; Nuyken, O.; Robert, J.; Salmio, H.; Tada, T.; Tomita, K.; Wokaun, A.

    2002-01-01

    The ablation characteristics of various polymers were studied at low and high fluences. The polymers can be divided into three groups, i.e. polymers containing triazene and ester groups, the same polymers without the triazene group, and polyimide as reference polymer. At high fluences similar ablation parameters, i.e. etch rates and effective absorption coefficients, were obtained for all polymers. The main difference is the absence of carbon deposits for the designed polymers. At low fluences (at 308 nm) very pronounced differences are detected. The polymers containing the photochemically most active group (triazene) exhibit the lowest threshold of ablation (as low as 25 mJ cm -2 ) and the highest etch rates (up to 3 μm/pulse), followed by the designed polyesters and then polyimide. The laser-induced decomposition of the designed polymers was studied by nanosecond-interferometry. Only the triazene-polymer reveals etching without any sign of surface swelling, which is observed for all other polymers. The etching of the triazene-polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, clearly indicating photochemical etching. The triazene-polymer was also studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The intensities of the ablation fragments show pronounced differences between irradiation at the absorption band of the triazene group (308 nm) and irradiation at a shorter wavelength (248 nm)

  12. Stress assisted selective ablation of ITO thin film by picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Nazar; Chan, Helios; Milne, David; Brunton, Adam; M. O'Connor, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    Fast selective pattering with high precession on 175 nm ITO thin film with IR ps lasers is investigated. Ablation parameters are optimized with detailed studies on the scribed depth, topography, and particle generation using AFM and SEM. A comparison of 10 and 150 ps laser revealed that the shorter pulse (10 ps) laser is more appropriate in selective and partial ablation; up to 20 nm resolution for controlled depth with multipulses having energy below the damage threshold is demonstrated. The experimental results are interpreted to involve stress assisted ablation mechanism for the 10 ps laser while thermal ablation along with intense melting occurs for 150 ps laser. The transition between these regimes is estimated to occur at approximately 30 ps.

  13. Laser ablation of polymer coatings allows for electromagnetic field enhancement mapping around nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures. The acc......Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  14. Regional Seismic Threshold Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kvaerna, Tormod

    2006-01-01

    ... model to be used for predicting the travel times of regional phases. We have applied these attenuation relations to develop and assess a regional threshold monitoring scheme for selected subregions of the European Arctic...

  15. Nanopillar formation from two-shot femtosecond laser ablation of poly-methyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baset, F.; Popov, K.; Villafranca, A.; Alshehri, A.M.; Guay, J.-M.; Ramunno, L.; Bhardwaj, V.R., E-mail: ravi.bhardwaj@uottawa.ca

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We studied morphological evolution and dynamics of two-pulse laser ablation in PMMA. • Nanopillar and volcanic eruption like structures are formed within the ablation crater. • Reflection of shockwave induced by the second laser pulse creates the structures. • Shockwave reflects from the boundary created by the first pulses. • Reflected shockwave causes density pinching in the middle of the ablation region. - Abstract: We present experimental and numerical studies on the morphological evolution and dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of bulk poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) irradiated with a pair of pulses. We show that a nanopillar-like structure is formed in the middle of the ablation crater for pulse energies below single-shot ablation threshold. The nanopillar is ∼400 nm long, lies adjacent to a nanopore, and protrudes ∼150 nm above the sample surface. As the pulse energy is increased gradually, the nanopillar disappears and the nanopore inside the ablation crater becomes larger. At higher pulse energies, a volcanic eruption like structure appears in the middle of the crater whose size and height increases with energy. 2D molecular dynamics simulations reveal that a nanojet and other features observed at higher pulse energies can be formed when the reflection of a shockwave, induced by the second laser pulse, causes density pinching in the middle of the interaction region that rapidly pushes out molten material towards the surface. The shockwave is reflected from the cold boundaries of a modified region created by the first laser pulse.

  16. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  17. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    enhancements on and around the gold nanostructures. At the positions of the enhancements, the ablation threshold of the polymer coating is significantly lowered creating subdiffractional topographic modifications on the surface which are quantified via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy......The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field....... The obtained experimental results for different polymer coating thicknesses and nanostructure geometries are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of the near field distribution for corresponding enhancement mechanisms. The developed method and its tunable experimental parameters show...

  18. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  19. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  20. From single-pulsed field gradient to double-pulsed field gradient MR: gleaning new microstructural information and developing new forms of contrast in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Noam; Ozarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Cohen, Yoram

    2010-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of diffusion NMR and MRI is its ability to utilize restricted diffusion to probe compartments much smaller than the excited volume or the MRI voxel, respectively, and to extract microstructural information from them. Single-pulsed field gradient (s-PFG) MR methodologies have been employed with great success to probe microstructures in various disciplines, ranging from chemistry to neuroscience. However, s-PFG MR also suffers from inherent shortcomings, especially when specimens are characterized by orientation or size distributions: in such cases, the microstructural information available from s-PFG experiments is limited or lost. Double-pulsed field gradient (d-PFG) MR methodology, an extension of s-PFG MR, has attracted attention owing to recent theoretical studies predicting that it can overcome certain inherent limitations of s-PFG MR. In this review, we survey the microstructural features that can be obtained from conventional s-PFG methods in the different q regimes, and highlight its limitations. The experimental aspects of d-PFG methodology are then presented, together with an overview of its theoretical underpinnings and a general framework for relating the MR signal decay and material microstructure, affording new microstructural parameters. We then discuss recent studies that have validated the theory using phantoms in which the ground truth is well known a priori, a crucial step prior to the application of d-PFG methodology in neuronal tissue. The experimental findings are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions and reveal, inter alia, zero-crossings of the signal decay, robustness towards size distributions and angular dependences of the signal decay from which accurate microstructural parameters, such as compartment size and even shape, can be extracted. Finally, we show some initial findings in d-PFG MR imaging. This review lays the foundation for future studies, in which accurate and novel microstructural

  1. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  2. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment.......Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  3. Hadron production near threshold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Final state interaction effects in → + and → 3He reactions are explored near threshold to study the sensitivity of the cross-sections to the potential and the scattering matrix. The final state scattering wave functions between and and and 3He are described rigorously. The production is ...

  4. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  5. Boundaries, Thresholds, and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl R.

    1997-01-01

    Highlights issues in the debate concerning Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) special education legislation as it relates to student discipline and incarcerated juveniles. Focuses on assessment issues and thresholds for diagnosable conditions. Looks at debates surrounding IDEA and some of the consequences of new legislation. (RJM)

  6. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm{sup 3}/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2} is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm{sup −2} and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2}. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  8. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm −2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm −2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm −2 . The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  9. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-zhen; Yao, Cai-zhen; Dou, Hong-qiang; Liao, Wei; Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie; Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2017-06-01

    Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm2 and 2.1 J/cm2 were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  10. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  11. Short-pulse laser ablation of solids: From phase explosion to fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorazo, Patrick; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms of laser ablation in silicon are investigated close to the threshold energy for pulse durations of 500 fs and 50 ps. This is achieved using a unique model coupling carrier and atom dynamics within a unified Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme. Under femtosecond laser irradiation, isochoric heating and rapid adiabatic expansion of the material provide a natural pathway to phase explosion. This is not observed under slower, nonadiabatic cooling with picosecond pulses where fragmentation of the hot metallic fluid is the only relevant ablation mechanism

  12. Hadron production near threshold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Final state interaction effects in pp → pΛK+ and pd → 3He η reactions are explored near threshold to study the sensitivity of the cross-sections to the pΛ potential and the ηN scattering matrix. The final state scattering wave functions between Λ and p and η and 3He are described rigorously. The Λ production is ...

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, P.L.; Clasen, S.; Schmidt, D.; Wiskirchen, J.; Tepe, G.; Claussen, C.D.; Boss, A.; Gouttefangeas, C.; Burkart, C.

    2004-01-01

    The liver is the second only to lymph nodes as the most common site of metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumor. Up to 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improvement of the survival time, only approximately 20% of the patients are eligible for surgical intervention. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation represents one of the most important alternatives as well as complementary methods for the therapy of liver metastases. RF ablation can lead in a selected patient group to a palliation or to an increased life expectancy. RF ablation appears either safer (vs. cryotherapy) or easier (vs. laser) or more effective (percutaneous ethanol instillation [PEI]), transarterial chemoembolisation [TACE] in comparison with other minimal invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or intraoperatively and may be combined with chemotherapy as well as with surgical resection. Permanent technical improvements of RF systems, a better understanding of the underlying electrophysiological principles and an interdisciplinary approach will lead to a prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.) [de

  14. [Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P L; Clasen, S; Boss, A; Schmidt, D; Gouttefangeas, C; Burkart, C; Wiskirchen, J; Tepe, G; Claussen, C D

    2004-04-01

    The liver is the second only to lymph nodes as the most common site of metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumor. Up to 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improvement of the survival time, only approximately 20% of the patients are eligible for surgical intervention. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation represents one of the most important alternatives as well as complementary methods for the therapy of liver metastases. RF ablation can lead in a selected patient group to a palliation or to an increased life expectancy. RF ablation appears either safer (vs. cryotherapy) or easier (vs. laser) or more effective (percutaneous ethanol instillation [PEI], transarterial chemoembolisation [TACE]) in comparison with other minimal invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or intraoperatively and may be combined with chemotherapy as well as with surgical resection. Permanent technical improvements of RF systems, a better understanding of the underlying electrophysiological principles and an interdisciplinary approach will lead to a prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases.

  15. Endometrial ablation with paracervical block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, Josien P. M.; Mol, Ben Willem; Bongers, Marlies Y.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of endometrial ablation under local anesthesia. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was performed at the gynecology department of a large teaching hospital. Women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were included to undergo NovaSure

  16. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved.

  17. Laser ablation of metal into liquid: near critical point phenomena and hydrodynamic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inogamov, Nail; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Khokhlov, Viktor

    2017-06-01

    Laser ablation of metal in contact with liquid differs much from ablation into vacuum. In spite of importance of this kind of laser-matter interaction (e.g., for nanoparticles production), the involved processes are still poorly understood. We show that to produce nanoparticles the laser absorbed energy should overcome the ablation threshold into vacuum by a few times. Thus the required temperatures in the heat-affected zone increase above a critical temperature. The flow of the substances, including propagation of a strong shock in liquid and a rarefaction wave inside the metal target, is analyzed. We demonstrate that the contact between metal and liquid, both being in their supercritical states, is hydrodynamically unstable. The instability is of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. Dynamics of the instability is important for separation of melt droplets which are frozen up to solid nanoparticles later.

  18. Single-pulse Raman and photoacoustic spectroscopy studies of triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and related compounds. [Trinitrobenzene (TNB), 1-amino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene(MATB), 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.; Jungst, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed-laser-excited Raman scattering methods and photoacoustic spectroscopy have been applied to the study of porous, granular samples (i.e., pressed pellets) of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), 1-amino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (MATB), 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Single-pulse spontaneous Raman spectra have been obtained for all four materials. Using 532-nm excitation, the intensity of the background emission observed with the Raman scattered light varies as TNB > MATB > DATB > TATB. This trend is compared to information on the long-wavelength absorption edge of MATB, DATB and TATB as determined by the photoacoustic spectra of these materials. Stimulated Raman scattering has been observed for three of the compounds with conversion efficiency as follows: DATB > TATB > MATB. In the case of TATB, this process may be limited by photo-induced chemical reactions. The relatively efficient formation of one or more stable photolysis products in TATB is evident on the basis of its photoacoustic spectrum. Preliminary single-pulse Raman scattering measurements on shocked TATB are also described. 16 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  20. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L.; Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J.; Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  1. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  2. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  3. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  4. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Cysts : Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ye Ri; Kim, Pyo Nyun

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has been frequently performed on intra-hepatic solid tumor, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic tumor and cholangio carcinoma, for take the cure. But, the reports of radiofrequency ablation for intrahepatic simple cysts are few. In vitro experiment of animal and in vivo treatment for intrahepatic cysts of human had been reported in rare cases. We report 4 cases of radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic intrahepatic cysts

  6. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  7. Iris pigmentation and AC thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, A F; Mukherjee, D; Chumlea, W C; Siervogel, R M

    1983-03-01

    Data from 160 White children were used to analyze possible associations between iris pigmentation and AC pure-tone thresholds. Iris pigmentation was graded from iris color using glass models of eyes, and AC thresholds were obtained under carefully controlled conditions. Analyses of variance using two groupings of iris color grades showed no evidence of an association between iris color grade and AC thresholds. Furthermore, inspection of arrays of the actual glass eye models, in conjunction with the order of mean thresholds at each test frequency, did not indicate the presence of an association between iris color grades and thresholds. It was concluded that while iris pigmentation may be related to some aspects of hearing ability, it does not appear to be related to AC thresholds in children.

  8. Crossing the threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Tambasco, Lucas

    2017-11-01

    First, we summarize the circumstances in which chaotic pilot-wave dynamics gives rise to quantum-like statistical behavior. For ``closed'' systems, in which the droplet is confined to a finite domain either by boundaries or applied forces, quantum-like features arise when the persistence time of the waves exceeds the time required for the droplet to cross its domain. Second, motivated by the similarities between this hydrodynamic system and stochastic electrodynamics, we examine the behavior of a bouncing droplet above the Faraday threshold, where a stochastic element is introduced into the drop dynamics by virtue of its interaction with a background Faraday wave field. With a view to extending the dynamical range of pilot-wave systems to capture more quantum-like features, we consider a generalized theoretical framework for stochastic pilot-wave dynamics in which the relative magnitudes of the drop-generated pilot-wave field and a stochastic background field may be varied continuously. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through their CMMI and DMS divisions.

  9. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Chrestensen, Inge Byg; Damager, Iben

    2011-01-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by 13C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by 2H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains...... hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side...... chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose...

  10. Albania - Thresholds I and II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — From 2006 to 2011, the government of Albania (GOA) received two Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Threshold Programs totaling $29.6 million. Albania received...

  11. Olfactory threshold in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, N P; Rossor, M N; Marsden, C D

    1987-01-01

    Olfactory threshold to differing concentrations of amyl acetate was determined in 78 subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 40 age-matched controls. Impaired olfactory threshold (previously reported by others) was confirmed in Parkinsonian subjects compared with controls. There was no significant correlation between olfactory threshold and age, sex, duration of disease, or current therapy with levodopa or anticholinergic drugs. In a sub-group of 14 levodopa-treated patients with severe "on-off" fluctuations, no change in olfactory threshold between the two states was demonstrable. Olfactory impairment in Parkinson's disease may involve mechanisms that are not influenced by pharmacologic manipulation of dopaminergic or cholinergic status. PMID:3819760

  12. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computer Science; Hart, W.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, D.B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  13. Gallbladder ablation by radiologic intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.D.; Quenville, N.F.; Burhenne, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty pigs underwent cystic duct occlusion by means of transcatheter endoluminal bipolar radiofrequency electrocoagulation under fluoroscopic guidance. Twenty animals subsequently underwent gallbladder ablation with alcohol and sotradecol; ten animals served as controls. Serial histologic blocking of the common bile duct, cystic duct, and gallbladder in all animals revealed no adverse effects of the sclerosants on the bile ducts or the structures adjacent to the gallbladder. The combination of 95% alcohol plus 3% sotradecol resulted in necrosis of the gallbladder mucosa within 2 weeks (two of two animals) and complete eradication of the mucosa and fibrotic obliteration of the gallbladder lumen within 8 weeks (six of eight animals)

  14. Hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoevena, BH; Haagsma, EB; Appeltans, BMG; Slooff, MJH; de Jong, KP

    Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours is a useful therapy for otherwise unresectable tumours. The complication rate is said to be low. In this case report we describe hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of a hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient with end-stage renal insufficiency. (C)

  15. Ablation Techniques for Mahaim Fiber Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shomu Bohora

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mahaim fiber exhibits atrio-ventricular node like properties and generally is localized at the lateral aspect of the tricuspid annulus. Of the varying methods for localization, ablation at the site of Mahaim potential is the most accepted and successful method. Radiofrequency ablation of Mahaim fiber has high success rates.

  16. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  17. The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analy...

  18. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment

  19. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  20. High Heat Flux Block Ablator-in-Honeycomb Heat Shield Using Ablator/Aerogel-Filled Foam, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory previously developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer substantially increased high...

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Evolution in Ablatively Driven Cylindrical Implosions^*,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsing, W. W.

    1996-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an important limitation in ICF capsule designs. Significant work both theoretically and experimentally has been done to demonstrate the stabilizing effects due to material flow through the unstable region. The experimental verification has been done predominantly in planar geometry. Convergent geometry introduces effects not present in planar geometry such as shell thickening and accelerationless growth of modal amplitudes (e.g. Bell-Plesset growth). Amplitude thresholds for the nonlinear regime are reduced, since the wavelength of a mode m decreases with convergence λ ~ r/m, where r is the radius. We have investigated convergent effects using an imploding cylinder driven by x-ray ablation on the NOVA laser. By doping sections of the cylinder with high-Z materials, in conjunction with x-ray backlighting, we have measured the growth and feedthrough of the perturbations from the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder for various initial modes and amplitudes from early time through stagnation. Mode coupling of illumination asymmetries with material perturbations is observed, as well as phase reversal of the perturbations from near the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder. Imaging is performed with an x-ray pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector. In collaboration with C. W. Barnes, J. B. Beck, N. Hoffman (LANL), D. Galmiche, A. Richard (CEA/L-V), J. Edwards, P. Graham, B. Thomas (AWE). ^**This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  2. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  3. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  4. Second threshold in weak interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The point of view that weak interactions must have a second threshold below 300 – 600 GeV is developed. Above this threshold new physics must come in. This new physics may be the Higgs system, or some other nonperturbative system possibly having some similarities to the Higgs system. The limit of

  5. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  6. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  7. Polarization image segmentation of radiofrequency ablated porcine myocardial tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Ahmad

    Full Text Available Optical polarimetry has previously imaged the spatial extent of a typical radiofrequency ablated (RFA lesion in myocardial tissue, exhibiting significantly lower total depolarization at the necrotic core compared to healthy tissue, and intermediate values at the RFA rim region. Here, total depolarization in ablated myocardium was used to segment the total depolarization image into three (core, rim and healthy zones. A local fuzzy thresholding algorithm was used for this multi-region segmentation, and then compared with a ground truth segmentation obtained from manual demarcation of RFA core and rim regions on the histopathology image. Quantitative comparison of the algorithm segmentation results was performed with evaluation metrics such as dice similarity coefficient (DSC = 0.78 ± 0.02 and 0.80 ± 0.02, sensitivity (Sn = 0.83 ± 0.10 and 0.91 ± 0.08, specificity (Sp = 0.76 ± 0.17 and 0.72 ± 0.17 and accuracy (Acc = 0.81 ± 0.09 and 0.71 ± 0.10 for RFA core and rim regions, respectively. This automatic segmentation of parametric depolarization images suggests a novel application of optical polarimetry, namely its use in objective RFA image quantification.

  8. Lung ablation: Best practice/results/response assessment/role alongside other ablative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Gravel, G; Deschamps, F

    2017-08-01

    Today, in addition to surgery, other local therapies are available for patients with small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and oligometastatic disease from various cancers. Local therapies include stereotactic ablation radiotherapy (SABR) and thermal ablative therapies through percutaneously inserted applicators. Although radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been explored in series with several hundreds of patients with pulmonary tumours, investigation of the potential of other ablation technologies including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation is ongoing. There are no randomised studies available to compare surgery, SABR, and thermal ablation. In small-size lung metastases, RFA seems to produce results very close to surgical series with >90% local control and 5-year overall survival of 50%. In primary lung cancer, the technique is reserved for non-surgical candidates. In future, the low invasiveness of thermal ablative therapies will allow for a combination of ablation and systemic therapies in order to improve the outcomes of ablation alone. Another major advantage of thermal ablation is the possibility to treat several metastases in close proximity to one another and retreatment in the same location in case of failure, which is not possible with SABR. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Photoproduction of Charm Near Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2000-10-31

    Charm and bottom production near threshold is sensitive to the multi-quark, gluonic, and hidden-color correlations of hadronic and nuclear wavefunctions in QCD since all of the target's constituents must act coherently within the small interaction volume of the heavy quark production subprocess. Although such multi-parton subprocess cross sections are suppressed by powers of 1=m{sub Q}{sup 2}, they have less phase-space suppression and can dominate the contributions of the leading-twist single-gluon subprocesses in the threshold regime. The small rates for open and hidden charm photoproduction at threshold call for a dedicated facility.

  10. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis.

  11. Percutaneous ablation of the gallbladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, S.; Mueller, P.R.; Girard, M.; Lee, M.J.; Goldberg, M.; Brink, J.A.; Flotte, T.J.; Ribiero, R.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of using Holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser to permanently obliterate the cystic duct and then using chemical sclerosants to ablate the gallbladder mucosa. Percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed in 30 domestic pigs. The cystic duct was cannulated and while the laser fiber was withdrawn at a rate of 0.5 cm/sec, pulsed laser energy (10 Hz) was delivered. Animals were sacrificed immediately (n = 7), at 72 hours (n = 4), and 6 weeks (n = 19). In the 6-week group, gallbladder sclerosis (95% alcohol plus sodium tetradecyl sulfate) was performed in 13 animals immediately after occluding the cystic duct. Control animals were included in each group

  12. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  13. Dental hard tissue ablation using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Taichen; Aoki, Akira; Saito, Norihito; Yumoto, Masaki; Nakajima, Sadahiro; Nagasaka, Keigo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Mizutani, Koji; Wada, Satoshi; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-12-01

    Mid-infrared erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers (2.94- and 2.78-μm, respectively) are utilized for effective dental hard tissue treatment because of their high absorption in water, hydroxide ion, or both. Recently, a mid-infrared tunable, nanosecond pulsed, all-solid-state chromium-doped: cadmium-selenide (Cr:CdSe) laser system was developed, which enables laser oscillation in the broad spectral range around 2.9 μm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ablation of dental hard tissue by the nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser at a wavelength range of 2.76-3.00 μm. Enamel, dentin, and cementum tissue were irradiated at a spot or line at a fluence of 0-11.20 J/cm 2 /pulse (energy output: 0-2.00 mJ/pulse) with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and beam diameter of ∼150 μm on the target (pulse width ∼250 ns). After irradiation, morphological changes, ablation threshold, depth, and efficiency, and thickness of the structurally and thermally affected layer of irradiated surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy of non-decalcified histological sections. The nanosecond pulsed irradiation without water spray effectively ablated dental hard tissue with no visible thermal damage such as carbonization. The SEM analysis revealed characteristic micro-irregularities without major melting and cracks in the lased tissue. The ablation threshold of dentin was the lowest at 2.76 μm and the highest at 3.00 μm. The histological analysis revealed minimal thermal and structural changes ∼20 μm wide on the irradiated dentin surfaces with no significant differences between wavelengths. The efficiency of dentin ablation gradually increased from 3.00 to 2.76 μm, at which point the highest ablation efficiency was observed. The nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser demonstrated an effective ablation ability of hard dental tissues

  14. Ablation and optical third-order nonlinearities in Ag nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Torres-Torres

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Torres-Torres1, Néstor Peréa-López2, Jorge Alejandro Reyes-Esqueda3, Luis Rodríguez-Fernández3, Alejandro Crespo-Sosa3, Juan Carlos Cheang-Wong3, Alicia Oliver31Section of Graduate Studies and Research, School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, National Polytechnic Institute, Zacatenco, Distrito Federal, Mexico; 2Laboratory for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research and Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la Presa San Jose, San Luis Potosi, Mexico; 3Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 20-364, México, D.F. 01000, MéxicoAbstract: The optical damage associated with high intensity laser excitation of silver nanoparticles (NPs was studied. In order to investigate the mechanisms of optical nonlinearity of a nanocomposite and their relation with its ablation threshold, a high-purity silica sample implanted with Ag ions was exposed to different nanosecond and picosecond laser irradiations. The magnitude and sign of picosecond refractive and absorptive nonlinearities were measured near and far from the surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the Ag NPs with a self-diffraction technique. Saturable optical absorption and electronic polarization related to self-focusing were identified. Linear absorption is the main process involved in nanosecond laser ablation, but nonlinearities are important for ultrashort picosecond pulses when the absorptive process become significantly dependent on the irradiance. We estimated that near the resonance, picosecond intraband transitions allow an expanded distribution of energy among the NPs, in comparison to the energy distribution resulting in a case of far from resonance, when the most important absorption takes place in silica. We measured important differences in the ablation threshold and we estimated that the high selectiveness of the SPR of Ag NPs as well as their corresponding optical nonlinearities can be strongly significant for laser

  15. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvini, Marco; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculation. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  16. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afarideh, H., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghergherehchi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (λ = 193 nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193 nm) at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230 nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  17. Nanostructure formation upon femtosecond ablation from silicon: Effect of double pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Muth, Marco; Arguirov, Tzanimir

    2012-09-01

    To study the dynamics of laser-ablation induced structure formation (LIPPS), silicon was irradiated by (above-threshold) pulse pairs with a variable time-lag between 100 fs and a few picoseconds. With increasing pulse-to-pulse delay we find a significant change in ablated-area morphology: the central range of the irradiated spot becomes less and less depressed whereas a surrounding ring structure exhibits increasingly coarser modulation, typical for strong irradiation, where the ripples are characterized by an alternation between elevation above and depression below the unaffected surface level. At the spot center the ablation depth decreases with increasing pulse separation, showing only structures usually observed for weak irradiation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the modified areas indicates an unexpectedly high, almost mono-dispersed, abundance of confined nanostructures. The results clearly seem to rule out structure formation by any interference-induced modulated ablation. Instead, they support the model of self-organized structure formation upon the creation of a thermally unstable, "soft" state of the target after laser impact.

  18. Laser ablation of dental materials using a microsecond Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniaeva, M. L.; Siniavsky, M. N.; Pashinin, V. P.; Mamedov, Ad. A.; Konov, V. I.; Kononenko, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The action of microsecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1064 nm on dental tissues (enamel and dentin) and various dental materials used for tooth replacement and filling (ceramics, metal alloys, and composites) is studied. It is demonstrated that the ablation thresholds of all of the dental materials are significantly lower than the threshold laser fluences for the dental tissue ( E thr = 200-300 J/cm2). At the laser fluences that do not allow ablation and damage of the dental tissues, the dental materials are effectively removed at a rate of no greater than 40 μm per pulse. It is shown that the laser ablation of the materials under study involves two processes (evaporation and volume explosion) depending on the optical density. The results obtained indicate that the laser radiation with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the microsecond pulse duration is promising for dental applications, since it allows effective cleaning of the tooth surface from various dental materials in the absence of the damages of dental tissues.

  19. Laterality of motor cortical function measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Park, Susanna B; Howells, James; Huynh, William; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Matamala, José M; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Threshold tracking paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TTTMS) examines cortical function and is useful for diagnosis of motor neuron disorders. Differences in cortical function have been identified between dominant and non-dominant limbs using constant stimulus methods, but they remain unclear, potentially due to methodological differences. In this study we aimed to clarify differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant limbs using TTTMS. Single-pulse TMS, TTTMS, and nerve conduction studies were performed in 25 healthy, right-handed participants by recording from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. There were no side-to-side differences observed in resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, central motor conduction time, cortical silent period, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, CMAP latency, F-wave latency, or neurophysiological index. These findings suggest that, when using TTTMS, there are no differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Muscle Nerve 55: 424-427, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Conceptions of nuclear threshold status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews some alternative definitions of nuclear threshold status. Each of them is important, and major analytical confusions would result if one sense of the term is mistaken for another. The motives for nations entering into such threshold status are a blend of civilian and military gains, and of national interests versus parochial or bureaucratic interests. A portion of the rationale for threshold status emerges inevitably from the pursuit of economic goals, and another portion is made more attraction by the derives of the domestic political process. Yet the impact on international security cannot be dismissed, especially where conflicts among the states remain real. Among the military or national security motives are basic deterrence, psychological warfare, war-fighting and, more generally, national prestige. In the end, as the threshold phenomenon is assayed for lessons concerning the role of nuclear weapons more generally in international relations and security, one might conclude that threshold status and outright proliferation coverage to a degree in the motives for all of the states involved and in the advantages attained. As this paper has illustrated, nuclear threshold status is more subtle and more ambiguous than outright proliferation, and it takes considerable time to sort out the complexities. Yet the world has now had a substantial amount of time to deal with this ambiguous status, and this may tempt more states to exploit it

  1. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-01-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML

  2. Tactile thresholds in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Moharić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of sensory thresholds provides a method of examining the function of peripheral nerve fibers and their central connections. Quantitative sensory testing is a variant of conventional sensory testing wherein the goal is the quantification of the level of stimulation needed to produce a particular sensation. While thermal and vibratory testing are established methods in assessment of sensory thresholds, assessment of tactile thresholds with monofilaments is not used routinely. The purpose of this study was to assess the tactile thresholds in normal healthy population.Methods: In 39 healthy volunteers (19 men aged 21 to 71 years, tactile thresholds were assessed with von Frey’s hair in 7 parts of the body bilaterally.Results: We found touch sensitivity not to be dependent on age or gender. The right side was significantly more sensitive in the lateral part of the leg (p=0.011 and the left side in the medial part of the arm (p=0.022. There were also significant differences between sites (p<0.001, whereby distal parts of the body were more sensitive.Conclusions: Von Frey filaments allow the estimation of tactile thresholds without the need for complicated instrumentation.

  3. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V., E-mail: bulgakov@itp.nsc.ru

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Laser damage thresholds of Ag, Au and Ag-Au alloys in air and water are measured. • Alloy thresholds are lower than those of Ag and Au due to low thermal conductivity. • Laser damage thresholds in water are ∼1.5 times higher than those in air. • Light scattering mechanisms responsible for high thresholds in water are suggested. • Light scattering mechanisms are supported by optical reflectance measurements. - Abstract: The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  4. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Dongfeng [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Chen, Songyan [Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-05-23

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  5. Observation of the stabilizing effect of a laminated ablator on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, L; Casner, A; Galmiche, D; Huser, G; Liberatore, S; Theobald, M

    2011-05-01

    A laminated ablator is explored as an alternative concept for stabilizing the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability which develops in inertial fusion targets. Experiments measuring the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laminated planar foils are reported. Consistent with both theory and simulations, a significant reduction of the perturbation growth is experimentally observed for laminated ablators in comparison to what is observed for classical uniform ablators. Such an enhanced hydrodynamic stability opens opportunities for the design of high-gain inertial fusion targets. © 2011 American Physical Society

  6. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy ganglia ablation in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thoracoscopic sympathectomy ganglia ablation in the management of palmer hyperhidrosis: A decade experience in a single institution. D Kravarusic, E Freud. Abstract. Background: Hyperhidrosis can cause significant professional and social handicaps. Surgery is the preferred treatment modality for hyperhidrosis.

  7. Ablative Ceramic Foam Based TPS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel composite material ablative TPS for planetary vehicles that can survive a dual heating exposure is proposed. NextGen's TPS concept is a bi-layer functional...

  8. Anatomic Twist to a Straightforward Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Singh Randhawa, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular (AV junction ablation for treatment of refractory atrial fibrillation is a well defined, standardized procedure and the simplest of commonly performed radiofrequency ablations in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. We report successful AV junction ablation using an inferior approach in a case of inferior vena cava interruption. Inability during the procedure to initially pass the ablation catheter into the right ventricle, combined with low amplitude electrograms, led to suspicion of an anatomic abnormality. This was determined to be a heterotaxy syndrome with inferior vena cava interruption and azygos continuation, draining in turn into the superior vena cava. Advancing Schwartz right 0 (SRO sheath through the venous abnormality into the right atrium allowed adequate catheter stability to successfully induce complete AV block with radiofrequency energy.

  9. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-06-23

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling.

  10. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  11. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  12. Introduction to Laser Ablation Video Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gene H; Sloan, Andrew E; Tatsui, Claudio E

    2018-04-01

    Laser ablation (also known as laser interstitial thermal therapy [LITT]) has emerged as an important new technology for treating various disorders of the brain and spine. As with any new or emerging technology, there is a learning curve for its optimal use, and video tutorials can be important learning tools to help bridge gaps in knowledge for those who wish to become more familiar with laser ablation. In this special supplement to Neurosurgical Focus, videos illustrate laser ablation's use in the treatment of epilepsy and failed radiosurgery, as well as technical aspects of performing these procedures in eloquent brain and in the spine. We hope that these videos will enable you to enhance your understanding of the evolving use of laser ablation for disorders of the brain or spine. It is the editors' sincere hope that this will be helpful either in your own practice or in determining whether to refer to a neurosurgical colleague experienced in this field.

  13. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  14. Gap detection threshold in the rat before and after auditory cortex ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syka, Josef; Rybalko, Natalia; Mazelová, Jana; Druga, R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2002), s. 151-159 ISSN 0378-5955 R&D Projects: GA MZd NK6454; GA ČR GA309/01/1063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : gap detection treshold Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.969, year: 2002

  15. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dielectrics: thresholds, mechanisms, role of breakdown

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mirza, M. Inam; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Tomáštík, J.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.; Fekete, Ladislav; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Dec (2016), 1-11, č. článku 39133. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA MŠk LM2015086; GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser material processing * surfaces * interfaces * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  16. ROLE OF RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION IN ADENOMA SEBACEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Madh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoma sebaceum, pathognomonic of tuberous sclerosis, are tiny angiofibromas which commonly occur over central part of face. Recurrence after treatment is common and hence a need for inexpensive, safe and efficient treatment is required. Radiofrequency ablation is a safe and an economical procedure and has been known to cause less scarring with good aesthetic results compared to other ablative methods such as electrocautery.

  17. Time-resolved photoluminescence for evaluating laser-induced damage during dielectric stack ablation in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, Stéphanie [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Blanc-Pélissier, Danièle, E-mail: daniele.blanc@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Barbos, Corina; Le Coz, Marine [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Poulain, Gilles [TOTAL MS—New Energies, R& D Division, La Défense (France); Lemiti, Mustapha [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Ablation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} on Si substrates was performed with a nanosecond UV laser. • Ablation thresholds were found in good agreement with COMSOL simulation, around 0.85 and 0.95 J cm{sup −2} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub X}, respectively. • Laser-induced damage was evaluated at room temperature by time-resolved photoluminescence decay with a single photon counting detector. • Minority carrier lifetime in silicon as a function of the ablation fluence was derived from the photoluminescence decay and related to the thickness of the heat affected zone. • Quantitative measurements of laser-induced damage can be used to evaluate laser ablation of dielectrics in photovoltaics. - Abstract: Selective laser ablation of dielectric layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and bi-layers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub X}:H with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.4 to 2 J cm{sup −2}. Ablation threshold was correlated to the simulated temperature at the interface between the dielectric coatings and the silicon substrate. Laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate was evaluated by time-resolved photoluminescence. The minority carrier lifetime deduced from time-resolved photoluminescence was related to the depth of the heat affected zone in the substrate.

  18. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  19. Sequential roles of primary somatosensory cortex and posterior parietal cortex in tactile-visual cross-modal working memory: a single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Zhao, Di; Hao, Ning; Hu, Yi; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2015-01-01

    Both monkey neurophysiological and human EEG studies have shown that association cortices, as well as primary sensory cortical areas, play an essential role in sequential neural processes underlying cross-modal working memory. The present study aims to further examine causal and sequential roles of the primary sensory cortex and association cortex in cross-modal working memory. Individual MRI-based single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) was applied to bilateral primary somatosensory cortices (SI) and the contralateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC), while participants were performing a tactile-visual cross-modal delayed matching-to-sample task. Time points of spTMS were 300 ms, 600 ms, 900 ms after the onset of the tactile sample stimulus in the task. The accuracy of task performance and reaction time were significantly impaired when spTMS was applied to the contralateral SI at 300 ms. Significant impairment on performance accuracy was also observed when the contralateral PPC was stimulated at 600 ms. SI and PPC play sequential and distinct roles in neural processes of cross-modal associations and working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal Ablation of Colorectal Lung Metastases: Retrospective Comparison Among Laser-Induced Thermotherapy, Radiofrequency Ablation, and Microwave Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Eckert, Romina; Naguib, Nagy N N; Beeres, Martin; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate local tumor control, time to tumor progression, and survival rates among patients with lung metastatic colorectal cancer who have undergone ablation therapy performed using laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), or microwave ablation (MWA). Data for this retrospective study were collected from 231 CT-guided ablation sessions performed for 109 patients (71 men and 38 women; mean [± SD] age, 68.6 ± 11.2 years; range, 34-94 years) from May 2000 to May 2014. Twenty-one patients underwent LITT (31 ablations), 41 patients underwent RFA (75 ablations), and 47 patients underwent MWA (125 ablations). CT scans were acquired 24 hours after each therapy session and at follow-up visits occurring at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after ablation. Survival rates were calculated from the time of the first ablation session, with the use of Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Changes in the volume of the ablated lesions were measured using the Kruskal-Wallis method. Local tumor control was achieved in 17 of 25 lesions (68.0%) treated with LITT, 45 of 65 lesions (69.2%) treated with RFA, and 91 of 103 lesions (88.3%) treated with MWA. Statistically significant differences were noted when MWA was compared with LITT at 18 months after ablation (p = 0.01) and when MWA was compared with RFA at 6 months (p = 0.004) and 18 months (p = 0.01) after ablation. The overall median time to local tumor progression was 7.6 months. The median time to local tumor progression was 10.4 months for lesions treated with LITT, 7.2 months for lesions treated with RFA, and 7.5 months for lesions treated with MWA, with no statistically significant difference noted. New pulmonary metastases developed in 47.6% of patients treated with LITT, in 51.2% of patients treated with RFA, and in 53.2% of patients treated with MWA. According to the Kaplan-Meier test, median survival was 22.1 months for patients who underwent LITT, 24.2 months

  1. Ovulation synchrony after follicle ablation in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfelt, D R; Adams, G P

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine the efficacy of ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicle ablation for synchronizing ovarian function in mares. The experiments were initiated at random stages of the oestrous cycle in control (nonablated) and follicle-ablated mares. On day 0, all follicles > or =10 mm in diameter were punctured, aspirated and curettaged in ablated mares, and, on day 4, two doses of PGF2alpha were administered with a 12 h interval between the doses to both ablated and nonablated (control) mares. In Expt 1, hCG was administered to the ablated mares on the first or second day after the largest follicle was > or =30 mm in diameter. In Expt 2, hCG was administered to ablated mares 6 days after PGF2alpha administration, at which time the largest follicle was expected to be > or =30 mm in diameter. FSH concentrations increased initially and decreased subsequently in the ablated mares, and the ablation-induced wave (first detection of a follicle > or =10 mm in diameter) was observed 1.9 days after ablation and was synchronous (1-3 days) in 90% of mares. In both Expts 1 and 2, the uniformity of follicular wave emergence among follicle-ablated mares resulted in significantly better synchrony of ovulation after PGF2alpha administration compared with that of control mares. The variation in the interval from PGF2alpha administration to ovulation in ablated mares was reduced further by hCG administration. In the ablation + hCG groups, ovulation synchrony occurred 6-10 days after PGF2alpha administration in Expt 1 (13/16, 81%) and 7-8 days after PGF2alpha administration in Expt 2 (7/8, 88%). The extended period of ovulation in Expt 1 compared with that of Expt 2 (5 versus 2 days) was inherent in the experimental design, as hCG was not administered in Expt 1 until the largest follicle reached > or =30 mm in diameter, whereas in Expt 2 the experimental design was modified such that hCG was administered 6 days after PGF2alpha administration. As a result, in

  2. Pulmonary vein stenosis after catheter ablation: electroporation versus radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Vincent J H M; Neven, Kars G E J; van Wessel, Harry; du Pré, Bastiaan C; Vink, Aryan; Doevendans, Pieter A F M; Wittkampf, Fred H M

    2014-08-01

    Radiofrequency ablation inside pulmonary vein (PV) ostia can cause PV stenosis. A novel alternative method of ablation is irreversible electroporation, but the long-term response of PVs to electroporation ablation is unknown. In ten 6-month-old pigs (60-75 kg), the response of PVs to circular electroporation and radiofrequency ablation was compared. Ten consecutive, nonarcing, electroporation applications of 200 J were delivered 5 to 10 mm inside 1 of the 2 main PVs, using a custom-deflectable, 18-mm circular decapolar catheter. Inside the other PV, circular radiofrequency ablation was performed using 30 W radiofrequency applications via an irrigated 4-mm ablation catheter. PV angiograms were made before ablation, immediately after ablation, and after 3-month survival. PV diameters and heart size were measured. With electroporation ablation, PV ostial diameter decreased 11±10% directly after ablation, but had increased 19±11% after 3 months. With radiofrequency ablation, PV ostial diameter decreased 23±15% directly after ablation and remained 7±17% smaller after 3 months compared with preablation diameter despite a 21±7% increase in heart size during aging from 6 to 9 months. In this porcine model, multiple circumferential 200-J electroporation applications inside the PV ostia do not affect PV diameter at 3-month follow-up. Radiofrequency ablation inside PV ostia causes considerable PV stenosis directly after ablation, which persists after 3 months. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Estimation of Al2O3 critical temperature using a Langmuir probe in laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Kellou, A.

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has demonstrated its capacity in thin films growing under the moderate laser intensity. But when the laser intensity increases, the presence of droplets on the thin film limits the PLD efficiency such that the process needs an optimization study. In this way, an experimental study has been conducted in order to correlate between the appearance of those droplets and the laser fluence. The comprehension of the physical mechanism during ablation and the control of the deposition parameters allowed to get a safe process. Our experiment consists in measuring the amount of ejected matter from polycrystalline alumina target as a function of the laser fluence when irradiated by a KrF laser. According to laser fluence, several kinds of ablation regimes have been identified. Below a threshold value found as 12 J/cm2, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to normal evaporation, desorption and nonthermal processes. While above this threshold value, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to phase explosion phenomenon which is responsible of droplets formation when the surface temperature approaches the critical temperature T tc. A negative charge collector was used to collect the positive ions in the plume. Their times of flight (TOF) signal were used to estimate the appropriate T tc for alumina target. Ions yield, current as well as kinetic energy were deduced from the TOF signal. Their evolutions show the occurrence of an optical breakdown in the vapor plume which is well correlated with the onset of the phase explosion phenomenon. At 10 J/cm2, the ions velocities collected by the probe have been compared to those obtained from optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic and were discussed. To prove the occurrence of phase explosion by the appearance of droplets, several thin films were elaborated on Si (100) substrate at different laser fluence into vacuum. They have been characterized by scanning electron microscope. The results were well

  4. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  5. Quantification and controllability study of minimally invasive exothermic chemo-ablation therapy for tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Huang, Yu; Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed exothermic chemical reaction based tumor hyperthermia method presented a new way of realizing truly minimally invasive treatment for tumor. This method utilizes heat generated from the reaction between acid and alkali solutions to allow for tumor ablation. Successful clinical implementation of this method requires a clearer understanding and quantification of the ablation area such that a more controllable operation can be made. A number of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments are designed to examine the features of thermal chemo-ablation therapy which include micro and macro characteristics of ablated tissue and temperature change during the ablation process. A Quantitative study on the relationship between velocity and ablation volume as well as a Graphical User Interface in Matlab for computerized ablation area analysis are also presented in this article. We present in here two instrument designs for thermal chemo-ablation and have completed the prototype design for the injection pump which has been tested and successfully applied in ex-vivo and vivo experiments.

  6. Selective femtosecond laser structuring of dielectric thin films with different band gaps: a time-resolved study of ablation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have been increasingly gaining importance for the selective structuring of dielectric thin films in industrial applications. In a variety of works the ablation of thin SiO2 and SiNx films from Si substrates has been investigated with near infrared laser wavelengths with photon energies of about 1.2 eV where both dielectrics are transparent (E_{{gap,SiO2}}≈ 8 eV; E_{{gap,SiN}x}≈ 2.5 eV). In these works it was found that few 100 nm thick SiO2 films are selectively ablated with a "lift-off" initiated by confined laser ablation whereas the SiN_{{x}} films are ablated by a combination of confined and direct laser ablation. In the work at hand, ultrafast pump-probe imaging was applied to compare the laser ablation dynamics of the two thin film systems directly with the uncoated Si substrate—on the same setup and under identical parameters. On the SiO2 sample, results show the pulse absorption in the Si substrate, leading to the confined ablation of the SiO2 layer by the expansion of the substrate. On the SiN_{{x}} sample, direct absorption in the layer is observed leading to its removal by evaporation. The pump-probe measurements combined with reflectivity corrected threshold fluence investigations suggest that melting of the Si substrate is sufficient to initiate the lift-off of an overlaying transparent film—evaporation of the substrate seems not to be necessary.

  7. Ridge waveguide lasers in Nd:GGG crystals produced by swift carbon ion irradiation and femtosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuechen; Dong, Ningning; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Akhmadaliev, Sh; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2012-04-23

    We report on the fabrication of ridge waveguide in Nd:GGG crystal by using swift C(5+) ion irradiation and femtosecond laser ablation. At room temperature continuous wave laser oscillation at wavelength of ~1063 nm has been realized through the optical pump at 808 nm with a slope efficiency of 41.8% and the pump threshold is 71.6 mW. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  8. DOE approach to threshold quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.; Kluk, A.F.; Department of Energy, Washington, DC)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Ideally, the threshold must be set high enough to significantly reduce the amount of waste requiring special handling. It must also be low enough so that waste at the threshold quantity poses a very small health risk and multiple exposures to such waste would still constitute a small health risk. It should also be practical to segregate waste above or below the threshold quantity using available instrumentation. Guidance is being prepared to aid DOE sites in establishing threshold quantity values based on pathways analysis using site-specific parameters (waste stream characteristics, maximum exposed individual, population considerations, and site specific parameters such as rainfall, etc.). A guidance dose of between 0.001 to 1.0 mSv/y (0.1 to 100 mrem/y) was recommended with 0.3 mSv/y (30 mrem/y) selected as the guidance dose upon which to base calculations. Several tasks were identified, beginning with the selection of a suitable pathway model for relating dose to the concentration of radioactivity in the waste. Threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose were determined for waste disposal sites at a selected humid and arid site. Finally, cost-benefit considerations at the example sites were addressed. The results of the various tasks are summarized and the relationship of this effort with related developments at other agencies discussed

  9. Factors Limiting Complete Tumor Ablation by Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulet, Erwan; Aube, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Lebigot, Jerome; Lhermitte, Emilie; Oberti, Frederic; Ponthieux, Anne; Cales, Paul; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiological or physical factors to predict the risk of residual mass or local recurrence of primary and secondary hepatic tumors treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eighty-two patients, with 146 lesions (80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 66 metastases), were treated by RFA. Morphological parameters of the lesions included size, location, number, ultrasound echogenicity, computed tomography density, and magnetic resonance signal intensity were obtained before and after treatment. Parameters of the generator were recorded during radiofrequency application. The recurrence-free group was statistically compared to the recurrence and residual mass groups on all these parameters. Twenty residual masses were detected. Twenty-nine lesions recurred after a mean follow-up of 18 months. Size was a predictive parameter. Patients' sex and age and the echogenicity and density of lesions were significantly different for the recurrence and residual mass groups compared to the recurrence-free group (p < 0.05). The presence of an enhanced ring on the magnetic resonance control was more frequent in the recurrence and residual mass groups. In the group of patients with residual lesions, analysis of physical parameters showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the time necessary for the temperature to rise. In conclusion, this study confirms risk factors of recurrence such as the size of the tumor and emphasizes other factors such as a posttreatment enhanced ring and an increase in the time necessary for the rise in temperature. These factors should be taken into consideration when performing RFA and during follow-up

  10. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  11. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  12. Nuclear threshold effects and neutron strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia

    2003-01-01

    One proves that a Nuclear Threshold Effect is dependent, via Neutron Strength Function, on Spectroscopy of Ancestral Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the Nuclear Threshold Effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function. Evidence for relation of Nuclear Threshold Effects to Neutron Strength Functions is obtained from Isotopic Threshold Effect and Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly. The empirical and computational analysis of the Isotopic Threshold Effect and of the Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly demonstrate their close relationship to Neutron Strength Functions. It was established that the Nuclear Threshold Effects depend, in addition to genuine Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, on Spectroscopy of (Ancestral) Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function, in their dependence on mass number. This result constitutes also a proof that the origins of these threshold effects are Neutron Single Particle States at zero energy. (author)

  13. Long-term Survival Following Ablation of Colorectal Liver Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Iben Rahbek; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Kirkegård, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Ablation of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) in highly selected patients is an option with curative potential. Patient selection and the ablative technique have continued to improve over the years. This study assessed the trends in long-term survival after ablation of CRLM. Methods...... divided into three subgroups according to time of ablation (2000-2004; 2005-2009, and 2010-2014). Survival was defined as the time from the first ablation procedure until death, censoring or end of the follow-up period (December 31, 2015). Results: 741 CRLM ablations were performed in 444 patients...

  14. Safety and effect on ablation size of hydrochloric acid-perfused radiofrequency ablation in animal livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Qi; Huang, Sen-Miao; Gu, Yang-Kui; Gao, Fei; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Liu, Ding-Xin; Huang, Jin-Hua

    2018-02-26

    Our objective was to determine the safety and ablation size of hydrochloric acid-perfused radiofrequency ablation (HCl-RFA) in liver tissues, prospectively using in vivo rabbit and ex vivo porcine liver models. The livers in 30 rabbits were treated in vivo with perfusions of normal saline (controls) and HCl concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%, during RFA at 103 °C and 30 W for 3 min. For each experimental setting, six ablations were created. Safety was assessed by comparing baseline weight and selected laboratory values with those at 2, 7, and 14 days' post-ablation, and by histopathological analysis. The livers in 25 pigs were treated ex vivo with the same five perfusions during RFA at 103 °C, at both 30 W and 60 W, for 30 min. Ablation diameters and volumes were measured by two examiners. Rabbit weights and selected laboratory values did not differ significantly from baseline to 7 and 14 days' post-ablation, liver tissues outside the ablation zones were normal histologically, and adjacent organs showed no macroscopic damage. The mean ablation volumes in the porcine livers treated with HCl-RFA were all larger than those treated with normal saline perfusion during RFA (NS-RFA), at both 30 W and 60 W (p < 0.001). The largest ablation volume and transverse diameter were observed in the porcine livers during 10% HCl-RFA at 60 W, measuring 179.22 (SD = 24.79) cm 3 and 6.84 (SD = 0.36) cm, respectively. Based on our experiments, HCl-RFA in the liver appears to be as safe as NS-RFA while also resulting in larger ablation zones.

  15. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors: Focus on Microwave Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A; Albrecht, Moritz Hans; Kaltenbach, Benjamin; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Lin, Han; Panahi, Bita; Eichler, Kathrin; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Roman, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    Background  Image-guided thermal ablation can be used for the treatment of medically inoperable primary and metastatic lung cancer. These techniques are based on the heating up or freezing (cryoablation) of a volume of tissue around a percutaneous applicator that induces necrosis of the tumor. Method  The English-language literature concerning thermal ablation of the lung was reviewed. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the most widely performed and investigated of these techniques. Microwave ablation (MWA) represents a relatively new alternative that shares the same indications and is conducted in a very similar fashion as RFA. It has been experimentally and clinically shown that MWA produces larger, more spherical ablation zones over shorter periods of time compared to RFA. Seven different MWA systems are available in Europe and the USA with significant differences in the size and shape of the produced ablation zones. Results  The types of complications caused by MWA and their rates of occurrence are very similar to those caused by RFA. The local progression rates after MWA of lung malignancies vary between 0 % and 34 % and are similar to those in the RFA literature. Conclusion  Despite technical improvements, the current generation of MWA systems has comparable clinical outcomes to those of RFA. Key Points   · MWA is a safe technique that should be considered one of the treatment options for medically inoperable lung tumors. · As thermal ablations of lung tumors are becoming more frequent, radiologists should be acquainted with the post-ablation imaging characteristics. · Although MWA has some theoretical advantages over RFA, the clinical outcomes are similar. Citation Format · Vogl TJ, Nour-Eldin NA, Albrecht MH et al. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors: Focus on Microwave Ablation. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 828 - 843. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Thresholds models of technological transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; Frenken, K.; Kupers, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic review of seven threshold models of technological transitions from physics, biology, economics and sociology. The very same phenomenon of a technological transition can be explained by very different logics, ranging from economic explanations based on price, performance and

  17. Risk thresholds for alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Angela M; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-risk limits recommended for alcohol consumption vary substantially across different national guidelines. To define thresholds associated with lowest risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease, we studied individual-participant data from 599 912 current drinkers withou...

  18. Weights of Exact Threshold Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babai, László; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider Boolean exact threshold functions defined by linear equations, and in general degree d polynomials. We give upper and lower bounds on the maximum magnitude (absolute value) of the coefficients required to represent such functions. These bounds are very close and in the linear case in ...... leave a substantial gap, a challenge for future work....

  19. Threshold quantities for helminth infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Roberts, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    For parasites with a clearly defined life-cycle we give threshold quantities that determine the stability of the parasite-free steady state for autonomous and periodic deterministic systems formulated in terms of mean parasite burdens. We discuss the biological interpretations of the quantities, how

  20. Percolation Threshold Parameters of Fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škvor, J.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2009), 041141-041147 ISSN 1539-3755 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : percolation threshold * universality * infinite cluster Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.400, year: 2009

  1. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  2. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  3. Comparison of the Three NIF Ablators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yi, S. A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Indirect drive implosion experiments on NIF have now been performed using three different ablator materials: glow discharge polymer (GDP) or CH, high density carbon (HDC, which we also refer to as diamond), and sputtered beryllium (Be). It has been appreciated for some time that each of these materials has specific advantages and disadvantages as an ICF ablator.[1-4] In light of experiments conducted on NIF in the last few years, how do these ablators compare? Given current understanding, is any ablator more or less likely to reach ignition on NIF? Has the understanding of their respective strengths and weaknesses changed since NIF experiments began? How are those strengths and weaknesses highlighted by implosion designs currently being tested or planned for testing soon? This document aims to address these questions by combining modern simulation results with a survey of the current experimental data base. More particularly, this document is meant to fulfill an L2 Milestone for FY17 to “Document our understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of CH, HDC, and Be designs.” Note that this document does not aim to recommend a down-selection of the current three ablator choices. It is intended only to gather and document the current understanding of the differences between these ablators and thereby inform the choices made in planning future implosion experiments. This document has two themes: (i) We report on a reanalysis project in which post-shot simulations were done on a common basis for layered shots using each ablator. This included data from keyholes, 2D ConA, and so forth, from each campaign, leading up to the layered shots. (“Keyholes” are shots dedicated to measuring the shock timing in a NIF target, as described in Ref. 5. “2DConAs” are backlit implosions in which the symmetry of the implosion is measured between about half and full convergence, as described in Ref. 6.) This set of common-basis postshot simulations is compared to

  4. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jong Hyun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 ~ 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal

  5. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G. [University Hospital Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Helmberger, T.K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Reiser, M.F. (eds.) [University Hospitals - Grosshadern and Innenstadt Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  6. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Helmberger, T.K.; Reiser, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  7. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  8. Quantifying ecological thresholds from response surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather E. Lintz; Bruce McCune; Andrew N. Gray; Katherine A. McCulloh

    2011-01-01

    Ecological thresholds are abrupt changes of ecological state. While an ecological threshold is a widely accepted concept, most empirical methods detect them in time or across geographic space. Although useful, these approaches do not quantify the direct drivers of threshold response. Causal understanding of thresholds detected empirically requires their investigation...

  9. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouder, M.; Itina, T.E.; Deghiche, D.; Lamrous, O.

    2012-01-01

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  10. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Universite Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Deghiche, D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  11. Transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue: advantages and disadvantages of different ablative techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenasa, M; Willems, S; Chen, X; Fromer, M; Borggrefe, M

    1992-06-01

    Transcatheter ablation techniques are emerging as an alternative therapeutical tool in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. Catheter ablation was initially introduced as the last resort to ablate the atrioventricular nodal conduction in patients with atrial fibrillation and uncontrolled ventricular response and in patients with drug refractory ventricular tachycardias. Direct current energy was used as the sole source of energy, but because of potential significant complications and early and late mortality, presumably mostly due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, other sources of energy were sought. Radiofrequency current which does not produce barotrauma and does not require general anesthesia rapidly replaced direct current ablation in many centers. Early results with radiofrequency current ablation of the atrioventricular node and accessory atrioventricular pathways are very encouraging. The results of radiofrequency as well as direct current ablation for atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia, where the components of reentry circuit are less defined, are not as favorable as those of AV junctional tachycardias. However, improvement of catheter and generatory technology and better understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular tachycardias and characteristics of the target site will enhance the results of catheter ablation in ventricular tachcardias. The procedures are still considered investigational, and mostly done by very experienced groups at tertiary referral hospitals with surgical teams available in case of serious complications. Larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods are required before these techniques expand to community hospitals and to patients with minimal symptoms or asymptomatic individuals as a prophylaxis therapy.

  12. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  13. Local anaesthesia during endometrial ablation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, I. M. A.; Geomini, P. M. A. J.; Timmermans, A.; de Lange, M. E.; Bongers, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endometrial ablation has been widely implemented in the outpatient setting. Many different protocols of local anaesthesia during endometrial ablation are used and described. However, prospective studies to assess and evaluate these protocols appear to be scarce. Objectives To evaluate

  14. [Delivery of megawatts high energy laser pulse with large core diameter silica fiber and its application in dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Peng, Fei-Fei; Li, Run-Hua; Chen, Yu-Qi; Yang, Xue-Jiao

    2013-12-01

    To resolve the contradiction between spatial resolution and analysis sensitivity in single pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a study on dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) was carried out by using one Nd : YAG laser which was capable of two laser beam outputs with different wavelengths, where, the second harmonic output, 532 nm laser beam, was used as laser-ablation source, and the fundamental output, 1064 nm laser beam, was delivered with a large core diameter silica fiber to realize nanoseconds time-delay and then used to breakdown the ablated samples. Two laser beams were orthogonally arranged to realize element analysis with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Some key techniques on the coupling of 1064 nm laser beam into fiber, the collimation of laser at the fiber end and re-focusing of the laser beam were studied. The energy delivery capabilities of four fibers of different types were studied and the maximum values were determined experimentally. A Q-switched laser pulse with 15 mJ pulse energy was successfully delivered by selecting a 50 meter long silica fiber with 800 microm core diameter and 0. 39 numerical aperture. And 250 ns time-delay was realized. A copper alloy was analyzed by spectra with current established LA-LIBS system and the possibility of realizing dual-wavelength LA-LIBS analysis based on one Nd : YAG laser was demonstrated experimentally. In this technique, only one Nd: YAG laser was required to carry out spectral analysis. It has a few advantages, such as simple equipment structure, and being convenient to miniaturize the whole system etc. This dual-wavelength LA-LIBS technique was suitable for in-situ elements microanalysis for different samples with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  16. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option.

  17. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: julien.garnon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: roberto-luigi.cazzato@chru-strasbourg.fr; Edalat, Faramarz, E-mail: faramarz.edalat@gmail.com; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Strasbourg University Hospital (France)

    2016-09-15

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option.

  18. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Climent

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure.

  19. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Silva, A.; Wright, M.; Wright, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  20. Kinetic depletion model for pellet ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic model for depletion effect, which determines pellet ablation when the pellet passes a rational magnetic surface, is formulated. The model predicts a moderate decrease of the ablation rate compared with the earlier considered monoenergy versions [1, 2]. For typical T-10 conditions the ablation rate reduces by a reactor of 2.5 when the 1-mm pellet penetrates through the plasma center. A substantial deceleration of pellets -about 15% per centimeter of low shire rational q region; is predicted. Penetration for Low Field Side and High Field Side injections is considered taking into account modification of the electron distribution function by toroidal magnetic field. It is shown that Shafranov shift and toroidal effects yield the penetration length for HFS injection higher by a factor of 1.5. This fact should be taken into account when plasma-shielding effects on penetration are considered. (author)

  1. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  2. Safety and efficacy in ablation of premature ventricular contraction: data from the German ablation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, S; Senges, J; Hochadel, M; Tilz, R; Willems, S; Eckardt, L; Deneke, T; Lewalter, T; Dorwarth, U; Reithmann, C; Brachmann, J; Steinbeck, G; Kääb, S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are often highly symptomatic with significantly reduced quality-of-life. We evaluated the outcome and success of PVC ablation in patients in the German Ablation Registry. The German Ablation Registry is a nationwide prospective multicenter database of patients who underwent an ablation procedure, initiated by the "Stiftung Institut für Herzinfarktforschung" (IHF), Ludwigshafen, Germany. Data were acquired from March 2007 to May 2011. Patients underwent PVC ablation in the enrolling ablation centers. A total of 408 patients (age 53.5 ± 15 years, 55 % female) undergoing ablation for PVCs were included. 32 % of patients showed a co-existing structural heart disease. Acute ablation success of the procedure was 82 % in the overall patient group. In patients without structural heart disease, acute success was significantly higher compared with patients with structural heart disease (86 vs. 74 %, p = 0.002). All patients were discharged alive after a median of 3 days. No patient suffered an acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or major bleeding. After 12 months' follow-up, 99 % of patients were still alive showing a significant different mortality between patients with structural heart disease compared with those without (2.3 vs. 0 %, p = 0.012). In addition, 76 % of patients showed significantly improved symptoms after 12 months of follow-up. Based on the data from this registry, ablation of PVCs is a safe and efficient procedure with an excellent outcome and improved symptoms after 12 months.

  3. Catheter Ablation of Tachyarrhythmias in Small Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Blaufox

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 80,000-100,000 radiofrequency ablation (RFA procedures are performed in the United States each year.1 Approximately 1% of these are performed on pediatric patients at centers that contribute data to the Pediatric Radiofrequency Registry.2 Previous reports from this registry have demonstrated that RFA can safely and effectively be performed in pediatric patients.3,4 However, patients weighing less than 15 kg have been identified as being at greater risk for complications.3,4 Consequently, there has been great reluctance to perform RFA in small children such that children weighing less than 15 kg only represent approximately 6% of the pediatric RFA experience2 despite the fact that this age group carries the highest incidence of tachycardia, particularly supraventricular tachycardia (SVT.5 Factors other than the risk of complications contribute to the lower incidence of RFA in this group, including the natural history of the most common tachycardias (SVT, technical issues with RFA in small hearts, and the potential unknown long-term effects of RF applications in the maturing myocardium. Conversely, there are several reasons why ablation may be desirable in small children, including greater difficulties with medical management,6,7,8 the higher risk for hemodynamic compromise during tachycardia in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD, and the inability of these small children to effectively communicate their symptoms thereby making it more likely that their symptoms may go unnoticed until the children become more seriously ill. Before ultimately deciding that catheter ablation is indicated in small children, one must consider which tachycardias are likely to be ablated, the clinical presentation of these tachycardias, alternatives to ablation, the relative potential for success or complications, and modifications of the procedure that might reduce the risk of ablation in this group.

  4. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip radiofrequency catheter ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with ventricular tachycardias due to structural heart disease, catheter ablation cures radiofrequency ablation. Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation using power control and high infusion rates enlarges lesion......: We conclude that temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation with irrigated tip catheters using low target temperature and low infusion rate enlarges lesion size without increasing the incidence of cratering and reduces coagulum formation of the tip....

  5. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  6. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  7. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  8. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  9. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  10. Scaling behavior of threshold epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2012-05-01

    We study the classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model for the spread of an infectious disease. In this stochastic process, there are two competing mechanism: infection and recovery. Susceptible individuals may contract the disease from infected individuals, while infected ones recover from the disease at a constant rate and are never infected again. Our focus is the behavior at the epidemic threshold where the rates of the infection and recovery processes balance. In the infinite population limit, we establish analytically scaling rules for the time-dependent distribution functions that characterize the sizes of the infected and the recovered sub-populations. Using heuristic arguments, we also obtain scaling laws for the size and duration of the epidemic outbreaks as a function of the total population. We perform numerical simulations to verify the scaling predictions and discuss the consequences of these scaling laws for near-threshold epidemic outbreaks.

  11. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  12. Realistic Realizations Of Threshold Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Hassan M.

    1987-08-01

    Threshold logic, in which each input is weighted, has many theoretical advantages over the standard gate realization, such as reducing the number of gates, interconnections, and power dissipation. However, because of the difficult synthesis procedure and complicated circuit implementation, their use in the design of digital systems is almost nonexistant. In this study, three methods of NMOS realizations are discussed, and their advantages and shortcomings are explored. Also, the possibility of using the methods to realize multi-valued logic is examined.

  13. Root finding with threshold circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 462, Nov 30 (2012), s. 59-69 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : root finding * threshold circuit * power series Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.489, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304397512008006#

  14. Stroke rehabilitation reaches a threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol E Han

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor training with the upper limb affected by stroke partially reverses the loss of cortical representation after lesion and has been proposed to increase spontaneous arm use. Moreover, repeated attempts to use the affected hand in daily activities create a form of practice that can potentially lead to further improvement in motor performance. We thus hypothesized that if motor retraining after stroke increases spontaneous arm use sufficiently, then the patient will enter a virtuous circle in which spontaneous arm use and motor performance reinforce each other. In contrast, if the dose of therapy is not sufficient to bring spontaneous use above threshold, then performance will not increase and the patient will further develop compensatory strategies with the less affected hand. To refine this hypothesis, we developed a computational model of bilateral hand use in arm reaching to study the interactions between adaptive decision making and motor relearning after motor cortex lesion. The model contains a left and a right motor cortex, each controlling the opposite arm, and a single action choice module. The action choice module learns, via reinforcement learning, the value of using each arm for reaching in specific directions. Each motor cortex uses a neural population code to specify the initial direction along which the contralateral hand moves towards a target. The motor cortex learns to minimize directional errors and to maximize neuronal activity for each movement. The derived learning rule accounts for the reversal of the loss of cortical representation after rehabilitation and the increase of this loss after stroke with insufficient rehabilitation. Further, our model exhibits nonlinear and bistable behavior: if natural recovery, motor training, or both, brings performance above a certain threshold, then training can be stopped, as the repeated spontaneous arm use provides a form of motor learning that further bootstraps performance and

  15. Color difference thresholds in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravina, Rade D; Ghinea, Razvan; Herrera, Luis J; Bona, Alvaro D; Igiel, Christopher; Linninger, Mercedes; Sakai, Maiko; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Tashkandi, Esam; Perez, Maria del Mar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to determine 50:50% perceptibility threshold (PT) and 50:50% acceptability threshold (AT) of dental ceramic under simulated clinical settings. The spectral radiance of 63 monochromatic ceramic specimens was determined using a non-contact spectroradiometer. A total of 60 specimen pairs, divided into 3 sets of 20 specimen pairs (medium to light shades, medium to dark shades, and dark shades), were selected for psychophysical experiment. The coordinating center and seven research sites obtained the Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals prior the beginning of the experiment. Each research site had 25 observers, divided into five groups of five observers: dentists-D, dental students-S, dental auxiliaries-A, dental technicians-T, and lay persons-L. There were 35 observers per group (five observers per group at each site ×7 sites), for a total of 175 observers. Visual color comparisons were performed using a viewing booth. Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy approximation was used for fitting the data points. The 50:50% PT and 50:50% AT were determined in CIELAB and CIEDE2000. The t-test was used to evaluate the statistical significance in thresholds differences. The CIELAB 50:50% PT was ΔEab  = 1.2, whereas 50:50% AT was ΔEab  = 2.7. Corresponding CIEDE2000 (ΔE00 ) values were 0.8 and 1.8, respectively. 50:50% PT by the observer group revealed differences among groups D, A, T, and L as compared with 50:50% PT for all observers. The 50:50% AT for all observers was statistically different than 50:50% AT in groups T and L. A 50:50% perceptibility and ATs were significantly different. The same is true for differences between two color difference formulas ΔE00 /ΔEab . Observer groups and sites showed high level of statistical difference in all thresholds. Visual color difference thresholds can serve as a quality control tool to guide the selection of esthetic dental materials, evaluate clinical performance, and

  16. Risk of Ionizing Radiation in Women of Childbearing Age undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Gustavo Glotz de, E-mail: gglima.pesquisa@gmail.com; Gomes, Daniel Garcia; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus N.; Pires, Leonardo Martins; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    The International Commission of Radiology recommends a pregnancy screening test to all female patients of childbearing age who will undergo a radiological study. Radiation is known to be teratogenic and its effect is cumulative. The teratogenic potential starts at doses close to those used during these procedures. The prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in patients undergoing electrophysiological studies and/or catheter ablation in our midst is unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in female patients referred for electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Cross-sectional study analyzing 2,966 patients undergoing electrophysiological study and/or catheter ablation, from June 1997 to February 2013, in the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 1490 procedures were performed in women, of whom 769 were of childbearing age. All patients were screened with a pregnancy test on the day before the procedure. Three patients tested positive, and were therefore unable to undergo the procedure. The prevalence observed was 3.9 cases per 1,000 women of childbearing age. Because of their safety and low cost, pregnancy screening tests are indicated for all women of childbearing age undergoing radiological studies, since the degree of ionizing radiation needed for these procedures is very close to the threshold for teratogenicity, especially in the first trimester, when the signs of pregnancy are not evident.

  17. A review of the safety aspects of radio frequency ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Bhaskaran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In light of recent reports showing high incidence of silent cerebral infarcts and organized atrial arrhythmias following radiofrequency (RF atrial fibrillation (AF ablation, a review of its safety aspects is timely. Serious complications do occur during supraventricular tachycardia (SVT ablations and knowledge of their incidence is important when deciding whether to proceed with ablation. Evidence is emerging for the probable role of prophylactic ischemic scar ablation to prevent VT. This might increase the number of procedures performed. Here we look at the various complications of RF ablation and also the methods to minimize them. Electronic database was searched for relevant articles from 1990 to 2015. With better awareness and technological advancements in RF ablation the incidence of complications has improved considerably. In AF ablation it has decreased from 6% to less than 4% comprising of vascular complications, cardiac tamponade, stroke, phrenic nerve injury, pulmonary vein stenosis, atrio-esophageal fistula (AEF and death. Safety of SVT ablation has also improved with less than 1% incidence of AV node injury in AVNRT ablation. In VT ablation the incidence of major complications was 5–11%, up to 3.4%, up to 1.8% and 4.1–8.8% in patients with structural heart disease, without structural heart disease, prophylactic ablations and epicardial ablations respectively. Vascular and pericardial complications dominated endocardial and epicardial VT ablations respectively. Up to 3% mortality and similar rates of tamponade were reported in endocardial VT ablation. Recent reports about the high incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism during AF ablation are concerning, warranting more research into its etiology and prevention.

  18. Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauchdobler, Julian; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Introducing a threshold in the sense of a minimal project size transforms a public goods game with an inefficient equilibrium into a coordination game with a set of Pareto-superior equilibria. Thresholds may therefore improve efficiency in the voluntary provision of public goods. In our one......-shot experiment, we find that coordination often fails and exogenously imposed thresholds are ineffective at best and often counter-productive. This holds under a range of threshold levels and refund rates. We test if thresholds perform better if they are endogenously chosen, i.e. if a threshold is approved...

  19. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D. E-mail: lumd@21cn.com; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D.; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up

  1. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forleo, Giovanni B; Casella, Michela; Russo, Antonio Dello; Moltrasio, Massimo; Fassini, Gaetano; Tesauro, Manfredi; Tondo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Although catheter ablation is an effective treatment for recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF), there is no consensus on the definition of success or follow-up strategies. Symptoms are the major motivation for undergoing catheter ablation in patients with AF, however it is well known that reliance on perception of AF by patients after AF ablation results in an underestimation of recurrence of the arrhythmia. Because symptoms of AF occurrence may be misleading, a reliable assessment of rhythm outcome is essential for the definition of success in both clinical care and research trials. Continuous rhythm monitoring over long periods of time is superior to intermittent recording using external monitors to detect the presence of AF episodes and to quantify the AF burden. Today, new devices implanted subcutaneously using a minimally invasive technique have been developed for continuous AF monitoring. Implantable devices keep detailed information about arrhythmia recurrences and might allow identification of very brief episodes of AF, the significance of which is still uncertain. In particular, it is not known whether there is any critical value of daily AF burden that has a prognostic significance. This issue remains an area of active discussion, debate and investigation. Further investigation is required to determine if continuous AF monitoring with implantable devices is effective in reducing stroke risk and facilitating maintenance of sinus rhythm after AF ablation.

  3. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  4. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  5. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    emission spectroscopy. Second, deposition rate and fast ion probe measurements have been used to study the plume propagation dynamics during laser ablation of a silver target, over a large range of Ar background gas pressures (from high vacuum to approximate to 100 Pa). A comparative analysis...

  6. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Kline

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. These measurements show that the mass-ablation rate of Al is higher than plastic (CH, comparable to high density carbon (HDC, and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. The results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators and further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  7. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  8. Residual heat deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, D; Ragadio, J; Champion, A

    2001-01-01

    The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth. Excessive heat deposition or accumulation may result in unacceptable damage to the pulp. The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during the laser ablation of dental enamel at those IR laser wavelengths well suited for the removal of dental caries. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual heat deposition in the tooth by efficiently transferring the deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in dental enamel was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm and pulse widths of 150 nsec -150 microsec using bovine block "calorimeters." Water droplets were applied to the surface before ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses to determine the influence of an optically thick water layer on reducing heat deposition. The residual heat was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where measured values ranged from 25-70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual heat were measured for short (Droplets of water applied to the surface before ablation significantly reduced the residual heat deposition during ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses. Residual heat deposition can be markedly reduced by using CO(2) laser pulses of less than 20 microsec duration and shorter Q-switched Er:YAG and Er:YSGG laser pulses for enamel ablation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Novel Mapping Strategies for Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Zaid; Tung, Roderick

    2018-03-23

    Despite advances in antiarrhythmic and device therapy, ventricular tachycardia (VT) continues to be a major cause of increased morbidity and mortality. During scar-mediated monomorphic ventricular tachycardia ablation, the search for critical isthmus sites continues to be the primary goal during successful ablative procedures. However, given the overwhelming hemodynamic instability of most ventricular arrhythmias (> 70%), VT ablation is increasingly performed during sinus rhythm. This technique requires either a greater reliance on isthmus surrogates, or more extensive ablation techniques and is a more probabilistic approach to substrate modification. We believe that a better understanding of scar physiology and activation during sinus rhythm has important implications for clinical workflow and mechanistic improvements with current ablation strategies. With advancements in high-density mapping and multi-electrode catheter technology, mapping of VT substrates is performed with higher resolution, with improved visualization of local abnormal ventricular activities (LAVA), and with a more nuanced functional understanding of late potentials. As a prerequisite, our practice for VT ablation starts with a high-density structural map to identify voltage abnormalities as well as an isochronal functional map of sinus rhythm activation to identify region of discontinuous wavefront propagation. As the era of increased automation has emerged, there continues to be vast array of customizable features, and we have adopted the use of multiple wavefront mapping to further elucidate possible arrhythmogenic substrate. Our emerging understanding of how scar propagation patterns relate to areas of abnormal signals and critical isthmuses may greatly improve the ability to identify surrogates during sinus rhythm and help localize the most arrhythmogenic regions within a given scar. In the hemodynamically unstable patients, we routinely integrate isochronal late activation mapping (ILAM

  10. Headache during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pison, Laurent; Peeters, Pim; Blaauw, Yuri; Vernooy, Kevin; Kumar, Narendra; Philippens, Suzanne; Crijns, Harry J; Vlaeyen, Johan; Schoenen, Jean; Timmermans, Carl

    2015-06-01

    Headache has been reported to occur during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). No study has systematically analysed this phenomenon. Twenty consecutive patients with symptomatic AF underwent cryoballoon ablation without sedation. Headache was evaluated before, during, and after the first cryoapplication in every pulmonary vein (PV) using a visual representation of a head for location of the headache, a numerical rating scale (NRS) for measuring pain intensity and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ) for qualitative analysis of pain. The order in which the PVs were ablated was randomized. Sixteen (80%) patients perceived mainly frontal headache during cryoablation. The overall NRS scores were significantly higher during (5.1 ± 1.7), compared with before (2.7 ± 1.4), and after (3.5 ± 2.2) a cryoapplication (P < 0.05). The NRS score was significantly higher during ablation of the first PV. The intensity of the perceived headache was not related to the temperature reached 150 s after initiation of a cryoapplication (P = 0.81). Of the MPQ, three sensory adjectives and one affective adjective averaged between scores 1 and 2, representing mild-to-moderate severity of pain. The majority of patients treated by balloon cryoablation experienced headache during a cryoapplication. There was no correlation between the temperature reached during a cryoballoon freeze and the intensity of the headache. Cryoballoon ablation of the first PV was significantly more painful than the remaining PVs. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  12. Tissue temperatures and lesion size during irrigated tip catheter radiofrequency ablation: an in vitro comparison of temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation, power-controlled irrigated tip ablation, and standard temperature-controlled ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    2000-01-01

    The limited success rate of radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with ventricular tachycardias related to structural heart disease may be increased by enlarging the lesion size. Irrigated tip catheter ablation is a new method for enlarging the size of the lesion. It was introduced...... in the power-controlled mode with high power and high infusion rate, and is associated with an increased risk of crater formation, which is related to high tissue temperatures. The present study explored the tissue temperatures during temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation, comparing it with standard...... temperature-controlled ablation and power-controlled irrigated tip ablation. In vitro strips of porcine left ventricular myocardium were ablated. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation at target temperatures 60 degrees C, 70 degrees C, and 80 degrees C with infusion of 1 mL saline/min were compared...

  13. Microwave ablation technology: What every use should know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a relatively new technology under development and testing to treat the same types of cancer that can be treated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Microwave energy has several possible benefits over RF energy for tumor ablation but, because clinical microwave ablation systems are not widespread, the underlying principles and technologies may not be as familiar. The basic microwave ablation system contains many of the same components as an RF ablation system: a generator, a power distribution system, and an interstitial applicator. This manuscript will attempt to provide an overview of each of these components, outline their functions and roles, and provide some insight into what every potential microwave ablation user should know about systems in development. PMID:19179193

  14. Optimizing Systems of Threshold Detection Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banschbach, David C

    2008-01-01

    .... Below the threshold all signals are ignored. We develop a mathematical model for setting individual sensor thresholds to obtain optimal probability of detecting a significant event, given a limit on the total number of false positives allowed...

  15. Nuclear thermodynamics below particle threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Algin, E.; Bagheri, A.; Chankova, R.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Voinov, A.

    2005-01-01

    From a starting point of experimentally measured nuclear level densities, we discuss thermodynamical properties of nuclei below the particle emission threshold. Since nuclei are essentially mesoscopic systems, a straightforward generalization of macroscopic ensemble theory often yields unphysical results. A careful critique of traditional thermodynamical concepts reveals problems commonly encountered in mesoscopic systems. One of which is the fact that microcanonical and canonical ensemble theory yield different results, another concerns the introduction of temperature for small, closed systems. Finally, the concept of phase transitions is investigated for mesoscopic systems

  16. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  17. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  18. Modelling of Indirect Laser-induced Thin-film Ablation of Epoxy for Local Exposing of Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, Michael; Fischer, Kai; Schmitt, Stefan; Schares, Richard Ludwig

    Laser radiation is used as enabling technology for intrinsic joining of high-strength CFRP laminates and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic injection moulding compounds by exposure of surface-near carbon fibers. Short-pulsed NIR laser sources represent an acceptable compromise with respect to ablation performance, remote process capability by use of compact 3D scanner and the capability for closed-loop process control. However, using such a laser source means also minimizing heat-affected zones (HAZ). Based on literature research about laser ablation of thin metal films, heat flow at CFRP and thermo-mechanical behavior in FRP by pyrolysis, an analytical model was generated for thin-film ablation of cured epoxy resins at the surface of CFRP laminates by lift-off of resin chips. A comparison between simulation and experimental results confirms the capability of the model to predict the exposure area and the HAZ with deviations below 15%. Threshold fluences for the HAZ (>1 J/cm2) and the resin ablation (>3 J/cm2) have been confirmed.

  19. Long-term evolution of brainstem electrical evoked responses to sound after restricted ablation of the auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Lamas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess the top-down control of sound processing in the auditory brainstem of rats. Short latency evoked responses were analyzed after unilateral or bilateral ablation of auditory cortex. This experimental paradigm was also used towards analyzing the long-term evolution of post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system and its ability to self-repair. METHOD: Auditory cortex lesions were performed in rats by stereotactically guided fine-needle aspiration of the cerebrocortical surface. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR were recorded at post-surgery day (PSD 1, 7, 15 and 30. Recordings were performed under closed-field conditions, using click trains at different sound intensity levels, followed by statistical analysis of threshold values and ABR amplitude and latency variables. Subsequently, brains were sectioned and immunostained for GAD and parvalbumin to assess the location and extent of lesions accurately. RESULTS: Alterations in ABR variables depended on the type of lesion and post-surgery time of ABR recordings. Accordingly, bilateral ablations caused a statistically significant increase in thresholds at PSD1 and 7 and a decrease in waves amplitudes at PSD1 that recover at PSD7. No effects on latency were noted at PSD1 and 7, whilst recordings at PSD15 and 30 showed statistically significant decreases in latency. Conversely, unilateral ablations had no effect on auditory thresholds or latencies, while wave amplitudes only decreased at PSD1 strictly in the ipsilateral ear. CONCLUSION: Post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system acts in two time periods: short-term period of decreased sound sensitivity (until PSD7, most likely resulting from axonal degeneration; and a long-term period (up to PSD7, with changes in latency responses and recovery of thresholds and amplitudes values. The cerebral cortex may have a net positive gain on the auditory pathway response to sound.

  20. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bharucha, Aoife; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-10

    The data collected by the LHC collaborations at an energy of 13 TeV indicates the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum that would correspond to a resonance of a 750 GeV mass. The apparently large production cross section is nevertheless very difficult to explain in minimal models. We consider the possibility that the resonance is a pseudoscalar boson $A$ with a two--photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the $\\frac12 M_A$ threshold and a very small decay width, $\\ll 1$ MeV; one can then generate a large enhancement of the $A\\gamma\\gamma$ amplitude which explains the excess without invoking a large multiplicity of particles propagating in the loop, large electric charges and/or very strong Yukawa couplings. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the $A$ state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through...

  1. In vivo percutaneous microwave ablation in kidneys: Correlation with ex vivo data and ablation work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, C; Leiner, J; Nasri, S; Petitpierre, F; Le Bras, Y; Yacoub, M; Grenier, N; Bernhard, J C; Cornelis, F

    2018-01-01

    To compare diameters of in vivo microwave ablation (MWA) performed in swine kidneys with ex vivo diameters, and to correlate with ablation work (AW), a new metric reflecting total energy delivered. Eighteen in vivo MWA were performed in 6 swine kidneys successively using one or two antennas (MicroThermX ® ). Ablation consisted in delivering power (45-120W) for 5-15minutes. Ex vivo diameters were provided by the vendors and obtained on bovine liver tissue. AW was defined as the sum of (power)*(time)*(number of antennas) for all phases of an ablation (in kJoules). Kidneys were removed laparoscopically immediately after ablation. After sacrifice, ablations zones were evaluated macroscopically, and maximum diameters of the zones were recorded. Wilcoxon sum rank test and Pearson's correlation were used for comparisons. For a single antenna (n=12), the in vivo diameters ranged from 12 to 35mm, and 15-49mm for 2 antennas (n=6). The in vivo diameters remained shorter than ex vivo diameters by 8.6%±30.1 on 1 antenna and 11.7%±26.5 on 2 antennas (P=0.31 and 0.44, respectively). AW ranged from 13.5 to 108kJ. Diameters increased linearly with AW both with 1 and 2 antennas, but only moderate correlations were observed (r=0.43 [95% confidence interval: -0.19; 0.81], P=0.16; and 0.57 [-0.44; 0.95], P=0.24, respectively). Although diameters after in vivo renal MWA increased linearly with AW, the moderate correlation and wide standard deviations observed may justify a careful imaging monitoring during treatment delivery and settings adaptation, if needed, for optimal ablation. Copyright © 2017 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of ethanol infusion on the size of the ablated lesion in radiofrequency thermal ablation: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Joo, Kyoung Bin

    2001-01-01

    To assess the effect of ethanol infusion on the size of ablated lesion during radiofrequency (RF) thermal ablation. We performed an ex vivo experimental study using a total of 15 pig livers. Three groups were designed: 1)normal control (n=10), 2) saline infusion (n=10) 3) ethanol infusion (n=10). Two radiofrequency ablations were done using a 50 watt RF generator and a 15 guage expandable elections with four prongs in each liver. During ablation for 8 minutes, continuous infusion of fluid at a rate of 0.5 ml/min through the side arm of electrode was performed. We checked the frequency of the 'impeded-out' phenomenon due to abrupt increase of impedance during ablation. Size of ablated lesion was measured according to length, width, height, and subsequently volume after the ablations. The sizes of the ablated lesions were compared between the three groups. 'Impeded-out' phenomenon during ablation was noted 4 times in control group, although that never happened in saline or ethanol infusion groups. There were significant differences in the volumes of ablated lesions between control group (10.62 ± 1.45 cm 3 ) and saline infusion group (15.33 ± 2.47 cm 3 ), and saline infusion group and ethanol infusion group (18.78 ± 3.58 cm 3 ) (p<0.05). Fluid infusion during radiofrequency thermal ablation decrease a chance of charming and increase the volume of the ablated lesion. Ethanol infusion during ablation may induce larger volume of ablated lesion than saline infusion.

  3. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  4. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  5. An integrative perspective of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Sousa, Caio Victor; da Silva Aguiar, Samuel; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Alves, Polissandro Mortoza; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2017-12-14

    The concept of anaerobic threshold (AT) was introduced during the nineteen sixties. Since then, several methods to identify the anaerobic threshold (AT) have been studied and suggested as novel 'thresholds' based upon the variable used for its detection (i.e. lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, glucose threshold). These different techniques have brought some confusion about how we should name this parameter, for instance, anaerobic threshold or the physiological measure used (i.e. lactate, ventilation). On the other hand, the modernization of scientific methods and apparatus to detect AT, as well as the body of literature formed in the past decades, could provide a more cohesive understanding over the AT and the multiple physiological systems involved. Thus, the purpose of this review was to provide an integrative perspective of the methods to determine AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimal approach for complete liver tumor ablation using radiofrequency ablation: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givehchi, Sogol; Wong, Yin How; Yeong, Chai Hong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode trajectory on complete tumor ablation using computational simulation. The RFA of a spherical tumor of 2.0 cm diameter along with 0.5 cm clinical safety margin was simulated using Finite Element Analysis software. A total of 86 points inside one-eighth of the tumor volume along the axial, sagittal and coronal planes were selected as the target sites for electrode-tip placement. The angle of the electrode insertion in both craniocaudal and orbital planes ranged from -90° to +90° with 30° increment. The RFA electrode was simulated to pass through the target site at different angles in combination of both craniocaudal and orbital planes before being advanced to the edge of the tumor. Complete tumor ablation was observed whenever the electrode-tip penetrated through the epicenter of the tumor regardless of the angles of electrode insertion in both craniocaudal and orbital planes. Complete tumor ablation can also be achieved by placing the electrode-tip at several optimal sites and angles. Identification of the tumor epicenter on the central slice of the axial images is essential to enhance the success rate of complete tumor ablation during RFA procedures.

  7. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  8. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia; Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods

  9. Sepsis-Induced Osteoblast Ablation Causes Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Asuka; Okamoto, Kazuo; Nakashima, Tomoki; Akira, Shizuo; Ikuta, Koichi; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Sepsis is a host inflammatory response to severe infection associated with high mortality that is caused by lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency. However, it is unknown how lymphopenia persists after the accelerated lymphocyte apoptosis subsides. Here we show that sepsis rapidly ablated osteoblasts, which reduced the number of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Osteoblast ablation or inducible deletion of interleukin-7 (IL-7) in osteoblasts recapitulated the lymphopenic phenotype together with a lower CLP number without affecting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pharmacological activation of osteoblasts improved sepsis-induced lymphopenia. This study demonstrates a reciprocal interaction between the immune and bone systems, in which acute inflammation induces a defect in bone cells resulting in lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency, indicating that bone cells comprise a therapeutic target in certain life-threatening immune reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation of two femoral head chondroblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petsas, Theodore [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece); Megas, Panagiotis [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Patras (Greece)]. E-mail: panmegas@med.upatras.gr; Papathanassiou, Zafiria [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous bone tumor. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for pain relief and prevention of further growth. Open surgical techniques are associated with complications, particularly when the tumors are located in deep anatomical sites. The authors performed RF ablation in two cases of subarticular femoral head chondroblastomas and emphasize its positive impact. The clinical course, the radiological findings and the post treatment results are discussed.

  12. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... with AFR incorporating our personal experience. AFR is still in the exploratory era, and systematic investigations of clinical outcomes related to various system settings are needed....

  13. Thermometry and ablation monitoring with ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew A; Staruch, Robert M; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    In this review we present the current status of ultrasound thermometry and ablation monitoring, with emphasis on the diverse approaches published in the literature and with an eye on which methods are closest to clinical reality. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the expansion of sonographic methods for treatment monitoring and thermometry since the last brief review in 2007.

  14. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-01-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  15. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson R.E.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash ρr, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  16. Morphology of ablation craters generated by ultra-short laser pulses in dentin surfaces: AFM and ESEM evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalova, A., E-mail: a_daskalova@code.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bashir, S.; Husinsky, W. [IAP, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the surface morphology and structure of dentin after ablation by ultra-short pulses were evaluated using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The dentin specimens examined were irradiated by a chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm) and the optimal conditions for producing various nanostructures were determined. Based on the ESEM results, it was possible to identify an energy density range as the ablation threshold for dentin. The laser-induced damage was characterized over the fluence range 1.3-2.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrate that by selecting suitable parameters one can obtain efficient dentin surface preparation without evidence of thermal damage, i.e., with minimized heat affected zones and reduced collateral damage, the latter being normally characterized by formation of microcracks, grain growth and recrystallization in the heat affected zones.

  17. A tubular electrode for radiofrequency ablation therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Carlos Lemos Lemos Lemos

    2012-07-06

    Purpose – Due to its good mechanical and biocompatibility characteristics, nitinol SEMS is a popular endoprothesis used for relieving stricture problems in hollow organs due to carcinomas. Besides its mechanical application, SEMS can be regarded as well as potential electrode for performing RF ablation therapy on the tumor. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical and experimental analyses in order to characterize the lesion volume induced in biological tissue using this kind of tubular electrode. Design/methodology/approach – Data concerning electrical conductivity and dimension of the damaged tissue after RF ablation procedure were obtained from ex vivo samples. Next, numerical models using 3D finite element method were obtained reassembling the conditions considered at experimentation setup and results were compared. Findings – Numerical and experimental results show that a regular volume of damaged tissue can be obtained considering this type of electrode. Also, results obtained from numerical simulation are close to those obtained by experimentation. Originality/value – SEMSs, commonly used as devices to minimize obstruction problems due to the growth of tumors, may still be considered as an active electrode for RF ablation procedures. A method considering this observation is presented in this paper. Also, numerical simulation can be regarded in this case as a tool for determining the lesion volume.

  18. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  19. Modeling CO2 Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO 2 laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO 2 laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  20. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  1. Innovative techniques for image-guided ablation of benign thyroid nodules: Combined ethanol and radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Sun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In the treatment of benign thyroid nodules, ethanol ablation (EA), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been suggested for cystic and solid thyroid nodules, respectively. Although combining these ablation techniques may be effective, no guidelines for or reviews of the combination have been published. Currently, there are three ways of combining EA and RFA: additional RFA is effective for treatment of incompletely resolved symptoms and solid residual portions of a thyroid nodule after EA. Additional EA can be performed for the residual unablated solid portion of a nodule after RFA if it is adjacent to critical structures (e.g., trachea, esophagus, and recurrent laryngeal nerve). In the concomitant procedure, ethanol is injected to control venous oozing after aspiration of cystic fluid prior to RFA of the remaining solid nodule.

  2. Design of Ablation Test Device for Brick Coating of Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    shirui, YAO; yongcai, CHEN; fei, WANG; jianxin, ZHAO

    2018-03-01

    As a result of the live ammunition test conditions, the barrel resistance of the barrel coating has high cost, time consuming, low efficiency and high test site requirements. This article designed a simple, convenient and efficient test device. Through the internal trajectory calculation by Matlab, the ablation environment produced by the ablation test device has achieved the expected effect, which is consistent with the working condition of the tube in the launching state, which can better reflect the ablation of the coating.

  3. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  4. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsa, Evanthia; Poulou, Loukia S; Koutsogiannis, Ioannis; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Koundouraki, Antonia; Alexopoulou, Efthimia; Thanos, Loukas

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation is a well-accepted technique of interventional oncology in adults. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for metastatic neoplasms in children. A total of 15 radiofrequency ablation sessions were performed in 12 children and young adults (median age 9.5; range 5-18 years) with metastatic malignancies. Seven children and young adults had secondary hepatic lesions, three had pulmonary and two had bone lesions. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation. The median lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 1.3-2.8 cm). The median time for ablation was 8 min (range 7-10 min). Radiofrequency procedures were technically successful in all tumors. Postablation imaging immediately after, and 1 month and 3 months after radiofrequency ablation showed total necrosis in all patients. At 6-month follow-up, three patients (all with lesion size >2 cm) had local recurrence and underwent a second radiofrequency ablation session. At 2-year follow-up no patient had recurrence of the treated tumor. Post-ablation syndrome occurred in four children. No major complication occurred. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation was safe and efficient for palliative treatment in our cohort of patients.

  5. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  6. Aromatic Thermosetting Copolyesters for Ablative TPS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Better performing ablative thermal protection systems than currently available are needed to satisfy requirements of the most severe crew exploration vehicles, such...

  7. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botsa, Evanthia [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, First Pediatric Clinic, Agia Sofia Children' s Hospital, Athens (Greece); Poulou, Loukia S.; Koundouraki, Antonia; Thanos, Loukas [Sotiria General Hospital for Chest Diseases, Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Athens (Greece); Koutsogiannis, Ioannis [General Military Hospital NIMTS, Department of Medical Imaging, Athens (Greece); Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Rhode Island Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Providence, RI (United States); Alexopoulou, Efthimia [Attikon University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens (Greece)

    2014-11-15

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation is a well-accepted technique of interventional oncology in adults. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for metastatic neoplasms in children. A total of 15 radiofrequency ablation sessions were performed in 12 children and young adults (median age 9.5; range 5-18 years) with metastatic malignancies. Seven children and young adults had secondary hepatic lesions, three had pulmonary and two had bone lesions. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation. The median lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 1.3-2.8 cm). The median time for ablation was 8 min (range 7-10 min). Radiofrequency procedures were technically successful in all tumors. Postablation imaging immediately after, and 1 month and 3 months after radiofrequency ablation showed total necrosis in all patients. At 6-month follow-up, three patients (all with lesion size >2 cm) had local recurrence and underwent a second radiofrequency ablation session. At 2-year follow-up no patient had recurrence of the treated tumor. Post-ablation syndrome occurred in four children. No major complication occurred. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation was safe and efficient for palliative treatment in our cohort of patients. (orig.)

  8. Threshold behavior in electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghpour, H.R.; Greene, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Ever since the classic work of Wannier in 1953, the process of treating two threshold electrons in the continuum of a positively charged ion has been an active field of study. The authors have developed a treatment motivated by the physics below the double ionization threshold. By modeling the double ionization as a series of Landau-Zener transitions, they obtain an analytical formulation of the absolute threshold probability which has a leading power law behavior, akin to Wannier's law. Some of the noteworthy aspects of this derivation are that the derivation can be conveniently continued below threshold giving rise to a open-quotes cuspclose quotes at threshold, and that on both sides of the threshold, absolute values of the cross sections are obtained

  9. Iran: the next nuclear threshold state?

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A nuclear threshold state is one that could quickly operationalize its peaceful nuclear program into one capable of producing a nuclear weapon. This thesis compares two known threshold states, Japan and Brazil, with Iran to determine if the Islamic Republic could also be labeled a threshold state. Furthermore, it highlights the implications such a status could have on U.S. nonproliferation policy. Although Iran's nuclear program is mir...

  10. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  11. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  12. Dynamical thresholds for complete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.T.R.; Sierk, A.J.; Nix, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    It is our purpose here to study the effect of nuclear dissipation and shape parametrization on dynamical thresholds for compound-nucleus formation in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. This is done by solving numerically classical equations of motion for head-on collisions to determine whether the dynamical trajectory in a multidimensional deformation space passes inside the fission saddle point and forms a compound nucleus, or whether it passes outside the fission saddle point and reseparates in a fast-fission or deep-inelastic reaction. Specifying the nuclear shape in terms of smoothly joined portions of three quadratic surfaces of revolution, we take into account three symmetric deformation coordinates. However, in some cases we reduce the number of coordinates to two by requiring the ends of the fusing system to be spherical in shape. The nuclear potential energy of deformation is determined in terms of a Coulomb energy and a double volume energy of a Yukawa-plus-exponential folding function. The collective kinetic energy is calculated for incompressible, nearly irrotational flow by means of the Werner-Wheeler approximation. Four possibilities are studied for the transfer of collective kinetic energy into internal single-particle excitation energy: zero dissipation, ordinary two body viscosity, one-body wall-formula dissipation, and one-body wall-and-window dissipation

  13. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  14. Junctional rhythm occurring during AV nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation, is it different among Egyptians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Abdel Moteleb

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Junctional rhythm is a sensitive predictor of successful ablation. The pattern of JR is a useful predictor of successful ablation. Egyptian population has distinctive patterns of JR during AVNRT ablation.

  15. Error Thresholds on Dynamic Fittness-Landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin; Snoad, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we investigate error-thresholds on dynamics fitness-landscapes. We show that there exists both lower and an upper threshold, representing limits to the copying fidelity of simple replicators. The lower bound can be expressed as a correction term to the error-threshold present on a static landscape. The upper error-threshold is a new limit that only exists on dynamic fitness-landscapes. We also show that for long genomes on highly dynamic fitness-landscapes there exists a lower b...

  16. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  17. Is Cryoballoon Ablation Preferable to Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation by Pulmonary Vein Isolation? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junxia; Huang, Yingqun; Cai, Hongbin; Qi, Yue; Jia, Nan; Shen, Weifeng; Lin, Jinxiu; Peng, Feng; Niu, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently radiofrequency and cryoballoon ablations are the two standard ablation systems used for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation; however, there is no universal consensus on which ablation is the optimal choice. We therefore sought to undertake a meta-analysis with special emphases on comparing the efficacy and safety between cryoballoon and radiofrequency ablations by synthesizing published clinical trials. Methods and Results Articles were identified by searching the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases before September 2013, by reviewing the bibliographies of eligible reports, and by consulting with experts in this field. Data were extracted independently and in duplicate. There were respectively 469 and 635 patients referred for cryoballoon and radiofrequency ablations from 14 qualified clinical trials. Overall analyses indicated that cryoballoon ablation significantly reduced fluoroscopic time and total procedure time by a weighted mean of 14.13 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 2.82 to 25.45; P = 0.014) minutes and 29.65 (95% CI: 8.54 to 50.77; P = 0.006) minutes compared with radiofrequency ablation, respectively, whereas ablation time in cryoballoon ablation was nonsignificantly elongated by a weighted mean of 11.66 (95% CI: −10.71 to 34.04; P = 0.307) minutes. Patients referred for cryoballoon ablation had a high yet nonsignificant success rate of catheter ablation compared with cryoballoon ablation (odds ratio; 95% CI; P: 1.34; 0.53 to 3.36; 0.538), and cryoballoon ablation was also found to be associated with the relatively low risk of having recurrent atrial fibrillation (0.75; 0.3 to 1.88; 0.538) and major complications (0.46; 0.11 to 1.83; 0.269). There was strong evidence of heterogeneity and low probability of publication bias. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate greater improvement in fluoroscopic time and total procedure duration for atrial fibrillation patients referred for cryoballoon ablation than those for

  18. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines).

  19. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  20. Sensitivity of microwave ablation models to tissue biophysical properties: A first step toward probabilistic modeling and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebek, Jan; Albin, Nathan; Bortel, Radoslav; Natarajan, Bala; Prakash, Punit

    2016-05-01

    Computational models of microwave ablation (MWA) are widely used during the design optimization of novel devices and are under consideration for patient-specific treatment planning. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of computational models of MWA to tissue biophysical properties. The Morris method was employed to assess the global sensitivity of the coupled electromagnetic-thermal model, which was implemented with the finite element method (FEM). The FEM model incorporated temperature dependencies of tissue physical properties. The variability of the model was studied using six different outputs to characterize the size and shape of the ablation zone, as well as impedance matching of the ablation antenna. Furthermore, the sensitivity results were statistically analyzed and absolute influence of each input parameter was quantified. A framework for systematically incorporating model uncertainties for treatment planning was suggested. A total of 1221 simulations, incorporating 111 randomly sampled starting points, were performed. Tissue dielectric parameters, specifically relative permittivity, effective conductivity, and the threshold temperature at which they transitioned to lower values (i.e., signifying desiccation), were identified as the most influential parameters for the shape of the ablation zone and antenna impedance matching. Of the thermal parameters considered in this study, the nominal blood perfusion rate and the temperature interval across which the tissue changes phase were identified as the most influential. The latent heat of tissue water vaporization and the volumetric heat capacity of the vaporized tissue were recognized as the least influential parameters. Based on the evaluation of absolute changes, the most important parameter (perfusion) had approximately 40.23 times greater influence on ablation area than the least important parameter (volumetric heat capacity of vaporized tissue). Another significant input parameter

  1. An experimental model to investigate the targeting accuracy of MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrusca, Lorena; Viallon, Magalie; Breguet, Romain; Terraz, Sylvain; Manasseh, Gibran; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Gross, Patrick; Sekins, K Michael; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2014-01-16

    liver MRgHIFU ablation, free of any side effects (e.g. no edema around the marker, no infection, no bleeding). The study suggests that the absolute reference marker had ultrasound conspicuity below the detection threshold, was irreversible, MR-compatible and MR-detectable, while also being a well-established histology staining technique.

  2. Thermal Performance of Ablative/ Ceramic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana STEFAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry based on ablative materials on top of ceramic matrix composites is investigated for the protection of the metallic structure in oxidative and high temperature environment of the space vehicles. The paper focuses on the joints of ablative material (carbon fiber based CALCARB® or cork based NORCOAT TM and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC material (carbon fibers embedded in silicon carbide matrix, Cf/SiC, SICARBON TM or C/C-SiC using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. To study the thermal performance of the bonded materials the joints were tested under thermal shock at the QTS facility. For carrying out the test, the sample is mounted into a holder and transferred from outside the oven at room temperature, inside the oven at the set testing temperature (1100°C, at a heating rate that was determined during the calibration stage. The dwell time at the test temperature is up to 2 min at 1100ºC at an increasing rate of temperature up to ~ 9,5°C/s. Evaluating the atmospheric re-entry real conditions we found that the most suited cooling method is the natural cooling in air environment as the materials re-entering the Earth atmosphere are subjected to similar conditions. The average weigh loss was calculated for all the samples from one set, without differentiating the adhesive used as the weight loss is due to the ablative material consumption that is the same in all the samples and is up to 2%. The thermal shock test proves that, thermally, all joints behaved similarly, the two parts withstanding the test successfully and the assembly maintaining its integrity.

  3. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J.

    2002-01-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  4. Ablative Material Testing at Lewis Rocket Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing demand for a low-cost, reliable way to launch commercial payloads to low- Earth orbit has led to the need for inexpensive, expendable propulsion systems for new launch vehicles. This, in turn, has renewed interest in less complex, uncooled rocket engines that have combustion chambers and exhaust nozzles fabricated from ablative materials. A number of aerospace propulsion system manufacturers have utilized NASA Lewis Research Center's test facilities with a high degree of success to evaluate candidate materials for application to new propulsion devices.

  5. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  6. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  7. Time-efficient multidimensional threshold tracking method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Kowalewski, Borys; Dau, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, adaptive methods have been used to reduce the time it takes to estimate psychoacoustic thresholds. However, even with adaptive methods, there are many cases where the testing time is too long to be clinically feasible, particularly when estimating thresholds as a function of anothe...

  8. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  9. Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauchdobler, Julian; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2010-01-01

    Introducing a threshold in the sense of a minimal project size transforms a public-good game with an inefficient equilibrium into a coordination game with a set of Pareto-superior equilibria. Thresholds may therefore improve efficiency in the voluntary provision of public goods. In our one-shot e...

  10. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  11. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  12. Evaluation of the Detection Threshold of Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mean count of 39 pigments per microlitre was obtained for these five patients. Both HEXAGON MALARIA and SD-BIOLINE had a detection threshold of 4 pigments per microlitre, while ACCU-STAT MALARIA had 20 pigments per microlitre. This suggests that these three kits have good detection thresholds and could ...

  13. Log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheltsov, Ivan A; Shramov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01

    The complex singularity exponent is a local invariant of a holomorphic function determined by the integrability of fractional powers of the function. The log canonical thresholds of effective Q-divisors on normal algebraic varieties are algebraic counterparts of complex singularity exponents. For a Fano variety, these invariants have global analogues. In the former case, it is the so-called α-invariant of Tian; in the latter case, it is the global log canonical threshold of the Fano variety, which is the infimum of log canonical thresholds of all effective Q-divisors numerically equivalent to the anticanonical divisor. An appendix to this paper contains a proof that the global log canonical threshold of a smooth Fano variety coincides with its α-invariant of Tian. The purpose of the paper is to compute the global log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds (altogether, there are 105 deformation families of such threefolds). The global log canonical thresholds are computed for every smooth threefold in 64 deformation families, and the global log canonical thresholds are computed for a general threefold in 20 deformation families. Some bounds for the global log canonical thresholds are computed for 14 deformation families. Appendix A is due to J.-P. Demailly.

  14. Ganglion Plexus Ablation in Advanced Atrial Fibrillation: The AFACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Antoine H. G.; Berger, Wouter R.; Krul, Sébastien P. J.; van den Berg, Nicoline W. E.; Neefs, Jolien; Piersma, Femke R.; Chan Pin Yin, Dean R. P. P.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; van Boven, WimJan P.; de Groot, Joris R.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long duration of atrial fibrillation (AF), enlarged atria, or failed catheter ablation have advanced AF and may require more extensive treatment than pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of additional ganglion plexus (GP) ablation

  15. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silviu, Ungureanu Bogdan; Daniel, Pirici; Claudiu, Mărgăritescu

    2015-01-01

    ultrasound (EUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) probe through a 19G needle in order to achieve a desirable necrosis area in the pancreas. Radiofrequency ablation of the head of the pancreas was performed on 10 Yorkshire pigs with a weight between 25 kg and 35 kg and a length of 40-70 cm. Using an EUS...

  17. Mechanisms for enlarging lesion size during irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Roman-Gonzalez, Javier; Johnson, Susan B

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation of cardiac arrhythmias was developed to increase the size of the radiofrequency-induced lesion, since cooling of the electrode tip allows use of higher power settings. The purpose of this study was to determine if the increased lesion size during......(3) (P radiofrequency irrigated-tip ablation is that higher power levels can be used...

  18. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of radiofrequency ablation in the left atrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Iskander-Rizk (Sophinese); P. Kruizinga (Pieter); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); G. van Soest (Gijs)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractCatheter-based radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has long-term success in 60-70% of cases. A better assessment of lesion quality, depth, and continuity could improve the procedure’s outcome. We investigate here photoacoustic contrast between ablated and healthy atrial-wall

  19. Catheter Ablation of Focal Atrial Tachycardia Using Remote Magnetic Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen

    2018-01-01

    , a total of 56 atrial foci were found. Acute success of the primary ablation was obtained in 52 patients (98%). Mean procedure duration was 109 ± 35 min, ablation duration was 401 sec (interquartile range [IQR], 332 sec), and fluoroscopy time was 5.0 min (IQR, 3.0 min). After a mean follow-up of 31 ± 18...

  20. Subtotal ablation of parietal epithelial cells induces crescent formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, E.M.; Fuss, A.; Uhlig, S.; Jirak, P.; Dijkman, H.; Wetzels, J.; Engel, D.R.; Urzynicok, T.; Heidenreich, S.; Kriz, W.; Kurts, C.; Ostendorf, T.; Floege, J.; Smeets, B.; Moeller, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Parietal epithelial cells (PECs) of the renal glomerulus contribute to the formation of both cellular crescents in rapidly progressive GN and sclerotic lesions in FSGS. Subtotal transgenic ablation of podocytes induces FSGS but the effect of specific ablation of PECs is unknown. Here, we established

  1. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasen, Stephan; Kettenbach, Joachim; Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kroeber, Stefan-Martin; Boemches, Andrea; Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  2. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  3. Underestimation of pacing threshold as determined by an automatic ventricular threshold testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, William H; Cooper, Joshua M; Lai, Rebecca W; Verdino, Ralph J

    2006-09-01

    In this case report, we describe markedly different pacing thresholds determined by a manual threshold test and the automatic Ventricular Capture Management algorithm. The discrepancy in pacing threshold values reported was due to the difference in the AV intervals used with the different testing methods. We propose that the differences in right ventricular dimensions with altered diastolic filling periods affected the threshold in this patient with a new passive fixation lead in the right ventricular apex.

  4. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  5. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  6. Current Situation Development of Lightweight Ablation Materials for Thermal Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XUE Hua- fei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of demand of lighter thermal protection system for our national space vehicle,recent development of investigation and practical application of lightweight thermal protection ablation materials are summarized systematically at home and abroad,in which the silicon or resin reinforced with honeycomb structural reinforcement and resin impregnated fibrous substrate ablators are included,focuses On silicone resin reinforced with glass,silica or carbon fiber/phenolic honeycomb as well as silicon,phenolic and Silicone Impregnated Reusable tendency Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator( in the future of aboard lightweight ablators is proposed,which can PICA,finally the development directly borrow or simply draw inspiration for our country in this field.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermal energy-based systems to treat uterine fibroids has resulted in a plethora of devices that are less invasive and potentially as effective in reducing symptoms as traditional options such as myomectomy. Most thermal ablation devices involve hyperthermia (heating of tissue, which entails the conversion of an external electromagnetic or ultrasound waves into intracellular mechanical energy, generating heat. What has emerged from two decades of peer-reviewed research is the concept that hyperthermic fibroid ablation, regardless of the thermal energy source, can create large areas of necrosis within fibroids resulting in reductions in fibroid volume, associated symptoms and the need for reintervention. When a greater percentage of a fibroid's volume is ablated, symptomatic relief is more pronounced, quality of life increases, and it is more likely that such improvements will be durable. We review radiofrequency ablation (RFA, one modality of hyperthermic fibroid ablation.

  8. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  9. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  10. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  11. Current oncologic applications of radiofrequency ablation therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Green, Sari; Elliot, Angelina; McGahan, John P; Khatri, Vijay P

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) uses high frequency alternating current to heat a volume of tissue around a needle electrode to induce focal coagulative necrosis with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. RFA can be performed via an open, laparoscopic, or image guided percutaneous approach and be performed under general or local anesthesia. Advances in delivery mechanisms, electrode designs, and higher power generators have increased the maximum volume that can be ablated, while maximizing oncological outcomes. In general, RFA is used to control local tumor growth, prevent recurrence, palliate symptoms, and improve survival in a subset of patients that are not candidates for surgical resection. It’s equivalence to surgical resection has yet to be proven in large randomized control trials. Currently, the use of RFA has been well described as a primary or adjuvant treatment modality of limited but unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastasis, especially colorectal cancer metastases, primary lung tumors, renal cell carcinoma, boney metastasis and osteoid osteomas. The role of RFA in the primary treatment of early stage breast cancer is still evolving. This review will discuss the general features of RFA and outline its role in commonly encountered solid tumors. PMID:23671734

  12. CT Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Kachare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of Computed Tomography (CT guided laser ablation of radiologically proven osteoid osteoma in the inter trochantric region of the femur. A19 year old female presented with severe pain in left upper thigh region since 6-7 months, which was exaggerated during nights and was relived on taking oral Non Steroid Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. On CT scan hypodense lesion with surrounding dense sclerosis noted in intertrochanteric region in left femur. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed small focal predominantly cortical, oval lytic lesion in the intertrochanteric region which appeared hypointense on T1 Weighted Image (T1WI and hyperintense on T2 Weighted Image (T2WI and Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR image. Diffuse extensive sclerosis and hyperostosis of bone was noted surrounding the lesion appearing hypointense on T1W and T2W images. Under local anesthesia the laser fibre was inserted in the nidus under CT guidance through bone biopsy needle and 1800 joules energy delivered in the lesion continuous mode. Complete relief of pain noted after 24 hours after the treatment. CT guided LASER ablation is a safe, simple and effective method of treatment for osteoid osteoma.

  13. Producing Uniform Lesion Pattern in HIFU Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Kargl, Steven G.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a modality for treatment of solid tumors. The temperature at the focus can reach over 65° C denaturing cellular proteins resulting in coagulative necrosis. Typically, HIFU parameters are the same for each treated spot in most HIFU control systems. Because of thermal diffusion from nearby spots, the size of lesions will gradually become larger as the HIFU therapy progresses, which may cause insufficient treatment of initial spots, and over-treatment of later ones. It is found that the produced lesion pattern also depends on the scanning pathway. From the viewpoint of the physician creating uniform lesions and minimizing energy exposure are preferred in tumor ablation. An algorithm has been developed to adaptively determine the treatment parameters for every spot in a theoretical model in order to maintain similar lesion size throughout the HIFU therapy. In addition, the exposure energy needed using the traditional raster scanning is compared with those of two other scanning pathways, spiral scanning from the center to the outside and from the outside to the center. The theoretical prediction and proposed algorithm were further evaluated using transparent gel phantoms as a target. Digital images of the lesions were obtained, quantified, and then compared with each other. Altogether, dynamically changing treatment parameters can improve the efficacy and safety of HIFU ablation.

  14. Three Achilles’ heels of alcohol septal ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Kashtanov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript looks at basic limitations of alcohol septal ablation in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. They include high-grade atrioventricular blockages, residual obstructions of the left ventricular outflow tract and the so-called proarrhythmic effects of alcohol septal ablation procedure. All these weaknesses are reviewed in the context of incidence, etiology, and prevention.Received 25 February 2017. Accepted 10 April 2017.Funding: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.Author contributionsConception and study design: M.G. Kashtanov.Data collection and analysis: M.G. Kashtanov.Drafting the article: M.G. Kashtanov, E.M. Idov.Final approval of the version to be published: M.G. Kashtanov, S.D. Chernyshev, L.V. Kardapoltsev, S.V. Berdnikov, E.M. Idov.Full text of the article is in the online version of this paper at http://dx.doi.org/10.21688/1681-3472-2017-3-12-22

  15. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...... impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with >>300-fs pulses and at a similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot...

  16. Radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: assistant techniques for difficult cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tatsuo; Minami, Yasunori; Chung, Hobyung; Hayaishi, Sousuke; Ueda, Taisuke; Tatsumi, Chie; Takita, Masahiro; Kitai, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Kinuyo; Ishikawa, Emi; Yada, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Satoru; Ueshima, Kazuomi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-07-01

    To confirm the safety and effectiveness of techniques to assist radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for difficult cases, we retrospectively evaluated successful treatment rates, early complications and local tumor progressions. Between June 1999 and April 2009, a total of 341 patients with 535 nodules were treated as difficult cases. Artificial pleural effusion assisted ablation was performed on 64 patients with 82 nodules. Artificial ascites-assisted ablation was performed on 11 patients with 13 nodules. Cooling by endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) tube-assisted ablation was performed on 6 patients with 8 nodules. When the tumors were not well visualized with conventional B-mode ultrasonography (US), contrast-enhanced US-assisted ablation with Levovist or Sonazoid or virtual CT sonography-assisted ablation was performed. Contrast-enhanced US-assisted ablation was performed on 139 patients with 224 nodules and virtual CT sonography-assisted ablation was performed on 121 patients with 209 nodules. In total, complete ablation was achieved in 514 of 535 (96%) nodules in difficult cases. For RFA with artificial pleural effusion, artificial ascites and ENBD, complete response was confirmed in all cases. For contrast-enhanced US- and CT sonography-assisted ablation, complete response was 95%. Early complications were recognized in 24 cases (4.5%). All cases recovered with no invasive treatment. Local tumor recurrence was investigated in 377 nodules of 245 patients, and 69 (18%) nodules were positive. Tumor recurrences in each assisted technique were 14.7% in artificial pleural effusion cases, 7% in artificial ascites, 12.5% in ENBD tube cases, 31% in virtual CT sonography, and 8.5% in contrast-enhanced US. Although local tumor progression needs to be carefully monitored, assisted techniques of RFA for difficult cases are well tolerated and expand the indications of RFA. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation to enhance drug delivery across the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie-Cook, Hazel; Stone, James M; Yu, Fei; Guy, Richard H; Gordeev, Sergey N

    2016-01-01

    Laser poration of the skin locally removes its outermost, barrier layer, and thereby provides a route for the diffusion of topically applied drugs. Ideally, no thermal damage would surround the pores created in the skin, as tissue coagulation would be expected to limit drug diffusion. Here, a femtosecond pulsed fiber laser is used to porate mammalian skin ex vivo. This first application of a hollow core negative curvature fiber (HC-NCF) to convey a femtosecond pulsed, visible laser beam results in reproducible skin poration. The effect of applying ink to the skin surface, prior to ultra-short pulsed ablation, has been examined and Raman spectroscopy reveals that the least, collateral thermal damage occurs in inked skin. Pre-application of ink reduces the laser power threshold for poration, an effect attributed to the initiation of plasma formation by thermionic electron emission from the dye in the ink. Poration under these conditions significantly increases the percutaneous permeation of caffeine in vitro. Dye-enhanced, plasma-mediated ablation of the skin is therefore a potentially advantageous approach to enhance topical/transdermal drug absorption. The combination of a fiber laser and a HC-NCF, capable of emitting and delivering femtosecond pulsed, visible light, may permit a compact poration device to be developed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Keratin film ablation for the fabrication of brick and mortar skin structure using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Bibi Safia; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Dou, Yuehua; Alam, Khan; Attaullah, Shehnaz; Zari, Islam

    2015-09-01

    The patterning of thin keratin films has been explored to manufacture model skin surfaces based on the "bricks and mortar" view of the relationship between keratin and lipids. It has been demonstrated that laser light is capable of preparing keratin-based "bricks and mortar" wall structure as in epidermis, the outermost layer of the human skin. "Bricks and mortar" pattern in keratin films has been fabricated using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm wavelength) and femtosecond laser (800 and 400 nm wavelength). Due to the very low ablation threshold of keratin, femtosecond laser systems are practical for laser processing of proteins. These model skin structures are fabricated for the first time that will help to produce potentially effective moisturizing products for the protection of skin from dryness, diseases and wrinkles.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Radiofrequency Ablation for Focal Hepatic Lesions Adjacent to Gallbladder: Reconfiguration of the Ablation Zone through Probe Relocation and Ablation Time Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Sung Gu; Won, Hyung Jin; Shin, Yong Moon

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treatment of focal hepatic lesions adjacent to the gallbladder with electrode relocation and ablation time reduction. Thirty-nine patients who underwent RF ablation for focal hepatic lesions adjacent to the gallbladder (≤ 10 mm) were evaluated retrospectively from January 2011 to December 2014 (30 men and 9 women; age range, 51-85 y; mean age, 65 y). Of 36 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 had a second treatment for recurrence (mean tumor size, 15 mm ± 6). Patients were divided into 2 subgroups based on lesion distance from the gallbladder: nonabutting (> 5 mm; n = 19) and abutting (≤ 5 mm; n = 20). Electrodes were inserted parallel to the gallbladder through the center of a tumor in the nonabutting group and through the center of the expected ablation zone between a 5-mm safety zone on the liver side and the gallbladder in the abutting group. Ablation time was decreased in proportion to the transverse diameter of the expected ablation zone. Technical success and technical effectiveness rates were 89.7% and 97.4%, respectively, with no significant differences between groups (P = 1.00). Local tumor progression was observed in 3 patients (1 in the nonabutting group and 2 in the abutting group; P = 1.00). There were no major complications. The gallbladder was thickened in 10 patients, with no significant difference between groups (P = .72). Biloma occurred in 1 patient in the nonabutting group. RF ablation with electrode relocation and reduction of ablation time can be a safe and effective treatment for focal hepatic lesions adjacent to the gallbladder. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ablation of porcine ligamentum flavum with Ho:YAG, q-switched Ho:YAG, and quadrupled Nd:YAG lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matt R; Codd, Patrick J; Hill, Westin M; Boettcher, Tara

    2015-12-01

    along the coronal plane, the surface temperature of the LF was measured with an IR camera during irradiation with the Ho:YAG laser, with and without constant saline flush. Third, the mass loss was measured over the course of 450 Ho:YAG pulses. Fourth, hole depth and temperature were measured over 30 pulses of fixed fluence from the Ho:YAG and Q-Switched Ho:YAG lasers. Fifth, the ablation rate and surface temperature were measured as a function of fluence from the Nd:YAG laser. Several LF staining and hole-depth measurement techniques were also explored. Aside from the expected absorbance peaks corresponding to the water in the LF, the most significant peaks in absorbance were located in the spectral band from 190 to 290 nm and persisted after the tissue was dehydrated. In the first experiment, using the Ho:YAG laser and with the laser-fiber in direct contact with the LF, the lowest single-pulse fluence for which LF was visibly removed was 35 J/cm(2) . Testing was conducted at 6 fluences between 35 and 354 J/cm(2) . Over this range the single-pulse hole depth was shown to be near linear (R(2)  = 0.9374, M = 1.6), ranging from 40 to 639 µm (N = 3). For the case where the laser-fiber face was displaced 1 mm from the LF surface, the lowest single-pulse fluence for which tissue was visibly removed was 72 J/cm(2) . Testing was conducted at 4 energy densities between 72 and 180 J/cm(2) . Over this range the single-pulse hole depth was shown to be near linear (R(2)  = 0.8951, M = 1.4), ranging from 31 to 220 µm (N = 3). In the second experiment, with LF in situ, constant flushing with room temperature saline was shown to drastically reduce surface temperature during exposure to Ho:YAG at 5 Hz with the laser-fiber in direct contact with the LF. Without saline, over 1 minute of treatment with a per-pulse fluence of 141 mJ/cm(2) , the average maximum surface temperature measured 110°C. With 10 cc's of saline flushed over 1

  1. Determination of ultra-short laser induced damage threshold of KH2PO4 crystal: Numerical calculation and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth and ultra-precision machining of large-size KDP (KH2PO4 crystals with high laser damage resistance are tough challenges in the development of large laser systems. It is of high interest and practical significance to have theoretical models for scientists and manufacturers to determine the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT of actually prepared KDP optics. Here, we numerically and experimentally investigate the laser-induced damage on KDP crystals in ultra-short pulse laser regime. On basis of the rate equation for free electron generation, a model dedicated to predicting the LIDT is developed by considering the synergistic effect of photoionization, impact ionization and decay of electrons. Laser damage tests are performed to measure the single-pulse LIDT with several testing protocols. The testing results combined with previously reported experimental data agree well with those calculated by the model. By taking the light intensification into consideration, the model is successfully applied to quantitatively evaluate the effect of surface flaws inevitably introduced in the preparation processes on the laser damage resistance of KDP crystals. This work can not only contribute to further understanding of the laser damage mechanisms of optical materials, but also provide available models for evaluating the laser damage resistance of exquisitely prepared optical components used in high power laser systems.

  2. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Woods

    Full Text Available Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water, a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1 and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2 were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  3. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of the MAS evidence review was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on the safety, effectiveness, durability and cost–effectiveness of endovascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins. Background The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) met on August 26th, 2010 to review the safety, effectiveness, durability, and cost-effectiveness of RFA for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins based on an evidence-based review by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). Clinical Condition Varicose veins (VV) are tortuous, twisted, or elongated veins. This can be due to existing (inherited) valve dysfunction or decreased vein elasticity (primary venous reflux) or valve damage from prior thrombotic events (secondary venous reflux). The end result is pooling of blood in the veins, increased venous pressure and subsequent vein enlargement. As a result of high venous pressure, branch vessels balloon out leading to varicosities (varicose veins). Symptoms typically affect the lower extremities and include (but are not limited to): aching, swelling, throbbing, night cramps, restless legs, leg fatigue, itching and burning. Left untreated, venous reflux tends to be progressive, often leading to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). A number of complications are associated with untreated venous reflux: including superficial thrombophlebitis as well as variceal rupture and haemorrhage. CVI often results in chronic skin changes referred to as stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis is comprised of a spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities including edema, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis and stasis ulceration. Ulceration represents the disease end point for severe CVI. CVI is associated with a reduced quality of life particularly in relation to pain, physical function and mobility. In severe cases, VV with ulcers, QOL has been rated to be as bad

  4. Automatic histogram threshold using fuzzy measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Lopes, Nuno; Mogadouro do Couto, Pedro A; Bustince, Humberto; Melo-Pinto, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic histogram threshold approach based on a fuzziness measure is presented. This work is an improvement of an existing method. Using fuzzy logic concepts, the problems involved in finding the minimum of a criterion function are avoided. Similarity between gray levels is the key to find an optimal threshold. Two initial regions of gray levels, located at the boundaries of the histogram, are defined. Then, using an index of fuzziness, a similarity process is started to find the threshold point. A significant contrast between objects and background is assumed. Previous histogram equalization is used in small contrast images. No prior knowledge of the image is required.

  5. Reaction thresholds in doubly special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyman, Daniel; Major, Seth; Hinteleitner, Franz

    2004-01-01

    Two theories of special relativity with an additional invariant scale, 'doubly special relativity', are tested with calculations of particle process kinematics. Using the Judes-Visser modified conservation laws, thresholds are studied in both theories. In contrast with some linear approximations, which allow for particle processes forbidden in special relativity, both the Amelino-Camelia and Magueijo-Smolin frameworks allow no additional processes. To first order, the Amelino-Camelia framework thresholds are lowered and the Magueijo-Smolin framework thresholds may be raised or lowered

  6. Digital IP Protection Using Threshold Voltage Control

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Joseph; Kulkarni, Niranjan; Yang, Jinghua; Dengi, Aykut; Vrudhula, Sarma

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to completely hide the functionality of a digital standard cell. This is accomplished by a differential threshold logic gate (TLG). A TLG with $n$ inputs implements a subset of Boolean functions of $n$ variables that are linear threshold functions. The output of such a gate is one if and only if an integer weighted linear arithmetic sum of the inputs equals or exceeds a given integer threshold. We present a novel architecture of a TLG that not only allows a single...

  7. Amorphization of silicon by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jimmy; Li Ming; Thompson, Carl V.

    2004-01-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to drill submicron holes in single crystal silicon films in silicon-on-insulator structures. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of material adjacent to the ablated holes indicates the formation of a layer of amorphous Si. This demonstrates that even when material is ablated using femtosecond pulses near the single pulse ablation threshold, sufficient heating of the surrounding material occurs to create a molten zone which solidifies so rapidly that crystallization is bypassed

  8. Pain perception description after advanced surface ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobas EM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eva M Sobas,1,2 Sebastián Videla,3,4 Amanda Vázquez,1 Itziar Fernández,1,5 Miguel J Maldonado,1 José-Carlos Pastor1,6,7 1Instituto Universitario de Oftalmobiología Aplicada (IOBA, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; 2Facultad de Enfermería, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid Spain; 3Laboratorios Dr. Esteve S.A., Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud y de la Vida, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 5Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN, Valladolid, Spain; 6Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain; 7Department of Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Physiotherapy, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the evolution of ocular pain after advanced surface ablation (ASA to improve strategies in postoperative pain management.Methods: This was a multicenter, prospective, descriptive, cohort study. The inclusion criteria were healthy individuals ≥18 years old receiving bilateral alcohol-assisted surface ablation with epithelial removal. Pain intensity was evaluated with the visual analog scale (VAS and the numeric pain rating scale before and after surgery. Comorbidities (photophobia, burning, tearing, and foreign body sensation and Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD questionnaire were evaluated before and at 6 hours after surgery. Postoperative treatments included cold patch, topical cold antibiotics, topical steroids, and benzodiazepines.Results: Thirty-two consecutive patients having similar profiles of postoperative pain evolution were included. At 0.5 hour after ASA, the pain score by VAS was 37±20 mm, and the maximum pain, 61±31 mm, occurred at 24 hours. Afterward, it decreased progressively until 72 hours after surgery (19±20 mm. Most patients (81% scored >60 mm, and

  9. Using daily air temperature thresholds to evaluate snow melting occurrence and amount on Alpine glaciers by T-index models: the case study of the Forni Glacier (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, A.; Maugeri, M.; Vuillermoz, E.; Smiraglia, C.; Diolaiuti, G.

    2014-10-01

    Glacier melt conditions (i.e., null surface temperature and positive energy budget) can be assessed by analyzing data acquired by a supraglacial automatic weather station (AWS), such as the station installed on the surface of Forni Glacier (Italian Alps). When an AWS is not present, the assessment of actual melt conditions and the evaluation of the melt amount is more difficult and simple methods based on T-index (or degree days) models are generally applied. These models require the choice of a correct temperature threshold. In fact, melt does not necessarily occur at daily air temperatures higher than 0 °C. In this paper, we applied both energy budget and T-index approaches with the aim of solving this issue. We start by distinguishing between the occurrence of snowmelt and the reduction in snow depth due to actual ablation (from snow depth data recorded by a sonic ranger). Then we find the daily average temperature thresholds (by analyzing temperature data acquired by an AWS on Forni Glacier) which, on the one hand, best capture the occurrence of significant snowmelt conditions and, on the other, make it possible, using the T-index, to quantify the actual snow ablation amount. Finally we investigated the applicability of the mean tropospheric lapse rate to reproduce air temperature conditions at the glacier surface starting from data acquired by weather stations located outside the glacier area. We found that the mean tropospheric lapse rate allows for a good and reliable reconstruction of glacier air temperatures and that the choice of an appropriate temperature threshold in T-index models is a very important issue. From our study, the application of the +0.5 °C temperature threshold allows for a consistent quantification of snow ablation while, instead, for detecting the beginning of the snow melting processes a suitable threshold has proven to be at least -4.6 °C.

  10. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  11. Actual role of radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The liver is, second only to lymph nodes, the most common site for metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumour. More than 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improved survival in patients with colorectal metastases, only approximately 20% of patients are eligible for surgery. Thermal ablation and especially radiofrequency ablation emerge as an important additional therapy modality for the treatment of liver metastases. RF ablation shows a benefit in life expectancy and may lead in a selected patient group to cure. Percutaneous RF ablation appears safer (versus cryotherapy), easier (versus laser), and more effective (versus ethanol instillation and transarterial chemoembolisation) compared with other minimally invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed by a percutaneous, laparoscopical or laparotomic approach, and may be potentially combined with chemotherapy and surgery. At present ideal candidates have tumours with a maximum diameter less than 3.5 cm. An untreatable primary tumour or a systemic disease represents contraindications for performing local therapies. Permanent technical improvements of thermal ablation devices and a better integration of thermal ablation in the overall patient care may lead to prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  12. Actual role of radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-01-01

    The liver is, second only to lymph nodes, the most common site for metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumour. More than 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improved survival in patients with colorectal metastases, only approximately 20% of patients are eligible for surgery. Thermal ablation and especially radiofrequency ablation emerge as an important additional therapy modality for the treatment of liver metastases. RF ablation shows a benefit in life expectancy and may lead in a selected patient group to cure. Percutaneous RF ablation appears safer (versus cryotherapy), easier (versus laser), and more effective (versus ethanol instillation and transarterial chemoembolisation) compared with other minimally invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed by a percutaneous, laparoscopical or laparotomic approach, and may be potentially combined with chemotherapy and surgery. At present ideal candidates have tumours with a maximum diameter less than 3.5 cm. An untreatable primary tumour or a systemic disease represents contraindications for performing local therapies. Permanent technical improvements of thermal ablation devices and a better integration of thermal ablation in the overall patient care may lead to prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  13. Pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Yao, Xiaoxi; Schilz, Stephanie; Van Houten, Holly; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Friedman, Paul A; Packer, Douglas L; Noseworthy, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction requiring pacemaker implantation is commonly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but may not be clinically apparent until restoration of sinus rhythm with ablation or cardioversion. We sought to determine frequency, time course, and predictors for pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation, and to compare the overall rates to a matched cardioversion cohort. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a large US commercial insurance database and identified 12,158 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012. Over an average of 2.4 years of follow-up, 5.6 % of the patients underwent pacemaker implantation. Using the Cox proportional hazards models, we found that risk of risks of pacemaker implantation was associated with older age (50-64 and ≥65 versus pacemaker implantation between ablation patients and propensity score (PS)-matched cardioversion groups (3.5 versus. 4.1 % at 1 year and 8.8 versus 8.3 % at 5 years). Overall, pacemaker implantation occurs in about 1/28 patients within 1 year of catheter ablation. The overall implantation rate decreased between 2005 and 2012. Furthermore, the risk after ablation is similar to cardioversion, suggesting that patients require pacing due to a common underlying electrophysiologic substrate, rather than the ablation itself.

  14. Midinfrared ablation of dentin with the Vanderbilt FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Reinisch, Lou; Edwards, Glenn S.; Yessik, Michael J.; Ashrafi, Shahid; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1996-04-01

    Absorption spectra of 0.1 - 0.2 mm thick, dehydrated sections of human teeth were measured in the transmission mode with a Bruker FT-IR spectrometer from 2.5 - 20 micrometers . Absorption peaks for amide I, II and III, carbonate and phosphate were identified. Craters were ablated in dentin and enamel using a tunable FEL at 6.45 micrometers at various fluences. Pulse duration: 3 microsecond(s) ; spot size (Gaussian, FWHM): 300 micrometers ; repetition rate: 10 Hz. Crater depth and width were measured from digitized optical images. Ablation rates were computed from crater depth and volume data. Selected specimens were examined with scanning electron microscopy to determine ablation surface characteristics. Depth of thermal damage and dentinal tubule morphology were estimated from SEM examination of fractures through ablation sites. Functions describing crater depth vs. number of pulses (quadratic function) were not the same as crater volume vs. number of pulses (linear function). Crater depth decreases with successive pulses, concurrently, the crater width increases. Thus, each pulse removes approximately a constant volume. Material was observed to flow through the dentinal tubules during and after ablation. Patent tubules on crater walls and floor were observed with SEM. Ablation rates in dentin were approximately 3X those in enamel at 6.45 micrometers . Ablation rates and surface characteristics varied across wavelengths from 5.8 to 8.0 micrometers .

  15. Secure information management using linguistic threshold approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2013-01-01

    This book details linguistic threshold schemes for information sharing. It examines the opportunities of using these techniques to create new models of managing strategic information shared within a commercial organisation or a state institution.

  16. Melanin microcavitation threshold in the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Wharmby, Andrew W.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-02-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine and porcine melanosomes were determined using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the NIR (1000 - 1319 nm) wavelength regime. Average fluence thresholds for microcavitation increased non-linearly with increasing wavelength. Average fluence thresholds were also measured for 10-ns pulses at 532 nm, and found to be comparable to visible ns pulse values published in previous reports. Fluence thresholds were used to calculate melanosome absorption coefficients, which decreased with increasing wavelength. This trend was found to be comparable to the decrease in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer absorption coefficients reported over the same wavelength region. Estimated corneal total intraocular energy (TIE) values were determined and compared to the current and proposed maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe exposure levels. Results from this study support the proposed changes to the MPE levels.

  17. A prototype threshold Cherenkov counter for DIRAC

    CERN Document Server

    Bragadireanu, M; Cima, E; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M A; Lanaro, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Petrascu, C; Girolami, B; Groza, L; Kulikov, A; Kuptsov, A; Topilin, N; Trusov, S

    1999-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested a gas threshold Cherenkov counter as prototype for a larger counter foreseen for use in the DIRAC experiment, at CERN. We describe the performances of the counter on a test beam.

  18. Recent progress in understanding climate thresholds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Good, Peter; Bamber, Jonathan; Halladay, Kate; Harper, Anna B.; Jackson, Laura C.; Kay, Gillian; Kruijt, Bart; Lowe, Jason A.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Ridley, Jeff; Srokosz, Meric; Turley, Carol; Williamson, Phillip

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews recent scientific progress, relating to four major systems that could exhibit threshold behaviour: ice sheets, the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), tropical forests and ecosystem responses to ocean acidification. The focus is on advances since the

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Grushko, Michael; Briceño, David F; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heritable form of cardiomyopathy, typically with autosomal dominant transmission, shown to be a defect in the cardiac desmosomes, with distinct regional and histopathological features. Clinically, this can ultimately result in bi-ventricular failure and/or malignant ventricular tachycardia (VT) via reentrant circuits created by patchy scar formation. We sought to review the current treatment for ventricular arrhythmias in the setting of ARVC, with particular attention to radiofrequency (RF) ablation and its varied techniques, along with potential therapies in the ablation spectrum. There is underwhelming data on the effectiveness of medical therapy for ARVC-related VT, including beta-blockers and antiarrhythmic medication. Primary and secondary prophylactic implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation in higher-risk patients is recommended. More recently, RF ablation has been used for ARVC-related VT. Endocardial VT ablation in this setting can produce acute success, though recurrence rate is quite high, which may be explained by the more epicardial and patchy nature of the disease. Combined endocardial-epicardial ablation has since been shown to be feasible, safe, and with significantly better acute and long-term success, particularly when combined with scar dechanneling or homogenization of the scar. However, recurrence rates are not insignificant, and ablation does not eliminate the need for ICD placement. Medical therapy for ARVC-related VT is suboptimal. RF ablation techniques including endocardial and epicardial approaches appear to have the highest success rates for ARVC-related VT. Catheter ablation of VT in ARVC patients should be considered a potentially effective strategy for eliminating frequent VT episodes and ICD shocks rather than a curative therapeutic approach, until long-term efficacy has been consistently documented. Research into the optimal mapping and ablation techniques

  20. Characterisation of tissue shrinkage during microwave thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Laura; Weiss, Noam; Nissenbaum, Yitzhak; Cavagnaro, Marta; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Tosoratti, Nevio; Amabile, Claudio; Cassarino, Simone; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise changes in tissue volume during image-guided microwave ablation in order to arrive at a more precise determination of the true ablation zone. The effect of power (20-80 W) and time (1-10 min) on microwave-induced tissue contraction was experimentally evaluated in various-sized cubes of ex vivo liver (10-40 mm ± 2 mm) and muscle (20 and 40 mm ± 2 mm) embedded in agar phantoms (N = 119). Post-ablation linear and volumetric dimensions of the tissue cubes were measured and compared with pre-ablation dimensions. Subsequently, the process of tissue contraction was investigated dynamically during the ablation procedure through real-time X-ray CT scanning. Overall, substantial shrinkage of 52-74% of initial tissue volume was noted. The shrinkage was non-uniform over time and space, with observed asymmetry favouring the radial (23-43 % range) over the longitudinal (21-29%) direction. Algorithmic relationships for the shrinkage as a function of time were demonstrated. Furthermore, the smallest cubes showed more substantial and faster contraction (28-40% after 1 min), with more considerable volumetric shrinkage (>10%) in muscle than in liver tissue. Additionally, CT imaging demonstrated initial expansion of the tissue volume, lasting in some cases up to 3 min during the microwave ablation procedure, prior to the contraction phenomenon. In addition to an asymmetric substantial shrinkage of the ablated tissue volume, an initial expansion phenomenon occurs during MW ablation. Thus, complex modifications of the tissue close to a radiating antenna will likely need to be taken into account for future methods of real-time ablation monitoring.

  1. Cost?effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    OpenAIRE

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost?effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost?effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost?effectiveness thresholds allow cost?effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization?s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost?effectiveness thresholds based...

  2. LAPAROSCOPIC NEPHRECTOMY USING RADIOFREQUENCY THERMAL ABLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of current diagnostic techniques, such as ultrasound study, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, has led to significantly increased detection rates for disease in its early stages. This gave rise to a change in the standards for the treatment of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Laparoscopic nephrectomy (LN has recently become the standard treatment of locally advanced RCC in the clinics having much experience with laparoscopic surgery. The chief drawback of LN is difficulties in maintaining intraoperative hemostasis and a need for creating renal tissue ischemia. The paper gives the intermediate results of application of the new procedure of LN using radiofrequency thermal ablation in patients with non-ischemic early-stage RCC.

  3. Emerging indications of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becq, Aymeric; Camus, Marine; Rahmi, Gabriel; de Parades, Vincent; Marteau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-validated treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Other indications of endoscopic RFA are under evaluation. Results Four prospective studies (total 69 patients) have shown that RFA achieved complete remission of early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia at a rate of 80%, but with a substantial risk of stricture. In the setting of gastric antral vascular ectasia, two prospective monocenter studies, and a retrospective multicenter study, (total 51 patients), suggest that RFA is efficacious in terms of reducing transfusion dependency. In the setting of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy, a prospective monocenter study and a retrospective multicenter study (total 56 patients) suggest that RFA is an efficient treatment. A retrospective comparative study (64 patients) suggests that RFA improves stents patency in malignant biliary strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic RFA is an upcoming treatment modality in early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia, as well as in gastric, rectal, and biliary diseases. PMID:26279839

  4. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  5. Radio Frequency Ablation Registration, Segmentation, and Fusion Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Hemler, Paul F.; Viswanathan, Anand; Wood, Bradford J.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Ablation Segmentation Tool (RFAST) is a software application developed using NIH's Medical Image Processing Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) API for the specific purpose of assisting physicians in the planning of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures. The RFAST application sequentially leads the physician through the steps necessary to register, fuse, segment, visualize and plan the RFA treatment. Three-dimensional volume visualization of the CT dataset with segmented 3D surface models enables the physician to interactively position the ablation probe to simulate burns and to semi-manually simulate sphere packing in an attempt to optimize probe placement. PMID:16871716

  6. Alternative High Performance Polymers for Ablative Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Mairead; Gonzales, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ablative thermal protection systems are commonly used as protection from the intense heat during re-entry of a space vehicle and have been used successfully on many missions including Stardust and Mars Science Laboratory both of which used PICA - a phenolic based ablator. Historically, phenolic resin has served as the ablative polymer for many TPS systems. However, it has limitations in both processing and properties such as char yield, glass transition temperature and char stability. Therefore alternative high performance polymers are being considered including cyanate ester resin, polyimide, and polybenzoxazine. Thermal and mechanical properties of these resin systems were characterized and compared with phenolic resin.

  7. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    González-Castillo, JR; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redo...

  8. Meta-analysis of bipolar radiofrequency endometrial ablation versus thermal balloon endometrial ablation for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yan; Zhang, Zihan; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Tingping; Zhang, Huili

    2018-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding is a common problem that can severely affect quality of life. To compare bipolar radiofrequency endometrial ablation and thermal balloon ablation for heavy menstrual bleeding in terms of efficacy and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Online registries were systematically searched using relevant terms without language restriction from inception to November 24, 2016. Randomized control trials or cohort studies of women with heavy menstrual bleeding comparing the efficacy of two treatments were eligible. Data were extracted. Results were expressed as risk ratios (RRs) or weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Six studies involving 901 patients were included. Amenorrhea rate at 12 months was significantly higher after bipolar radiofrequency endometrial ablation than after thermal balloon ablation (RR 2.73, 95% CI 2.00-3.73). However, no difference at 12 months was noted for dysmenorrhea (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.68-1.58) or treatment failure (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.38-1.60). The only significant difference for HRQoL outcomes was for change in SAQ pleasure score (12 months: WMD -3.51, 95% CI -5.42 to -1.60). Bipolar radiofrequency endometrial ablation and thermal balloon ablation reduce menstrual loss and improve quality of life. However, bipolar radiofrequency endometrial ablation is more effective in terms of amenorrhea rate and SAQ pleasure. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  9. Microwave Ablation of Porcine Kidneys in vivo: Effect of two Different Ablation Modes (“Temperature Control” and “Power Control”) on Procedural Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, C. M.; Arnegger, F.; Koch, V.; Pap, B.; Holzschuh, M.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Senft, J.; Nickel, F.; Mogler, C.; Zelzer, S.; Meinzer, H. P.; Stampfl, U.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to analyze the effect of two different ablation modes (“temperature control” and “power control”) of a microwave system on procedural outcome in porcine kidneys in vivo. Methods: A commercially available microwave system (Avecure Microwave Generator; MedWaves, San Diego, CA) was used. The system offers the possibility to ablate with two different ablation modes: temperature control and power control. Thirty-two microwave ablations were performed in 16 kidneys of 8 pigs. In each animal, one kidney was ablated twice by applying temperature control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96°C, automatic power set point; group I). The other kidney was ablated twice by applying power control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96°C, ablation power set point at 24 W; group II). Procedural outcome was analyzed: (1) technical success (e.g., system failures, duration of the ablation cycle), and (2) ablation geometry (e.g., long axis diameter, short axis diameter, and circularity). Results: System failures occurred in 0% in group I and 13% in group II. Duration of the ablation cycle was 60 ± 0 s in group I and 102 ± 21 s in group II. Long axis diameter was 20.3 ± 4.6 mm in group I and 19.8 ± 3.5 mm in group II (not significant (NS)). Short axis diameter was 10.3 ± 2 mm in group I and 10.5 ± 2.4 mm in group II (NS). Circularity was 0.5 ± 0.1 in group I and 0.5 ± 0.1 in group II (NS). Conclusions: Microwave ablations performed with temperature control showed fewer system failures and were finished faster. Both ablation modes demonstrated no significant differences with respect to ablation geometry.

  10. Percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation of lung VX2 tumors in a rabbit model: evaluation with helical CT findings for the complete and partal ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Lim, Yeong Su; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong; Chung, Gyung Ho [School of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings for complete and partial ablation after percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of lung VX2 tumor implanted in rabbits. Thirteen rabbits with successfully implanted lung VX2 were used. Three rabbits as controls did not receive RFA while the other ten rabbits underwent RFA; 5 complete and 5 partial. RFA was performed using an internally cooled, 17-gauge electrode (Radionics, Burlington, MA) with a 1-cm active tip under CT guidance. Postprocedural CT was performed within 3 days, and we analyzed the ablated size, enhancement pattern, shape, margin, and complications of the complete and partial ablation groups. Rabbits were sacrificed after postprocedural CT with an overdose of ketamine, and pathologic findings of the ablated groups were compared with those of the control group. The size of the ablated lesions and the enhancement pattern differed between the completely and partially ablated groups on chest CT. The size of the ablated lesions was increased by 47.1% in the completely ablated group and by 2.1% in the partially ablated group. In the completely ablated group, VX2 tumor showed absolutely no enhancement, whereas only ablated pulmonary parenchyma outside VX2 showed mild enhancement on enhanced CT. In the partial ablated group, a part of VX2 became strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. On microscopic examination, the completely ablated group demonstrated that a viable tumor cell was not visible. In the partially ablated group, however, a viable tumor cell within the surrounding fibrous capsule on the peripheral area of the VX2 was observed. The important CT findings for evaluation of complete and partial RFA are the ablated size and enhancement pattern of the ablated lesion.

  11. Benign thyroid nodules treatment using percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Giovanni; Cova, Luca; Monaco, Cristian Giuseppe; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Corbetta, Sabrina; Benedini, Stefano; Ambrogi, Federico; Milani, Valentina; Baroli, Alberto; Ierace, Tiziana; Solbiati, Luigi

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the reduction over time of benign thyroid nodules treated using percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by the same equipe. Ninety patients (age 55.6 ± 14.1 years) underwent ablation for benign thyroid nodule causing compression/aesthetic dissatisfaction from 2011. Fifty-nine (age 55.8 ± 14.1 years) underwent RFA and 31 (age 55.2 ± 14.2 years) PLA, ultrasound guided. Technical success, complications, duration of ablation and treatment, energy deployed, volumetric percentage reduction at 1, 6 and 12 months were derived. A regression model for longitudinal measurements was used with random intercept and random slope. Values are expressed as mean ± standard deviation or N (%). Technical success was always obtained. No major complications occurred. Mean ablation time was 30.1 ± 13.8 vs. 13.9 ± 5.9 min (p < .0001) and mean energy deployment was 5422.3 ± 2484.5 J vs. 34 662.7 ± 15 812.3 J in PLA vs. RFA group. Mean volume reduced from 20.3 ± 16.4 ml to 13.17 ± 10.74 ml (42% ± 17% reduction) at 1st month, 8.7 ± 7.4 ml (60% ± 15% reduction) at 6th month and 7.1 ± 7.7 ml (70%% ± 16% reduction) at 12th month, in PLA group, and from 32.7 ± 19.5 ml to 17.2 ± 12.9 ml (51%±15% reduction) at 1st month, 12.8 ± 9.6 ml (64 ± 14% reduction) at 6th month and 9.9 ± 9.2 ml (74% ± 14% reduction) at 12th month in RFA group. No difference in time course of the relative volume reduction between the two techniques was found. RFA and PLA are similarly feasible, safe and effective in treating benign thyroid nodules when performed by the same equipe. RFA is faster than PLA but require significantly higher energy.

  12. The influence of thin film grain size on the size of nanoparticles generated during UV femtosecond laser ablation of thin gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustrup, N.; O’Connor, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The upsurge in the number of thin film products has encouraged studies into every aspect of their fabrication and application. An additional source of industrial interest is the laser ablation of thin films to generate nanoparticles. This technique offers advantages over other fabrication methods, as no chemical pre-cursers are required, thereby giving rise to a pure product. The main disadvantage lies in the difficulty with controlling the size of the nanoparticles. This study aims to clarify the influence of the microstructure of a thin film on its optical properties and also to establish the size relationship between the film grain and the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation. A comprehensive sample set of Gold (Au) films with different grain sizes was achieved using different deposition rates, temperatures, film thicknesses (<100 nm) and substrates: Silica, Quartz and Sapphire. The microstructure of each film was analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Single femtosecond laser pulses, above the ablation threshold fluence of each film, were applied to generate nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to image the re-deposited nanoparticles, from which the nanoparticle size distribution was established. Results confirm that the film microstructure is directly linked to the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation.

  13. Comparison of a ZGP OPO with a Mark-III FEL as a Potential Replacement for Mid-Infrared Soft Tissue Ablation Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mackanos, M A

    2005-01-01

    A Mark-III FEL, tuned to 6.45 μm has demonstrated minimal collateral damage and high ablation yield in soft tissue. Further clinical advances are limited due to the overhead associated with an FEL; alternative mid-IR sources are needed. The FEL parameters needed to carry out efficient ablation with minimal damage must be determined. Studies by this author have shown that the unique pulse structure of the FEL does not play a role in this process [1]. We focused on comparing the macropulse duration of the FEL with a ZGP-OPO. No difference in pulse structure between the two laser sources with respect to the ablation threshold of water and mouse dermis was seen. There is a difference between the sources with respect to the crater depths in gelatin and mouse dermis. At 6.1 μm, the OPO craters are 8 times the depth of the FEL ones. Brightfield imaging shows the classic ablation mechanism. The timescale of the crater formation, ejection, and collapse occurs on a faster scale for the OPO. Histology ...

  14. Long-term efficacy of catheter ablation as first-line therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial compared radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Endpoint of ablat......OBJECTIVE: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial compared radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Endpoint...

  15. Multielectrode phased radiofrequency ablation compared with point-by-point ablation for pulmonary vein isolation – outcomes in 539 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitzer SG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stefan G Spitzer,1 Laszlo Karolyi,1 Thomas Weinmann,1 Frank Scharfe,1 Carola Rämmler,1 Tobias Otto,1 Friedrich Jung,2 Clemens T Kadalie11Praxisklinik Herz und Gefäße, Akademische Lehrpraxisklinik der TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Saarland University, Homburg, Saar, GermanyPurpose: To provide data on acute and long-term outcomes from pulmonary vein isolation with the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC in patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation (AF.Methods: This was a single-center, retrospective, nonrandomized, case control study. Patients with documented symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF were treated with PVAC or with point-by-point radiofrequency ablation guided by the NavX™ mapping system. All follow-up visits were conducted in our center at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, and then at 6-month intervals. Electrocardiography and 24-hour Holter monitoring were performed at each follow-up visit. The endpoints included procedure times, acute and 24-month outcomes, and complications.Results: Of the 539 patients that were enrolled consecutively, 388 were ablated using PVAC and 151 using radiofrequency ablation. More patients with paroxysmal AF were treated with PVAC than with radiofrequency ablation. Acute success rates were >99% with both methods. Procedure duration and fluoroscopy times were significantly (P<0.001 shorter with PVAC than with point-by-point ablation. Rates of freedom from AF at all follow-up times available (up to 24 months were significantly higher after PVAC ablation than with radiofrequency ablation (64.2% versus 48.2% at 24 months. With both ablation strategies, the rates of freedom from AF were higher in patients with paroxysmal AF than for persistent AF. Two posterior cerebral infarcts occurred in the PVAC group within 2 days of the procedure. No phrenic nerve injuries and no esophageal injuries were recorded. Data on embolic lesions were not collected.Conclusion: PVAC ablation achieved

  16. Tracking of nociceptive thresholds using adaptive psychophysical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doll, Robert; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Psychophysical thresholds reflect the state of the underlying nociceptive mechanisms. For example, noxious events can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms that increase the nociceptive threshold. Therefore, tracking thresholds over time facilitates the investigation of the dynamics of these

  17. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kast, W

    2003-01-01

    ... prostate. Castration of mice stimulates B and T lymphopoiesis, thymic and bone marrow hyperplasia. The induction of apoptotic cell death following androgen ablation is accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate comprised predominantly of activated T cells...

  18. Rapid growth of left atrial myxoma after radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Alvarez, José; Martinez de Alegria, Anxo; Sierra Quiroga, Juan; Adrio Nazar, Belen; Rubio Taboada, Carola; Martinez Comendador, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign tumor of the heart, but its appearance after radiofrequency ablation is very rare. We report a case in which an asymptomatic, rapidly growing cardiac myxoma arose in the left atrium after radiofrequency ablation. Two months after the procedure, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, performed to evaluate the right ventricular anatomy, revealed a 10 × 10-mm mass (assumed to be a thrombus) attached to the patient's left atrial septum. Three months later, transthoracic echocardiography revealed a larger mass, and the patient was diagnosed with myxoma. Two days later, a 20 × 20-mm myxoma weighing 37 g was excised. To our knowledge, the appearance of an atrial myxoma after radiofrequency ablation has been reported only once before. Whether tumor development is related to such ablation or is merely a coincidence is uncertain, but myxomas have developed after other instances of cardiac trauma.

  19. Computational Modeling of Ablative Materials: Application to Phenolic Pyrolysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many NASA missions (ESMD, SMD), including crewed missions to Mars, are not possible with current ablative materials. Improved understanding will (1) facilitate the...

  20. Ablation Rates of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides glacier surface ablation rates for a network of approximately 250 sites on Taylor Glacier, spanning a period from 2003 to 2011. Here...

  1. Capsule physics comparison of different ablators for NIF implosion designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel; Kritcher, Andrea; Yi, Austin; Zylstra, Alex; Haan, Steven; Ralph, Joseph; Weber, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Indirect drive implosion experiments on the Naitonal Ignition Facility (NIF) have now tested three different ablator materials: glow discharge polymer (GDP) plastic, high density carbon (HDC), and beryllium. How do these different ablator choices compare in current and future implosion experiments on NIF? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of each? This talk compares these different ablator options in capsule-only simulations of current NIF experiments and proposed future designs. The simulations compare the impact of the capsule fill tube, support tent, and interface surface roughness for each case, as well as all perturbations in combination. According to the simulations, each ablator is impacted by the various perturbation sources differently, and each material poses unique challenges in the pursuit of ignition. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Uninterrupted Dabigatran versus Warfarin for Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkins, Hugh; Willems, Stephan; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.; Verma, Atul; Schilling, Richard; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Okumura, Ken; Serota, Harvey; Nordaby, Matias; Guiver, Kelly; Biss, Branislav; Brouwer, Marc A.; Grimaldi, Massimo; de Asmundis, Carlo; Debruyne, Philippe; Pierard, Luc; Scavé e, Christophe; Schwagten, Bruno; van Acker, Hannes; van Heuverswyn, Frank; Ayala-Paredes, Felix; Lane, Christopher; Lockwood, Evan; Michael, Kevin; Morillo, Carlos; O’ Hara, Gilles; Cebron, Jean-Pierre; Chevalier, Philippe; DeChillou, Christian; Defaye, Pascal; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Duthoit, Guillaume; Marijon, Eloi; Mechulan, Alexis; Sacher, Fré dé ric; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Dahme, Tillmann; Ince, H.ü seyin; Neumann, Thomas; Steven, Daniel; Ü cer, Ekrem; Zabel, Markus; Calo, Leonardo; Cireddu, Manuela; Menardi, Endrju; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tondo, Claudio; Fujii, Kenshi; Iwasa, Atsushi; Inden, Yasuya; Kimura, Masaomi; Murakami, Masato; Murakami, Yoshimasa; Satomi, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Wataru; Watarai, Masato; Yoshida, Yukihiko; Merino, José -Luí s; Mitjans, Angel Moya; Mont, Lluí s; Asensi, Joaquí n Osca; Pedrote Martí nez, Á ngel Alonso; Teijeira-Ferná ndez, Elvis; Allaart, Cornelis P.; de Jong, Jonas S. G.; Folkeringa, Richard J.; Simmers, Tim A.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Kuznetsov, Vadim; Nedoshivin, Aleksandr; Novikova, Tatiana; Revishvili, Amiran S.; Staroverov, Ilya; Agarwal, Sharad; Betts, Timothy; Connelly, Derek; Hobson, Neil; Leong, Fong; McCready, James; Paisey, John; Tayebjee, Muzahir; Thornley, Andrew; Ahmed, Jameel; Beck, Hiroko; Beinart, Sean; Bindra, Sanjay; Chae, Sanders; Cheng, Jie; Eldadah, Zayd; Feigenblum, David; Fuenzalida, Charles; Gandhavadi, Maheer; Garabelli, Paul; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Gonzalez, Mario; Hurwitz, Jodie; Johnson, Colleen; Kabra, Rajesh; Kowalski, Marcin; Kulkarni, Gurudutt; Marrouche, Nassir; Miller, John; Mounsey, Paul; Norris, Blake; O’ Neill, Gearoid; Roukoz, Henri; Srivatsa, Uma; Talano, James; Vora, Aaditya; Wong, Brian; Camm, John; Cappato, Riccardo; Crijns, Harry; Kenigsberg, David; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Januzzi, James; Garasic, Joe; Pehrson, Steen; Kolansky, Daniel; McDonald, Michael; van Tosh, Andrew; Sturm, Jonathan; Peeters, André ; Hirsch, Karen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is typically performed with uninterrupted anticoagulation with warfarin or interrupted non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant therapy. Uninterrupted anticoagulation with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant, such as dabigatran, may be

  3. Intra-cardiac echocardiography in alcohol septal ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Robert M; Shahzad, Adeel; Newton, James

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy reduces left ventricular outflow tract gradients. A third of patients do not respond; inaccurate localisation of the iatrogenic infarct can be responsible. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) using myocardial contrast can...

  4. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  5. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of a metastatic lung nodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highland, Adrian M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Anlaby Road, Hull, HU3 2JZ (United Kingdom); Mack, Paul [Diana Princess of Wales Hospital, Scartho Road, Grimsby, DN33 2BA (United Kingdom); Breen, David J. [Department of Radiology, Southampton University Hospitals, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Pulmonary metastases are a common finding in patients with colonic adenocarcinoma. We report the treatment of a metastatic lung nodule with radiofrequency (RF) ablation under CT guidance. This case illustrates the use of RF ablation in a patient in whom surgical resection was no longer possible and where chemotherapy was unlikely to produce benefit. This technique may offer a viable method of cytoreduction when other treatments have not succeeded. (orig.)

  6. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of a metastatic lung nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highland, Adrian M.; Mack, Paul; Breen, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary metastases are a common finding in patients with colonic adenocarcinoma. We report the treatment of a metastatic lung nodule with radiofrequency (RF) ablation under CT guidance. This case illustrates the use of RF ablation in a patient in whom surgical resection was no longer possible and where chemotherapy was unlikely to produce benefit. This technique may offer a viable method of cytoreduction when other treatments have not succeeded. (orig.)

  7. Optimization of the generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Leblanc, Sarah; Vienne, Ariane; Rouquette, Alexandre; Beuvon, Frederic; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frederic

    2015-11-10

    To determine the optimal generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation was performed in live swine on the ampulla of Vater, the common bile duct and in the hepatic parenchyma. Radiofrequency ablation time, "effect", and power were allowed to vary. The animals were sacrificed two hours after the procedure. Histopathological assessment of the depth of the thermal lesions was performed. Twenty-five radiofrequency bursts were applied in three swine. In the ampulla of Vater (n = 3), necrosis of the duodenal wall was observed starting with an effect set at 8, power output set at 10 W, and a 30 s shot duration, whereas superficial mucosal damage of up to 350 μm in depth was recorded for an effect set at 8, power output set at 6 W and a 30 s shot duration. In the common bile duct (n = 4), a 1070 μm, safe and efficient ablation was obtained for an effect set at 8, a power output of 8 W, and an ablation time of 30 s. Within the hepatic parenchyma (n = 18), the depth of tissue damage varied from 1620 μm (effect = 8, power = 10 W, ablation time = 15 s) to 4480 μm (effect = 8, power = 8 W, ablation time = 90 s). The duration of the catheter application appeared to be the most important parameter influencing the depth of the thermal injury during endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. In healthy swine, the currently recommended settings of the generator may induce severe, supratherapeutic tissue damage in the biliary tree, especially in the high-risk area of the ampulla of Vater.

  8. Preparation of antibacterial textile using laser ablation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Sheila; Rashidian, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2018-02-01

    A facile in situ laser ablation synthesis of Copper nanoparticles on cotton fabric is reported in this paper. This synthetic method is a laser ablation based fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on cotton fabric for improved performance and antibacterial activity. The treated cotton fabric was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques and antibacterial counting test. Very good antibacterial behavior of treated fabrics achieved. This fabric can be used as medical and industrial textiles.

  9. Ablation from metals induced by visible and UV laser irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate of laser-ablated silver has been determined for fluences between 0.5 and 15 J/cm2 at the wavelengths 532 and 355 nm for a beam spot area of around 0.01 cm2. The ablated metal was collected on a quartz crystal microbalance. The rate at 5 J/cm2 was about 4 × 1013 Ag/cm2 per puls...

  10. Comparison of ablation stake measurements and Airborne Laser Scanning results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Lorenzo; Galos, Stephan; Klug, Christoph; Sailer, Rudolf

    2014-05-01

    Ablation measurements using ablation stakes are a well-established method in glaciology, which sees a lot of use. However, ablation stakes cannot always be installed and read at a sufficient number of points on a glacier or on multiple glaciers, due to limited personnel and financial capacities or because of inaccessible areas due to dangerous zones (crevasses, rock falls, avalanches) or remote terrain. Furthermore, ablation stakes only enable measurements of surface melt, whereas basal or internal melt processes as well as surface change related to glacier dynamics cannot be measured. Multi temporal Airborne laser scanning (ALS) can provide high resolution and very accurate topographic information for the whole glacier area, which allows the calculation of the difference in surface height and therefore - if the density profile is known or can be estimated - the determination of the local mass balance, including processes like basal melt at least to a certain degree. To gain a better understanding of the differences between ablation stake readings and differential ALS data at the stake locations, the results of both methods have been compared in detail. At Langenferner, a glacier in the Italian Eastern Alps, where mass balance measurements have been carried out since 2004, three ALS campaigns have been conducted at the end of the hydrological year in 2005, 2010 and 2013. There are about 30 ablation stakes installed at the glacier, which have been read during or very close to the time of the flight campaigns. The ablation measurements are then compared to the surface differences calculated from ALS data at the locations of the ablation stakes. To take the movement of the stakes due to glacier dyanmics into account, the position of the stakes has been measured with a differential GPS.

  11. Identifying Threshold Concepts for Information Literacy: A Delphi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Townsend

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study used the Delphi method to engage expert practitioners on the topic of threshold concepts for information literacy. A panel of experts considered two questions. First, is the threshold concept approach useful for information literacy instruction? The panel unanimously agreed that the threshold concept approach holds potential for information literacy instruction. Second, what are the threshold concepts for information literacy instruction? The panel proposed and discussed over fifty potential threshold concepts, finally settling on six information literacy threshold concepts.

  12. Cost-effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost-effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost-effectiveness thresholds allow cost-effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost-effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country's per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this - in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost-effectiveness ratios - can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost-effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations - e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations - in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost-effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair.

  13. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  14. Assisted laser ablation: silver/gold nanostructures coated with silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, J. R.; Rodríguez-González, Eugenio; Jiménez-Villar, Ernesto; Cesar, Carlos Lenz; Andrade-Arvizu, Jacob Antonio

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis processes of metallic nanoparticles have seen a growing interest in recent years, mainly by the potential applications of the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance associated with metallic nanoparticles. This paper shows a fast method to synthesize silver, gold and silver/gold alloy nanoparticles coated with a porous silica shell by the assisted laser ablation method in three steps. The method involves a redox chemical reaction where the reducing agent is supplied in nanometric form by laser ablation. In the first step, a silicon target immersed in water is ablated for several minutes. Later, AgNO3 and HAuCl4 aliquots are added to the solution. The redox reaction between the silver and gold ions and products resulting from ablation process can produce silver, gold or silver/gold alloy nanoparticles coated with a porous silica shell. The influence of the laser pulse energy, ablation time, Ag+ and Au3+ concentration, as well as the Ag+/Au3+ ratio, on optical and structural properties of the nanostructures was investigated. This work represents a step forward in the study of reaction mechanisms that take place during the synthesis of nanoscale materials by the assisted laser ablation technique.

  15. Rising charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M; Evans, Frank; Pearson, Gail D; Berul, Charles I; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2013-02-01

    Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. We used the 1997-2009 Kids' Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P charges. The same factors also predicted increased costs. Charges and costs varied considerably by region, particularly for high-volume centers (P Charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation of cardiac tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of basic factors such as electrode tip pressure, flow around the electrode and electrode orientation influence lesion size during radiofrequency ablation, but importantly is dependent on the chosen mode of ablation. However, only little information is available for the frequ......BACKGROUND: A variety of basic factors such as electrode tip pressure, flow around the electrode and electrode orientation influence lesion size during radiofrequency ablation, but importantly is dependent on the chosen mode of ablation. However, only little information is available...... for the frequently used temperature-controlled mode. The purpose of the present experimental study was to evaluate the impact during temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation of three basic factors regarding electrode-tissue contact and convective cooling on lesion size. METHODS AND RESULTS: In vitro strips......-controlled radiofrequency ablation increased external cooling of the electrode tip due to either flow of the surrounding liquid or poor electrode tissue contact, as exemplified by perpendicular versus parallel electrode orientation, increases lesion size significantly. This is in contrast to the impact of these factors...

  17. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO2 Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO 2 laser (wavelength: 10.6 μm; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  18. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness and Ablation Outcome of Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Yun, Chun-Ho; Lai, Yau-Huei; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chang, Hung-Yu; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Epicardial fat was closely related to atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has been proposed to be a convenient imaging tool in assessing epicardial adipose tissue (EAT). The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the EAT thickness measured on TTE was a useful parameter in predicting procedural outcomes of AF ablations. Methods and Results A total of 227 paroxysmal AF (PAF) and 56 non-paroxysmal AF (non-PAF) patients receiving catheter ablations from 2008-2010 were enrolled. Echocardiography-derived regional EAT thickness from parasternal long-axis view was quantified for each patient. Free of recurrence was defined as the absence of atrial arrhythmias without using antiarrhythmic agents after ablations. The mean EAT thickness of the study population was 6.1 ± 0.8 mm. Non-PAF patients had a thicker EAT than that of PAF patients (7.0 ± 0.7 mm versus 5.9 ± 0.7 mm, p value EAT thickness were independent predictors of recurrence after catheter ablations. At a cutoff value of 6 mm for PAF and 6.9 mm for non-PAF, the measurement of EAT thickness could help us to identify patients at risk of recurrences. Conclusions EAT thickness may serve as a useful parameter in predicting recurrences after AF ablations. Compared to other imaging modalities, TTE can be an alternative choice with less cost and time in assessing the effects of EAT on ablation outcomes. PMID:24066158

  19. Avoiding Complications in Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurup, A. Nicholas, E-mail: kurup.anil@mayo.edu; Schmit, Grant D., E-mail: schmit.grant@mayo.edu; Morris, Jonathan M., E-mail: morris.jonathan@mayo.edu; Atwell, Thomas D., E-mail: atwell.thomas@mayo.edu; Schmitz, John J., E-mail: schmitz.john@mayo.edu; Weisbrod, Adam J., E-mail: weisbrod.adam@mayo.edu; Woodrum, David A., E-mail: woodrum.david@mayo.edu; Eiken, Patrick W., E-mail: eiken.patrick@mayo.edu; Callstrom, Matthew R., E-mail: callstrom.matthew@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-02-15

    As with percutaneous ablation of tumors in the liver, lungs, and kidneys, ablation of bone and non-visceral soft tissue tumors carries risk, primarily from collateral damage to vital structures in proximity to the target tumor. Certain risks are of particular interest when ablating bone and non-visceral soft tissue tumors, namely neural or skin injury, bowel injury, fracture, and gas embolism from damaged applicators. Ablation of large volume tumors also carries special risk. Many techniques may be employed by the interventional radiologist to minimize complications when treating tumors in the musculoskeletal system. These methods include those to depict, displace, or monitor critical structures. Thus, measures to provide thermoprotection may be active, such as careful ablation applicator placement and use of various displacement techniques, as well as passive, including employment of direct temperature, radiographic, or neurophysiologic monitoring techniques. Cementoplasty should be considered in certain skeletal locations at risk of fracture. Patients treated with large volume tumors should be monitored for renal dysfunction and properly hydrated. Finally, ablation applicators should be cautiously placed in the constrained environment of intact bone.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs.

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Malignancies: Where Do We Stand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura; Cioni, Roberto; Mussi, Alfredo; Fontanini, Gabriella; Ambrogi, Marcello; Franchini, Chiara; Cioni, Dania; Fanucchi, Olivia; Gemignani, Raffaello; Baldassarri, Rubia; Angeletti, Carlo Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to treat solid tumors. Because of its ability to produce large volumes of coagulation necrosis in a controlled fashion, this technique has gained acceptance as a viable therapeutic option for unresectable liver malignancies. Recently, investigation has been focused on the clinical application of RF ablation in the treatment of lung malignancies. In theory, lung tumors are well suited to RF ablation because the surrounding air in adjacent normal parenchyma provides an insulating effect, thus facilitating energy concentration within the tumor tissue. Experimental studies in rabbits have confirmed that lung RF ablation can be safely and effectively performed via a percutaneous, transthoracic approach, and have prompted the start of clinical investigation. Pilot clinical studies have shown that RF ablation enables successful treatment of relatively small lung malignancies with a high rate of complete response and acceptable morbidity, and have suggested that the technique could represent a viable alternate or complementary treatment method for patients with non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases of favorable histotypes who are not candidates for surgical resection. This article gives an overview of lung RF ablation, discussing experimental animal findings, rationale for clinical application, technique and methodology, clinical results, and complications

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs

  3. Avoiding Complications in Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Schmit, Grant D.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Schmitz, John J.; Weisbrod, Adam J.; Woodrum, David A.; Eiken, Patrick W.; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    As with percutaneous ablation of tumors in the liver, lungs, and kidneys, ablation of bone and non-visceral soft tissue tumors carries risk, primarily from collateral damage to vital structures in proximity to the target tumor. Certain risks are of particular interest when ablating bone and non-visceral soft tissue tumors, namely neural or skin injury, bowel injury, fracture, and gas embolism from damaged applicators. Ablation of large volume tumors also carries special risk. Many techniques may be employed by the interventional radiologist to minimize complications when treating tumors in the musculoskeletal system. These methods include those to depict, displace, or monitor critical structures. Thus, measures to provide thermoprotection may be active, such as careful ablation applicator placement and use of various displacement techniques, as well as passive, including employment of direct temperature, radiographic, or neurophysiologic monitoring techniques. Cementoplasty should be considered in certain skeletal locations at risk of fracture. Patients treated with large volume tumors should be monitored for renal dysfunction and properly hydrated. Finally, ablation applicators should be cautiously placed in the constrained environment of intact bone.

  4. Rising Charges and Costs for Pediatric Catheter Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BURNS, KRISTIN M.; EVANS, FRANK; PEARSON, GAIL D.; BERUL, CHARLES I.; KALTMAN, JONATHAN R.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. Methods We used the 1997-2009 Kids’ Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. Results There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. PMID:23066833

  5. Lesion dimensions during temperature-controlled radiofrequency catheter ablation of left ventricular porcine myocardium: impact of ablation site, electrode size, and convective cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh Petersen, H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1999-01-01

    It is important to increase lesion size to improve the success rate for radiofrequency ablation of ischemic ventricular tachycardia. This study of radiofrequency ablation, with adjustment of power to approach a preset target temperature, ie, temperature-controlled ablation, explores the effect...

  6. Successful treatment of hepatic oligometastases with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion-positive lung cancer patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Liu, Mitchell; Sobkin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Local ablative therapy with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy may improve survival in oncogene‐addicted lung cancer patients with extracranial oligometastatic disease treated with targeted therapies. There is limited data on the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in this same setting. We present...

  7. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in nigh-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels <2 ng/ml in a TSH-stimulated state after ablation. We extracted data on patients' age, sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P < 0.001), while no significant differences were found for other factors between the groups. Furthermore, thyroglobulin levels >10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria. (author)

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of nonlinear light scattering in air on ablation of materials produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2002-05-01

    Nonlinear light scattering appearing upon air breakdown induced by high-power ultrashort pulses (110 — 5200 fs) from a Ti:Al2O3 laser is studied. As a result of forward scattering, the beam profile is severely deformed, which is accompanied by spectral conversion of the incident radiation to a series of shorter-wavelength peaks extending into the visible spectral range. Measurements are made of the thresholds and the scattered radiation energy, which amounts to 75% of the incident energy. The effect of scattering on the material ablation in air is investigated. The obtained data offer an explanation for the experimentally observed paradoxical morphology of the channels ablated by high-power femtosecond pulses.

  9. Regression Discontinuity Designs Based on Population Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, Andrew C.; Freier, Ronny; Grembi, Veronica

    ) to measure the effects of these threshold-based policies on political and economic outcomes. Using evidence from France, Germany, and Italy, we highlight two common pitfalls that arise in exploiting population-based policies (confounded treatment and sorting) and we provide guidance for detecting......In many countries, important features of municipal government (such as the electoral system, mayors' salaries, and the number of councillors) depend on whether the municipality is above or below arbitrary population thresholds. Several papers have used a regression discontinuity design (RDD...... and addressing these pitfalls. Even when these problems are present, population-threshold RDD may be the best available research design for studying the effects of certain policies and political institutions....

  10. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saritas, Emine U., E-mail: saritas@ee.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); National Magnetic Resonance Research Center (UMRAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Goodwill, Patrick W. [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Conolly, Steven M. [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Department of EECS, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  11. THRESHOLD PARAMETER OF THE EXPECTED LOSSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Arnerić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of extreme value analysis is to quantify the probabilistic behavior of unusually large losses using only extreme values above some high threshold rather than using all of the data which gives better fit to tail distribution in comparison to traditional methods with assumption of normality. In our case we estimate market risk using daily returns of the CROBEX index at the Zagreb Stock Exchange. Therefore, it’s necessary to define the excess distribution above some threshold, i.e. Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD is used as much more reliable than the normal distribution due to the fact that gives the accent on the extreme values. Parameters of GPD distribution will be estimated using maximum likelihood method (MLE. The contribution of this paper is to specify threshold which is large enough so that GPD approximation valid but low enough so that a sufficient number of observations are available for a precise fit.

  12. Threshold Theory Tested in an Organizational Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo T.; Hartmann, Peter V. W.; Hedegaard Rasmussen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    correlations differed significantly. The finding was stable across distinct parts of the sample, providing support for the theory, although the correlations in all subsamples were small. The findings lend support to the existence of threshold effects using perceptual measures of behavior in real......A large sample of leaders (N = 4257) was used to test the link between leader innovativeness and intelligence. The threshold theory of the link between creativity and intelligence assumes that below a certain IQ level (approximately IQ 120), there is some correlation between IQ and creative...... potential, but above this cutoff point, there is no correlation. Support for the threshold theory of creativity was found, in that the correlation between IQ and innovativeness was positive and significant below a cutoff point of IQ 120. Above the cutoff, no significant relation was identified, and the two...

  13. Social contagion with degree-dependent thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun; Holme, Petter

    2017-07-01

    We investigate opinion spreading by a threshold model in a situation in which the influence of people is heterogeneously distributed. We assume that there is a coupling between the influence of an individual (measured by the out-degree) and the threshold for accepting a new opinion or habit. We find that if the coupling is strongly positive, the final state of the system will be a mix of different opinions. Otherwise, it will converge to a consensus state. This phenomenon cannot simply be explained as a phase transition, but it is a combined effect of mechanisms and their relative dominance in different regions of parameter space.

  14. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  15. Color image Segmentation using automatic thresholding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrabi, R.; Ben Braiek, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, entropy and between-class variance based thresholding methods for color images segmentation are studied. The maximization of the between-class variance (MVI) and the entropy (ME) have been used as a criterion functions to determine an optimal threshold to segment images into nearly homogenous regions. Segmentation results from the two methods are validated and the segmentation sensitivity for the test data available is evaluated, and a comparative study between these methods in different color spaces is presented. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the MVI method for color image segmentation.

  16. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  17. Nephron-sparing percutaneous ablation of a 5 cm renal cell carcinoma by superselective embolization and percutaneous RF-ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.; Buecker, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Rohde, D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the nephron-sparing, percutaneous ablation of a large renal cell carcinoma by combined superselective embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. Materials and Methods: A 5 cm renal cell carcinoma of a 43-year-old drug abusing male with serologically proven HIV, hepatitis B and C infection, who refused surgery, was superselectively embolized using microspheres (size: 500 - 700 μm) and a platinum coil under local anesthesia. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation using a 7F LeVeen probe (size of expanded probe tip: 40 mm) and a 200 Watt generator was performed one day after transcatheter embolization under general anesthesia. Results: The combined treatment resulted in complete destruction of the tumor without relevant damage of the surrounding healthy renal tissue. The patient was discharged 24 hours after RF ablation. No complications like urinary leaks or fistulas were observed and follow up CT one day and 4 weeks after the radiofrequency intervention revealed no signs of residual tumor growth. Conclusion: The combined transcatheter embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma has proved technically feasible, effective, and safe in this patient. It may be offered as an alternative treatment to partial or radical nephrectomy under certain circumstances. Abbreviations: RF = radiofrequency ablation; CT = computed tomography; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiofrequency ablation with epinephrine injection: in vivo study in normal pig livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Dong Hoo; Lim, Joo Won; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Youn Wha; Choi, Bong Keun [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We wanted to evaluate whether epinephrine injection prior to radiofrequency (RF) ablation can increase the extent of thermally mediated coagulation in vivo normal pig liver tissue. Eighteen RF ablation zones were created in six pigs using a 17-gauge internally cooled electrode under ultrasound guidance. Three RF ablation zones were created in each pig under three conditions: RF ablation alone, RF ablation after the injection of 3 mL of normal saline, and RF ablation after the injection of 3 mL of epinephrine (1:10,000 solution). After the RF ablation, we measured the short and long diameters of the white zones in the gross specimens. Three of the RF ablations were technically unsuccessful; therefore, measurement of white zone was finally done in 15 RF ablation zones. The mean short and long diameters of the white zone of the RF ablation after epinephrine injection (17.2 mm {+-} 1.8 and 20.8 mm {+-} 3.7, respectively) were larger than those of RF ablation only (10 mm {+-} 1.2 and 12.2 mm {+-} 1.1, respectively) and RF ablation after normal saline injection (12.8 mm {+-} 1.5 and 15.6 mm {+-} 2.5, respectively) ({rho} < .05). RF ablation with epinephrine injection can increase the diameter of the RF ablation zone in normal pig liver tissue.

  19. Ablation front hydrodynamic instability experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remington, B.A.; Marinak, M.M.; Weber, S.V.; Budil, K.S.; Landen, O.L.; Haan, S.W.; Wallace, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The x-ray driven ablation front hydrodynamic instability experiments at Nova span 1988-present, and can be divided into three generations. The 1st generation experiments consisted of planar foils with perturbations of the form k = k x imposed on the drive side of the foil. A variety of drive pulse shapes, foil materials, and perturbation wavelengths and amplitudes were investigated, with growth factors of up to 80 being observed. The 2nd generation experiments investigated mode-mode interactions with imposed perturbations corresponding to the superposition of modes. They have done experiments with two-mode and eight-mode foils. In the linear regime, the modes grow independently with their own respective growth rates. In the nonlinear regime, in addition to the higher harmonics of the pre-existing modes, coupled terms k i ± k j occur. The 3rd generation experiments focus on 3D Rayleigh-Taylor growth. They have recently done experiments with an imposed 3D single-mode perturbation of the form k = (k x ,k y ), with k x = k y . In the linear regime, this perturbation grows exponentially with wave vector k = (k x 2 + k y 2 ) 1/2 . In the nonlinear regime, the perturbations evolve into broad bubbles surrounded on four corners by very dense, localized spikes with archways or saddle points in between. Simulations suggest that this 3D square mode grows larger than the corresponding 2D perturbation with the same magnitude wavevector and initial amplitude

  20. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  1. Radiofrequency ablation for renal tumors. Our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Kenji; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakamura, Terukazu; Soh, Jintetsu; Mikami, Kazuya; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report our results of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for renal tumors and to assess predictors of therapeutic efficacy. Forty patients (median age 73 years) with renal tumors were treated with RFA under local or epidural anesthesia. All of them had high surgical risk or refused radical surgery. Tumors were punctured percutaneously using the Radionics Cool-tip RF System under computed tomography or ultrasonographic guidance. Median tumor diameter was 24 mm. After RFA, contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was performed within 1 month. Complete response (CR) was defined as no enhancement inside the tumor. Factors related to the outcome and to renal function were assessed. Median follow up was 16 months. CR was observed in 34 cases (85.0%). A significant difference in CR rate was observed between tumors ≤30 mm and those >30 mm. Outcomes tended to be better for tumors in the mid to lower kidney, and those away from the renal hilum. Recurrence was observed in one case (2.9%), but a CR was obtained again by additional RFA. Out of a total of 77 RFA procedures, complications occurred in only three cases (3.9%), and conservative treatment was possible in all cases. Serum creatinine levels 3 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for small renal tumors in patients with high surgical risk or who refuse radical surgery. (author)

  2. Pulmonary oligometastases: Metastasectomy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widder, Joachim; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groen, Harry J.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; or stereotactic body radiotherapy, SBRT) emerges as treatment option for pulmonary oligometastatic disease (OMD), but there are no studies comparing SABR with pulmonary metastasectomy (PME). We analysed consecutive patients referred via a university-hospital based multidisciplinary team. Material and methods: Patients were offered PME as first choice and SABR in case they were considered to be less suitable surgical candidates. Overall survival was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were progression-free-survival, local control of treated metastases, and freedom-from-failure of a local-only treatment strategy without systemic therapy. Results: From 2007 until 2010, 110 patients were treated and analysed (PME, n = 68; SABR, n = 42). Median follow-up time was 43 months (minimally, 25). Estimated overall survival rates at one, three, and five years were 87%, 62%, and 41% for PME, and 98%, 60%, and 49% for SABR, respectively (logrank-test, p = 0.43). Local control at two years was 94% for SABR and 90% for PME. Progression-free survival was 17% at three years, but 43% of the patients still had not failed a local-only treatment strategy. Conclusions: Although SABR was second choice after PME, survival after PME was not better than after SABR. Prospective comparative studies are clearly required to define the role of both, SABR and PME in OMD

  3. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  4. Comparison between intensity- duration thresholds and cumulative rainfall thresholds for the forecasting of landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Rosi, Ascanio; Rossi, Guglielmo; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    This work makes a quantitative comparison between the results of landslide forecasting obtained using two different rainfall threshold models, one using intensity-duration thresholds and the other based on cumulative rainfall thresholds in an area of northern Tuscany of 116 km2. The first methodology identifies rainfall intensity-duration thresholds by means a software called MaCumBA (Massive CUMulative Brisk Analyzer) that analyzes rain-gauge records, extracts the intensities (I) and durations (D) of the rainstorms associated with the initiation of landslides, plots these values on a diagram, and identifies thresholds that define the lower bounds of the I-D values. A back analysis using data from past events can be used to identify the threshold conditions associated with the least amount of false alarms. The second method (SIGMA) is based on the hypothesis that anomalous or extreme values of rainfall are responsible for landslide triggering: the statistical distribution of the rainfall series is analyzed, and multiples of the standard deviation (σ) are used as thresholds to discriminate between ordinary and extraordinary rainfall events. The name of the model, SIGMA, reflects the central role of the standard deviations in the proposed methodology. The definition of intensity-duration rainfall thresholds requires the combined use of rainfall measurements and an inventory of dated landslides, whereas SIGMA model can be implemented using only rainfall data. These two methodologies were applied in an area of 116 km2 where a database of 1200 landslides was available for the period 2000-2012. The results obtained are compared and discussed. Although several examples of visual comparisons between different intensity-duration rainfall thresholds are reported in the international literature, a quantitative comparison between thresholds obtained in the same area using different techniques and approaches is a relatively undebated research topic.

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation in Systolic Dysfunction: Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasso Julio Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF often coexist in a deleterious cycle. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction and AF treated with radiofrequency (RF ablation. Methods: Patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction [ejection fraction (EF <50%] and AF refractory to drug therapy underwent stepwise RF ablation in the same session with pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of AF nests and of residual atrial tachycardia, named "background tachycardia". Clinical (NYHA functional class and echocardiographic (EF, left atrial diameter data were compared (McNemar test and t test before and after ablation. Results: 31 patients (6 women, 25 men, aged 37 to 77 years (mean, 59.8±10.6, underwent RF ablation. The etiology was mainly idiopathic (19 p, 61%. During a mean follow-up of 20.3±17 months, 24 patients (77% were in sinus rhythm, 11 (35% being on amiodarone. Eight patients (26% underwent more than one procedure (6 underwent 2 procedures, and 2 underwent 3 procedures. Significant NYHA functional class improvement was observed (pre-ablation: 2.23±0.56; postablation: 1.13±0.35; p<0.0001. The echocardiographic outcome also showed significant ventricular function improvement (EF pre: 44.68%±6.02%, post: 59%±13.2%, p=0.0005 and a significant left atrial diameter reduction (pre: 46.61±7.3 mm; post: 43.59±6.6 mm; p=0.026. No major complications occurred. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that AF ablation in patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction is a safe and highly effective procedure. Arrhythmia control has a great impact on ventricular function recovery and functional class improvement.

  6. On the two steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling of extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Mazas, Franck; Weiss, Jerome; Andreewsky, Marc; Kergadallan, Xavier; Benoit, Michel; Hamm, Luc

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the probability of occurrence of extreme events is traditionally achieved by fitting a probability distribution on a sample of extreme observations. In particular, the extreme value theory (EVT) states that values exceeding a given threshold converge through a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) if the original sample is composed of independent and identically distributed values. However, the temporal series of sea and ocean variables usually show strong temporal autocorrelation. Traditionally, in order to select independent events for the following statistical analysis, the concept of a physical threshold is introduced: events that excess that threshold are defined as "extreme events". This is the so-called "Peak Over a Threshold (POT)" sampling, widely spread in the literature and currently used for engineering applications among many others. In the past, the threshold for the statistical sampling of extreme values asymptotically convergent toward GPD and the threshold for the physical selection of independent extreme events were confused, as the same threshold was used for both sampling data and to meet the hypothesis of extreme value convergence, leading to some incoherencies. In particular, if the two steps are performed simultaneously, the number of peaks over the threshold can increase but also decrease when the threshold decreases. This is logic in a physical point of view, since the definition of the sample of "extreme events" changes, but is not coherent with the statistical theory. We introduce a two-steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling, aiming to discriminate (i) a physical threshold for the selection of extreme and independent events, and (ii) a statistical threshold for the optimization of the coherence with the hypothesis of the EVT. The former is a physical events identification procedure (also called "declustering") aiming at selecting independent extreme events. The latter is a purely statistical optimization

  7. Mesoscale spatial variability in seawater cavitation thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, N. P.; Elistratov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the spatial variability of cavitation thresholds and some hydrological and hydrochemical parameters of seawater in the interfrontal zone of the Pacific Subarctic Front, in the Drake Passage, and in the equatorial part of the Pacific Ocean, measured in the near-surface layer to a depth of 70 m.

  8. Intraoperative transfusion threshold and tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K; Dahl, B; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) may be needed to maintain oxygen delivery during major surgery, but the appropriate haemoglobin (Hb) concentration threshold has not been well established. We hypothesised that a higher level of Hb would be associated with improved subcutaneous...

  9. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  10. Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The object of this study was to estimate heritabilities and sire breeding values for stayability and reproductive traits in a composite multibreed beef cattle herd using a threshold model. A GFCAT set of programmes was used to analyse reproductive data. Heritabilities and product-moment correlations between.

  11. Design of Threshold Controller Based Chaotic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, I. Raja; Murali, K.; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2010-01-01

    We propose a very simple implementation of a second-order nonautonomous chaotic oscillator, using a threshold controller as the only source of nonlinearity. We demonstrate the efficacy and simplicity of our design through numerical and experimental results. Further, we show that this approach...

  12. Grid - a fast threshold tracking procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure, called “grid”, is evaluated that allows rapid acquisition of threshold curves for psychophysics and, in particular, psychoacoustic, experiments. In this method, the parameterresponse space is sampled in two dimensions within a single run. This allows the procedure to focus more e...

  13. Atherogenic Risk Factors and Hearing Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from c...

  14. 40 CFR 68.115 - Threshold determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with the definition of flammability hazard rating 4 in the NFPA 704, Standard System... more than a threshold quantity is present at a stationary source. (iii) Naturally occurring hydrocarbon..., regulated substances in naturally occurring hydrocarbon mixtures need not be considered when determining...

  15. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  16. Determining lower threshold concentrations for synergistic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Kretschmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    which proven synergists cease to act as synergists towards the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. To do this, we compared several approaches and test-setups to evaluate which approach gives the most conservative estimate for the lower threshold for synergy for three known azole synergists. We focus.......619±8.555μgL(-1)) and 0.122±0.0417μM (40.236±13.75μgL(-1)), respectively, in the 14-days tests. Testing synergy in relation to concentration addition provided the most conservative values. The threshold values for the vertical assessments in tests where the two could be compared were in general 1.2 to 4.......7 fold higher than the horizontal assessments. Using passive dosing rather than dilution series or spiking did not lower the threshold significantly. Below the threshold for synergy, slight antagony could often be observed. This is most likely due to induction of enzymes active in metabolization of alpha...

  17. Microplastic effect thresholds for freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redondo Hasselerharm, P.E.; Dede Falahudin, Dede; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

  18. Distribution of sensory taste thresholds for phenylthiocarbamide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to taste Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), a bitter organic compound has been described as a bimodal autosomal trait in both genetic and anthropological studies. This study is based on the ability of a person to taste PTC. The present study reports the threshold distribution of PTC taste sensitivity among some Muslim ...

  19. A low-threshold erbium glass minilaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapontsev, V. P.; Gromov, A. K.; Izyneev, A. A.; Sadovskii, P. I.; Stavrov, A. A.

    1989-04-01

    Minilasers emitting in the 1.54-micron region with an emission threshold less than 5 J and efficiency up to 1.7 percent have been constructed using a Cr-Y-Er laser glass, LGS-Kh. Under repetitively-pulsed operation, an average lasing power of 0.7 W and a pulse repetition rate of 7 Hz have been achieved.

  20. Thresholding methods for PET imaging: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Betrouni, N.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Hossein-Foucher, C.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Hossein-Foucher, C.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; El Abiad, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with positron emission tomography segmentation methods for tumor volume determination. We propose a state of art techniques based on fixed or adaptive threshold. Methods found in literature are analysed with an objective point of view on their methodology, advantages and limitations. Finally, a comparative study is presented. (authors)

  1. Low-threshold conical microcavity dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario

    2010-01-01

    element simulations confirm that lasing occurs in whispering gallery modes which corresponds well to the measured multimode laser-emission. The effect of dye concentration on lasing threshold and lasing wavelength is investigated and can be explained using a standard dye laser model....

  2. Classification error of the thresholded independence rule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Britta Anker; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Jensen, Jens Ledet

    We consider classification in the situation of two groups with normally distributed data in the ‘large p small n’ framework. To counterbalance the high number of variables we consider the thresholded independence rule. An upper bound on the classification error is established which is taylored...

  3. The acoustic reflex threshold in aging ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, C A; Silman, S; Miller, M H

    1983-01-01

    This study investigates the controversy regarding the influence of age on the acoustic reflex threshold for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators between Jerger et al. [Mono. Contemp. Audiol. 1 (1978)] and Jerger [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] on the one hand and Silman [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] and others on the other. The acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators were evaluated under two measurement conditions. Seventy-two normal-hearing ears were drawn from 72 subjects ranging in age from 20-69 years. The results revealed that age was correlated with the acoustic reflex threshold for BBN activator but not for any of the tonal activators; the correlation was stronger under the 1-dB than under the 5-dB measurement condition. Also, the mean acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise activator were essentially similar to those reported by Jerger et al. (1978) but differed from those obtained in this study under the 1-dB measurement condition.

  4. Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment Jessica Parker Air Operations...Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment Executive Summary The Aeronautical Design Standard...position to be perceived. This minimum distance was defined as the distance discrimination threshold. For both high and low sea states, the thresholds

  5. Preparation of Silicon Rubber/2,2'-(3-methyl-4-dihydro-1,3,2-benzoxazinePropane Ablative-resistant Composites and Its Ablative Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Yimin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Benzoxazine resin is a new generation of anti-ablation resin with high char yield and high-temperature oxidation resistance. Using high temperature vulcanized silicon rubber as ablation resistance matrix and 2,2'-(3-methyl-4-dihydro-1,3,2-benzoxazinepropane as anti-ablation resin, silicon rubber/polybenzoxazine anti-ablation composite was prepared by blending method. The mechanical properties were tested,and the ablation structure and the composition of the composite were investigated by DSC,SEM,FT-IR and Raman.Experimental results show that the polybenzoxazine resin can improve the ablation resistance property of silicone rubber composite. The composite has good ablation resistance and mechanical property when the addition of polybenzoxazine resin reaches 20 phr. After ablated by oxygen acetylene flame,the ablation layer is divided into three obvious layers as surface ceramic layer,pyrolysis carbonization layer and base layer. The surface ceramic layer formed in the progress of ablation plays a positive role in the ablation property of the composite material.

  6. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-09-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in high-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P 10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria.

  7. Cost–effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost–effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost–effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost–effectiveness thresholds allow cost–effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization’s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost–effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country’s per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this – in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost–effectiveness ratios – can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost–effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations – e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations – in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost–effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair. PMID:27994285

  8. Multimodal distribution of human cold pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Dimova, Violeta; Lieb, Isabel; Zimmermann, Michael; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    It is assumed that different pain phenotypes are based on varying molecular pathomechanisms. Distinct ion channels seem to be associated with the perception of cold pain, in particular TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been highlighted previously. The present study analyzed the distribution of cold pain thresholds with focus at describing the multimodality based on the hypothesis that it reflects a contribution of distinct ion channels. Cold pain thresholds (CPT) were available from 329 healthy volunteers (aged 18 - 37 years; 159 men) enrolled in previous studies. The distribution of the pooled and log-transformed threshold data was described using a kernel density estimation (Pareto Density Estimation (PDE)) and subsequently, the log data was modeled as a mixture of Gaussian distributions using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to optimize the fit. CPTs were clearly multi-modally distributed. Fitting a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to the log-transformed threshold data revealed that the best fit is obtained when applying a three-model distribution pattern. The modes of the identified three Gaussian distributions, retransformed from the log domain to the mean stimulation temperatures at which the subjects had indicated pain thresholds, were obtained at 23.7 °C, 13.2 °C and 1.5 °C for Gaussian #1, #2 and #3, respectively. The localization of the first and second Gaussians was interpreted as reflecting the contribution of two different cold sensors. From the calculated localization of the modes of the first two Gaussians, the hypothesis of an involvement of TRPM8, sensing temperatures from 25 - 24 °C, and TRPA1, sensing cold from 17 °C can be derived. In that case, subjects belonging to either Gaussian would possess a dominance of the one or the other receptor at the skin area where the cold stimuli had been applied. The findings therefore support a suitability of complex analytical approaches to detect mechanistically determined patterns from pain phenotype data.

  9. Do multiple body modifications alter pain threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamotová, A; Hrabák, P; Hříbek, P; Rokyta, R

    2017-12-30

    In recent years, epidemiological data has shown an increasing number of young people who deliberately self-injure. There have also been parallel increases in the number of people with tattoos and those who voluntarily undergo painful procedures associated with piercing, scarification, and tattooing. People with self-injury behaviors often say that they do not feel the pain. However, there is no information regarding pain perception in those that visit tattoo parlors and piercing studios compared to those who don't. The aim of this study was to compare nociceptive sensitivity in four groups of subjects (n=105, mean age 26 years, 48 women and 57 men) with different motivations to experience pain (i.e., with and without multiple body modifications) in two different situations; (1) in controlled, emotionally neutral conditions, and (2) at a "Hell Party" (HP), an event organized by a piercing and tattoo parlor, with a main event featuring a public demonstration of painful techniques (burn scars, hanging on hooks, etc.). Pain thresholds of the fingers of the hand were measured using a thermal stimulator and mechanical algometer. In HP participants, information about alcohol intake, self-harming behavior, and psychiatric history were used in the analysis as intervening variables. Individuals with body modifications as well as without body modifications had higher thermal pain thresholds at Hell Party, compared to thresholds measured at control neutral conditions. No such differences were found relative to mechanical pain thresholds. Increased pain threshold in all HP participants, irrespectively of body modification, cannot be simply explained by a decrease in the sensory component of pain; instead, we found that the environment significantly influenced the cognitive and affective component of pain.

  10. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    The work presented in this thesis encompassed laser ablation of various transition metals within a liquid environment. Through an improved understanding of the ablation process, control over the properties of the resultant nanoparticles can be obtained, and thusly nanoparticles can be tailored with specific properties. Creation of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution is a relatively youngtechnique for nanoparticle synthesis, and the work presented should prove useful in guiding further exploration in ablation processes in liquids for nanomaterial production. When a laser is focused onto a target under a liquid environment, the target material and its surrounding liquid are vaporized. The concoction of vapor is ejected normal to the surface as a bubble. The bubble has a temperature reaching the boiling point of the metal, and has a gradient to the boiling point of the solvent. The bubble expands until it reaches a critical volume, and then subsequently collapses. It is within this bubble that nanoparticle formation occurs. As the bubble expands, the vapor cools and nanoparticle growth transpires. During the bubble collapse, pressures reaching GigaPascals have been reported, and a secondary nanoparticle formation occurs as a result of these high pressures. Chapter 1 delves a little more into the nanoparticle formation mechanisms, as well as an introduction to the analytical techniques used for characterization. Ablation of titanium took place in isopropanol, ethanol, water, and n-hexane, under various fluences, with a 532 nm Nd:YAG operating at 10 Hz. It was found that a myriad of nanoparticles could be made with vastly different compositions that were both solvent and fluence dependent. Nanoparticles were made that incorporated carbon and oxygen from the solvent, showing how solvent choice is an important factor in nanoparticle creation. Chapter 3 discusses the results of the titanium work in great detail and demonstrates carbide production with ablation in

  11. Development of double-pulse lasers ablation system and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for direct spectral analysis of manganese doped PVA polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. A. I.; Morsy, M. A.; El-Deen, H. Z.

    2017-11-01

    Series of manganese-co-precipitated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed using laser ablation system (LAS) based on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The collinear nanosecond laser beams of 266 and 1064 nm were optimized to focus on the surface of the PVA polymer target. Both laser beams were employed to estimate the natural properties of the excited Mn-PVA plasma, such as electron number density (Ne), electron temperature (Te), and Mn concentration. Individual transition lines of manganese (Mn), carbon (C), lithium (Li), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms are identified based on the NIST spectral database. The results show better responses with DP-LIBS than the single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS). On the other hand, the EPR investigation shows characteristic broad peak of Mn-nano-particles (Mn-NPs) in the range of quantum dots of superparamagnetic materials. The line width (peak-to-peak, ΔHpp) and g-value of the observed Mn-EPR peak are ∼20 mT and 2.0046, respectively. The intensities of Mn-emission line at a wavelength 403.07 nm and the Mn-EPR absorption peak were used to accurate quantify the Mn-content in the polymer matrix. The results produce linear trends within the studied concentration range with regression coefficient (R2) value of ∼0.99, and limit of detection (LOD) of 0.026 mol.% and 0.016 mol.%, respectively. The LOD values are at a fold change of about -0.2 of the studied lowest mol.%. The proposed protocols of trace element detection are of significant advantage and can be applied to the other metal analysis.

  12. Ablation effect indicated by impedance fall is correlated with contact force level during ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bortoli, Alessandro; Sun, Li-Zhi; Solheim, Eivind; Hoff, Per Ivar; Schuster, Peter; Ohm, Ole-Jørgen; Chen, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have validated the use of impedance fall as a measure of the effects of ablation. We investigated whether catheter-to-tissue contact force correlated with impedance fall during atrial fibrillation ablation. A total of 394 ablation points from 35 patients who underwent atrial fibrillation ablation were selected and analyzed in terms of the presence of stable catheter contact in non-ablated areas in the left atrium. A fixed power output (30 W) was applied for 60 seconds. Contact force, impedance fall, and force-direction angle were retrieved and exported for off-line analysis. Qualified points were divided into 5 groups according to the level of contact force (1-5 g, 6-10 g, 11-15 g, 16-20 g, and >20 g). An acute impedance fall was observed in the first 10 seconds followed by a plateau in group I and by a further fall in the other groups. Group V showed a rise in impedance during the last 20 seconds of ablation. Levels of impedance fall at each time point were significantly different among all the groups (Pcontact force and maximum impedance fall (rho = 0.54, Pangle of 0-30° had significantly lower contact force and maximum impedance fall than those with angles of 30-60° and 60-135° (Pcontact force correlates with impedance fall during 60 seconds of ablation. Contact force exceeding 5 g produces greater impedance fall, which probably indicates adequate lesion formation. A contact force greater than 20 g may lead to late tissue overheating. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effect of Particle Concentration on Ablation Behavior of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHA Bai-lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A self-designed oxygen-kerosene ablation system was employed to study the ablation mechanism and performance of the carbon-carbon composites. Particle concentrations of the gas-solid two-phase ablation flow were 0, 1.37%, 2.22%, and 2.64% respectively. The microstructure of post-test samples was analysed through the scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the ablation rate was calculated. The influence principle of particle concentrations on the ablation rate of the carbon-carbon composites was studied, and the mechanism of ablation was analysed. Experiment results show that with no particles involved the mass ablation rate is 0.159g/s and the linear ablation rate is 0.175mm/s, while with particles introduced, the minimum mass ablation rate and linear ablation rate are 0.432g/s and 0.843mm/s respectively, with the increase of particle concentrations, the ablation rate becomes accelerated. Particle erosion makes the ablation of sample seriously intensified, and the ablation gradient of radial fiber on erosion surface is increased with the increase of particle concentrations as well.

  14. Thermodynamic pathways to melting, ablation, and solidification in absorbing solids under pulsed laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorazo, Patrick; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathways involved in laser irradiation of absorbing solids are investigated in silicon for pulse durations of 500 fs and 100 ps. This is achieved by accounting for carrier and atom dynamics within a combined Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme and simultaneously tracking the time evolution of the irradiated material in ρ-T-P space. Our simulations reveal thermal changes in long-range order and state of aggregation driven, in most cases, by nonequilibrium states of rapidly heated or promptly cooled matter. Under femtosecond irradiation near the ablation threshold, the system is originally pulled to a near-critical state following rapid ( -12 s) disordering of the mechanically unstable crystal and isochoric heating of the resulting metallic liquid. The latter is then adiabatically cooled to the liquid-vapor regime where phase explosion of the subcritical, superheated melt is initiated by a direct conversion of translational, mechanical energy into surface energy on a ∼10 -12 -10 -11 s time scale. At higher fluences, matter removal involves, instead, the fragmentation of an initially homogeneous fluid subjected to large strain rates upon rapid, supercritical expansion in vacuum. Under picosecond irradiation, homogeneous and, at later times, heterogeneous melting of the superheated solid are followed by nonisochoric heating of the molten metal. In this case, the subcritical liquid material is subsequently cooled onto the binodal by thermal conduction and explosive boiling does not take place; as a result, ablation is associated with a ''trivial'' fragmentation process, i.e., the relatively slow expansion and dissociation into liquid droplets of supercritical matter near thermodynamic equilibrium. This implies a liquid-vapor equilibration time of ∼10 -11 -10 -10 s and heating along the binodal under nanosecond irradiation. Solidification of the nonablated, supercooled molten material is eventually observed on a ∼10 -11 -10 -9 s time scale

  15. Sphere-Enhanced Microwave Ablation (sMWA) Versus Bland Microwave Ablation (bMWA): Technical Parameters, Specific CT 3D Rendering and Histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gockner, T. L., E-mail: theresa.gockner@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Zelzer, S., E-mail: s.zelzer@dkfz-heidelberg.de [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Medical and Biological Informatics (Germany); Mokry, T., E-mail: theresa.mokry@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Gnutzmann, D., E-mail: daniel.gnutzmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Bellemann, N., E-mail: nadine.bellemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Mogler, C., E-mail: carolin.mogler@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General Pathology (Germany); Beierfuß, A., E-mail: anja.beierfuss@ethianum.de; Köllensperger, E., E-mail: eva.koellensperger@ethianum.de; Germann, G., E-mail: guenter.germann@ethianum.de [Ethianum Heidelberg, Clinic for Plastic Reconstructive Surgery and Aesthetic Surgery (Germany); Radeleff, B. A., E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stampfl, U., E-mail: ulrike.stampfl@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, H. U., E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L., E-mail: philippe.pereira@slk-kliniken.de [SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology, Minimally-invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare technical parameters during ablation as well as CT 3D rendering and histopathology of the ablation zone between sphere-enhanced microwave ablation (sMWA) and bland microwave ablation (bMWA).MethodsIn six sheep-livers, 18 microwave ablations were performed with identical system presets (power output: 80 W, ablation time: 120 s). In three sheep, transarterial embolisation (TAE) was performed immediately before microwave ablation using spheres (diameter: 40 ± 10 μm) (sMWA). In the other three sheep, microwave ablation was performed without spheres embolisation (bMWA). Contrast-enhanced CT, sacrifice, and liver harvest followed immediately after microwave ablation. Study goals included technical parameters during ablation (resulting power output, ablation time), geometry of the ablation zone applying specific CT 3D rendering with a software prototype (short axis of the ablation zone, volume of the largest aligned ablation sphere within the ablation zone), and histopathology (hematoxylin-eosin, Masson Goldner and TUNEL).ResultsResulting power output/ablation times were 78.7 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for bMWA and 78.4 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for sMWA (n.s., respectively). Short axis/volume were 23.7 ± 3.7 mm/7.0 ± 2.4 cm{sup 3} for bMWA and 29.1 ± 3.4 mm/11.5 ± 3.9 cm{sup 3} for sMWA (P < 0.01, respectively). Histopathology confirmed the signs of coagulation necrosis as well as early and irreversible cell death for bMWA and sMWA. For sMWA, spheres were detected within, at the rim, and outside of the ablation zone without conspicuous features.ConclusionsSpecific CT 3D rendering identifies a larger ablation zone for sMWA compared with bMWA. The histopathological signs and the detectable amount of cell death are comparable for both groups. When comparing sMWA with bMWA, TAE has no effect on the technical parameters during ablation.

  16. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  17. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  18. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  19. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Wu, D.J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences

  1. Management of Atrio-Esophageal Fistula Following Left Atrial Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Tariq; Keshmiri, Hesam; Bulwa, Zachary; Kramer, Jason; Sharjeel Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad; Issa, Rasha; Woznicka, Daniel; Gordon, Paul; Abi-Mansour, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Currently, no guidelines have been established for the treatment of atrio-esophageal fistula (AEF) secondary to left atrial ablation therapy. After comprehensive literature review, we aim to make suggestions on the management of this complex complication and also present a case series. We performed a review of the existing literature on AEF in the setting of atrial ablation. Using keywords atrial fibrillation, atrial ablation, fistula formation, atrio-esophageal fistula, complications, interventions, and prognosis, a search was made using the medical databases PUBMED and MEDLINE for reports in English from 2000 to April 2015. A statistical analysis was performed to compare the three different intervention arms: medical management, stent placement and surgical intervention. The results of our systematic review confirm the high mortality rate associated with AEF following left atrial ablation and the necessity to diagnose atrio-esophageal injury in a timely manner. The mortality rates of this complication are 96% with medical management alone, 100% with stent placement, and 33 % with surgical intervention. Atrio-esophageal injury and subsequent AEF is an infrequent but potentially fatal complication of atrial ablation. Early, prompt, and definitive surgical intervention is the treatment of choice.

  2. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally.

  3. Advanced Controlled Cryogenic Ablation Using Ultrasonic Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryoablation process is one of the methods for treating various tissue abnormities. Cryoablation devices are mostly minimally invasive and are used in open loop control, monitored by additional imaging devices. In this study, we monitor the growth of the ablated area by using a miniature ultrasonic transducer that is collocated with the tip of the cryogenic device. The 20 MHz ultrasonic sensor is capable of measuring the size of the ice sphere that is created in front of the needle. In addition to real time monitoring of the ablation process, the ultrasonic sensor will be able to determine the local thickness of the tissue prior to the treatment (thus enabling the setting of the power of the ablation treatment. The combined device will shorten the ablation treatment and will eliminate the need for additional ablation treatments or monitoring devices. The proof of concept was done in water, ultrasonic gel and muscle tissue. In the experiments we found that, in the frequency domain one can identify at 10-12 MHz the increase of the intensity of the returned echo in the ice and the decrease of the signal after the ice-tissue boundary. One can correlate the increase of the intensity with the growth of the ice sphere.

  4. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  5. Threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers; Threshold Pion-Elektroproduktion bei grossen Energieuebertraegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Andreas

    2008-02-15

    We consider pion electroproduction close to threshold for Q{sup 2} in the region 1-10 GeV{sup 2} on a nucleon target. The momentum transfer dependence of the S-wave multipoles at threshold, E{sub 0+} and L{sub 0+}, is calculated in the chiral limit using light-cone sum rules. Predictions for the cross sections in the threshold region are given taking into account P-wave contributions that, as we argue, are model independent to a large extent. The results are compared with the SLAC E136 data on the structure function F{sub 2}(W,Q{sup 2}) in the threshold region. (orig.)

  6. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  7. Outcome of regional and local ablative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma: a collective review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M. C.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.; van Delden, O. M.; Gouma, D. J.; van Gulik, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Transcatheter arterial. (chemo) embolization (TACE), cryoabtation (CA) and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) were the first regional and local ablative techniques that came into use for irresectable HCC. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) followed

  8. Stepwise radiofrequency ablation of Barrett's esophagus preserves esophageal inner diameter, compliance, and motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Gondrie, J. J.; McMahon, B. P.; Pouw, R. E.; Gregersen, H.; Bergman, J. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aim: Stepwise endoscopic circumferential and focal radiofrequency ablation is safe and effective for the eradication of Barrett's esophagus. In contrast to other techniques, radiofrequency ablation appears to avoid significant esophageal scarring or stenosis. Our aim was to evaluate

  9. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  10. The influence of residual apixaban on bleeding complications during and after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaro Mukai

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Low residual plasma apixaban is associated with a higher incidence of bleeding complications during/after AF ablation, potentially because of a greater heparin requirement during AF ablation.

  11. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müssigbrodt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy.

  12. Complications associated with radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Pérez, J M; García Barquín, P M; Villanueva Marcos, A J; García Bolao, J I; Bastarrika Alemañ, G

    Radiofrequency ablation is an efficacious alternative in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who do not respond to or are intolerant to at least one class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug. Although radiofrequency ablation is a safe procedure, complications can occur. Depending on the location, these complications can be classified into those that affect the pulmonary veins themselves, cardiac complications, extracardiac intrathoracic complications, remote complications, and those that result from vascular access. The most common complications are hematomas, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms at the puncture site. Some complications are benign and transient, such as gastroparesis or diaphragmatic elevation, whereas others are potentially fatal, such as cardiac tamponade. Radiologists must be familiar with the complications that can occur secondary to pulmonary vein ablation to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Aggregation effect on absorbance spectrum of laser ablated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni; Irmaniar; Herbani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmon of gold nanoparticles is one of the hot topics nowadays due to various possible applications. The application is determined by plasmon peak in absorbance spectrum. We have fabricated gold nanoparticles using laser ablation technique and studied the influence of CTAB (Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) effect on the optical characterization of fabricated gold nanoparticles. We ablated a gold plate using NdYAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 10 Hz pulse frequency at low energy density. We found there are two distinctive plasmon peaks, i.e., primary and secondary peaks, where the secondary peak is the main interests of this work. Our simulation results have revealed that the secondary plasmon peak is affected by random aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our research leads to good techniques on fabrication of colloidal gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution using laser ablation technique.

  15. Ablation acceleration of macroparticle in spiral magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1981-05-01

    The rocket motion of macroparticles heated by energetic pulses in a spiral magnetic field was studied. The purpose of the present work is to study the ablation acceleration of a macroparticle in a spiral magnetic field with the help of the law of conservation of angular momentum. The basic equation of motion of ablatively accelerated projectile in a spiral magnetic field was derived. Any rocket which is ejecting fully ionized plasma in an intense magnetic field with rotational transform is able to have spin by the law of conservation of momentum. The effect of spiral magnetic field on macroparticle acceleration is discussed. The necessary mass ratio increase exponentially with respect to the field parameter. The spiral field should be employed with care to have only to stabilize the position of macroparticles. As conclusion, it can be said that the ablation acceleration of the projectile in a spiral field can give the accelerated body spin quite easily. (Kato, T.)

  16. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  17. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  18. Anterior two-thirds corpus callosotomy via stereotactic laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsy, Michael; Patel, Daxa M; Halvorson, Kyle; Mortimer, Vance; Bollo, Robert J

    2018-04-01

    Anterior two-thirds corpus callosotomy is a common palliative surgical intervention most commonly employed in patients with atonic or drop seizures. Recently, stereotactic laser ablation of the corpus callosum without a craniotomy has shown promise in achieving similar outcomes with fewer side effects and shorter hospitalizations. The authors demonstrate ablation of the anterior two-thirds corpus callosum in a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and drug-resistant drop seizures. Technical nuances of laser ablation with 3 laser fibers are described. Postoperatively, the patient showed a significant reduction in seizure frequency and severity over a 9-month follow-up period. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/3-mMq5-PLiM .

  19. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Amoruso, S.

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently....... This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation were analyzed by MALDI and a significant number of intact molecules in the films with fs-laser deposition was found as well....... impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with 300-fs pulses and at at similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot...

  20. Laser ablation/ionization studies in a glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, K.R.; Harrison, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The pin cathode glow discharge is used in the laboratory as an atomization/ionization source for a variety of applications, including solids mass spectrometry. Coupled with a tunable dye laser, the glow discharge may also serve as an atom reservoir for resonance ionization mass spectrometry in which the laser ionizes the discharge sputtered atoms. By tightly focusing the laser onto solid samples, various ablation effects may also be investigated. The laser may be used to generate an ionized plasma which may be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. Alternatively, the ablated neutral atoms may be used in post-ablation excitation/ionization processes, in this case the glow discharge. The results of these investigations are the basis of this paper