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Sample records for single-level lumbar microdiscectomy

  1. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality-of-life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: a randomized controlled trial protocol

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    Yamada Kimiko A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain remains a costly quality-of-life-related health problem. Microdiscectomy is often the surgical procedure of choice for a symptomatic, single-level, lumbar disc herniation in younger and middle-aged adults. The question of whether a post-microdiscectomy exercise program enhances function, quality of life, and disability status has not been systematically explored. Thus, the overall purpose of this study is to assess immediate and long-term outcomes of an exercise program, developed at University of Southern California (USC, targeting the trunk and lower extremities (USC Spine Exercise Program for persons who have undergone a single-level microdiscectomy for the first time. Methods/design One hundred individuals between the ages of 18 and 60 who consent to undergo lumbar microdiscectomy will be recruited to participate in this study. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1 one session of back care education, or 2 a back care education session followed by the 12-week USC Spine Exercise Program. The outcome examiners (evaluators, as well as the data managers, will be blinded to group allocation. Education will consist of a one-hour "one-on-one" session with the intervention therapist, guided by an educational booklet specifically designed for post-microdiscectomy care. This session will occur four to six weeks after surgery. The USC Spine Exercise Program consists of two parts: back extensor strength and endurance, and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. This exercise program is goal-oriented, performance-based, and periodized. It will begin two to three days after the education session, and will occur three times a week for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, SF-36® quality of life assessment, Subjective Quality of Life Scale, 50-foot Walk, Repeated Sit-to-Stand, and a modified Sorensen test. The outcome

  2. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality-of-life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: a randomized controlled trial protocol.

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    Selkowitz, David M; Kulig, Kornelia; Poppert, Elizabeth M; Flanagan, Sean P; Matthews, Ndidiamaka D; Beneck, George J; Popovich, John M; Lona, Jose R; Yamada, Kimiko A; Burke, Wendy S; Ervin, Carolyn; Powers, Christopher M

    2006-08-25

    Low back pain remains a costly quality-of-life-related health problem. Microdiscectomy is often the surgical procedure of choice for a symptomatic, single-level, lumbar disc herniation in younger and middle-aged adults. The question of whether a post-microdiscectomy exercise program enhances function, quality of life, and disability status has not been systematically explored. Thus, the overall purpose of this study is to assess immediate and long-term outcomes of an exercise program, developed at University of Southern California (USC), targeting the trunk and lower extremities (USC Spine Exercise Program) for persons who have undergone a single-level microdiscectomy for the first time. One hundred individuals between the ages of 18 and 60 who consent to undergo lumbar microdiscectomy will be recruited to participate in this study. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) one session of back care education, or 2) a back care education session followed by the 12-week USC Spine Exercise Program. The outcome examiners (evaluators), as well as the data managers, will be blinded to group allocation. Education will consist of a one-hour "one-on-one" session with the intervention therapist, guided by an educational booklet specifically designed for post-microdiscectomy care. This session will occur four to six weeks after surgery. The USC Spine Exercise Program consists of two parts: back extensor strength and endurance, and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. This exercise program is goal-oriented, performance-based, and periodized. It will begin two to three days after the education session, and will occur three times a week for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, SF-36 quality of life assessment, Subjective Quality of Life Scale, 50-foot Walk, Repeated Sit-to-Stand, and a modified Sorensen test. The outcome measures in the study will be assessed before and after

  3. Factors associated with lumbar disc hernia recurrence after microdiscectomy.

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    Camino Willhuber, G; Kido, G; Mereles, M; Bassani, J; Petracchi, M; Elizondo, C; Gruenberg, M; Sola, C

    Lumbar disc hernias are a common cause of spinal surgery. Hernia recurrence is a prevalent complication. To analyse the risk factors associated with hernia recurrence in patients undergoing surgery in our institution. Lumbar microdiscectomies between 2010 and 2014 were analysed, patients with previous surgeries, extraforaminales and foraminal hernias were excluded. Patients with recurrent hernia were the case group and those who showed no recurrence were the control group. 177 patients with lumbar microdiscectomy, of whom 30 experienced recurrence (16%), and of these 27 were reoperated. Among the risk factors associated with recurrence, we observed a higher rate of disc height, higher percentage of spinal canal occupied by the hernia and presence of degenerative facet joint changes; we observed no differences in sex, body mass index or age. Previous studies show increased disc height and young patients as possible factors associated with recurrence. In our series we found that the higher rate of disc height, the percentage of spinal canal occupied by the hernia and degenerative facet joint changes were associated with hernia recurrence. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation After Tubular Microdiscectomy: Analysis of Learning Curve Progression.

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    Staartjes, Victor E; de Wispelaere, Marlies P; Miedema, Johan; Schröder, Marc L

    2017-11-01

    Tubular microdiscectomy has become a staple technique among spine surgeons. Yet the associated learning curve, especially its later stages, has not been extensively studied. With studies reporting a higher rate of recurrent herniation using tubular microdiscectomy, surgeons' level of experience becomes of primary importance for the interpretation of such findings. We aimed to analyze possible improvements in the later stages of the learning curve and to identify factors independently associated with recurrent herniation. A retrospective study was conducted using prospectively collected data from a consecutive cohort of all 1241 patients operated for single-level lumbar disc herniation with tubular microdiscectomy by a single surgeon who already had extensive experience with this technique. We collected demographic and perioperative data and consequently tracked all complications, recurrent herniations, and other reoperations. In addition, 495 patients (40%) provided complete outcome scores on a numeric rating scale for back and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 months postoperatively. A decrease in surgical time (P herniations was observed (P = 0.012) over time. Increased leg pain at 6 weeks was independently associated with recurrent herniation (P = 0.01). Fifty-six patients (4.5%) experienced ipsilateral recurrent herniation. Relevant improvements in clinical results were seen even after the surgeon had already accumulated extensive experience. Any future studies should unambiguously report the level of experience of the participating surgeons, possibly including the number of cases previously treated using a particular technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Work intensity in sacroiliac joint fusion and lumbar microdiscectomy

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    Frank C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Clay Frank,1 Dimitriy Kondrashov,2 S Craig Meyer,3 Gary Dix,4 Morgan Lorio,5 Don Kovalsky,6 Daniel Cher7 1Integrated Spine Care, Wawautosa, WI, 2St Mary’s Spine Center, San Francisco, CA, 3Columbia Orthopedic Group, Columbia, MO, 4Maryland Brain Spine and Pain, Annapolis, MD, 5Neurospine Solutions, Bristol, TN, 6Orthopaedic Center of Southern Illinois, Mt Vernon, IL, 7SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA Background: The evidence base supporting minimally invasive sacroiliac (SI joint fusion (SIJF surgery is increasing. The work relative value units (RVUs associated with minimally invasive SIJF are seemingly low. To date, only one published study describes the relative work intensity associated with minimally invasive SIJF. No study has compared work intensity vs other commonly performed spine surgery procedures.Methods: Charts of 192 patients at five sites who underwent either minimally invasive SIJF (American Medical Association [AMA] CPT® code 27279 or lumbar microdiscectomy (AMA CPT® code 63030 were reviewed. Abstracted were preoperative times associated with diagnosis and patient care, intraoperative parameters including operating room (OR in/out times and procedure start/stop times, and postoperative care requirements. Additionally, using a visual analog scale, surgeons estimated the intensity of intraoperative care, including mental, temporal, and physical demands and effort and frustration. Work was defined as operative time multiplied by task intensity.Results: Patients who underwent minimally invasive SIJF were more likely female. Mean procedure times were lower in SIJF by about 27.8 minutes (P<0.0001 and mean total OR times were lower by 27.9 minutes (P<0.0001, but there was substantial overlap across procedures. Mean preservice and post-service total labor times were longer in minimally invasive SIJF (preservice times longer by 63.5 minutes [P<0.0001] and post-service labor times longer by 20.2 minutes [P<0.0001]. The number of

  6. Effects of dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises following lumbar microdiscectomy on pain, mobility and return to work. Randomized controlled trial.

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    Demir, S; Dulgeroglu, D; Cakci, A

    2014-12-01

    Various lumbar exercise programs are prescribed for rehabilitation purposes following microdiscectomy applied for the treatment of lumbar disk herniation. The literature contains several studies on this subject. However, there are no studies investigating the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises on fear and fear/regression attitudes of patients and on their return to work. This study investigates the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises during postoperative rehabilitation on spinal mobility, pain, functional status, return to work, quality of life, and fear/regression attitude of patients who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy for the first time. The study was conducted at physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics. A randomized clinical trial comparing exercise programs after lumbar microdiscectomy. Forty-four lumbar microdiscectomy patients were randomized into two groups. Each group was assessed in terms of low back pain, leg pain, spinal mobility, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), at the postoperative first, second, and sixth months. Fear/regression beliefs and level of pain were evaluated through the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ). Forty-four patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of 22 subjects, respectively, as a study group with Dynamic Lumbar Stabilization (DLS) exercises and home exercises, and a control group with only home exercises for a period of four weeks. Leg pain decreased more in the study group compared with the control group (P=0.004). Spinal mobility scores demonstrated greater increases in the study group (Pwork periods.

  7. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

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    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes. Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138. The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups.

  8. Scoliosis may increase the risk of recurrence of lumbar disc herniation after microdiscectomy.

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    Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Chang, Huang-Chou; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the risk of recurrence of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with scoliosis who underwent microdiscectomy. A series of consecutive patients who underwent microdiscectomy for LDH was retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criteria were young adults younger than 40 years who received microdiscectomy for symptomatic 1-level LDH. An exclusion criterion was any previous spinal surgery, including fusion or correction of scoliosis. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with scoliosis and those without scoliosis. The demographic data in the 2 groups were similar. All medical records and clinical and radiological evaluations were reviewed. A total of 58 patients who underwent 1-level microdiscectomy for LDH were analyzed. During the mean follow-up of 24.6 months, 6 patients (10.3%) experienced a recurrence of LDH with variable symptoms. The recurrence rate was significantly higher among the scoliosis group than the nonscoliosis group (33.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.001). Furthermore, the recurrence-free interval in the scoliosis group was short. Young adults (scoliosis are at higher risk of recurrent LDH after microdiscectomy.

  9. Does surgical technique affect the incidence of spondylodiscitis post-lumbar microdiscectomy? A retrospective analysis of 3063 patients.

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    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Kuechler, Derek; Kaar, George; Marks, Charles; OʼSullivan, Michael

    2013-02-15

    Retrospective audit in a single center during a period of 7 years operated by 3 groups of surgeons after 3 different surgical techniques. Our study aimed to determine whether surgical technique had any influence on the incidence of spondylodiscitis in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy and to compare this with published rate of incidence of spondylodiscitis. The incidence of spondylodiscitis post-lumbar microdiscectomy ranges from 0.2% to 15%. There is limited evidence to compare different techniques and the incidence of spondylodiscitis. A total of 3063 patients were analyzed from 2005 to 2011 for discitis postoperatively. The first group followed a standard microdiscectomy technique, the second group used antiseptic (Savlon; Novartis Consumer Health UK Limited, Surrey, UK) irrigation at the end of the procedure to irrigate the disc space, and the third group followed standard microdiscectomy along with usage of a separate disc instruments when discectomy was performed. The number of patients operated in the individual groups was 559, 1122, and 1382. The total number of patients who had postoperative discitis was 3 (0.10%), with a range of 0.07% to 0.18%. There was 1 case of discitis in each group. The incidence of spondylodiscitis in groups A, B, and C were 0.18%, 0.09%, and 0.07%, respectively. This study concluded that different techniques used for lumbar microdiscectomy revealed that standard microsurgical technique with usage of antiseptic irrigation for the disc space and usage of separate disc instruments had lesser incidence of spondylodiscitis in comparison with standard microdiscectomy. The overall incidence of postoperative discitis remains less in our series. So far, to our knowledge, this report involves the largest number of patients studied to determine the incidence of discitis in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy. 3.

  10. Lumbar microdiscectomy as a day-case procedure: Scope for improvement?

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    Ahuja, Neeraj; Sharma, Himanshu

    2017-05-15

    There are no significant differences in outcomes between patients receiving inpatient and day-case lumbar microdiscectomy, but the latter is still underused in the NHS. Here we aimed to identify factors contributing to successful same-day discharge in day-case patients. This was a retrospective observational study of patients undergoing elective lumbar microdiscectomy between August 2012 and December 2014. Age, gender, day of surgery, distance to hospital, ASA grade, regular opiate use, smoking status, order on the operating list, and side and level of surgery were examined by logistic regression to assess their influence on same-day discharge. 28/95 (29.5%) patients were discharged on the day of surgery. Age (p = 0.041), ASA grade (p = 0.016), distance to hospital (p = 0.011), and position on the list (p = 0.004) were associated with day-case discharge by univariate analysis. ASA grade (p = 0.032; OR 0.176), distance to hospital (p = 0.003; OR 0.965), and position on the operating list (morning case; p = 0.011; OR 8.901) remained significant in multivariate analysis. Thirteen (13.7%) patients were identified who could have been managed as day cases had they been listed for morning operations. Day-case lumbar microdiscectomy is viable when patients are carefully selected. Younger, fit patients living close to the hospital and operated on in the morning are more likely to be discharged on the same day. Knowledge of these factors while planning elective lists can help optimise bed space and improve spinal services. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microdiscectomy improves pain-associated depression, somatic anxiety, and mental well-being in patients with herniated lumbar disc.

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    Lebow, Richard; Parker, Scott L; Adogwa, Owoicho; Reig, Adam; Cheng, Joseph; Bydon, Ali; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-02-01

    Emotional distress and depression are common psychological disturbances associated with low-back and leg pain. The effects of lumbar discectomy on pain, disability, and physical quality of life are well described. The effects of discectomy on emotional distress and mental well-being are less well understood. To assess the effect of microdiscectomy on depression, somatization, and mental well-being in patients with herniated lumbar discs. Patients undergoing surgical discectomy for single-level, herniated lumbar disc were prospectively evaluated preoperatively, and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Back and leg pain, depression, somatic perception, and mental well-being were assessed. One hundred patients were enrolled. All were available for 1-year follow-up. Preoperatively, the visual analog scale for low-back pain (BP-VAS), visual analog scale for leg pain (LP-VAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZUNG), Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire (MSPQ), and Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 mental component summary scale (SF-36-MCS) were 6.3 ± 2.5, 6.3 ± 2.5, 19 ± 11, 9 ± 7, and 4 ± 14. BP-VAS and LP-VAS significantly improved by 6 weeks. Significant improvement in SF-36-MCS was observed by 6 weeks postoperatively, improvement in MSPQ score was observed 3 months postoperatively, and improvement in the ZUNG depression score was observed 12 months postoperatively. No statistical difference occurred during the remainder of follow-up for any outcome measured once improvement reached statistical significance. Eighteen patients were somatized preoperatively, 67% of which were nonsomatized 1 year postoperatively. Ten patients were clinically depressed preoperatively, 70% of which were nondepressed 1 year postoperatively. Improvement in SF-36-MCS, ZUNG, and MSPQ correlated (P herniated lumbar disc.

  12. Puncture laser microdiscectomy in treatment of large lumbar spinal hernias

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    Zorin M.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hernia size influence on final result of PLME in 34 patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome was detected. In medical center "Endoscopic Neurosurgery" from 2006 to 2010 we examined and treated 34 patients with hernia size from 6 to 8 mm by CT data. Patients were from 19 to 49 years of age. Average age was 35.9 ± 1.5 years. Males – 16 (47.1%, females – 18 (52.9%. Disease duration – 5.53 ± 0.44 months with duration of last exacerbation – 1.87 ± 0.21 months. Duration of conservative therapy is 4.6 ± 2.1 weeks. During survey and objec¬tive examination we determined pain syndrome intensity, pain location, degree of spinal static – dynamic function disorder. Neurological examination determined severity of sensory and motor disorders. Pain syndrome intensity, quality of life in patients before and after surgery, surgery effectiveness were determined by common scales: VAS, OSWESTRY, Roland - Morris, McNab. Before PLME we evaluated preoperative spondylograms performed with functional load. Height of intervertebral fissure was determined by these images. By SCT and MRI data we measured hernia size, its shape and location as well as intervertebral disk dehydration degree. For PLME performance we used neodymium laser with aluminum garnet (Dorinyer Fibertom Medilas 4060 with wave-length of 1.06 micrometers. In the next period of observation after PLME its effectiveness was 79%, and in 3-5 years - 76%. At the same time it must be emphasized that 75% of patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome significantly and for a long time improved their life quality avoiding more traumatic surgery. Satisfactory results with PLM use in the nearest future could be obtained in 79% of patients, in the remote term - in 76% of patients with large hernia size.

  13. [Long-term outcomes of lumbar microdiscectomy in a working class sample].

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    Martínez Quiñones, J V; Aso, J; Consolini, F; Arregui, R

    2011-06-01

    In the treatment of the lumbar disc herniaton (LDH) microdiscectomy constitutes one of the standard procedures. In the present study we have analyzed the clinical outcome of the lumbar microdis- cectomy in a series of worker patients who underwent surgery in our service. Retrospective analysis and a 5-year follow up, of a series of 142 patients operated on by means of lumbar microdiscectomy in the 2004-2005 period. The clinical outcome was analyzed according to the "Herron and Turner" outline: pain reduction, use of medical treatment, restriction in the ability to perform physical activities, and return to work. 116 men and 26 women, with an average age of 37.9 and 45.4 years respectively, underwent surgery because of LDH. In the clinical aspect, sciatica was predominant over low back pain in a ratio of three to one. The L5-S1 discal level was operated on in 68.3% of the cases. It was considered that occupational activities gave rise to damage in 107 patients (75.3%). Besides a symptomatic disc, there was an additional injured disc in 44.3% of the cases. An initial unfavourable outcome was seen in 42 patients (33%), 15 of which recovered from in an interval of 3 months, and another fifteen within a one year period. A re-operation was necessa ry in 16 patients because of recurrent lumbar disc herniation (11%). Work reintegration was achieved in 83.3% (119/142) of the cases. After a 5-year follow up, we stated the consistency of the clinical result. We analyzed the intervertebral disc behaviour as regards sex, age, variety of discal herniation, additional disc, outcome and re-operation variables. After the analysis of the type of discal herniation and additional disc we defined three disc injury patterns. We consider microdiscectomy as the technique of choosing for the treatment of recurrence disc herniation. Between the working class, discal injury predominates in young men, as a consequence of the annulus breakage, or an annulus plus posterior longitudinal ligament

  14. Aggressive discectomy for single level lumbar disk herniation

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    Md. Kamrul Ahsan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive open lumbar discectomy is the most commonly performed surgical procedure for patients with persistent low back and leg pain. In this retrospective study,  1,380 patients were evaluated for long-term results of aggressive discectomy for the single level lumbar disk herniation. Demographic data, surgical data, complications and reherniation rate were collected and clinical outcomes were assessed using visual analogue score (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI and modified Mcnab criteria. The mean follow-up period was 28.8 months. According to the modified Mcnab criteria, the long-term results were excellent in 640 cases, good in 445 cases, fair in 255 cases, and poor in 40 cases. The mean VAS scores for back and radicular pains and ODI at the end of 2 years were 1.1 ± 1.0, 1.5 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 3.1% respectively. The complications were foot drop (n=7, dural tear (n=14, superficial wound infection (n=17, discitis (n=37 and reherniation (n=64. The dural tear and superficial wound infections resolved after treatment but 28 discitis patients were treated by conservatively and the remaining 9 underwent surgery. Among reherniation patients, 58 underwent revision discectomy and 4 underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and stabilization. Aggressive discectomy is an effective treatment of lumbar disk herniation and maintains a lower incidence of reherniation but leads to a collapse of disc height and in long run gives rise to intervertebral instability and accelerates spondylosis.

  15. Tubular microscopes discectomy versus conventional microdiscectomy for treating lumbar disk herniation

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    Li, Xianbo; Chang, Hengrui; Meng, Xianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: The application of tubular microscopes discectomy (TMD) was supposed to have similar or better results than conventional microdiscectomy (CMD). However, this conclusion had not been verified by sufficient evidence. Therefore, the focus of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficiency, safety, and clinical outcome of these 2 surgical procedures for treating lumbar disk herniation (LDH). Methods: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Collaboration Central databases were searched for studies which compared the results of TMD and CMD for the treatment of LDH up to July 2017. Data analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3. A standardized electronic form of 17 predefined criteria from the Consort statement was used for the quality assessment. Results: Eight randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 2 retrospective studies were included in this review, including 804 patients. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in operative time (P = .38), blood loss (P = .14), the length of hospital stay (P = .47), the rate of intraoperative complications (P = .79), postoperative complications (P = .16), dural tear (P = .87), the reoperation (P = .20), the short-term back visual analog scale (VAS) scores (P = .76), the long-term back VAS scores (P = .64), the short-term leg VAS scores (P = .09), the long-term leg VAS scores (P = .35), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores (P = .41). Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that TMD and CMD are both safe and effective surgical procedures which can be recommended for treating LDH. Additionally, the conclusion should be cautiously treated, because it was reached in the context of limited amount of studies and relatively small sample size. Therefore, future studies with good design and more large samples are required to validate this conclusion. PMID:29384882

  16. Minimally invasive discectomy versus microdiscectomy/open discectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

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    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Shokraneh, Farhad; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Chou, Roger

    2014-09-04

    Microdiscectomy or open discectomy (MD/OD) are the standard procedures for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation and they involve removal of the portion of the intervertebral disc compressing the nerve root or spinal cord (or both) with or without the aid of a headlight loupe or microscope magnification. Potential advantages of newer minimally invasive discectomy (MID) procedures over standard MD/OD include less blood loss, less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalisation and earlier return to work. To compare the benefits and harms of MID versus MD/OD for management of lumbar intervertebral discopathy. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (November 2013), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1974 to November 2013) and applied no language restrictions. We also contacted experts in the field for additional studies and reviewed reference lists of relevant studies. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (QRCTs) that compared MD/OD with a MID (percutaneous endoscopic interlaminar or transforaminal lumbar discectomy, transmuscular tubular microdiscectomy and automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy) for treatment of adults with lumbar radiculopathy secondary to discopathy. We evaluated the following primary outcomes: pain related to sciatica or low back pain (LBP) as measured by a visual analogue scale, sciatic specific outcomes such as neurological deficit of lower extremity or bowel/urinary incontinence and functional outcomes (including daily activity or return to work). We also evaluated the following secondary outcomes: complications of surgery, duration of hospital stay, postoperative opioid use, quality of life and overall participant satisfaction. Two authors checked data abstractions and articles for inclusion. We resolved discrepancies by consensus. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We used pre-developed forms to extract data

  17. Do intraoperative radiographs predict final lumbar sagittal alignment following single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion?

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    Salem, Khalid M I; Eranki, Aditya P; Paquette, Scott; Boyd, Michael; Street, John; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-02-16

    OBJECTIVE The study aimed to determine if the intraoperative segmental lordosis (as calculated on a cross-table lateral radiograph following a single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [TLIF] for degenerative spondylolisthesis/low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis) is maintained at discharge and at 6 months postsurgery. METHODS The authors reviewed images and medical records of patients ≥ 16 years of age with a diagnosis of an isolated single-level, low-grade spondylolisthesis (degenerative or isthmic) with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated between January 2008 and April 2014. Age, sex, surgical level, surgical approach, and facetectomy (unilateral vs bilateral) were recorded. Upright standardized preoperative, early, and 6-month postoperative radiographs, as well as intraoperative lateral radiographs, were analyzed for the pelvic incidence, segmental lumbar lordosis (SLL) at the TILF level, and total LL (TLL). In addition, the anteroposterior position of the cage in the disc space was documented. Data are presented as the mean ± SD; a p value level using a bullet-shaped cage. A bilateral facetectomy was performed in 17 patients (20.2%), and 89.3% of procedures were done at the L4-5 and L5-S1 segments. SLL significantly improved intraoperatively from 15.8° ± 7.5° to 20.9° ± 7.7°, but the correction was lost after ambulation. Compared with preoperative values, at 6 months the change in SLL was modest at 1.8° ± 6.7° (p = 0.025), whereas TLL increased by 4.3° ± 9.6° (p level of surgery, and use of a bilateral facetectomy did not significantly affect postoperative LL. CONCLUSIONS Following a single-level TLIF procedure using a bullet-shaped cage, the intraoperative improvement in SLL is largely lost after ambulation. The improvement in TLL over time is probably due to the decompression part of the procedure. The approach, level of surgery, bilateral facetectomy, and position of the cage do not seem to have a significant effect on LL achieved

  18. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in Intervertebral Discs of Patients Undergoing Lumbar Microdiscectomy: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

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    Capoor, Manu N.; Ruzicka, Filip; Machackova, Tana; Jancalek, Radim; Smrcka, Martin; Schmitz, Jonathan E.; Hermanova, Marketa; Sana, Jiri; Michu, Elleni; Baird, John C.; Ahmed, Fahad S.; Maca, Karel; Lipina, Radim; Alamin, Todd F.; Coscia, Michael F.; Stonemetz, Jerry L.; Witham, Timothy; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Birkenmaier, Christof; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between intervertebral disc degeneration and chronic infection by Propionibacterium acnes is controversial with contradictory evidence available in the literature. Previous studies investigating these relationships were under-powered and fraught with methodical differences; moreover, they have not taken into consideration P. acnes’ ability to form biofilms or attempted to quantitate the bioburden with regard to determining bacterial counts/genome equivalents as criteria to differentiate true infection from contamination. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of P. acnes in patients undergoing lumbar disc microdiscectomy. Methods and Findings The sample consisted of 290 adult patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. An intraoperative biopsy and pre-operative clinical data were taken in all cases. One biopsy fragment was homogenized and used for quantitative anaerobic culture and a second was frozen and used for real-time PCR-based quantification of P. acnes genomes. P. acnes was identified in 115 cases (40%), coagulase-negative staphylococci in 31 cases (11%) and alpha-hemolytic streptococci in 8 cases (3%). P. acnes counts ranged from 100 to 9000 CFU/ml with a median of 400 CFU/ml. The prevalence of intervertebral discs with abundant P. acnes (≥ 1x103 CFU/ml) was 11% (39 cases). There was significant correlation between the bacterial counts obtained by culture and the number of P. acnes genomes detected by real-time PCR (r = 0.4363, p<0.0001). Conclusions In a large series of patients, the prevalence of discs with abundant P. acnes was 11%. We believe, disc tissue homogenization releases P. acnes from the biofilm so that they can then potentially be cultured, reducing the rate of false-negative cultures. Further, quantification study revealing significant bioburden based on both culture and real-time PCR minimize the likelihood that observed

  19. Early individualised manipulative rehabilitation following lumbar open laser microdiscectomy improves early post-operative functional disability: A randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungho J; Ahn, Junghoon; Cho, Heecheol; Kim, Dongyun; Kim, Taeyeong; Yoon, Bumchul

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar open laser microdiscectomy has been shown to be an effective intervention and safe approach for lumbar disc prolapse. However early post-operative physical disability affecting daily activities have been sporadically reported. To evaluate the feasibility of using early individualised manipulative rehabilitation to improve early post-operative functional disability following lumbar discectomy. Randomised controlled pilot trial. Setting at a major metropolitan spine surgery hospital. Twenty-one patients aged 25-69 years who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy were randomised to either the manipulative rehabilitation treatment group or the active control group. Rehabilitation was initiated 2-3 weeks after surgery, twice a week for 4 weeks. Each session was for 30 minutes. Primary outcomes were the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire and the visual analogue pain scale. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Early post-operative physical disability was improved with a 55% reduction by early individualised manipulative rehabilitation, compared to that of control care with a 5% increase. Early post-operative residual leg pain decreased with rehabilitation (55%) and control care (9%). This pilot study supports the feasibility of a future definitive randomised control trial and indicates this type of rehabilitation may be an important option for post-operative management after spinal surgery.

  20. Postoperative Complications for Elderly Patients After Single-Level Lumbar Fusions for Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Bryan A; Chiang, Vicky; Prabhu, Arpan V; Agarwal, Nitin; Henry, Jensen K; Lin, Derek; Kazemi, Noojan; Tabbosha, Monir

    2016-07-01

    A large-scale study on postoperative complications of lumbar fusion surgery for spondylolisthesis comparing patients >80 years old with younger patients has not been performed. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of extreme age (>80 years old) on early postoperative outcomes after single-level lumbar fusions for spondylolisthesis. From a validated multicenter surgical database, 2475 patients who underwent a single-level lumbar fusion procedure for spondylolisthesis were selected retrospectively. An extreme age cohort with 227 patients >80 years old was compared with a typical age cohort with 2248 patients 45-65 years old. The preoperative characteristics and comorbidities were different between the typical age cohort and the extreme age cohort, with older patients having more preoperative comorbidities, including a lack of independent functional health status before surgery (P 80 cohort regarding urinary tract infection (P = 0.008; odds ratio = 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-7.40) and intraoperative and postoperative transfusions (P spondylolisthesis in patients >80 years old versus younger patients. The data support that age alone should not exclude a patient for this procedure. However, extra caution is warranted given the slightly increased morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outpatient Lumbar Microdiscectomy in France: From an Economic Imperative to a Clinical Standard-An Observational Study of 201 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Bertrand; Sabatier, Pascal; Garnault, Valérie; Hamel, Olivier; Bousquet, Philippe; Lescure, Jean-Paul; Plas, Jean-Yves

    2017-10-01

    The outpatient lumbar discectomy procedures have been established for more than 2 decades. However, especially in Europe, there are still obstacles to the development of these procedures, which may be related to medicoeconomic imperatives, and to several factors concerning both surgeons and patients. We describe our initial experience in introducing this method in our institution. During a 3-year period, 201 patients met the criteria for ambulatory lumbar microdiscectomy. A dedicated fast-tracking unit provided preoperative patient education and immediate postoperative follow-up. A surgical consultation was organized 6 weeks after surgery, and a late satisfaction phone survey concerning ambulatory management was carried out after 6 months. The average total inpatient time was 10 hours and 12 minutes. One patient (0.5%) remained overnight because of an anxiety attack. No patients contacted the FT unit during the first night, and no complications occurred. All patients were reviewed in consultation around day 45: the average visual analog scale score was significantly reduced. At this early postoperative follow-up, 87.5% of patients were (very) satisfied with this procedure. At the day 180 survey, average visual analog scale scores were not significantly different from the day 45 data. In terms of return to normal activities of daily living, 120 patients (60%) had no limitation, 72 patients (36%) had minor or major limitations, and 8 (4%) were incapacitated. At this final evaluation, 8% of patients (n = 16) were very satisfied, 73% were satisfied (n = 146), 11% (n = 22) were partly satisfied, and 8% (n = 16) were not satisfied with the outpatient procedure. Reducing hospitalization for lumbar discectomies to a few hours is not a reduction in the quality of care. It is not necessarily simple to overcome the resistances of all protagonists, but placing the patient as the main actor of an integrated management plan is the key to transforming a medicoeconomic

  2. Minimally invasive discectomy versus microdiscectomy/ discectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rasouli, Mohammad; Shokraneh, Farhad; Moradi-lakeh, Maziyar; Vakaro, Alex; Sadeghi-Naini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Lumbar discectomy is a surgery to remove all or part of a disc cushion that helps protect the spinal column. These cushions, called disks, separate the spinal vertebrae/bones. When one of the disks herniates (moves out of place) in patients with protruded disc, the soft gel inside pushes through the wall of the disk. The disk may then place pressure on the spinal cord and nerves that are coming out of the spinal column. The lumbar discectomy procedure remained basically ...

  3. A Change in Lumbar Sagittal Alignment After Single-level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Normal Sagittal Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Seung Heon; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2017-08-01

    Retrospective analysis. The object is to assess the correlation between whole lumbar lordosis (LL) and the segmental angle (SA) after single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The restoration of the SA at lower lumbar spine is meaningful, considering it contributes approximately 60% of LL, and revision surgery due to flat back or adjacent segment pathology was necessary decades after the initial surgery. However, little is known about the change of whole lumbar curvature after single-level lower lumbar fusion surgery, especially for balanced spine. We included 41 consecutive patients (M:F=9:32; mean age, 59.8±9.3 y) with a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery for low-grade degenerative spinal spondylolisthesis, with C7 plumb line of <5 cm and ≥2-year follow-up period. The operated levels were L4-L5 in 34 patients and L5-S1 in 7 patients. Whole LL, SA, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope were compared. According to the Macnab criteria, a favorable outcome (excellent, 21; good, 15) was achieved in 36/41 (88%; excellent, 21; good, 15) patients. LL and SA were significantly changed from -50.8±9.9 to -54.6±11.1 degrees and -15.6±6.1 to -18.7±5.1 degrees (P<0.01), and a positive correlation (r=0.43, P=0.01) was observed between LL and SA at postoperative month 24. The changes to the pelvic tilt and sacral slope were not significant. Whole lumbar sagittal alignment was influenced by single SA. Therefore, obtaining adequate segmental lordosis is desirable considering the effect on the whole spine for a long time.

  4. Tubular microscopes discectomy versus conventional microdiscectomy for treating lumbar disk herniation: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianbo; Chang, Hengrui; Meng, Xianzhong

    2018-02-01

    The application of tubular microscopes discectomy (TMD) was supposed to have similar or better results than conventional microdiscectomy (CMD). However, this conclusion had not been verified by sufficient evidence. Therefore, the focus of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficiency, safety, and clinical outcome of these 2 surgical procedures for treating lumbar disk herniation (LDH). PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Collaboration Central databases were searched for studies which compared the results of TMD and CMD for the treatment of LDH up to July 2017. Data analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3. A standardized electronic form of 17 predefined criteria from the Consort statement was used for the quality assessment. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 2 retrospective studies were included in this review, including 804 patients. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in operative time (P = .38), blood loss (P = .14), the length of hospital stay (P = .47), the rate of intraoperative complications (P = .79), postoperative complications (P = .16), dural tear (P = .87), the reoperation (P = .20), the short-term back visual analog scale (VAS) scores (P = .76), the long-term back VAS scores (P = .64), the short-term leg VAS scores (P = .09), the long-term leg VAS scores (P = .35), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores (P = .41). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that TMD and CMD are both safe and effective surgical procedures which can be recommended for treating LDH. Additionally, the conclusion should be cautiously treated, because it was reached in the context of limited amount of studies and relatively small sample size. Therefore, future studies with good design and more large samples are required to validate this conclusion.

  5. Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro-discectomy Surgery: A Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients' Views and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Jonathan; Newsome, Ruth; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2017-07-01

    Sciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life-changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica. A qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed. Most patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first. Many patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Does approach matter? a comparative radiographic analysis of spinopelvic parameters in single level lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlquist, Seth; Park, Howard Y; Gatto, Jonathan; Shamie, Ayra N; Park, Don Y

    2018-04-06

    Lumbar fusion is a popular and effective surgical option to provide stability and restore anatomy. Particular attention has recently been focused on sagittal alignment and radiographic spinopelvic parameters that apply to lumbar fusion as well as spinal deformity cases. Current literature has demonstrated the effectiveness of various techniques of lumbar fusion, however comparative data of these techniques is limited. To directly compare the impact of various lumbar fusion techniques (ALIF, LLIF, TLIF, PLF) based on radiographic parameters. A single-center retrospective study examining pre-operative and post-operative radiographs. A consecutive list of lumbar fusion surgeries performed by multiple spine surgeons at a single institution from 2013-2016 were identified. Radiographic measurements utilized included segmental lordosis (SL), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch (PI-LL), anterior and posterior disk height (DH-A, DH-P respectively), and foraminal height (FH). Radiographic measurements were performed on pre-operative and post-operative lateral lumbar radiographs on all single-level lumbar fusion cases. Demographic data was collected including age, gender, approach, diagnosis, surgical level, and implant lordosis. Paired sample t-test, one-way ANOVA, McNemar Test, and independent sample t-test were used to establish significant differences in the outcome measures. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a predictive model for lordosis from implant lordosis, fusion technique, and surgical level. There were 164 patients (78 males, 86 females) with a mean age of 60.1 years and average radiographic follow up time of 9.3 months. These included 34 ALIF, 23 LLIF, 63 TLIF, and 44 PLF surgeries. ALIF and LLIF significantly improved SL (7.9° & 4.4°), LL (5.5° & 7.7°), DH-A (8.8 mm & 5.8 mm), DH-P (3.4 mm & 2.3 mm), and FH (2.8 mm & 2.5 mm), respectively (p ≤ .003). TLIF significantly improved these

  7. [Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bilateral tubular channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z L; Jia, L; Yu, Y; Xu, W; Hu, X; Zhan, X H; Jia, Y W; Wang, J J; Cheng, L M

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment with bilateral Spotlight tubular channels. Methods: A total of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis whom underwent MIS-TLIF via bilateral Spotlight tubular channels were retrospectively analyzed from October 2014 to November 2015. The 21 patients included 11 males and 10 females ranged from 35 to 82 years (average aged 60.7 years). In term of spondylolisthesis category, there were 18 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 3 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis. With respect to spondylolisthesis degree, 17 cases were grade Ⅰ° and 4 cases were grade Ⅱ°. Besides, 17 cases at L(4-5) and 4 cases at L(5)-S(1)were categorized by spondylolisthesis levels. Operation duration, blood loss, postoperative drainage and intraoperative exposure time were recorded, functional improvement was defined as an improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was also employed at pre and post-operation (3 months and the last follow-up), to evaluate low back and leg pain. Furthermore, to evaluate the recovery of the intervertebral foramen and of lumbar sagittal curvature, average height of intervertebral space, Cobb angles of lumbar vertebrae and operative segments, spondylolisthesis index were measured. At the last follow-up, intervertebral fusion was assessed using Siepe evaluation criteria and the clinical outcome was assessed using the MacNab scale. Radiographic and functional outcomes were compared pre- and post-operation using the paired T test to determine the effectiveness of MIS-TLIF. Statistical significance was defined as P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =17.1, P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =18.6, P spondylolisthesis vertebrae were restored completely. Lastly, at the last follow-up, 12 cases of grade 1 and 7 cases of grade 2 fusion were present as determined

  8. Postoperative discitis following single-level lumbar discectomy: Our experience of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saumyajit; Ghosh, Jay Deep; Malik, Farid H; Tikoo, Agnivesh

    2012-07-01

    The established protocols of treatment of postoperative lumbar discitis have not been validated till date. We report a retrospective analysis of a series of patients with discitis following single level lumbar discectomy. We analyzed the outcome of conservative treatment of postoperative discitis with the objective to define when and what surgery was required when the conservative treatment failed. A total of 17 cases of postoperative discitis treated from 2002 to 2009 were followed up and evaluated clinically, radiologically and by laboratory investigations. All the patients were treated initially conservatively with rest and antibiotic therapy after diagnosis and those who did not respond to conservative treatment of at least 4 weeks were treated surgically. The cases were followed up with serial C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for at least 1 year. The mean followup was 40.38 months (range 12-86 months). Four cases failed to respond to conservative therapy and were treated surgically. In three of these four cases, open debridement, transpedicular fixation and posterolateral fusion was performed, and in the fourth case percutaneous transpedicular fixation was done. In the former group, one case was diagnosed to be tubercular, in another case Staphylococcus aureus was cultured where as the third case culture was sterile. All operated patients showed evidence of interbody fusion at 1 year followup. Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postoperative discitis and the majority do well with conservative treatment. Surgical management in the form of transpedicular fixation and debridement, when required, gives excellent results.

  9. A perioperative cost analysis comparing single-level minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Oglesby, Mathew; Pelton, Miguel A; Andersson, Gunnar B; Isayeva, Darya; Jegier, Briana J; Phillips, Frank M

    2014-08-01

    Emerging literature suggests superior clinical short- and long-term outcomes of MIS (minimally invasive surgery) TLIFs (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) versus open fusions. Few studies to date have analyzed the cost differences between the two techniques and their relationship to acute clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in hospitalization costs and payments for patients treated with primary single-level MIS versus open TLIF. The impact of clinical outcomes and their contribution to financial differences was explored as well. This study was a nonrandomized, nonblinded prospective review. Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing a single-level TLIF (open/MIS) were analyzed (33 open, 33 MIS). Patients in either cohort (MIS/open) were matched based on race, sex, age, smoking status, medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity index), payer, and diagnosis. Every patient in the study had a diagnosis of either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Operative time (minutes), length of stay (LOS, days), estimated blood loss (EBL, mL), anesthesia time (minutes), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and hospital cost/payment amount were assessed. The MIS and open TLIF groups were compared based on clinical outcomes measures and hospital cost/payment data using SPSS version 20.0 for statistical analysis. The two groups were compared using bivariate chi-squared analysis. Mann-Whitney tests were used for non-normal distributed data. Effect size estimate was calculated with the Cohen d statistic and the r statistic with a 95% confidence interval. Average surgical time was shorter for the MIS than the open TLIF group (115.8 minutes vs. 186.0 minutes respectively; p=.001). Length of stay was also reduced for the MIS versus the open group (2.3 days vs. 2.9 days, respectively; p=.018). Average anesthesia time and EBL were also lower in the MIS group (pFinancial analysis demonstrated lower total hospital direct

  10. Trends Analysis of rhBMP Utilization in Single-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lifeng; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C; Meisel, Hans-Joerg

    2017-10-01

    Retrospective study. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been widely used in spinal fusion surgery, but there is little information on rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the trends and demographics of rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level PLIF. Patients who underwent single-level PLIF from 2005 to 2011 were identified by searching ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database, a national database of orthopedic insurance records. The year of procedure, age, gender, and region of the United States were recorded for each patient. Results were reported for each variable as the incidence of procedures identified per 100 000 patients searched in the database. A total of 2735 patients had single-level PLIF. The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 maintained at a relatively stable level (28% to 31%) from 2005 to 2009, but decreased in 2010 (9.9%) and 2011 (11.8%). The overall incidence of single-level PLIF without rhBMP-2 (0.68 cases per 100 000 patients) was statistically higher ( P level PLIF with rhBMP-2 (0.21 cases per 100 000 patients). The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 utilization was the highest in West (30.1%), followed by Midwest (26.9%), South (20.5%), and Northeast (17.8%). The highest incidence of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 was observed in the age group level PLIF. There was a 3-fold increase in the rate of PLIF without rhBMP-2 compared to PLIF with rhBMP-2, with both procedures being mainly done in patients less than 65 years of age.

  11. The Effect of Single-Level Disc Degeneration on Dynamic Response of the Whole Lumbar Spine to Vertical Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Xin; Fan, Wei

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of single-level disc degeneration on dynamic response of the whole lumbar spine to vertical whole body vibration that is typically present when driving vehicles. Ligamentous finite element models of the lumbar L1-S1 motion segment in different grades of degeneration (healthy, mild, and moderate) at the L4-L5 level were developed with consideration of changing disc height and material properties of the nucleus pulpous. All models were loaded with a compressive follower preload of 400 N and a sinusoidal vertical vibration load of ±40 N. After transient dynamic analyses, computational results for the 3 models in terms of disc bulge, von-Mises stress in annulus ground substance, and nucleus pressure were plotted as a function of time and compared. All the predicted results showed a cyclic response with time. At the degenerated L4-L5 disc level, as degeneration progressed, maximum value of the predicted response showed a decrease in disc bulge and von-Mises stress in annulus ground substance but a slight increase in nucleus pressure, and their vibration amplitudes were all decreased. At the adjacent levels of the degenerated disc, there was a slight decrease in maximum value and vibration amplitude of these predicted responses with the degeneration. The results indicated that single-level disc degeneration can alter vibration characteristics of the whole lumbar spine especially for the degenerated disc level, and increasing the degeneration did not deteriorate the effect of vertical vibration on the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Subcutaneous Infiltration of Liposomal Bupivacaine Following Single-Level Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery Improve Immediate Postoperative Pain Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Tou, Kevin; Winkel, Rose; Puffer, Ross; Bydon, Mohamad; Nassr, Ahmad; Huddleston, Paul; Yaszemski, Michael; Currier, Bradford; Freedman, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case-control study using prospectively collected data. Evaluate the impact of liposomal bupivacaine (LB) on postoperative pain management and narcotic use following standardized single-level low lumbar transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Poor pain control after surgery has been linked with decreased pain satisfaction and increased economic burden. Unfortunately, opioids have many limitations and side effects despite being the primary treatment of postoperative pain. LB may be a form of pre-emptive analgesia used to reduce the use of postoperative narcotics as evidence in other studies evaluating its use in single-level microdiskectomies. The infiltration of LB subcutaneously during wound closure was performed by a single surgeon beginning in July 2014 for all single-level lumbar TLIF spinal surgeries at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. This cohort was compared against a control cohort of patients who underwent the same surgery by the same surgeon in the preceding 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed on relevant variables including: morphine equivalents of narcotic medication used (primary outcome), length of hospitalization, Visual Analog Scale pain scores, and total time spent on a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. A total of 30 patients were included in this study; 16 were in the intervention cohort and 14 were in the control cohort. The morphine equivalents of intravenous narcotic use postoperatively were significantly less in the LB cohort from day of surgery to postoperative day 3. Although the differences lost their statistical significance, the trend remained for total (oral and intravenous) narcotic consumption to be lower in the LB group. The patients who received the study intervention required an acute pain service consult less frequently (62.5% in LB cohort vs. 78.6% in control cohort). The amount of time spent on a PCA pump in the LB group was 31 hours versus 47 hours in the control group ( p =0.1506). Local

  13. Single-Level Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Adjacent Segment Disease: A Retrospective Two-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichmair, Alexander; Alimi, Marjan; Hughes, Alexander P; Sama, Andrew A; Du, Jerry Y; Härtl, Roger; Burket, Jayme C; Lampe, Lukas P; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-05-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to assess the postoperative outcome after single-level lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for adjacent segment disease (ASD). Although there is a plethora of literature on ASD following traditional arthrodesis techniques, literature on ASD following LLIF is limited. Vice versa, the surgical outcome after LLIF for the treatment of ASD remains to be elucidated. Patients who underwent single-level LLIF for ASD at two institutions (March 2006-April 2012) were included, and the medical records, operative reports, radiographic imaging studies, and office records reviewed. Out of 523 LLIF patients, 52 met the inclusion criteria, and were postoperatively followed for 16.1 ± 9.8 months (range: 5-44). When comparing the pre-operative data with both the first and most recent follow-up postoperatively, LLIF resulted in a reduction in back pain (P fusion rate in patients who underwent circumferential fusion than the standalone subgroup (87.5% vs. 53.8%; P = 0.173). LLIF may be an effective surgical treatment option for ASD with regard to both the clinical and radiographic outcome in a large proportion of cases. Although standalone LLIF is associated with a narrower spectrum of adverse effects than circumferential fusion, posterior instrumentation may be necessary to increase segmental stability. 4.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of lumbar discectomy and single-level fusion for spondylolisthesis: experience with the NeuroPoint-SD registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Whitmore, Robert G; Curran, Jill N; Ziewacz, John E; Wadhwa, Rishi; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Asher, Anthony L; Heary, Robert F; Cheng, Joseph S; Hurlbert, R John; Douglas, Andrea F; Smith, Justin S; Malhotra, Neil R; Dante, Stephen J; Magge, Subu N; Kaiser, Michael G; Abbed, Khalid M; Resnick, Daniel K; Ghogawala, Zoher

    2014-06-01

    There is significant practice variation and uncertainty as to the value of surgical treatments for lumbar spine disorders. The authors' aim was to establish a multicenter registry to assess the efficacy and costs of common lumbar spinal procedures by using prospectively collected outcomes. An observational prospective cohort study was completed at 13 academic and community sites. Patients undergoing single-level fusion for spondylolisthesis or single-level lumbar discectomy were included. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) data were obtained preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Power analysis estimated a sample size of 160 patients: lumbar disc (125 patients) and lumbar listhesis (35 patients). The quality-adjusted life year (QALY) data were calculated using 6-dimension utility index scores. Direct costs and complication costs were estimated using Medicare reimbursement values from 2011, and indirect costs were estimated using the human capital approach with the 2011 US national wage index. Total costs equaled $14,980 for lumbar discectomy and $43,852 for surgery for lumbar spondylolisthesis. There were 198 patients enrolled over 1 year. The mean age was 46 years (49% female) for lumbar discectomy (n = 148) and 58.1 years (60% female) for lumbar spondylolisthesis (n = 50). Ten patients with disc herniation (6.8%) and 1 with listhesis (2%) required repeat operation at 1 year. The overall 1-year follow-up rate was 88%. At 30 days, both lumbar discectomy and single-level fusion procedures were associated with significant improvements in ODI, visual analog scale, and SF-36 scores (p = 0.0002), which persisted at the 1-year evaluation (p spondylolisthesis. One-year cost per QALY was obtained, and this cost per QALY is expected to improve further by 2 years. This work sets the stage for real-world analysis of the value of health interventions.

  15. Comparison of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Nonrigid Fixation System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Single-Level Lumbar Disc Herniation: A New Method of MRI Analysis of Lumbar Nucleus Pulposus Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaofeng; Liu, Yanan; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate the influence of a nonrigid fixation system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion on adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration by using MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume for single-level lumbar disc herniation. We selected 112 patients who underwent nonrigid fixation (17 men and 44 women) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (13 men and 38 women) for this retrospective study. Based on the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans taken preoperatively, and 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, the nucleus pulposus in the upper segments of the operated level was considered an ellipsoid, and their volumes were measured respectively and then compared between the two groups. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion group had significantly lower lumbar nucleus pulposus volume than the nonrigid fixation group at 12 (4.04 ± 1.42 vs. 5.25 ± 1.47 mm 3 ) and 24 months (4.16 ± 0.89 vs. 5.06 ± 1.23 mm 3 ), and had the highest nucleus pulposus. Meanwhile, the h value in the posterior lumbar interbody fusion group was notably smaller than the preoperative level at 12 (0.46 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm) and 24 months (0.44 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm). MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume is a new and quantitative method of analysis, which is a considerable method and contributes to the detection of severe intervertebral disc degeneration. Based on this new method, nonrigid fixation demonstrates excellent outcomes on the adjacent segment in comparison with posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

  16. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. The mean operative time was 181.1 ± 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 ± 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic

  17. Does restoration of focal lumbar lordosis for single level degenerative spondylolisthesis result in better patient-reported clinical outcomes? A systematic literature review.

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    Rhee, Chanseok; Visintini, Sarah; Dunning, Cynthia E; Oxner, William M; Glennie, R Andrew

    2017-10-01

    It is controversial whether the surgical restoration of sagittal balance and spinopelvic angulation in a single level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis results in clinical improvements. The purpose of this study to systematically review the available literature to determine whether the surgical correction of malalignment in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis correlates with improvements in patient-reported clinical outcomes. Literature searches were performed via Ovid Medline, Embase, CENTRAL and Web of Science using search terms "lumbar," "degenerative/spondylolisthesis" and "surgery/surgical/surgeries/fusion". This resulted in 844 articles and after reviewing the abstracts and full-texts, 13 articles were included for summary and final analysis. There were two Level II articles, four Level III articles and five Level IV articles. Most commonly used patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were Oswestery disability index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Four articles were included for the final statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the patient groups who achieved successful surgical correction of malalignment and those who did not for either ODI (mean difference -0.94, CI -8.89-7.00) or VAS (mean difference 1.57, CI -3.16-6.30). Two studies assessed the efficacy of manual reduction of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and their clinical outcomes after the operation, and there was no statistically significant improvement. Overall, the restoration of focal lumbar lordosis and restoration of sagittal balance for single-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis does not seem to yield clinical improvements but well-powered studies on this specific topic is lacking in the current literature. Future well-powered studies are needed for a more definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Value in Single-level Lumbar Discectomy: Surgical Disposable Item Cost and Relationship to Patient-reported Outcomes.

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    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Modic, Michael T; Krishnaney, Ajit A

    2017-11-01

    This is a retrospective study. Compare improvements in health status measures (HSMs) and surgical costs to determine whether use of more costly items has any relationship to clinical outcome and value in lumbar disc surgery. Association between cost, outcomes, and value in spine surgery, including lumbar discectomy is poorly understood. Outcomes were calculated as difference in mean HSM scores between preoperative and postoperative timeframes. Prospective validated patient-reported HSMs studied were EuroQol quality of life index score (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Surgical costs consisted of disposable items and implants used in operating room. We retrospectively identified all adult patients at Cleveland Clinic main campus between October 2009 and August 2013 who underwent lumbar discectomy (652) using administrative billing data, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code 63030. HSMs were obtained from Cleveland Clinic Knowledge Program Data Registry. In total, 67% of operations performed in the outpatient or ambulatory setting, 33% in the inpatient setting. Among 9 surgeons who performed >10 lumbar discectomies, there were 72.4 operations per surgeon, on average. Mean surgical costs of each surgeon differed (Pcosts (Pcosts (P=0.76, 0.07, 0.76, respectively). In multivariable regression, only surgical cost was significantly correlated to mean difference in PDQ (P=0.030). More costly surgeries resulted in worse PDQ outcomes. Mean surgical costs varied statistically among 9 surgeons; costs were not shown to be positively correlated with patient outcomes. Performing an operation using more costly disposable supplies/implants does not seem to improve patient outcomes and should be considered when constructing preference cards and during an operation.

  19. Microdiscectomia lombar tubular com o uso de seringas descartáveis de diâmetros progressivos: resultados cirúrgicos Microdiscectomía lumbar tubular con el uso de seringas desechables de diámetros progresivos: resultados quirúrgicos Tubular lumbar microdiscectomy using disposable syringes of progressive diameters: surgical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Valli Anderle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever técnica minimamente invasiva para abordagem das hérnias discais com material de baixo custo. MÉTODOS: estudo prospectivo da avaliação dos resultados cirúrgicos de dez pacientes submetidos à microdiscectomia lombar tubular com uso de seringas descartáveis de diâmetros progressivos. RESULTADOS: utilizando os critérios de MacNab modificados, 60% dos pacientes apresentaram resultados considerados excelentes, 30% bons e 10% razoáveis. O tempo médio de cirurgia foi de 70 minutos e o de permanência hospitalar, de 14 horas. CONCLUSÃO: o uso de seringas descartáveis para microdiscectomia tubular foi seguro, de baixo custo e com resultados preliminares semelhantes aos da literatura para o tratamento minimamente invasivo da hérnia discal lombar.OBJETIVO: describir una técnica mínimamente invasiva para el abordaje de las hernias discales con material de bajo costo y de fácil acceso. MÉTODOS: estudio prospectivo de la evaluación de los resultados quirúrgicos de diez pacientes sometidos a una microdiscectomía lumbar utilizando jeringas desechables de diámetros progresivos. RESULTADOS: utilizando los criterios de MacNab cambiados, un 60% de los pacientes tuvieron resultados considerados como excelentes, el 30% buenos y el 10% razonables. El tiempo medio de cirugía fue 70 minutos y de permanencia en el hospital fue de 14 horas. CONCLUSIÓN: los resultados del estudio indican que la técnica es viable, de bajo costo y con resultados similares a los reportados en la literatura para el tratamiento mínimamente invasivo de la hernia discal lumbar.OBJECTIVE: to describe a minimally invasive technique to treat lumbar disc herniation with low-cost material. METHODS: this is a prospective evaluation of ten patients submitted to a tubular lumbar microdiscectomy with disposable syringes for herniated disc. The modified MacNab criteria were used to evaluate the surgical results. RESULTS: according to the modified Mac

  20. PTED study : design of a non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) versus open microdiscectomy for patients with a symptomatic lumbar disc herniation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiger, Ankie; Gadjradj, Pravesh S; Harhangi, Biswadjiet S; van Susante, Job Lc; Peul, Wilco C; van Tulder, Maurits W; de Boer, Michiel R; Rubinstein, Sidney M

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lumbosacral radicular syndrome is often caused by a disc herniation. The standard surgical technique to remove a disc herniation is open microdiscectomy. An alternative technique is percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED), which is less invasive. In the Netherlands,

  1. Superior Facet Joint Violations during Single Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Preliminary Retrospective Clinical Study

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    Long Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Facet joint violation (FV was reported as variable iatrogenic damage that can be a crucial risk factor leading to the adjacent segment degeneration (ASD. “Blind” screw placement technique in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF contributes to the increasing incidence of FV that can be influenced by several potential factors. Many controversies about these factors and clinical outcomes of different types of FV patients exist, yet they have not been analyzed. Methods. 99 cases undergoing single-segment MIS-TLIF from July 2013 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography (CT was applied to determine the incidence of FV, and then the correlation between FV and relevant factors, including gender, age, body mass index (BMI, top-screw level, and decompression, was analyzed. A total of 53 cases were followed up after one year, 31 cases in noninjury (A group and 22 patients in FV injury (B group. Results. The incidence of FV was 39. 39% (39/99 in the patients and 23.23% (46/198 in the screws. Logistic regression analysis showed that screw at L5 in patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2 was vulnerable to FV (P<0.05. Moreover, postoperative average intervertebral disc height (AIDH of fusion segment, visual analog scale (VAS, and Oswestry disability index (ODI scores improved significantly in group A and B when compared with preoperative data (P<0.05. Adjacent superior average intervertebral disc height (ASAIDH presented decrease, but adjacent superior intervertebral disc Cobb angle (ASIDCA appeared to increase in the two groups at the final follow-up compared with postoperative 3 days (P<0.05. Low back VAS and ODI scores in group A (31 cases were lower than those in group B (22 cases in the final follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion. MIS-TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease, but FV occurred at a higher incidence. Facet joints should be protected in MIS-TLIF to avoid FV.

  2. [Sciatica. From stretch rack to microdiscectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, P; Böni, T

    2015-12-01

    In ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages treatment options for discogenic nerve compression syndrome were limited and usually not very specific because of low anatomical and pathophysiological knowledge. The stretch rack (scamnum Hippocratis) was particularly prominent but was widely used as a therapeutic device for very different spinal disorders. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century anatomical knowledge increased and the advances in the fields of asepsis, anesthesia and surgery resulted in an increase in surgical interventions on the spine. In 1908 the first successful lumbar discectomy was initiated and performed by the German neurologist Heinrich O. Oppenheim (1858-1919) and the surgeon Fedor Krause (1857-1937); however, neither recognized the true pathological condition of discogenic nerve compression syndrome. With the landmark report in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1934, the two American surgeons William Jason Mixter (1880-1958) and Joseph Seaton Barr (1901-1963) finally clarified the pathomechanism of lumbar disc herniation and furthermore, propagated discectomy as the standard therapy. Since then interventions on intervertebral discs rapidly increased and the treatment options for lumbar disc surgery quickly evolved. The surgical procedures changed over time and were continuously being refined. In the late 1960s the surgical microscope was introduced for spinal surgery by the work of the famous neurosurgeon Mahmut Gazi Yasargil and his colleague Wolfhard Caspar and so-called microdiscectomy was introduced. Besides open discectomy other interventional techniques were developed to overcome the side effects of surgical procedures. In 1964 the American orthopedic surgeon Lyman Smith (1912-1991) introduced chemonucleolysis, a minimally invasive technique consisting only of a cannula and the proteolytic enzyme chymopapain, which is injected into the disc compartment to dissolve the displaced disc material. In 1975 the Japanese orthopedic

  3. Comparison of functional outcomes following surgical decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion in single level low grade lumbar degenerative versus isthmic spondylolisthesis.

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    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Rahimi, Mohammad Dawood; Khanzadeh, Reza

    2014-06-01

    The two most common types of surgically treated lumbar spondylolisthesis in adults include the degenerative and isthmic types. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcomes of surgical decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the clinical outcomes in surgically treated patients with single level, low grade lumbar degenerative, and isthmic spondylolisthesis (groups A and B, respectively) from August 2007 to April 2011. We tried to compare paired settings with similar initial conditions. Group A included 52 patients with a mean age of 49.2 ± 6.1 years, and group B included 52 patients with a mean age of 47.3 ± 7.4 years. Minimum follow-up was 24 months. The surgical procedure comprised neural decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion. Pain and disability were assessed by a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to compare indices. The most common sites for degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis were at the L4-L5 (88.5%) and L5-S1 (84.6%) levels, respectively. Surgery in both groups significantly improved VAS and ODI scores. The efficacy of surgery based on subjective satisfaction rate and pain and disability improvement was similar in the degenerative and isthmic groups. Notable complications were also comparable in both groups. Neural decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion significantly improved pain and disability in patients with degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis. The efficacy of surgery for overall subjective satisfaction rate and pain and disability improvement was similar in both groups.

  4. Microdiscectomy with and without insertion of interspinous device for herniated disc at the L5-S1 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Marcelo; Gazzeri, Roberto; De la Rosa, Pedro; Martínez-Lage, Juan F

    2014-11-01

    The role of interspinous devices (ISD) after lumbar herniated disc surgery for the prevention of postoperative back pain is controversial. The aim of this comparative prospective study was to determine outcomes in a selective cohort with L5-S1 disc herniation and degenerative disc changes after microdiscectomy with or without insertion of an ISD. One hundred and two consecutive patients underwent an L5-S1 microdiscectomy with or without implantation of an ISD. Group 1 consisted of 47 patients, with mild (n=22), moderate (n=14) or severe (n=11) degenerative disc changes who had microdiscectomy alone. Group 2 comprised 45 patients with similar types of disc changes who underwent microdiscectomy with an ISD implant. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to grade low-back pain and postoperative clinical status was rated according to the modified MacNab criteria. Mean VAS score for low-back pain improved significantly at 1 year follow-up from 7.3 at baseline to 2.75 (pdisc changes were more likely to achieve improvement of their low-back pain when treated with both microdiscectomy and ISD insertion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preoperative estimation of disc herniation recurrence after microdiscectomy: predictive value of a multivariate model based on radiographic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, Evgenii; Krutko, Alexander V; Baykov, Evgenii S; Giers, Morgan B; Preul, Mark C; Byvaltsev, Vadim A

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is one of the unfavorable outcomes after microdiscectomy. Prediction of the patient population with increased risk of rLDH is important because patients may benefit from preventive measures or other surgical options. The study assessed preoperative factors associated with rLDH after microdiscectomy and created a mathematical model for estimation of chances for rLDH. This is a retrospective case-control study. The study includes patients who underwent microdiscectomy for LDH. Lumbar disc herniation recurrence was determined using magnetic resonance imaging. The study included 350 patients with LDH and a minimum of 3 years of follow-up. Patients underwent microdiscectomy for LDH at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels from 2008 to 2012. Patients were divided into two groups to identify predictors of recurrence: those who developed rLDH (n=50) within 3 years and those who did not develop rLDH (n=300) within the same follow-up period. Multivariate analysis was performed using patient baseline clinical and radiography data. Non-linear, multivariate, logistic regression analysis was used to build a predictive model. Recurrence of LDH occurred within 1 to 48 months after microdiscectomy. Preoperatively, patients who developed rLDH were smokers (70% vs. 27%, pnon-linear modeling allowed for more accurate prediction of rLDH (90% correct prediction of rLDH; 99% correct prediction of no rLDH) than other univariate logit models. Preoperative radiographic parameters in patients with LDH can be used to assess the risk of recurrence after microdiscectomy. The multifactorial non-linear model provided more accurate rLDH probability estimation than the univariate analyses. The software developed from this model may be implemented during patient counseling or decision making when choosing the type of primary surgery for LDH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anterior corpectomy via the mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach combined with short-segment posterior fixation for single-level traumatic lumbar burst fractures: analysis of health-related quality of life outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologis, Alexander A; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Toogood, Paul; Kennedy, Abbey; Birk, Harjus; McClellan, R Trigg; Pekmezci, Murat

    2016-01-01

    .4%) and mental health outcomes (SF-12 mental component score 50.2% ± 11.6%) after surgery. Anterior corpectomy and cage placement via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach supplemented by short-segment posterior instrumentation is a safe, effective alternative to conventional approaches in the treatment of single-level unstable burst fractures and is associated with excellent functional outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  7. Clinical outcomes and efficacy of transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy

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    Cezmi Çagri Türk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy (TLED is a minimally invasive procedure for removing lumbar disc herniations. This technique was initially reserved for herniations in the foraminal or extraforaminal region. This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, lesion levels, numbers of affected levels, visual analog scores (VASs, Oswestry disability questionnaire scale scores and MacNab pain relief scores. Results: A total of 48 female and 57 male patients aged between 25 and 64 years (mean: 41.8 years underwent TLED procedures. The majority (83% of the cases were operated on at the levels of L4-5 and L5-S1. Five patients had herniations at two levels. There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3 and those collected after 1-year (2.5. Two patients were referred for microdiscectomy after TLED due to unsatisfactory pain relief on the 1 st postoperative day. The overall success rate with respect to pain relief was 90.4% (95/105. Seven patients with previous histories of open discectomy at the same level reported fair pain relief after TLED. Conclusions: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma. Herniations that involved single levels and foraminal/extraforaminal localizations were associated with better responses to TLED.

  8. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, H.F.; Keers, J.C.; Oterdoom, D.L. Marinus; Kuijlen, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  9. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis : a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boogert, Hugo F.; Keers, Joost C.; Oterdoom, D. L. Marinus; Kuijlen, Jos M. A.

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  10. Analysis of the Characteristics and Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Upper Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junlong; Zhang, Chao; Zheng, Wenjie; Hong, Christopher S; Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar disc herniations at the L1-L2 and L2-L3 levels have unique characteristics that result in worse surgical outcomes after traditional microdiscectomy compared with herniation at L3-L4. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes of patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) at L1-L2 and L2-L3, compared with those who underwent PELD at L3-L4. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical data from 55 patients who underwent PELD for single-level lumbar disc herniation between 2008 and 2014, at a mean follow-up of 29.9 ± 16.4 months (12-month minimum; effective rate, 89.1%). Surgical duration; length of postoperative hospital stay; hospitalization cost; recurrence rate; Macnab criteria assessment; visual analog scale (VAS) of back pain, leg pain, and numbness; Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) low back pain score; and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before and after surgery were evaluated. In the L1-L3 group, 76.9% of the patients had a positive femoral stretch test, compared with only 42.8% of those in the L3-L4 group (P disc herniation and may compare favorably with the same procedure for lower lumbar disc herniation. In addition, the positive femoral stretch test was a relatively good diagnostic method for disc herniation at L1-L2 and L2-L3, compared with herniation at L3-L4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgery for Herniated Lumbar Disc in Daily Tobacco Smokers: A Multicenter Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsbu, Mattis A; Salvesen, Øyvind; Werner, David A T; Franssen, Eric; Weber, Clemens; Nygaard, Øystein P; Solberg, Tore K; Gulati, Sasha

    2018-01-01

    To compare clinical outcomes at 1 year following single-level lumbar microdiscectomy in daily tobacco smokers and nonsmokers. Data were collected through the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery. The primary endpoint was a change in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 1 year. Secondary endpoints were change in quality of life measured with EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), leg and back pain measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS), and rates of surgical complications. A total of 5514 patients were enrolled, including 3907 nonsmokers and 1607 smokers. A significant improvement in ODI was observed for the entire cohort (mean, 31.1 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 30.4-31.8; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers experienced a greater improvement in ODI at 1 year compared with smokers (mean, 4.1 points; 95% CI, 2.5-5.7; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers were more likely to achieve a minimal important change (MIC), defined as an ODI improvement of ≥10 points, compared with smokers (85.5% vs. 79.5%; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers experienced greater improvements in EQ-5D (mean difference, 0.068; 95% CI, 0.04-0.09; P < 0.001), back pain NRS (mean difference, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.21-0.66; P < 0.001), and leg pain NRS (mean difference, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.77; P < 0.001). There was no difference between smokers and nonsmokers in the overall complication rate (6.2% vs. 6.7%; P = 0.512). Smoking was identified as a negative predictor for ODI change in a multiple regression analysis (P < 0.001). Nonsmokers reported a greater improvement in ODI at 1 year following microdiscectomy, and smokers were less likely to experience an MIC. Nonetheless, significant improvement was also found among smokers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamper, S.J.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Nellensteijn, J.M.; Peul, W.C.; Arts, M.P.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assessing the benefits of surgical treatments for sciatica is critical for clinical and policy decision-making. To compare minimally invasive (MI) and conventional microdiscectomy (MD) for patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis

  13. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus microdiscectomy for sciatica: Cost utility analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart; van den Hout, Wilbert B; van Buchem, Mark A; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-10-01

    Background Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) for patients with lumbar disc herniation is believed to be cheaper than surgery. However, cost-effectiveness has never been studied. Materials and Methods A cost utility analysis was performed alongside a randomized controlled trial comparing PLDD and conventional surgery. Patients reported their quality of life using the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), 36-item short form health survey (SF-36 and derived SF-6D) and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Using cost diaries patients reported health care use, non-health care use and hours of absenteeism from work. The 1-year societal costs were compared with 1-year quality adjusted life years (QALYs) based on the United States (US) EQ-5D. Sensitivity analyses were carried out on the use of different utility measures (Netherland (NL) EQ-5D, SF-6D, or VAS) and on the perspective (societal or healthcare). Results On the US EQ-5D, conventional surgery provided a non-significant gain in QALYs of 0.033 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.026 to 0.093) in the first year. PLDD resulted in significantly lower healthcare costs (difference €1771, 95% CI €303 to €3238) and non-significantly lower societal costs (difference €2379, 95% CI -€2860 to €7618). For low values of the willingness to pay for a QALY, the probability of being cost-effective is in favor of PLDD. For higher values of the willingness to pay, between €30,000 and €70,000, conventional microdiscectomy becomes favorable. Conclusions From a healthcare perspective PLDD, followed by surgery when needed, results in significantly lower 1-year costs than conventional surgery. From a societal perspective PLDD appears to be an economically neutral innovation.

  14. Lumbar disk herniation presented with cauda equina syndrome in a pregnant woman

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    Tayfun Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite low back pain being common in pregnancy, cauda equina syndrome is rare. Misdiagnosis and delay in treatment may cause neurological sequelae including urinary and fecal incontinence, sexual dysfunction in patients. A case of cauda equina syndrome in a pregnant woman at 25-week gestation is presented here. The patient underwent an emergency, standard lumbar microdiscectomy under general anesthesia on prone position. Neither the patient nor the baby had any complication related to surgery.

  15. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  16. Transforaminal Approach in Thoracal Disc Pathologies: Transforaminal Microdiscectomy Technique

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    Sedat Dalbayrak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Many surgical approaches have been defined and implemented in the last few decades for thoracic disc herniations. The endoscopic foraminal approach in foraminal, lateral, and far lateral disc hernias is a contemporary minimal invasive approach. This study was performed to show that the approach is possible using the microscope without an endoscope, and even the intervention on the discs within the spinal canal is possible by having access through the foramen. Methods. Forty-two cases with disc hernias in the medial of the pedicle were included in this study; surgeries were performed with transforaminal approach and microsurgically. Extraforaminal disc hernias were not included in the study. Access was made through the Kambin triangle, foramen was enlarged, and spinal canal was entered. Results. The procedure took 65 minutes in the average, and the mean bleeding amount was about 100cc. They were mobilized within the same day postoperatively. No complications were seen. Follow-up periods range between 5 and 84 months, and the mean follow-up period is 30.2 months. Conclusion. Transforaminal microdiscectomy is a method that can be performed in any clinic with standard spinal surgery equipment. It does not require additional equipment or high costs.

  17. Surgical management for lumbar disc herniation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, S; Giovannopoulou, E; Blontzos, N; Kazakos, G; Givissis, P

    2017-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common surgical spine pathology that may be presented during pregnancy. The state of pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and therapeutical management of this entity. Specific considerations rule the decision for surgical intervention, the optimal timing of it and the type of selected procedure in a pregnant patient, due to the potential risks for the fetus. In the last 30 years, evolution in the field of spine surgery has provided options other than open standard discectomy. The well-established concept of "minimal intervention" has led to the development of microdiscectomy and other innovative, full-endoscopic techniques for lumbar discectomy. The aim of the present study is to review the surgical management of lumbar disc herniation in pregnancy and investigate the potential role of minimally invasive spine surgery in this specific population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy for patients with sciatica: Two-year results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Jacobs, Wilco Ch; Schenk, Barry; van den Berg-Huijsmans, Annette A; Koes, Bart W; Arts, Mark A; van Buchem, M A; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-06-01

    Background Percutaneous laser disc decompression is a minimally invasive treatment, for lumbar disc herniation and might serve as an alternative to surgical management of sciatica. In a randomised trial with two-year follow-up we assessed the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression compared to conventional surgery. Materials and methods This multicentre randomised prospective trial with a non-inferiority design, was carried out according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. One hundred and fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were randomly allocated to percutaneous laser disc decompression ( n = 55) or conventional surgery ( n = 57). The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analogue scores for back and leg pain and the patient's report of perceived recovery. Results The primary outcome measures showed no significant difference or clinically relevant difference between the two groups at two-year follow-up. The re-operation rate was 21% in the surgery group, which is relatively high, and with an even higher 52% in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group. Conclusion At two-year follow-up, a strategy of percutaneous laser disc decompression, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in non-inferior outcomes compared to a strategy of microdiscectomy. Although the rate of reoperation in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group was higher than expected, surgery could be avoided in 48% of those patients that were originally candidates for surgery. Percutaneous laser disc decompression, as a non-surgical method, could have a place in the treatment arsenal of sciatica caused by contained herniated discs.

  19. Postoperative nerve root displacement and scar tissue. A prospective cohort study with contrast-enhanced MR imaging one year after microdiscectomy

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    Nygaard, O.P.; Jacobsen, E.A.; Solberg, T.; Kloster, R.; Dullerud, R. [University Hospital of Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the association between postoperative nerve root displacement and epidural scar tissue, one hundred patients who had undergone lumbar microdiscectomy were included in a prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. The patients were classified as failures or successes at the 12-month follow-up according to a clinical score. Patients with signs of recurrent disc herniation on MR were excluded from the study. All the 13 patients classified as failures were investigated with MR at the 1-year follow-up, and 40 patients classified as successes were picked at random for MR imaging; thus MR was performed in 53 patients. The MR images were independently evaluated by two neuro radiologists. The images were rated according to the presence or absence of nerve root displacement at the surgically treated disc interspace. Scar formation was rated according to two different classification systems. Nerve root displacement was observed in 13 patients. No evidence of scar formation was found in 4 patients, a small amount in 11, intermediate in 37 and extensive scar formation in 1 patient. No association between nerve root displacement and the amount of scar tissue was found. Postoperative nerve root displacement seems to be an independent clinical entity not associated to postoperative scar tissue.

  20. An updated review of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy for the contained herniated lumbar disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Falco, Frank J E; Calodney, Aaron K; Onyewu, Obi; Helm, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-04-01

    Lumbar disc prolapse, protrusion, and extrusion are the most common causes of nerve root pain and surgical interventions, and yet they account for less than 5% of all low back problems. The typical rationale for traditional surgery is that it is an effort to provide more rapid relief of pain and disability. It should be noted that the majority of patients do recover with conservative management. The primary rationale for any form of surgery for disc prolapse associated with radicular pain is to relieve nerve root irritation or compression due to herniated disc material. The primary modality of treatment continues to be either open or microdiscectomy, although several alternative techniques, including automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy, have been described. There is, however, a paucity of evidence for all decompression techniques, specifically alternative techniques including automated and laser discectomy. A systematic review of the literature of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy for the contained herniated lumbar disc. To evaluate and update the effectiveness of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy. The available literature on automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain was reviewed. The quality assessment and clinical relevance criteria utilized were the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group criteria, as utilized for interventional techniques for randomized trials, and the criteria developed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale criteria for observational studies.The level of evidence was classified as good, fair, and limited or poor, based on the quality of evidence scale developed by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to September 2012, and manual searches of the bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Pain relief was the primary

  1. [Lumbar spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichi, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar spondylosis is a chronic, noninflammatory disease caused by degeneration of lumbar disc and/or facet joints. The etiology of lumbar spondylosis is multifactorial. Patients with lumbar spondylosis complain of a broad variety of symptoms including discomfort in the low back lesion, whereas some of them have radiating leg pain or neurologenic intermittent claudication (lumbar spinal stenosis). The majority of patients with spondylosis and stenosis of the lumbosacral spine can be treated nonsurgically. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2 inhibitors are helpful in controlling symptoms. Prostaglandin, epidural injection, and transforaminal injection are also helpful for leg pain and intermittent claudication. Operative therapy for spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis is reserved for patients who are totally incapacitated by their condition.

  2. Two-year follow-up after microsurgical discectomy and dynamic percutaneous stabilization in degenerate and herniated lumbar disc: clinical and neuroradiological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, G; Altruda, C; Gatti, M; Saletti, A; Borrelli, M; Sarubbo, S

    2014-06-01

    Lumbar disc herniation associated with back pain is often related to disc degeneration. Back pain after microdiscectomy often persists, prejudicing clinical outcome and quality of life. To this day, the evolution of disc degeneration after classical microdiscectomy has never been proven. Percutaneous dynamic stabilization after microdiscectomy has been proposed as a novel surgical strategy for treatment of back pain with herniated disc. However, clinical results are still debated and no evidences about the long-term evolution of back pain and relationships between neuroradiological imaging and clinical outcome have been provided. We report our preliminary observations concerning the clinical and neuroradiological outcome of 11 patients treated with microdiscectomy and dynamic percutaneous lumbo-sacral stabilization, after a long-term follow-up (2-years). This was an uncontrolled case series. The study included 11 patients (3 F, 8 M) with L5-S1 discal herniation and degeneration underwent microdiscectomy and percutaneous dynamic stabilization, from December 2008 to November 2009. All the patients were symptomatic with back and leg pain non-responsive to long-term (8-12 months) medical and physical treatments. VAS and Satisfaction Index were used, respectively, for evaluation of clinical outcome and general postoperative patients' satisfaction. Modic and Pfirrmann scores were used for evaluation of neuroradiological outcome. All the patients underwent to microdiscectomy and implantation of the same percutaneous device for dynamic stabilization of the middle vertebral column during the same surgery. Modic, Pfirrmann, VAS and Satisfaction Index scores were collected before surgery and over the follow-up (45 days, 1 and 2 years). MRI and dynamic X-Ray 2 years after surgery were compared to the preoperative imaging. Motion preservation at the functional spinal unit after surgery was demonstrated in all the cases. All patients reported a reduction or complete resolution

  3. Factors that influence recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, M E; Kazancı, A; Yaman, N D; Baş, F; Ayberk, G

    2017-06-01

    The most common cause of poor outcome following lumbar disc surgery is recurrent herniation. Recurrence has been noted in 5% to 15% of patients with surgically treated primary lumbar disc herniation. There have been many studies designed to determine the risk factors for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the influence of disc degeneration, endplate changes, surgical technique, and patient's clinical characteristics on recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients who underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and who were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. All these operations were performed between August 2004 and September 2009 at the Neurosurgery Department of Ataturk Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. During the study period, 126 patients were reviewed, with 101 patients underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and 25 patients were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation. Preoperative higher intervertebral disc height (Pdisc herniation had preoperative higher disc height and higher body mass index. Modic endplate changes had a higher tendency for recurrence of lumbar disc herniation. Well-planned and well-conducted large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm this and enable convenient treatment modalities to prevent recurrent disc pathology.

  4. Prevention of epidural scarring after microdiscectomy: a randomized clinical trial comparing gel and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Gerd M; Pink, Peter T; Schneider, Frank; Stuecker, Markus; Homann, Nicolaus C; Preidler, Klaus W

    2006-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial compared two materials used to prevent epidural scarring after microdiscectomy. To determine whether ADCON-L Gel (ALG) or Preclude Spinal Membrane (PSM) was more effective in preventing scarring, reducing pain, and improving quality of life postoperatively. Postdiscectomy syndrome may result from epidural scarring. Various materials have been used in attempts to prevent this problem, but none have provided optimal results. Previous laboratory and clinical studies have found ALG and PSM to be effective, but none compared the two materials. Thirty-one patients undergoing primary microdiscectomy were randomly assigned to receive either ALG or PSM. Postoperatively, patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with contrast, for volume and rostral-caudal extent of scar tissue and nerve root involvement. Back and leg pain and quality of life were assessed by neurologic examinations and standardized patient surveys. Findings at any reoperations were recorded. Results in the PSM (n = 18) and ALG (n = 13) groups were compared statistically. No operative or postoperative complications occurred. Two patients in each group required reoperation. MRI at 6 months showed no, mild or mild-moderate scarring in most patients, with no significant differences between the ALG and PSM groups in scar volume and extent or nerve root involvement. Neurologic examinations and patient surveys showed substantial reductions in pain over time in both groups but no significant differences between groups. PSM was easy to see and remove at reoperation. PSM and ALG are equally effective in preventing epidural scarring associated with postdiscectomy syndrome.

  5. IMMEDIATE RECIPROCAL CHANGES AT ADJACENT LEVEL FOLLOWING SINGLE-LEVEL ALIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vargas Uribe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To assess the segmental sagittal parameters and the adjacent mobile segment after interbody fusion by anterior approach in single-level L5-S1. Methods : Retrospective study. Inclusion: Interbody fusion by anterior approach (10°/15° angle, due to DDD, low-grade spondylolisthesis and/or stenosis without prior lumbar fusion. Thirty-five cases were included (25 women; mean age 47±15 years. Analysis of lumbar radiographs were performed preoperatively and 3 months after surgery. The following parameters were evaluated: lumbar lordosis; segmental lordosis L4-L5 and L5-S1; sacral and L5 slope. Two independent evaluators made the measurements. Student's t test was used. Results : There was correction of lordosis at the L5-S1 level, from an average of 19° prior to surgery to 28° three months after surgery (p<0.001. It was observed reduction of the L4-L5 angle from 17° to 14° (p <0.001. Moreover, there was a small, but statistically significant, reduction of L5 inclination from 17 ° to 13 ° (p=0.007 and increase in the sacral slope from 37° to 40° (p=0.002. The change of total lumbar lordosis was not significant: 52° versus 53° (p=0.461. Before surgical correction, lordosis of the L5-S1 level contributed, on average, 37% of lumbar lordosis, and after, 54% (p<0.001. The L4-L5 level accounted for 34% and decreased to 24% (p<0.001. Conclusion : In the group studied, it was observed a decrease in lordosis of the adjacent mobile level following the treatment of the degenerate level by anterior interbody fusion and concomitant increase in lordosis.

  6. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Altinkaya, Naime [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Cekinmez, Melih [Baskent University Medical School Adana, Department of Neurosurgery, Adana (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  7. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinkaya, Naime; Cekinmez, Melih

    2016-01-01

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  8. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkaya, Naime; Cekinmez, Melih

    2016-01-01

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P  0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  9. Postoperative discitis following single-level lumbar discectomy: Our experience of 17 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumyajit Basu

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postoperative discitis and the majority do well with conservative treatment. Surgical management in the form of transpedicular fixation and debridement, when required, gives excellent results.

  10. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION WITH TRANSFORAMINAL NERVE ROOT BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIANO NEVES VIALLE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of anesthetic transforaminal nerve root block in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation through a prospective observational study. Methods: The study included 176 patients from a private clinic undergoing transforaminal injection performed by a single spinal surgeon. The patients were assessed after two weeks, three months and six months regarding to the improvement of the pain radiating to the lower limbs. In case of persistent symptoms, patients could choose to perform a new nerve root block and maintenance of physical therapy or be submitted to conventional microdiscectomy. Results: By the end of six-month follow-up of the 176 patients, 116 had a favorable outcome (95 after one block and 21 after two blocks, and only 43 required surgery. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest a positive effect of transforaminal block for the treatment of sciatica in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  11. Propionibacterium acnes biofilm is present in intervertebral discs of patients undergoing microdiscectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu N Capoor

    Full Text Available In previous studies, Propionibacterium acnes was cultured from intervertebral disc tissue of ~25% of patients undergoing microdiscectomy, suggesting a possible link between chronic bacterial infection and disc degeneration. However, given the prominence of P. acnes as a skin commensal, such analyses often struggled to exclude the alternate possibility that these organisms represent perioperative microbiologic contamination. This investigation seeks to validate P. acnes prevalence in resected disc cultures, while providing microscopic evidence of P. acnes biofilm in the intervertebral discs.Specimens from 368 patients undergoing microdiscectomy for disc herniation were divided into several fragments, one being homogenized, subjected to quantitative anaerobic culture, and assessed for bacterial growth, and a second fragment frozen for additional analyses. Colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and P. acnes phylotyping was conducted by multiplex PCR. For a sub-set of specimens, bacteria localization within the disc was assessed by microscopy using confocal laser scanning and FISH.Bacteria were cultured from 162 discs (44%, including 119 cases (32.3% with P. acnes. In 89 cases, P. acnes was cultured exclusively; in 30 cases, it was isolated in combination with other bacteria (primarily coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. Among positive specimens, the median P. acnes bacterial burden was 350 CFU/g (12 - ~20,000 CFU/g. Thirty-eight P. acnes isolates were subjected to molecular sub-typing, identifying 4 of 6 defined phylogroups: IA1, IB, IC, and II. Eight culture-positive specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and revealed P. acnes in situ. Notably, these bacteria demonstrated a biofilm distribution within the disc matrix. P. acnes bacteria were more prevalent in males than females (39% vs. 23%, p = 0.0013.This study confirms that P. acnes is prevalent in herniated disc tissue. Moreover, it provides the first visual

  12. Propionibacterium acnes biofilm is present in intervertebral discs of patients undergoing microdiscectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Filip; Schmitz, Jonathan E.; James, Garth A.; Machackova, Tana; Jancalek, Radim; Smrcka, Martin; Lipina, Radim; Ahmed, Fahad S.; Alamin, Todd F.; Anand, Neel; Baird, John C.; Bhatia, Nitin; Demir-Deviren, Sibel; Eastlack, Robert K.; Fisher, Steve; Garfin, Steven R.; Gogia, Jaspaul S.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Kuo, Calvin C.; Lee, Yu-Po; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Michu, Elleni; Noskova, Hana; Raz, Assaf; Sana, Jiri; Shamie, A. Nick; Stewart, Philip S.; Stonemetz, Jerry L.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Witham, Timothy F.; Coscia, Michael F.; Birkenmaier, Christof; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Slaby, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    Background In previous studies, Propionibacterium acnes was cultured from intervertebral disc tissue of ~25% of patients undergoing microdiscectomy, suggesting a possible link between chronic bacterial infection and disc degeneration. However, given the prominence of P. acnes as a skin commensal, such analyses often struggled to exclude the alternate possibility that these organisms represent perioperative microbiologic contamination. This investigation seeks to validate P. acnes prevalence in resected disc cultures, while providing microscopic evidence of P. acnes biofilm in the intervertebral discs. Methods Specimens from 368 patients undergoing microdiscectomy for disc herniation were divided into several fragments, one being homogenized, subjected to quantitative anaerobic culture, and assessed for bacterial growth, and a second fragment frozen for additional analyses. Colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and P. acnes phylotyping was conducted by multiplex PCR. For a sub-set of specimens, bacteria localization within the disc was assessed by microscopy using confocal laser scanning and FISH. Results Bacteria were cultured from 162 discs (44%), including 119 cases (32.3%) with P. acnes. In 89 cases, P. acnes was cultured exclusively; in 30 cases, it was isolated in combination with other bacteria (primarily coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp.) Among positive specimens, the median P. acnes bacterial burden was 350 CFU/g (12 - ~20,000 CFU/g). Thirty-eight P. acnes isolates were subjected to molecular sub-typing, identifying 4 of 6 defined phylogroups: IA1, IB, IC, and II. Eight culture-positive specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and revealed P. acnes in situ. Notably, these bacteria demonstrated a biofilm distribution within the disc matrix. P. acnes bacteria were more prevalent in males than females (39% vs. 23%, p = 0.0013). Conclusions This study confirms that P. acnes is prevalent in herniated disc tissue. Moreover, it

  13. Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro?discectomy Surgery: A Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients' Views and Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Boote, Jonathan; Newsome, Ruth; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Sciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life?changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study o...

  14. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  15. Percutaneous endoscopical transforaminal approach versus PLF to treat the single-level adjacent segment disease after PLF/PLIF: 1-2 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Zhaoyu; Pan, Fumin; Liu, Zhonghan; Yu, Bin; Fuentes, Laurel; Wu, Desheng; Zhu, Jianguang

    2017-06-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a common complication after lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. Traditional revision-surgery, including posterior lumbar decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF) or interbody fusion (PLIF) is traumatic. The percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal procedure (PE-TF) has been widely used in patients with lumbar disc disease. However, there are no reports about using PE-TF procedure to treat ASD in the current literature. To compare the clinical outcomes between PE-TF and PLF for single-level ASD after PLF or PLIF. A retrospective study. Department of Spine Surgery. There were 64 patients diagnosed with single-level ASD and accepted revision surgery. 33 patients accepted PE-TF (Group A) and 31 underwent PLF (Group B). Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Complications, length of skin incision, hospitalization time and blood loss were investigated according to patient records. All symptoms had improved at the final follow-up. The improvement rate was 82.75% in group A and 86.28% in group B. The satisfactory clinical outcomes were similar in both groups with no recurrence in all cases. PE-TF procedure had significant advantages in the following items: traumatization, cosmetology, hospitalization time and blood loss. Clinical outcomes of using PE-TF procedure to treat single-level ASD were similar to those of PLF approach, but PE-TF was less invasive and could shorten hospitalization time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The accuracy of MRI in the detection of Lumbar Disc Containment

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    Weiner Bradley K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI has proven to be an extremely valuable tool in the assessment of normal and pathological spinal anatomy. Accordingly, it is commonly used to assess containment of discal material by the outer fibers of the anulus fibrosus and posterior longitudinal ligaments. Determination of such containment is important to determine candidacy for intradiscal techniques and has prognostic significance. The accuracy of MRI in detecting containment has been insufficiently documented. Methods The MRI's of fifty consecutive patients undergoing open lumbar microdiscectomy were prospectively evaluated for disc containment by a neuroradiologist and senior spinal surgeon using criteria available in the literature and the classification of Macnab/McCulloch. An independent surgeon then performed the surgery and documented the actual containment status using the same methods. Statistical evaluation of accuracy was undertaken. Results MRI was found to be 72% sensitive, 68% specific, and 70% accurate in detecting containment status of lumbar herniated discs. Conclusion MRI may be inaccurate in assessing containment status of lumbar disc herniations in 30% of cases. Given the importance of containment for patient selection for indirect discectomy techniques and intradiscal therapies, coupled with prognostic significance; other methods to assess containment should be employed to assess containment when such alternative interventions are being considered.

  17. [Lumbar spinal surgery in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Rivas, P; Sola, R G; Pallares-Fernández, J M; Pintor-Escobar, A

    In the geriatric population, pain with sciatic irradiation requires a differential diagnosis to enable a distinction to be made mainly between a herniated disc, lateral recess stenosis or lumbar stenosis. In addition, in many cases the degenerative problems are often associated with lumbar listhesis or instability. Furthermore, these patients present very diverse associated cardiovascular, pulmonary or metabolic pathologies which can make surgery complicated and, above all, prolong post-operative recovery, as well as increasing morbidity and mortality. We reviewed a group of 50 patients aged between 70 and 87 who had been submitted to surgery between 1997 and 2003; 27 were females and 23 males. 76% of them presented associated systemic pathologies and 22% had a history of previous spinal surgery. In 15 cases clinical symptoms were gait disorders involving claudication, there were three cases of paraparesis with cauda equina syndrome, 19 lumbagos with bilateral sciatica and 16 cases of lumbago with unilateral sciatica. Unilateral decompression hemilaminectomy was performed in 16 patients (group I) with microdiscectomy in 13 cases, laminectomy of one or several vertebrae (group II) was carried out in 17 patients and another 17 patients were submitted to decompression laminectomy plus arthrodesis with transpedicular instrumentation (group III). Overall a significant improvement was observed in 86% of patients. Detected complications involved two serious deep infections (4%), one of which was secondary to cerebrospinal fluid fistula, and the other occurred in an instrumented patient. No instabilities secondary to the laminectomy were observed in non-instrumented patients. No intraoperative anaesthetic or surgical complications were produced. Patients are followed up simultaneously during the post-operative period by both Internal Medicine and Neurosurgery. In the geriatric population there is a high incidence of degenerative problems, not only involving canal stenosis

  18. Predictors of clinical outcome following lumbar disc surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie; Koppenhaver, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    abnormality or pain peripheralization. Preoperative pain peripheralization remained a significant predictor of improved disability (p = 0.04) and LBP (p = 0.02) after accounting for information from the clinical history. Preoperative lumbar multifidus function was not associated with clinical outcome......PURPOSE: Explore the relationships between preoperative findings and clinical outcome following lumbar disc surgery, and investigate the prognostic value of physical examination findings after accounting for information acquired from the clinical history. METHODS: We recruited 55 adult patients...... scheduled for first time, single-level lumbar discectomy. Participants underwent a standardized preoperative evaluation including real-time ultrasound imaging assessment of lumbar multifidus function, and an 8-week postoperative rehabilitation programme. Clinical outcome was defined by change in disability...

  19. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

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    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  20. Results of arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy

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    Mohinder Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    were able to return to light and sedentary work with an average delay of 2 weeks and normal physical activities after 2 months. Conclusion: Arthrospine system is compatible with 30° arthroscope and conventional micro-discectomy instruments. Technique minimizes approach related morbidity and provides minimal access corridor for lumbar discectomy.

  1. The distribution of infection with Propionibacterium acnes is equal in patients with cervical and lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanshir, Naghmeh; Salehpour, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Javad; Mirzaei, Farhad; Naseri Alavi, Seyed Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Cervical and back pains are important clinical problems affecting human populations globally. It is suggested that Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is associated with disc herniation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the distribution of P. acnes infection in the cervical and lumbar disc material obtained from patients with disc herniation. A total of 145 patients with mean age of 45.21 ± 11.24 years who underwent micro-discectomy in cervical and lumbar regions were enrolled into the study. The samples were excited during the operation and then cultured in the anaerobic incubations. The cultured P. acnes were detected by 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction. In this study, 145 patients including 25 cases with cervical and 120 cases with lumbar disc herniation were enrolled to the study. There was no significant difference in the age of male and female patients (p = 0.123). P. acnes infection was detected in nine patients (36%) with cervical disc herniation and 46 patients (38.3%) with lumbar disc herniation and no significant differences were reported in P. acnes presence according to the disc regions (p = 0.508.). Moreover, there was a significant difference in the presence of P. acnes infection according to the level of lumbar disc herniation (p = 0.028). According to the results, the presence of P. acnes is equal in patients with cervical and lumbar disc herniation. There was a significant difference in the distribution of P. acnes infection according to level of lumbar disc herniation. II.

  2. Depression, social factors, and pain perception before and after surgery for lumbar and cervical degenerative vertebral disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska, Renata; Ślusarz, Robert; Królikowska, Agnieszka; Haor, Beata; Antczak, Anna; Szewczyk, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of psychosocial factors on pain levels and depression, before and after surgical treatment, in patients with degenerative lumbar and cervical vertebral disc disease. The study included 188 patients (98 women, 90 men) who were confirmed to have cervical or lumbar degenerative disc disease on magnetic resonance imaging, and who underwent a single microdiscectomy procedure, with no postoperative surgical complications. All patients completed two questionnaires before and after surgery - the Beck Depression Inventory scale (I-IV) and the Visual Analog Scale for pain (0-10). On hospital admission, all patients completed a social and demographic questionnaire. The first pain and depression questionnaire evaluations were performed on the day of hospital admission (n=188); the second on the day of hospital discharge, 7 days after surgery (n=188); and the third was 6 months after surgery (n=140). Patient ages ranged from 22 to 72 years, and 140 patients had lumbar disc disease (mean age, 42.7±10.99 years) and 44 had cervical disc disease (mean age, 48.9±7.85 years). Before surgery, symptoms of depression were present in 47.3% of the patients (11.7% cervical; 35.6% lumbar), at first postoperative evaluation in 25.1% of patients (7% cervical; 18.1% lumbar), and 6 months following surgery in 31.1% of patients (7.5% cervical; 23.6% lumbar). Patients with cervical disc disease who were unemployed had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery ( p =0.037). Patients with lumbar disc disease who had a primary level of education or work involving standing had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery ( p =0.368). This study highlighted the association between social and demographic factors, pain perception, and depression that may persist despite surgical treatment for degenerative vertebral disc disease.

  3. Multiple-level lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Lianlei; Yuan, Suomao; Tian, Yonghao; Zheng, Yanping; Li, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis occur most commonly at only one spinal level. The authors report on 13 cases of lumbar spondylolysis with spondylolisthesis at multiple levels. During July 2007-March 2012, multiple-level spondylolysis associated with spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 13 patients (10 male, 3 female) at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University. The mean patient age was 43.5 ± 14.6 years. The duration of low-back pain was 11.7 ± 5.1 months. Spondylolysis occurred at L-2 in 2 patients, L-3 in 4 patients, L-4 in all patients, and L-5 in 5 patients. Spondylolysis occurred at 3 spinal levels in 3 patients and at 2 levels in 10 patients. All patients had spondylolisthesis at 1 or 2 levels. Japanese Orthopaedic Association and visual analog scale scores were used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function and low-back pain. All patients underwent pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion or direct pars interarticularis repair. Both low-back pain scores improved significantly after surgery (p spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis occurred more often in men. Most multiplelevel lumbar spondylolysis occurred at 2 spinal levels and was associated with sports, trauma, or heavy labor. Multiplelevel lumbar spondylolysis occurred mostly at L3-5; associated spondylolisthesis usually occurred at L-4 and L-5, mostly at L-4. The treatment principle was the same as that for single-level spondylolisthesis.

  4. SACRALISATION OF LUMBAR VERTEBRAE

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Wazir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lumbar backache is a very common problem nowadays. Sacralisation of lumbar vertebrae is one of the cause for that. During routine osteology teaching a sacrum with incomplete attached lumbar 5 vertebrae is seen. Observation: Incompletely fused L 5 vertebrae with sacrum is seen. The bodies of the vertebrae are fused but the transverse process of left side is completely fused with the ala of sacrum.But on the right side is incompletely fused. Conclusion: The person ...

  5. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  6. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordon, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2009-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30-50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  7. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2011-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  8. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy in sciatica: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Schenk, Barry; van den Berg-Huijsmans, Annette A; Koes, Bart W; van Buchem, M A; Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C

    2015-05-01

    Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) is a minimally invasive treatment for lumbar disc herniation, with Food and Drug Administration approval since 1991. However, no randomized trial comparing PLDD to conventional treatment has been performed. In this trial, we assessed the effectiveness of a strategy of PLDD as compared with conventional surgery. This randomized prospective trial with a noninferiority design was carried out in two academic and six teaching hospitals in the Netherlands according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. One hundred fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were included. The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analog scores for back and leg pain, and the patient's report of perceived recovery. Patients were randomly allocated to PLDD (n=57) or conventional surgery (n=58). Blinding was impossible because of the nature of the interventions. This study was funded by the Healthcare Insurance Board of the Netherlands. The primary outcome, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, showed noninferiority of PLDD at 8 (-0.1; [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.3 to 2.1]) and 52 weeks (-1.1; 95% CI, -3.4 to 1.1) compared with conventional surgery. There was, however, a higher speed of recovery in favor of conventional surgery (hazard ratio, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.42-0.97]). The number of reoperations was significantly less in the conventional surgery group (38% vs. 16%). Overall, a strategy of PLDD, with delayed surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes at 1 year. At 1 year, a strategy of PLDD, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes compared with surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Does the duration of symptoms influence outcome in patients with sciatica undergoing micro-discectomy and decompressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsika, Marina; Thomas, Eleanor; Shaheen, Sabeena; Sharma, Himanshu

    2016-04-01

    Early surgical treatment for back and leg pain secondary to disc herniation has been associated with very good outcomes. However, there are conflicting data on the role of surgical treatment in case of prolonged radicular symptomatology. We aimed to evaluate whether the duration of symptoms at presentation affects the subjective outcome. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a single surgeon including micro-discectomies and lateral recess decompressions in patients younger than 60 years old using patient medical notes, radiology imaging, operation notes, and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale for back pain and leg pain (VAS-BP and VAS-LP). The final follow-up was carried out through postal questionnaire or telephone consultation. Demographic information, duration of symptoms, type and incidence of complications, length of hospital stay, and follow-up were analyzed. Data were categorized into four subgroups: symptoms 0≥6 months, 6 months≥1 year, 1 year≥2 years, and >2 years. A clinically significant result was an average improvement of 2 or more points in the VAS and of 20% and over in the ODI. The level of statistical significance was 2 years (VAS-LP 4.77±3.61, VAS-BP 3.54±3.43, ODI 28.36±20.93). The length of hospital stay and complication rate was comparable between groups. Average follow-up was 15.69 months. Our study showed significant improvement in patients with symptoms beyond 1 as well as 2 years since onset, and surgery is a viable option in selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective: Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: * Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. * To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. * If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc

  11. Comparison of lumbar lordosis in lateral radiographs in standing position with supine MR imaging in consideration of the sacral slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benditz, Achim; Boluki, Daniel; Weber, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Voellner, Florian [Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany). Orthopedic Surgery; Zeman, Florian [Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany). Center for Clinical Studies

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the influence of sacral slope on the correlation between measurements of lumbar lordosis obtained by standing radiographs and magnetic resonance images in supine position (MRI). Little information is available on the correlation between measurements of lumbar lordosis obtained by radiographic and MR images. Most relevant studies have shown correlations for the thoracic spine, but detailed analyses on the lumbar spine are lacking. MR images and standing lateral radiographs of 63 patients without actual low back pain or radiographic pathologies of the lumbar spine were analyzed. Standing radiographic measurements included the sagittal parameters pelvic incidence (PI) pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS); MR images were used to additionally measure lumbar L1-S1 lordosis and single level lordosis. Differences between radiographic and MRI measurements were analyzed and divided into 4 subgroups of different sacral slope according to Roussouly's classification. Global lumbar lordosis (L1-S1) was 44.99 (± 10754) on radiographs and 47.91 (±9.170) on MRI, yielding a clinically relevant correlation (r = 0.61, p < 0.01). Measurements of single level lordosis only showed minor differences. At all levels except for L5 / S1, lordosis measured by means of standing radiographs was higher than that measured by MRI. The difference in global lumbar L1-S1 lordosis was -2.9 . Analysis of the Roussouly groups showed the largest difference for L1-S1 (-8.3 ) in group 2. In group 4, when measured on MRI, L5 / S1 lordosis (25.71 ) was lower than L4 / L5 lordosis (27.63 ) compared to the other groups. Although measurements of global lumbar lordosis significantly differed between the two scanning technologies, the mean difference was just 2.9 . MRI in supine position may be used for estimating global lumbar lordosis, but single level lordosis should be determined by means of standing radiographs.

  12. [Effect of intravenous dexketoprofen use on postoperative analgesic consumption in patients with lumbar disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsaka, Ebru; Güldoğuş, Fuat; Cetinoğlu, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the postoperative analgesic effect of a preemptive, single-dose intravenous dexketoprofen administration in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy. A total of 50 ASA I-II patients candidate to laminectomy were included in this study. They were divided in two groups. Patients in Group A were given 50 mg (2 mL) dexketoprofen and those in Group K 2 mL normal saline intravenously by a blinded anesthesia physician, 10 minutes before the start of intervention. All cases underwent general anesthesia. All patients received postoperative patient-controlled analgesia with tramadol. The VAS scores 1, 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours following the operation, sedation and patient satisfaction scores and tramadol consumption were evaluated. VAS scores recorded during the first 8 postoperative hours and total tramadol amounts were lower, and the patient satisfaction scores higher, in patients given dexketoprofen than control group. Sedation scores and side effects were similar in both groups. Single-dose preemptive intravenous dexketoprofen provides effective analgesia especially in the first 8 postoperative hours, reducing tramadol use.

  13. COMPARISON OF ENDOSCOPIC AND MICROSURGICAL METHODS IN THE TREATMENT OF LUMBAR DISC HERNIATIONS

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    SERGEY ARESTOV

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The development of minimally invasive spine surgery leads us to reflect on the efficiency of new methods compared with older ones. In the case of endoscopic spine surgery, we always seek to compare our results using new techniques with the results of older and trusted microsurgical techniques. Unfortunately, there are few reliable studies measuring endoscopic and microsurgical approaches. We therefore decided to compare our treatment results with those of what are, in our opinion, the best and most thorough studies found. Furthermore, we found no illustrated experience in the usability of endoscopic methods. We therefore analyzed each step of the technique used, according to the practical experience with microsurgical discectomy. Methods: We compared our two-year experience of treatment of 183 patients with lumbar disc herniations using the endoscopic technique, with data reported in the literature on microsurgical minimally invasive methods. Results: Our group achieved good to excellent results in 92.9% of cases (170 patients compared to 90% reported in the literature. We compared the capabilities of endoscopic discectomy with microsurgical methods, and concluded that the endoscopic method is sufficient to perform any movement inside the surgical field that is microscopically possible. It is also possible to perform any type of spinal cord decompression, with better visualization provided by the endoscope. Conclusions: We conclude that endoscopic microdiscectomy is a good and reliable alternative, with better outcomes and more efficient usage of the approach space.

  14. Our Experience with 67 Cases of Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

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    Mehmat Ozer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Minimally invasive interventions have become increasingly popular with the developments in technology and surgical tools. In this article, we present our experience with 67 cases of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Material and Method: A total of 67 cases that underwent endoscopic surgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc hernia between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively examined. Results: The mean pre-operative VAS score was 8.13. The mean post-operative VAS score was 2.4 in the 1st month and 2.01 in the 12th month. Satisfaction according to MacNab criteria in the 12th month was excellent in 35 (52.2% patients, good in 18 (26.9% patients, fair in 11 (16.4% patients, and poor in 3 (4.5% patients. Microdiscectomy was required due to continuing symptoms in 3 patients (4.5%. Temporary dysesthesia was found in 3 patients. Discussion: Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy has become a good alternative to microsurgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc herniations because of the developments in technology and surgical tools as well as the increased experience of surgeons. The technique is not limited to these localizations; it can also be used for free fragments within the channel, recurrent disc herniations, and narrow channels.

  15. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  16. Epidurography in lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J.G.; Hauge, O.

    1982-04-01

    Seventeen patients with lytic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grade I-II) and radicular symptoms were examined by epidurography in addition to radiculomyelography before surgical treatment. Epidurography is considered more suitble than radiculomyelogrphy for assessing this condition because narrowing of the epidural space and compression of the nerve roots, due to osteofibrous changes at the lysis, are more consistently demonstrated.

  17. Operative management of lumbar disc herniation : the evolution of knowledge and surgical techniques in the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postacchini, F; Postacchini, R

    2011-01-01

    Removal of a herniated disc with the use of the operative microscope was first performed by Yasargil (Adv Neurosurg. 4:81-2, 1977) in 1977. However, it began to be used more and more only in the late 1980s (McCulloch JA (1989) Principles of microsurgery for lumbar disc disease. Raven Press, New York). In the 1990s, many spinal surgeons abandoned conventional discectomy with naked-eye to pass to the routine practice of microdiscectomy. The merits of this technique are that it allows every type of disc herniation to be excised through a short approach to skin, fascia and muscles as well as a limited laminoarthrectomy. For these reasons, it has been, and still is, considered the "gold standard" of surgical treatment for lumbar disc herniation, and the method used by the vast majority of spinal surgeons. In the 1990s, the advent of MRI and the progressive increase in definition of this modality of imaging, as well as histopathologic and immunochemical studies of disc tissue and the analysis of the results of conservative treatments have considerably contributed to the knowledge of the natural evolution of a herniated disc. It was shown that disc herniation may decrease in size or disappear in a few weeks or months. Since the second half of the 1990s there has been a revival of percutaneous procedures. Some of these are similar to the percutaneous automated nucleotomy; other methods are represented by intradiscal injection of a mixture of "oxygen-ozone" (Alexandre A, Buric J, Paradiso R. et al. (2001) Intradiscal injection of oxygen ozone for the treatment of lumbar disc herniations: result at 5 years. 12th World Congress of Neurosurgery; 284-7), or laserdiscectomy performed under CT scan (Menchetti PPM. (2006) Laser Med Sci. 4:25-7). The really emerging procedure is that using an endoscope inserted into the disc through the intervertebral foramen to visualize the herniation and remove it manually using thin pituitary rongeurs, a radiofrequency probe or both (Chiu JC

  18. Kinematic analysis of diseased and adjacent segments in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin H; Daubs, Michael D; Kupperman, Asher I; Scott, Trevor P; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2015-02-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common pathologic condition that leads to lumbar instability and significant clinical symptoms. The effect of this pathology on adjacent lumbar motion segments, however, has not yet been studied. To characterize the motion characteristics of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis at both the diseased and adjacent levels in patients with low-grade, single-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using kinetic magnetic resonance imaging (kMRI). Retrospective study of patient kMRIs. One-hundred twelve patient MRIs with low-grade, single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis were included. Angular and translational motion. This study compared 112 patients diagnosed with low-grade (Grade 1 or 2), single-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis at L3-L4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 with 296 control patients without spondylolisthesis. Angular and translational motion were measured using patient kMRIs. The level of slip was graded according to the Meyerding classification system, and disc degeneration was classified according to the Pfirrmann system. Instability was defined as translational motion greater than 4 mm. Lumbar hypomobility was often present regardless of the level of degenerative spondylolisthesis. A slip at L3-L4 resulted in the largest decrease in lumbar range of motion. Instability at the diseased level was most common at L3-L4 (36%), followed by L5-S1 (31%) and L4-L5 (30%). Instability at the adjacent segments was most frequent at L4-L5 (49%), followed by L5-S1 (34%) and L3-L4 (23%). Patients with stable spondylolisthesis generally had decreased angular motion at all lumbar levels. Translational motion at the diseased level was consistently increased. Disc degeneration was significantly greater at the level of slip for the L3-L4 and L4-L5 spondylolisthesis groups and equal to the control group in the L5-S1 group. There was no significant difference in disc degeneration at adjacent segments in L3-L4 and L4-L5 degenerative

  19. Suprapedicular Circumferential Opening Technique of Percutaneous Endoscopic Transforaminal Lumbar Discectomy for High Grade Inferiorly Migrated Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeun Sung Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of suprapedicular circumferential opening technique (SCOT of percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal lumbar discectomy (PETLD for high grade inferiorly migrated lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods. Eighteen consecutive patients who presented with back and leg pain with a single-level high grade inferiorly migrated lumbar disc herniation were included. High grade inferiorly migrated disc was removed by the SCOT through PETLD approach. Outcome evaluation was done with visual analog scale (VAS and Mac Nab’s criteria. Result. There were 14 males and 4 females. The mean age of patients was 53.3±14.12 years. One, 4, and 13 patients had disc herniation at L1-2, L3-4, and L4-5 levels, respectively, on MRI, which correlated with clinical findings. The mean follow-up duration was 8.4±4.31 months. According to Mac Nab’s criteria, 9 patients (50% reported excellent and the remaining 9 patients (50% reported good outcomes. The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS for leg pain were 7.36±0.73 and 1.45±0.60, respectively (p<0.001. Improvement in outcomes was maintained even at final follow-up. There was no complication. Conclusion. In this preliminary study we achieved good to excellent clinical results using the SCOT of PETLD for high grade inferiorly migrated lumbar disc herniation.

  20. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  1. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Test procedure. (1) Soak the lumbar... Figure U2-A in appendix A to this subpart. Torque the lumbar hex nut (p/n 9000057) on to the lumbar cable...

  2. Early multimodal rehabilitation following lumbar disc surgery: a randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of two exercise programmes on clinical outcome and lumbar multifidus muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie M; Thackeray, Anne; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Teyhen, Deydre

    2015-01-01

    The optimal components of postoperative exercise programmes following single-level lumbar discectomy have not been identified. Facilitating lumbar multifidus (LM) function after discectomy may improve postoperative recovery. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and muscle function outcomes of patients randomised to receive early multimodal rehabilitation following lumbar discectomy consisting of exercises targeting specific trunk muscles including the LM or general trunk exercises. We included participants aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled to undergo single-level lumbar discectomy. After two postoperative weeks, participants were randomly assigned to receive an 8-week multimodal exercise programme including either general or specific trunk exercises. The primary outcome was pain-related disability (Oswestry Index). Secondary outcomes included low back and leg pain intensity (0-10 numeric pain rating scale), global change, sciatica frequency, sciatica bothersomeness and LM function measured with real-time ultrasound imaging. Treatment effects 10 weeks and 6 months after surgery were estimated with linear mixed models. 61 participants were randomised to receive a general trunk (n=32) or specific (n=29) exercise programme. There were no between-group differences in clinical or muscle function outcomes. Participants in both groups experienced improvements in most outcome measures. Following lumbar discectomy, multimodal rehabilitation programmes comprising specific or general trunk exercises have similar effects on clinical and muscle function outcomes. Local factors such as the individual patient characteristics identified by specific assessment findings, clinician expertise and patient preferences should direct therapy selection when considering the types of exercises tested in this trial for inclusion in rehabilitation programmes following lumbar disc surgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  3. EFFICACY OF CAGE PLACEMENT WITHOUT PLATE IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY WITH SINGLE-LEVEL AFFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ALBERTO ZUÑIGA-MAZÓN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of PEEK (Poly-ether-ether-ketone cage without plate for the treatment of single-level cervical spondylosis. Methods: Ten patients with cervical myelopathy data, with a single-level root condition, seen at the outpatient clinic of the Neurosurgery Service, operated in 2016, mean age 53 years, 6 (60% female, 4 (40% obese, 3 (30% smokers. The Cloward technique was used by anterior approach, discectomy, and PEEK cage placement. Results: At six months of surgery, 100% of the patients had increased intervertebral space, with a 100% reduction in osteophytes; only one patient had dysphagia, no patient had lesion of the adjacent segment and 10% had persistent root pathology. Cervical lordosis was observed in 90% of the patients and arthrodesis in 100% of the cases. Conclusions: Anterior approach arthrodesis using PEEK cage without cervical plate is effective as a treatment of cervical myelopathy in a single level.

  4. Hemodynamics of hepatocellular carcinoma with single-level dynamic computed tomography during hepatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Hirohiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the hemodynamics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to explore the draining pathway using single-level dynamic computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (single-level dynamic CTHA). One hundred one patients with 131 nodules of HCC underwent single level dynamic CTHA. Forty seven nodules were diagnosed by histological specimen and the other eighty four nodules by clinical findings of elevation in AFP and/or PIVKA II and hypervascular tumor in angiography. Single-level dynamic CTHA was performed under insertion of a catheter into proper hepatic artery or the more peripheral hepatic artery with a slice thickness of 3 mm at the same level. Each image of single level dynamic CTHA was continuously taken in a second for 40 seconds during injection of contrast medium at of 2 ml/sec for 10 seconds. The images of single-level dynamic CTHA were differentiated into three phases, as early phase 1 to 10 seconds, middle phase 11 to 20 seconds and late phase 21 to 40 seconds. After the analysis of the vascular pattern in each phase, the hemodynamics of HCC was classified into three patterns; hypovascular pattern in the 24 nodules whose average size was 13.4±4.2 mm, intermediate pattern in the 21 nodules whose average size was 20.8±7.8 mm and hypervascular pattern in 86 nodules whose average size was 31.6±16.3 mm. There were significant correlations between the tumor size and the vascular pattern. In the groups of hypovascular and intermediate pattern, the draining pathways were sinusoids. Of the 86 nodules of the group with hypervascular pattern, blood flow drained into portal vein including bright branch structure in 20 nodules, into portal vein and hepatic vein in 2 nodules, into portal vein and extrahepatic vein in 1 nodule, into hepatic vein in 11 nodules, into extrahepatic vein in 4 nodules and into sinusoids in 48 nodules. In conclusion, from a viewpoint of hemodynamics using single-level dynamic CTHA, I proposed the new

  5. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques’ outcome on spondylolisthesis. The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients’ demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24–32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times. PMID:28906383

  6. PARAMETRIC MODEL OF LUMBAR VERTEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAPPETTI Nicola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes the realization of a parametric/variational CAD model of a normotype lumbar vertebra, which could be used for improving the effectiveness of actual imaging techniques in informational augmentation of the orthopaedic and traumatological diagnosis. In addition it could be used for ergonomic static and dynamical analysis of the lumbar region and vertebral column.

  7. An unexpected lumbar lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report details an interesting case of suspected spinal bifida in an obstetric patient who presented for an elective cesarean section. A large scarred/dimpled area, surrounded by significant hair growth in the region of the lumbar spine had been missed in multiple antenatal and preoperative assessments and was recognized on the day of the surgery as the patient was being prepared for spinal anesthesia. The patient was uncertain regarding the pathology of the lesion, and all investigations relating to this had been undertaken in Pakistan where she lived as a child. General anesthesia was undertaken because magnetic resonance imaging had not been performed and tethering of the spinal cord could not be ruled out clinically. The patient suffered from significant blood loss intra and postoperatively, requiring a two unit blood transfusion. She was discharged after 5 days in the hospital. This case highlights the need for thorough examination in all obstetric patients presenting to the preoperative clinic, focusing on the airway, vascular access, and lumbar spine. Patients may not always disclose certain information due to a lack of understanding, embarrassment, forgetfulness, or language barriers. Significant aspects of their care may have been undertaken abroad and access to these notes is often limited. Preoperative detection of the lesion would have allowed further investigation and imaging of the lesion and enabled more comprehensive discussions with the patient regarding anesthetic options and risk.

  8. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Lumbar disc degeneration is an equally important risk factor as lumbar fusion for causing adjacent segment disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Raghu N; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of degenerative spinal disorders by fusion produces abnormal mechanical conditions at mobile segments above or below the site of spinal disorders and is clinically referred to as adjacent segments disc disease (ASDD) or transition syndrome in the case of a previous surgical treatment. The aim of the current study is to understand with the help of poro-elastic finite element models how single or two level degeneration of lower lumbar levels influences motions at adjacent levels and compare the findings to motions produced by single or two level fusions when the adjacent disk has varying degree of degeneration. Validated grade-specific finite element models including varying grades of disc degeneration at lower lumbar levels with and without fusion were developed and used to determine motions at all levels of the lumbar spine due to applied moment loads. Results showed that adjacent disc motions do depend on severity of disc degeneration, number of disc degenerated or fused, and level at which degeneration or fusion occurred. Furthermore, single level degeneration and single level fusion produced similar amount of adjacent disc motions. The pattern of increase in adjacent segment motions due to disc degeneration and increase in motions at segment adjacent to fusion was similar. Based on the current study, it can be concluded that disc degeneration should also be considered as a risk factor in addition to fusion for generating adjacent disc degeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:123-130, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reproduction of the lumbar lordosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Marianne Løgtholt; Langhoff, Lotte; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether it is possible to reproduce the lumbar lordosis in the upright position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities and investigates intra- and interexaminer reliability of measurements...... supine with straightened lower extremities. These measurements were compared statistically. Intra- and interexaminer reliability was calculated applying the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: The lumbar lordosis in the standing position was reproduced in the straightened supine position with a median......: The findings of this study show that lumbar lordosis in the upright position can be reproduced by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities....

  11. The imaging of lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom) and Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculo-Skeletal Sciences, University College, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2005-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is a common finding on plain radiographs. The condition has a variety of causes which can be differentiated on the basis of imaging findings. As the treatment is dependent upon the type of spondylolisthesis, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of these features. We present a pictorial review of the imaging features of lumbar spondylolisthesis and explain the differentiating points between different groups of this disorder. The relative merits of the different imaging techniques in assessing lumbar spondylolisthesis are discussed.

  12. Single level cervical disc herniation: A questionnaire based study on current surgical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrishamkar Saeid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative procedures like simple discectomy, with or without fusion and with or without instrumentation, for single level cervical disc herniation causing neck pain or neurological compromise have been described and are largely successful. However, there is a debate on definitive criteria to perform fusion (with or without instrumentation for single level cervical disc herniation. Hence, we conducted a questionnaire based study to elicit the opinions of practicing neurosurgeons. Materials and Methods: About 148 neurosurgeons with atleast 12 years of operative experience on single level cervical disc herniation, utilizing the anterior approach, were enrolled in our study. All participating neurosurgeons were asked to complete a practice based questionnaire. The responses of 120 neurosurgeons were analysed. Results: The mean age of enrolled surgeons was 51 yrs (range 45-73 with mean surgical experience of 16.9 yrs (range 12-40 yrs on single level cervical disc herniation. Out of 120 surgeons 10(8% had 15-25 years experience and always preferred fusion with or without instrumentation and six (five per cent with 17-27 yrs experience had never used fusion techniques. However, 104 (87% surgeons with 12-40 yrs experience had their own criteria based on their experiences for performing fusion with graft and instrumentation (FGI, while. 85 (75% preferred auto graft with cage. Conclusions: Most of surgeons performed FGI before the age of 40, but for others, patient criteria such as job (heavier job, physical examination (especially myelopathy and imaging findings (mild degenerative changes on X-ray and signal change in the spinal cord on MRI were considered significant for performing FGI.

  13. Side effects after diagnostic lumbar puncture and lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Salvesen, R.; Dale, L.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study was performed to compare side effect incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography (n=97) and diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=85). No significant side effect incidence differences (iohexol vs. controls) were found regarding number of patients with any side effect (63 vs. 73%), headache (44 vs. 54%), nausea, dizziness, visual, auditory, or psychic symptoms. Early-onset headache occurred significantly more often in the iohexol group (16 vs 5%), while postural headache occurred most frequently after lumbar puncture (25 vs. 41%). These results suggest that apart from the slight early-onset headache, most side effets after lumbar iohexol myelography are related to the puncture per se, not to the contrast agent. (orig.)

  14. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

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    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  15. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; Xu Sui; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effects, indications and safety of the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLDP). Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and modified jaw structure of pulpiform nacleus forceps, with statistic analysis of the therapeutic results of 352 cases of patient undergone PLDP and follow up ranging from 6 to 38 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 45.5%, good for 45.4% and bad in 9.1%. 44 of 352 cases with pulps prolapse were cured. No intervertebral inflammation and paradisc hematoma took place. One case complicated with cauda equina injury and 4 cases with appliances broken inside the disc. Conclusions: PLDP is effective and safe, not only adaptive to the contained disc herniation, but also for noncontained herniation. (authors)

  16. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  17. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  18. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  19. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  20. Local bone graft harvesting and volumes in posterolateral lumbar fusion: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J; Comer, Garet C; Smith, Micah W

    2011-06-01

    In lumbar surgery, local bone graft is often harvested and used in posterolateral fusion procedures. The volume of local bone graft available for posterolateral fusion has not been determined in North American patients. Some authors have described this as minimal, but others have suggested the volume was sufficient to be reliably used as a stand-alone bone graft substitute for single-level fusion. To describe the technique used and determine the volume of local bone graft available in a cohort of patients undergoing single-level primary posterolateral fusion by the authors harvesting technique. Technical description and cohort report. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes. Local bone graft volume. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes of were studied. Local bone graft was harvested by a standard method in each patient and the volume measured by a standard procedure. Twenty-five patients were studied, and of these 11 (44%) had a previous decompression. The mean volume of local bone graft harvested was measured to be 25 cc (range, 12-36 cc). Local bone graft was augmented by iliac crest bone in six of 25 patients (24%) if the posterolateral fusion bed was not well packed with local bone alone. There was a trend to greater local bone graft volumes in men and in patients without previous decompression. Large volumes of local bone can be harvested during posterolateral lumbar fusion surgery. Even in patients with previous decompression the volume harvested is similar to that reported harvested from the posterior iliac crest for single-level fusion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Survivorship Analysis of Clinical Adjacent-Segment Pathology After Single-Level Cervical Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingde; Ma, Qinghua; Yu, Kunlun; Cao, Junming; Wang, Linfeng; Shen, Yong

    2017-10-25

    BACKGROUND Clinical adjacent-segment pathology (CASP) is an important problem after anterior cervical surgery. The purpose of this study was to predict prevalence of CASP and determine the possible risk factors for CASP after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a series of patients who underwent single-level cervical discectomy and fusion surgery (ACDF). Both basic and radiographic data of patients were collected. Life-table method and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to calculate prevalence of CASP and disease-free survival rate. Cox analysis was performed to determine the predictive factors for it. RESULTS A total of 256 patients were included in this study. The mean length of follow-up was 70.64 months. Among them, 31 patients were diagnosed as having CASP during follow-up. Nineteen of them were at the cephalad adjacent segment, and the other 12 were at the caudal segment. After ACDF procedures, 10.01% of patients developed new symptoms of CASP within 5 years, and the incidence increased to 23.89% after 10 years. The incidence rate of CASP was an average of 2.46% per year. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that congenital stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 3.250; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.538-6.867) and degeneration of adjacent segment (HR, 2.681; 95% CI, 1.259-5.709) were correlated with the incidence of CASP. CONCLUSIONS Patients with congenital stenosis and pre-existing degenerative changes of adjacent segments had a higher risk of developing CASP after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

  2. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis and degenerative spondylosis: 5-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung; Ha, Joong Won; Lee, Yun Tae; Sung, Na Young

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies have reported favorable short-term results after treatment of spondylolisthesis and other degenerative lumbar diseases with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. However, to our knowledge, results at a minimum of 5 years have not been reported. We determined (1) changes to the Oswestry Disability Index, (2) frequency of radiographic fusion, (3) complications and reoperations, and (4) the learning curve associated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at minimum 5-year followup. We reviewed our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion to treat low-grade spondylolisthesis and degenerative lumbar diseases and did not need a major deformity correction. This represented 63% (124 of 198) of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures we performed for those indications during the study period (2003-2007). Eighty-three (67%) patients had complete 5-year followup. Plain radiographs and CT scans were evaluated by two reviewers. Trends of surgical time, blood loss, and hospital stay over time were examined by logarithmic curve fit-regression analysis to evaluate the learning curve. At 5 years, mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 60 points preoperatively to 24 points and 79 of 83 patients (95%) had improvement of greater than 10 points. At 5 years, 67 of 83 (81%) achieved radiographic fusion, including 64 of 72 patients (89%) who had single-level surgery. Perioperative complications occurred in 11 of 124 patients (9%), and another surgical procedure was performed in eight of 124 patients (6.5%) involving the index level and seven of 124 patients (5.6%) at adjacent levels. There were slowly decreasing trends of surgical time and hospital stay only in single-level surgery and almost no change in intraoperative blood loss over time, suggesting a challenging learning curve. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved for patients with spondylolisthesis

  3. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  4. LEARNING CURVE IN SINGLE-LEVEL MINIMALLY INVASIVE TLIF: EXPERIENCE OF A NEUROSURGEON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Romano-Feinholz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the learning curve that shows the progress of a single neurosurgeon when performing single-level MI-TLIF. Methods: We included 99 consecutive patients who underwent single-level MI-TLIF by the same neurosurgeon (JASS. Patient’s demographic characteristics were analyzed. In addition, surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and hospital stay were evaluated. The learning curves were calculated with a piecewise regression model. Results: The mean age was 54.6 years. The learning curves showed an inverse relationship between the surgical experience and the variable analyzed, reaching an inflection point for surgical time in case 43 and for blood loss in case 48. The mean surgical time was 203.3 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 150-240 minutes, intraoperative bleeding was 97.4ml (IQR 40-100ml and hospital stay of four days (IQR 3-5 days. Conclusions: MI-TLIF is a very frequent surgical procedure due to its effectiveness and safety, which has shown similar results to open procedure. According to this study, the required learning curve is slightly higher than for open procedures, and is reached after about 45 cases.

  5. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  6. [Interspinous spacers and disc herniation. Geomorphometric and clinical study of 71 cases treated by L4-L5 microdiscectomy associated to spacer placement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso Escario, José; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Consolini, Fabian; Martín Gallego, Álvaro; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    A controversial indication of interspinous spacers is their use as a complement to discectomy. At the present time, there is no solid clinical evidence of effectiveness of that association, which might result from variability in spacer positioning, restricting its correct biomechanical actions. In this study our goal was to identify and analyse the variability in the placement of an interspinous spacer, and to investigate its relationship with the clinical results. We performed a retrospective study on X-ray films from 71 patients suffering from disc herniation in L4-L5 who underwent surgery in our hospital, consisting of: microdiscectomy and biomed interspinous spacer implantation. The geomorphometric techniques used to analyse the data were procrustes superimposition and principal components analysis. We compared the clinical results (using the Herron and Turner scale), segmental lordosis and surgical distraction with the geomorphometric parameters. Significant morphological variability was found in the implant position showing cephalo-caudal translation and clockwise-counterclockwise rotations. This variability did not correlate with clinical results. A relationship with anatomical features (lordosis) and additional surgical distraction was identified. A different morphology of implant-segment configuration was identified in cases with recurrence of disc herniation. Geometric morphometrics allowed identifying high variability in the final placement of interspinous spacers. Nevertheless, it seems not to be related to the clinical outcome, depending rather on the degree of lordosis and distraction. Some differences in segment-implant morphology were identified in cases with recurrences. To assess the effectiveness of spacers, larger studies including morphological and clinical variables are required. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Subsidence after single-level anterior cervical fusion with a stand-alone cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for subsidence in patients treated with stand-alone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages for single-level degenerative cervical disease. Seventy-seven consecutive patients who underwent single-level stand-alone ACDF with a PEEK cage between 2005 and 2012 were included. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in the interbody height of more than 3mm on radiographs at the 1-year follow-up compared with that in the immediate post-operative image. Patients were divided into the subsidence and non-subsidence groups. The following factors were investigated in relation to the occurrence of subsidence: age, pre-operative overall cervical sagittal angle, segmental angle of the operated level, interbody height, cage height, cage devices and cage location (distance between anterior margin of the body endplate and that of the cage). The clinical outcomes were assessed with visual analog scale, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score and neck disability index. Twenty-six out of the 77 (33.8%) patients had radiological signs of cage subsidence. Solid fusion was achieved in 25 out of the 26 patients (96.2%) in the subsidence group and in 47 out of the 51 patients (92.2%) in the non-subsidence group. More than 3mm distance between anterior margin of the vertebral body and that of the cage was significantly associated with subsidence (psubsidence did not correlate with fusion rate or clinical outcomes. Cage location was the only significant risk factor. Therefore, cage location should be taken into consideration during stand-alone ACDF using PEEK cages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A lumbar body support (KBS 2000) alters lumbar muscle recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    back pain. K. L. Derman, E. w. Derman, T. D. Noakes. Objective. To determine the effects of a locally designed lumbar body support (LBS) on integrated ... surface, patients with chronic low back pain have higher. IEMG activity of the erector spinae ... It has also been shown that changes in sitting posture can alter LBP.6 The ...

  9. Vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebral fracture following lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Adjacent segment vertebral compression fracture after lumbosacral instrumented fusion has been reported to be a significant complication. Recently, percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been widely used for the treatment of non-traumatic osteoporotic vertebral fracture. However, the clinical effect of this minimally invasive treatment option to the post-fusion vertebral fracture has rarely been reported. We analysed characteristics of adjacent vertebral fractures following lumbar fusion and evaluated the clinical outcome of PVP. A total of 202 consecutive patients underwent PVP for compression fracture in our institute between January 2007 and December 2008. Among them, nine symptomatic adjacent vertebral fractures following lumbar fusion were identified. We randomly selected 50 control patients undergoing vertebroplasty for osteoporotic compression fracture in single level. We analysed the clinical data according to age, height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), and bone mineral density (BMD). Clinical outcome was assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the rate of overall satisfaction. Fractures occurred at the cranial adjacent vertebra after fusion surgery in all cases. The mean BMD score for the spine and femur were significantly higher than the control group (p adjacent segment disease. The increased stress around the fusion segment can cause vertebral fracture even with a relatively higher BMD score. Vertebroplasty for the post-fusion vertebral fracture can be as effective as it is for the usual osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

  10. Lumbar discography: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results.

  11. MERRA IAU 2d atmospheric single-level diagnostics subsetted along CloudSat track V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the MERRA IAU 2d atmospheric single-level diagnostics subset, collocated with the CloudSat track. The subset is processed at the Modeling and Assimilation...

  12. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis: A STROBE-compliant observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques' outcome on spondylolisthesis.The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients' demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24-32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05).Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times.

  13. Chondroblastoma of the lumbar vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L.Y.J.; Shu, S.J.; Chan, M.K.; Chan, C.H.S. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2001-12-01

    Chondroblastoma of the vertebra is a very rare condition. To our knowledge fewer than 20 cases have been reported in the world literature. We report a 54-year-old man with chondroblastoma of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The clinical and radiological aspects of the tumor are discussed, emphasizing the presence of an extraosseous mass suggestive of locally aggressive behavior. (orig.)

  14. CASE REPORT Lumbar vertebra chordoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vertebral column tumours. Introduction. Spinal chordomas mostly present in association with the clivus or sacrum. We report a case where it was overlooked in the differential diagnosis of vertebral col- umn tumours because it presented in the lumbar spine. Case. A 66-year-old male patient presented with a longstand-.

  15. Lumbar myelography with Omnipaque (iohexol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleaas, F.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Weber, H.

    1986-07-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes.

  16. Ipsilateral atrophy of the psoas major muscle in patients with lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Takahiro; Hosono, Noboru; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Miwa, Toshitada; Fuji, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    We measured the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the psoas major muscles of 48 male patients under 50 years of age with unilateral sciatica caused by a single-level lumbar disc herniation. Patients who had multi-level disc lesions, lumbar canal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, scoliosis>5deg, or a history of lumbar surgery or hip joint disease were excluded. Mean age at surgery was 33 years old. Two orthopedic surgeons measured the CSA independently and blindly on magnetic resonance images in which the spinal canal had been blacked out. The CSA ratio (pain-positive side/pain-negative side) was 0.99 at L3/4, 0.98 at L4/5, and 1.00 at L5/S. There was a statistically significant difference between the CSA of the psoas major muscle on the painful side and the unaffected side at L4/5 (p=0.02). There was no correlation between the CSA ratio and the angle in the straight leg raising test, the duration of symptoms, or the size of the disc herniation. The atrophy of the psoas major muscle observed on the pain-positive side in lumbar disc herniation patients may be attributable to disuse of the affected leg. (author)

  17. Efficacy of triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine for pain after lumbar discectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bahari, Syah

    2012-02-01

    The study is a prospective blinded randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of triamcinolone acetonide, bupivacaine or in combination in managing pain after lumbar discectomy. Patients undergoing primary single-level lumbar discectomy were randomised. Triamcinolone acetonide, bupivacaine or in combination was instilled at the nerve root as decompression. Preoperative, day 1 and 6 weeks pain score, 24-h postoperative opiate requirements and duration of inpatient stay were recorded. Data was analysed using Mann-Whitney test for statistical significance. 100 patients were recruited. A significant difference was noted in day one postoperative mean pain score, mean 24-h opiate requirement and mean inpatient stay in the triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine group. At 8 weeks postoperatively, no significant differences were seen in the pain score in all groups. Significant postoperative pain reduction and opiate requirements in the first 24 h, and significantly shortened duration of inpatient stay were achieved in the triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine group compared with other groups.

  18. SLP - A single level Breit-Wigner cross-section generating programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, G.

    1965-06-01

    Unbroadened cross-sections are calculated from a single level Breit-Wigner approximation which allows for resonance-potential interference but not resonance-resonance interference. Doppler broadening, and instrumental resolution broadening for thin samples, are optionally performed by successive numerical convolutions. An energy point selection and discard system enables the cross-section over a specified energy range to be represented to a required degree of accuracy using the minimum number of energy points. An energy grid prepared by the user can be incorporated in the calculation but the programme will usually be more efficient if only the end points of the energy range of interest are specified by the user and the intermediate energy points left to the programme to organise. The capacity of the programme varies with the energy range and type of resonance (narrow or broad). About fifty resonances may be sufficient to generate an energy grid of 4000 energy points, which is the maximum allowable energy vector. The programme is written in KDF9 EGTRAN (a FORTRAN dialect); output is printed and may be copied on cards, and intermediate results are stored on magnetic disc. (author)

  19. Visceral adipose tissue area measurement at a single level: can it represent visceral adipose tissue volume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumura, Yusuke; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Sutherland, Kenneth; Nishimura, Hideho

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) needs to be accurate and sensitive to change for risk monitoring. The purpose of this study is to determine the CT slice location where VAT area can best reflect changes in VAT volume and body weight. 60 plain abdominal CT images from 30 males [mean age (range) 51 (41-68) years, mean body weight (range) 71.1 (101.9-50.9) kg] who underwent workplace screenings twice within a 1-year interval were evaluated. Automatically calculated and manually corrected areas of the VAT of various scan levels using "freeform curve" region of interest on CT were recorded and compared with body weight changes. The strongest correlations of VAT area with VAT volume and body weight changes were shown in a slice 3 cm above the lower margin of L3 with r values of 0.853 and 0.902, respectively. VAT area measurement at a single level 3 cm above the lower margin of the L3 vertebra is feasible and can reflect changes in VAT volume and body weight. Advances in knowledge: As VAT area at a CT slice 3cm above the lower margin of L3 can best reflect interval changes in VAT volume and body weight, VAT area measurement should be selected at this location.

  20. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  1. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  2. A protocol of a randomized controlled multicenter trial for surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis: the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Trial (LIFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kunder, Suzanne L; Rijkers, Kim; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Evers, Silvia M A A; de Bie, Rob A; van Santbrink, Henk

    2016-10-06

    With a steep increase in the number of instrumented spinal fusion procedures, there is a need for comparative data to develop evidence based treatment recommendations. Currently, the available data on cost and clinical effectiveness of the two most frequently performed surgeries for lumbar spondylolisthesis, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), are not sufficient. Therefore, current guidelines do not advise which is the most appropriate surgical treatment strategy for these patients. Non-randomized studies comparing TLIF and PLIF moreover suggest that TLIF is associated with fewer complications, less blood loss, shorter surgical time and hospital duration. TLIF may therefore be more cost-effective. The results of this study will provide knowledge on short- and long-term clinical and economical effects of TLIF and PLIF procedures, which will lead to recommendations for treating patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Multicenter blinded Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT; blinding for the patient and statistician, not for the clinician and researcher). A total of 144 patients over 18 years old with symptomatic single level lumbar degenerative, isthmic or iatrogenic spondylolisthesis whom are candidates for LIF (lumbar interbody fusion) surgery through a posterior approach will be randomly allocated to TLIF or PLIF. The study will consist of three parts: 1) a clinical effectiveness study, 2) a cost-effectiveness study, and 3) a process evaluation. The primary clinical outcome measures are: change in disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and change in quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured with EQ-5D-5L. Secondary clinical outcome measures are: Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), complications, productivity related costs (iPCQ) and medical costs (iMCQ). Measurements will be carried out at five fixed time points (pre

  3. Outcome of single level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cages have been widely used for the anterior reconstruction and fusion of cervical spine. Nonmetal cages have become popular due to prominent stress shielding and high rate of subsidence of metallic cages. This study aims to assess fusion with n-HA/PA66 cage following one level anterior cervical discectomy. Materials and Methods: Forty seven consecutive patients with radiculopathy or myelopathy underwent single level ACDF using n-HA/PA66 cage. We measured the segmental lordosis and intervertebral disc height on preoperative radiographs and then calculated the loss of segmental lordosis correction and cage subsidence over followup. Fusion status was evaluated on CT scans. Odom criteria, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA and Visual Analog Pain Scales (VAS scores were used to assess the clinical results. Statistically quantitative data were analyzed while Categorical data by χ2 test. Results: Mean correction of segmental lordosis from surgery was 6.9 ± 3.0° with a mean loss of correction of 1.7 ± 1.9°. Mean cage subsidence was 1.2 ± 0.6 mm and the rate of cage subsidence (>2 mm was 2%. The rate of fusion success was 100%. No significant difference was found on clinical or radiographic outcomes between the patients (n=27 who were fused by n-HA/PA66 cage with pure local bone and the ones (n=20 with hybrid bone (local bone associating with bone from iliac crest. Conclusions: The n-HA/PA66 cage is a satisfactory reconstructing implant after anterior cervical discectomy, which can effectively promote bone graft fusion and prevent cage subsidence.

  4. Clinical comparison of 2 implantation systems for single-level cervical disk replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Li, Juan; Liu, Hao; Ding, Chen; Hu, Tao; Li, Tao; Gong, Quan

    2014-02-01

    The safety and effectiveness of 2 implantation systems for single-segment cervical disk replacement-the Bryan Cervical Disc System (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota) and the ACCEL system (Medtronic Inc)-have not been clinically compared. A prospective, nonrandomized controlled study in consecutive patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up was performed. Fifty patients with single-level cervical disk degeneration who responded poorly to conservative treatment and underwent Bryan Cervical Disc replacement were involved. Fifty patients were included (24 in group A [Bryan Cervical Disc System] and 26 in group B [ACCEL system]).The patients' visual analog scale scores, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores, Odom scores, operative time, blood loss, and complications were compared. Patients' baseline statuses were similar (P>.05). Visual analog scale for neck and arm pain, NDI, and SF-36 were significantly improved postoperatively (P.05). All Odom scores were better than good. Mean operative time and average blood loss in group A (173±42.5 minutes and 250±159.8 mL, respectively), were both significantly higher than the values in group B (137.5±19.3 minutes and 138.1±86.7 mL, respectively) (Pprosthesis; there was no significant difference in the total complication rates between the 2 groups (P>.05). The 2 implantation systems displayed equal clinical effectiveness and safety, but the ACCEL system appears to have the advantages of shorter operative time and less blood loss. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro‐discectomy Surgery: A Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients' Views and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Ruth; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Sciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life‐changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica. Methods A qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi‐structured interviews. Twenty‐one in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Most patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first. Discussion Many patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26914525

  6. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-05-07

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy.

  7. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5–S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively. PMID:19888608

  8. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  9. Discopathy in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiński, Piotr; Gilis-Januszewska, Maciej; Serafin, Witold; Płomiński, Daniel

    2004-06-30

    Background. In a group of patients treated surgically for stenosis in the lumbar spine, we compared the pre-operative nature of the pathology of the intervertebral disc as measured by MRI to the treatment outcome. Material and methods. In 30 persons ranging in age from 39 to 68 who reported at least 60% subjective improvement in quality of life after surgery (wide decompression of the spinal canal in the lumbar segment, spondylodesis, transpedicular fixation) the character of the discopathy was evaluated by MRI. Results. In MRI studies from the study group, feature of dehydratation and protrusion of the nucleus pulposus occurred among all patients, while the most common clinical symptom was neurogenic claudication. Non-removal of intervertebral discs protruding less than 6 mm into the lumen of the spinal canal did not cause worse outcome. Conclusion. In this group of patients treated surgically for lumbar stenosis with wide decompression, the fact that a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc (prolapse <6mm) persists after surgery, in the absence of conflict between the disc and nerve elements, has no influence on treatment outcome.

  10. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  11. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  12. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative

  13. Performance-based outcomes after nonoperative treatment, discectomy, and/or fusion for a lumbar disc herniation in National Hockey League athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; McCarthy, Kathryn J; Micev, Alan J; Terry, Michael A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2013-11-01

    Ice hockey players have a high incidence of lumbar spine disorders; however, there is no evidence in the literature to guide the treatment of an ice hockey player with a herniated lumbar disc. To determine the performance-based outcomes in professional National Hockey League (NHL) athletes with a lumbar disc herniation after either nonsurgical or surgical treatment. Descriptive epidemiological study. Athletes in the NHL with a lumbar disc herniation were identified through team injury reports and archives on public record. The return-to-play rate, games played per season, points per game, and performance score for each player were determined before and after the diagnosis of a lumbar disc herniation. Statistical analysis was used to compare preinjury and postinjury performance measures for players treated with either nonsurgical or surgical treatment. A total of 87 NHL players met the inclusion criteria; 31 underwent nonoperative care, 48 underwent a discectomy, and 8 underwent a single-level fusion. The return-to-play rate for all players was 85%. There was a significant decrease in performance in all players after a lumbar disc herniation in games played per season, points scored per game, and performance score. A comparison of the posttreatment results for the nonsurgical and surgical patient groups revealed no significant difference in performance measures. Notably, the lumbar fusion group did not show a decrease in games played per season or performance score after surgery, likely secondary to a small sample size. National Hockey League players with a lumbar disc herniation have a high return-to-play rate regardless of the type of treatment; however, performance-based outcomes may decrease compared with preinjury levels. The study data suggest that a lumbar fusion is compatible with a return to play in the NHL, which is in contrast to other professional sports.

  14. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  15. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  16. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  17. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  18. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters in 2-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Huan; Ma, Lei; Liu, Feng-Yu; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of our study is to evaluate sagittal parameters in 2-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) (TLDS). A total of 15 patients with TLDS, 40 patients with single-level DS (SLDS), and 30 normal volunteers as control were included in our study. All subjects performed on full spine X-ray. Two categorized data were analyzed: patient characteristics—age, sex, body mass index, radiographic parameters-pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), PI–LL, Cobb between the fifth thoracic vertebral and 12th thoracic vertebral (T5–T12), sagittal vertical axis (SVA) Cobb angle of spondylolisthesis level (CSL), ratio of PT to SS (PT/SS), CSL/LL, variation trend of SS over PI, and LL over PI. The PI (73.1° vs 52.9°), SS (50.8° vs 32.2°), LL (53.1° vs 46.9°), SVA (66.1 vs 22.0 mm), PI–LL (20.0° vs 6.0°), and CSL (23.6° vs 20.0°) in TLDS were significantly larger than these in SLDS. The PI (73.1° vs 40.6°), PT (22.3° vs 17.1°), SS (50.8° vs 23.5°), LL (53.1° vs 32.5°), PI–LL (20.0° vs 8.1°), and SVA (66.1 vs 17.0 mm) in TLDS were significantly larger than those in the normal group (NG). The PI (52.9° vs 40.6°), PT (21.0° vs 17.1°), SS (32.2° vs 23.5°), LL (46.9° vs 32.5°), and SVA (22.0 vs 17.0 mm) in SLDS were significantly higher than those in NG. However, PT/SS (44.0%), LL over PI (y = 0.39x + 24.25), SS over PI (y = 10.79 + 0.55x) were lower in TLDS than these in SLDS (63.8%, y = 0.41x + 25, y = 0.65x − 2.09, respectively), and the similar tend between SLDS and NG (74.0%, y = 0.49x + 13.09, y = 0.67x − 3.9, respectively). Our results showed that 2-level lumbar DS, which was caused by multiple-factors, has a severe sagittal imbalance, but single-level has not any. When we plan for surgical selection for 2-level lumbar DS, global sagittal balance must be considered. PMID:27977581

  19. An unresolved discussion: presence of premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction in lumbar disc hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Cenk Murat; Sarifakioglu, Banu; Guzelant, Aliye; Turker, Polat; Ates, Ozkan

    2013-06-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are both frequent diseases with several questions about the aetiological factors for these disorders. Lumbar disc herniation (LDH), which can cause both neurological and physiological impairments, may be a causative reason. We prospectively tried to evaluate the presence of PE and ED in patients with LDH and identify the effect of both surgical and physical therapy treatments for LDH on PE and ED. A total of 50 patients with LDH and a corresponding control group without LDH at an age of 18-50 years were included in the study. Both PE and ED were evaluated with premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT) and International Index of Erectile Function. Mean intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) was calculated at their 5 consecutive intercourse. Physical therapy or microdiscectomy was performed according to indication. After 6 months of follow-up, patients in treatment group were re-evaluated for PE and ED. Mean age of study and control group was 34.1 ± 3.3 and 34.2 ± 4.0 years, respectively (p = 0.979). In LDH group, IELT was <1 min in 12 (24 %), 1-2 (16 %) min in 8, 2-3 min in 7 (14 %), 3-4 min in 7 (14 %) and 4 or more minutes in 16 (32 %) patients. These numbers were 11 (22 %), 8 (16 %), 5 (10 %), 9 (18 %) and 17 (34 %) in control group, respectively. Mean PEDT score of patients who had IELT < 1 min was 11.9 ± 2.1 and 10.7 ± 2.1 in study and control group, whereas it decreased to 1.0 ± 2.8 and 0.5 ± 1.8 as IELT increased over 4 min, respectively. There were 11 (22 %) patients with ED in LDH group, whereas there were only 2 (4 %) in control group (p = 0.017). Twenty patients with LDH underwent surgery while 30 had been taken into physical therapy. After 6 months, patients with PE significantly decreased in both surgery and physical therapy group (p = 0.025 and p = 0.046). Patients with ED also decreased after treatment, but the numbers were so limited for statistical evaluation. Although ED was

  20. Hernia discal lumbar: Tratamiento conservador

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Candau Pérez, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    Existe una gran demanda de patología lumbar crónica y aguda que debe de tratarse conjuntamente entre el especialista en Rehabilitación y el Cirujano de columna vertebral. En este trabajo se detallan las posibilidades del tratamiento conservador antes de optar por la cirugía. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de los resultados conservadores del tratamiento de la lumbociática de origen discal comparando aquellos estudios publicados con validez estadística. Se detallan las modernas pautas de...

  1. CRP and leukocyte-count after lumbar spine surgery: fusion vs. nucleotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Clayton N; Krüger, Tobias; Westhoff, Jörn; Lüring, Christian; Weber, Oliver; Wirtz, Dieter C; Pennekamp, Peter H

    2011-08-01

    Despite the fact that C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and white blood cell (WBC) count are routine blood chemistry parameters for the early assessment of wound infection after surgical procedures, little is known about the natural history of their serum values after major and minimally invasive spinal procedures. Pre- and postoperative CRP serum levels and WBC count in 347 patients were retrospectively assessed after complication-free, single-level open posterior lumbar interlaminar fusion (PLIF) (n = 150) for disc degeneration and spinal stenosis and endoscopically assisted lumbar discectomy (n = 197) for herniated lumbar disc. Confounding variables such as overweight, ASA classification, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and perioperative antibiotics were recorded to evaluate their influence on the kinetics of CRP values and WBC count postoperatively. In both procedures, CRP peaked 2-3 days after surgery. The maximum CRP level was significantly higher after fusion: mean 127 (SD 57) (p 25 and long duration of surgery were associated with higher peak CRP values. WBC count did not show a typical and therefore interpretable profile. CRP is a predictable and responsive serum parameter in postoperative monitoring of inflammatory responses in patients undergoing spine surgery, whereas WBC kinetics is unspecific. We suggest that CRP could be measured on the day before surgery, on day 2 or 3 after surgery, and also between days 4 and 6, to aid in early detection of infectious complications.

  2. Prognosis and adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion surgery for destructive spondyloarthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Moriyama, Tokuhide; Tachibana, Toshiya; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Kusuyama, Kazuki; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) is a serious complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. There have not been many reports regarding the surgical management for lumbar DSA. In addition, the adjacent segment pathology after lumbar fusion surgery for DSA is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome and occurrence of adjacent segmental disease (ASD) after lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA in long-term hemodialysis patients. A consecutive series of 36 long-term hemodialysis patients who underwent lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA were included in this study. The mean age at surgery was 65 years. The mean follow-up period was 4 years. Symptomatic ASD was defined as symptomatic spinal stenosis or back pain with radiographic ASD. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score (JOA score), recovery rate (Hirabayashi method), complications, and reoperation were reviewed. The mean JOA score significantly increased from 13.5 before surgery to 21.3 at the final follow-up. The mean recovery rate was 51.4%. Six of the 36 patients died within 1 year after index surgery. One patient died due to perioperative complication. Symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% (13 of 30) of the cases. Of these 13 cases, 5 had adjacent segment disc degeneration and 8 had adjacent segment spinal stenosis. Three cases (10%) required reoperation due to proximal ASD. Multi-level fusion surgery increased the risk of ASD compared with single-level fusion surgery (59% vs. 23%). The recovery rate was significantly lower in the ASD group than the non-ASD group (38% vs. 61%). This study demonstrated that symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% of patients after surgery for lumbar DSA. A high mortality rate and complication rate were observed in long-term hemodialysis patients. Therefore, care should be taken for preoperative planning for surgical management of DSA. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty versus arthrodesis for single-level cervical spondylosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Aria; Akl, Elie A; Ebrahim, Shanil; Ibrahim, George M; Mansouri, Alireza; Foote, Clary J; Zhang, Yuqing; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty (ACDA) compared to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) for patient-important outcomes for single-level cervical spondylosis. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Register for Randomized Controlled Trials, BIOSIS and LILACS), archives of spine meetings and bibliographies of relevant articles. We included RCTs of ACDF versus ACDA in adult patients with single-level cervical spondylosis reporting at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neurological success, neck pain, arm pain, quality of life, surgery for adjacent level degeneration (ALD), reoperation and dysphonia/dysphagia. We used no language restrictions. We performed title and abstract screening and full text screening independently and in duplicate. We used random-effects model to pool data using mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes and relative risk (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We used GRADE to evaluate the quality of evidence for each outcome. Of 2804 citations, 9 articles reporting on 9 trials (1778 participants) were eligible. ACDA is associated with a clinically significant lower incidence of neurologic failure (RR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.37-0.75, p = 0.0004) and improvement in the Neck pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (MD = 6.56, 95% CI = 3.22-9.90, p = 0.0001; Minimal clinically important difference (MCID) = 2.5. ACDA is associated with a statistically but not clinically significant improvement in Arm pain VAS and SF-36 physical component summary. ACDA is associated with non-statistically significant higher improvement in the Neck Disability Index Score and lower incidence of ALD requiring surgery, reoperation, and dysphagia/dysphonia. There is no strong evidence to support the routine use of ACDA over ACDF in single-level cervical spondylosis. Current trials lack long-term data required to assess safety as well as surgery for ALD. We suggest that ACDA in patients with single level

  4. Lumbar interspinous bursitis in active polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, Carlo; Barozzi, Libero; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolò; Bajocchi, Gian Luigi; Macchioni, Pier Luigi; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Pazzola, Giulia; Valentino, Massimo; De Luca, Carlo; Hunder, Gene G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory involvement of lumbar interspinous bursae in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten consecutive, untreated new patients with PMR and pain in the shoulder and pelvic girdles were investigated. Seven patients with spondyloarthritis (4 with psoriatic spondyloarthrits, one with entheropatic spondyloarthritis, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis) as well as 2 patients with spinal osteoarthritis and 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with lumbar pain served as controls. MRI of lumbar spine was performed in all PMR patients and controls. Nine patients (5 PMR patients and 4 controls) also had MRI of the thoracic spine. MRI evidence of interspinous lumbar bursitis was found in 9/10 patients with PMR and in 5/11 controls. A moderate to marked (grade ≥2 on a semiquantitative 0-3 scale) lumbar bursitis occurred significantly more frequently in patients with PMR than in control patients (60% vs. 9%, p=0.020). In most of the patients and controls lumbar bursitis was found at the L3-L5 interspaces. Only 2 patients had bursitis at a different level (one patient had widespread lumbar bursitis, and one control at L2-L4). No interspinous bursitis was demonstrated by MRI of the thoracic spine in patients and controls. Inflammation of lumbar bursae may be responsible for the low back pain reported by patients with PMR. The prominent inflammatory involvement of bursae including those of the lumbar spine supports the hypothesis that PMR may be a disorder affecting predominantly extra-articular synovial structures.

  5. Return to Work and Multilevel Versus Single-Level Cervical Fusion for Radiculopathy in a Workers' Compensation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2017-01-15

    Retrospective comparative cohort study. Examine the impact of multilevel fusion on return to work (RTW) status and compare RTW status after multi- versus single-level cervical fusion for patients with work-related injury. Patients with work-related injuries in the workers' compensation systems have less favorable surgical outcomes. Cervical fusion provides a greater than 90% likelihood of relieving radiculopathy and stabilizing or improving myelopathy. However, more levels fused at index surgery are reportedly associated with poorer surgical outcomes than single-level fusion. Data was collected from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) between 1993 and 2011. The study population included patients who underwent cervical fusion for radiculopathy. Two groups were constructed (multilevel fusion [MLF] vs. single-level fusion [SLF]). Outcomes measures evaluated were: RTW criteria, RTW cervical fusion for radiculopathy was associated with poor return to work profile after surgery. Multilevel cervical fusion was associated with lower RTW rates, less likelihood of achieving stable return to work, and higher rate of disability after surgery. 3.

  6. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope.

  7. Value of CT in the evaluation of nerve root compression in the lumbar herniated disc disease: comparative study with myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Il; Ku, Yong Woon; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Su [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a lumbar herniated disc disease, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. The purpose of this study is to estimate the valve of CT in athe evaluation of nerve root compression caused by herniated disc disease. We analyzed 52 roots of 26 patients of single level herniated disc disease with definite evidence of bilateral or unilateral neurologic deficit who had both CT and myelography at Pusan National University Hospital from May 1983 to March, 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Sensitivity and specificity of CT is 77% and 81%, respectively in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 2. Sensitivity and specificity of myelography is 77% and 81% respectively, in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 3. The results of this study indicate that high resolution CT was equivalent to myelography in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumar herniated disc disease.

  8. Nursing care for patients receiving percutaneous lumbar discectomy and intradiscal electrothermal treatment for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the nursing experience in caring patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who received percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) together with intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET) under DSA guidance. Methods: The perioperative nursing care measures carried out in 126 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who underwent PLD and IDET were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful treatment of PLD and IDET was accomplished in 112 cases. Under comprehensive and scientific nursing care and observation, no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Scientific and proper nursing care is a strong guarantee for a successful surgery and a better recovery in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with PLD and IDET under DSA guidance. (authors)

  9. [Physiotherapy in lumbar disc herniation ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, T; Germann, D; Hagmann, H

    2001-08-01

    Physiotherapy is the treatment of choice in patients with symptoms caused by a lumbar disc herniation. In clinical practice a broad range of physiotherapeutic modalities has been revealed to be helpful. During the acute stage the efficacy of the McKenzie-concept, mobilisation therapies and traction has been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials with a blind assessor. In addition, pain reducing physical therapies such as cold or electrotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics and/or muscle relaxants are sensible initial accompanying treatments. The effectiveness of active physiotherapies such as training of local strength endurance of back and abdominal muscles has been proven in patients during the chronic stage. The indications for a in-patient rehabilitation programme, for surgery and the danger of developing chronic low back pain are discussed.

  10. Significance of Vertebral Endplate Failure in Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Madan Mohan; Kaur, Sheetal; Sarangi, Jitendra; Mohapatra, Manoranjan

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objective: Endplate lesions though have been implicated in the genesis of lumbar disc herniation (LDH), very little is known regarding their clinical course. Thus, the present study is aimed to investigate the incidence and types of endplate failure (EPF) in LDH and its correlation with the clinical symptoms and prognosis. Methods: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 66 patients with isolated single level LDH were studied. Three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient (3D FSPGR) MRI and computed tomography scans were used to identify the bony and cartilaginous EPF. Twenty-five patients were operated on and 41 patients were treated conservatively. Changes in the pain score, function and neurology were noted at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 weeks. Results: Endplate lesions were observed in 64 patients (96.9%), including bony endplate failure (bony failure) in 47 patients (71.2%) and isolated cartilaginous endplate lesions in 17 patients (25.7%). Bony failure group had similar pain and functional scores but more severe neurological deficit at the initial evaluation. Clinical parameters improved in all groups, but the recovery was lesser in conservatively treated bony failure patients. Conclusion: Endplate lesions are commonly associated with symptomatic LDH. Presence of bony failure can increase neurological deficit and reduce the chance of recovery with conservative management. The 3D FSPGR sequence of MRI can be successfully used for detection of the endplate lesions in the herniated disc. PMID:28660105

  11. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Implants: Importance of the Interdevice Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Subach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. The implantation of interbody fusion cages allows for the restoration of disc height and the enlargement of the neuroforaminal space. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of subsidence occurring after conventional cage placement compared to a novel wider cage placement technique. Methods. This study is a retrospective evaluation of radiographs of patients who underwent stand-alone single level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with lordotic titanium cages and rhBMP-2. Fifty-three patients were evaluated: 39 patients had wide cage placement (6 mm interdevice distance and 14 had narrow cage placement (2 mm interdevice distance. Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc space heights were measured post-operatively and at follow-up imaging. Results. The decrease in anterior intervertebral disc space height was 2.05 mm versus 3.92 mm (<.005 and 1.08 mm versus 3.06 mm in posterior disc space height for the wide cage placement and the narrow cage placement respectively. The proportion of patients with subsidence greater than 2 mm was 41.0% in the wide cage patients and 85.7% for the narrow cage patients (<.005. Conclusions. The wider cage placement significantly reduced the amount of subsidence while allowing for a greater exposed surface area for interbody fusion.

  12. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Idiris; Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5 or L5-S1 were enrolled. The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5-22). It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery.

  13. Fusion Rate and Clinical Outcomes in Two-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Hiroyuki; Takenaka, Shota; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Tobimatsu, Hidekazu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Furuya, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2018-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become a general surgical method for degenerative lumbar diseases. Although many reports have focused on single-level PLIF, few have focused on 2-level PLIF, and no report has covered the fusion status of 2-level PLIF. The purpose of this study is to investigate clinical outcomes and fusion for 2-level PLIF by using a combination of dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography scans. This study consisted of 48 consecutive patients who underwent 2-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar diseases. We assessed surgery duration, estimated blood loss, complications, clinical outcomes as measured by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, lumbar sagittal alignment as measured on standing lateral radiographs, and fusion status as measured by dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography. Patients were examined at a follow-up point of 4.8 ± 2.2 years after surgery. Thirty-eight patients who did not undergo lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbolumbar group, and 10 patients who underwent lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbosacral group. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved from 12.1 to 22.4 points by the final follow-up examination. Sagittal alignment also was improved. All patients had fusion in the cranial level. Seven patients had nonunion in the caudal level, and the lumbosacral group (40%) had a significantly poorer fusion rate than the lumbolumbar group (97%) did. Surgical outcomes of 2-level PLIF were satisfactory. The fusion rate at both levels was 85%. All nonunion was observed at the caudal level and concentrated at L5-S level in L4-5-S PLIF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebra: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Adolescent Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bangke; Wang, Liang; Wang, Haibin; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Xuhua; Chen, Deyu

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the role of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) in the pathogenesis of adolescent lumbar disc herniation (ALDH) and the association between LSTV type and the herniation level of ALDH. This study was a retrospective case-control analysis of roentgenographic images. All adolescent patients who received surgical treatment for L4/5 or L5/S1 single level lumbar disc herniation in our department from 2010 to 2015 were eligible for the ALDH group. All adolescent patients admitted to our hospital during the same period and who had ever undergone a plain anteroposterior radiologic examination of the abdomen and met the inclusion criteria that ensured the absence of any spinal disorders were selected into the control group. The anteroposterior lumbar or abdomen roentgenograms were collected to identify the LSTV. The incidence of LSTV in the ALDH group and the control group were compared. Among the ALDH group, the association between LSTV type (sacralization or lumbarization) and the herniation level of ALDH were evaluated. A total of 80 adolescent patients were included in the ALDH group and 92 asymptomatic adolescents were included in the control group. LSTV was found in 24 patients (30%) in ALDH group compared with 7 patients (7.6%) in the control group (P adolescent patients with sacralization, the L4/5 disc herniation was significantly more common than L5/S1 (81.3% vs. 18.7%; P = 0.019). The LSTV is associated with LDH in adolescents and the sacralization of L5 may contribute to the L4/5 disc herniation in adolescent patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution of MRI signal alterations of the cartilage endplate in pre-operated patients with special focus on recurrent lumbar disc herniation; Verteilungsmuster von (Modic-)Signalveraenderungen an den vertebralen Endplatten voroperierter Patienten und ihr Bezug zu Rezidivvorfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G.T.; Liphofer, J.; Koester, O. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, St. Josef-Hospital, Bochum (Germany); Willburger, R.E. [Abt. fuer Rheumaorthopaedie, St. Elisabeth-Hospital, Bochum (Germany); Schmid, G. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Johanna-Etienne-Krankenhaus, Neuss (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To study the location of (Modic) MR signal alterations (SA) of the cartilage endplate (CEP) in pre- and non-operated segments L3-S1 with special focus on the presence of recurrent lumbar disc herniation (RLDH). Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study the MR images of vertebrae L3-S1 of 65 consecutive patients with a history of microdiscectomy were evaluated. Of the 190 segments studied, 67 were pre-operated. These were divided into a group with recurrent lumbar disc herniation (RLDH) (n=19) and a group without evidence of RLDH (n=48). Non-operated segments (n=123) were also considered as a separate group. In these three groups the prevalence of different Modic types was determined using the sag. T1- and T2-weighted images, and, in particular, the distribution of SA at the upper and lower CEP was examined by evaluating the sag. T2-weighted images. In order to achieve this, each CEP was divided into nine regions. Results: Pre-operated segments showed significantly more frequent (p<0.001) and more expansive (p<0.001) SA than non-operated segments. Non-operated segments showed SA less frequently in the central region of both upper and lower CEP (p=0.056 and p=0.015, respectively). In operated segments without RLDH, the upper CEP had significantly more SA on the operation side than in the mid-sagittal and contra-lateral regions (p=0.016, p=0.037) and significantly more on the operation side of the lower CEP than in the contra-lateral region (p=0.027). Operated segments with RLDH did not show an emphasis of SA on the operation side. In this group SA occurred significantly more often in the central and ventral mid-sagittal regions of the upper CEP than in the preoperated segments without RLDH. (orig.)

  16. Herniated lumbar disc: injection interventions for sciatica

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Joanne L; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2016-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  17. GUIDELINES FOR TREATMENT OF DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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    CARMEN YOSSALETH BRICEÑO-GONZÁLEZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To determine the standard of treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in its different clinical presentations in UMAE Dr. Victorio de la Fuente Narváez. Methods: Six cases found in the literature were presented to 36 experts in spine surgery, along with treatment options, to thereby obtain a standard prescription for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Analytical observational cross-sectional descriptive study. Results: It was found that the treatment of choice in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with axial symptoms is conservative. The surgical treatment of choice for both stable and unstable patients with radiculopathy and/or claudication is decompression + posterolateral graft + transpedicular instrumentation + discectomy (graft. Conclusions: We managed to define the degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment guidelines in our unit, which can serve as a basis for the development of a clinical practice guide.

  18. Bulging Fontanelle and Need for Lumbar Puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Etiologies of bulging fontanelle and fever and clinical evidence for lumbar puncture were determined from medical records of 153 infants treated at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Israel.

  19. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of massive lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang-Qing; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Large lumbar or lumbosacral (LS) disc herniations usually expand from the paramedian space to the neuroforamen and compress both the transversing (lower) and the exiting (upper) nerve roots, thus leading to bi-radicular symptoms. Bi-radicular involvement is a statistically significant risk factor for poor outcome in patients presenting with far lateral or foraminal disc herniation after facet preserving microdecompression. There is evidence showing that patients suffering from large lumbar disc herniations treated with interbody fusion have significant superior results in comparison with those who received a simple discectomy. We report our experiences on managing large LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation. Twenty-three patients who suffered from single level lumbar or LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms treated with unilateral decompression and TLIF using one diagonal fusion cage with ipsilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation operated between January 2005 and December 2009, were included in this study. Operation time and blood loss were recorded. The pain and disability status were pre- and postoperatively evaluated by the visual analog score (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Interbody bony fusion was detected by routine radiographs and computed tomography scan. Adjacent segment degeneration was detected by routine radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Overall outcomes were categorized according to modified Macnab classification. The patients were followed up for an average of 44.7 months. Pain relief in the VAS and improvement of the ODI were significant after surgery and at final followup. No severe complications occurred during hospital stay. Interbody bony fusion was achieved in every case. No cage retropulsion was observed, while 3 cases experienced cage subsidence. Adjacent segment degeneration

  20. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  1. Pathomechanisms of sciatica in lumbar disc herniation: effect of periradicular adhesive tissue on electrophysiological values by an intraoperative straight leg raising test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Takeno, Kenichi; Yayama, Takafumi; Awara, Kousuke; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Guerrero, Alexander; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-10-15

    This study is aimed to investigate the changes of nerve root functions during the straight leg raising (SLR) test in vivo. To investigate the relationship between nerve root movement and the electrophysiological values during an intraoperative SLR test. The SLR test is one of the most significant signs for making a clinical diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation. A recent study showed that intraradicular blood flow apparently decreased during the SLR test in patients with disc herniation. The study included 32 patients who underwent microdiscectomy. During the surgery, the nerve root motion affected by the hernia was observed during the SLR test. The patients' legs were allowed to hang down to the angle at which sciatica had occurred and the change of nerve root action potentials was measured. After removal of the hernia, a similar procedure was repeated. The periradicular specimens collected during surgery were examined by light and electron microscope. In all patients intraoperative microscopy revealed that the hernia was adherent to the dura mater of the nerve roots. During the SLR test, the limitation of nerve root movement occurred by periradicular adhesive tissue and amplitude of action potential showed a sharp decrease at the angle that produced sciatica. After removal of the hernia, all the patients showed smooth gliding of the nerve roots during the test, and there was no marked decrease of amplitude. Our data suggest that temporary ischemic changes in the nerve root cause transient conduction disturbances. Pathologic examination showed that the periradicular tissue consisted of the granulation with vascularization and many inflammatory cell infiltrations. The presence of periradicular fibrosis will compound the nerve root pain by fixing the nerve in one position, thereby increasing the susceptibility of the nerve root to tension or compression.

  2. Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy for the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation in Obese Patients: Health-Related Quality of Life Assessment in a 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkantsinikoudis, Nikolaos; Chaniotakis, Constantinos; Charitoudis, Georgios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2018-05-01

    Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used principally for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). LDH is a frequent spinal ailment in obese individuals. The aim of this prospectively designed study was to assess for the first time in the literature the impact of PTED in postoperative parameters of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in obese patients with LDH within a 2-year follow-up period, to further evaluate the effectiveness of PTED. Patients with surgically treatable LDH were divided into 2 groups. Group A constituted 20 obese patients, and group B was composed of 10 patients with normal body mass index (BMI). A visual analog scale was used for pain evaluation, and the Short Form SF-36 Medical Survey Questionnaire contributed to HRQoL assessment. Follow-up was conducted preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Two of the 20 patients (10%) presented with severe postoperative pain, necessitating conventional microdiscectomy. All studied parameters exhibited maximal improvement at 6 months in group A and at 6 weeks in group B, with subsequent stabilization. Obese patients scored lower in all parameters compared with their healthy counterparts with normal BMI, acquiring a less favorable clinical benefit. PTED appears to be a generally safe and effective method for treating obese patients with LDH. However, major technical challenges that lead to a higher frequency of complications, as well as the lesser acquired clinical benefit, in obese patients may contribute to the further consideration for PTED in specific obese patients, especially on the grounds of low surgical experience. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty versus arthrodesis for single-level cervical spondylosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Fallah

    Full Text Available To estimate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty (ACDA compared to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF for patient-important outcomes for single-level cervical spondylosis.Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Register for Randomized Controlled Trials, BIOSIS and LILACS, archives of spine meetings and bibliographies of relevant articles.We included RCTs of ACDF versus ACDA in adult patients with single-level cervical spondylosis reporting at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neurological success, neck pain, arm pain, quality of life, surgery for adjacent level degeneration (ALD, reoperation and dysphonia/dysphagia. We used no language restrictions. We performed title and abstract screening and full text screening independently and in duplicate.We used random-effects model to pool data using mean difference (MD for continuous outcomes and relative risk (RR for dichotomous outcomes. We used GRADE to evaluate the quality of evidence for each outcome.Of 2804 citations, 9 articles reporting on 9 trials (1778 participants were eligible. ACDA is associated with a clinically significant lower incidence of neurologic failure (RR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.37-0.75, p = 0.0004 and improvement in the Neck pain visual analogue scale (VAS (MD = 6.56, 95% CI = 3.22-9.90, p = 0.0001; Minimal clinically important difference (MCID = 2.5. ACDA is associated with a statistically but not clinically significant improvement in Arm pain VAS and SF-36 physical component summary. ACDA is associated with non-statistically significant higher improvement in the Neck Disability Index Score and lower incidence of ALD requiring surgery, reoperation, and dysphagia/dysphonia.There is no strong evidence to support the routine use of ACDA over ACDF in single-level cervical spondylosis. Current trials lack long-term data required to assess safety as well as surgery for ALD. We suggest that ACDA in patients with single

  4. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  5. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gülşen, İsmail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  6. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  7. Location and direction specificity in motion direction learning associated with a single-level method of constant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying-Zi; Xie, Xin-Yu; Yu, Cong

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies reported significantly less location specificity in motion direction learning than in previous classical studies. The latter performed training with the method of constant stimuli containing a single level of direction difference. In contrast the former used staircase methods that varied the direction difference trial by trial. We suspect that extensive practice with a single direction difference could allow an observer to use some subtle local cues for direction discrimination. Such local cues may be unavailable at a new stimulus location, leading to higher location specificity. To test this hypothesis, we jittered slightly the directions of a stimulus pair by the same amount while keeping the direction difference constant, so as to disturb the potential local cues. We observed significantly more transfer of learning to untrained locations. The local cue effects may also explain the recent controversies regarding the finding that foveal motion direction learning becomes significantly more transferrable to a new direction with TPE (training-plus-exposure) training. One specific study by Zili Liu and collaborators that challenges this finding also used a single-level direction difference for training. We first replicated their results. But we found that if the directions of the stimulus pair were again jittered while the direction difference was kept constant, motion direction learning transferred significantly more to an orthogonal direction with TPE training. Our results thus demonstrate the importance of using appropriate psychophysical methods in training to reduce local-cue related specificity in perceptual learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Schneider, Wilke [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  9. [Imaging study of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-yang; Yang, Cun-rui; Yu, Lang-tao

    2009-04-01

    Using regional assignment to forked method to study lumbar intervertebral disc hemiation (bugle, hernia, prolapse) dependablity and reason of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. From March 2005 to October 2006, 120 patients of match condition from orthopaedics dept and rehabilitative dept of the Boai hospital of Longyan were studied. All patients were equally divided into two groups according to whether or not accompany with symptom of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. There was not statistical difference in sex, age, course of disease, segment of intervertebral disc between two groups. Sixty patients of symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. Sixty patients of asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. The age was 20-59 years old with an average of 38.5 years. Using regional assignment to give a mark respectively for every group. The sagittal diameter index (SI), anterior diastema of flaval ligaments, the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac were respectively measured by sliding caliper. CT value and protrusible areas were respectively evaluated by computer tomography. Adopting mean value to measure three times. (1) There were not statistical difference in SI, CT value, hernia areas, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). There were statistical difference in the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anterior diastema of flaval ligaments between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). (2) There were statistical difference in protrusible type,protrusible segment

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  11. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  12. The shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal

    OpenAIRE

    Zarzur,Edmundo

    1996-01-01

    Literature on the anatomy of the human vertebral column characterizes the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal as triangular. The purpose of the present study was to determine the precise shape of the lumbar vertebral canal. Ten lumbar vertebral columns of adult male cadavers were dissected. Two transverse sections were performed in the third lumbar vertebra. One section was performed at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava, and the other section was performed at the level of t...

  13. Enlargement of lumbar spinal canal in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Evaluation with three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishi, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that enlargement of the lumbar spinal canal is one of the effective surgical procedures for the treatment of the lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and provides a good result. In the present study, we have evaluated the long-term outcome of the enlargement of the lumbar canal without fusion in thirty eight patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) The improvement rate was excellent in 80% of the patients (mean improvement ratio, 83%) according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system. We found that the sufficient enlargement of the canal was obtained by the surgery and maintained for a long period of time. The results from 3D-CT suggested that a round shape was maintained in the canal after the surgery because of pressures of the dura mater against to the bony canal. None of patients showed lumbar instability. In conclusion, enlargement of lumbar canal without fusion is useful for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the enlarged canal has been maintained for a long period of time after the surgery. The results demonstrated the clinical utility of 3D-CT to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative shape of the spine. (author)

  14. [Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Li-Jun; Tan, Jun

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effect of treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery. From Jan. 2006 to Jan. 2009, one hundred fifty patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The diagnosis was degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in 84 cases of grade I, and 66 cases of grade II. There were 88 males and 62 females. Preoperatively, at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, the pain was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring system and therapeutic effect was observed with modified Prolo scoring system. In complications, dural tear happened in 3 cases, biological glues were used for dural tear sealing and neither cerebrospinal fluid leak was found. One case suffered from intervertebral Infection and muscle weakness of foot was found in one case, either was cured after symptomatic treatment. Operative time averaged 160 minutes (120-280 min). Estimated blood loss averaged 210 ml (100-450 ml). The postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (averaged 15.2 months). Preoperatively,at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, VAS scores were respectively 7.9 +/- 2.1, 2.2 +/- 0.6, 3.2 +/- 1.1 (P surgery transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique is indicated for lumbar vertebral instability, localized intervertebral disc disorder and lumbar spondylolisthesis with stenotic nerve root or tube below grade II. This technique has advantages of minimal invasion and early functional recovery.

  15. Analytical determination of Kondo and Fano resonances of electron Green's function in a single-level quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Bich Ha; Nguyen Van Hop

    2009-01-01

    The Kondo and Fano resonances in the two-point Green's function of the single-level quantum dot were found and investigated in many previous works by means of different numerical calculation methods. In this work we present the derivation of the analytical expressions of resonance terms in the expression of the two-point Green's function. For that purpose the system of Dyson equations for the two-point nonequilibrium Green's functions in the complex-time Keldysh formalism was established in the second order with respect to the tunneling coupling constants and the mean field approximation. This system of Dyson equations was solved exactly and the analytical expressions of the resonance terms are derived. The conditions for the existence of Kondo or Fano resonances are found.

  16. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the thoracic spine to...

  17. Lumbar posture and muscular activity while sitting during office work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörl, Falk; Bradl, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Field study, cross-sectional study to measure the posture and sEMG of the lumbar spine during office work for a better understanding of the lumbar spine within such conditions. There is high incidence of low back pain in office workers. Currently there is little information about lumbar posture and the activity of lumbar muscles during extended office work. Thirteen volunteers were examined for around 2h of their normal office work. Typical tasks were documented and synchronised to a portable long term measuring device for sEMG and posture examination. The correlation of lumbar spine posture and sEMG was tested statistically. The majority of time spent in office work was sedentary (82%). Only 5% of the measured time was undertaken in erect body position (standing or walking). The sEMG of the lumbar muscles under investigation was task dependent. A strong relation to lumbar spine posture was found within each task. The more the lumbar spine was flexed, the less there was activation of lumbar muscles (P sitting postures. Because of very low activation of lumbar muscles while sitting, the load is transmitted by passive structures like ligaments and intervertebral discs. Due to the viscoelasticity of passive structures and low activation of lumbar muscles, the lumbar spine may incline into de-conditioning. This may be a reason for low back pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lumbar plexus and psoas major muscle: not always as expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchmair, Lukas; Lirk, Philipp; Colvin, Joshua; Mitterschiffthaler, Gottfried; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting definitions concerning the exact location of the lumbar plexus have been proposed. The present study was carried out to detect anatomical variants regarding the topographical relation between the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle as well as lumbar plexus anatomy at the L4-L5

  19. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  20. Side effects after lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Myhr, G.; Dale, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    Side effects of iohexol lumbar myelography have been analyzed with respect to the influence of the type of radiological abnormality, sex and age in a group of 200 patients. Headache, postural headache, nausea and back/leg pain were significantly more frequent in patients without definite radiological abnormalities. Postural headache, nausea, dizziness and mental symptoms were more frequent in women, while headache, postural headache, nausea, dizziness, minor mental symptoms (i.e. anxiety or depression) and pain became less frequent with age. This pattern is similar to that reported after lumbar puncture. Young women without definite clinical signs of nerve root lesions probably have the greatest risk of experiencing side effects after iohexol lumbar myelography. (orig.)

  1. Congenital lumbar vertebrae agenesis in a lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajli Abbasi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Bahador; Azari, Omid

    2017-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae was diagnosed in a day-old female lamb based on radiology and clinical examinations. There was no neurological deficit in hindlimb and forelimb associated with standing disability. Radiography of the abdominal region revealed absence of lumbar vertebrae. Necropsy confirmed clinical and radiographic results. No other anomaly or agenesis was seen macroscopically in the abdominal and thoracic regions as well as vertebral column. Partial absence of vertebral column has been reported in human and different animal species, as an independent occurrence or associated with other organs anomalies. The latter has been designated as caudal regression syndrome. Vertebral agenesis may arise from irregularity in the differentiation of somites to the sclerotome or sclerotome to the vertebral primordium. Most of the previously reported cases of agenesis were related to the lumbosacral region, lonely or along with other visceral absences. This case was the first report of congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae in a lamb.

  2. An enhanced unified uncertainty analysis approach based on first order reliability method with single-level optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Wen; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Tooren, Michel van

    2013-01-01

    In engineering, there exist both aleatory uncertainties due to the inherent variation of the physical system and its operational environment, and epistemic uncertainties due to lack of knowledge and which can be reduced with the collection of more data. To analyze the uncertain distribution of the system performance under both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, combined probability and evidence theory can be employed to quantify the compound effects of the mixed uncertainties. The existing First Order Reliability Method (FORM) based Unified Uncertainty Analysis (UUA) approach nests the optimization based interval analysis in the improved Hasofer–Lind–Rackwitz–Fiessler (iHLRF) algorithm based Most Probable Point (MPP) searching procedure, which is computationally inhibitive for complex systems and may encounter convergence problem as well. Therefore, in this paper it is proposed to use general optimization solvers to search MPP in the outer loop and then reformulate the double-loop optimization problem into an equivalent single-level optimization (SLO) problem, so as to simplify the uncertainty analysis process, improve the robustness of the algorithm, and alleviate the computational complexity. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated with two numerical examples and one practical satellite conceptual design problem. -- Highlights: ► Uncertainty analysis under mixed aleatory and epistemic uncertainties is studied. ► A unified uncertainty analysis method is proposed with combined probability and evidence theory. ► The traditional nested analysis method is converted to single level optimization for efficiency. ► The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method are testified with three examples

  3. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47?72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column...

  4. Optimizing Residents' Performance of Lumbar Puncture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Wienecke, Troels; Thagesen, Helle

    2018-01-01

    Background: Lumbar puncture is often associated with uncertainty and limited experience on the part of residents; therefore, preparatory interventions can be essential. There is growing interest in the potential benefit of videos over written text. However, little attention has been given...... of three interventions as preparation for performing lumbar puncture: 1) goal- and learner-centered video (GLV) presenting procedure-specific process goals and learner-centered information; 2) traditional video (TV) providing expert-driven content, but no process goals; and 3) written text (WT...... a traditionally designed video or written text. Participants’ self-confidence was not predictive of their actual performance....

  5. Radiation exposure during the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure and techniques to reduce radiation dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used in spine surgery to assist with graft and hardware placement. Previous studies have not measured radiation exposure to a surgeon during minimally invasive lateral lumbar spine surgery for single-level discectomy and interbody cage insertion. This study was performed to model and measure radiation exposure to a surgeon during spine surgery using the direct lateral lumbar procedure. The study was performed using a mannequin substituting for the surgeon and a cadaver substituting for the patient. Radiation was measured with dosimeters attached to 6 locations on the mannequin using a OEC Medical Systems 9800 C-arm fluoroscope (OEC Medical Systems, Salt Lake City, Utah). Three different fluoroscopy setups were tested: a standard imaging setup, a standard setup using pulsed-mode fluoroscopy, and a reversed setup. The experiment was tested 5 times per setup, and the dosimeters' values were recorded. The highest amount of radiation exposure occurred when obtaining an anteroposterior view of the spine in the standard setup. Compared with the standard setup, the pulsed-mode setting decreased the radiation exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the eye level (P exposure. Radiation exposure to the surgeon can be greatly minimized by using either a pulsed imaging mode or the reversed setup. The reversed setup has the lowest amount of radiation exposure to the eye level.

  6. MERRA 2D IAU Ocean Surface Diagnostic, Single Level, Time Avg 1-hr (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT1NXOCN or tavg1_2d_ocn_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional ocean surface single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  7. MERRA 2D IAU Ocean Surface Diagnostic, Single Level, Monthly Mean (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATMNXOCN or tavgM_2d_ocn_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional ocean surface single-level diagnostics that is monthly mean...

  8. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Diurnal (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATUNXSLV or tavgU_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  9. MERRA 2D IAU Ocean Surface Diagnostic, Single Level, Diurnal (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATUNXOCN or tavgU_2d_ocn_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional ocean surface single-level diagnostics that is monthly mean...

  10. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Time Average 1-hourly (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT1NXSLV or tavg1_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  11. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Monthly Mean (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATMNXSLV or tavgM_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  12. Percutaneous fusion of lumbar facet with bone allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Dolorit Verdecia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the evolution of the cases treated with percutaneous facet fusion with bone allograft in lumbar facet disease. METHOD: Between 2010 and 2014, 100 patients (59 women and 41 men diagnosed with lumbar facet disease underwent surgery. RESULTS: The lumbar facet fusion with bone allograft shows good clinical results, is performed on an outpatient basis, and presents minimal complications and rapid incorporation of the patient to the activities of daily living. CONCLUSIONS: The lumbar facet fusion with bone allograft appears to be an effective treatment for lumbar facet disease.

  13. A reappraisal of the anatomy of the human lumbar erector spinae.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogduk, N

    1980-01-01

    In the lumbar region the longissimus thoracis and iliocostalis lumborum are separated by the erector spinae aponeurosis and its ventral reflection--the lumbar intermuscular aponeurosis. Lumbar fibres of the longissimus arise from the ilium and the lumbar intermuscular aponeurosis and insert into the accessory processes and proximal ends of the transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae. Lumbar fibres of iliocostalis insert into the costal elements of the first four lumbar vertebrae. The lum...

  14. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  15. Lumbar radiculopathy due to unilateral facet hypertrophy following lumbar disc hernia operation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kökeş, Fatih; Günaydin, Ahmet; Aciduman, Ahmet; Kalan, Mehmet; Koçak, Halit

    2007-10-01

    To present a radiculopathy case due to unilateral facet hypertrophy developing three years after a lumbar disc hernia operation. A fifty two-year-old female patient, who had been operated on for a left L5-S1 herniated lumbar disc three years ago, was hospitalized and re-operated with a diagnosis of unilateral facet hypertrophy. She had complaints of left leg pain and walking restrictions for the last six months. Left Straight Leg Raising test was positive at 40 degrees , left ankle dorsiflexion muscle strength was 4/5, left Extensor Hallucis Longus muscle strength was 3/5, and left Achilles reflex was hypoactive. Lumbar spinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed left L5-S1 facet hypertrophy. Lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar facet hypertrophy is a well-known neurological condition. Radicular pain develops during the late postoperative period following lumbar disc hernia operations that are often related to recurrent disc herniation or to formation of post-operative scar tissue. In addition, it can be speculated that unilateral facet hypertrophy, which may develop after a disc hernia operation, might also be one of the causes of radiculopathy.

  16. Clinical outcomes and considerations of the lumbar interbody fusion technique for lumbar disk disease in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dae-Woong; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Young-Eun; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2013-08-01

    The posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) techniques are commonly used surgical methods for wide indications such as degeneration or trauma. Although they are rarely required for lumbar disk disease in younger patients, there are a few children and adolescents who are indicated for PLIF or TLIF for other reasons, such as congenital severe stenosis with or without lumbar instability that requires wide decompression or severe bony spur that need to be removed. In such cases, different pathophysiology and outcomes are expected compared with adult patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 23 patients who underwent PLIF or TLIF surgery when less than 20 years old. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed during a mean of 36.4 months follow-up period. The indications of lumbar interbody fusion, success of fusion, complications, and visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Radiographs of all patients taken 6 months after the surgery showed fusion. Clinical outcome was also satisfactory, with improvement of VAS score from 7.7 preoperatively to 2.3 at 6 months after surgery. Only one patient had reoperation due to adjacent segment disease. For adolescent patients with severe bony spur, massive central disk rupture, or severe spondylolisthesis, lumbar interbody fusion surgery has good surgical outcome with few complications.

  17. Surgically Treated Symptomatic Prolapsed Lumbar and Sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intention of this study is to share the experience of the author in the occurrence, possible causative factors, and treatment of surgically symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in females, and to compare this experience in Switzerland, Nigeria, and Jamaica using surgery records for a period of over ...

  18. Postoperative braces for degenerative lumbar diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, Andre N.; Ayala, Ana Patricia; Rubinstein, Sidney M.; El Dib, Regina; Rodrigues, Luciano M.; Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun; Belloti, João Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of orthosis following lumbar spinal surgery for people with degenerative disease on pain reduction and improvement of functional status. Secondary objectives

  19. How to perform a lumbar puncture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-04

    Nov 4, 2016 ... Clinical Fellow, Acute and Elderly Care Medicine, Ashford and St Peter's Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust ... The Lumbar. Puncture was a procedure dedicated to the relief of symptoms (at that time mainly meningitis or raised intracranial pressure) [4]. .... in the back as a consequence of the trauma of the.

  20. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required.

  1. Changing the needle for lumbar punctures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Thorbjørn Søndergaard; Ording, H.; Vilholm, O. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is a common complication of diagnostic lumbar punctures. Both a non-cutting needle design and the use of smaller size needles have been shown to greatly reduce the risk of PDPH. Nevertheless, larger cutting needles are still widely used. This study d...

  2. Lumbar Puncture for First Simple Febrile Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compliance with American Academy of Pediatrics consensus statement recommendations regarding lumbar puncture for infants 6-18 months of age with a first simple febrile seizure was investigated by a retrospective review of 704 infants evaluated in the pediatric emergency medicine division at Children’s Hospital Boston, MA, Oct 1995-Oct 2006.

  3. [Discarthrosis with hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radicular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaru, D; Tiţu, Gabriela; Pendefunda, L

    2012-01-01

    The problems at the level of intervertebral discs are producing dysfunctions and important functional regression at the level of lumbar column, at a stage at which the patient could remain blocked in an anterior or lateral flexion position or producing an antalgic position of scoliosis that could incapacitate the patient to perform activities of daily living. The medical rehabilitation, in such cases, must seek not only the relief of local pain through different methods of obtaining it, but also the functional reeducation of the intervertebral articulations through specific analytical mobilization in order to achieve the biomechanical harmonization of the rachis. We report the case study of a 66 year-old patient who presented to our clinic for medical consult and physical therapy when he was diagnosed with discharthrosis, hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The lumbar x-ray showed osteophytes, disc narrowing at the level of L5-S1 and inter-apophysis arthrosis. The clinical examination revealed difficulty walking with pain in the right sacroiliac articulations and right sciatic emergence with plantar paraesthesia. The patient developed pain induced scoliosis on the right side that restricted the lumbar range of motion and prevented the right flexion blocking him into an left flexion, any attempt of straightening inducing pain. The condition was treated using specific analytical lumbar mobilization for the realignment of the vertebrae complex. In this case study, we found that functional reeducation in cases of pain induced deviations of the rachis of the column should be centered on the harmonization of inadequate pressure and position of the complex intervertebral articulations.

  4. Hyper-attenuating nodules on CT during arterial portography (CTAP). Analysis using single-level dynamic CTAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Akihiro; Kita, Ryuichi; Sakamoto, Yasuaki

    2007-01-01

    Recently several cases of hyper-attenuating nodules on CT during arterial portography (CTAP) have been reported as the chance of meticulous examination has been increasing. For the study reported here, seven cases of hyper-attenuating nodules on CTAP were analyzed by means of single-level dynamic CTAP (sCTAP). Peak values of the time-density curve from the 7 cases were 110, 106, 71, 75, 65, 45, 246 Hounsfield unit (HU) for the ROIs (regions of interest) placed on the nodule, and 63, 73, 41, 35, 20, 28, 22 HU for those placed on the surrounding liver parenchyma, respectively. Average peak value in another set of 46 cases as a control, including chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and normal liver, was 55.3±17.6 HU. These results seem to indicate that portal flow shows an absolute increase in some cases of hyper-attenuating nodules on CTAP and that a decreased portal flow in the surrounding parencyma may cause the visual effect of hyper-attenuation on CTAP in some cases. (author)

  5. Is the lasègue sign a predictor of outcome in lumbar disc herniation surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the predictive value of the Lasègue sign on self-reported quality of life measures (HRQoL in patients who undergo microdiscectomy. METHODS: 95 patients with clinical and radiological diagnosis of LDH who underwent microdiscectomy were included. The patients were assessed by a neurological examination and answered validated instruments to assess pain, disability, quality of life, and mood disorder in the preoperative period, and 1, 6 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Preoperative Lasègue sign was identified in 56.8% (n=54/95 of the cases. There was no difference between the groups in the preoperative period regarding HRQoL. At one year follow-up no statistically significant difference in HRQoL was observed in the Lasègue group. The discrimination capacity of the preoperative Lasègue sign to determinate variations in HRQoL outcomes one year postoperatively was low. CONCLUSION: Lasègue sign is not a good predictor of outcome after microdiscectomy for LDH.

  6. Risk factors for intervertebral instability assessed by temporal evaluation of the radiographs and reconstructed computed tomography images after L5-S1 single-level transforaminal interbody fusion: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiomi; Shinozaki, Yoshio; Takahashi, Yohei; Takaishi, Hironari; Ogawa, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Intervertebral instability risks following L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and causes of bony bridge formation on computed tomography (CT) remain largely unknown. We evaluated the temporal changes on plain radiographs and reconstructed CT images from 178 patients who had undergone single-level L5-S1 TLIF between February 2011 and February 2015. We statistically analyzed temporal changes the L5-S1 angle on radiographs and intervertebral stability (IVS) at the last observation. Bony bridge formation between the L5-S1 vertebral bodies and the titanium cage subsidence were analyzed by using reconstructed CT. Preoperative L5-S1 angle in the non-IVS group was significantly greater than that in the IVS group. The cage subsidence was classified as follows: type A, both upper and lower endplates; type B, either endplate; or type C, no subsidence. Types B and C decreased over time, whereas type A increased after surgery. The bony bridges between vertebral bodies were found in 87.2% of patients, and 94.5% of all bony bridges were found only in the cage, not on the contralateral side. Our findings suggested that high preoperative L5-S1 angle increased the risk of intervertebral instability after TLIF. The L5-S1 angle decreased over time with increasing type A subsidence, and almost all bony bridges were found only in the cage. These results suggest that the vertebral bodies were stabilized because of cage subsidence, and final bony bridges were created. Methods to improve bony bridge creation are needed to obtain reliable L5-S1 intervertebral bone union. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. General practitioners' willingness to request plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryynaenen, Olli-Pekka; Lehtovirta, Jukka; Soimakallio, Seppo; Takala, Jorma

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To examine general practitioners' attitudes to plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations. Design: A postal questionnaire consisting of questions on background data and doctors' opinions about plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, as well as eight vignettes (imaginary patient cases) presenting indications for lumbar radiography, and five vignettes focusing on the doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiography on the basis of patients' age and duration of symptoms. The data were analysed according to the doctor's age, sex, workplace and the medical school of graduation. Setting: Finland. Subjects: Six hundred and fifteen randomly selected physicians working in primary health care (64% of original target group). Results: The vignettes revealed that the use of plain lumbar radiographic examination varied between 26 and 88%. Patient's age and radiation protection were the most prominent factors influencing doctors' decisions to request lumbar radiographies. Only slight differences were observed between the attitudes of male and female doctors, as well as between young and older doctors. Doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiographies increased with the patient's age in most vignettes. The duration of patients' symptoms had a dramatic effect on the doctor's decision: in all vignettes, doctors were more likely to request lumbar radiography when patient's symptoms had exceeded 4 weeks. Conclusions: General practitioners commonly use plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, despite its limited value in the diagnosis of low back pain. Further consensus and medical education is needed to clarify the indications for plain lumbar radiographic examination

  8. Prospective Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Either Interbody Graft or Interbody Cage in the Treatment of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, A; Altaf, Farhaan; Jalgaonkar, Azal; Kakkar, Rahul; Sirigiri, P B R; Howieson, A; Crawford, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    A prospective study of 2 different fusion techniques for the treatment of single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. To determine whether the addition of an intervertebral cage improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) after decompression for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The surgical approach that should be used for degenerative spondylolisthesis is a controversial issue. Decompression and PLIF with an interbody cage is widely used. Theoretical advantages in favor of PLIF include anterior column support, indirect foraminal decompression, restoration of lordosis, and reduction of the slip via ligamentotaxis. Despite numerous publications, the scientific support for the PLIF method is, however, weak. A prospective study was carried out including 59 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Average age of patients was 66 years: 34 males and 25 females. Patients were divided into 2 treatment groups: group 1-32 patients with PLIF with interbody graft and group 2-27 patients with PLIF with cage. Minimum 2-year follow-up. Outcomes were assessed by measuring preoperative and postoperative lordotic angles. SF-12 physical and mental health scores were recorded along with visual analogue scores for pain. Complications were also recorded. No significant difference in the postoperative lordotic angles was achieved between the 2 techniques. Nonsignificant difference in the clinical outcomes between both the techniques. We have found the use of a cage to achieve lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis does not confer any significant advantages in terms of restoration of lumbar lordosis, improvement in clinical symptoms, or relief of pain postoperatively.

  9. Intercomparison of methods for the estimation of displacement height and roughness length from single-level eddy covariance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; van de Boer, Anneke; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Moene, Arnold; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    The displacement height d and roughness length z0 are parameters of the logarithmic wind profile and as such these are characteristics of the surface, that are required in a multitude of meteorological modeling applications. Classically, both parameters are estimated from multi-level measurements of wind speed over a terrain sufficiently homogeneous to avoid footprint-induced differences between the levels. As a rule-of thumb, d of a dense, uniform crop or forest canopy is 2/3 to 3/4 of the canopy height h, and z0 about 10% of canopy height in absence of any d. However, the uncertainty of this rule-of-thumb becomes larger if the surface of interest is not "dense and uniform", in which case a site-specific determination is required again. By means of the eddy covariance method, alternative possibilities to determine z0 and d have become available. Various authors report robust results if either several levels of sonic anemometer measurements, or one such level combined with a classic wind profile is used to introduce direct knowledge on the friction velocity into the estimation procedure. At the same time, however, the eddy covariance method to measure various fluxes has superseded the profile method, leaving many current stations without a wind speed profile with enough levels sufficiently far above the canopy to enable the classic estimation of z0 and d. From single-level eddy covariance measurements at one point in time, only one parameter can be estimated, usually z0 while d is assumed to be known. Even so, results tend to scatter considerably. However, it has been pointed out, that the use of multiple points in time providing different stability conditions can enable the estimation of both parameters, if they are assumed constant over the time period regarded. These methods either rely on flux-variance similarity (Weaver 1990 and others following), or on the integrated universal function for momentum (Martano 2000 and others following). In both cases

  10. Percutaneous posterior cervical fusion with the DTRAX Facet System for single-level radiculopathy: results in 60 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Bruce M; Bundoc, Rafael C; Ver, Mario R; Ignacio, Jose Manuel F; Berven, Sigurd H; Eyster, Edward F

    2013-03-01

    The authors present 1-year results in 60 patients with cervical radiculopathy due to spondylosis and stenosis that was treated with a bilateral percutaneous facet implant. The implant consists of a screw and washer that distracts and immobilizes the cervical facet for root decompression and fusion. Clinical and radiological results are analyzed. Between 2009 and 2011, 60 patients were treated with the DTRAX Facet System in a multicenter prospective single-arm study. All patients had symptomatic clinical radiculopathy, and conservative management had failed. The majority of patients had multilevel radiographically confirmed disease. Only patients with single-level radiculopathy confirmed by history, physical examination, and in some cases confirmatory nerve blocks were included. Patients were assessed preoperatively with Neck Disability Index, visual analog scale, quality of life questionnaire (Short Form-12 version 2), CT scans, MRI, and dynamic radiographs. Surgery was percutaneous posterior bilateral facet implants consisting of a screw and expandable washer and iliac crest bone aspirate. Patients underwent postoperative assessments at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year with validated outcome questionnaires. Alterations of segmental and overall cervical lordosis, foraminal dimensions, device retention and fusion criteria were assessed for up to 1 year with CT reconstructions and radiographs. Fusion criteria were defined as bridging trabecular bone between the facets, translational motion cervical lordosis. There was a 1.6° loss of segmental lordosis at the treated level at 1 year that was significant. Foraminal width, volume, and posterior disc height was significantly increased at 6 months and returned to baseline levels at 1 year. There was no significant decrease in foraminal width and height at adjacent levels. There were no reoperations or surgery- or device-related complications, including implant failure or retained hardware. Results

  11. Surgical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Motoi; Kuno, Shigehiko; Inoue, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Problems of lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment are many surgical tactics, elderly patient, osteoporosis, complications and recurrence of the symptoms. PLIF (posterior lumbar interbody fusion) and PS (pedicle screw) fixation technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis provide good patient satisfaction. Good outcome has been reported by only laminectomy alone, but patient satisfaction becomes worse year after year. The role of instrumentation for lumbar spondylolisthesis is decompression of the nerve root, correction of lumbar pathologies, bony fusion and early mobilization. We show our surgical technique and long term outcome of PLIF with PS for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Three hundred and fifty cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis were operated on in Department of Neurosurgery, Fujita Health University during the period of from December 1992 to August 2008. Patient background: age 16-84 years old (mean 62.5), Gender: male 153, female 197. Follow-up period 1-180 months (mean 61.2). Degenerative: 255, Isthmic: 63, Dysplastic: 10, Fracture: 5 and scoliosis 16 cases. Surgical procedure was PS with interbody fusion cage: 331, Hybrid cage (titanium cage with hydroxyapatite) 314, PS with Cerabone: 2 and PS with autograft: 17. CT was done to evaluate bony fusion postoperatively. Post operative improvements by JOA (Japan Orthopedic Association) score is 11.4 before surgery, 24.1 (post op. within 2 years), 25.4 (post op. 2-5 years), 25.0 (post op. 5-10 years) and 22.4 (post op. 10-15 years). Significant improvements were observed in %Slip and Slip angle but no remarkable change was observed in lumbar lordotic angle by postoperative X-ray evaluation. No root injury, and systemic complication except 4 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Two cases were reoperated in whom cage with autograft migration due to pseudoarthrosis. Two cases had to undergo screw and cage system removal due to infection. Two cases of adjacent level stenosis had to undergo operation 10

  12. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY FOR DIRECT REPAIR OF LUMBAR SPONDYLOLYSIS BY UTILIZING INTRAOPERATIVE NAVIGATION AND MICROENDOSCOPIC TECHNIQUES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Yue; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Li, Changqing; Zheng, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the effectiveness of direct screw repair for lumbar spondylolysis by using intraoperative O-arm based navigation and microendoscopic techniques. Between February 2012 and May 2014, 11 consecutive patients with lumbar spondylolysis were treated with Buck's procedure by the aid of intraoperative O-arm based navigation and minimally invasive approach. The debridement and autograft of pars interarticularis defects was performed under microendoscopy. There were 7 males and 4 females, with an average age of 28.4 years (range, 19 - 47 years) and an average disease duration of 10.5 months (range, 8-23 months); no nerve symptoms or signs of lower limb was observed. The radiological examinations showed single level bilateral lumbar spondylolysis without obvious disc degeneration, lumbar instability, or spondylolisthesis. Isthmic injury located at L4 in 2 cases and at L5 in 9 cases. Of 11 patients, 7 were rated as grade 2 disc degeneration, and 4 as grade 3 disc degeneration according to the modified Pfirrmann classification system. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and complications were recorded. The fluoroscopic examinations were performed to assess defect repair and screw position. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score was used to evaluate the improvement of low back pain. The average operation time was 147.6 minutes (range, 126-183 minutes). The average blood loss was 54.9 mL (range, 40-85 mL). Primary healing of incision was obtained. There was no complication of nerve root injury, dural tear, or infection. Three patients had pain at donor site postoperatively, and pain disappeared within 3 weeks. The average follow-up duration was 15.7 months (range, 10-23 months). VAS score of low back pain was significantly decreased from preoperative 7.1 ± 2.3 to 1.8 ± 0.4 at last follow-up (t = 13.42, P = 0.01). Of 22 isthmic bone grafting, bilateral isthmic bony fusion was achieved in 7 patients and unilateral isthmic bony fusion in 3 patients at 6-10 months

  13. Spontaneous Regression of Lumbar Herniated Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Chang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc herniation of the lumbar spine is a common disease presenting with low back pain and involving nerve root radiculopathy. Some neurological symptoms in the majority of patients frequently improve after a period of conservative treatment. This has been regarded as the result of a decrease of pressure exerted from the herniated disc on neighboring neurostructures and a gradual regression of inflammation. Recently, with advances in magnetic resonance imaging, many reports have demonstrated that the herniated disc has the potential for spontaneous regression. Regression coincided with the improvement of associated symptoms. However, the exact regression mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present 2 cases of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with spontaneous regression. We review the literature and discuss the possible mechanisms, the precipitating factors of spontaneous disc regression and the proper timing of surgical intervention.

  14. Side effects after ambulatory lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Myhr, G.; Stovner, L.J.; Dale, L.G.; Tangerud, A.

    1989-01-01

    Side effect incidences after ambulatory (22G needle and two h bed rest) and after non-ambulatory (22 and 20G needles and 20 h bed rest) lumbar iohexol myelography have been estimated and compared. Headache incidence was significantly greater in ambulatory (50%, n=107) as compared to nonambulatory myelography (26%, n=58). Headaches in the ambulatory group tended to be of shorter duration and the difference between severe headaches in ambulatory and non-ambulatory groups was not significant. Serious adverse reactions did not occur and none of the ambulatory patients required readmission because of side effects. The headache was predominantly postural and occurred significantly earlier in the ambulatory group. Headache incidence was significantly greater after 20G needle myelography (44%, n=97) as compared to 22G needle iohexol myelography (26%, n=58). The results support the hypothesis that CSF leakage is a major cause of headache after lumbar iohexol myelography. (orig.)

  15. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  16. Primary lumbar extradural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Matthew; Glass, Eric; Kent, Marc; Clifford, Craig A; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 9 yr old castrated male golden retriever weighing 36 kg was presented for evaluation of progressive left pelvic limb paresis and fecal and urinary incontinence. MRI demonstrated an extradural, ovoid mass compressing the lumbar spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Histologically, the mass was consistent with hemangiosarcoma with no involvement of the adjacent vertebrae. The dog underwent a doxorubicin-based chemotherapy protocol with the addition of oral cyclophosphamide. After completion of chemotherapy, the dog was evaluated q 4 mo for restaging. Clinicopathological evidence of primary tumor recurrence or metastatic disease was not detected for 15 mo after initial diagnosis and treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a primary extradural hemangiosarcoma in the lumbar vertebral column in a dog. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome are also discussed.

  17. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical lumbar sympathectomy with radiological assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Forty cases of chemical lumbar sympathectomy are presented. A 7.5% solution of phenol in meglumine iothianate was injected under local anaesthesia and abdominal radiography performed. Skin temperature changes in the legs were compared with the radiological appearances and clinical results. Six injections were performed on cadavers before autopsy using a solution of methylene blue and meglumine iothianate in order to correlate the radiological appearance with the exact site of the injection. ...

  19. Myxomatous degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R A

    1985-08-01

    Sixteen patients were operated on for lumbar pain and pain radiating into the sciatic nerve distribution. In all 16, when the anulus fibrosus was incised, soft, gray disc material extruded under pressure like toothpaste being squeezed from a tube. This syndrome of myxomatous degeneration is a distinct entity, different from classical fibrotic disc degeneration or herniated nucleus pulposus. Surgical removal associated with partial facetectomy produced excellent results. The concept of incompetence of the anulus fibrosis is discussed.

  20. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant contro...

  1. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle ('pediculolysis') is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors)

  2. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle (`pediculolysis`) is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Comparisons of Safety and Clinical Outcomes Between Multiple-level and Single-level Cervical Disk Replacement for Cervical Spondylosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lianghai; Tan, Mingsheng; Yang, Feng; Yi, Ping; Tang, Xiangsheng; Hao, Qingying

    2016-12-01

    This is a systematic review and meta-analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multiple-level cervical disk replacement (CDR) over single-level CDR for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. Some authors advocate for the multiple-level CDR instead of anterior decompression and fusion in cervical multiple-level spondylosis. However, whether the efficacy and safety of multi-level CDR are as favorable as that of single-level CDR remains controversial. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases were searched up to November 2015 for controlled studies that compared the clinical outcomes of single-level and multiple-level CDR for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. The following outcomes were extracted and analyzed: prevalence of heterotopic ossification and reoperation, preoperative and postoperative Neck Disability Index scores, preoperative and postoperative Visual Analog Scale scores, and success rate using the Odom grading system. Ten studies involving 1402 patients were included: including 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 prospective studies, and 3 retrospective studies. No significant differences between single-level and multiple-level groups were found in terms of the prevalence of heterotopic ossification and reoperation rate, Neck Disability Index score, Visual Analog Scale score, and success rate using the Odom grading system. On the basis of this meta-analysis, clinical outcomes of multiple-level CDR are similar to those of single-level CDR for cervical spondylosis, which suggests the multiple-level CDR is as effective and safe as the single-level CDR. Nonetheless, more well-designed studies are needed for further evaluation.

  4. Comparing Short-term Complications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: An Analysis of 6940 Patients Using the ACS-NSQIP Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Ryan; Kim, Robert B; Lam, Sandi K; Cybulski, George R; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2018-02-01

    Multicenter propensity score-adjusted retrospective cohort study. To determine baseline 30-day complication rates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and compare clinical complications for patients undergoing single-level ACDFs between inpatient and outpatient settings. ACDF remains the most common procedure in the treatment of a variety of cervical disc pathologies, making it a focus of quality improvement initiatives. Outpatient single-level ACDFs are becoming more common and offer advantages including reducing nosocomial infections and costs, as well as improved patient satisfaction. The 2011-2013 NSQIP datasets were queried to identify all patients who underwent single-level ACDF procedures using current procedural terminology codes. Outpatient and inpatient cohorts were matched 1:1 using propensity score analysis to assess short-term outcomes. The outcomes assessed included 30-day medical and surgical complications, reoperation, readmission, and mortality. In total, 6940 patients underwent a single-level ACDF with an overall complication rate of 4.2%. A total of 5162 patients (74.4%) had an inpatient hospital stay after surgery, whereas 1778 patients (25.6%) had outpatient surgery. After matching based on preoperative and operative characteristics to account for potential confounders, the overall complication rate was higher in the inpatient arm compared with the outpatient arm (2.5% vs. 1.2%; P=0.003). The 30-day readmission rate was also higher but not significant in the inpatient group than the outpatient group (2.2% vs. 1.8%; P=0.355). Mortality was the same with 0.1% in both groups (P=0.564). Patients undergoing outpatient single-level ACDF had a lower 30-day complication rates than those undergoing it in the inpatient setting. Outpatient surgery for single-level ACDF is safe and a favorable option for suitable patients. Level 3.

  5. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    David, Gh; Ciurea, AV; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth ...

  6. The Neandertal vertebral column 2: The lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Arlegi, Mikel; Barash, Alon; Stock, Jay T; Been, Ella

    2017-05-01

    Here we provide the most extensive metric and morphological analysis performed to date on the Neandertal lumbar spine. Neandertal lumbar vertebrae show differences from modern humans in both the vertebral body and in the neural arch, although not all Neandertal lumbar vertebrae differ from modern humans in the same way. Differences in the vertebral foramen are restricted to the lowermost lumbar vertebrae (L4 and L5), differences in the orientation of the upper articular facets appear in the uppermost lumbar vertebrae (probably in L1 and L2-L3), and differences in the horizontal angle of the transverse process appear in L2-L4. Neandertals, when compared to modern humans, show a smaller degree of lumbar lordosis. Based on a still limited fossil sample, early hominins (australopiths and Homo erectus) had a lumbar lordosis that was similar to but below the mean of modern humans. Here, we hypothesize that from this ancestral degree of lumbar lordosis, the Neandertal lineage decreased their lumbar lordosis and Homo sapiens slightly increased theirs. From a postural point of view, the lower degree of lordosis is related to a more vertical position of the sacrum, which is also positioned more ventrally with respect to the dorsal end of the pelvis. This results in a spino-pelvic alignment that, though different from modern humans, maintained an economic postural equilibrium. Some features, such as a lower degree of lumbar lordosis, were already present in the middle Pleistocene populations ancestral to Neandertals. However, these middle Pleistocene populations do not show the full suite of Neandertal lumbar morphologies, which probably means that the characteristic features of the Neandertal lumbar spine did not arise all at once. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computed tomography as the primary radiological examination of lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkko, E.; Laehde, S.

    1988-10-01

    A series of 235 patients examined by lumbar CT because of sciatica or other low back disorder was studied. The need of additional examinations and correlations to surgical findings were evaluated. Inadequate information was the cause of additional examination, mostly myelography in 20 patients (8,5%). It was concluded that lumbar CT is a suitable first examination of the lumbar spine in sciatica and low back pain. The indications to complementary myelography and its benefit are discussed.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Hajime

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the stenotic condition of the lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelography and with discography in 102 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Various pathologic conditions were studied including 50 cases of herniated nucleus pulposus, 39 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral type or combined type), and 13 cases of spondylolisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, and dysplastic type). High correlation was detected between the T2 weighted mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and the lateral view of a full-column myelogram, but subtle changes such as adhesive changes, or redundancy, or anomalous changes of the nerve roots were more clearly demonstrated on myelograms than on MRI. Actually some of these changes could not be detected on MRI. The degrees of disc degeneration were classified into five grades according to the signal intensity and the irregularity of the disc on the T2-weighted image. The MRI evaluation of disc degeneration in this series was similar to that of the discography. However, MRI could not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI might be the imaging modality for diagnostic screening and for detecting stenotic conditions of the lumbar spinal canal, it will not be able to replace myelography and/or discography for determining indication for surgery and preferred surgical approach. (author)

  9. The Clinical Analysis on 32 Cases of Herniated Lumbar Disc Patients according to Lumbar CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-ho Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the oriental medicine treatment on lumbar disc herniation. Subjects and Methods : The clinical analysis was done on 32 cases of patients with lumbar disc herniation diagnosed by lumbar CT scan. Patients who admitted in Cheongju Oriental Medicine Hospital from April 2007 to April 2008 were analyzed according to the distribution of sex, age, the period of disease, condition on admission, the symptom on admission, Admission day, the treatment efficacy at discharge day. Results : 1. The forties was the most, the acutest phase the most, the day of 8-14 days the most. 2. Multiple bulging disc in 37.5% of CT scan was the most common, followed by a single HNP was 28.1%. 3. Almost 81% patients showed effective efficacy under VAS 3 at discharge day. 4. Single bulging and herniated disc were more short admission days than multiple bulging and herniated disc.

  10. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  11. Congenital absence of the lumbar facet joint associated with bilateral spondylolysis of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with a rare case of congenital absence of lumbar facet joint manifesting as low back pain. Physical examination showed no neurological or hematologic abnormalities. Radiography revealed absence of a facet joint on the right side of L4-5. Computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography revealed absence of the facet joint on the right side of L4-5 and spondylolysis on both sides of L5. Pain subsided after conservative treatment. This is an extremely rare case of congenital absence of lumbar facet joint associated with bilateral spondylolysis.

  12. A retrospective study of epidural and intravenous steroids after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for large lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Patients who underwent PELD with epidural steroid administration for large lumbar disc herniation showed favorable curative effect compared with those who underwent PELD with intravenous steroid administration.

  13. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Surgery for Adjacent Segment Degeneration and Recurrent Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Chieh Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients, due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group P<0.0001. Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group P<0.0001. Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and −0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group P<0.0001. Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort.

  14. Can facet joint fluid on MRI and dynamic instability be a predictor of improvement in back pain following lumbar fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoddy, Mark C; Sielatycki, John A; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Engstrom, Stephen M; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between lumbar facet fluid and dynamic instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), as well as the relationship between facet fluid and patient-reported outcomes following a posterior lumbar fusion. We analyzed consecutive patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis undergoing single level posterior lumbar fusion from December 2010 to January 2013 at a single academic institution. We investigated the relationship between fluid in the facet joint as measured on axial MRI and the presence of dynamic instability. We investigated the impact of facet fluid, Modic changes, and dynamic instability on patient-reported outcomes. There was a significant association between the amount of facet joint fluid and the presence of dynamic instability (p = 0.03); as facet fluid increases, the probability of dynamic instability also increases. For every 1 mm of facet fluid, there was a 41.6 % increase (95 % CI 1.8-97) in the odds of dynamic instability. A facet fluid amount less than 0.5 mm gave a 90 % probability that there was no dynamic instability. The presence of facet fluid and dynamic instability were associated with achieving minimal clinical important difference (MCID) in low back pain following lumbar fusion (p = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). Facet joint fluid is associated with the presence of dynamic instability in DS. The presence of facet fluid and dynamic instability may predict increased likelihood of achieving MCID for improvement in back pain following posterior lumbar fusion.

  15. Correlation between lumbar intervertebral disc height and lumbar spine sagittal alignment among asymptomatic Asian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Kai; Tian, Hai-Jun; Wu, Ai-Min; Cheng, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Tang-Jun; Zhao, Jie

    2018-02-12

    To investigate the distribution and characteristics of the lumbar intervertebral disc height (IDH) in asymptomatic Asian population and to determine whether the lumbar IDH is related to the lumbar spine sagittal alignment. A cohort of 169 cases of asymptomatic volunteers was enrolled from January 2014 to July 2016. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine and panoramic radiography of the spine. Panoramic radiographs of the spine were taken to evaluate pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) using Surgimap® software. Roussouly classification was utilized to categorize all subjects according to the four subtypes of sagittal alignment. The IDH was measured on the MRI mid-saggital section of the vertebral body. The relationships between lumbar IDH and spine-pelvic parameters were also assessed using the Spearman correlation analysis. The reference value ranges of IDH in asymptomatic Asian volunteers between L1/2, L2/3, L3/4, L4/5, and L5/S1 were (6.25, 10.99), (6.97, 12.08), (7.42, 13.3), (7.76, 14.57),and (7.11, 13.12) mm, respectively. Based on the above reference value, the high lumbar intervertebral space is defined as more than 14 mm. According to the Roussouly Classification, there are 33 cases in type I, 48 in type II, 66 in type III, and 22 in type IV. According to the definition of the high IDH, there are two cases in type I, three in type II, nine in type III, and eight in type IV. The results indicated that people in the Roussouly III and IV subtypes had greater values for IDH compared to those of Roussouly I and II subtypes, and the spinopelvic parameters were partly correlated with IDH in different subtypes. In addition, levels L4-L5 showed the highest IDH for all four groups followed by the L3-L4 and L5-S1 levels, and the value of L3-L4 is equivalent to that of L5-S1. All type groups showed moderate and positive correlations between the PI and IDH except the level of L1-L2 in type IV. The IDH may

  16. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems to predispose to adjacent segment disease. Patients with such pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch exhibit a 10-times higher risk for undergoing revision surgery than controls if

  17. Lumbar hernia - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Yonamine, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a case of lumbar hernia of inferior right space (Petit's triangle), classified as acquired hernia and diagnosed by clinical history and computed tomography. Lumbar hernia are quite rare. Authors have done a literature review of this disease. (author)

  18. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  19. Responses to lumbar magnetic stimulation in newborns with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Pasman, J.W.; Roeleveld, N.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Searching for a tool to quantify motor impairment in spina bifida, transcranial and lumbar magnetic stimulation were applied in affected newborn infants. Lumbar magnetic stimulation resulted in motor evoked potentials in both the quadriceps muscle and the tibialis anterior muscle in most (11/13)

  20. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Yohan; Sand?n, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) are reviewed from the available literature and imaging reco...

  1. Surgical treatment of foraminal herniated disc of the lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Halikov Shavkatbek; Abduhalikov Alimjon Karimjanovich

    2017-01-01

    Herniated lumbar intervertebral disc have a significant impact on both the patient’s life as well, and because of the high prevalence and economic impact on society as a whole. Designed scheduling algorithm foraminal hernia surgical treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc, based on the preoperative detection of compressing factors allows to define differentiated indications for decompressive or decompressive-stabilizing surgery.

  2. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenbode, I. C. D.; Jellema, P.; van Poppel, M. N. M.; van Tulder, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar supports are used in the treatment of low-back pain patients, to prevent the onset of low-back pain (primary prevention) or to prevent recurrences of a low-back pain episode (secondary prevention). To assess the effects of lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of non-specific low-back

  3. Complications of lumbar puncture in a child treated for leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, Melanie; Delpierre, Isabelle; Damry, Nash; Christophe, Catherine [Children' s University Hospital Queen Fabiola, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Azzi, Nadira [Children' s University Hospital Queen Fabiola, Haematology-Oncology Unit, Brussels (Belgium); Sekhara, Tayeb [Children' s University Hospital Queen Fabiola, Department of Neurology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-11-01

    Lumbar puncture may lead to neurological complications. These include intracranial hypotension, cervical epidural haematomas, and cranial and lumbar subdural haematomas. MRI is the modality of choice to diagnose these complications. This report documents MRI findings of such complications in a child treated for leukaemia. (orig.)

  4. Mechanisms of action of lumbar supports : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, M N; de Looze, M P; Koes, B W; Smid, T; Bouter, L M

    2000-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the putative mechanisms of action of lumbar supports in lifting activities. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the evidence bearing on the putative mechanisms of action of lumbar supports. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A restriction of trunk

  5. NONFUSION STABILIZATION IN THE DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Voršič

    2009-04-01

    Conclusions Cosmic is a posterior dynamic nonfusion pedicle screw-rod system for the stabilization of the lumbar vertebral column. It represents the new step in the development of the spinal instrumentation and can efficiently replace the spondylodesis in the treatment of painful degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine.

  6. Multiple Osseous Loose Bodies Associated with Lumbar Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Hanakita, Junya; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-01

    Multiple osseous loose bodies in the lumbar spine have never been reported. We describe a rare surgical case of multiple osseous loose bodies associated with lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. A 74-year-old man who experienced left foot numbness and bilateral gluteal pain was diagnosed with lumbar spondylolisthesis 7 years previously and managed conservatively. He reported recurrence of the left foot numbness 6 months previously, at which time aggressive (rather than conservative) therapy became a consideration. Radiographs of the lumbar spine revealed L5 isthmic spondylolisthesis with dynamic instability at L5/S1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed multiple mass lesions dorsally located in the lumbar canal. Computed tomography myelography demonstrated multiple osseous materials near the isthmic portion at the L5 level where compression of the dural sac by the lesions induced lumbar canal stenosis. The patient underwent posterior decompression surgery that enabled total removal of the osseous lesions. Intraoperative findings revealed osseous lesions located in the fibrocartilage material and no connection of the lytic portion at the L5 level or ligamentum flavum. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful as his neurological symptoms improved. We described the first instance of multiple loose bodies in the spinal canal with lumbar canal stenosis. It is presumed that long standing minor trauma due to dynamic instability with a trend of hyperossification induced secondary synovial osteochondromatosis forming multiple loose bodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complications of lumbar puncture in a child treated for leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, Melanie; Delpierre, Isabelle; Damry, Nash; Christophe, Catherine; Azzi, Nadira; Sekhara, Tayeb

    2005-01-01

    Lumbar puncture may lead to neurological complications. These include intracranial hypotension, cervical epidural haematomas, and cranial and lumbar subdural haematomas. MRI is the modality of choice to diagnose these complications. This report documents MRI findings of such complications in a child treated for leukaemia. (orig.)

  8. Reliability and validity of subjective assessment of lumbar lordosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reliability and validity studies of different lumbar curvature analysis and measurement techniques have been documented however there is limited literature on the reliability and validity of subjective visual analysis. Radiological assessment of lumbar lordotic curve aids in early diagnosis of conditions even ...

  9. Segmental fracture of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'hEireamhoin, Sven; Devitt, Brian; Baker, Joseph; Kiely, Paul; Synnott, Keith

    2010-10-01

    A case report is presented. To describe a rare, previously undescribed pattern of spinal injury. This seems to be a unique injury with no previously described injuries matching the fracture pattern observed. This is a case report based on the experience of the authors. The discussion includes a short literature review based on pubmed searches. We report the case of a 26-year-old female cyclist involved in a road traffic accident with a truck resulting in complete disruption of the lumbar spine. The cyclist was caught on the inside of a truck turning left and seems to have passed under the rear wheels. She was brought to the local emergency department where, after appropriate resuscitation, trauma survey revealed spinal deformity with complete neurologic deficit below T12 and fractured pubic rami, soft tissue injuries to the perineum and multiple abrasions. Plain radiology showed a segmental fracture dislocation of her lumbar vertebrae, extending from the L1 superior endplate through to L4-L5 disc space. The entire segment was displaced in both anteroposterior and lateral planes. Computed tomography confirmed these injuries and ruled out significant visceral injury. She was transferred to the national spinal unit (author unit), where she underwent reduction and fixation with rods and screws from T9-S1, using one cross-link. After her immediate postoperative recovery, she was referred to the national rehabilitation unit. Although so-called "en bloc" lumbar fractures have been previously described, the authors were unable to find any injury of this degree in the literature. This rare injury seems to show a pattern of spinal injury previously undescribed.

  10. Acute lumbar spondylolysis in intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jeremy Hunter; Guin, Patrick D; Theiss, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective case series. The purpose of this study was to describe a unique group of intercollegiate athletes who are skeletally mature and who developed symptomatic acute lumbar spondylolysis and to study long-term return to play outcome of nonoperative and surgical repair of L3 and L4 spondylolysis in skeletally mature athletes. Traditionally, symptomatic acute lumbar spondylolysis is a defect found in skeletally immature athletes, most commonly in the pars interarticularis of L5, less commonly in the L3/L4 region, and even less commonly in skeletally mature athletes as described in this group. Eight intercollegiate athletes (2 women and 6 men, ages ranging from 19 to 21 y) with acute lumbar spondylolysis were diagnosed by means of computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission-CT bone scan. L3 lesions were present in 5 patients, and L4 lesions were present in 3 patients. All patients were treated initially nonoperatively with a protocol of bracing and activity modification. The healing progress was assessed through repeat CT scan. Patients who failed to respond to nonoperative procedures underwent direct repair of their pars defect through variable angle pedicle screw and sublaminar hook. Outcomes were measured by completion of the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (mean follow-up 6.5 y) and return to athletic participation. All patients successfully returned to full athletic competition. Two patients showed radiographic healing and resolution of pain following 3 months of nonoperative treatment. Five patients required surgical repair of the pars defect. All of these patients eventually returned to unrestricted participation in athletics. This study shows that this subgroup will generally respond well to surgical correction of the pars defect and return to uninhibited competition following conservative treatment and/or surgical repair.

  11. Is Body Mass Index a Risk Factor for Revision Procedures After Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Bohl, Daniel D; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine if an association exists between body mass index (BMI) and the rate of revision surgery after single-level minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). MIS TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease. Previous studies in the orthopedic literature have associated increased BMI with increased postoperative complications and need for revision. Few studies have evaluated the association between BMI and the risk for revision after minimally invasive spinal procedures. A surgical registry of patients who underwent a single-level MIS TLIF for degenerative pathology between 2005 and 2014 was reviewed. Patients were stratified based on BMI category: normal weight (BMIrevision fusion procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF using multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling. In total, 274 patients were analyzed; of these, 52 (18.98%) were normal weight, 101 (36.86%) were overweight, 62 (22.63%) were obese I, and 59 (21.53%) were obese II-III. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling, BMI category was not associated with undergoing a revision procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF (P=0.599). On multivariate analysis, younger age (P=0.004) was associated with increased risk of undergoing a revision after MIS TLIF. The results of this study suggest that increasing BMI is not a risk factor for undergoing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF. As such, patients with high BMI should be counseled regarding having similar rates of needing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF as those with lower BMI. Level IV.

  12. [Severe Raynaud's syndrome treated by lumbar sympathectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Thomas Laden; Roeder, Ole

    2016-03-28

    Avoiding exposure of extremities to cold combined with pharmacologic treatment usually suffice in the attempt to suppress the related symptoms of Raynaud's syndrome. This case report describes a severe case of Raynaud's syndrome affecting the lower extremities of a 16-year-old female. She was referred to a centre of vascular surgery with severe vasospasms of the feet. After failed attempts of pharmacologic treatment, a laparoscopic lumbar sympathectomy was performed with no complications and a slight reduction of symptoms three years post-surgically.

  13. Collateral pathways in lumbar epidural venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijssen, H.O.M.; Ike, B.W.; Chevrot, A.; Bijlsma, R.

    1982-01-01

    Opacification of collateral pathways other than the central channels is very rare in lumbar epidural venography. Two cases of opacification of the inferior mesenteric vein following extravasation of contrast medium at the tip of the lateral sacral vein catheter are reported. One case is presented in which filling of normal parametrial venous plexuses and the left ovarian vein occurred as a consequence of incompetent or absent valves in the internal iliac vein. The literature containing comparable collateral flow patterns in disease is reviewed. The significance of the phlebographic features in our cases is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Percutaneous treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardi, M.; Resta, F.; Bettinelli, A. [Ospedale Maggiore di Milano (Italy); Lavaroni, A.; Fabris, G. [Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy); Abelli, F. [Fondazione Clinica del Lavorno, Pavia (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    918 patients were subjected to percutaneous treatment of lumbar herniated disc. 733 of these were treated through enzymatic nucleolysis with chymopapain, for a total 883 levels. Chemonucleolysis was carried out on 733 patients (79.8%). Automated discectomy has been carried out in 185 cases (20.1%). Chemonucleolysis has led to the resolution of the symptoms in a high percentage of cases (82.2%). Nucleotomy has proved to be an effective method in 74.6% of cases. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  16. Dolor lumbar agudo: mecanismos, enfoque y tratamiento

    OpenAIRE

    Mahecha Toro, Marco Tulio

    2009-01-01

    El dolor lumbar agudo tiene un gran impacto socioeconómico a nivel mundial, esto lo constituye en un problema de salud pública. En nuestro país su ocurrencia es muy similar a la de otras latitudes. A lo largo de la historia se ha considerado como un “precio” que debemos pagar los mamíferos bipedestres de importante longevidad. Comparte sus mecanismos fisiopatológicos con los otros tipos de dolor agudo. Sin embargo, en la gran mayoría de los casos, implica un reto determinar su origen patológi...

  17. Hidroterapia en el embarazo. Dolor lumbar

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Manzano, Eva S.; Martínez Payá, Jacinto Javier

    2002-01-01

    Con este trabajo hemos estudiado las ventajas que tiene la hidroterapia en el embarazo y la presencia de dolor lumbar, tan frecuente, sobre todo en los últimos meses de gestación. Creemos conveniente hacer referencia a la evolución que sufre la columna vertebral de la cuadrupedia a la bipedestación. Dicho paso contribuye al desarrollo de la inteligencia humana, pero es un importante inconveniente para su columna vertebral, que sigue pagando tributo a la posición erguida, y al conj...

  18. Surgical anatomy of the minimally invasive lateral lumbar approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Robert W; Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-03-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion approach (LLIF), which encompasses the extreme lateral interbody fusion or direct lateral interbody fusion techniques, has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional posterior approaches. With rapidly expanding applications, this minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach is now utilized in basic degenerative pathologies as well as complex lumbar degenerative deformities and tumors. Given the intimate relationship of the psoas muscle, and hence the lumbar plexus, to this MIS approach, several authors have examined the surgical anatomy of this approach. Understanding this regional neural anatomy is imperative given the potential for serious injuries to both the motor and sensory nerves of the lumbar plexus. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss all published studies detailing the surgical anatomy of the lateral lumbar approach with respect to the MIS LLIF techniques. This is a timely review given the rapidly growing number of surgeons utilizing this technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine...... models for four different postures. The in uence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine were studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force...... were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most in uential. The results indicated that measuring these parameters from X-rays would be most important to morph an existing musculoskeletal...

  20. Serum lipid levels are positively correlated with lumbar disc herniation--a retrospective study of 790 Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuedong; Zhao, Yunpeng; Wang, Mei; Si, Meng; Li, Jingkun; Hou, Yong; Jia, Jialin; Nie, Lin

    2016-04-18

    Abnormal serum lipid levels have been shown to be associated with the occurrence of atherosclerosis, but little is known about the relationships of them with the risk of developing intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) in Chinese population. We performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc degeneration. A total of 790 Chinese patients were recruited for this study at the time of hospitalization. We examined fasting serum lipid levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). 396 patients (235 men and 161 women; mean age: 41.07 years) underwent surgery for single-level lumbar disc herniation. A control group of 394 patients (225 men and 169 women; mean age: 42.1 years) underwent surgery for wounded lower limbs during the same period. Patients in the control group were collected randomly from among patients who were age- and sex-matched patients with the case group. Patients with lumbar disc herniation had significantly higher TC and LDL-C serum concentrations (P disc herniation group (P = 0.017, P = 0.002, P = 0.039, P =0.002 and P disc herniation (P disc herniation, in which odds ratio (OR) was 1.462 and confidence interval (CI) was 1.179 ~ 1.813. Moreover, patients with High-TG and borderline High-LDL-C had a higher probability of disc herniation (OR: 2.974, CI: 1.488 ~ 5.945, statistical power: 100%; OR: 1.626, CI: 1.012 ~ 2.612, statistical power: 61.4%, respectively). However, hyperlipidaemia did not seem to be associated with the herniated segment of the lumbar intervertebral disc (p = 0.374). The present study suggests that dyslipidaemia may be associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar disc herniation. Serum lipid levels could be a useful predictor for intervertebral disc degeneration in Chinese population.

  1. Vertebral Body Hounsfield Units are Associated With Cage Subsidence After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jie; Li, Kang; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between Hounsfield units (HU) measurement and cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation becomes a popular treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. Cage subsidence is a potentially devastating complication after lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral fixation. Recently, a new technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU values from computed tomography has been proposed. Bone quality is believed to be one of the important factors that cause cage subsidence after TLIF. Cage subsidence after single-level (L4/5) TLIF with unilateral fixation was prospectively documented at a single institution between 2013 and 2014. Patients with cage subsidence were matched 1:1 to a control cohort without cage subsidence on the basis of age and sex. HU values were measured from the preoperative computed tomography. All patients received computed tomographic scans at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Sagittal images were evaluated for evidence of cage subsidence. Eighteen patients with cage subsidence were well matched 1:1 to a cohort without cage subsidence and had complete imaging data. The global lumbar HU values were significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence than in the controls (112.4±10.08 vs. 140.2±10.17; P=0.0015). Similarly, a regional assessment of HU across the fusion levels was significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence (113.4±10.47 vs. 127.9±8.13; P=0.0075). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic cure were 0.715 and 0.636 for global and regional assessment, respectively. The best cut-offs for global and regional assessment were 132 (sensitivity: 83.3%; specificity: 61.1%) and 122 (sensitivity: 72.2%; specificity: 55.6%), respectively. Lower preoperative HU values is associated with cage subsidence after TLIF with unilateral fixation. HU measurement may be used as a predictor of cage subsidence after

  2. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion for aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: is intentional surgical reduction essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Feng; Hou, Tie-Sheng; Xu, Jian-Guang; Zeng, Bing-Fang; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Zhao, Cheng; Li, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Surgical reduction and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is commonly used to recover segmental imbalance in degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, whether intentional reduction of the slipped vertebra during PLIF is essential in aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of surgical reduction and fusion in situ among aged patients who underwent PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis. A prospective randomized clinical trial on the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients aged older than 70 years. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 73 patients aged 70 years or older with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis requiring surgical treatment were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes included percentage of vertebral slippage, focal lordosis, and disc height. The 73 patients were randomly assigned to two groups treated using surgical reduction (Group A, n=36) and fusion in situ (Group B, n=37). Both groups were followed up for an average of 33.2 months (range, 24-54 months). The clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared between the two groups. Surgical complications were similar in the two groups. The average operative time and blood loss during surgery did not insignificantly differ (p>.05) between the two groups. Spondylolisthesis, disc height, and focal lordosis were significantly improved postoperatively in both groups. There was no obvious difference in clinical outcomes, as assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, although the radiographic outcomes were considerably better in Group A than in Group B. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screws fixation, with or without intraoperative reduction, provides good outcomes in the surgical treatment of

  3. Percutaneous Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with a New Interspinous Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masala, Salvatore; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto; Volpi, Tommaso; Calabria, Eros; Novegno, Federica; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of a new interspinous device (Falena) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The clinical outcomes and imaging results were assessed by orthostatic MR during an up to 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Between October 2008 and February 2010, the Falena was implanted at a single level in 26 patients (17 men; mean age, 69 (range, 54–82) years) who were affected by degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. All of the patients were clinically evaluated before the procedure and at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, 20 patients have completed a 6-month follow-up. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention using the Visual Analogue Scale score and the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Orthostatic MR imaging was performed before the implantation and at 3 months to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Results: The mean ODI score decreased from 48.9 before the device implantation to 31.2 at 1 month (p < 0.0001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.6 before to 3.9 (p < 0.0001) at 1 month and 3.6 at 3 months after the procedure (p = 0.0115). These values were stable at 6 months evaluation. No postimplantation major complications were recorded. MRI evaluation documented in most cases an increased size of the spinal canal area. Similarly a bilateral foraminal area improvement was found. The variation of the intervertebral space height measured on the posterior wall was not significant. Conclusions: In our preliminary experience with the Falena in a small cohort of patients, we obtained clinical and imaging results aligned to those reported with similar interspinous devices.

  4. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  5. The incidence of adjacent segment disease after lumbar discectomy: A study of 751 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the incidence and prognostic factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following first-time lumbar discectomy (LD). We retrospectively reviewed all neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time LD for degenerative lumbar disease from 1990 to 2012. ASD was defined as a clinical and radiographic progression of degenerative spinal disease that required surgical decompression (with or without fusion) at the level above or below the index discectomy. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from multivariable logistical regression controlling for sex and age, as well as postoperative sensory deficit, motor deficit, back pain, neurogenic claudication, and radiculopathy. Of the 751 patients who underwent single-level LD, the cumulative reoperation rate for degenerative spinal disease was 10.79%. The incidence of ASD requiring reoperation was 4% over 3.11years. More specifically, the incidence of adjacent level discectomy was 1.86% over 3.45years. The annualized reoperation rate for ASD was 1.35% (1.35 ASD reoperations per 100 person-years). The 63.33% incidence of cranial ASD requiring reoperation was statistically significantly higher than the 40.00% incidence of caudal ASD requiring reoperation. Following multivariable logistical regression, the strongest (and only) statistically significant predictor of ASD requiring reoperation was lower extremity radiculopathy after the index discectomy operation (OR=14.23, p<0.001). In the first series on ASD following first-time LD without fusion, the rate of reoperation for ASD was 4% and the cumulative reoperation rate 10.79%. Rostral ASD is more common than caudal ASD and lower extremity radiculopathy is the strongest predictor of ASD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Postural Cueing to Increase Lumbar Lordosis Increases Lumbar Multifidus Activation During Trunk Stabilization Exercises: Electromyographic Assessment Using Intramuscular Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneck, George J; Story, John W; Donald, Shelby

    2016-04-01

    Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Diminished multifidus activation and cross-sectional area are frequent findings in persons with low back pain. Increasing lumbar lordosis has been shown to increase activation of the multifidus with a minimal increase in activation of the long global extensors during unsupported sitting. To examine the influence of postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis on lumbar extensor activation during trunk stabilization exercises. Thirteen asymptomatic participants (9 male, 4 female) were instructed to perform 6 trunk stabilization exercises using a neutral position and increasing lumbar lordosis. Electrical activity of the deep multifidus and longissimus thoracis was recorded using fine-wire intramuscular electrodes. The mean root-mean-square of the electromyography (EMG) signal obtained during each exercise was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A 2-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance (posture by exercise) was performed for each muscle. When averaged across the 6 exercises, postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis resulted in greater multifidus EMG activity compared to performing the exercises in a neutral posture (35.3% ± 15.1% versus 29.5% ± 11.2% MVIC). No significant increase in longissimus thoracis EMG activity was observed when exercising with cueing to increase lumbar lordosis. This study suggests that postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis during trunk stabilization exercises may better promote multifidus activation than traditional stabilization exercises alone. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing lumbar lordosis improves multifidus activation in persons with low back pain.

  7. Interventional Radiology Management of a Ruptured Lumbar Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Cryoablation and Vertebroplasty of a Lumbar Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, Aldo Victor; Arrigoni, Francesco, E-mail: arrigoni.francesco@gmail.com [Ospedale San Salvatore, Department of Radiology (Italy); Bruno, Federico [University of L’Aquila, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences (Italy); Carducci, Sergio; Varrassi, Marco; Zugaro, Luigi [Ospedale San Salvatore, Department of Radiology (Italy); Barile, Antonio; Masciocchi, Carlo [University of L’Aquila, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    We describe the management of a complication (a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and its rupture) after combined procedure (cryoablation and vertebroplasty) on a lumbar (L2) metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. Review of the literature is also presented with discussion about the measures to be taken to prevent these types of complications.

  8. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Suh Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH, disc angle (DA, disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA, lumbar lordotic angle (LLA, and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI, and patient satisfaction rate (PSR were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21 at 12 months’ follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21. The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21. Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable.

  9. The reasons for delay lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH. Lotfi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis and prompt initiation of appropriate therapy is vital and any delay will lead to high mortality and serious and permanent morbidity. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the management of 220 patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS infections (meningitis and encephalitis to determine the percentage of patients’ suspected CNS infection undergo lumbar puncture in acceptable time (in accordance with conventional algorithms. In this descriptive study, patients with suspected CNS infections admitted to Bu-Ali and Qods hospitals, in the period July 2013 to December 2015 were studied. Information of 220 patients was collected. Continuous variables were summarized as means ± standard deviation and categorical variables as frequencies and percentages. Lumbar puncture (LP in patients was delayed in 200 cases (91%. Most common causes of delay in performing LP were prolongation of the process of determining patient needs to puncture, satisfying patients, CT scan delay and the delay in allowing LP by neurologist. In this study, delaying LP rate was higher than other studies. It seems certain pattern in assistants’ visits for counseling. CT requests and neurologic consultation before LP performed for all adult patients.

  10. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung [Kang Nam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal gro0008.

  11. Repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Ibarra, Javier; Arrieta Maria, Victor; Torres Romero Fernando; Ramirez Cabrales, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to present the surgical experience in the repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine. Background: Spodylolysis is an important cause of low back pain in young adults and is responsible for high grade of incapacity. Classically, patients with surgical indications with Spondylolysis have been treated with vertebral arthrodesis arthrodesis, with the following functional lost of the intervened segment and biomechanical overload of the upper contiguous segment. There are not previous reports about repairing of lysis in national literature and international references in this technique are scarce. Materials and methods: Eight patients within 2002-2004 were operated, a direct repairing of the lyses by in situ, fusion and interfragmental osteosynthesis with AO 3.5 mm titanium cortical screws with autogenous bone grafts was achieved. The casuistic was analyzed depending on clinical presentation, consolidation, mobility and vitality of the disc in imaginology studies. Results: During the follow-up a firm fusion in all cases, mobility and vitality preservation of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc was detected. There was neither infection nor neurological deficit. Recommendations: Repairing of spondylolysis in lumbar column, in young symptomatic patients without or with mild lystesis (grade I) and without associated disc damage, is a safe surgical technique

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Hajime; Matsui, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Fuminori; Izumida, Makoto; Wakita, Sato; Sekiya, Isato

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate the stenotic condition of lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelogram and with discogram in 82 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Pathologic conditions were studied including herniated nucleus pulposus in 36, lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral portion, combined) in 35, and spondylisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, dysplastic) in 11. Correlation between T2 mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and profile view of full-column myelogram was very high, but fine parts such as adhesive change or redundancy or anomalous condition of nerve roots were more clearly observed on myelogram than on MRI. And some of them were not detected on MRI. The stage of disc degeneration was classified in 5 grades according to signal intensity and irregularity of the disc on T2-weighted image. The evaluation of disc degeneration was similar to discogram. But MRI will not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI is the most important imaging modality to diagnostic screening and to post-operative evaluation of the stenotic condition, determination of the strict indication and the method of the operation will need myelogram and/or discogram and so on. (author)

  13. [Lumbar hypermobility: where swimming becomes hydrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergeay, D; De Neve, M

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the clinical problem of lumbar hypermobility. The therapeutical possibilities are resumed briefly. The philosophy of medical training therapy ("Heilgymnastik") is described. More extensive the extra-advantages of hydrotherapy (methodical back-stroke swimming) are searched for in a theoretical deductive way. The authors found that: 1. swimming is a low-impact sport so far as the articulations are concerned, 2. back-stroke is done mainly in a lumbar kyphosis, 3. swimming is also an excellent cardiopulmonary training, 4. when swimming the muscles of the shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle are trained in a nearly isokinetic way (power-endurance), 5. the short transverso-spinal muscles are indirectly trained in their tonic more than phasic stretch reflex (posture function), 6. the muscles of the trunk are trained in a nearly isometric way in the appropriate angles (erect position), 7. the position of the head in the water facilitates the abdominal muscles (tonic neck reflex), 8. the cool temperature of the water generates training-enhancing stress-responses, 9. endurance-training is ideal for the postural function of the lower back muscles (especially the deeper layers near the spine) which are anatomical and physiological suited for this purpose, 10. warming-up and cooling-down procedures prepare the neuromuscular, the cardiovascular and metabolic functions before the workout-session (a cold shower afterwards acts to tonicize the skin and muscles).

  14. Lumbar spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kevin J; Elser, Tim; Stromberg, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Spondylolysis is a common occurrence for adolescent athletes who have low back pain. The injury involves a defect in the pars interarticularis, occurring as a result of repeated hyperextension and rotation. Clinical findings might include tightness of the hip flexors and hamstrings, weakness of the abdominals and gluteals, and an excessive lordotic posture. The validity of several clinical tests were compared alongside magnetic resonance imaging, but were not able to distinguish spondylolysis from other causes of low back pain. Medical referral should be arranged so that medical imaging and diagnostic testing can be completed to insure a proper diagnosis. Initial intervention includes rest from sport, which may vary from 2 weeks to 6 months. Bracing is also used to help minimize lumbar lordosis and lumbar extension. Exercises that focus on stabilization and spine neutral position should be incorporated in physical therapy intervention. Avoiding end ranges is important while performing exercises to minimize the translational and rotational stresses on the spine. Surgical interventions have also been recommended for athletes who have had persistent low back pain for more than six months with no relief from rest and bracing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic effect of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy on lumbar disc herniation and its effect on oxidative stress in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng; Zhang, Ting; Gao, Gang; Yu, Chen; Liu, Ping; Zuo, Genle; Huang, Xinhu

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic effect of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy on lumbar disc herniation, and explored its effect on oxidative stress in patients with lumbar disc herniation. One hundred and ten patients with lumbar disc herniation were selected in The Affiliated People's Hospital of Shanxi Medical University from May 2015 to May 2016. Patients were divided into control group (n=50) and observation group (n=60) according to different surgical methods. Patients in control group were subjected to traditional open discectomy, while patients in observation group were treated with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Surgical-related indicators, ODI and VAS scores before and 3 months after surgery, serum inflammatory factors and oxidative stress indicators were compared between 2 groups. There was no significant difference in operation time between the groups. Blood loss, incision size and time of bed rest in observation group were better than those in control group (P0.05). Levels of serum inflammatory factors TNF-α and CRP and oxidative stress indicators MDA and MPO were significantly lower and levels of oxidative stress indicators SOD and TAC were significantly higher in observation group than in control group (Pdisc herniation with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy has the advantages of small trauma, less blood loss and fast recovery, and can effectively improve the dysfunction, reduce pain and serum levels of inflammatory factors, and improve the levels of oxidative stress indicators, thereby improving the surgical results. Thus, this method should be considered for wide-use.

  16. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and...) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of...

  17. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan; Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon

    2001-01-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm 2 in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm 2 and 0.765g/cm 2 . Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures

  18. Preoperative Mental Health is not Predictive of Patient-reported Outcomes Following a Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Benjamin C; Massel, Dustin H; Bohl, Daniel D; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Lopez, Gregory; Singh, Kern

    2017-12-01

    This is a retrospective cohort study. To determine if preoperative mental health is associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following a minimally invasive lumbar discectomy. PROs are commonly used to quantify a patient's perceived health status. Recently, mental health has been theorized to directly affect patients' perception of their disability and pain after spine surgery. A registry of patients who underwent a primary, single-level minimally invasive lumbar discectomy was reviewed. The association between preoperative Short-Form Health Survey mental composite score (MCS) and change in PROs [Oswestry Disability Index, back and leg visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores] from preoperative to postoperative (6-week, 12-week, 6-month) timepoints was assessed using multivariate regression controlling for patient demographics and the respective preoperative PRO. Patients in the top and bottom quartiles of preoperative MCS were compared regarding achievement of minimum clinically important difference for each PRO. A total of 110 patients were included in the analysis. Better preoperative mental health was associated with lower preoperative disability and decreased preoperative back VAS (Ppreoperative MCS was also associated with greater improvements in back VAS at 6-weeks postoperatively (Ppreoperative MCS and change in any PROs at the 12-week or 6-month postoperative visits. Patients in the bottom quartile of preoperative MCS achieved minimum clinically important difference in all PROs at similar rates to patients in the top quartile of preoperative MCS. Patients with better preoperative mental health scores are more likely to report decreased disability and pain preoperatively. However, preoperative mental health was not predictive of changes in long-term disability or pain. As a result, patients with a wide range of preoperative mental health scores can achieve satisfactory long-term reductions in disability and pain levels after a lumbar discectomy. Level

  19. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P degenerative lumbar disease, and the short-term clinical outcome is satisfactory

  20. FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY, SAGITTAL ALIGNMENT AND PELVIC BALANCE IN LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Muñiz Luna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To demonstrate the recovery of lumbar sagittal pelvic alignment and sagittal pelvic balance after surgical reduction of lumbar spondylolisthesis and establish the benefits of the surgery for reduction and fixation of the lumbar spondylolisthesis with 360o circumferential arthrodesis for 2 surgical approaches by clinical and functional evaluation. Method: Eight patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis treated with surgical reduction and fixation of listhesis and segmental circumferential fusion with two surgical approaches were reviewed. They were evaluated before and after treatment with Oswestry, Visual Analogue for pain and Odom scales, performing radiographic measurement of lumbar sagittal alignment and pelvic sagittal balance with the technique of pelvic radius. Results: Oswestry scales and EVA reported improvement of symptoms after treatment in 8 cases; the Odom scale had six outstanding cases reported. The lumbar sagittal alignment presented a lumbosacral lordosis angle and a lumbopelvic lordosis angle reduced in 4 cases and increased in 4 other cases; pelvic sagittal balance increased the pelvic angle in 4 cases and decreased in 3 cases and the sacral translation of the hip axis to the promontory increased in 6 cases. Conclusion: The surgical procedure evaluated proved to be useful by modifying the lumbar sagittal alignment and the pelvic balance, besides reducing the symptoms, enabling the patient to have mobility and movement and the consequent satisfaction with the surgery.

  1. The top 100 classic papers in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jeremy; Skovrlj, Branko; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2015-05-15

    Bibliometric review of the literature. To analyze and quantify the most frequently cited papers in lumbar spine surgery and to measure their impact on the entire lumbar spine literature. Lumbar spine surgery is a dynamic and complex field. Basic science and clinical research remain paramount in understanding and advancing the field. While new literature is published at increasing rates, few studies make long-lasting impacts. The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all papers relevant to lumbar spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1990 by Boden et al that described magnetic resonance imaging findings in individuals without back pain, sciatica, and neurogenic claudication showing that spinal stenosis and herniated discs can be incidentally found when scanning patients. The second most cited study similarly showed that asymptomatic patients who underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging frequently had lumbar pathology. The third most cited paper was the 2000 publication of Fairbank and Pynsent reviewing the Oswestry Disability Index, the outcome-measure questionnaire most commonly used to evaluate low back pain. The majority of the papers originate in the United States (n=58), and most were published in Spine (n=63). Most papers were published in the 1990s (n=49), and the 3 most common topics were low back pain, biomechanics, and disc degeneration. This report identifies the top 100 papers in lumbar spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the lumbar spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in lumbar spine surgery today. 3.

  2. Dynamic Stabilization for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Lumbar Spinal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTONARI, Tatsuya; NISHIHARA, Nobuharu; SUWA, Katsuyasu; OTA, Taisei; KOYAMA, Tsunemaro

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted surgical procedure for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability in the active age group. However, in elderly patients, it is often questionable whether it is truly necessary to construct rigid fixation for a short period of time. In recent years, we have been occasionally performing posterior dynamic stabilization in elderly patients with such lumbar disorders. Posterior dynamic stabilization was performed in 12 patients (6 women, 70.9 ± 5.6 years old at the time of operation) with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis in whom % slip was less than 20% or instability associated with lumbar disc herniation between March 2011 and March 2013. Movement occurs through the connector linked to the pedicle screw. In practice, 9 pairs of D connector system where the rod moves in the perpendicular direction alone and 8 pairs of Dynamic connector system where the connector linked to the pedicle screw rotates in the sagittal direction were installed. The observation period was 77–479 days, and the mean recovery rate of lumbar Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 65.6 ± 20.8%. There was progression of slippage due to slight loosening in a case with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, but this did not lead to exacerbation of the symptoms. Although follow-up was short, there were no symptomatic adjacent vertebral and disc disorders during this period. Posterior dynamic stabilization may diminish the development of adjacent vertebral or disc disorders due to lumbar interbody fusion, especially in elderly patients, and it may be a useful procedure that facilitates decompression and ensures a certain degree of spinal stabilization. PMID:25169137

  3. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  4. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    Lumbar stenosis has been well discussed recently, especially at the 64th French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT: July 1989). The results of different surgical treatments were considered as good, but the indications for surgical treatment were not clear cut. Laminectomy is not the only treatment of spinal stenosis. Laminectomy is an approach with its own rate of complications (dural tear, fibrosis, instability... ).Eight years ago, J. Sénégas described what he called the "recalibrage" (enlargement). His feeling was that, in the spinal canal, we can find two different AP diameters. The first one is a fixed constitutional AP diameter (FCAPD) at the cephalic part of the lamina. The second one is a mobile constitutional AP diameter (MCAPD) marked by the disc and the ligamentum flavum. This diameter is maximal in flexion, minimal in extension. The nerve root proceeds through the lateral part of the canal: first above, between the disc and the superior articular process, then below, in the lateral recess bordered by the pedicle, the vertebral body and the posterior articulation. With the degenerative change the disc space becomes shorter, the superior articular process is worn out with osteophytes. These degenerative events are complicated by inter vertebral instability increasing the stenosis. The idea of the "recalibrage" is to remove only the upper part of the lamina with the ligamentum flavum and to cut the hypertrophied anterior part of the articular process from inside. If needed the disc and other osteophytes are removed. The surgery is finished with a ligamentoplasty reducing the flexion and preventing the extension by a posterior wedge.Our experience in spine surgery especially in scoliosis surgery, showed us that it was possible to cure a radicular compression without opening the canal. The compression is then lifted by the 3D reduction and restoration of an anatomy as normal as possible. Lumbar stenosis is the consequence of a degenerative process. Indeed, hip

  5. ASSOCIATION OF SPINOPELVIC PARAMETERS WITH THE LOCATION OF LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Léo, Jefferson Coelho de; Léo, Álvaro Coelho de; Cardoso, Igor Machado; Jacob Júnior, Charbel; Batista Júnior, José Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To associate spinopelvic parameters, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis with the axial location of lumbar disc herniation.Methods:Retrospective study, which evaluated imaging and medical records of 61 patients with lumbar disc herniation, who underwent surgery with decompression and instrumented lumbar fusion in only one level. Pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis with simple lumbopelvic lateral radiographs, which included the ...

  6. Pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis treated with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: safety and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Aiyer, Siddharth N; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Maheswaran, Anupama; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to study the safety and outcomes of posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for treating pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis. Retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected data of 27 consecutive cases of lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with posterior instrumentation and TLIF between January 2009 and December 2012. Cases were analysed for safety, radiological and clinical outcomes of transforaminal interbody fusion using bone graft ± titanium cages. Interbody metallic cages with bone graft were used in 17 cases and ten cases used only bone graft. Indications for surgical treatment were failed conservative management in 17, neurodeficit in six and significant bony destruction in four. There were no cases reporting cage migration, loosening, pseudoarthrosis or recurrence of infection at a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Kirkaldy-Willis criteria, which showed 14 excellent, nine good, three fair and one poor result. Mean focal deformity improved with the use of bone graft ± interbody cages, and the deformity correction was maintained at final follow-up. Mean pre-operative focal lordosis for the graft group was 8.5° (2-16.5°), which improved to 10.9 °(3.3-16°); mean pre-operative focal lordosis in the group treated with cages was 6.7 °(0-15°), which improved to 7°(0-15°) . TLIFs with cages in patients with pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis allows for acceptable clearance of infection, satisfactory deformity correction with low incidence of cage migration, loosening and infection recurrence.

  7. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  8. Regional lumbar motion and patient-rated outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune M; Bronfort, Gert; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    therapy or spinal manipulation using 6 different motion parameters. METHODS: Regional lumbar motions were sampled using a 6 degrees of freedom instrumented spatial linkage system in 199 participants at baseline and 12-week follow-up. The regional lumbar motion data were analyzed as a total cohort as well...... relevant improved vs no clinical relevant change were found in some motion parameters in the subgroup with back pain only and the treatment group receiving spinal manipulation. CONCLUSION: Overall, changes in regional lumbar motion were poorly associated with patient-rated outcomes measured by back...

  9. Cirugía de la columna lumbar degenerativa

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Menéndez Díaz, D.; Vaquero Morillo, F.

    1998-01-01

    En una realidad la gran demanda actual de fusiones de la columna lumbar. Los resultados clínicos obtenidos con la fusión posterolateral se ven claramente superados con las fusiones anteroposteriores. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de las diferentes formas de fusión de la columna lumbar y la reaparición del concepto de soporte de columna anterior. Se establecen las indicaciones y las ventajas de la fusión anteroposterior lumbar, describiéndose las posibles vías de abordaje posterior y a...

  10. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  11. Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Bilateral Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chunpeng; Li, Yin; Qin, Rujie; Sun, Penghao; Wang, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy (TELD), a minimally invasive spinal technique, has advantages over open discectomy. Unilateral TELD for disc herniation causing bilateral symptoms is challenging. In this study, we describe a percutaneous endoscopic herniotomy technique by using a unilateral approach for lumbar disc herniation with bilateral obvious symptoms. From June 2014 to October 2015, 26 patients who had back as well as bilateral leg pain and/or weakness due to lumbar disc herniation were treated by TELD with a unilateral approach. Clinical outcomes were evaluated via a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-10), and functional status was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (0-100%) postoperatively and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Surgical satisfaction rate was assessed during the final follow-up. The mean VAS for leg pain on the operative side improved from preoperative 8.39 ± 1.84 to 2.18 ± 1.26 postoperatively, 1.96 ± 0.83 at 3 months postoperatively, and 2.05 ± 1.42 at 1 year postoperatively (P disc herniation causing bilateral symptoms, through one working channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical outcomes of two minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonghao; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-10-01

    There are two modified TLIF, including MIS-TLIF and TLIF through Wiltse approach (W-TLIF). Although both of the two minimally invasive surgical procedures can be effective in the treatment for lumbar degenerative diseases, no comparative analysis has been made so far regarding their clinical outcomes. To compare the clinical outcomes of MIS-TLIF and W-TLIF for the treatment for single-segment degenerative lumbar diseases. Ninety-seven patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disorders were included in this study. Forty-seven underwent MIS-TLIF surgery (group A). For group B, fifty patients underwent W-TLIF. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, the visual analog scale (VAS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, MRI score and atrophy rate of CSA, interbody fusion rate were assessed during the postoperative follow-up. Incision length, blood loss, operative time, CPK, and postoperative incision pain VAS were better in group A (P degenerative disease. MIS-TLIF has less blood loss, shorter surgical incision, and less lower postoperative back pain, while W-TLIF is less expensive for hospital stay with lower exposure to X-rays.

  13. Manejo del síndrome doloroso lumbar Management of lumbar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rivas Hernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica del síndrome doloroso lumbar y se seleccionaron los artículos relacionados con este síndrome publicados desde 1991 hasta 2009. Se hizo hincapié en la búsqueda de guías para el manejo del dolor lumbar en la práctica clínica, y sus criterios fueron revisados por el equipo de especialistas en Ortopedia y Traumatología del Servicio de columna vertebral del Hospital Ortopédico Docente "Fructuoso Rodríguez" y adaptados a las condiciones del Sistema Nacional de Salud cubano.A bibliographic review on painful syndrome was made selecting the articles published from 1991 to 2009 related to this syndrome. Authors emphasize in the search of guides for management of lumbar pain in the clinical practice, whose criteria were analyzed by the team Orthopedics and Traumatology team of the spinal column service from the "Fructuoso Rodríguez" Hospital and adjusted to conditions of the Cuban Health System.

  14. Effect of Lumbar Disc Degeneration and Low-Back Pain on the Lumbar Lordosis in Supine and Standing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke B; Bendix, Tom; Grindsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of low-back pain (LBP) and lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) on the lumbar lordosis in weight-bearing positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The lumbar lordosis increases with a change of posi...... in the lordosis between the positions may be independent of pain. Decreasing lordosis change seems to be associated with age-related increasing disc degeneration in healthy individuals. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.......STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of low-back pain (LBP) and lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) on the lumbar lordosis in weight-bearing positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The lumbar lordosis increases with a change...... control group without LBP were scanned in the supine and standing position in a 0.25-T open MRI unit. LDD was graded using Pfirrmann's grading-scale. Subsequently, the L2-to-S1 lumbar lordosis angle (LA) was measured. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients with an average VAS of 58 (±13.8) mm during rest and 75...

  15. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  16. Lumbar Facet Tropism: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Kirkpatrick, Christina M; Jeong, William; Fisahn, Christian; Usman, Sameera; Rustagi, Tarush; Loukas, Marios; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-06-01

    Scattered reports exist in the medical literature regarding facet tropism. However, this finding has had mixed conclusions regarding its origin and impact on the normal spine. We performed a literature review of the anatomy, embryology, biomechanics, and pathology related to lumbar facet tropism. Facet tropism is most commonly found at L4-L5 vertebral segments and there is some evidence that this condition may lead to facet degenerative spondylolisthesis, intervertebral disc disease, and other degenerative conditions. Long-term analyses of patients are necessary to elucidate relationships between associated findings and facet tropism. In addition, a universally agreed definition that is more precise should be developed for future investigative studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  18. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  19. Total 3D Airo® Navigation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Lian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A new generation of iCT scanner, Airo®, has been introduced. The purpose of this study is to describe how Airo facilitates minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF. Method. We used the latest generation of portable iCT in all cases without the assistance of K-wires. We recorded the operation time, number of scans, and pedicle screw accuracy. Results. From January 2015 to December 2015, 33 consecutive patients consisting of 17 men and 16 women underwent single-level or two-level MIS-TLIF operations in our institution. The ages ranged from 23 years to 86 years (mean, 66.6 years. We treated all the cases in MIS fashion. In four cases, a tubular laminectomy at L1/2 was performed at the same time. The average operation time was 192.8 minutes and average time of placement per screw was 2.6 minutes. No additional fluoroscopy was used. Our screw accuracy rate was 98.6%. No complications were encountered. Conclusions. Airo iCT MIS-TLIF can be used for initial planning of the skin incision, precise screw, and cage placement, without the need for fluoroscopy. “Total navigation” (complete intraoperative 3D navigation without fluoroscopy can be achieved by combining Airo navigation with navigated guide tubes for screw placement.

  20. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Azimi

    Full Text Available Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3 years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001. Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117. The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy.

  1. Mini-open Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation Following Posterior Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Fan, Shunwu; Liu, Junhui; Shan, Zhi; Wang, Chongyan; Li, Shengyun; Zhao, Fengdong

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study is to evaluate, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of mini-open retroperitoneal anterior lumbar discectomy followed by anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for recurrent lumbar disc herniation following primary posterior instrumentation. Recurrent disc herniation following previous disc surgery occurs in 5 to 15% of cases. This is often treated by further surgical intervention where posterior approach is generally preferred. However, posterior surgery may be problematic if the initial surgery involved posterior instrumentation. An anterior approach may be indicated in these patients, and recent findings suggest that a "mini-open" procedure may have some benefits when compared with traditional open techniques and their associated morbidities. A total of 35 recurrent lumbar disc herniation patients (10 male, 25 female) following primary posterior instrumentation with an average age of 52.8 years (range: 34-70 yrs) who underwent the mini-open ALIF procedures between August 2001 and February 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. The ALIF was performed at the levels L4-L5 (n = 14), L5-S1 (n = 15), or both L4-L5 and L5-S1 (n = 6). Visual Analog pain Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) together with radiological results were assessed. The mean operating time, intraoperative estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were 115 minutes, 70 mL, and 6 days, respectively. No blood transfusion was needed. Transient complication was recorded in two patients. Postoperative follow-up was a minimum 24.3 months. VAS score and ODI percentage decreased significantly from 7.9 ± 0.8 and 78.8% ± 12.4% pre-operatively to 1.4 ± 0.6 and 21.7 ± 4.2% at final follow-up, respectively. There was no neurological worsening and radicular pain improved significantly compared with pre-operation in all the patients. Computed tomographic reconstruction 12 and 24 months after surgery showed bony fusion

  2. Usefulness of dynamic contrast enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging postoperative herniated lumbar disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Eun; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Yong Eun; Park, Mi Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To compare the usefulness of dynamic contrast enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging with that of conventional delayed contrast enhanced MR imaging in the assessment of postoperative herniated lumbar disc. Forty-one postoperative herniated lumbar disc (HLD) lesions of 32 patients with back pain were examined with MR imaging (1.5T, Vision, Siemens, Germany). Five-phase dynamic 2D FLASH sagittal images (TR/TE = 118.1msec/4.1msec) were obtained every 19 seconds with a 4 minutes delayed image after contrast injection. As seen on delayed images, the discs were assessed as recurred, fibrosis, or no change. On dynamic images, the pattern of enhancement was evaluated as follows : Type 1 (no change in peripheral disc enhancement between the early and late phases) ; or Type 2 (minimal internal extension of marginal smooth enhancement during the late phase) ; or Type 3 (marked internal extension of peripheral irregular enhancement). Dynamic and delayed imaging were compared, and early epidural space enhancement with rapid wash-out was also evaluated. Of 41 postoperative HLDs, 39 lesions showed peripheral contrast enhancement. Evaluation depended on delayed imaging, and was as follows : recurred HLD (n=27) ; fibrosis (n=5) ; no change in postoperative disc (n=7). On dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, enhancement patterns were Type 1 (n=29), Type 2 (n=7), and Type 3 (n=3). In 29 Type 1 lesions, there were no significant differences in image findings between dynamic and delayed images. However, in ten lesions (type 2 : n=7, type 3 : n=3), findings additional to those revealed by delayed images were demonstrated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Nine of the ten Type 2 and 3 lesions were diagnosed as recurred HLD. On dynamic images, five lesions showed early epidural space enhancement. Dynamic contrast-enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging provided additional findings such as increased peripheral disc enhancement, and epidural space enhancement, which cannot be detected on

  3. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  4. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery.In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared.The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively.PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period, and financial

  5. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery. In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared. The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively. PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period

  6. Lumbar vertebra chordoma | Erlank | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Spinal chordomas in the lumbar region are rare and can easily be overlooked in the differential diagnosis of vertebral column tumours. South African Journal of Radiology Vol. 10 (3) 2006: pp. 37-38 ...

  7. Radiographic comparison between male and female patients with lumbar spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Shoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Kondo, Tadashi; Ueno, Junji; Yasui, Natsuo; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2010-02-01

    We studied the lumbar spines of 117 adults (39 women and 78 men) with spondylolysis unrelated to low back pain using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Of the 117 subjects with spondylolysis, including five with multiple-level spondylolysis, there were 124 vertebrae with spondylolysis. In adult lumbar spines with unilateral spondylolysis, there was no significant difference between the incidence of spondylolisthesis in female and male subjects. However, in those with bilateral spondylolysis, there was a significantly higher incidence of spondylolisthesis in female subjects (90.9%) than in males (66.2%). Furthermore, females with bilateral spondylolysis had significant more slippage than males. Lumbar index and lumbar lordosis were not significantly different between male and female subjects, and did not significantly correlate with slippage. In conclusion, to treat acute spondylolysis in adolescents, it is important to obtain bony union at least unilaterally, especially in female subjects, to prevent further slippage.

  8. Endoscopic anatomy and features of lumbar discectomy by Destandau technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Mostofi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive spine surgery prevents alteration of paraspinal muscles and avoids traditional open surgery, so in the majority of cases, recovery is much quicker and patients have less back pain after surgery. The authors describe an endoscopic approach to lumbar disc herniation by the Destandau's method originated in Bordeaux. Destandau designed ENDOSPINE for discectomy will be inserted, and the procedure will continue using endoscopy. The Endoscopic approach to lumbar disc herniation by Destandau's method offers a convenient access to lumbar disc herniation with less complications and negligible morbidity. It gives maximum exposure to the disc space with maximal angles and minimal cutaneous incision. Contrary to other minimally invasive approaches, the visual field in discectomy by Destandau technique is broad and depending on the workability of ENDOSPINE an adequate access to lumbar disc herniation is possible.

  9. Iliac artery pseudoaneurysm after lumbar disc hernia operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Atay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc herniation surgery is usually performed through a posterior approach. Vascular injuries can be counted among the complications. 39 years old male patient had lower extremity pain which has started after lumbar disc herniation surgery and continued for a month. Iliac arterial pseudoaneurysm has been detected in computerized tomography. It was successfully treated with vascular surgery [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 5-7

  10. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  11. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemys?aw; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was...

  12. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  13. Deformation Measurement Of Lumbar Vertebra By Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryoukei; Iwata, Koichi; Nagata, Ryo

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of normal lumbar vertebra and one with the interarticular part cut off to simulate hemi-spondylolysis were measured by the double exposure holographic interferometry. In the normal lumbar vertebra, displacement due to the load applied to the inferior articular process was greater than that of superior articular process under the same load. The interarticular part was subjected to the high stress. From these points, one of the valuable data to consider the cause of spondylolysis was obtained.

  14. Radiographic comparison between male and female patients with lumbar spondylolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Shoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Kondo, Tadashi; Ueno, Junji; Yasui, Natsuo; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2010-01-01

    We studied the lumbar spines of 117 adults (39 women and 78 men) with spondylolysis unrelated to low back pain using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Of the 117 subjects with spondylolysis, including five with multiple-level spondylolysis, there were 124 vertebrae with spondylolysis. In adult lumbar spines with unilateral spondylolysis, there was no significant difference between the incidence of spondylolisthesis in female and male subjects. However, in those with bilateral spondyloly...

  15. Posterior Cervical Transfacet Fusion with Facetal Spacer for the Treatment of Single-Level Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized, Controlled Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Jacopo; Nardone, Antonio; Passacantilli, Emiliano; Caporlingua, Alessandro; Lapadula, Gennaro; Caporlingua, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Single-level cervical radiculopathy may be treated conservatively with cervical tractions. Posterior cervical transfacet fusion with a facetal spacer is a viable option. The aim of the present study is to compare posterior cervical transfacet fusion with conservative physical treatment in single-level cervical radiculopathy. A total of 80 patients were randomized in 2 groups, a surgical group in which patients were given posterior cervical transfacet fusion and a traction group in which patients were treated conservatively with mechanical cervical tractions. Visual analog scale for arm and neck, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires were administered preoperatively and after treatment up to 12 months. After treatment, visual analog scale arm scores were greater in traction group (4.7 vs. 1.5 the day after treatment) and at follow-up controls (traction group vs. surgical group: 5.3 vs. 0.6 at 1 month, 3.6 vs. 0.3 at 6 months, 1.8 vs. 0.2 at 12 months). Neck Disability Index scores were lower in the surgical group (surgical group vs. traction group: 4.4 vs. 20.3 at 1 month, 1.3 vs. 10.5 at 6 months). SF-36 scores were greater in the surgical group (surgical group vs. traction group: 96 vs. 70 at 1 month, 96.5 vs. 82.6 at 6 months). Neck disability index and SF-36 scores were superimposable between the groups at 12-month follow-up. No adjacent-segment arthrosis or late complications were reported at 1-year follow-up in the surgical group. posterior cervical transfacet fusion is a safe and effective procedure to treat single-level cervical radiculopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus minimally invasive posterior cervical foraminotomy for patients with cervical radiculopathy: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Haley E; Canar, W Jeffrey; Gerard, Carter S; O'Toole, John E

    2014-11-01

    Patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy in whom a course of nonoperative treatment has failed are often candidates for a single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF). The objective of this analysis was to identify any significant cost differences between these surgical methods by comparing direct costs to the hospital. Furthermore, patient-specific characteristics were also considered for their effect on component costs. After obtaining approval from the medical center institutional review board, the authors conducted a retrospective cross-sectional comparative cohort study, with a sample of 101 patients diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy and who underwent an initial single-level ACDF or minimally invasive PCF during a 3-year period. Using these data, bivariate analyses were conducted to determine significant differences in direct total procedure and component costs between surgical techniques. Factorial ANOVAs were also conducted to determine any relationship between patient sex and smoking status to the component costs per surgery. The mean total direct cost for an ACDF was $8192, and the mean total direct cost for a PCF was $4320. There were significant differences in the cost components for direct costs and operating room supply costs. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in component costs with regard to patient sex or smoking status. In the management of single-level cervical radiculopathy, the present analysis has revealed that the average cost of an ACDF is 89% more than a PCF. This increased cost is largely due to the cost of surgical implants. These results do not appear to be dependent on patient sex or smoking status. When combined with results from previous studies highlighting the comparable patient outcomes for either procedure, the authors' findings suggest that from a health care economics standpoint, physicians should consider a minimally invasive PCF

  17. [Comparison of early clinical effects between Activ C cervical disc replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for single-level cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-ke; Zhang, Chang-jiang; Wang, Ming-jun; Yang, Xian-yu; Li, Lai-hao

    2015-11-01

    To compare the early clinical effects of Activ C cervical disc replacement (ACDR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in treating single-level cervical spondylosis. The clinical data of 76 patients with single-level cervical spondylosis underwent surgery from July 2009 to September 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 28 patients were treated with ACDR (ACDR group), including 18 males and 10 females, aged from 32 to 62 years old with an average of (45.2±6.2) years; and 48 patients were treated with ACDF (ACDF group), including 28 males and 20 females, aged from 33 to 60 years old with an average of (45.8±6.4) years. Visual analogue scale (VAS), Japanese Orthopedics Association (JOA) score, Short Form-36 (SF-36), imaging data were used to assess the clinical effects after operation. A total of 76 patients were followed up from 6 to 24 months with an average of 13.2 months. VAS of neck pain and brachialgia were improved in all patients after operation (P0.05). Somato-score and psycho-score of SF-36 of two groups were obviously increased (P0.05); heterotopic ossification around the edge of vertebral body occurred in 1 case on the 6th month after operation, no fusion was found on the 1st year after operation. In ACDF group, the adjacent vertebral disease occurred in 1 case and the patient underwent the reoperation. Activ C cervical disc replacement can reduce the degeneration of adjacent segments and its early outcomes for the treatment of single-level cervical spondylosis are satisfactory, but the long-term effects still need study.

  18. A radiological study on the degenerative joint disease of the lumbar spine in Korean adult men below the age of forty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sook Hi; Lee, Sang Seun

    1979-01-01

    It is generally believed that this disease is a degenerative process, a part of the general phenomena, hastened by excessive functional demand and a decreasing efficiency of blood supply. Though degenerative joint disease is the commonest of all ailments, its manifestations do not appear as a rule until the fourth or fifth decade, and it is not always easy to diagnose because we know less about it than about many less common types. Little information is available on its frequency in person below the age of forty. The present study was designed to obtain more precise information about development of this disease in person below the age of forty. After a detailed clinical examination, x-ray findings of a total of 566 men with low back pain checked at the Department of Radiology, National Public Hospital from Jan. 1976 to Dec. 1978 were received. The following result were obtained: 1. 111 (19.6%) of the 566 men had radiologic evidence of degenerative disease in lumbar spine. The degenerative joint disease first appeared on the age of 26. The degenerative joint disease was found in 16 (14.9%) of the 107 men between 25 and 29 years old, 14 (16.3%) of the 86 men between 35 and 39 years old, 31 (27.4%) of the 113 men between 35 and 39 years old, and 50 (50%) of the 100 between 40 and 44 years old. 2.The 4th lumbar spine was most commonly involved, being in 82.0% of the cases, and less frequent sites were the 5th lumbar spine (67.6%), the 3rd lumbar spine (51.3%), the 2nd lumbar spine (18.9%) and the 1st lumbar spine (3.6%). 38 (28.8%) of the 111 cases revealed single level involvement, but 79 (71.2%) cases showed multiple level involvement with the highest incidence at 14 and 15. 3. 111 cases of the 566 revealed marginal spurring. Bridging was noted in 8 cases, space narrowing 8 cases, and eburnation 7 caes.

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, S.; Muro, T.; Eisenstein, S.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of single photon emission computed tomographic images and plain X-ray films of the lumbar vertebrae was performed in 15 patients with lumbar spondylosis and 15 patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. The facet joint and osteophyte images were observed in particular, and the slipping ratio of spondylolisthetic vertebrae was determined. The slipping ratio of degenerative spondylolisthesis ranged from 11.8 % to 22.3 %. Hot uptake of 99mTc-HMDP by both L4-5 facet joints was significantly greater in the patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis than in those with lumbar spondylosis. The hot uptake by the osteophytes in lumbar spondylosis was nearly uniform among the three inferior segments, L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S, but was localized to the spondylolisthetic vertebrae, L4-5, or L5-S, in the patients with spondylolisthesis. Half of the osteophytes with hot uptake were assigned to the 3rd degree of Nathan's grading. It was suggested that stress was localized to the slipping vertebrae and their facet joints in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. (author)

  20. Medical optimization of lumbar fusion in the osteoporotic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew T; Tarpada, Sandip P; Tabatabaie, Vafa; Cho, Woojin

    2018-03-14

    In patients undergoing lumbar fusion, osteoporosis has been shown to lead to poorer outcomes and greater incidence of fusion-related complications. Given the undesirable effect of osteoporosis on lumbar fusion surgery, a number of medications have been proposed for use in the peri- and postoperative period to mitigate risks and enhance outcomes. The purpose of this review was to summarize and synthesize the current literature regarding medical management of osteoporosis in the context of lumbar fusion surgery. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science was conducted in October 2016, using permutations of various search terms related to osteoporosis, medications, and lumbar fusion. Teriparatide injections may lead to faster, more successful fusion, and may reduce fusion-related complications. Bisphosphonate therapy likely does not hinder fusion outcomes and may be useful in reducing certain complications of fusion in osteoporotic patients. Calcitonin and selective estrogen receptor modulator therapy show mixed results, but more research is necessary to make a recommendation. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with poor fusion outcomes, but evidence for supplementation in patients with normal serum levels is weak. Overall, the current body of research appears to support the use of teriparatide therapy to enhance lumbar fusion outcomes in the osteoporotic patient, although the extent of research on this topic is limited. Additionally, very little evidence exists to cease any of the mentioned osteoporosis treatments prior to lumbar fusion.

  1. Radiographic Morphometry of the Lumbar Spine in Munich Miniature Pigs†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Elisabeth C; Post, Christina; Pfarrer, Christiane D; Sager, Martin; Waibl, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human spinal column disease remains high, and animal models still play important roles in prophylactic, diagnostic, and therapeutic research. Because of their similar size to humans, pigs remain an important spine model. For pigs to serve as a model for the human spine, basic similarities and differences must be understood. In this study, morphometric data of the lumbar spine of Munich miniature pigs (Troll) were recorded radiologically, evaluated, and compared with recorded human data. Whereas humans have a constant number of 5 lumbar vertebrae, Munich minipigs had 5 or 6 lumbar vertebrae. Compared with their human counterparts, the lumbar vertebral bodies of the minipigs were remarkably larger in the craniocaudal (superior–inferior) direction and considerably smaller in the dorsoventral and laterolateral directions. The porcine vertebral canal was smaller than the human vertebral canal. The spinal cord extended into the caudal part of the porcine lumbar vertebral canal and thus did not terminate as cranial, as seen in humans. The lumbar intervertebral spaces of the pig were narrower in craniocaudal direction than human intervertebral spaces. These differences need to be considered when planning surgical actions, not only to avoid pain and irreversible damage to the minipigs but also to achieve accurate scientific results. PMID:27177570

  2. Lumbar spine fusion surgery and stroke: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Thien, Peck-Foong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the incidence and risk of stroke after lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Study subjects were identified from a nationwide cohort of 1 million people from 2000 to 2005 and were divided into the lumbar spinal fusion group (n = 2,015), who received posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery, and the comparison group (n = 16,120) composed of age-, sex-, and propensity score-matched control subjects. The matching process was intended to adjust for demographics, comorbidities, and other immeasurable covariates to minimize selection bias. All subjects were followed up for 3 years for stroke, including hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed. The overall incidence rate of stroke in the cohort was 9.99 per 1,000 person-year. The lumbar spinal fusion group was less likely to have any stroke (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, p = 0.293), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.74, p = 0.739) and ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.81, p = 0.250) than the comparison group, but without significance. Three years post-operatively, patients who received lumbar spinal fusion had stroke incidence rates similar to those without surgery. Posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery is not associated with increased risks for any kind of stroke.

  3. [Lumbar herniated disks treated with a dynamic interspacer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva-del Castillo Mendoza, J F; Franco-López, E A; Hinojosa-Sandoval, F; de León-Martínez, U A; Cueva-del Castillo Mendoza, F J

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar herniated disks result in lumbar pain with neurologic involvement. Medical treatment and rehabilitation provide improvement for this type of lumbar pain at the early stages. When conservative treatment fails, the surgical option offers the possibility of improving patients' health status. Moojen considers that the application of interspinous spacers provides good results. The purpose of this research is to assess the clinical and imaging results in patients with contained lumbar herniated disk treated with the DYNAMIC INTERSPACER interspinous spacer, a Mexican product. The efficacy of the interspinous device was assessed by means of a near-investigational and longitudinal study conducted at "General Ignacio Zaragoza" ISSSTE Regional Hospital in patients with a diagnosis of lumbar pain. The mean age of the sample is 46.1 years, with an age range of 26-55 years. The treated levels were 6 L5-S1 and 5 L4-L5; two levels were treated in two patients. The mean preoperative VAS score was 8.1. The mean VAS score at postoperative year three was 1.6. Multiple types and brands of foreign interspinous devices are applied in Mexico which results in patients' clinical improvement. We proved that the use of the Mexican interspinous device can clinically improve patients with lumbar pain due to herniated disk. A decrease in the compression of the sac or the nerve roots by the hernia was observed in the comparative preoperative and postoperative MRI images.

  4. Circumferential Decompression via a ModifiedCostotransversectomy Approach for the Treatment of Single Level Hard Herniated Disc between T10 -L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Sun, Chao; Xue, Ruoyan; Xue, Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Zong, Ya-qi; Lin, Wei; Wang, Pei

    2016-02-01

    To describe a novel surgical strategy for circumferentially decompressing the T10 -L1 spinal canal when impinged upon by single level hard thoracic herniated disc (HTHD) via a modified costotransversectomy approach. This is a retrospective review of 26 patients (17 men, 9 women; mean age at surgery 48.5 years, range 20-77 years) who had undergone single level HTHD between T10 -L1 by circumferential decompression via a modified costotransversectomy approach. The characteristics of the approach are using a posterior midline covered incision, which keeps the paraspinal muscle intact and ensures direct visualization of circumferential spinal cord decompression of single level HTHD between T10 -L1 . The average operative time was 208 ± 36 min (range, 154-300 min), mean blood loss 789 ± 361 mL (range, 300-2000 mL), mean preoperative and postoperative mJOA scores 5.2 ± 1.5 and 9.0 ± 1.3, respectively (t = 19.7, P < 0.05). The rate of recovery of neurological function ranged from 33.3% to 100%. The ASIA grade improved in 24 patients (92.3%) and stabilized (no grade change) in two (7.7%). MRI indicated that the cross-sectional area of the dural sac at the level of maximum compression increased from 45.0 ± 5.8 mm(2) preoperatively to 113.5 ± 6.1 mm(2) postoperatively (t = 68.2, P < 0.05). Anterior tibialis muscle strength of the 15 patients with foot drop had a mean recovery rate of 95% at final follow-up. One patient who resumed work early after the surgery showed a significantly augmented Cobb angle. One patient had transient postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage. No patients showed neurological deterioration. This procedure achieves sufficient direct visualization for circumferential decompression of the spinal cord via a posterior midline covered costotransversectomy approach with friendly bleeding control and without muscle sacrifice. It is a reasonable alternative treatment option for thoracic myelopathy caused by single level HTHD between T10 -L1 . © 2016

  5. Angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation of single-level dynamic spiral CT scans in arterial phase and expression of α-smooth muscle actin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Min Pengqiu; Chen Weixia; Zhang Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the single-level dynamic spiral CT scans (SDCT) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in arterial phase (AP) and the immunohistochemistry expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Methods: 33 cases of suspected HCC undergoing spiral CT plain scan of the whole liver, the single-level dynamic scan of the target level of lesion in AP and finally the whole liver scan in portal-venous phase before operations and proved after were included into the study. After the SDCT, a time-density curve (T-DC) was drawn according to the density change of the region of interest (ROI) of the tumor parenchyma with some parameters calculated, and signs of enhancement evaluated. Slices of post-operation specimen underwent hemotoxylin-eosin (HE) and ASMA immunohistochemistry staining. Then the slices were evaluated with emphases on the ASMA-positive neovasculatures in the parenchyma and mesenchyma of carcinomas, and the average count in a low microscopic field (x 100) was recorded (5 low microscopic field were observed and then an average was calculated.). Finally the immunohistochemistry and histologic results were correlated with image findings. Results: According to the PV of the tumor parenchyma, T-DC was divided into type I, II and III in which the criteria were PV>80, 40 HU< PV< 80 HU and PV<40 HU respectively. In the 33 cases, type I, II and III of T-DC were 3, 17 and 13 cases with PV of 103.30, 57.65 and 33.55 HU respectively. In ASMA immunohistochemistry study, ASMA-positive neovasculatures were devided into type A with a thick wall and B with a thin wall. The mean count of neovasculatures of tumor parenchyma in type I, II and III of T-DC were 10, 4.59 and 1 respectively. Statistically, different types of T-DC were significantly correlated with the count of neovasculatures in the parenchyma of carcinomas (r=-0.567, P<0.01). Homogeneous and inhomogeneous enhancement of carcinomas during SDCT in AP were correlated with the

  6. Comparison of open surgical discectomy versus plasma-laser nucleoplasty in patients with single lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Kouchakzadeh, Masih; Mirhosseini, Ahmad; Tabesh, Homayoun; Rezvani, Majid; Moayednia, Amir; Ganjeifar, Babak; Mahabadi, Amir; Yousefi, Elham; Kooshki, Ali Mehrabi

    2015-12-01

    account; we suggest considering nucleoplasty as an effective method of treatment in patients with single-level disc herniation.

  7. Results of lumbar spondylodeses using different bone grafting materials after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonderHoeh, Nicolas Heinz; Voelker, Anna; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2017-11-01

    Can a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and autologous bone from decompression sites produce similar results when used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)? In the current literature, autologous iliac crest bone grafts (ICBGs) have been reported the gold standard for this procedure. Indeed, to date, no clinical data have confirmed that a mixture of equal volumes of HA and local autologous bone produce similar results in term of fusion as the same volume of autologous ICBG alone. Study design/setting This study was approved by the local ethics committee and completed in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded manner. The results of lumbar fusion using TLIF and different bone grafting materials were compared. Patient sample The patient sample included patients with spinal lumbar degenerative disease. Outcome measures The clinical outcome was determined using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The radiological outcomes and fusion rates were determined with radiographs evaluated using the McAfee criteria and computed tomography (CT) data evaluated by the Williams criteria. Three blinded investigators (one radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons) assessed the data. The secondary variables included donor site morbidity. Methods The patients were admitted to our department for orthopedic surgery with degenerative lumbar pathologies (L2-S1) that required stabilization in one or two segments using a TLIF procedure. The patients were 18-80 years old. Only those patients who had degenerative lumbar pathologies and agreed to be educated about the study were included. The patients were divided into the following two randomized groups: group A: TLIF procedure using autologous ICBGs alone; and group B: TLIF procedure using local bone from decompression site mixed with hydroxyapatite. Each group received equal graft volumes. The mixture in group B consisted of equal volumes of local autograft (5 cc) and synthetic

  8. Lumbar Posterior Apophyseal Ring Fracture Combined with Spondylolysis in Pediatric Athletes: A Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Kazuta; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar posterior apophyseal ring fracture is an uncommon finding in children, but lumbar spondylolysis is a common disorder. Both disorders are prevalent in young athletes. We describe 3 adolescent athletes who showed both lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar posterior apophyseal ring fracture. Because lumbar spondylolysis is comparatively easy to diagnose, a concurrent posterior lumbar apophyseal ring fracture is likely to be overlooked. In patients with severe low back and radicular pain in whom spondylolysis is suspected, it is important to perform not only magnetic resonance imaging and radiography but also computed tomography for identifying posterior apophyseal ring fractures.

  9. Seven years follow-up for total lumbar facet joint replacement (TOPS) in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekstein, Yoram; Floman, Yizhar; Smorgick, Yossi; Rand, Nahshon; Millgram, Michael; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical improvement of a total posterior arthroplasty system in the surgical management of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and or spinal stenosis. During a 1-year period (June 2006 to July 2007), ten patients were enrolled in a non-randomized prospective clinical study. The primary indication was neurogenic claudication due to spinal stenosis with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were evaluated with X-rays and MRI scans, visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability questionnaire, and the SF-36 health survey preoperatively, at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and at 1, 2, 3 and 7 years postoperatively. The VAS score for back pain dropped from 56.2 preoperatively to 12.5 at 6 weeks and 19 at 7 years follow-up. The VAS score for worse leg pain dropped from 83.5 before surgery to 13 at 6 weeks and 8.8 at 7 years follow-up. The ODI dropped from 49.1 preoperatively to 13.5 at 6 weeks and 7.8 at 7 years follow-up. MRI examination at 7 years after surgery did not demonstrate stenosis adjacent to the stabilized segment. Spondylolisthesis did not progress in any of the cases. One patient had a symptomatic L3-L4 far lateral disc herniation 5 years after surgery whose symptoms resolved with non-operative treatment. In one patient, conversion to posterolateral fusion was performed due to an early device malfunction. In patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, decompression and posterior arthroplasty with the TOPS System can maintain clinical improvement and radiologic stability over time.

  10. A randomized clinical trial of treatment for lumbar segmental rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J; Keeley, Janice; McGeary, Don; Dersh, Jeffrey; Anagnostis, Christopher

    2004-10-15

    A randomized single-blind clinical trial of facet injections plus exercise, versus exercise alone, in chronic disabling work-related lumbar spinal disorders (CDWRLSD), accompanied by pilot interrater reliability and facet syndrome prevalence studies. To systematically investigate the use of facet injections as an adjunct to supervised lumbar stretching exercises in regaining lumbar range of motion (ROM) following prolonged deconditioning after work-related lumbar injuries. To assess interrater reliability of visual assessment of segmental rigidity (SR), and to evaluate the prevalence of facet syndrome in cases of lumbar SR. Corticosteroid joint injections have often been used to reduce musculoskeletal inflammation to facilitate joint mobilization in the presence of degenerative arthritis. Lumbar segmental rigidity is a recently described entity usually associated with painful chronic spinal disorders and postoperative spine surgery. Previous work has shown that SR and lumbar ROM improves with a brief intervention consisting of facet injections followed by specific stretching exercises. No systematic study has investigated the potential benefits of a combination of facet injections and exercise over supervised exercises alone to treat lumbar SR. Similarly, no study has assessed the association between SR and the facet syndrome. From a group of consecutive patients (n = 421) with CDWRLSD referred for tertiary rehabilitation between November 1999 and January 2001, 70 were noted to have SR on intake physical examination. The first part of this study assessed interrater reliability for detecting SR, and intrarater reliability for 3-segment true lumbar ROM measurements. Patients randomly assigned to participate in supervised stretching exercises with the addition of fluoroscopically guided bilateral facet injections at the involved levels (Group A, n = 36) also underwent facet syndrome prevalence assessment at the time of injection. They were compared to a randomly

  11. Retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sonia O; de Santana, Vanessa R; Valido, Daisy P; de Andrade, Renata L B; Fontes, Leticia M; Leite, Victor Hugo O; Neto, José M; Santos, Jéssica M; Varjão, Lucas L; Reis, Francisco P

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the reduction in quality of life (QoL) caused by the persistence of primary plantar hyperhidrosis (PPH) symptoms and the level of satisfaction in PPH patients after retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy (RLS). The efficacy, safety, and procedure of bilateral RLS in both sexes are also described in this study. This is a longitudinal study of consecutive patients who sought specific treatment from a private practitioner for severe PPH as classified on the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) from October 2005 to October 2014. The patients were asked to report the symptoms of PPH experienced in the immediate preoperative period and to complete a standardized QoL questionnaire developed by de Campos at least 12 months after RLS. Disease outcomes, recurrence of symptoms, and any adverse effects of surgery were evaluated after 30 days and at least 12 months after RLS. Lumbar sympathectomy was performed 116 times in 58 patients; 30 days after surgery, PPH was resolved in all patients. Three patients (5.2%) reported transient thigh neuralgia, and 19 (32.7%) reported transient paresthesia in the lower limbs. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation. At a minimum of 12 months after RLS, 49 of the 58 patients had fully and correctly answered the follow-up questionnaire and noted a mild (HDSS 2) to moderate (HDSS 3) increase in pre-existing compensatory sweating. One patient had a PPH relapse within 6 months. Improvement in QoL due to the resolution of PPH was reported in 98% of the 49 patients. None of the operations necessitated a change in the laparotomy approach, and none of the patients died. RLS is safe and effective for the treatment of severe PPH in both sexes. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation after resection of L3 and L4 ganglia. There was a mild to moderate increase in compensatory sweating in about half of the patients, but without any regret or dissatisfaction for having undergone the

  12. Sex differences in lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Smoll, Nicolas R; Corniola, Marco V; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of studies focus on sex differences in the pre- and postoperative setting in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). The exact pathomechanism behind this phenomenon, however, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate pre- and postoperative sex differences in patients with lumbar DDD. In a prospective two-center study, back and leg pain (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Roland-Morris Disability Index) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (EuroQol 5D and Short-Form (SF12)) were collected for patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery. In addition to the subjective functional impairment (SFI), objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age- and sex-adjusted cut-off values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. The 6-week responder status was defined using minimally clinically important differences of the ODI, SF12 PCS, VAS back and leg pain in all patients. Six months and one year follow-up (FU) was available in n=127 and n=87 patients, respectively. The patient cohort comprised of n=214 patients (41.6% females). Preoperatively, female patients scored significantly worse on VAS back and leg pain, ODI and SF12 PCS (psex-related differences had resolved for SFI and OFI was similar as well (p=0.333). There were no sex differences in the mean improvement after 6 weeks for all measures of pain intensity, functional impairment and HRQoL (p>0.182). Male and female patients profited equally on measures of SFI and HRQoL up to six months and one year after surgery (p>0.091). Preoperatively, female patients scored worse in terms of SFI, while OFI was similar. Consecutively, OFI appears to be less prone to sex bias and may thus serve as a valuable surrogate-marker of disability. The disadvantageous preoperative SFI-status did not translate into worse postoperative results, as no sex differences were present at the 6-week, 6-months and 1-year follow

  13. Lumbar disc herniation treated with post lateral lumbar endoscopy by YESS system: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carlos Montes

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: en los pacientes con diagnóstico de hernia de disco lumbar, los cuales son candidatos a tratamiento quirúrgico, la disectomía posterior abierta ha sido por muchos anos el estándar de oro. Sin embargo, las complicaciones de este procedimiento, en el que se invade el canal medular, han hecho que se busquen otros métodos menos invasivos. Uno de estos procedimientos es la disectomía endoscópica lateral con el método YESS (Young Endoscopic Spine System). OBJETIVO: revisar los resulta...

  14. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures, the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management

  15. Effects of acceleration level on lumbar spine injuries in military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Baisden, Jamie L; Pintar, Frank A; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2015-06-01

    belonging to helicopter crash-type loadings. Peak axial forces for all specimens ranged from 4.8 to 7.2 kN. Ejection-type loaded specimens sustained single-level injuries to the L1 vertebra; one injury was stable and the other was unstable. Helicopter crash-type loaded specimens sustained injuries at inferior levels, including bilateral facet dislocation at L4-L5 and L2-L4 compression fractures, and all specimens were considered unstable at least at one spinal level. These findings suggest that the severity of spinal injuries increase with increasing acceleration levels and, more importantly, injuries shift inferiorly from the thoracolumbar junction to lower lumbar levels. Acknowledging that the geometry and load carrying capacity of vertebral bodies increase in the lower lumbar spine, involvement of inferior levels in trauma sparing the superior segments at greater acceleration inputs agree with military literature of caudal shift in injured levels. The present study offers an experimental explanation for the clinically observed caudal migration of spinal trauma in military populations as applied to high-speed aircraft ejection catapult and helicopter crashes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis.

  17. Risk factors for adjacent segment pathology requiring additional surgery after single-level spinal fusion: impact of pre-existing spinal stenosis demonstrated by preoperative myelography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugué, Itaru; Okada, Seiji; Masuda, Muneaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Maeda, Takeshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-05-01

    We determined the incidence of and risk factors for clinical adjacent segment pathology (C-ASP) requiring additional surgeries among patients previously treated with one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. We retrospectively analysed 161 consecutive patients who underwent one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), facet orientation and tropism, laminar inclination angle, spinal canal stenosis ratio [on myelography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)], preoperative adjacent segment instability, arthrodesis type, pseudarthrosis, segmental lordosis at L4-5, and the present L4 slip were evaluated by a log-rank test using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model was used to analyse all factors found significant by the log-rank test. Of 161 patients, 22 patients (13.7 %) had additional surgeries at cranial segments located adjacent to the index surgery's location. Pre-existing canal stenosis ≥47 % at the adjacent segment on myelography, greater facet tropism, and high BMI were significant risk factors for C-ASP. The estimated incidences at 10 years postoperatively for each of these factors were 51.3, 39.6, and 32.5 %, and the risks for C-ASP were 4.9, 3.7, and, 3.1 times higher than their counterparts, respectively. Notably, spinal canal stenosis on myelography, but not on MRI, was found to be a significant risk factor for C-ASP (log-rank test P < 0.0001 and 0.299, respectively). Pre-existing spinal stenosis, greater facet tropism, and higher BMI significantly increased C-ASP risk. Myelography is a more accurate method for detecting latent spinal canal stenosis as a risk factor for C-ASP.

  18. CSF RBC count in successful first-attempt lumbar puncture: the interest of atraumatic needle use.

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    Renard, Dimitri; Thouvenot, Eric

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze CSF red blood cell (RBC) count from first-attempt lumbar punctures and to analyze parameters associated with first-attempt lumbar punctures and hemorrhagic lumbar puncture. This is a prospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent lumbar puncture for any reason other than suspected acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Analyzed parameters were the following: age, indication for lumbar puncture, aPTT ratio, PTT, platelet count, patient's position, needle type (atraumatic/standard), needle diameter, person performing lumbar puncture (medical student/resident/attending physician), number of lumbar levels punctured, necessity of needle repositioning, CSF RBC and white blood cell count, and protein level. Lumbar puncture resulting in RBC count > 5 RBC/mm 2 was classified as hemorrhagic lumbar puncture (different cut-offs were studied: > 5/> 10/> 100/> 500/> 1000 RBC). In total, 169 elective lumbar punctures in 165 different patients were included. First-attempt lumbar puncture occurred in 22% > 5 RBC, in 19.5% > 10 RBC, in 4.5% > 100 RBC, in 3% > 500 RBC, and 1.5% > 1000 RBC count. First-attempt lumbar puncture was associated with non-hemorrhagic lumbar puncture for each of the RBC count cut-offs (OR for non-hemorrhagic lumbar puncture in first-attempt lumbar puncture 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.7). The presence of a hemorrhagic disorder (concerning cerebral amyloid angiopathy in all patients) and higher aPTT ratio were associated with hemorrhagic lumbar puncture. Atraumatic needle use was associated with non-hemorrhagic lumbar puncture for RBC count cut-offs ≤ 5 and ≤ 10 RBC (OR for non-hemorrhagic lumbar puncture in atraumatic needle use 2.5 [95% CI 1.3-4.8] and 2.2 [95% CI 1.1-4.4], respectively). First-attempt lumbar puncture and hemorrhagic lumbar puncture were not associated with other parameters. Slightly elevated CSF RBC count after first-attempt lumbar puncture occurs relatively frequently, but is even more

  19. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

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    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  20. Operative treatment of degenerative lumbar spine spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftandziev, I; Trpeski, S; Filipce, V; Arsovski, O; Hasani, I; Nikolov, L; Kaev, A

    2015-01-01

    Management of degenerative lumbosacral spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis is still controversial. Surgery is widely used, as well as non-surgical treatment. To evaluate the clinical results and functional outcome after operative treatment in Grade II and III lumbar spine spondylolisthesis. Twelve patients with symptoms and image-confirmed degenerative spondylolisthesis entered the study. Mean patient age was 57 years. Spondylolisthesis Grade II or III, segment L4-L5 or L5-S1 were evaluated. All patients underwent similar protocols. Operative treatment was decompressive laminectomy, posterior one segment fixation, and fusion with autologous bone grafting. Functional outcome measures were Visual Analog Scale (VAS, 10-point scale) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, 100-percent scale) after 6 and 12 months. Patient follow-up was 12 months. Preoperatively, 7 patients had severe disability according to ODI, 4 had moderate disability. VAS measured 6 and 7 points in 6 patients, lowest score of 4 points and the highest score of 9. After 6 months, ODI showed 5 patients had minimal and 7 had moderate disability; 2 patients had 0 points on the VAS, 2 had a score of 1, 4 had a score of 2, highest score of 4 points. Treatment outcome effects after 1 year were 9 patients with minimal disability, 3 with moderate; VAS - 2 patients with O points, 3 with 1 point, 4 with 2 points. Patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis treated surgically showed substantially greater improvement in pain and functional outcome during a period of 1 year.

  1. [Therapeutic progress in lumbar spinal stenosis].

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    Shi, Shao-Yan; Huang, Yan-Sheng; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-05-25

    Along with the population aging in China, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis(LSS) caused by recessive change incessantly increase. At present, there is no adequate evidence to recommend any specific nonoperative treatment for LSS, and surgery is still an effective method. The cilincal symptoms of the patients without conservative treatment got improvement after surgery, which is the strongest evidence base. Spinal instability after simple decompression promotes the development of fusion technique, and the accelerated adjacent segment degeneration and no relief in symptoms after fusion lead to dynamic fixation technology emerge as the times require. Patients with spinal canal decompression whether need bone fusion or not is still controversial. For the past few years, the operation of simple decompression for LSS obviously decreased, whereas the decompression plus fusion surgery showed sustainable growth. Decompression complicated with fusion was more and more adopted in LSS, in order to reduce the hidden risk of spinal instability and deformity. Although decompressive operation has determinate effect, now it is still unclear if the therapeutic effect of decompression complicated with fusion is better than simple decompression. This article reviews the current studies to explore whether decompression plus bone fusion is applicable for LSS. To further explore the best choice of surgical treatment for LSS, we focused on evidence-based therapeutic options. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  2. Computed tomography in lumbar degenerative disease

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    Isu, Toyohiko; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Takei, Hidetoshi; Kaneda, Kiyoshi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    We reported the 18 patients which underwent surgical exploration and reviewed these CT findings. Method All CT scans were obtained on Somatom II, high resolution CT scanner, with the patient in the supine position. A lateral localizer image (Topogram) was used to select the appropriate intervertebral disk space. The slice thickness was 4 mm. Results 1) CT findings in lumbar degenerative diseases include bony canal stenosis (central canal stenosis, narrowed lateral recess), soft tissue abnormalities (herniated nucleus pulposus, bulging annulus, hypertrophy and/or ossification of ligamentum flavum, no delineation of nerve root in lateral recess), and spinal instability (spondylolisthesis, vacuum phenomenon). 2) The above three factors contribute to narrowing of spinal canal. 3) No delineation of nerve root or soft tissue replacement of epidural fat in lateral recess suggests that the nerve root may be compressed by some factors. 4) Herniated nucleus pulposus may cause nerve root compression with or without canal stenosis. Conclusion This study revealed that the CT findings correlated closely with the surgical findings and the site of nerve root compression could be determined.

  3. 3-D MRI for lumbar degenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aota, Yoichi; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Yu; Izumi, Yasujiro; Yoshikawa, Koki; Yamazaki, Tatsuo.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from 10 patients with lumbar degenerative diseases were retrospectively reviewed to determine how far 3-D MR imaging is capable of demonstrating nerve roots. In 8 of the 10 patients, the area up to the dorsal root ganglion was visualized on 3-D MR images. Thus, it is capable of detecting a wide area of nerve roots, thereby allowing the determination of running of nerve root, and size and location of dorsal root ganglion. In delineating the area from the dural canal to root cyst, 3-D MR imaging was equal to conventional myelography. The former was superior to the latter in detecting the positional relation between the degenerative intervertebral disc and the nerve root, and herniation-compressed root cyst. In 3 of 9 patients who presented with root symptoms, disturbed nerve roots were of high signal on 3-D MR images. This may suggest that it has the potential for selectively detecting root nerves associated with clinical manifestations. (N.K.)

  4. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  5. Transition of a herniated lumbar disc to lumbar discal cyst: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, Rohit; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Hideo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Another rare cause of lower back pain with radiculopathy is the discal cyst. It is believed to arise from degeneration of a herniated disc, although many other theories of its origin have been proposed. Here, we report a patient with lower back pain/radiculopathy attributed originally to a herniated lumbar disc, which transformed within 6 months into a discal cyst. A 42-year-old male had a magnetic resonance (MR) documented herniated lumbar disc at the L4-5 level. It was managed conservatively for 6 months, after which symptoms recurred and progressed. The follow-up MR study revealed a discal cyst at the L4-5 without residual herniated disc. Of interest, the cyst communicated with the L4-5 intervertebral disc, which was herniated under the posterior longitudinal ligament and the disc space. During surgery, the cyst was completely removed, and his symptoms/signs resolved. A discal cyst develops as pathological sequelae of a degenerated herniated disc. Although rare, these lesions must be considered among the differential diagnoses in young patients with radicular back pain. MR study clearly documents these lesions, and surgical excision of the cyst is the treatment of choice.

  6. An audit of consent practices and perceptions of lumbar puncture, Botswana inpatient setting experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. King

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Contrasting responses between doctors and patients indicates a need for standard consenting practices among doctors. Also, patients’ attitudes and receptiveness to lumbar punctures can be improved through education on lumbar puncture indications, benefits, and risks.

  7. Jogging gait kinetics following fatiguing lumbar paraspinal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph M; Kerrigan, D Casey; Fritz, Julie M; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    A relationship exists between lumbar paraspinal muscle fatigue and quadriceps muscle activation. The objective of this study was to determine whether hip and knee joint moments during jogging changed following paraspinal fatiguing exercise. Fifty total subjects (25 with self-reported history of low back pain) performed fatiguing, isometric lumbar extension exercise until a shift in EMG median frequency corresponding to a mild level of muscle fatigue was observed. We compared 3-dimensional external joint moments of the hip and knee during jogging before and after lumbar paraspinal fatigue using a 10-camera motion analysis system. Reduced external knee flexion, knee adduction, knee internal rotation and hip external rotation moments and increased external knee extension moments resulted from repetitive lumbar paraspinal fatiguing exercise. Persons with a self-reported history of LBP had larger knee flexion moments than controls during jogging. Neuromuscular changes in the lower extremity occur while resisting knee and hip joint moments following isolated lumbar paraspinal exercise. Persons with a history of LBP seem to rely more heavily on quadriceps activity while jogging.

  8. Functional kyphosis and lumbar kyphosis in adolescent paddlers

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    Pedro Ángel López-Miñarro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of functional kyphosis and lumbar kyphosis in adolescent paddlers. A total of 140 paddlers (mean age: 13,67 ± 0,61 years participated in this study. The sagittal spinal curvatures (thoracic and lumbar curves in relaxed standing and in maximal trunk flexion with knees extended (sit-and-reach test were evaluated with an inclinometer. The analysis of angular values with respect to the normality references showed that 63% of athletes with normal thoracic curve in standing, while in maximal trunk flexion there were many athletes (91.2% with a moderate or slight kyphotic posture. With respect to lumbar curve, 68.5% of the subjects had normal values in standing, while 83.9% showed lumbar kyphotic postures in maximal trunk flexion. In conclusion, there was a high percentage of paddlers with normal angular values in relaxed standing, although when maximal trunk flexion with knees extended was performed there was a significant increase of kyphotic postures in both thoracic and lumbar curves. For this reason, the evaluation of sagittal spinal curvatures of paddlers is an important variable to include in training planning.

  9. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplasia presenting with low back pain without neurologic symptoms. The measurements were made on left and right parasagittal MRI scans of the lumbar spine. The foramen area and root area were reduced at all levels from L1 to L5 between the patients with achondroplasia (Groups I and II) and the nonachondroplasia group (Group III). The percentage of nerve root occupancy in the foramen between Group I and Group II as compared with the patients without achondroplasia was similar or lower. This implied the lumbar nerve root size in patients with achondroplasia was smaller than that of the normal population and thus there is no effective nerve root compression. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia may be arising from the central canal secondary to degenerative disc disease rather than a true foraminal stenosis. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18259829

  10. [Operative treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabanka, M; Thomé, C; Ringel, F; Meyer, B; Eicker, S-O; Rohde, V; Stoffel, M; Vajkoczy, P

    2018-04-20

    Degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine and associated lower back pain represent a major epidemiological and health-related economic challenge. A distinction is made between specific and unspecific lower back pain. In specific lower back pain lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis with or without associated segment instability are among the most frequent pathologies. Diverse conservative and operative strategies for treatment of these diseases are available. The aim of this article is to present an overview of current data and an evidence-based assessment of the possible forms of treatment. An extensive literature search was carried out via Medline plus an additional evaluation of the authors' personal experiences. Conservative and surgical treatment represent efficient treatment options for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation shows slight advantages compared to conservative treatment consisting of faster recovery of neurological deficits and a faster restitution of pain control. Surgical decompression is superior to conservative measures for the treatment of spinal canal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. In this scenario conservative treatment represents an important supporting measure for surgical treatment in order to improve the mobility of patients and the outcome of surgical treatment. The treatment of specific lower back pain due to degenerative lumbar pathologies represents an interdisciplinary challenge, requiring both conservative and surgical treatment strategies in a synergistic treatment concept in order to achieve the best results for patients.

  11. Mechanical contribution to lumbar stress injuries in female gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S J

    1986-12-01

    Because female gymnasts as a group display higher than average incidences of stress-related pathologies of the lumbar spine, it was of interest to evaluate mechanical factors which are potential contributors. Lumbar hyperextension and impact forces were quantified for performances of five commonly executed gymnastics skills by four competitive collegiate women gymnasts. The skills performed were the front walkover, the back walkover, and the front handspring, the back handspring, and the handspring vault. Wielke's (1983) radius method was used to quantify lumbar curvatures from film data during normal relaxed standing postures and during subject performances of the five selected skills. A force platform was used to monitor vertical and lateral ground reaction forces at the terminations of the respective skill performances. Of the skills examined, the handspring vault produced the highest vertical and lateral impact forces, and the back handspring and back walkover required the greatest amounts of lumbar hyperextension. During the front and back walkovers and during the back handspring, maximum lumbar hyperextension occurred very close to the time that impact force was sustained by either the hands or the feet.

  12. Characterization of radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Wang, Hui; Yang, Dalong; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Sidong; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wenyuan

    2016-11-01

    Radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed in a total of 17 patients treated for this condition at the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2005 to March 2012.To investigate the radiographic features, pelvic compensatory mechanisms, and possible underlying etiologies of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the characteristics of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.The Taillard index and the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were determined on lateral X-ray images, and the angular displacement was analyzed on flexion-extension X-ray images. Correlation between LL and various pelvic parameters and correlation between Taillard index and angular displacement were assessed by Pearson correlation analysis.A total of 20 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis and 14 of degenerative spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied in 17 patients. The Taillard index and the angular displacement in the lower vertebrae were both larger than those in the upper vertebrae. Statistical analysis revealed that LL was correlated with PI and PT, whereas PI was correlated with PT and SS. However, no correlation was identified between Taillard index and angular displacement.In consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis, the degree of vertebral slip and the angular displacement of the lower vertebrae were both greater than those of the upper vertebrae, indicating that the compensatory mechanism of the pelvis plays an important role in maintaining sagittal balance.

  13. CHANGES IN RADIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER MINIMALLY INVASIVE LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

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    Emiliano Vialle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study aims to evaluate changes in lumbosacral parameters after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether interbody cage shape (crescent shaped or rectangular would influence the results. Method : Retrospective analysis of 70 patients who underwent one or two level lumbar interbody fusion through a minimally invasive posterolateral approach. This included midline preservation and unilateral facetectomy. Pre- and postoperative (three to six months postoperative radiographs were used for measuring lumbar lordosis (LL, segmental lordosis (SL at the level of interbody fusion, and sacral slope (SS. Further analyses divided the patients into Roussouly lumbar subgroups. Results : LL was significantly reduced after surgery (59o:39o, p=0.001 as well as the SS (33.8o:31.2o, p=0.05. SL did not change significantly (11.4:11.06, p=0.85. There were no significant differences when comparing patients who received crescent shaped cage (n=27 and rectangular cage (n=43. Hypolordotic patients (Roussouly types 1 and 2 had radiographic improvement in comparison to normolordotic and hyperlordotic groups (types 3 and 4. Conclusion : Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion caused reduction in lumbosacral parameters. Cage shape had no influence on the results.

  14. The effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on lumbar spine stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Morse, M G; Stokes, I A

    1998-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the lumbar spine was used to calculate the effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on spinal stability. To estimate the effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on lumbar spine stability, muscle fatigue rate, and lumbar spine compression forces. The activation of human trunk muscles has been found to involve coactivation of antagonistic muscles, which has not been adequately predicted by biomechanical models. Antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles might produce flexion moments resulting from abdominal pressurization. Qualitatively, antagonistic activity also has been attributed to the need to stabilize the spine. Spinal loads and spinal stability were calculated for maximum and submaximum (40%, 60% and 80%) efforts in extension and lateral bending using a previously published, anatomically realistic biomechanical model of the lumbar spine and its musculature. Three different antagonistic abdominal muscle coactivation patterns were imposed, and results were compared with those found in a model with no imposed coactivation. Results were quantified in terms of the sum of cubed muscle stresses (sigma sigma m3, which is related to the muscle fatigue rate), the maximum compressive loading on the lumbar spine, and the critical value of the muscle stiffness parameter (q) required for the spine to be stable. Forcing antagonistic coactivation increased stability, but at the cost of an increase in sigma sigma m3 and a small increase in maximum spinal compression. These analyses provide estimates of the effects of antagonistic abdominal muscle coactivation, indicating that its probable role is to stabilize the spine.

  15. Incidence and etiology of lumbar spondylolysis: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Suzue, Naoto; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Yasui, Natsuo

    2010-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis is a defect of the pars interarticularis known to occur as a stress fracture. Its incidence varies considerably depending on ethnicity, sex, and sports activity. However, there are few literature reviews describing its incidence in different ethnic groups or in people who engage in different sports. We reviewed the most relevant articles on spondylolysis published in scientific journals. First, we focused on its incidence in various ethnic groups distributed by sex, the familial occurrence, and in patients with relevant diseases. Second, we focused on the incidence of spondylolysis in relation to the sports practiced by the patients. Although placing special emphasis on the incidence of lumbar spondylolysis in the general population in Japan, we also reviewed the Japanese and English literature to investigate its incidence among those who engage in different sports. The incidence of lumbar spondylolysis in the general Japanese population was 5.9%. Most studies report that the incidence in higher in male subjects than in female subjects. We found that Japanese rugby and judo players were prone to suffer lumbar spondylolysis, at an incidence of about 20%. However, the incidence for Japanese professional soccer and baseball players was much higher, at 30%, which was more than five times the incidence in the general Japanese population. The incidence of lumbar spondylolysis varies depending on ethnicity, sex, family history, relevant disease, and sports activity.

  16. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  17. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

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    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  18. Comparison Between Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Zheng, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Zhe; Yang, Xin-Jian

    2018-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety in the management of lumbar diseases performed by either posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Interbody fusion is considered the "gold standard" in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Both PLIF and TLIF have been advocated, and it remains controversial as to the best operative technique. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies up to September 2017. The primary outcomes were fusion rate, complications, and clinical satisfaction. The secondary outcomes were length of hospitalization, operation time, blood loss, postoperative visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 16 studies involving 1502 patients (805 patients in PLIF group and 697 in TLIF group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in terms of fusion rate (P > 0.05) and clinical satisfaction (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups. TLIF was superior to PLIF with significantly lower incidence of nerve root injury (P 0.05) and graft malposition (P > 0.05). PLIF required significant longer operation time (P degenerative lumbar diseases. However, TLIF was superior to PLIF with shorter operation time, less blood loss, and lower incidence of nerve root injury and dural tear. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding wound infection and graft malposition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Korse, Nina S.; Kruit, Mark C.; Peul, Wilco C.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar...

  20. Intracranial haemorrhage following lumbar myelography: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, O.; Stendel, R.; Baur, S.; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a subacute intracranial subdural haematoma following lumbar myelography. This rare but potentially life-threatening complication has been reported both after lumbar myelography and following lumbar puncture for spinal anaesthesia. We review 16 previously reported cases of intracranial haemorrhage following lumbar myelography, and discuss the pathogenesis. In all reported cases post-puncture headache was the leading symptom and should therefore be regarded as a warning sign. (orig.)

  1. Morphometric and Histological Study of Osteophytes in Human Cadaveric Lumbar Vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwini Aithal Padur; Naveen Kumar; Swamy Ravindra Shanthakumar; Arijit Bishnu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Osteophytes are bony outgrowth on the vertebral column. Its prevalence in the lumbar region and clinical importance mandates to conduct a detailed study of lumbar osteophytes in the cadaveric vertebral column. Aim: The present study was conducted to study the detailed features of lumbar osteophytes and document its prevalence, morphometric and histological structure. Materials and Methods: This was an observational study in which frequency of occurrence of lumbar osteophyt...

  2. Clinical and Radiographic Results of Indirect Decompression and Posterior Cervical Fusion for Single-Level Cervical Radiculopathy Using an Expandable Implant with 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, Kris; Janusz, Piotr; Phillips, Frank M; Youssef, Jim A; Isaacs, Robert; Tyrakowski, Marcin; McCormack, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Background  Indirect posterior cervical nerve root decompression and fusion performed by placing bilateral posterior cervical cages in the facet joints from a posterior approach has been proposed as an option to treat select patients with cervical radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to report 2-year clinical and radiologic results of this treatment method. Methods  Patients who failed nonsurgical management for single-level cervical radiculopathy were recruited. Surgical treatment involved a posterior approach with decortication of the lateral mass and facet joint at the treated level followed by placement of the DTRAX Expandable Cage (Providence Medical Technology, Lafayette, California, United States) into both facet joints. Iliac crest bone autograft was mixed with demineralized bone matrix and used in all cases. The Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain, and SF-12 v.2 questionnaire were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Segmental (treated level) and overall C2-C7 cervical lordosis, disk height, adjacent segment degeneration, and fusion were assessed on computed tomography scans and radiographs acquired preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Results  Overall, 53 of 60 enrolled patients were available at 2-year follow-up. There were 35 females and 18 males with a mean age of 53 years (range: 40-75 years). The operated level was C3-C4 ( N  = 3), C4-C5 ( N  = 6), C5-C6 ( N  = 36), and C6-C7 ( N  = 8). The mean preoperative and 2-year scores were NDI: 32.3 versus 9.1 ( p  cervical fusion using an expandable intervertebral cage may be an effective tissue-sparing option in select patients with single-level cervical radiculopathy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Biomechanical effect of interspinous dynamic stabilization adjacent to single-level fusion on range of motion of the transition segment and the adjacent segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chao; Lu, Shibao; Hai, Yong; Zang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Despite numerous biomechanical studies have been carried out on dynamic stabilizers, there is very little information on their hybrid application, especially when combined interspinous dynamic stabilization with single-level fusion. The aim of this study is to assess the biomechanical effect of interspinous dynamic stabilization adjacent to single-level fusion on range of motion of the transition segment and the adjacent segment. Six fresh lumbosacral spines (L2-S1) were tested in the following sequence: 1) intact (Construct A); 2) fusion in L5/S1 and intact in L4/5 (Construct B); 3) fusion in L5/S1 and unstable state in L4/5 (Construct C); 4) fusion in L5/S1 and Coflex in L4/5 (Construct D). Range of motion (at L3/4 and L4/5) was recorded and calculated. Range of motion in L3/4 in the four constructs showed no difference under all motion states. Under flexion/extension, the range of motion of L4/5 in Construct B and Construct C increased, while the range of motion of L4/5 in Construct D decreased compared with Construct A. Compared with Construct D, the range of motion of L4/5 in Constructs B and C showed a significant increase. Under lateral bending and axial rotation, Construct A showed similar range of motion of L3/4 compared with other constructs. Fusion combined with Coflex is able to stabilize the transition segment and restrict flexion and extension in that segment, while having no significant effect on the range of motion of the adjacent segment or the range of motion of the transition segment under lateral bending and axial rotation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Axial lumbar interbody fusion: a 6-year single-center experience

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    Zeilstra DJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dick J Zeilstra,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block3 1Bergman Clinics, Naarden and NedSpine, Ede, The Netherlands; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Introduction: The aim of this study is to report our 6-year single-center experience with L5–S1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF. Methods: A total of 131 patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease refractory to nonsurgical treatment were treated with AxiaLIF at L5–S1, and were followed for a minimum of 1 year (mean: 21 months. Main outcomes included back and leg pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index score, working status, analgesic medication use, patient satisfaction, and complications. Computed tomography was used to determine postoperative fusion status. Results: No intraoperative complications, including vascular, neural, urologic, or bowel injuries, were reported. Back and leg pain severity decreased by 51% and 42%, respectively, during the follow-up period (both P < 0.001. Back function scores improved 50% compared to baseline. Clinical success, defined as improvement ≥30%, was 67% for back pain severity, 65% for leg pain severity, and 71% for back function. The employment rate increased from 47% before surgery to 64% at final follow-up (P < 0.001. Less than one in four patients regularly used analgesic medications postsurgery. Patient satisfaction with the AxiaLIF procedure was 83%. The fusion rate was 87.8% at final follow-up. During follow-up, 17 (13.0% patients underwent 18 reoperations on the lumbar spine, including pedicle screw fixation (n = 10, total disc replacement of an uninvolved level (n = 3, facet screw fixation (n = 3, facet screw removal (n = 1, and interbody fusion at L4–L5 (n = 1. Eight (6.1% reoperations were at the index level. Conclusion: Single-level AxiaLIF is a safe and effective means to achieve lumbosacral fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease. Keywords: Axia

  5. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Karen Ka Man; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2017-01-01

    Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS) are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP) bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group) and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group). Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW) as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0), L2 (2.0), L3 (2.2), L4 (2.2), L5 (2.5), and S1 (2.8). This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better cost-saving means for clinical diagnosis or research

  6. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Pui Yin Cheung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group. Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Results Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0, L2 (2.0, L3 (2.2, L4 (2.2, L5 (2.5, and S1 (2.8. Conclusions This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better

  7. Reoperation Rates Following Instrumented Lumbar Spine Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmola, Tero Matti; Häkkinen, Arja; Järvenpää, Salme; Marttinen, Ilkka; Vihtonen, Kimmo; Neva, Marko

    2018-02-15

    A prospective cohort study. This study evaluated the cumulative reoperation rate and indications for reoperation following instrumented lumbar spine fusion (LSF). LSF reduces disability and improves health-related quality of life for patients with several spinal disorders. The rate of instrumented LSF has drastically increased over the last few decades. The increased incidence of LSF, however, has led to increased reoperation rates. The data are based on the prospective LSF database of Tampere University Hospital that includes all elective indications for LSF surgery. A total of 433 consecutive patients (64% women, mean age 62 years) who underwent LSF in Tampere University Hospital between 2008 and 2011 were evaluated and indications for reoperations were rechecked from patient records and radiographs. The most common diagnosis for the primary surgery was degenerative spondylolisthesis and the mean follow-up time was 3.9 years. The cumulative incidence of reoperations and the "time to event" survival rate was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. By the end of 2013, 81 patients had undergone at least one reoperation. The cumulative reoperation rate at 2 years was 12.5% (95% confidence interval: 95% CI: 9.7-16.0) and at 4 years was 19.3% (95% CI: 15.6-23.8). The most common pathology leading to reoperation was adjacent segment pathology with a cumulative reoperation rate of 8.7% (95% CI: 6.1-12.5) at 4 years. The corresponding rates for early and late instrumentation failure were 4.4% (95% CI: 2.7-7.0) and 2.9% (95% CI: 1.9-7.1), respectively, and for acute complications, 2.5% (95% CI: 1.4-4.5). Although previous studies reported that early results of spinal fusion are promising, one in five patients required reoperation within 4 years after surgery. Patients and surgeons should be aware of the reoperation rates when planning fusion surgery. 4.

  8. OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

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    Samo K. Fokter

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS is a common cause of low back and leg pain in the elderly. Conservative treatment seldom results in sustained improvement.Methods. Fifty-six patients (33 women, 23 men older than 50 years (mean 67 years, range 51 to 82 years and with no prior low back surgery were treated from 1993 to 1999 for clinical and radiologic evidence of DLSS. The goal of this study was to describe the results of decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion in terms of reoperation, severity of back pain, leg pain and patient satisfaction. Answers to Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaires completed before surgery and one to five years afterwards were evaluated. Seven patients (12.5% with degenerative spondylolisthesis, scoliosis and/or more radical facetectomies received fusion.Results. Of the 56 patients in the original cohort, two were deceased and two had undergone reoperation by follow-up. Forty-eight patients answered questionnaires. Average duration of follow-up was 2.5 years. More than 70 percent of the respondents had no or only mild back or buttock pain at follow-up and more than 60 percent were able to walk more than 500 m. Added fusion reduced the incidence of low back pain and pain frequency, and increased walking distance (ANOVA.Conclusions. Eighty-one percent of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and 87.5% would choose to have the operation again if they had the choice. Decompressive laminectomy for DLSS yields best results if instrumented fusion is included in the procedure.

  9. Hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the cerebrospinal fluid of a neonate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wusthoff, Courtney J; Abend, Nicholas S; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages in cerebrospinal fluid are described as indicators of pathology. We present findings from the lumbar puncture of a child without neurologic disease. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained after an initial, traumatic lumbar puncture attempt included a high proportion of macrophages, some containing erythrocyte fragments and hemosiderin. This suggests that although macrophages may indicate pathology, they can also accumulate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

  10. Clinical study of CT discography for the lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Tadashi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to introduce technique for correct positioning of the needle into the center of the disc for discography by means of CT analysis and also to clarify usefulness of CT discography for diagnosis of the lumbar disc herniation. We have taken CT analysis in order to determine correct place and the angle of inserting the needle. This measurement provides easy needle insertion. Unless the needle tip places center of disc, discogram false positive or negative will occur as a result. The materials of this study are 222 discs of 105 cases with the lumbar disc herniation. Comparative study of the findings among myelography, discography and CT discography was investigated. The results indicated that CT discography demonstrates the most clear findings and is useful in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, especially in obtaining detailed observation of herniated discs. (author).

  11. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  12. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh Lakkol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period.

  13. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  14. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: an epidemiological perspective: the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Rovsing, Hans

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional epidemiological survey of 4151 participants of the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study. OBJECTIVE: To identify prevalences and individual risk factors for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study has...... registered health parameters since 1976. In 1993, standardized, lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine were recorded. There were 1533 men and 2618 women. METHODS: Statistical correlations were made between degenerative spondylolisthesis, and physical, occupational, and general epidemiological data. RESULTS......: A total of 254 cases of lumbar slip were found (males 2.7%, females 8.4%). In females, no significant relationship between age at menopause or childbirths and the presence of degenerative spondylolisthesis were found. In women, relationships between body mass index (BMI) in 1976 and L4 olisthesis (P = 0...

  15. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced he...

  16. [Endovascular repair of iliocaval arteriovenous fistula complicating lumbar disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jemaa, H; Maalej, A; Lazzez, K; Jemal, H; Karray, S; Ben Mahfoudh, K

    2016-05-01

    Vascular complications of lumbar disc surgery are rare. Few cases have been reported. Arteriovenous fistulas are the most common. They are due to anatomical relationships between the last lumbar vertebrae, the corresponding discs, and the iliac vessels; degenerative lesions of the intervertebral discs facilitate instrumental vessel perforation, and operative difficulty. Computed tomography is particularly accurate for making the diagnosis. Treatment strategies consist in surgery or endovascular management. Percutaneous endovascular treatment using a stent-graft is a reasonable option for treating arteriovenous fistula. We describe the case of a 50-year-old patient who developed an iliocaval arteriovenous fistula following lumbar disc hernia surgery. The lesion was excluded by a stent-graft. The postoperative period was uneventful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Traumatic Lumbar Subdural Hematoma in the Absence of Intracranial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jared; Gillick, John L; LaBagnara, Michael; Das, Kaushik; Hillard, Virany H

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an exceedingly rare condition, with those occurring in the absence of intracranial disease being particularly uncommon. Only 13 such cases have been reported. Although theories exist to describe the pathophysiology of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma, the precise mechanism and guidelines for management remain unclear. This report describes a 37-year-old woman who suffered a traumatic assault who developed progressive low back pain with radicular symptoms 2 days after presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbar subdural hematoma extending from L1 to L5. No intracranial disease was detected on imaging. Definitive guidelines for management of this condition are uncertain; however, successful use of conservative management, lumbar drainage, and surgical evacuation has been reported. This patient underwent a lumbar laminectomy with evacuation of the hematoma, resulting in immediate pain relief and resolution of symptoms within 1 week of the procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mini-invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion through Wiltse Approach to Treating Lumbar Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Tian, Yong-hao; Zheng, Yan-ping; Liu, Xin-yu; Wang, Hu-hu

    2016-02-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of mini-invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) through the Wiltse approach for treating lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. In this retrospective controlled study, 69 cases with lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis treated in Qilu hospital from April to November 2014 were randomly assigned to Wiltse approach (31 cases, 16 male, 15 female; mean age 45.1 years) and traditional approach groups (38 cases, 21 male, 17 female; 47.2 years. In the Wiltse approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 19 cases and L5 S1 in 12, 9 of whom had low back pain (LBP) only and 21 both LBP and leg pain. There were 17 cases of I degree and 14 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 13.1 ± 2.6; visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP 7.4 ± 1.2; VAS for leg pain 6.1 ± 2.0 and Oswestry disability index (ODI) score 42.2% ± 1.2%. In the traditional approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 22 cases and L5 S1 in 16, 11 of whom had LBP only and 27 both LBP and leg pain. There were 21 cases of I degree and 17 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative JOA score was 12.8 ± 1.2; VAS for LBP 6.9 ± 1.1; VAS for leg pain 7.1 ± 2.0 and ODI score 41.2% ± 2.0%. The JOA score, VAS for LBP and leg pain, ODI dynamic X-rays, CT and/or MR were evaluated 3 and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. There were no differences in sex, age, affected levels, spondylolisthesis degree, pre-operative JOA score, VAS for LBP or leg pain and ODI score between the two groups (P > 0.05). The incision length, blood loss and time to achieving exposure were better in the Wiltse approach than the traditional approach group (P 0.05). The interbody fusion rate was not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). There were no complications of internal fixation in either group. TLIF via both approaches has satisfactory clinical efficacy. TLIF through the Wiltse approach significantly reduces the

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab′s criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years. Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations.

  20. Herpes zoster sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Masao; Mannoji, Chikato; Oikawa, Makiko; Murakami, Masazumi; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Kon, Tamiyo; Okawa, Akihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo

    2015-07-29

    Symptom of herpes zoster is sometimes difficult to distinguish from sciatica induced by spinal diseases, including lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis. Here we report a case of sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis. A 74-year-old Chinese male patient visited our hospital for left-sided sciatic pain upon standing or walking for 5 min of approximately 1 month's duration. At the first visit to our hospital, there were no skin lesions. A magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal canal stenosis between the 4th and 5th lumbar spine. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with sciatica induced by spinal canal stenosis. We considered decompression surgery for the stenosis of 4th and 5th lumbar spine because conservative therapy failed to relieve the patient's symptom. At that time, the patient complained of a skin rash involving his left foot for several days. A vesicular rash and erythema were observed on the dorsal and plantar surfaces of the great toe and lateral malleolus. The patient was diagnosed with herpes zoster in the left 5th lumbar spinal nerve area based on clinical findings, including the characteristics of the pain and vesicular rash and erythema in the 5th lumbar spinal dermatome. The patient was treated with famciclovir (1,500 mg/day) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After 1 week of medication, the skin rash resolved and pain relief was obtained. In conclusion, spinal surgeons should keep in mind herpes zoster infection as one of the possible differential diagnoses of sciatica, even if there is no typical skin rash.

  1. Characteristics of lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Goda, Yuichiro; Tezuka, Fumitake; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sato, Masahiro; Mase, Yasuyoshi; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis in the lumbar spine, is often precipitated by trauma, but there may be a congenital predisposition to this condition. There have been few studies on spondylolysis in young children, despite their suitability for studies on congenital defects. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features of lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children in order to elucidate its pathogenesis. Thirty lumbar spondylolysis patients (23 boys, 7 girls, including a pair of twins; mean age 9.5 years, age range 5-12 years) were studied. Patient data on history of athletic activity, symptoms at first consultation, and radiological findings such as spinal level, stage of the stress fracture, and skeletal age were collected. Among the 30 patients, 27 (21 boys, 6 girls) had L5 spondylolysis (90.0 %). Only 2 patients had no history of athletic activity at the first consultation. All patients, except for 2 whose diagnosis was incidental, complained of low back pain. In the 27 patients with L5 spondylolysis, 17 (63.0 %) had terminal-stage fracture and 25 (92.6 %) had spina bifida occulta (SBO) involving the S1 lamina. Sixteen of the 27 (59.3 %) had SBO involving the affected lamina (L5) and S1 lamina. In contrast, the 3 patients with L3 or L4 spondylolysis had no evidence of SBO. With respect to skeletal age, 23 of the 27 L5 spondylolysis patients (85.2 %) were in the cartilaginous stage while the remaining 4 patients were in the apophyseal stage. Lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children was commonly a terminal-stage bone defect at L5, which was not necessarily related to history of athletic activity and was sometimes asymptomatic. It was often associated with SBO, indicating a possible congenital predisposition. These findings may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of lumbar spondylolysis.

  2. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans.A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines.Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576.Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  3. [Fibrinolytic activity and adhesive syndromes of the lumbar vertebral canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, F; De Palma, L; Santucci, A; Marra, R; Pagano, L; Storti, S

    1989-01-01

    The recent studies, related in medical literature, indicate a reduced activity of fibrinolysis in patients with low back-pain caused by multiple factors (lumbar disc disease, post-laminectomy, post myelography) and suggest a new pathogenetic hypothesis of this disease and new therapeutic implications. The authors conducted a research based on the study of fibrinolysis in patients affected by post-surgical lumbar adhesive syndrome, with the aim of finding, eventually, a relationship between reduced fibrinolytic activity and clinical symptoms. The results are referred and discussed.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Nakamura, Takafumi; Kikuchi, Taro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Katsumasa; Yoshizumi, Kazuhiro; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-03-01

    We studied the accuracy of MRI in lumbar disc herniation, comparing the results with the operative findings in the assessment of the rupture of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL), and type of herniation. The MRI findings in 47 subjects who were operated on for lumbar disc herniation were retrospectively studied. The accuracy rate was 75.2% for the rupture of the PLL and 40.4% for the type of herniation respectively. It was hard to differentiate subligamentous extrusion from transligamentous extrusion on MRI. (author)

  5. Spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keynan, Ory; Ashkenazi, Ely; Floman, Yizhar [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorgick, Yossi [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zerifin (Israel); Schwartz, Allan J. [Hadassah University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2006-09-15

    Lumbar or sacral nerve root compression is most commonly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and/or herniation. Less frequently, other extradural causes may be implicated, such as infection, neoplasm, epidural hematoma, or ligamentum flavum pathology. We present the case of a patient with spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma compressing the L4 nerve root, without antecedent trauma. Although exceedingly rare, the diagnosis of ligamentum flavum pathology in general, and that of ligamentum flavum hematoma in particular, should be considered on those rare occasions when the etiology of lumbar or sacral nerve root compressions appears enigmatic on radiological studies. Usually surgical treatment produces excellent clinical outcome. (orig.)

  6. Spontaneous regression of a lumbar disc herniation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostarchid Brahim El

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc herniation is a common disease that induces back pain and radicular pain. Some cases require conservative treatment or at times relived spontaneously. Spontaneous regression of disc herniation is an atypical clinical presentation, and it has been recognized with the advancement of recent advances in imaging techniques. We present a 35-year-old woman presented a spontaneous regression of a lumbar disc herniation with good outcome after intensive physical therapy program. Spontaneous regression of disc herniation is thought to occur via an inflammatory reaction with molecular mechanisms of phagocytic processes.

  7. Multiplanar reformatted CT applications in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takafumi; Kojima, Shinsaburo; Araki, Nobuto; Miyauchi, Sumihiko

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic value and limitations of multiplanar reformatted CT were evaluated in 55 patients with lumbar diseases. Reformatted images in coronal, sagittal, paraxial, and oblique planes were acquired from the transverse axial images, thereby allowing three-dimensional visualization of lesions in the lumbar spine. Oblique images that were reformmated along the nervous root were useful in visualizing lesions in the root canal, which were not available on either conventional myelography or transverse axial CT. A definitive plane determination is required for reformation of images, taking curvature of the spinal column into account. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Lesiones de la columna lumbar en el deportista

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Pantoja C. Samuel

    2012-01-01

    El dolor lumbar es relativamente común en deportistas. Su etiología es variada y está determinada por múltiples factores que incluyen la edad, nivel y cargas de entrenamiento y condición física. Existen disciplinas que imponen un riesgo particularmente alto de lesión y adicionalmente los atletas pueden presentar alteraciones que afecten por igual a la población no deportista. Esta revisión se centra en las causas más habituales de dolor lumbar en deportistas y aborda las bases de la rehabi...

  9. [The usefulness of neurological and radiological signs in lumbar discopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the work was to show the usefulness of neurological and radiological signs in the patients with L4 and L5 discopathy. The axial symptoms with the highest occurrence frequency and the differential symptoms closely connected with definite disc pathology: the type and/or the level of discopathy were defined. The problem of importance of the above-mentioned signs in the diagnostic management was discussed on the basis of literature. The significance of bilateral and polyradicular symptoms in the diagnosis of central lumbar disc and unilateral symptoms in the diagnosis of lateral lumbar disc were emphasized.

  10. Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome with congenital lumbar hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lucky; Mala, Tariq Ahmed; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done.

  11. Why should we use atraumatic needles in lumbar puncture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic lumbar puncture is essential to the diagnosis of central nervous system infections, subarachnoid haemorrhage and others neurological diseases. Myeloradicular involvement or life-threatening adverse events due to the procedure are rare, but less severe complications are more frequent. Post-lumbar puncture headache is the most common complication, by spinal fluid leakage due to delayed closure of a dural defect. Therefore, the development of fine needles, with differentiated atraumatic bevel, has contributed to minimize that problem. These generically called atraumatic needles cause less deformation of the dura mater then the Quincke® ones. So, why don't we use these atraumatic needles?

  12. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Time Average 1-hourly 0.6 x 0.25 degree subsetted along CloudSat track V5.2.0 (MAT1NXSLV_CPR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the MERRA IAU 2d atmospheric single-level diagnostics subset, collocated with the CloudSat track. The subset is processed at the Modeling and Assimilation...

  13. tavgM_2d_slv_Nx: MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Monthly Mean 0.667 x 0.5 degree V5.2.0 (MATMNXSLV) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATMNXSLV or tavgM_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  14. tavg1_2d_slv_Nx: MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Time Average 1-hourly 0.667 x 0.5 degree V5.2.0 (MAT1NXSLV) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT1NXSLV or tavg1_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  15. Outcome after surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: the lumbar extension test is not a predictive factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Lars; Hauerberg, John; Springborg, Jacob B

    2009-01-01

    surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery using 3 different scoring systems: Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score, and Oswestry Disability Index. The group of patients with preoperative aggravation of the symptoms by the lumbar extension test, (positive...... itself had no prognostic value for the overall outcome after lumbar decompression. Using regression models with the 2-year Oswestry Disability Index as dependent variable, only before surgery self-reported health and age were found to have prognostic significance. CONCLUSION: The lumbar extension test...... extension test), was compared with the group of patients without aggravation by the test, (negative extension test). RESULTS: Before surgery, patients with a positive extension test scored significantly worse on all disability scoring systems than patients with a negative test. However, the extension test...

  16. Development of a fibre optic goniometer system to measure lumbar and hip movement to detect activities and their lumbar postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J A; Stigant, M

    2007-01-01

    If sitting postures influence the risk of developing low back pain then it is important that quantification of sedentary work activities and simultaneous measurement of lumbar postural characteristics takes place. The objective of this study was to develop a system for identifying activities and their associated lumbar postures using fibre optic goniometers (FOGs). Five student subjects wore two FOGs attached to the lumbar spine and hip for 8 min while being recorded using a video camera when sitting, standing and walking. Observer Software was used to code the video recording, enabling the sagittal movement characteristics of each FOG to be described for individual activities. Results indicated that each activity produced unique data, and could be independently identified from their motion profiles by three raters (k = 1). The data will be used to develop algorithms to automate the process of activity detection. This system has the potential to measure behaviour in non-clinical settings.

  17. Long-term outcomes and quality of lift after percutaneous lumbar discectomy for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wengui; Geng Gaojun; Guo Jinhe; He Shicheng; Deng Gang; Liu Wengui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the long-term outcomes as well as the living quality of the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) after the treatment of percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD), and to discuss the influential factors related to the long-term effectiveness. Methods: During the period of January 2000 to March 2002, PLD was performed in 129 patients with LDH. By using self-evaluation questionnaires of Oswestry disability index(ODI), Short Form-36(SF-36) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association(JOA) through letter or telephone interviews as well as the patients' initial medical records, the related clinical data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted by using Wilcoxon's rank sum test, Chi-square test. Results: One hundred and eight patients (83.7%) were able to be followed up and 104 effective ques-tionnaires were collected. The mean follow-up time was (6.64±0.67) years, the excellent rate(ODI score, 0-20%) was 71.15%. The average scores of the JOA and SF-36 was 23.66±5.72 and 75.88±25.57, respectively. The scores of quality of life were obviously improved in all follow-up subscales. Conventional operations were carried out subsequently in 9 patients as they failed to respond to PLD. No complications related to PLD occurred in this study. The age,course of the disease and the patient's condition at the time of discharge might bear a relationship to long-term effectiveness. Conclusion: PLD is a safe and minimally-invasive technique for the treatment of LDH with quick and reliable effect. PLD can dramatically improve the quality of life. Many factors,such as the age, course of the disease and the patient's condition at the time of discharge,can affect the long-term outcomes. (authors)

  18. Uninstrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Have Technological Advances in Stabilizing the Lumbar Spine Truly Improved Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Laura M; Oklund, Sally A; Zawadzki, Nadine; Desai, Manisha; Prolo, Donald J

    2018-04-06

    Since 1980s numerous operations have replaced posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with human bone. These often involve expensive implants and complex procedures. Escalating expenditures in lumbar fusion surgery warrant re-evaluation of classical PLIF with allogeneic ilium and without instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term fusion rate and clinical outcomes of allo-PLIF. Between 1981-2006 321 patients ages 12-80, underwent 339 one- or two-level allo-PLIFs for degenerative instability and were followed 1-28 years. Fusion status was determined by radiographs and as available, by CT scans. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Economic/Functional Outcome Scale. 308 of the 321 patients were followed postoperatively (average 6.7 years, range 1-28); 297 (96%) fused. Fusion rates were lower for patients with substance abuse (89%, p=0.007). Clinical outcomes in 87% of patients were excellent (52%) or good (35%). Economic/Functional Outcome Scale scores following initial allo-PLIF on average increased 5.2 points. Successful fusion correlated with nearly a 2-point gain in outcome score (p=0.001). A positive association between a patient characteristic and outcome was observed only with age 65 and greater; whereas negative associations in clinical outcomes were observed with mental illness, substance abuse, heavy stress to low back, or industrial injuries. Total complication rate was 7%. With three decades of follow-up we found successful clinical outcomes are highly correlated with solid fusion using only allogeneic iliac bone. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhidee; Ito, Michihiro; Yamashita, Masaomi; Furuya, Takeo; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Ohtori, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case series. To examine the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using local bone grafting. Several authors have reported the efficacy of PRP for bone union in animal models. However, the use of PRP for bone fusion in TLIF surgery has not been fully explored. Twenty patients underwent single-level TLIF surgery because of L4 spondylolisthesis. An interbody fusion cage and local bone were used in nine patients (control group) and an interbody fusion cage, local bone, and PRP were used in 11 patients (PRP group). PRP was prepared from the patients' blood samples (400 mL) immediately before surgery. The duration of bone union and postoperative bone fusion rate were assessed using plain radiography at every 3 months postoperatively and computed tomography at 12 or 24 months postoperatively, respectively. Lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness were evaluated using the visual analog scale preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. The platelet count was 8.7 times higher in PRP than in blood. The bone union rate was significantly superior in the PRP group than in the control group (91% and 77%, respectively; p =0.035), whereas the average duration of bone union was not significantly different between the groups (7.7±0.74 and 10.0±2.00 months, respectively; p =0.131). There was no significant difference in lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness in both groups during follow-up ( p >0.05). Our study suggests that the use of PRP in TLIF surgery increases bone fusion rate.

  20. Effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on lumbar fusion in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Hsiung; Huang, Shun-Chen; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Fong-Fu; Ko, Jih-Yang

    2012-09-01

    Implantation of TheraCyte 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells can increase the bone marrow density of the spine of ovariectomized rats. There has been no published study examining the effect of such implantation on spinal fusion outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on posterolateral lumbar fusions in a rat model. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats underwent single-level, intertransverse process spinal fusions using iliac crest autograft. The rats were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 rats received sham operations on their necks (control; N = 20); Group 2 rats were implanted with TheraCyte-encapsulated 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells into the subcutis of their necks (TheraCyte; N = 20). Six weeks after surgery the rats were killed. Fusion was assessed by inspection, manual palpation, radiography, and histology. Blood was drawn to measure the serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH). Based on manual palpation, the control group had a fusion rate of 33 % (6/18) and the TheraCyte group had a fusion rate of 72 % (13/18) (P = 0.044). Histology confirmed the manual palpation results. Serum iPTH levels were significantly higher in the TheraCyte group compared with the control group (P animal study revealed that there were more fusions in rats that received TheraCyte-encapsulated 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells than in control rats without significant change in serum calcium or phosphorus concentrations. As with any animal study, the results may not extrapolate to a higher species. Further studies are needed to determine if these effects are clinically significant.

  1. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of postoperative lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomiec, B.; Samson, B.; Zabek, M.; Walecki, J.; Krolicki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Extruded lumbar discs are common reasons of lumbar pain and required appropriate surgical treatment. In 10-40% patients appear postoperative complications (e.g. recurrent lumbar disc on the same or different level, scar tissues involving nerve roots, arachnoiditis, discitis, postoperative pseudomeningocele, wrong level laminectomy) resulting recurrent lumbar pain and neurological symptoms. In our study 20 out of 216 patients have suffered recurrent back pain: 12 patients due to scar tissues, 6 patients due to recurrent discs, 2 patients due to postoperative discitis. Authors try to show the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of postoperative lumbar spine, result of surgical treatment, analyze the reasons of recurrent back pain. (author)

  2. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part I: Biology of spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C; Chen, M I

    1995-12-15

    The histology of lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion was studied in an experimental model in rabbits. To qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the sequential histology of spinal fusion using a previously validated animal model. Few previous studies have described the sequential histology during the posterolateral spinal fusion healing process using autogenous bone, and a basic understanding of the biology of this repair process is lacking. Fourteen adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent single-level posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process arthrodesis with autogenous iliac bone graft. Animals were killed 1-10 weeks after surgery, and the fusion masses were analyzed histologically and quantitated using a semiautomated image analysis system. Three distinct phases of healing were identified (inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling) and occurred in sequence but in a delayed fashion in the central zone of the fusion mass compared with the outer transverse process zones. Membraneous bone formation, evident first at the ends of the fusion eminating from the decorticated transverse processes, was the predominant mechanism of healing. The central zone was somewhat different in that there was a period of endochondral bone formation during weeks 3 and 4 in this zone where cartilage formed and was converted to bone. Remodeling in the central zone had equilibrated with the transverse process zones by 10 weeks. Lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion is a complex process from a spatial and temporal standpoint. When autogenous bone is used as the graft material, this process critically depends on a variety of factors from the decorticated host bone and exposed marrow. The persistence of a central cartilage zone may be related to some types of nonunions and deserves future investigation. This enhanced understanding of the biology of spinal fusion with autogenous bone graft will provide a foundation for optimizing the use of osteoinductive bone growth

  3. Subsidence as of 12 months after single-level anterior cervical inter-body fusion. Is it related to clinical outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Yeom, Jin S; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    Subsidence is a frequent phenomenon in the interbody fusion process in patients with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). There is little evidence of whether subsidence in the cervical spine has any impact on clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of subsidence and clinical outcomes after ACDF and to consider reasons subsidence might not cause unfavorable clinical outcomes. A total of 158 consecutive patients who underwent single-level ACDF were included. The patients were divided into a subsidence group (S-group) and a no subsidence group (N-group), with subsidence defined as a decrease by ≥3 mm in total intervertebral height (TIH). We analyzed outcomes resulting from subsidence, particularly focusing on clinical outcomes and subsequent global and segmental kyphosis using a repeated measure analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA). Subsidence occurred in 74 patients (46.8%) as of a 12-month follow-up. The S-group included 58.6% with a stand-alone cage for interbody fusion (p = 0.002). Clinical outcomes improved significantly over time (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(1.3, 205) = 125.1, p subsidence and clinical outcomes between the S- and N-group (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 1.04, p = 0.356, partial η(2) = 0.229; arm pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 0.56, p = 0.571, partial η(2) = 0.142). Segmental angle increased in both groups over time and showed a statistically significant difference between the S- and N-groups (RM-ANOVA: F(3,143) = 6.148, p = 0.001, partial η(2) = 0.959). Although, global cervical angle decreased generally and displayed no statically significant difference between the S- and N-group (RM-ANOVA: F(3,119) = 2.361, p = 0.075, partial η(2) = 0.056). Radiographic subsidence after ACDF occurred in 46.8% patients as of 12 months after the single-level ACDF. The lack of correlation between bad clinical outcome and radiographic subsidence may be due to

  4. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Serum cytokines, a diagnostic tool for herniated lumbar disc type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum levels of IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα may be applicable for preoperative diagnosis of the type of the herniated lumbar disc, especially TNFα, and IL-6 parameters which have a high sensitivity and specificity for differentiation between bulging and extrusion or sequestration discus. Key words: Intervertebral disk displacement, ...

  6. Primary lumbar hernia in an elderly woman: case report | Ouma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical dissection revealed a large hernial sac, which contained retro peritoneal fat, protruding through a 3-4 centimetres defect in the transversalis fascia lining the floor of the superior lumbar triangle. The hernia sac was reduced and the defect closed. There was no recurrence four months post-operative. Lumber hernias ...

  7. Routine Cranial Computed Tomography before Lumbar Puncture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Current international guidelines recommend that a cranial computed tomography (CT) be performed on all HIV-positive patients presenting with new onset seizures, before a lumbar puncture (LP) is performed. In the South African setting, however this delay could be life threatening. The present study sought to ...

  8. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandén Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied.

  9. Lumbar Vertebral Canal Diameters in Adult Ugandan Skeletons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The midsagittal, transverse diameters of the lumbar vertebral canal and the anteroposterior diameter of the inferior vertebral notch were measured using an electronic digital caliper. Collected data was analyzed using SPSS 12.0 computer program. Results and discussion: In both sexes, the midsagittal diameter of the canal ...

  10. Spontaneous regression of lumbar herniated disc Case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc herniation is a common disease that usually requires surgical intervention. However, in some cases, neurological symptoms may improve with conservative treatment. In this article, we present a case with spontaneous regression of extruded lumbar herniated disc correlated with clinical improvement and documented with follow up MRI studies.

  11. Operated herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis in Togolese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the anatomical aspects and results of surgical treatment of herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis observed in the Rheumatology unit of CHU SO of Lomé. Patients and methods: This was a transversal study conducted on a series of patients cases admitted to the Rheumatology Unit of CHU SO of ...

  12. Treatment and outcome of herniated lumbar intervertebral disk in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment and outcome of herniated lumbar intervertebral disk in a referral hospital in Kenya. K. W. Ongeti,BSc., MBChB, J. A. Ogeng'o, PhD,P. K. Bundi, BSc., P. O. Box 45 Kikuyu, Kenya and L.N. Gakuu, MMed,. FCS, (ECSA), Associate Professor, Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, College of Health Sciences, University ...

  13. Ergonomic lumbar risk analysis of construction workers by NIOSH method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Caetano Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Work in construction has tasks directly connected with manual transport. One of the body segments suffering greater demand in works with these characteristics is the lumbar spine segment. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of risk of lumbar construction workers in the shipment of materials. The sample was composed of 74 construction workers. Were used as a research tool: the NIOSH method for lumbar risk verification expressed by weight limit recommended (WPR and the lifting Index (IL, Visual analogue scale (VAS for the evaluation of pain intensity, the e-1 Corlett.0 for the mapping of the pain and Borg to the subjective perception of the intensity of physical exertion. The present study identified the weight limit (WP of 8.707 for management activity of bags of cement for the load of 8.194 wheelbarrows used. These findings are 6 times under actual weights handled during the activities that revolve around 50 kg with the sacks and averaged 49.72 kg stands with mass. The dimensional settings found in the search are at high risk for ergonomic lumbar region, and measures of reconfiguration of workplaces and operation of auxiliary devices for lifting, transporting and unloading are fundamental, in addition to the need for reflection about the current logistical problems that induce producers to supply the cement sacks with 50 kg.

  14. Atypical back pain in a child: subcutaneous lumbar abscess ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... potentially life-threatening musculoskeletal complications. We discuss the extremely unusual case of a child with an extensive subcutaneous lumbar abcess who presented with severe back pain associated with active chickenpox infection. Keywords: abscess, back pain, chickenpox, group A β-haemolytic streptococcus, ...

  15. Cobb angle changes in thoracic and lumbar spine fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This is a retrospective study to evaluate the short-term clinical outcome of conservative treatment of all consecutive patients that were treated for closed thoracic and lumbar spine fractures following Road Traffic Injury (RTI) at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (UATH) Gwagwalada, Abuja Nigeria.

  16. Early experience with endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Kaur, Simranjit; Wilson, Paul

    2016-05-01

    We describe our endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy technique and our early experience using it to treat plantar hyperhidrosis. We reviewed 20 lumbar sympathectomies performed in our vascular unit for plantar hyperhidrosis in 10 patients from 2011 and 2014. Demographics and outcomes were analyzed and a review of the literature conducted. All procedures were carried out endoscopically with no intraoperative or postoperative morbidity. Plantar anhidrosis was achieved in all the patients, although two patients (20%) suffered a relapse. Unwanted side-effects occurred in the form of compensatory sweating in three patients (30%) and post-sympathectomy neuralgia in two patients (20%). None of the patients experienced sexual dysfunction. Management of plantar hyperhidrosis may be based upon a therapeutic ladder starting with conservative measures and working up to surgery depending on the severity of the disease. Minimally invasive (endoscopic) sympathectomy for the thoracic chain is well established, but minimally invasive sympathectomy for the lumbar chain is a relatively new technique. Endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy provides an effective, minimally invasive method of surgical management, but long-term data are lacking. © 2016 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ageing and Incidence of Osteoarthritis of the Knee Joint, Lumbar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant difference in the distribution of osteoarthritis between gender and within the age groups (P=0.000). Osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine was the highest in males within the age groups of 61-65, followed by 45- 50, 56 - 60, and 51 - 55; whereas in the females, osteoarthritis of the knee joint was the ...

  19. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after lumbar trauma in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Birk, Harjus; Robinson, Caitlin K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are common injuries, accounting for approximately 90% of all spinal trauma. Lumbar spine trauma in the elderly is a growing public health problem with relatively little evidence to guide clinical management. The authors sought to characterize the complications, morbidity, and mortality associated with surgical and nonsurgical management in elderly patients with traumatic fractures of the lumbar spine. METHODS Using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients ≥ 55 years of age who had traumatic fracture to the lumbar spine. This group was divided into middle-aged (55-69 years) and elderly (≥ 70 years) cohorts. Cohorts were subdivided into nonoperative, vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, noninstrumented surgery, and instrumented surgery. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to characterize and identify predictors of medical and surgical complications, mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, number of days on ventilator, and hospital discharge in each subgroup. Adjusted odds ratios, mean differences, and associated 95% CIs were reported. Statistical significance was assessed at p elderly is associated with increased morbidity. In particular, instrumented fusion is associated with periprocedural complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a decreased likelihood of being discharged home. However, fusion surgery is also associated with reduced mortality. Age alone should not be an exclusionary factor in identifying surgical candidates for instrumented lumbar spinal fusion. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  1. The incidence of lumbar ligamentum flavum midline gaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Moriggl, Bernhard; Colvin, Joshua; Keller, Christian; Kirchmair, Lukas; Rieder, Josef; Kolbitsch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Lumbar epidural anesthesia and analgesia has gained increasing importance in perioperative pain therapy for abdominal and lower limb surgery. The loss-of-resistance technique, used to identify the epidural space, is thought to rely on the penetration of the ligamentum flavum. However, the exact

  2. An experience with epidural morphine in lumbar surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J; Snyder, G

    1987-10-01

    A chart review of the patients who received epidural morphine for lumbar surgery during the first year of implementation of the procedure was conducted. This article reviews the pharmacology and side effects of epidural morphine, describes the procedure of administering epidural morphine, discusses side effects and technical problems encountered, and presents implications for nursing practice.

  3. Lumbar puncture in acute admissions to an adult medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspected multiple sclerosis - very rare in. Africa. Methods. From January t6 June 1986, 1,908 patients were admitted to the adult medical wards,. Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe. Lumbar puncture was considered necessary in 15 I, patients because of a clinical suspicion' of meningitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage. A.

  4. Lumbar Puncture in Brain Abscessor Subdural Empyema: Not an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To assess the role of lumbar puncture (LP) in aiding diagnosis and influencing outcome in patients with intracranial brain abscess or subdural empyema. Methods The records of patients admitted with space occupying intracranial infective mass lesions (brain abscess and subdural empyema) to the neurosurgical ...

  5. Rachipagus: A report of two cases - Thoracic and Lumbar | Sanoussi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the first case it was a limb attached to the lower lumbar region with a rudimentary posterior arch. At the junction there was ... Anatomical dissection of the limb identified the bones of the lower limb. ... Rachipagus is a rare embryogenic malformation with a good prognosis in the absence of associated congenital anomalies.

  6. Diagnosis and conservative management of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is a disorder that causes the slip of one vertebral body over the one below due to degenerative changes in the spine. Lumbar DS is a major cause of spinal canal stenosis and is often related to low back and leg pain. We reviewed the symptoms, prognosis and conservative treatments for symptoms associated with DS. PubMed and MEDLINE databases (1950–2007) were searched for the key words “spondylolisthesis”, “pseudospondylolisthesis”, “degenerative spondylolisthesis”, “spinal stenosis”, “lumbar spine”, “antherolisthesis”, “posterolisthesis”, “low back pain”, and “lumbar instability”. All relevant articles in English were reviewed. Pertinent secondary references were also retrieved. The prognosis of patients with DS is favorable, however, those who suffer from neurological symptoms such as intermittent claudication or vesicorectal disorder, will most probably experience neurological deterioration if they are not operated upon. Nonoperative treatment should be the initial course of action in most cases of DS, with or without neurologic symptoms. Treatment options include use of analgesics and NSAIDs to control pain; epidural steroid injections, and physical methods such as bracing and flexion strengthening exercises. An up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis and prevention of lumbar DS can assist in determination of future research goals. Additional studies are required to establish treatment protocols for the conservative treatment of DS. PMID:18026865

  7. Contiguous Lower Lumbar Fracture-dislocation plus Morel-Lavallee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Burst fractures constitutes up to one-fifth of spinal fractures. The mechanism of injury is axial compressive force. Additional forces may be involved, like flexion, extension and rotation. The thoraco-lumbar junction is the area commonly involved. Neurological injury occurs in 8% to 18% of cases. Multiple burst ...

  8. Computer aided measurement of biomechanical characteristics of cadaverous lumbar spines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoněk, L.; Keprt, Jiří; Charamza, J.; Hrabálek, L.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2004), s. 504-510 ISSN 1644-3608 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : lumbar spine * force gauges * specle interferometry * fast Fourier transform PACS Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.375, year: 2004

  9. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  10. Intradural hemangiopericytoma of the lumbar spine: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, D; Mahajan, J; Lewkowitz, M; Black, K; Setton, A; Woldenberg, R

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with an intradural hemangiopericytoma of the lumbar spine and the unusual MR angiography (MRA) and spinal angiography findings of arteriovenous shunting with spinal venous congestion. We highlight the concordance of the unusual MRA and angiographic findings and their relationship to combined endovascular and surgical therapy.

  11. Lumbar motion changes in chronic low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune M; Hartvigsen, Jan; Boyle, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    /SETTING: Secondary analysis of a subset of participants from a randomized clinical trial. PATIENT SAMPLE: 199 study participants with low back pain of more than six weeks' duration who had spinal motion measures obtained before and after the period of intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: Lumbar region spinal kinematics...

  12. Early Versus Late Initiation of Rehabilitation After Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V

    2013-01-01

    , and costs. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis and a cost-utility analysis were conducted. Eighty-two patients undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion due to degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis (grade I or II) were randomized to an identical protocol of 4 sessions of group...

  13. Effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaswinkel, Erwin; van Drunen, Paul; Veeger, Dirk-Jan H E J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control. Torso perturbations were applied with a pushing device while the subjects were restrained at the pelvis in a kneeling-seated position. Torso kinematics and the muscle activity of the lumbar part of the M. Longissimus were recorded for 14 healthy subjects. Four conditions were included: a flexion, extension and neutral lumbar posture with eyes closed and the neutral posture with eyes open. Frequency response functions of the admittance and reflexes showed that there was no significant difference between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions, thereby confirming that vision does not play a role in the stabilization of the trunk during small-amplitude trunk perturbations. In contrast, manipulating posture did lead to significant differences. In particular, the flexed condition led to a lower admittance and lower reflex contribution compared to the neutral condition. Furthermore, the muscle pre-activation (prior to the onset of the perturbation) was significantly lower in the flexed posture compared to neutral. This confirms that flexing the lumbar spine increases the passive tissue stiffness and decreases the contribution of reflex activity to trunk control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Finite element analysis on stress change of lumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-zhi; Wu, Zhi-hong; Wang, Xue-song; Xing, Ze-jun; Song, Hai-feng; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Jian-guo; Wang, Yi-peng; Qiu, Gui-xing

    2009-05-05

    To build a 3D finite element model of whole lumbar spine and verify its efficiency and analyze the biomechanical change of L3-4 motion segment. L1-L5 segment data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of the lumbar spine of a 40-year-old man with no abnormal findings. A three-dimensional finite element model of the human whole lumbar spine was built in the Mimics and the ABAQUS software. The model was composed of bony vertebrae, articulating facets, intervertebral disc and associated ligaments. The basic stress analysis of L3-4 motion segment was made under the considerations of different material properties of bone, ligaments and facet joints contacting frictional property. The stress on annulus fiber, nucleus pulposus, endplate and facet joints under axial pressure (0.3 MPa, 0.5 MPa, 1.0 MPa, 2.0 MPa & 4.0 MPa) were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element model of human L3-L4 motion segment has 272, 619 elements, the stresses were higher in the posterior of annulus fiber, the Max pressure stress (S33) distributed in nucleus pulposus and the center of endplate. The stresses increased as axial pressure rose. 3D finite element model of whole lumbar spine and L3-4 motion segment were established successfully and the stress analyses were feasible and reliable.

  15. Clinical And Surgical Anatomy Of Lumbar Hernia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Souza Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernia is defined as the presence of failure in the transverse fascia or in the aponeurosis of the transverse abdominal muscle that results in the extrusion of intra or extra peritoneal organs through the discontinuity of the postero lateral abdominal wall. The aim of this study was to conduct a methodical review of the anatomy of the hernia form grynfelt dated from 2006 to 2017. For this, we performed a bibliographic review by means of electronic databases like SciELO, PubMed, Science Direct, LILACS and Bireme to get better approach to the subject. It has been found that the lumbar hernia is a disease little known by doctors whose diagnostics are often performed in the wrong way and for surgical correction needs a good anatomical knowledge. Lumbar hernias, although rare, must be taken into account, since ischemia of herniated intestinal segments can lead to the death of the patient, especially in the elderly. Knowledge about the anatomy of the lumbar region is of vital importance because it makes surgery safe and reduces risks of complications and recidivating of the hernia.

  16. Impact of Age and Duration of Symptoms on Surgical Outcome of Single-Level Microscopic Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in the Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to evaluate the impact of age and duration of symptoms on surgical outcome of the patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR who had been treated by single-level microscopic anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. We retrospectively evaluated 68 patients (48 female and 20 male with a mean age of 41.2±4.3 (ranged from 24 to 72 years old in our Orthopedic Department, Imam Reza Hospital. They were followed up for 31.25±4.1 months (ranged from 25 to 65 months. Pain and disability were assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Neck Disability Index (NDI questionnaires in preoperative and last follow-up visits. Functional outcome was eventually evaluated by Odom’s criteria. Surgery could significantly improve pain and disability from preoperative 6.2±1.4 and 22.2±6.2 to 3.5±2.0 and 8.7±5.2 (1–21 at the last follow-up visit, respectively. Satisfactory outcomes were observed in 89.7%. Symptom duration of more and less than six months had no effect on surgical outcome, but the results showed a statistically significant difference in NDI improvement in favor of the patients aged more than 45 years (P=0.032, although pain improvement was similar in the two groups.

  17. Risk factors for postoperative subsidence of single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: the significance of the preoperative cervical alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seok; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Seung-Won

    2014-07-15

    Retrospective cohort study. To investigate and analyze the preoperative risk factors affecting subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to reduce subsidence. Subsidence after ACDF may be caused by various risk factors, although the related information is scarce. Seventy-eight patients who underwent single-level ACDF between 2005 and 2011 were included. Patients were categorized into the subsidence (n = 26) and nonsubsidence groups (n = 52). Preoperative factors such as age, sex, operative level, bone mineral density, cervical alignment, segmental sagittal angle, and anterior/posterior disc height were assessed. The use of plates and the anterior/posterior disc height gap were examined as perioperative factors. The clinical outcome was assessed using a visual analogue scale for neck and arm pain. Subsidence occurred in 26 (33.3%) of 78 patients. A significant difference was found in clinical outcomes between the subsidence and nonsubsidence groups (P subsidence group. The mean time to subsidence was 4.8 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed that cervical alignment (P = 0.017), age (P = 0.022), and use of plates (P = 0.041) affected subsidence. In patients who received a stand-alone cage, the risk of subsidence was significantly greater in the kyphotic angle group than in the lordotic angle group (odds ratio = 13.56; P subsidence are cervical alignment, age, and use of plates. Our data suggest that surgeons should consider the kyphotic curvature and/or age when deciding on the use of plates.

  18. Endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for women: effect on compensatory sweat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Paula Loureiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Plantar hyperhidrosis is present in 50% of patients with hyperhidrosis. Thoracic sympathectomy is an important tool for the treatment of this condition, which is successful in about 60% of patients. For the remaining patients, lumbar sympathectomy is the procedure of choice. As new minimally invasive techniques have been developed, a significant demand for this type of access has led to its adaptation to the lumbar sympathectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy in controlling plantar hyperhidrosis and its effects on compensatory sweat. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty female patients with persistent plantar hyperhidrosis after thoracic sympathectomy were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to laparoscopic retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy (Group A or no surgical intervention (Group B - control groups. Quality-of-life modifications were assessed by specific questionnaires before and after surgery. In the same manner, direct sweat measurements were also performed pre- and post-intervention by evaluating trans-epidermal water loss. Despite the lack of intervention, the control group was evaluated at similar timepoints. RESULTS: In Group A, no major complications occurred in the peri-operative period. During the immediate post-operative period, three patients (20% experienced prolonged pain (more than ten days. Eight patients suffered from worsened compensatory sweating (53.3%. In Group A, after lumbar sympathectomy, the quality of life significantly improved (p<0.05, intra-group comparison beyond that of the control group (p<0.05, inter-group comparison. Also, lumbar sympathectomy resulted in significantly lower values of foot sweat (pre- vs. post-operative periods, p<0.05; Group A vs. Group B, p<0.05. These patients also developed higher values of sweat measurements on specific points of their dorsal and abdominal regions after the procedure (p<0

  19. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  20. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-12-19

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6 o to 50 o . It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  1. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6o to 50o. It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  2. Kinematics of the lumbar spine : clinical significance of lateral X-rays of the lumbar spine in anteflexion and retroflexion in healthy individuals, in cases of symptomatic herniated lumbar disc diseases and of spondylolisthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Berfelo

    1989-01-01

    textabstractAbout half of the population of the Netherlands suffers at some stage in their life from low back pain (Haanen, 1984) ; clinical examination of the lumbar spine is a matter of daily routine. X-Rays of the lumbar spine are taken in order to detect morphological changes that may be

  3. Do Turkish patients with lumbar disc herniation know body mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Sacide Yildizeli

    2017-01-01

    Most common and important cause of the low back pain is lumbar disc herniation. Patients with lumbar disc herniation face with difficulties during daily activities due to the reduction of physical functions. In order to maintain daily activities without pain and discomfort, the patients should be informed about proper positions and body mechanics. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and the applications of the patients with lumbar disc herniation about body mechanics. This descriptive study was conducted with 75 patients with lumbar disc herniation in Edirne, Turkey. The population consisted of 75 patients who accepted to participate in the study. In the collection of data the questionnaire, which was developed according to literature by the researcher, was used. Descriptive statistics, student t-test, variance and correlation analysis were used for assessment of the data. The significance level was accepted at 0.05. It was found that 53.3% of the patients experienced awful/very severe pain. and there were some points that the patients have enough information about; mobilisation, standing, carrying the goods, leaning back while sitting, leaning somewhere while standing, getting support from the chair when standing up, avoiding sudden position changes, changing feet frequently while standing. It was detected that a statistical relation between educational level and knowledge about body mechanics exists. This study shows that individuals with lumbar disc herniation have not enough information about body mechanics and they experienced long-term severe pain. Nurses and other health care workers have important role in explaining the importance of body mechanics to the patients and should encourage them to use that in daily life.

  4. The Lumbar Lordosis in Males and Females, Revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Hay

    Full Text Available Whether differences exist in male and female lumbar lordosis has been debated by researchers who are divided as to the nature of variations in the spinal curve, their origin, reasoning, and implications from a morphological, functional and evolutionary perspective. Evaluation of the spinal curvature is constructive in understanding the evolution of the spine, as well as its pathology, planning of surgical procedures, monitoring its progression and treatment of spinal deformities. The aim of the current study was to revisit the nature of lumbar curve in males and females.Our new automated method uses CT imaging of the spine to measure lumbar curvature in males and females. The curves extracted from 158 individuals were based on the spinal canal, thus avoiding traditional pitfalls of using bone features for curve estimation. The model analysis was carried out on the entire curve, whereby both local and global descriptors were examined in a single framework. Six parameters were calculated: segment length, curve length, curvedness, lordosis peak location, lordosis cranial peak height, and lordosis caudal peak height.Compared to males, the female spine manifested a statistically significant greater curvature, a caudally located lordotic peak, and greater cranial peak height. As caudal peak height is similar for males and females, the illusion of deeper lordosis among females is due partially to the fact that the upper part of the female lumbar curve is positioned more dorsally (more backwardly inclined.Males and females manifest different lumbar curve shape, yet similar amount of inward curving (lordosis. The morphological characteristics of the female spine were probably developed to reduce stress on the vertebral elements during pregnancy and nursing.

  5. Lumbar facet anatomy changes in spondylolysis: a comparative skeletal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Gali; Peleg, Smadar; Steinberg, Nili; Alperovitch-Najenson, Dvora; Salame, Khalil; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2007-01-01

    Opinions differ as to the exact mechanism responsible for spondylolysis (SP) and whether individuals with specific morphological characteristics of the lumbar vertebral neural arch are predisposed to SP. The aim of our study was to reveal the association between SP and the architecture of lumbar articular facets and the inter-facet region. Methods: Using a Microscribe three-dimensional apparatus (Immersion Co., San Jose, CA, USA), length, width and depth of all articular facets and all inter-facet distances in the lumbar spine (L1–L5) were measured. From the Hamann-Todd Human Osteological Collection (Cleveland Museum of Natural History, OH, USA) 120 normal male skeletons with lumbar spines in the control group and 115 with bilateral SP at L5 were selected. Analysis of variance was employed to examine the differences between spondylolytic and normal spines. Results: Three profound differences between SP and the norm appeared: (1) in individuals with SP, the size and shape of L4’s neural arch had significantly greater inter-facet widths, significantly shorter inter-facet heights and significantly shorter and narrower articular facets; (2) only in the L4 vertebra in individuals with SP was the inferior inter-facet width greater in size than the superior inter-facet width of the vertebra below (L5) (38.7 mm versus 40 mm); (3) in all lumbar vertebrae, the right inferior articular facets in individuals with SP were flatter compared to the control group. Conclusions: Individuals with L4 “SP” characteristics are at a greater risk of developing fatigue fractures in the form of spondylolysis at L5. PMID:17440753

  6. Transforaminal Endoscopic Surgery for Adjacent Segment Disease After Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfeian, Albert Edward

    2017-01-01

    The natural history of degenerative disease after instrumented lumbar fusion can result in symptomatic radiculopathy at the adjacent segment. Here we describe our experience with transforaminal endoscopic decompression for the treatment of adjacent segment radiculopathy. A technique for the transforaminal endoscopic treatment of lumbar radiculopathy adjacent to instrumented lumbar fusions is presented. Prospectively, we followed a series of 9 consecutive patients operated on with lumbar radiculopathy above (5) or below (4) their instrumented fusion. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data with 2-year follow-up are presented. A consecutive series of 9 patients who underwent transforaminal endoscopic treatment for lumbar radiculopathy adjacent to an instrumented spinal fusion between 2012 and 2014 is presented. Three patients required revision to fusion at 2, 13, and 19 months postoperatively. The mean visual analogue scale score for radicular pain improved from an average pain score before surgery of 8.4 to 1.3 1 year after surgery and the mean visual analogue scale for back pain improved from an average pain score before surgery of 8.0 to 4.7 1 year after surgery (excluding the 1 patient with 2month postoperative failure). Transforaminal endoscopic surgical access to adjacent level disease pathology may be a unique approach to the treatment of adjacent segment disease because it allows for neural decompression of disc and foraminal pathology without requiring significant destabilizing bone removal. However, the 2-year failure rate presented here is 33%, which indicates that the benefit of this technique may ultimately be temporary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lordosis manoeuvre in the diagnosis of lumbar facet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Ulloa, M A; Almira Suárez, E L; Otero Fernández, M; Leborans Eiras, S; Collado Arce, G

    2016-01-01

    In lumbar pain patients an aetiopathogenic diagnosis leads to a better management. When there are alarm signs, they should be classified on an anatomical basis through anamnesis and physical examination. A significant group is of facet origin (lumbar facet syndrome [LFS]), but the precise clinical diagnosis remains cumbersome and time-consuming. In clinical practice it is observed that patients with an advanced degenerative disease do not perform extension or rotation of their lumbar spine when prompted to extend it, but rather knee flexion, making the manoeuvre meaningless. For this reason, a new simple and quick clinical test was developed for the diagnosis of lumbar facet syndrome, with a facet block-test as a confirmation. The new test is better than a classic one in the diagnosis of facet syndrome, and probably even better than imaging studies A prospective study was conducted on a series of 68 patients (01/01/2012-30/06/2013). A comparison in between: classic manoeuvre (CM), imaging diagnostics (ID), and the new lordosis manoeuvre (LM) test. Examination and block test by one author, and evaluation of results by another one. Deformity and instability. using a physical. To determine the effectiveness of a new clinical test (LM) for the diagnosis of LFS (as confirmed by a positive block-test of medial branch of dorsal ramus of the lumbar root, RMRDRL). R package software. The LM was most effective (pdiagnosis of LFS is presented that is reliable, quick, and simple. Clinical examination is more reliable than imaging test for the diagnosis of LFS. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Overpowering posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody cages followed by posterior revision: a preliminary feasibility study.

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    Kadam, Abhijeet; Wigner, Nathan; Saville, Philip; Arlet, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this study was to evaluate whether sagittal plane correction can be obtained from the front by overpowering previous posterior instrumentation and/or fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages in patients undergoing revision surgery for degenerative spinal conditions and/or spinal deformities. METHODS The authors report their experience with the application of hyperlordotic cages at 36 lumbar levels for ALIFs in a series of 20 patients who underwent revision spinal surgery at a single institution. Included patients underwent staged front-back procedures: ALIFs with hyperlordotic cages (12°, 20°, and 30°) followed by removal of posterior instrumentation and reinstrumentation from the back. Patients were divided into the following 2 groups depending on the extent of posterior instrumentation and fusion during the second stage: long constructs (≥ 6 levels with extension into thoracic spine and/or pelvis) and short constructs (lumbar lordosis increased from 44.3° to 59.8° (p lumbar levels that have pseudarthrosis from the previous posterior spinal fusion. Meticulous selection of levels for ALIF is crucial for safely and effectively performing this technique.

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Ossification of the Yellow Ligament in the Lumbar Spine: First Reported Case

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    Kengo Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL occurs in the lumbar spine and extends to the lateral wall of the spinal canal, facetectomy is required to remove all of the ossified lesion and achieve decompression. Subsequent posterior fixation with interbody fusion will then be necessary to prevent postoperative progression of the ossification and intervertebral instability. The technique of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF has recently been introduced. Using this procedure, surgeons can avoid excess blood loss from the extradural venous plexus and detachment of the ossified lesion and the ventral dura mater is avoidable. We present a 55-year-old male patient with OYL at L3/4 and anterior spondylolisthesis of L4 vertebra, with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, who presented with a severe gait disturbance. He underwent a 2-stage operation without complications: LLIF for L3/4 and L4/5 was performed at the initial surgery, and posterior decompression fixation using pedicle screws from L3 to L5 was performed at the second surgery. His postoperative progress was favorable, and his interbody fusion was deemed successful. Here, we present the first reported case of LLIF for OYL of the lumbar spine. This procedure can be a good option for OYL of the lumbar spine.

  10. Are Modic changes related to outcomes in lumbar disc herniation patients treated with imaging-guided lumbar nerve root blocks?

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    Peterson, Cynthia K., E-mail: cynthia.peterson@balgrist.ch [Department of Radiology, Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, University of Zürich (Switzerland); Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Department of Radiology, Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, University of Zürich (Switzerland); Hodler, Jürg [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, University of Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Objective: To compare outcomes after imaging-guided transforaminal lumbar nerve root blocks in MRI confirmed symptomatic disc herniation patients with and without Modic changes (MC). Methods: Consecutive adult patients with MRI confirmed symptomatic lumbar disc herniations and an imaging-guided lumbar nerve root block injection who returned an outcomes questionnaire are included. Numerical rating scale (NRS) pain data was collected prior to injection and 20–30 min after injection. NRS and overall improvement were assessed using the patient's global impression of change (PGIC) scale at 1 day, 1 week and 1 month post injection. The proportion of patients with and without MC on MRI as well as Modic I and Modic II was calculated. These groups were compared for clinically relevant ‘improvement’ using the Chi-squared test. Baseline and follow-up NRS scores were compared for the groups using the unpaired t-test. Results: 346 patients are included with MC present in 57%. A higher percentage of patients without MC reported ‘improvement’ and a higher percentage of patients with MC reported ‘worsening’ but this did not reach statistical significance. The numerical scores on the PGIC and NRS scales showed that patients with MC had significantly higher pain and worse overall improvement scores at 1 month (p = 0.048 and p = 0.03) and a significantly lower 1 month NRS change score (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Patients with MRI confirmed symptomatic lumbar disc herniations and MC report significantly lower levels of pain reduction after a lumbar nerve root block compared to patients without MC.

  11. Outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy via a translaminar approach, especially for soft, highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation.

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    Du, Jianwei; Tang, Xiangyu; Jing, Xin; Li, Ningdao; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xifeng

    2016-06-01

    This study reports a new approach for percutaneous endoscopic lumbar iscectomy (PELD), especially for soft, highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation. Seven patients with soft, highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation who underwent PELD via a translaminar approach under local anaesthesia from January 2013 to June 2015, including five patients who underwent failed PELD in other hospitals, were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to pre-operative and post-operative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores and post-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation was completely removed by PELD via a translaminar approach in seven patients, as confirmed by post-operative MRI. Leg pain was eased after removal of the disc migrations. The mean follow-up duration was 9.8 (range, 6-14) months. The mean pre-operative VAS was 7.6 ± 0.8 (range, 6-9), which decreased to 3.1 ± 1.5 (range, 2-5) at one week post-operatively and to 1.3 ± 0.8 (range, 0-3) by the last follow-up visit. The mean pre-operative ODI was 61.6 (range, 46-84), which decreased to 16.3 (range, 10-28) at the one month post-operative follow-up and to 8.4 (range, 0-14) by the last follow-up visit. No recurrence was observed in any of the seven patients during the follow-up period. PELD via a translaminar approach could be a good alternative option for the treatment of soft, highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation.

  12. Lumbar spine stability after combined application of interspinous fastener and modified posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a biomechanical study.

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    Yu, Xiuchun; Zhu, Lei; Su, Qing

    2014-05-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and internal fixation are commonly performed for the treatment of lower back pain due to lumbar spinal degeneration. We have developed a novel interspinous fixation device, the interspinous fastener (ISF) for potential use in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro biomechanical characteristics of calf lumbar spine specimens after ISF fixation with modified PLIF. Ten lumbar spine (L3-L6) specimens from ten fresh calf cadavers (8-10 weeks of age) were used. Each specimen underwent sequential testing for each of the following four groups: no instrumentation (INTACT); interspinous fusion device fixation + PLIF (ISF); unilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (UPS); bilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (BPS). Outcome measures included angular range of motion (ROM) during unloaded and loaded (8 Nm) flexion, extension, left bending, right bending, left torsion and right torsion. For all unloaded and loaded assessments, ROM was significantly higher in the INTACT group compared with all other groups (P < 0.05). Similarly, ROM was significantly higher in the UPS group (indicating decreased stability) compared with the ISF and BPS groups (P < 0.05). The only significant difference between the ISF and BPS groups was in the ROM with unloaded extension (higher in the BPS group, P = 0.006). We found that ISF fixation with PLIF of the lower lumbar spine provided biomechanical stability that was equivalent to that associated with bilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation with PLIF. The ISF shows potential as an alternative means of fixation in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease.

  13. What's the best surgical treatment for patients with cervical radiculopathy due to single-level degenerative disease? A randomized controlled trial.

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    Donk, Roland D; Verbeek, André L M; Verhagen, Wim I M; Groenewoud, Hans; Hosman, Allard J F; Bartels, Ronald H M A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of adding supplemental fusion or arthroplasty after cervical anterior discectomy for symptomatic mono-level cervical degenerative disease (radiculopathy), which has not been substantiated in controlled trials until now. A randomized controlled trial is reported with 9 years follow up comparing anterior cervical anterior discectomy without fusion, with fusion by cage standalone, or with disc prosthesis. Patients suffering from symptomatic cervical disk degeneration at one level referred to spinal sections of department of neurosurgery or orthopedic surgery of a large general hospital with educational facilities were eligible. Neck Disability Index (NDI), McGill Pain Questionnaire Dutch language version (MPQ-DLV), physical-component summary (PCS), and mental-component summary (MCS) of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and re operation rate were evaluated. 142 patients between 18 and 55 years were allocated. The median follow-up was 8.9±1.9 years (5.6 to 12.2 years). The response rate at last follow-up was 98.5%. NDI at the last follow-up did not differ between the three treatment groups, nor did the secondary outcomes as MPQ-DLV and PCS or MCS from SF-36. The major improvement occurred within the first 6 weeks after surgery. Afterward, it remained stable. Eleven patients underwent surgery for recurrent symptoms and signs due to nerve root compression at the index or adjacent level. This randomized trial could not detect a difference between three surgical modalities for treating a single-level degenerative disk disease. Anterior cervical discectomy without implant seems to be similar to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by cage stand-alone or with disk prosthesis. Due to the small study sample size, this statement should be considered as inconclusive so far. ISRCTN41681847.

  14. What's the best surgical treatment for patients with cervical radiculopathy due to single-level degenerative disease? A randomized controlled trial.

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    Roland D Donk

    Full Text Available To investigate the efficacy of adding supplemental fusion or arthroplasty after cervical anterior discectomy for symptomatic mono-level cervical degenerative disease (radiculopathy, which has not been substantiated in controlled trials until now.A randomized controlled trial is reported with 9 years follow up comparing anterior cervical anterior discectomy without fusion, with fusion by cage standalone, or with disc prosthesis. Patients suffering from symptomatic cervical disk degeneration at one level referred to spinal sections of department of neurosurgery or orthopedic surgery of a large general hospital with educational facilities were eligible. Neck Disability Index (NDI, McGill Pain Questionnaire Dutch language version (MPQ-DLV, physical-component summary (PCS, and mental-component summary (MCS of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36, and re operation rate were evaluated.142 patients between 18 and 55 years were allocated. The median follow-up was 8.9±1.9 years (5.6 to 12.2 years. The response rate at last follow-up was 98.5%. NDI at the last follow-up did not differ between the three treatment groups, nor did the secondary outcomes as MPQ-DLV and PCS or MCS from SF-36. The major improvement occurred within the first 6 weeks after surgery. Afterward, it remained stable. Eleven patients underwent surgery for recurrent symptoms and signs due to nerve root compression at the index or adjacent level.This randomized trial could not detect a difference between three surgical modalities for treating a single-level degenerative disk disease. Anterior cervical discectomy without implant seems to be similar to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by cage stand-alone or with disk prosthesis. Due to the small study sample size, this statement should be considered as inconclusive so far.ISRCTN41681847.

  15. What’s the best surgical treatment for patients with cervical radiculopathy due to single-level degenerative disease? A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donk, Roland D.; Verbeek, André L. M.; Verhagen, Wim I. M.; Groenewoud, Hans; Hosman, Allard J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the efficacy of adding supplemental fusion or arthroplasty after cervical anterior discectomy for symptomatic mono-level cervical degenerative disease (radiculopathy), which has not been substantiated in controlled trials until now. Methods A randomized controlled trial is reported with 9 years follow up comparing anterior cervical anterior discectomy without fusion, with fusion by cage standalone, or with disc prosthesis. Patients suffering from symptomatic cervical disk degeneration at one level referred to spinal sections of department of neurosurgery or orthopedic surgery of a large general hospital with educational facilities were eligible. Neck Disability Index (NDI), McGill Pain Questionnaire Dutch language version (MPQ-DLV), physical-component summary (PCS), and mental-component summary (MCS) of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and re operation rate were evaluated. Findings 142 patients between 18 and 55 years were allocated. The median follow-up was 8.9±1.9 years (5.6 to 12.2 years). The response rate at last follow-up was 98.5%. NDI at the last follow-up did not differ between the three treatment groups, nor did the secondary outcomes as MPQ-DLV and PCS or MCS from SF-36. The major improvement occurred within the first 6 weeks after surgery. Afterward, it remained stable. Eleven patients underwent surgery for recurrent symptoms and signs due to nerve root compression at the index or adjacent level. Conclusions This randomized trial could not detect a difference between three surgical modalities for treating a single-level degenerative disk disease. Anterior cervical discectomy without implant seems to be similar to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by cage stand-alone or with disk prosthesis. Due to the small study sample size, this statement should be considered as inconclusive so far. Trial registration ISRCTN41681847 PMID:28850600

  16. Comparison Between Acrylic Cage and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage in Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Farrokhi, Majid R; Nikoo, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Hosseini, Khadijeh

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, single-blind randomized-controlled clinical study. To compare polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with a novel Acrylic cage to find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical outcomes following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is considered a standard neurosurgical treatment for degenerative diseases of cervical intervertebral disks. There are many options, including bone grafts, bone cement, and spacers made of titanium, carbon fiber, and synthetic materials, used to restore physiological disk height and enhance spinal fusion, but the ideal device, which would provide immediate structural support and subsequent osteointegration and stability, has not been identified yet. To overcome this, we designed a new, inexpensive Acrylic cage. A total of 64 patients were eligible to participate and were randomly allocated to undergo ACDF either with Acrylic interbody fusion cage filled with bone substitute (n=32) or PEEK cage (n=32). Nurick's grading was used for quantifying the neurological deficit. Clinical and radiologic outcome was assessed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and subsequently at 2, 6, and 12 months of follow-up using Odom's criteria and dynamic radiographs (flexion-extension) and computed tomography scans, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of the Acrylic cage group compared with the PEEK cage group (mean difference: -0.438; 95% confidence interval, -0.807 to -0.068; P=0.016). There was a statistically significant difference in disk space height increase between the 2 groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. The Acrylic cage achieved higher fusion rate (good fusion) than the PEEK cage (96.9% vs. 93.8%). Intervertebral angle demonstrated a significant difference among the 2 treated groups throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that the use of Acrylic cage is associated with good clinical and radiologic outcomes and it can be therefore a

  17. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain

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    Burnett Angus F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. Methods One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx, Upper lumbar (ULx and total lumbar (TLx spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Results Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638, but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p Conclusion This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  18. Analysis of Patients with Myelopathy due to Benign Intradural Spinal Tumors with Concomitant Lumbar Degenerative Diseases Misdiagnosed and Erroneously Treated with Lumbar Surgery.

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    Lu, Kang; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Yang, Chih-Hui; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Chen, Po-Yuan; Chye, Cien-Leong; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Han-Jung

    2017-09-01

    When a cervical or thoracic benign intradural spinal tumor (BIST) coexists with lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), diagnosis can be difficult. Symptoms of BIST-myelopathy can be mistaken as being related to LDD. Worse, an unnecessary lumbar surgery could be performed. This study was conducted to analyze cases in which an erroneous lumbar surgery was undertaken in the wake of failure to identify BIST-associated myelopathy. Cases were found in a hospital database. Patients who underwent surgery for LDD first and then another surgery for BIST removal within a short interval were studied. Issues investigated included why the BISTs were missed, how they were found later, and how the patients reacted to the unnecessary lumbar procedures. Over 10 years, 167 patients received both surgeries for LDD and a cervical or thoracic BIST. In 7 patients, lumbar surgery preceded tumor removal by a short interval. Mistakes shared by the physicians included failure to detect myelopathy and a BIST, and a hasty decision for lumbar surgery, which soon turned out to be futile. Although the BISTs were subsequently found and removed, 5 patients believed that the lumbar surgery was unnecessary, with 4 patients expressing regrets and 1 patient threatening to take legal action against the initial surgeon. Concomitant symptomatic LDD and BIST-associated myelopathy pose a diagnostic challenge. Spine specialists should refrain from reflexively linking leg symptoms and impaired ability to walk to LDD. Comprehensive patient evaluation is fundamental to avoid misdiagnosis and wrong lumbar surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

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    Luca Proietti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2011 the number and type of complications were recorded and both univariate, (considering the patients′ age and a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted in order to establish a possible predisposing role. 133 were lumbar disc hernia treated with microdiscetomy, 88 were lumbar stenosis, treated in 36 cases with only decompression, 52 with decompression and instrumentation with a maximum of 2 levels. 26 patients showed a lumbar fracture treated with percutaneous or open screw fixation. 12 showed a scoliotic or kyphotic deformity treated with decompression, fusion and osteotomies with a maximum of 7.3 levels of fusion (range 5-14. 70 were spondylolisthesis treated with 1 or more level of fusion. In 34 cases a fusion till S1 was performed. Results: Of the 338 patients who underwent surgery, 55 showed one or more complications. Type of surgical treatment ( P = 0.004, open surgical approach (open P = 0.001 and operative time ( P = 0.001 increased the relative risk (RR of complication occurrence of 2.3, 3.8 and 5.1 respectively. Major complications are more often seen in complex surgical treatment for severe deformities, in revision surgery and in anterior approaches with an occurrence of 58.3%. Age greater than 65 years, despite an increased RR of perioperative complications (1.5, does not represent a predisposing risk factor to complications ( P = 0.006. Conclusion: Surgical decision-making and exclusion of patients is not justified only

  20. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

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    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced her pain, as did trigger points in the left lumbar and gluteal muscles. clinical neuro-conduction testing revealed weakness of the big and other toe extensors, as well as eversion and plantar flexion of the left ankle, and a diminished left ankle reflex. This indicated possible involvement of both the l5 and S1 nerve roots.   A  manual  therapy  treatment  approach including  lumbar rotation mobilisations (Maitland approach, massage, trigger point pressure release  and  Transversus  Abdominus muscle activation  was  used.   The  patient  was  symptom  free,  had  full pain-free  range  of  all  lumbar  movements,  a full  pain-free  left  straight leg  raise  neurodynamic  test  and  normal  neurological  conduction  six weeks  after  onset, following seven manual therapy treatments.  Although the results of this case report cannot be generalised, it describes the successful outcome of a patient with severe radicular pain and neurological deficits, whose signs and symptoms  had completely resolved following manual therapy treatment.

  1. Cumulative occupational lumbar load and lumbar disc disease – results of a German multi-center case-control study (EPILIFT

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    Michaelis Martina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The to date evidence for a dose-response relationship between physical workload and the development of lumbar disc diseases is limited. We therefore investigated the possible etiologic relevance of cumulative occupational lumbar load to lumbar disc diseases in a multi-center case-control study. Methods In four study regions in Germany (Frankfurt/Main, Freiburg, Halle/Saale, Regensburg, patients seeking medical care for pain associated with clinically and radiologically verified lumbar disc herniation (286 males, 278 females or symptomatic lumbar disc narrowing (145 males, 206 females were prospectively recruited. Population control subjects (453 males and 448 females were drawn from the regional population registers. Cases and control subjects were between 25 and 70 years of age. In a structured personal interview, a complete occupational history was elicited to identify subjects with certain minimum workloads. On the basis of job task-specific supplementary surveys performed by technical experts, the situational lumbar load represented by the compressive force at the lumbosacral disc was determined via biomechanical model calculations for any working situation with object handling and load-intensive postures during the total working life. For this analysis, all manual handling of objects of about 5 kilograms or more and postures with trunk inclination of 20 degrees or more are included in the calculation of cumulative lumbar load. Confounder selection was based on biologic plausibility and on the change-in-estimate criterion. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated separately for men and women using unconditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, region, and unemployment as major life event (in males or psychosocial strain at work (in females, respectively. To further elucidate the contribution of past physical workload to the development of lumbar disc diseases, we performed lag

  2. Feasibility of Percutaneous Lumbar Discectomy Combined with Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation with Modic Type I Endplate Changes.

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    Tian, Qing-Hua; Lu, Ying-Ying; Sun, Xi-Qi; Wang, Tao; Wu, Chun-Gen; Li, Ming-Hua; Cheng-Ying, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes is complex and challenging, requiring systemic and local therapies which include conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations, percutaneous therapeutic techniques, and surgical options. The clinical management of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation involving Modic type I endplate changes is uniquely challenging because it requires alleviating pain caused by both the herniated disc and the endplate osteochondritis. Through different approaches, percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) and percutaneous cementoplasty (PCP) have been introduced into clinical practice as alternatives to traditional surgical and radiotherapy treatments of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation and other spine diseases. To evaluate the feasibility of PLD and PCP for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes. PLD and PCP in 7 patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes and its clinical effects were retrospectively evaluated. This study was conducted by an interventional therapy group at a medical center in a major Chinese city. Seven consecutive patients (2 men, 5 women; median age, 74.14 ± 5.34 years; age range, 68 - 82 years) who underwent percutaneous lumbar discectomy and cementoplasty for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I changes between May 2013 and August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The MacNab Criteria, visual analog scale (VAS), and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain were assessed before and one week, 6 months, and one year after the procedure. Furthermore, the procedure duration, hospital stay length, and complications were assessed. The VAS of the back and leg decreased from 6.14 ± 0.69 (range, 5 - 7) and 7.29 ± 0.76 (range, 6 - 8) preoperatively to 2.29 ± 1.38 (range, 1 - 5) and 2.71 ± 0.60 (range, 1 - 6) one week, 1.86 ± 0.69 (range, 1 - 3) and 2.00 ± 0.58 (range, 1 - 3) 6 months

  3. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part II: Study of dose, carrier, and species.

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    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C

    1995-12-15

    Efficacy of a bovine-derived osteoinductive growth factor was studied in a rabbit model and in a nonhuman primate model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. To determine the minimum effective dose of growth factor and the influence of different carrier material on the outcome of intertransverse process lumbar fusion. Bone morphogenetic proteins and related growth factors are becoming increasingly available in purified extract or genetically engineered forms and are capable of inducing new bone formation in vivo. Osteoinductive growth factors to enhance lumbar spinal infusion have not been well studied in models of posterolateral intertransverse process fusion. Because of the diminished potential of bone regeneration in primates (including humans) compared with phylogenetically lower animals, extrapolations regarding dose and efficacy cannot be made directly from results obtained in experiments performed on phylogenetically lower animals. Experiments on non-human primates are a critical step before attempting to use these growth factors on humans. METHODS. One hundred fifteen adult New Zealand white rabbits and 10 adult rhesus macaques underwent single level posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal arthrodesis to evaluate different doses and carrier materials for a bovine-derived osteoinductive bone protein extract. Rabbit fusion masses were evaluated 5 weeks after arthrodesis by manual palpation, radiography, biomechanical testing, and light microscopy. Monkey fusion masses were evaluated 12 weeks after arthrodesis by radiography and light microscopy. Successful posterolateral intertransverse process spinal fusions were achieved in the rabbit models using an osteoinductive growth factor with three different carriers (autogenous iliac bone, demineralized allogeneic bone matrix, and natural coral). There was a dose-dependent response to the osteoinductive growth factor in the rabbit model, indicating that a threshold must be overcome before bone

  4. Medium-term effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease.

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    Wu, Haiting; Pang, Qingjiang; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare the medium-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Fifty-seven patients with multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease underwent Dynesys stabilization (n = 26) or PLIF (n = 31) from December 2008 to February 2010. The mean follow-up period was 50.3 (range, 46-65) months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic evaluations included disc height and range of motion (ROM) of the operative segments and proximal adjacent segment on lumbar flexion-extension X-rays. The intervertebral disc signal change was defined by magnetic resonance imaging, and disc degeneration was classified by the Pfirrmann grade. Results The clinical outcomes including the VAS score and ODI were significantly improved in both groups at 3 months and the final follow-up, but the difference between the two was not significant. At the final follow-up, the disc height of stabilized segments in both groups was significantly increased; the increase was more notable in the Dynesys than PLIF group. The ROM of stabilized segments at the final follow-up decreased from 6.20° to 2.76° and 6.56° to 0.00° in the Dynesys and PLIF groups, respectively. There was no distinct change in the height of the proximal adjacent segment in the two groups. The ROM of the proximal adjacent segment in both groups increased significantly at the final follow-up; the change was significantly greater in the PLIF than Dynesys group. Only one case of adjacent segment degeneration occurred in the PLIF group, and this patient underwent a second operation. Conclusions Both Dynesys stabilization and PLIF can improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Compared with PLIF, Dynesys stabilization can maintain the mobility of the

  5. Lumbar burner and stinger syndrome in an elderly athlete.

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    Wegener, Veronika; Stäbler, Axel; Jansson, Volkmar; Birkenmaier, Christof; Wegener, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Burner or stinger syndrome is a rare sports injury caused by direct or indirect trauma during high-speed or contact sports mainly in young athletes. It affects peripheral nerves, plexus trunks or spinal nerve roots, causing paralysis, paresthesia and pain. We report the case of a 57-year-old male athlete suffering from burner syndrome related to a lumbar nerve root. He presented with prolonged pain and partial paralysis of the right leg after a skewed landing during the long jump. He was initially misdiagnosed since the first magnet resonance imaging was normal whereas electromyography showed denervation. The insurance company refused to pay damage claims. Partial recovery was achieved by pain medication and physiotherapy. Burner syndrome is an injury of physically active individuals of any age and may appear in the cervical and lumbar area. MRI may be normal due to the lack of complete nerve transection, but electromyography typically shows pathologic results.

  6. Lumbar laminectomy in a captive, adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John F; Vakharia, Kunal; Moreland, Douglas B

    2017-01-01

    Animals held in captivity tend to live longer than do their wild counterparts, and as such, are prone to developing age-related degenerative injuries. Here, we present a case of an adult female polar bear with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. There is a paucity of literature on large mammalian spine surgery, and anatomical differences between humans and other vertebrates must be taken into consideration. A 24-year-old female polar bear residing at the zoo was found to have decreased motor function in her hind legs. Diagnostic myelography performed at the L7/S1 level demonstrated lumbar stenosis at L5/6 for which a laminectomy was performed. Postoperatively, she returned to premorbid functional level, with no apparent associated adverse sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spine surgery in a polar bear and demonstrates that neurosurgical diagnostic and operative techniques developed for humans can also be applied to large mammals with successful results.

  7. Percutaneous automated diskectomy in the treatment of herniated lumbar disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onik, G.; Mooney, V.; Wiltse, L.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a new automated lumbar disk aspiration technique in which a 2-mm suction cutting probe is used. The procedure allows rapid and safe removal of disk material percutaneously. The presentation describes the technique and the preliminary results of a cooperative study. The procedure is performed under local anesthesia and the aspiration probe is placed into the disk under fluoroscopic guidance and using a posterrolateral approach. One hundred twenty patients have met the study criteria, undergone the procedure, and had at least a 6-week follow-up. Of these, 74% have achieved good to excellent results, based on physician and patient satisfaction and three other criteria. Of 93 patients for whom 6-mont follow-up is available, 71% have achieved good to excellent results. No complications have been reported. The preliminary results indicate that percutaneous automated diskectomy is a low morbidity procedure that can be done on an outpatient basis and be used successfully to treat uncomplicated herniated lumbar disks

  8. Natural history of symptomatic lumbar disk herniation controlled by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Hiromichi; Yamaura, Isakichi; Kurosa, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Hirotoshi (Toride Kyodo General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan)); Nakai, Osamu

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in clinical symptoms and sequential findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 66 patients managed with conservative treatment for lumbar disc herniation. In all but 12 patients, there was a good correlation between leg pain and MRI findings, although findings of MRI tended to slightly follow symptom improvement. A notable reduction of herniated mass was seen in a high frequency in sequentrated herniation from an extremely degenerated lumbar disk. The greater the degree of sequentration, the greater the reduction of herniated mass. A shorter duration of leg pain was significantly associated with greater reduction of the herniated mass; leg pain disappeared within 2 months when the herniated mass disappeared on MRI. Because herniated mass disappeared within a short period of time, the involvement of immune reaction was suggested, as well as the possibility of sequentration, degeneration, and phagocytosis. (N.K.).

  9. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-03-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed.

  10. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed. (orig.)

  11. A generic detailed rigid-body lumbar spine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Zee, Mark; Hansen, Lone; Wong, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present a musculo-skeletal model of the lumbar spine, which can be shared and lends itself to investigation in many locations by different researchers. This has the potential for greater reproducibility and subsequent improvement of its quality from the combined e...... is relatively easy to share and modify due to the use of a well-defined and self-contained scripting language. Validation is though still necessary for specific cases....... the literature. The work resulted in a detailed lumbar spine model with seven rigid segments with 18 degrees-of-freedom and 154 muscles. The model is able to produce a maximum extension moment of 238 Nm around L5/S1. Moreover, a comparison was made with in vivo intradiscal pressure measurements of the L4-5 disc...

  12. Which factors affect reported headache incidences after lumbar myelography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen publications were reviewed and subjected to a combined statistical analysis (meta-analysis) regarding the influence of study design factors upon reported headache and total symptom incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography. A significant association was found between reported side effects on one hand and needle diameter, follow-up time and the method of questioning