WorldWideScience

Sample records for single-leaflet mechanical heart

  1. Mechanism of artificial heart

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  2. Developments in mechanical heart valve prosthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most commonly used for replacement are mechanical heart valves and biological valves. This paper briefly outlines the evolution, designs employed, materials being used,. and important factors that affect the performance of mechanical heart valves. The clinical performance of mechanical heart valves is also addressed.

  3. FLUID MECHANICS OF ARTIFICIAL HEART VALVES

    OpenAIRE

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simon, Helene A; Sucosky, Philippe; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    1. Artificial heart valves have been in use for over five decades to replace diseased heart valves. Since the first heart valve replacement performed with a caged-ball valve, more than 50 valve designs have been developed, differing principally in valve geometry, number of leaflets and material. To date, all artificial heart valves are plagued with complications associated with haemolysis, coagulation for mechanical heart valves and leaflet tearing for tissue-based valve prosthesis. For mecha...

  4. Developments in mechanical heart valve prosthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial heart valves are engineered devices used for replacing diseased or damaged natural valves of the heart. Most commonly used for replacement are mechanical heart valves and biological valves. This paper briefly outlines the evolution, designs employed, materials being used,. and important factors that affect the ...

  5. Estimation of torque on mechanical heart valves due to magnetic resonance imaging including an estimation of the significance of the Lenz effect using a computational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Neil M. [44 Ardgowan Street, Greenock PA16 8EL (United Kingdom). E-mail: neil.robertson at physics.org; Diaz-Gomez, Manuel [Plaza Alcalde Horacio Hermoso, 2, 3-A 41013 Seville (Spain). E-mail: manolo-diaz at latinmail.com; Condon, Barrie [Department of Clinical Physics, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom). E-mail: barrie.condon at udcf.gla.ac.uk

    2000-12-01

    Mitral and aortic valve replacement is a procedure which is common in cardiac surgery. Some of these replacement valves are mechanical and contain moving metal parts. Should the patient in whom such a valve has been implanted be involved in magnetic resonance imaging, there is a possible dangerous interaction between the moving metal parts and the static magnetic field due to the Lenz effect. Mathematical models of two relatively common forms of single-leaflet valves have been derived and the magnitude of the torque which opposes the motion of the valve leaflet has been calculated for a valve disc of solid metal. In addition, a differential model of a ring-strengthener valve type has been considered to determine the likely significance of the Lenz effect in the context of the human heart. For common magnetic field strengths at present, i.e. 1 to 2 T, the effect is not particularly significant. However, there is a marked increase in back pressure as static magnetic field strength increases. There are concerns that, since field strengths in the range 3 to 4 T are increasingly being used, the Lenz effect could become significant. At 5 to 10 T the malfunction of the mechanical heart valve could cause the heart to behave as though it is diseased. For unhealthy or old patients this could possibly prove fatal. (author)

  6. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  7. Developments in mechanical heart valve prosthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Mechanical heart valves; biological valves; valve design; valve performance. 1. Introduction. The human heart can be considered a twin positive displacement pump working in tandem for supporting the systemic and pulmonary circulation of blood. Each pump comprises of a receiving chamber called atrium and a pumping ...

  8. Serotonin Mechanisms in Heart Valve Disease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Bo; Xu, Jie; Connolly, Jeanne; Savani, Rashmin C.; Narula, Navneet; Liang, Bruce; Levy, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical disorders associated with increased serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] levels, such as carcinoid syndrome, and the use of serotonin agonists, such as fenfluoramine have been associated with a valvulopathy characterized by hyperplastic valvular and endocardial lesions with increased extracellular matrix. Furthermore, 5-HT has been demonstrated to up-regulate transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mesangial cells via G-protein signal transduction. We investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure of heart valve interstitial cells to 5-HT may result in increased TGF-β1 expression and activity because of serotonin receptor-mediated signal transduction with activation of Gαq, and subsequently up-regulation of phospholipase C. Thus, in the present study we performed a clinical-pathological investigation of retrieved carcinoid and normal valve cusps using immunohistochemical techniques to detect the presence of TGF-β1 and other proteins associated with TGF-β expression, including TGF-β receptors I and II, latent TGF-β-associated peptide (LAP), and α-smooth muscle actin. Carcinoid valve cusps demonstrated the unusual finding of widespread smooth muscle actin involving the interstitial cells in the periphery of carcinoid nodules; these same cells were also positive for LAP. Normal valve cusps were only focally positive for smooth muscle actin and LAP. In sheep aortic valve interstitial cell cultures 5-HT induced TGF-β1 mRNA production and increased TGF-β1 activity. 5-HT also increased collagen biosynthesis at the dosages studied. Furthermore, TGF-β1 added to SAVIC cultures increased the production of sulfated glycan and hyaluronic acid. In addition, overexpression of Gαq using an adenoviral expression vector for a constitutively active Gαq mutant (Q209L-Gαq) resulted in increased phospholipase C activity as well as up-regulation of TGF-β expression and activity. These results strongly support the view that G-protein-related signal

  9. [Spectral analysis and LDB based classification of heart sounds with mechanical prosthetic heart valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Wu, Yuequan; Yao, Jianping; Yang, Song; Du, Minghui

    2011-12-01

    Auscultation, the act of listening for heart sounds to aid in the diagnosis of various heart diseases, is a widely used efficient technique by cardiologists. Since the mechanical prosthetic heart valves are widely used today, it is important to develop a simple and efficient method to detect abnormal mechanical valves. The study on five different mechanical valves showed that only the case of perivalvular leakage could be detected by spectral estimation. Though it is possible to classify different mechanical valves by using time-frequency components of the signal directly, the recognition rate is merely 84%. However, with the improved local discriminant bases (LDB) algorithm to extract features from heart sounds, the recognition rate is 97.3%. Experimental results demonstrated that the improved LDB algorithm could improve classification rate and reduce computational complexity in comparison with original LDB algorithm.

  10. Patents and heart valve surgery--I: mechanical valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Faisal H; Hussain, Nasir; Kossar, Alexander P; Polvani, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    Valvular heart disease, inherited or acquired, affects more than 5 million Americans yearly. Whereas medical treatment is beneficial in the initial stages of valvular heart disease, surgical correction provides symptomatic relief and long-term survival benefits. Surgical options include either repair or replacement using mechanical or bio-prosthetic valves. Patient age and the post-operative need for anticoagulation therapy are major determinants of the choice between use of mechanical or bio-prosthetic valves. Since the first mechanical valves were made available several decades ago, the incorporation of increasingly sophisticated materials and methodologies has led to substantial improvements in the valve design, and has catalyzed a parallel increase in the amount of patents issued for these emerging technologies. In this paper, we have chronologically reviewed such patents, briefly discussed various challenges that mechanical heart valve implementation is faced with and finally reviewed some of the strategies employed to overcome such obstacles. An ideal prosthetic heart valve would comprehensively mimic the natural hemodynamics and physiology of the native heart valve. Additionally, such a valve would be easily implantable, associated with a minimal risk of thrombosis and thus need for anti-coagulation, and with a proven long-term durability. With cutting edge technological advancements in the recent times, the ongoing innovative and collaborative efforts of physicians, scientists, and engineers will not seize until an ideal mechanical heart valve becomes a reality.

  11. Computational Hemodynamic Investigation of Bileaflet and Trileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yee Han; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Kabinejadian, Foad; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-05-01

    The trileaflet heart valve is a more desirable mechanical heart valve due to its similarity to native heart valves, which produce a central blood flow with decreased blood flow disturbance. There are, however, many challenges and difficulties in designing a trileaflet valve, mainly due to a greater number of moving mechanical parts. The flow profiles through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) and a trileaflet mechanical heart valve (TMHV) were compared at downstream regions. Geometric models of a 29 mm St. Jude Medical BMHV and a TMHV were used and positioned at the anatomic position in a curved aortic downstream geometry. Three-dimensional numerical simulations for both types of mechanical heart valve were performed under normal physiological pulsatile flow conditions. Flow profiles were studied under three different implantation locations at Z = 1D (D = 29 mm inlet diameter), 2D and 4D along the aorta centerline during peak systole. The simulation results showed different flow fields at the downstream positions at Z = 1D and 2D. The leaflets of the BMHV obstructed the flow, while the TMHV allowed a central orifice flow which resulted in a more physiological flow profile. Further downstream, at Z = 4D, the flow fields shared similarities in terms of the flow profile and velocity magnitude. The findings of this study may help to further improve the development of the TMHV.

  12. Mechanical stimulation in the engineering of heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Norman Yu; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2016-01-15

    Recreating the beating heart in the laboratory continues to be a formidable bioengineering challenge. The fundamental feature of the heart is its pumping action, requiring considerable mechanical forces to compress a blood filled chamber with a defined in- and outlet. Ventricular output crucially depends on venous loading of the ventricles (preload) and on the force generated by the preloaded ventricles to overcome arterial blood pressure (afterload). The rate of contraction is controlled by the spontaneously active sinus node and transmission of its electrical impulses into the ventricles. The underlying principles for these physiological processes are described by the Frank-Starling mechanism and Bowditch phenomenon. It is essential to consider these principles in the design and evaluation of tissue engineered myocardium. This review focuses on current strategies to evoke mechanical loading in hydrogel-based heart muscle engineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-[ 14 C]carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by ∼20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels

  14. Mechanical stresses at the heart of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eripret, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    In a production unit, cracking of a sensitive component can mean unavailability with very high costs. In the case of pressurised water nuclear reactors, an incident on the primary circuit can lead to radioactive pollution. Safety requirements mean that containment of nuclear fuel and fission products must be totally assured by the three 'safety' barriers (fuel-rod sheathing, primary circuit piping, and the concrete containment building). Control of material damage mechanisms is therefore a major technical concern in nuclear engineering. (author)

  15. Space-time fluid mechanics computation of heart valve models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Buscher, Austin; Asada, Shohei

    2014-10-01

    Fluid mechanics computation of heart valves with an interface-tracking (moving-mesh) method was one of the classes of computations targeted in introducing the space-time (ST) interface tracking method with topology change (ST-TC). The ST-TC method is a new version of the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) method. It can deal with an actual contact between solid surfaces in flow problems with moving interfaces, while still possessing the desirable features of interface-tracking methods, such as better resolution of the boundary layers. The DSD/SST method with effective mesh update can already handle moving-interface problems when the solid surfaces are in near contact or create near TC, if the "nearness" is sufficiently "near" for the purpose of solving the problem. That, however, is not the case in fluid mechanics of heart valves, as the solid surfaces need to be brought into an actual contact when the flow has to be completely blocked. Here we extend the ST-TC method to 3D fluid mechanics computation of heart valve models. We present computations for two models: an aortic valve with coronary arteries and a mechanical aortic valve. These computations demonstrate that the ST-TC method can bring interface-tracking accuracy to fluid mechanics of heart valves, and can do that with computational practicality.

  16. Mechanisms of initial heart rate response to postural change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, C.; Wieling, W.; van Brederode, J. F.; Hond, A.; de Rijk, L. G.; Dunning, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    We explored in 43 healthy subjects the afferent mechanisms of the initial heart rate response to standing by comparing free standing, 70 degrees head-up tilt, handgrip, and contraction of abdominal and leg muscles. The results indicate the following. 1) Standing evokes an immediate, large, bimodal

  17. Atrial fibrillation driver mechanisms: Insight from the isolated human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csepe, Thomas A; Hansen, Brian J; Fedorov, Vadim V

    2017-01-01

    Although there have been great technological advances in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF), current therapies remain limited due to a narrow understanding of AF mechanisms in the human heart. This review will highlight our recent studies on explanted human hearts where we developed and employed a novel functional-structural mapping approach by integrating high-resolution simultaneous endo-epicardial and panoramic optical mapping with 3D gadolinium-enhanced MRI to define the spatiotemporal characteristics of AF drivers and their structural substrates. The results allow us to postulate that the primary mechanism of AF maintenance in human hearts is a limited number of localized intramural microanatomic reentrant AF drivers anchored to heart-specific 3D fibrotically insulated myobundle tracks, which may remain hidden to clinical single-surface electrode mapping. We suggest that ex vivo human heart studies, by using an integrated 3D functional and structural mapping approach, will help to reveal defining features of AF drivers as well as validate and improve clinical approaches to detect and target these AF drivers in patients with cardiac diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical testing of pericardium for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiari, Paola; Fiorese, Michele; Iop, Laura; Gerosa, Gino; Bagno, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian pericardia are currently used for the production of percutaneous prosthetic heart valves. The characteristics of biological tissues largely influence the durability of prosthetic devices used in the percutaneous approach and in traditional surgery, too. This paper reviews methodologies employed to assess and compare mechanical properties of pericardial patches from different mammalian species in order to identify the biomaterials adequate for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluid Mechanics of Heart Valves and Their Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Le, Trung Bao; Gilmanov, Anvar

    2016-01-01

    As the pulsatile cardiac blood flow drives the heart valve leaflets to open and close, the flow in the vicinity of the valve resembles a pulsed jet through a nonaxisymmetric orifice with a dynamically changing area. As a result, three-dimensional vortex rings with intricate topology emerge that interact with the complex cardiac anatomy and give rise to shear layers, regions of recirculation, and flow instabilities that could ultimately lead to transition to turbulence. Such complex flow patterns, which are inherently valve- and patient-specific, lead to mechanical forces at scales that can cause blood cell damage and thrombosis, increasing the likelihood of stroke, and can trigger the pathogenesis of various life-threatening valvular heart diseases. We summarize the current understanding of flow phenomena induced by heart valves, discuss their linkage with disease pathways, and emphasize the research advances required to translate in-depth understanding of valvular hemodynamics into effective patient therapies.

  20. Superhydrophobicity to minimize thrombogenic risk on mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, David; Vahabi, Hamed; Movafaghi, Sanli; Popat, Ketul; Kota, Arun K.; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2017-11-01

    A large number of prosthetic heart valves are implanted each year to treat heart valve disease, where half of the surgically replaced valves are mechanical heart valves (MHV)s. MHVs are at high risk for thrombosis and therefore require lifelong antithrombotic therapies, causing an increased bleeding risk that can lead to death. To alleviate this need, we investigate the potential of superhydrophobic surfaces in reducing the thrombotic risk. Particle imaging velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics are used to quantify shear stress in the presence of potential slip on the surface. Coagulation and cell adhesion are quantified by incubating blood under static conditions. We further evaluate a dynamic blood response in polydimethylsiloxane channels under complex shear conditions that mimic the hinge region of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a region known to exhibit thrombosis. Overall, Shear stress is not reduced on a superhydrophobic bileaflet MHV. However, superhydrophobic surfaces significantly reduce the potential for platelet responses under static and dynamic blood flow conditions, a counterintuitive result when considering that hydrophobic surfaces are prone to protein and cell adhesion. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number R01HL119824 and F32HL129730. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

  1. Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Jorde, Ulrich P; González-Costello, José

    2017-05-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis and heart transplant is still the best treatment option. However, the scarcity of donors, long waiting times, and an increasing number of unstable patients have favored the development of mechanical circulatory support. This review summarizes the indications for heart transplant, candidate evaluation, current immunosuppression strategies, the evaluation and treatment of rejection, infectious prophylaxis, and short and long-term outcomes. Regarding mechanical circulatory support, we distinguish between short- and long-term support and the distinct strategies that can be used: bridge to decision, recovery, candidacy, transplant, and destination therapy. We then discuss indications, risk assessment, management of complications, especially with long-term support, and outcomes. Finally, we discuss future challenges and how the widespread use of long-term support for patients with advanced heart failure will only be viable if their complications and costs are reduced. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of novel anticoagulants for patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Peter; DeSancho, Maria T

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of the target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) has led to a major shift in the management of patients at risk for thrombosis. The landscape continues to evolve as the evidence regarding their efficacy and safety in various clinical situations emerges. Antithrombotic therapy for thromboprophylaxis in patients with mechanical heart valves is challenging. To date, the RE-ALIGN trial comparing dabigatran etexilate to warfarin is the only randomized controlled study in this patient population. The higher risk of thromboembolic and bleeding events in the group of patients who received dabigatran compared with warfarin reinforced current guidelines recommending against the use of TSOACs in patients with mechanical heart valves. However, additional studies are needed to find suitable alternatives to vitamin K antagonists in this unique patient population.

  3. Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie N Tillquist

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Maggie N Tillquist1, Thomas M Maddox21School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 2VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, and Department of Medicine (Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve's longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients' values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed.Keywords: prosthetic heart valves, patient preference, valve type, anticoagulant, structural valve deterioration 

  4. Platelet activation through a Bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Platelet activation is one of the major drawbacks of the Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) which can increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients. The platelet activation in MHVs can be due to the abnormal shear stress during the systole, the backward leakage flow during the diastole, and the flow through the hinge region. We investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanism to the activation of platelets in MHVs by performing simulations of the flow through the MHV and in the hinge region. The large scale heart valve simulations are performed in a straight aorta using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm under physiological flow conditions. In addition, in order to perform the simulation of hinge region the flow field boundary conditions are obtained from the largescale simulations during a whole cardiac cycle. In order to investigate the role of hinge flow on platelet activation in MHVs, a 23mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve hinge with three different gap sizes is tested along with different platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of our results with different activation models. We compare the platelet activation of the hinge region against the bulk of the flow during one cardiac cycle. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Flow trough a Mechanical Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Esmaeili, Farida; Oshkai, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Turbulent flow trough a model of a mechanical heart valve is investigated using digital particle image velocimetry. The valve leaflets are represented by flat plates mounted in a duct. The emphasis is on the effect of the valve design on the platelet activation state associated with the resulting flow field. Global quantitative images corresponding to multiple planes of data acquisition provide insight into the three-dimensional nature of the flow. Turbulent flow structures including jet-like regions and shed vortices are characterized in terms of patterns of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity, vorticity, and streamline topology. Potential of bileaflet heart valves for being thrombogenic is assessed by quantitative comparison of the associated flow fields in terms of maximum values of turbulent stresses and platelet activation states.

  6. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested.

  7. Effects of Myocardial Contractility on Microemboli Production by Mechanical Heart Valves in a Bovine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Deklunder, Ghislaine; Lecroart, Jean-Louis; Conger, Jeff L.; Lapeyre, Didier; Gregoric, Igor; Rose, Harris; Tamez, Daniel; Frazier, O. H.

    2000-01-01

    Microemboli caused by mechanical heart valves have the potential to cause cerebrovascular events. We investigated the effects of myocardial contractility and heart rate on microemboli production in association with conventional and experimental mechanical heart valves implanted in the mitral position in a bovine model.

  8. Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillquist, Maggie N; Maddox, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve’s longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients’ values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed. PMID:21448466

  9. Genesis of the Mechanical Heart Valves' Ultrasonic Closing Clicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Kenji

    A new in vitro experimental tool was developed to study the mechanism of the ultrasonic closing clicks' genesis of mechanical heart valves. Since the newly developed tester adopted compressed air flow directly instead of the blood analog fluid to drive the mechanical heart valve, it is not possibe to generate any cavitation. Closing clicks were measured with a small accelerometer at the surface of the valve holder made of silicone rubber. Ultrasonic closing clicks as well as audible closing clicks, similar to those measured clinically, could be observed using this setup. Thus, it was confirmed that the ultrasonic closing clicks can be generated without the existence of cavitation. Simultaneous measurements of the valve motion were made with a high-speed video camera, and the analysis of the video frames and clicks showed that higher frequency signal components of more than 50kHz could be generated only at the instant of the closure, which means the collision of the occluder with the housing. Eighteen miniature accelerometers with an area of one square millimeter were developed and stuck on the housing to monitor the distribution of the housing vibrations in detail, and it was found that the vibrations correspond to the ultrasonic closing clicks propagated from the valve stop: the collision point of the occluder with the housing. This fact indicated that the generation of ultrasonic closing clicks are limited to the small area of the collision. From those results, it was concluded that the major origin of the ultrasonic closing clicks' genesis should be the collision of the occluder with the housing.

  10. Effectiveness of dabigatran etexilate for thromboprophylaxis of mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Abel, Stuart; Camp, Christopher L; Suri, Rakesh M; Ereth, Mark H; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2011-06-01

    Warfarin reduces risk of stroke in patients with mechanical heart valves but increases risk of hemorrhage and is difficult to use. Dabigatran etexilate, a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor, is safe and effective in reducing risk of stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation. No data exist in the setting of mechanical heart valves. We tested the hypothesis that dabigatran etexilate is as effective as heparin for thromboprophylaxis of mechanical valves in a porcine heterotopic aortic valve model. Thirty swine underwent implantation of modified bileaflet mechanical valved conduit bypassing the ligated, native descending thoracic aorta. Animals randomly received no anticoagulation (n = 10), enoxaparin 2 mg/kg subcutaneously twice daily (n = 10), or dabigatran etexilate 20 mg/kg orally twice daily. Primary end point was amount of valve thrombus at 30 days. Secondary end points included quantitative measurement of platelet deposition on valve prosthesis, thromboelastography, and hemorrhagic and embolic events. At 30 days, we observed 638 ± 895 mg thrombus in no anticoagulation group, 121 ± 128 mg in enoxaparin group, and 19 ± 31 mg in dabigatran etexilate group (P = .01 enoxaparin vs dabigatran etexilate). Fewer platelets were deposited on valves in dabigatran etexilate group (2.7 × 10(8)) than in enoxaparin group (1.8 × 10(9), P = .03). No major or occult hemorrhagic or embolic events were observed. By thromboelastographic analysis, dabigatran etexilate produced less prolongation of K value (P = .01) and less decreases in angle (P = .01) and maximum amplitude (P = .001) than enoxaparin. Dabigatran etexilate is as effective as enoxaparin for short-term thromboprophylaxis of mechanical valves. It prevents valve thrombus and platelet deposition at 30 days without increased adverse events. These promising results serve as a foundation for prospective clinical trials with dabigatran etexilate as an alternative to warfarin in patients with bileaflet

  11. Mechanism of action of ethanol on heart contractility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oquendo-Muriente, I.; De Mello, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol depresses heart contractility. To investigate the mechanism of the negative inotropic action of ethanol, rat ventricular strips were dissected and mounted vertically in a transparent chamber. The preparation was superfused initially with normal oxygenated Tyrode solution (32.5 0 C) and electrically stimulated (1 Hz). After 1 hour of equilibration, contractures were elicited by exposing the muscle strips to high K + (100 mM) solution. Studies on the influence of (Ca 2+ ) 0 on K + contractures showed that the first rapid component of the contracture (58 mg/sec - S.E. +/- 8; n = 8) was greatly dependent upon (Ca 2+ ) 0 while the second slow component (20 mg/sec - S.E. +/- 5; n = 8) was slightly altered. The addition of ethanol (400 mg/100 ml) to high K solution abolished the fast component and reduced the amplitude of the second phase of K contractures. Similar results were obtained with verapamil (10 -5 M). These results, as well as studies on the effect of the drug on 45 Ca fluxes support the view that ethanol decreases the permeability of the heart cell membrane to Ca

  12. Mechanism of action of ethanol on heart contractility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oquendo-Muriente, I.; De Mello, W.C.

    1986-03-05

    Ethanol depresses heart contractility. To investigate the mechanism of the negative inotropic action of ethanol, rat ventricular strips were dissected and mounted vertically in a transparent chamber. The preparation was superfused initially with normal oxygenated Tyrode solution (32.5/sup 0/C) and electrically stimulated (1 Hz). After 1 hour of equilibration, contractures were elicited by exposing the muscle strips to high K/sup +/ (100 mM) solution. Studies on the influence of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub 0/ on K/sup +/ contractures showed that the first rapid component of the contracture (58 mg/sec - S.E. +/- 8; n = 8) was greatly dependent upon (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub 0/ while the second slow component (20 mg/sec - S.E. +/- 5; n = 8) was slightly altered. The addition of ethanol (400 mg/100 ml) to high K solution abolished the fast component and reduced the amplitude of the second phase of K contractures. Similar results were obtained with verapamil (10/sup -5/ M). These results, as well as studies on the effect of the drug on /sup 45/Ca fluxes support the view that ethanol decreases the permeability of the heart cell membrane to Ca.

  13. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, H.; Chaudhry, A.; Ayyub, M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  14. Heart failure and kidney dysfunction: epidemiology, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefold, Joerg C; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major health-care problem and the prognosis of affected patients is poor. HF often coexists with a number of comorbidities of which declining renal function is of particular importance. A loss of glomerular filtration rate, as in acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD), independently predicts mortality and accelerates the overall progression of cardiovascular disease and HF. Importantly, cardiac and renal diseases interact in a complex bidirectional and interdependent manner in both acute and chronic settings. From a pathophysiological perspective, cardiac and renal diseases share a number of common pathways, including inflammatory and direct, cellular immune-mediated mechanisms; stress-mediated and (neuro)hormonal responses; metabolic and nutritional changes including bone and mineral disorder, altered haemodynamic and acid-base or fluid status; and the development of anaemia. In an effort to better understand the important crosstalk between the two organs, classifications such as the cardio-renal syndromes were developed. This classification might lead to a more precise understanding of the complex interdependent pathophysiology of cardiac and renal diseases. In light of exceptionally high mortality associated with coexisting HF and kidney disease, this Review describes important crosstalk between the heart and kidney, with a focus on HF and kidney disease in the acute and chronic settings. Underlying molecular and cellular pathomechanisms in HF, AKI and CKD are discussed in addition to current and future therapeutic approaches.

  15. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  16. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  17. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou Jianhong; Xia Ling; Zhang Yu; Shou Guofa [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wei Qing; Liu Feng; Crozier, Stuart [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: xialing@zju.edu.cn

    2009-01-21

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  18. The mechanisms of muscle wasting in COPD and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Vescovo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the mechanisms leading to skeletal muscle wasting in COPD and heart failure are common to both conditions. These encompass neurohormonal activation and systemic inflammation. The mechanisms leading to muscle dysfunction are both qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative changes comprise the transition from aerobic metabolism and prevalent slow fibers composition toward anaerobic metabolism and fast fibers synthesis. Quantitative changes are mainly linked to muscle loss. These changes occur not only in the major muscles bulks of the body but also in respiratory muscles. The mechanisms leading to muscle wastage include cytokine-triggered skeletal muscle apoptosis and ubiquitin-proteasomeand non-ubiquitin-dependent pathways. The regulation of fiber type involves the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1/calcineurin/transcriptional coactivator PGC1 cascade. The imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation plays an important role. Protein degradation can occur through ubiquitin-dependent and non-ubiquitin-dependent pathways. Very recently, two systems controlling ubiquitin-proteasome activation have been described: FOXO-ubiquitin ligase and NFkB ubiquitin ligase. These are triggered by TNFα and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1. Moreover, apoptosis, which is triggered by tumor necrosis factor α, plays an important role. Another mechanism acting on muscle wastage is malnutrition, with an imbalance between catabolic and anabolic factors toward the catabolic component. Catabolism is also worsened by the activation of the adrenergic system and alteration of the cortisol/DEHA ratio toward cortisol production. Sarcomeric protein oxidation and its consequent contractile impairment can be another cause of skeletal muscle dysfunction in CHF.

  19. Myocardial Architecture, Mechanics, and Fibrosis in Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ghonim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common category of birth defect, affecting 1% of the population and requiring cardiovascular surgery in the first months of life in many patients. Due to advances in congenital cardiovascular surgery and patient management, most children with CHD now survive into adulthood. However, residual and postoperative defects are common resulting in abnormal hemodynamics, which may interact further with scar formation related to surgical procedures. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has become an important diagnostic imaging modality in the long-term management of CHD patients. It is the gold standard technique to assess ventricular volumes and systolic function. Besides this, advanced CMR techniques allow the acquisition of more detailed information about myocardial architecture, ventricular mechanics, and fibrosis. The left ventricle (LV and right ventricle have unique myocardial architecture that underpins their mechanics; however, this becomes disorganized under conditions of volume and pressure overload. CMR diffusion tensor imaging is able to interrogate non-invasively the principal alignments of microstructures in the left ventricular wall. Myocardial tissue tagging (displacement encoding using stimulated echoes and feature tracking are CMR techniques that can be used to examine the deformation and strain of the myocardium in CHD, whereas 3D feature tracking can assess the twisting motion of the LV chamber. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging and more recently T1 mapping can help in detecting fibrotic myocardial changes and evolve our understanding of the pathophysiology of CHD patients. This review not only gives an overview about available or emerging CMR techniques for assessing myocardial mechanics and fibrosis but it also describes their clinical value and how they can be used to detect abnormalities in myocardial architecture and mechanics in CHD patients.

  20. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-05-03

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal Anticoagulation for Pregnant Women with Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Rohan; Silversides, Candice K; McLintock, Claire

    2016-10-01

    The prothrombotic state of pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolic complications and death in women with mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Although it is accepted that these women must be on therapeutic anticoagulation throughout pregnancy, competing maternal and fetal risks, as well as the lack of high-quality data from prospective studies, make the choice of the optimal method of anticoagulation challenging. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with fewer maternal complications, but conversely also the lowest live birth rates as well as warfarin-related embryopathy and fetopathy. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) does not cross the placenta and is associated with fewer fetal risks but more maternal complications. Sequential treatment involving VKAs in the second and third trimesters and either low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin in the first trimester, although appealing is still associated with maternal complications, especially around the time of bridging. As absolute equipoise of maternal versus fetal wellbeing is unlikely, patient preferences should be considered in decision making. A multidisciplinary team including hematologists, cardiologists, obstetric physicians, and high-risk obstetricians with expertise in the management of pregnant women with cardiac disease is required to optimize outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to determine the anticoagulant regimen for women with MHVs that provides optimal and acceptable maternal and fetal outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  3. Bridge Therapy Outcomes in Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delate, Thomas; Meisinger, Stephanie M; Witt, Daniel M; Jenkins, Daniel; Douketis, James D; Clark, Nathan P

    2017-11-01

    Bridge therapy is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism (TE) without a corresponding reduction in TE. The benefits of bridge therapy in patients with mechanical heart valve (MHV) prostheses interrupting warfarin for invasive procedures are not well described. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at an integrated health-care delivery system. Anticoagulated patients with MHV interrupting warfarin for invasive diagnostic or surgical procedures between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2012, were identified. Patients were categorized according to exposure to bridge therapy during the periprocedural period and TE risk (low, medium, and high). Outcomes validated via manual chart review included clinically relevant bleeding, TE, and all-cause mortality in the 30 days following the procedure. There were 547 procedures in 355 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Mean cohort age was 65.2 years, and 38% were female. Bridge therapy was utilized in 466 (85.2%) procedures (95.2%, 77.3%, and 65.8% of high, medium, and low TE risk category procedures, respectively). The 30-day rate of clinically relevant bleeding was numerically higher in bridged (5.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9%-8.3%) versus not bridged procedures (1.2%; 95% CI, bridge therapy is common among patients with MHV and may be associated with increased bleeding risk. Further research is needed to determine whether bridge therapy reduces TE in patients with MHV interrupting warfarin for invasive procedures.

  4. A Structural Analysis of a Mechanical Heart Valve Prosthesis with Flat Leaflet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Joo

    This paper addresses the basic concept of MDO methodology and the structural analysis that should be performed in the design process of a mechanical heart valve prosthesis with flat leaflet using MDO methodology. In the structural design of the mechanical heart valve (MHV) prosthesis, the fluid mechanics analysis is executed for the blood flow passing through the leaflets of a mechanical heart valve prosthesis. Thereafter, the rigid body dynamics analysis of the leaflet motion is performed to obtain the structural condition for the structural mechanics analysis of the deformed leaflet. Then the structural mechanics analysis of the deformed leaflet follows to confirm the minimum thickness of the leaflet for the structural durability of the mechanical heart valve prosthesis. This paper shows that the minimum leaflet thickness can be evaluated to be 0.6mm among the suggested thicknesses.

  5. Prognostic importance of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Shah, Sanjiv J; Anand, Inder

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony has been described in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), but its prognostic significance is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: Of 3445 patients with HFpEF enrolled in the Treatment of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure with an...

  6. Effects of captopril on the heart mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graeff, Pieter Andries de

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental and clinical effects of captopril on the heart. Captopril was the first angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor for oral administration. This enzyme is responsiblef or the conversion of angiotensin I in angiotensinII , one of the most potent pressor substances

  7. Mechanisms and management of heart failure in active rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulminating active rheumatic carditis has been observed for over three decades in this environment with no recent alteration in either the incidence or the pattern of presentation. Heart failure (in this context defined as 'an inadequate circulation at rest together with a raised pulmonary venous pressure, with or without an ...

  8. Development of mechanical heart valves - an inspiring tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rajashekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical evolution of the prosthetic heart valves from the first attempts with the Hufnagel′s valve in the treatment of the aortic insufficiency to the Starr-Edwards′ ball valve and later the tilting disc valves (Bjork-Shiley etc., and finally the bileaflet valves (St. Jude are discussed. The Indian contribution with Chitra valve is also described.

  9. Mechanisms and active rheumatic management carditis of heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-18

    Aug 18, 1990 ... active rheumatic management carditis. , of heart failure. •. In. J. B. BARLOW, R. H. MARCUS, W. A. POCOCK, C. W. BARLOW,. R.ESSOP, P.SAREU. Summary. Fulminating ... management of the valve lesion mandatory as a life-saving measure. .... definite clubbing of the fmgers in about 15% of patients. This.

  10. Hydrodynamic characteristics of mechanical heart valve prostheses in steady and pulsatile flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, František; Kořenář, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2002), s. 249-258 ISSN 1210-2717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : mechanical heart valve prostheses * flow visualization- steady and pulsatile flow Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  11. Holographic methods for quality monitoring and stress visualization in biological and mechanical prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubin, Alexander M.; von Bally, Gert; Deiwick, M.; Geiger, A. W.; Scheld, H. H.

    1996-01-01

    A new application of holographic interferometry in biomedicine and bioengineering is presented. Holographic interferometry techniques for non-destructive testing and biomechanical evaluation of prosthetic heart valves are developed, and experimental results obtained with tissue and mechanical values are demonstrated.

  12. Management dilemmas in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Muslahi, Muhanna; Haque, Mohammed A; Shehab, Abdullah

    2012-03-26

    Management of warfarin-induced major bleeding in patients with mechanical heart valves is challenging. There is vast controversy and confusion in the type of treatment required to reverse anticoagulation and stop bleeding as well as the ideal time to restart warfarin therapy safely without recurrence of bleeding and/or thromboembolism. Presently, the treatments available to reverse warfarin-induced bleeding are vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa. Currently, vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma are the recommended treatments in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding. The safe use of prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa in patients with mechanical heart valves is controversial and needs well-designed clinical studies. With regard to restarting anticoagulation in patients with warfarin-induced major bleeding and mechanical heart valves, the safe period varies from 7-14 d after the onset of bleeding for patients with intracranial bleed and 48-72 h for patients with extra-cranial bleed. In this review article, we present relevant literature about these controversies and suggest recommendations for management of patients with warfarin-induced bleeding and a mechanical heart valve. Furthermore, there is an urgent need for separate specific guidelines from major associations/ professional societies with regard to mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced bleeding.

  13. The mechanization of the heart: Harvey and Descartes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuchs, Thomas; Grene, Marjorie Glicksman

    2001-01-01

    ... Physiology d) Conclusion THE MOTION OF HEART AND BLOOD 33 35 43 47 48 48 51 53 53 56 59 III. : a) Calor and Spiritus b) Muscles and Nerves c) Sensus and Motus in Harvey's Later Works d) Summary: Polarity and Movement DE MOTU LOCALI ANIMALIUM THINGS 62 64 66 69 73 THE MOVEMENT OF LIVING IV. DE GENERATIONE : a) The Early Stages of Ontogenesis b) The Regula...

  14. [The Starr-Edwards heart valve: one of the oldest mechanical heart valves still functioning today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenaker, Michiel H; van Wetten, Herbert B; Morshuis, Wim J

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, the Starr-Edwards valve was the first artificial heart valve to be successfully implanted in humans. This valve has now been in use for decades with outstanding results: patients whose life expectancy had previously been short acquired a good prognosis with this development. Nowadays the Starr-Edwards valve is not used anymore, but patients are being described today in whom these valves are still functioning well after more than 40 years.

  15. Mechanisms and management of diuretic resistance in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyne, L K M

    2003-05-01

    Diuretic drugs are used almost universally in patients with congestive heart failure, most frequently the potent loop diuretics. Despite their unproven effect on survival, their indisputable efficacy in relieving congestive symptoms makes them first line therapy for most patients. In the treatment of more advanced stages of heart failure diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention despite the use of appropriate doses. Diuretic resistance may be caused by decreased renal function and reduced and delayed peak concentrations of loop diuretics in the tubular fluid, but it can also be observed in the absence of these pharmacokinetic abnormalities. When the effect of a short acting diuretic has worn off, postdiuretic salt retention will occur during the rest of the day. Chronic treatment with a loop diuretic results in compensatory hypertrophy of epithelial cells downstream from the thick ascending limb and consequently its diuretic effect will be blunted. Strategies to overcome diuretic resistance include restriction of sodium intake, changes in dose, changes in timing, and combination diuretic therapy.

  16. Motion analysis of mechanical heart valve prosthesis utilizing high-speed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlparvar, Payam; Guo, George; Kingsbury, Chris

    1993-01-01

    The Edwards-Duromedics (ED) mechanical heart valve prosthesis is of a bileaflet design, incorporating unique design features that distinguish its performance with respect to other mechanical valves of similar type. Leaflet motion of mechanical heart valves, particularly during closure, is related to valve durability, valve sounds and the efficiency of the cardiac output. Modifications to the ED valve have resulted in significant improvements with respect to leaflet motion. In this study a high-speed video system was used to monitor the leaflet motion of the valve, and to compare the performance of the Modified Specification to that of the Original Specification using a St. Jude Medical as a control valve.

  17. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation.

  18. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. The contribution of inspiratory muscles function to exercise limitation in heart failure: pathophysiological mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Jorge P.; Chiappa,Gaspar R.; Callegaro,Carine C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure induces histological, metabolic and functional adaptations in the inspiratory muscles. This inspiratory muscle weakness, which occurs in 30% to 50% of the heart failure patients, is associated with reduction in the functional capacity, reduction in the quality of life and with a poor prognosis in these individuals. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain the role of the inspiratory muscles in the exer...

  20. Mechanism of Microbubble Growth at Mitral Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambod, Edmond; Beizaie, Masoud; Shusser, Michael; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The growth mechanism of microbubbles at mitral MHV closure has been experimentally studied. In the heart, some of the tiny bubbles grow explosively and form larger and persistent bubbles. An experimental set-up was designed to allow the passage of micron-size bubbles through an 80 micron-wide slot, simulating a typical gap between the housing ring and the occluders in MHV. The bubbles were generated using an air-liquid dispenser and were delivered to the system via a 250 micron-diameter hypedermic needle positioned vertically near the slot. A solenoid valve was used to deliver a 10cc volume of liquid in 25ms time through the slot. High-speed imaging was used to study the impact of flow through the slot on bubble growth. The velocity of liquid through the slot was assessed to be in the range of 12-15 m/s. Our observations confirmed the rapid and drastic growth of microbubbles following their passage through the narrow slot, due to pressure drop. Vortices, which were induced by flow separation on the downstream of the slot, caused the grown bubbles to shatter and form more stable bubbles.

  1. [Regulatory mechanisms of young men heart rate during psychoemotional load accompanied by irritation with different sounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachkebiia, Dzh N; Kvachadze, I D; Tsibadze, A D

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to evaluate regulatory mechanisms of young men heart rate during psychoemotional load on the background of sound irritations of different characteristics. The study was a community trial and performed by single blind method on volunteer young men (age 18-22, n=73). As a method of description of heart rate regulation mechanisms, analysis of heart rate variability was selected. Psychoemotional load was studied by Landolt rings. We observed that only high frequency sound irritation increases mistakes and reaction time during psychoemotional load. We conclude that despite of initial status of organism regulation mechanisms, during high frequency sound irritation, quality of psychoemotional functions worsens. Increasing of sympathetic effect in persons with initial sympathetic domination in vegetative nervous system is observed.

  2. Recommendations for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapkaitz, Elise; Jacobson, Barry Frank; Manga, Pravin; Chitsike, Rufaro Saeed; Benade, Estee; Jackson, S; Haas, Sylvia; Buller, Harry R

    2015-09-14

    The management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves remains challenging because there are no large randomised studies to provide guidelines for effective anticoagulant therapy. Both vitamin K antagonists and heparins may be associated with maternal and foetal adverse events. The Southern African Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis reviewed available literature and comprehensive evidence-based guidelines for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves. A draft document was produced and revised by consensus agreement. The guidelines were adjudicated by independent international experts to avoid local bias. We present concise, practical guidelines for the clinical management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves. Recommendations reflect current best practice which will hopefully lead to improved anticoagulation practice in this select group of high risk patients.

  3. ENDURANCE TRAINING AND GLUTATHIONE-DEPENDENT ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSE MECHANISM IN HEART OF THE DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Atalay

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical exercise beneficially influences cardiac antioxidant defenses in normal rats. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training can strengthen glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense mechanism and decrease lipid peroxidation in heart of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Redox status of glutathione in blood of diabetic rats in response to training and acute exercise was also examined. Eight weeks of treadmill training increased the endurance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. It did not affect glutathione level in heart tissue at rest and also after exercise. On the other hand, endurance training decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in heart, while glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities were not affected either by acute exhaustive exercise or endurance training. Reduced and oxidized glutathione levels in blood were not affected by either training or acute exercise. Conjugated dienes levels in heart tissue were increased by acute exhaustive exercise and also 8 weeks treadmill training. Longer duration of exhaustion in trained group may have contributed to the increased conjugated dienes levels in heart after acute exercise. Our results suggest that endurance type exercise may make heart more susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore it may be wise to combine aerobic exercise with insulin treatment to prevent its adverse effects on antioxidant defense in heart in patients with diabetes mellitus

  4. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Adults and Children With Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peberdy, Mary Ann; Gluck, Jason A; Ornato, Joseph P; Bermudez, Christian A; Griffin, Russell E; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Kerber, Richard E; Lewis, Eldrin F; Link, Mark S; Miller, Corinne; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Weiss, Robert M; O'Neil, Brian

    2017-06-13

    Cardiac arrest in patients on mechanical support is a new phenomenon brought about by the increased use of this therapy in patients with end-stage heart failure. This American Heart Association scientific statement highlights the recognition and treatment of cardiovascular collapse or cardiopulmonary arrest in an adult or pediatric patient who has a ventricular assist device or total artificial heart. Specific, expert consensus recommendations are provided for the role of external chest compressions in such patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Analysis of velocity fluctuations downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2010-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves are widely used to replace diseased aortic heart valves. The stresses induced by the rich and unsteady non-physiological flow structures have been the focus to evaluate red blood cells damage and platelet activation, develop flow control strategies, or improve valve designs. In this study, we analyzed the flow fields obtained downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using time-resolved particle image velocimetry under pulsatile and steady flow conditions. Our study demonstrates the rich dynamics downstream of the valve and weighs the relevance of unsteady effects vs inertia effects on the different flow structures. Power spectrum analyses of the turbulent fluctuations highlight the highly anisotropic influence and the limited applicability of classical self-similar turbulence theory in describing the small-scale structures in the immediate vicinity of the valve.

  6. Radiation-induced changes in the ultrastructure and mechanical function of the rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilliers, G.D.; Lochner, A.

    1989-01-01

    A time sequence study was performed to study the early effects of radiation on the ultrastructure of the rat heart. Wistar rats were exposed to 20 Gy electron irradiation to a field including the heart and a third of the lung. The hearts were excised at varying time intervals (1 h-180 days), and the ultrastructure of perfusion-fixed subepicardium and subendocardium studied. Changes were observed in both myocytes and interstitium at all time intervals. The most pronounced change observed in the myocyte was that of intercalated disc damage which reached a peak at 30 days post-irradiation. Mitochondrial damage, characterized by swelling and fenstration in areas of myofibrillar contracture, was focal and relatively scarce. Swelling of the capillary endothelial cells and ollapse of the capillaries were marked up to 60 days. Of significance was the observation that the damage to both myocytes and interstitium receded after 60 days and the hearts exhibited an almost normal ultrastructure from 100 to 180 days post-irradiation. Mechanical function of these hearts followed a similar pattern: maximal depression was observed 60 days after irradiation. Thereafter the work performance of these hearts improved significantly, almost reaching control level after 180 days. (author). 34 refs.; 21 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Retrieval analysis of mechanical heart valves: impact on design and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cromheecke, M. E.; Overkamp, P. J.; de Mol, B. A.; van Gaalen, G. L.; Becker, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Explanted mechanical heart valves were examined nondestructively, and the findings were related to guidelines, technical reports, and other information to judge the risk of failure and its possible impact on valve design and clinical practice. Diagnoses for single valves could be made, but risks and

  8. Neurohumoral Mechanisms Associated with Orthostasis: Reaffirmation of the Significant Contribution of the Heart Rate Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Rickards, C. A., and Ryan, K. L. (2012). Autonomic mechanisms associated with heart rate and vasoconstrictor reserves. Clin. Auton. Res. 22, 123–130. doi...Verheyden, B., Wieling, W., and Levine, B. D. (2012). Cardiac output and sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses during upright tilt to presyncope in healthy

  9. Recommendations for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapkaitz, Elise; Jacobson, Barry Frank; Manga, Pravin; Chitsike, Rufaro Saeed; Benade, Estee; Haas, Sylvia; Buller, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves remains challenging because there are no large randomised studies to provide guidelines for effective anticoagulant therapy. Both vitamin K antagonists and heparins may be associated with maternal and foetal adverse events. The

  10. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as percutaneous valves. © IMechE 2016.

  11. [Mechanism of "treating heart and brain with same methods" based on data science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Tang, Shi-huan; Lu, Peng; Yang, Hong-jun

    2015-11-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory of "treating heart and brain diseases with same methods (Nao Xin Tong Zhi: NXTZ)" has great significance to the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It has been proven effective by a great deal of clinical researches. However, the underlying mechanism for this theory is still unclear. To provide insights into the potential mechanism of "NXTZ", this study attempts to deeply investigate the mechanism from two representative cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebral apoplexy. First, various data resources were integrated to obtain different types of biomedical entities including drugs, targets, pathways and diseases. Then, three different approaches including text mining, biological network and enrichment analysis were utilized to recognize the potential common features between CHD and cerebral apoplexy, and the corresponding functions of drugs which could treat both diseases, thus unveiling the mechanism of NXTZ.

  12. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: mechanisms, clinical features, and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Kass, David A

    2014-06-20

    The clinical syndrome comprising heart failure (HF) symptoms but with a left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) that is not diminished, eg, HF with preserved EF, is increasingly the predominant form of HF in the developed world, and soon to reach epidemic proportions. It remains among the most challenging of clinical syndromes for the practicing clinician and scientist alike, with a multitude of proposed mechanisms involving the heart and other organs and complex interplay with common comorbidities. Importantly, its morbidity and mortality are on par with HF with reduced EF, and as the list of failed treatments continues to grow, HF with preserved EF clearly represents a major unmet medical need. The field is greatly in need of a more unified approach to its definition and view of the syndrome that engages integrative and reserve pathophysiology beyond that related to the heart alone. We need to reflect on prior treatment failures and the message this is providing, and redirect our approaches likely with a paradigm shift in how the disease is viewed. Success will require interactions between clinicians, translational researchers, and basic physiologists. Here, we review recent translational and clinical research into HF with preserved EF and give perspectives on its evolving demographics and epidemiology, the role of multiorgan deficiencies, potential mechanisms that involve the heart and other organs, clinical trials, and future directions. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Maternal complications and pregnancy outcome in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves treated with enoxaparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; McCowan, L M E; North, R A

    2009-11-01

    To determine maternal and fetal outcomes in women with mechanical heart valves managed with therapeutic dose enoxaparin during pregnancy. Retrospective audit. Hospital-based high-risk antenatal clinics. Pregnant women with mechanical heart valves attending high-risk antenatal clinics, treated with enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice daily) during pregnancy. Women with mechanical heart valves treated with enoxaparin at any stage during pregnancy (1997-2008) identified using a database of women with mechanical heart valves attending the high-risk clinics and a prospective database of women prescribed enoxaparin for any indication during pregnancy. Maternal outcomes included thromboembolic and haemorrhagic complications. Pregnancy and fetal outcomes included miscarriage, stillbirth, baby death and live birth, small-for-gestational-age infants, warfarin embryopathy and warfarin-related fetal loss. Thirty-one women underwent 47 pregnancies. In 34 pregnancies (72.3%), anticoagulation was with predominantly enoxaparin and 13 (27.7%) pregnancies women received mainly warfarin, with enoxaparin given in the first trimester and/or peri-delivery. Seven (14.9%) thrombotic complications occurred, of which five (10.6%) were associated with enoxaparin treatment. Non-compliance or sub-therapeutic anti-Xa levels contributed in each case. Antenatal and postpartum haemorrhagic complications occurred in eight (17%) and 15 (32%) pregnancies respectively. Of 35 pregnancies continuing after 20 weeks' gestation, 96% (22/23) of women taking predominantly enoxaparin had a surviving infant compared with 75% (9/12) in women taking primarily warfarin. Four perinatal deaths occurred, three attributable to warfarin. Compliance with therapeutic dose enoxaparin and aspirin during pregnancy in women with mechanical heart valves is associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis and good fetal outcomes, but close monitoring is essential.

  14. The Influence of Fluid Overload on the Length of Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiana Z A L; O'Hearn, Katie; Reddy, Deepti; Menon, Kusum

    2015-12-01

    Fluid overload and prolonged mechanical ventilation lead to worse outcomes in critically ill children. However, the association between these variables in children following congenital heart surgery is unknown. The objectives of this study were to describe the association between fluid overload and duration of mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirement and radiologic findings of pulmonary and chest wall edema. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent congenital heart surgery between June 2010 and December 2013. Univariate and multivariate associations between maximum cumulative fluid balance and length of mechanical ventilation and OI were tested using the Spearman correlation test and multiple linear regression models, respectively. There were 85 eligible patients. Maximum cumulative fluid balance was associated with duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted analysis beta coefficient = 0.53, CI 0.38-0.66, P mechanical ventilation (P = 0.012 and 0.014, respectively). Fluid overload is associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation and PICU length of stay after congenital heart surgery. Fluid overload was also associated with physiological markers of respiratory restriction. A randomized controlled trial of a restrictive versus liberal fluid replacement strategy is necessary in this patient population, but in the meantime, accumulating observational evidence suggests that cautious use of fluid in the postoperative care may be warranted.

  15. Use of low molecular weight heparin in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinon, Yoav; Siu, Samuel C; Warshafsky, Chelsie; Maxwell, Cynthia; McLeod, Anne; Colman, Jack M; Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2009-11-01

    There are a number of different anticoagulation options for pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. The purpose of this study was to examine maternal thromboembolic complications in women with mechanical valves treated with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) throughout pregnancy. This was a substudy of a larger prospective cohort study of pregnant women with heart disease followed from 1998 to 2008. All pregnant women with mechanical left-sided valves who were treated with LMWH throughout pregnancy were included. Maternal thromboembolic events were defined as valve thrombosis, need for valve replacement, or stroke during pregnancy or postpartum (up to 6 months). Twenty-three pregnancies (17 women) occurred in women treated with LMWH and low-dose aspirin: 15 in women with mechanical mitral valves, 9 in women with mechanical aortic valves, and 1 in a woman with both. There was 1 maternal thromboembolic event (4%), which resulted in maternal and fetal death. Five women (22%) developed other adverse cardiac events during pregnancy. Nine pregnancies (43%) had fetal or neonatal adverse events, 5 of which had favorable outcomes. Three pregnancies were complicated by postpartum hemorrhage. In conclusion, carefully monitored LMWH may be a suitable anticoagulation strategy in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves who are unwilling to use warfarin. However, this group of women remains at risk for maternal cardiac and fetal complications. The occurrence of valve thrombosis resulting in maternal death despite therapeutic anti-Xa levels highlights current limitations with anticoagulation in this population.

  16. Postoperative anticoagulation in patients with mechanical heart valves following surgical treatment of subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anubhav G; Ng, Julie; Hsu, Wesley; Pradilla, Gustavo; Raza, Shaan; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lim, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Thromboembolic events and anticoagulation-associated bleeding events represent frequent complications following cardiac mechanical valve replacement. Management guidelines regarding the timing for resuming anticoagulation therapy following a surgically treated subdural hematoma (SDH) in patients with mechanical valves remains to be determined. To determine optimal anticoagulation management in patients with mechanical heart valves following treatment of SDH. Outcomes were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients on anticoagulation therapy for thromboembolic prophylaxis for mechanical cardiac valves who underwent surgical intervention for a SDH at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2010. The mean age at admission was 71 years. All patients had St. Jude's mechanical heart valves and were receiving anticoagulation therapy. All patients had their anticoagulation reversed with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma and underwent surgical evacuation. Anticoagulation was withheld for a mean of 14 days upon admission and a mean of 9 days postoperatively. The average length of stay was 19 days. No deaths or thromboembolic events occurred during the hospitalization. Average follow-up time was 50 months, during which two patients had a recurrent SDH. No other associated morbidities occurred during follow-up. Interruptions in anticoagulation therapy for up to 3 weeks pose minimal thromboembolic risk in patients with mechanical heart valves. Close follow-up after discharge is highly recommended, as recurrent hemorrhages can occur several weeks after the resumption of anticoagulation.

  17. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy for mechanical heart valve patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2001-01-01

    of conventionally managed heart valve patients (control group) was used as reference. Results: The median observation time was 1175 days (range: 174–1428 days). The self-managed patients were within therapeutic INR target range for a mean of 78.0% (range: 36.1%–93.9%) of the time compared with 61.0% (range 37.......4%–2.9%) for the control group. Conclusion: Self-management of OAT is a feasible and safe concept for selected patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses also on a long-term basis. It provides at least as good and most likely better quality of anticoagulant therapy than conventional management assessed by time within...... of self-management of OAT in patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses on a 4-year perspective in a prospective, non-randomized study. Design: Twenty-four patients with mechanical heart valves and on self-managed OAT were followed for up to 4 years. A matched, retrospectively selected group...

  18. A genome resource to address mechanisms of developmental programming: determination of the fetal sheep heart transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Laura A; Glenn, Jeremy P; Spradling, Kimberly D; Nijland, Mark J; Garcia, Roy; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-06-15

    The pregnant sheep has provided seminal insights into reproduction related to animal and human development (ovarian function, fertility, implantation, fetal growth, parturition and lactation). Fetal sheep physiology has been extensively studied since 1950, contributing significantly to the basis for our understanding of many aspects of fetal development and behaviour that remain in use in clinical practice today. Understanding mechanisms requires the combination of systems approaches uniquely available in fetal sheep with the power of genomic studies. Absence of the full range of sheep genomic resources has limited the full realization of the power of this model, impeding progress in emerging areas of pregnancy biology such as developmental programming. We have examined the expressed fetal sheep heart transcriptome using high-throughput sequencing technologies. In so doing we identified 36,737 novel transcripts and describe genes, gene variants and pathways relevant to fundamental developmental mechanisms. Genes with the highest expression levels and with novel exons in the fetal heart transcriptome are known to play central roles in muscle development. We show that high-throughput sequencing methods can generate extensive transcriptome information in the absence of an assembled and annotated genome for that species. The gene sequence data obtained provide a unique genomic resource for sheep specific genetic technology development and, combined with the polymorphism data, augment annotation and assembly of the sheep genome. In addition, identification and pathway analysis of novel fetal sheep heart transcriptome splice variants is a first step towards revealing mechanisms of genetic variation and gene environment interactions during fetal heart development.

  19. A detailed fluid mechanics study of tilting disk mechanical heart valve closure and the implications to blood damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Keefe B; Herbertson, Luke H; Fontaine, Arnold A; Deutsch, Steven

    2008-08-01

    Hemolysis and thrombosis are among the most detrimental effects associated with mechanical heart valves. The strength and structure of the flows generated by the closure of mechanical heart valves can be correlated with the extent of blood damage. In this in vitro study, a tilting disk mechanical heart valve has been modified to measure the flow created within the valve housing during the closing phase. This is the first study to focus on the region just upstream of the mitral valve occluder during this part of the cardiac cycle, where cavitation is known to occur and blood damage is most severe. Closure of the tilting disk valve was studied in a "single shot" chamber driven by a pneumatic pump. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure all three velocity components over a 30 ms period encompassing the initial valve impact and rebound. An acrylic window placed in the housing enabled us to make flow measurements as close as 200 microm away from the closed occluder. Velocity profiles reveal the development of an atrial vortex on the major orifice side of the valve shed off the tip of the leaflet. The vortex strength makes this region susceptible to cavitation. Mean and maximum axial velocities as high as 7 ms and 20 ms were recorded, respectively. At closure, peak wall shear rates of 80,000 s(-1) were calculated close to the valve tip. The region of the flow examined here has been identified as a likely location of hemolysis and thrombosis in tilting disk valves. The results of this first comprehensive study measuring the flow within the housing of a tilting disk valve may be helpful in minimizing the extent of blood damage through the combined efforts of experimental and computational fluid dynamics to improve mechanical heart valve designs.

  20. Hypoxia induces near-native mechanical properties in engineered heart valve tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balguid, Angelique; Mol, Anita; van Vlimmeren, Marijke A A; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2009-01-20

    Previous attempts in heart valve tissue engineering (TE) failed to produce autologous valve replacements with native-like mechanical behavior to allow for systemic pressure applications. Because hypoxia and insulin are known to promote protein synthesis by adaptive cellular responses, a physiologically relevant oxygen tension and insulin supplements were applied to the growing heart valve tissues to enhance their mechanical properties. Scaffolds of rapid-degrading polyglycolic acid meshes coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate were seeded with human saphenous vein myofibroblasts. The tissue-engineered constructs were cultured under normal oxygen tension (normoxia) or hypoxia (7% O(2)) and incubated with or without insulin. Glycosaminoglycan production in the constructs approached that of native values under the influence of hypoxia and under the influence of insulin. Both insulin and hypoxia were associated with enhanced matrix production and improved mechanical properties; however, a synergistic effect was not observed. Although the amount of collagen and cross-links in the engineered tissues was still lower than that in native adult human aortic valves, constructs cultured under hypoxic conditions reached native human aortic valve levels of tissue strength and stiffness after 4 weeks of culturing. These results indicate that oxygen tension may be a key parameter for the achievement of sufficient tissue quality and mechanical integrity in tissue-engineered heart valves. Engineered tissues of such strength, based on rapid-degrading polymers, have not been achieved to date. These findings bring the potential use of tissue-engineered heart valves for systemic applications a step closer and represent an important improvement in heart valve tissue engineering.

  1. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  2. The heart as a self-regulating system: integration of homeodynamic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresh, J Y; Armour, J A

    1997-04-01

    In the past the study of mechanical and electrical properties of the heart has been disjointed with minimal overlap and unification. The fact remains that these features are tightly coupled and central to the functioning heart. The maintenance of adequate cardiac output relies upon the highly integrated autoregulatory mechanisms and modulation of cardiac myocyte function. Regional ventricular mechanics and energetics are dependent upon muscle fiber stress-strain rate, the passive properties of myocardial collagen matrix, adequate vascular perfusion, transcapillary transport and electrical activation pattern. Intramural hydraulic "loading" is regulated by coronary arterial and venous dynamics. All of these components are under the constant influence of intrinsic cardiac and extracardiac autonomic neurons, as well as circulating hormones. A brief overview of the putative regulation of these various components is presented in this paper.

  3. Possible mechanism of superoxide formation through redox cycling of plumbagin in pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Yamaoka, Yusuke; Morita, Reiko; Mizuno, Takayuki; Gotoh, Kousei; Higuchi, Toshiyuki; Shiraishi, Takayuki; Imamura, Yorishige

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the possible mechanism of superoxide formation through redox cycling of plumbagin (PLG) in pig heart. Of four 1,4-naphthoquinones tested in this study, PLG was most efficiently reduced in the cytosolic fraction of pig heart. On the other hand, lawsone (LAS) was little reduced. Thus, whether or not PLG and LAS induce the formation of superoxide anion radical in pig heart cytosol was examined, by using the methods of cytochrome c reduction and chemiluminescence. PLG significantly induced the formation of superoxide anion radical, even though LAS had no ability to mediate superoxide formation. PLG was a significant inhibitor for the stereoselective reduction of 4-benzoylpyridine (4-BP) catalyzed by tetrameric carbonyl reductase (TCBR) in pig heart cytosol. Furthermore, PLG was confirmed to competitively inhibit the 4-BP reduction, and the optimal pH for the PLG reduction was around 6.0 similar to that for the 4-BP reduction. These results suggest that PLG mediates superoxide formation through its redox cycling involved in the two-electron reduction catalyzed by TCBR, and induces oxidative stress in pig heart. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-coagulation during pregnancy in women with mechanical heart valves: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamoushi, Amir Jamshid; Kashfi, Fahimeh; Hosseini, Saeid; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Ali Reza; Samiei, Niloufar; Haddadzadeh, Mehdi

    2011-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a hypercoagulable state, therefore the optimal anticoagulants for potential use in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves are controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anticoagulants on pregnancy outcomes and their potential risks in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. In this prospective cohort study, we followed 44 women with 49 pregnancies who had mechanical heart valves from September 2002 to September 2007. A total of 38 patients took warfarin throughout their pregnancies (group A). In 11 patients, warfarin was changed to heparin during the first trimester and then again to warfarin during 12thto 36thweeks of gestational age (group B). All women took warfarin from 36thweeks of gestational age until delivery. In group A, there were 22 live births (57.9%), 15 abortions (39.5%) and 1 maternal death (2.6%). In group B, there were seven live births (63.6%), three spontaneous abortions (27.3%) and one intra-uterine fetal death (9.1%). There was no significant difference in live birth rate between the two groups (p=0.24). Thirty-three pregnancies (86.8%) in group A and five pregnancies (45.4%) in group B had no maternal complications (p=0.004). The difference in pregnancy complications between both groups was significant (pmechanical heart valves remain on a warfarin regimen. The risk of embryopathy does not necessarily increase.

  5. The Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Heart Diseases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yaqi; Shen, Zhuqing; Luo, Shanshan; Guo, Wei; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as a third gaseous mediator along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), though it was originally considered as a malodorous and toxic gas. H2S is produced endogenously from cysteine by three enzymes in mammalian tissues. An increasing body of evidence suggests the involvement of H2S in different physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have shown that H2S has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypertrophy, fibrosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and heart failure. Some mechanisms, such as antioxidative action, preservation of mitochondrial function, reduction of apoptosis, anti-inflammatory responses, angiogenic actions, regulation of ion channel, and interaction with NO, could be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of H2S. Although several mechanisms have been identified, there is a need for further research to identify the specific molecular mechanism of cardioprotection in different cardiac diseases. Therefore, insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying H2S action in the heart may promote the understanding of pathophysiology of cardiac diseases and lead to new therapeutic targets based on modulation of H2S production.

  6. The Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Heart Diseases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is now recognized as a third gaseous mediator along with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO, though it was originally considered as a malodorous and toxic gas. H2S is produced endogenously from cysteine by three enzymes in mammalian tissues. An increasing body of evidence suggests the involvement of H2S in different physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have shown that H2S has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypertrophy, fibrosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and heart failure. Some mechanisms, such as antioxidative action, preservation of mitochondrial function, reduction of apoptosis, anti-inflammatory responses, angiogenic actions, regulation of ion channel, and interaction with NO, could be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of H2S. Although several mechanisms have been identified, there is a need for further research to identify the specific molecular mechanism of cardioprotection in different cardiac diseases. Therefore, insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying H2S action in the heart may promote the understanding of pathophysiology of cardiac diseases and lead to new therapeutic targets based on modulation of H2S production.

  7. Antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    Cardioembolic strokes account for one-sixth of all strokes and are an important potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K antagonists (e.g., warfarin) are effective for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and in those with mechanical heart valves but because of their inherent limitations are underutilized and often suboptimally managed. Antiplatelet therapies have been the only alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF but although they are safer and more convenient they are much less efficacious. The advent of new oral anticoagulant drugs offers the potential to reduce the burden of cardioembolic stroke by providing access to effective, safe, and more convenient therapies. New oral anticoagulants have begun to replace warfarin for stroke prevention in some patients with AF, based on the favorable results of recently completed phase III randomized controlled trials, and provide for the first time an alternative to antiplatelet therapy for patients deemed unsuitable for warfarin. The promise of the new oral anticoagulants in patients with mechanical heart valves is currently being tested in a phase II trial. If efficacy and safety are demonstrated, the new oral anticoagulants will provide an alternative to warfarin for patients with mechanical heart valves and may also lead to increased use of mechanical valves for patients who would not have received them in the past because of the requirement for long term warfarin therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparative classification of thrombotic formations on bileaflet mechanical heart valves by phonographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romata, Clemens; Susin, Francesca Maria; Cambi, Andrea; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Pengo, Vittorio; Gerosa, Gino; Bagno, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Haemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves can be severely affected by the formation of thrombotic deposits. Hence, early detection of thrombi is fundamental for a prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy. This article aims at designing a novel diagnostic and prognostic tool able to detect valvular thrombosis at early stages of formation, i.e., before the appearance of critical symptoms in patients who can be effectively treated by pharmacological therapy, preventing re-operation. This approach relies on the acquisition of the acoustic signals produced by mechanical heart valves in the closing phase; the corresponding power spectra are then analysed by means of artificial neural networks trained to identify the presence of thrombi and classify their occurrence. Five commercial bileaflet mechanical heart valves were investigated in vitro in a Sheffield Pulse Duplicator; for each valve six functional conditions were considered, each corresponding to a risk class for patients (one normofunctioning and five thrombosed): they have been simulated by placing artificial deposits of increasing weight and different shape on the valve leaflet and on the annular housing; the case of one completely blocked leaflet was also investigated. These six functional conditions represent risk classes: they were examined under various hydrodynamic regimes. The acoustic signals produced by the valves were acquired by means of a phonocardiographic apparatus, then analysed and classified. The ability to detect and classify thrombotic formations on mechanical valve leaflet would allow ranking patients by assigning them to one of the six risk classes, helping clinicians in establish adequate therapeutic approaches.

  9. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Luciene Ferreira; Perlingeiro, Patricia; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Gomes-Santos, Igor Lucas; Tsutsui, Jeane Mike; Negrao, Carlos Eduardo; De Matos, Luciana D N J

    2016-01-01

    Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart's structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT) and competitive training (CT) on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10). Heart rate (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry) were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine-0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol-500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg). Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n) and sympathetic (m) modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography) and cardiac structure (echocardiography) were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value) decreased in CT (P≤0.05). Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (Ptrainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings.

  10. T Cell Response in Patients with Implanted Biological and Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarash, L; Kudryavtsev, I; Rutkovskaya, N; Golovkin, A

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing T cell subsets of peripheral blood from recipients of long-term functioning (more than 60 months) biological and mechanical heart valve prostheses. The absolute and relative number of CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets was analyzed: naïve (N, CD45RA(+)CD62L(+)), central memory (CM, CD45RA(-)CD62L(+)), effector memory (EM, CD45RA(-)CD62L(-)), and terminally differentiated CD45RA-positive effector memory (TEMRA, CD45RA(+)CD62L(-)) in 25 persons with biological and 7 with mechanical prosthesis compared with 48 apparently healthy volunteers. The relative and absolute number of central memory and naïve CD3(+)CD8(+) in patients with biological prosthesis was decreased (p biological heart valve prostheses.

  11. Role and possible mechanisms of clenbuterol in enhancing reverse remodelling during mechanical unloading in murine heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppa, Gopal K.R.; Lee, Joon; Stagg, Mark A.; Felkin, Leanne E.; Barton, Paul J.R.; Siedlecka, Urszula; Youssef, Samuel; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Terracciano, Cesare M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Aims Combined left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and pharmacological therapy has been proposed to favour myocardial recovery in patients with end-stage heart failure (HF). Clenbuterol (Clen), a β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonist, has been used as a part of this strategy. In this study, we investigated the direct effects of clenbuterol on unloaded myocardium in HF. Methods and results Left coronary artery ligation or sham operation was performed in male Lewis rats. After 4–6 weeks, heterotopic abdominal transplantation of the failing hearts into normal recipients was performed to induce LV unloading (UN). Recipient rats were treated with saline (Sal) or clenbuterol (2 mg/kg/day) via osmotic minipumps (HF + UN + Sal or HF + UN + Clen) for 7 days. Non-transplanted HF animals were treated with Sal (Sham + Sal, HF + Sal) or clenbuterol (HF + Clen). LV myocytes were isolated and studied using optical, fluorescence, and electrophysiological techniques. Clenbuterol treatment improved in vivo LV function measured with echocardiography (LVEF (%): HF 35.9 ± 2 [16], HF + Clen 52.1 ± 1.4 [16]; P clenbuterol increased sarcomere shortening (amplitude (µm): HF + UN + Clen 0.1 ± 0.01 [50], HF + UN + Sal 0.07 ± 0.01 [38]; P Clenbuterol treatment of failing rat hearts, alone or in combination with mechanical unloading, improves LV function at the whole-heart and cellular levels by affecting cell morphology, excitation–contraction coupling, and myofilament sensitivity to calcium. This study supports the use of this drug in the strategy to enhance recovery in HF patients treated with LVADs and also begins to elucidate some of the possible cellular mechanisms responsible for the improvement in LV function. PMID:18178572

  12. Fast Simulation of Mechanical Heterogeneity in the Electrically Asynchronous Heart Using the MultiPatch Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Walmsley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac electrical asynchrony occurs as a result of cardiac pacing or conduction disorders such as left bundle-branch block (LBBB. Electrically asynchronous activation causes myocardial contraction heterogeneity that can be detrimental for cardiac function. Computational models provide a tool for understanding pathological consequences of dyssynchronous contraction. Simulations of mechanical dyssynchrony within the heart are typically performed using the finite element method, whose computational intensity may present an obstacle to clinical deployment of patient-specific models. We present an alternative based on the CircAdapt lumped-parameter model of the heart and circulatory system, called the MultiPatch module. Cardiac walls are subdivided into an arbitrary number of patches of homogeneous tissue. Tissue properties and activation time can differ between patches. All patches within a wall share a common wall tension and curvature. Consequently, spatial location within the wall is not required to calculate deformation in a patch. We test the hypothesis that activation time is more important than tissue location for determining mechanical deformation in asynchronous hearts. We perform simulations representing an experimental study of myocardial deformation induced by ventricular pacing, and a patient with LBBB and heart failure using endocardial recordings of electrical activation, wall volumes, and end-diastolic volumes. Direct comparison between simulated and experimental strain patterns shows both qualitative and quantitative agreement between model fibre strain and experimental circumferential strain in terms of shortening and rebound stretch during ejection. Local myofibre strain in the patient simulation shows qualitative agreement with circumferential strain patterns observed in the patient using tagged MRI. We conclude that the MultiPatch module produces realistic regional deformation patterns in the asynchronous heart and that

  13. Comparing Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin for Atrial Fibrillation, Venous Thromboembolism, and Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Todd R; Truong, Teresa; Rai, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    To summarize available data for use of direct oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical heart valves including dose-response consistency to offer considerations for pharmacotherapeutic decision-making for oral anticoagulants. A Medline search of English-language studies published between 2000 and March 2015 was conducted to identify pertinent papers using combinations of the following words: apixaban, atrial fibrillation, dabigatran, direct oral anticoagulant, edoxaban, factor IIa inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors, mechanical heart valves, novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, venous thromboembolism, and warfarin. Original studies, guidelines, and approved prescribing information were evaluated and included if contributing new or complementary data toward the objective. References for all identified studies were reviewed and entries included if contributory. Randomized controlled trials have established the safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism for most patient groups. Direct oral anticoagulants should not be used in patients with mechanical heart valves until proven safe and effective. There are groups for which questions remain regarding inter-patient dose-response consistency for direct oral anticoagulants. There are postmarketing data suggesting poorer real-world performance of dabigatran relative to clinical trial data. Direct oral anticoagulants offer several advantages over warfarin, and large clinical trial data establish the appropriateness of their use in broad populations. There remain groups for whom the relative benefit and risk of these agents relative to warfarin are uncertain. A patient-specific approach in pharmacotherapeutic decision-making is appropriate.

  14. An Implantable Extracardiac Soft Robotic Device for the Failing Heart: Mechanical Coupling and Synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher J; Wamala, Isaac; Abah, Colette; Thalhofer, Thomas; Saeed, Mossab; Bautista-Salinas, Daniel; Horvath, Markus A; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Roche, Ellen T; Pigula, Frank A; Walsh, Conor J

    2017-09-01

    Soft robotic devices have significant potential for medical device applications that warrant safe synergistic interaction with humans. This article describes the optimization of an implantable soft robotic system for heart failure whereby soft actuators wrapped around the ventricles are programmed to contract and relax in synchrony with the beating heart. Elastic elements integrated into the soft actuators provide recoiling function so as to aid refilling during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle. Improved synchronization with the biological system is achieved by incorporating the native ventricular pressure into the control system to trigger assistance and synchronize the device with the heart. A three-state electro-pneumatic valve configuration allows the actuators to contract at different rates to vary contraction patterns. An in vivo study was performed to test three hypotheses relating to mechanical coupling and temporal synchronization of the actuators and heart. First, that adhesion of the actuators to the ventricles improves cardiac output. Second, that there is a contraction-relaxation ratio of the actuators which generates optimal cardiac output. Third, that the rate of actuator contraction is a factor in cardiac output.

  15. Mechanical circulatory assist device development at the Texas Heart Institute: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, O H

    2014-01-01

    In December 2013, we performed our 1000th ventricular assist device implantation at the Texas Heart Institute. In my professional career, I have been fortunate to see the development of numerous mechanical circulatory support devices for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure. In fact, most of the cardiac pumps in wide use today were developed in the Texas Heart Institute research laboratories in cooperation with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute or device innovators and manufacturers and implanted clinically at our partner St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital. My early involvement in this field was guided by my mentors, Dr Michael E. DeBakey and, especially, Dr Denton A. Cooley. Also, many of the advances are directly attributable to my ongoing clinical experience. What I learned daily in my surgical practice allowed me to bring insights to the development of this technology that a laboratory researcher alone might not have had. Young academic surgeons interested in this field might be well served to be active not only in laboratory research but also in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T.; Mizuno, K.; Mishima, A.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management

  17. Potential markers and metabolic processes involved in the mechanism of radiation-induced heart injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Jan; Kura, Branislav; Babal, Pavel; Barancik, Miroslav; Ferko, Miroslav; Frimmel, Karel; Kalocayova, Barbora; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Lazou, Antigone; Mezesova, Lucia; Okruhlicova, Ludmila; Ravingerova, Tanya; Singal, Pawan K; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Viczenczova, Csilla; Vrbjar, Norbert; Tribulova, Narcis

    2017-10-01

    Irradiation of normal tissues leads to acute increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species that serve as intra- and inter-cellular signaling to alter cell and tissue function. In the case of chest irradiation, it can affect the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, with consequent tissue remodelation and adverse side effects and symptoms. This complex process is orchestrated by a large number of interacting molecular signals, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombogenesis, organ dysfunction, and ultimate failing of the heart occur as a pathological entity - "radiation-induced heart disease" (RIHD) that is major source of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to bring insights into the basic mechanisms of RIHD that may lead to the identification of targets for intervention in the radiotherapy side effect. Studies of authors also provide knowledge about how to select targeted drugs or biological molecules to modify the progression of radiation damage in the heart. New prospective studies are needed to validate that assessed factors and changes are useful as early markers of cardiac damage.

  18. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms

  19. Study of molecular mechanism of Prostaglandin E1 in inhibiting coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H J; Ma, J W; Qiao, Z Y; Xu, B

    2013-12-01

    Prostaglandin E1 has been used clinically for improving heart diseases. In this study, we examined the effect of Prostaglandin E1 on blood lipid levels, heart protein and genes expression in coronary heart disease (CHD) rats. Female rats were fed either a control diet or hypercholesterolemic diet for 14 weeks. The feeding of a hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) increased the serum TC, TG, and LDL-c levels, decreased the serum HDL-c, E2, P, FSH, LH and PRL levels in CHD rats. In addition, The feeding of a HCD diet markedly increased the content of serum TXA2, TXB2, and decreased the content of serum PGI2, and PGI2/TXA2, 6-Keto PGF1a. Furthermore, the feeding of a hypercholesterolemic diet markedly increased expression levels of myocardium Fas and Caspase-3 protein and mRNA levels, vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor mRNA, and decreased RyR2 mRNA in CHD rats. The feeding of Prostaglandin E1 for 14 weeks significantly reversed these abnormal biochemical indexes in rats. These findings suggest that Prostaglandin E1 play a obvious heart protective effect. The mechanisms may be related to restraining the excessive activation of Fas and Caspase-3 protein and modulating some gene expressions associated with CHD.

  20. T Cell Response in Patients with Implanted Biological and Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarash, L.; Kudryavtsev, I.; Rutkovskaya, N.; Golovkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing T cell subsets of peripheral blood from recipients of long-term functioning (more than 60 months) biological and mechanical heart valve prostheses. The absolute and relative number of CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets was analyzed: na?ve (N, CD45RA+CD62L+), central memory (CM, CD45RA?CD62L+), effector memory (EM, CD45RA?CD62L?), and terminally differentiated CD45RA-positive effector memory (TEMRA, CD45RA+CD62L?) in 25 persons with biological and 7 with mechanical pro...

  1. THE RESULTS OF MECHANICAL HEART SUPPORT SYSTEMS «INCOR» IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Cherniavskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of investigation isestimation of mechanical heart support system «INCOR» implantation efficacy. Materials and methods. The Institute of Circulation Pathology has clinical experience of mechanical circulatory support systems «INCOR» (Berlin Heart AG implantation in 12 patients (10 men and 2 women with severe heart failure during the period from November 2006 to October 2012. The main indication for the use of mechanical support of the left ventricle was a left ventricular failure with marked dilatation of the left heart: end-diastolic volume (EDV, LV – 283 ± 58 ml, end-systolic volume (ESV – 233 ± 57 ml, ejection fraction (EF – 16 ± 7%, with preserved function of the right ventricle (RV (RV ejection fraction 35 ± 12%. Results. All patients showed a significant improvement in central hemodynamics in early postoperative period, reducing the volume of the heart chambers: LV EDV from 283 ± 58 to 183 ± 94 ml; LV ESV with 234 ± 57 to 157 ± 65 ml, increased right ventricular ejection fraction (RV EF (from 35 ± 12 to 43 ± 17%. Improve the function of the right ventricle oc- curred mainly due to the expense of left ventricular unloading and pulmonary circulation. In addition, there was a significant improvement in clinical status of patients – regression of symptoms of heart failure, a recovery of the liver and kidney function. Despite the ongoing anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy under constant parameters of coagulation, there was some complications. Uterine bleeding occurred in 1 patient (16.6%, which required the abolition of anticoagulants and antiplatelet, uterine artery embolization, and as a result has led to thrombosis and stop system «INCOR». Four patients (33.3% had severe thromboembolic complications – acute cerebrovascular accident (CVA. In 1 patient (8% there was a hemorrhagic stroke due to rupture of intracerebral aneurysms with a breakthrough into the lateral ventricle of the brain. In 3 patients (25

  2. Mechanisms linking electrical alternans and clinical ventricular arrhythmia in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, J D; Lalani, G G; Vigmond, E J; Narayan, S M; Trayanova, N A

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in patients with heart failure (HF) are undefined. The purpose of this study was to elucidate VT/VF mechanisms in HF by using a computational-clinical approach. In 53 patients with HF and 18 control patients, we established the relationship between low-amplitude action potential voltage alternans (APV-ALT) during ventricular pacing at near-resting heart rates and VT/VF on long-term follow-up. Mechanisms underlying the transition of APV-ALT to VT/VF, which cannot be ascertained in patients, were dissected with multiscale human ventricular models based on human electrophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging data (control and HF). For patients with APV-ALT k-score >1.7, complex action potential duration (APD) oscillations (≥2.3% of mean APD), rather than APD alternans, most accurately predicted VT/VF during long-term follow-up (+82%; -90% predictive values). In the failing human ventricular models, abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium handling caused APV-ALT (>1 mV) during pacing with a cycle length of 550 ms, which transitioned into large magnitude (>100 ms) discordant repolarization time alternans (RT-ALT) at faster rates. This initiated VT/VF (cycle length heart rates in patients with HF are linked to arrhythmogenic discordant RT-ALT. This may enable novel physiologically tailored, bioengineered indices to improve VT/VF risk stratification, where SR calcium handling and spatial apicobasal repolarization are potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current Perioperative Anticoagulation Practices in Children with Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Sharathkumar, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinician practices on perioperative anticoagulation in children with prosthetic mechanical heart valves who undergo elective surgeries. An online survey was administered to members of PediHeartNet. The survey consisted of multiple choice questions and clinical scenarios. The study described clinical practice patterns and variables that influence the clinicians' bridging anticoagulation decisions. Ninety-one respondents completed the survey; 68% were affiliated with university settings; 91% were pediatric cardiologists, and 49% had ≥10 years of experience in pediatric cardiology. Approximately one-half of the respondents (54%) independently provided perioperative anticoagulation management to their patients, while 46% utilized cardiac or hematology anticoagulation services. Resources that influenced bridging decisions included hematology experts (20%), American College of Chest Physicians guidelines (34%), and the clinicians' personal experience (56%). In planning for major surgeries, 47% of the respondents hospitalized patients for unfractionated heparin (UFH) and 46% prescribed outpatient low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). For minor surgeries, 58% hospitalized patients for UFH, 22% prescribed outpatient LMWH, and 17% opted out of bridging anticoagulation. Immediately after mitral valve replacement, 23% used bridging anticoagulation with UFH. When LMWH was used, there were no reports of thromboembolic complications. Major bleeding complications were rare and reported by 2% of the respondents. This was the first documentation that clinical practice of bridging perioperative anticoagulation in children with mechanical heart valves varies widely among pediatric cardiac specialists. There is poor adoption of published guidelines and a tendency toward more conservative strategies. Further studies comparing the safety and efficacy of LMWH vs. UFH as perioperative anticoagulation agents in children with mechanical heart valves are needed

  4. Anti-Coagulation During Pregnancy in Women with Mechanical Heart Valves: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Jamshid Khamoushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy is associated with a hypercoagulable state, therefore the optimalanticoagulants for potential use in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves are controversial.The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anticoagulants on pregnancy outcomes and theirpotential risks in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves.Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we followed 44 women with 49pregnancies who had mechanical heart valves from September 2002 to September 2007. A totalof 38 patients took warfarin throughout their pregnancies (group A. In 11 patients, warfarin waschanged to heparin during the first trimester and then again to warfarin during 12th to 36th weeksof gestational age (group B. All women took warfarin from 36th weeks of gestational age untildelivery.Results: In group A, there were 22 live births (57.9%, 15 abortions (39.5% and 1 maternal death(2.6%. In group B, there were seven live births (63.6%, three spontaneous abortions (27.3% andone intra-uterine fetal death (9.1%. There was no significant difference in live birth rate betweenthe two groups (p=0.24. Thirty-three pregnancies (86.8% in group A and five pregnancies (45.4%in group B had no maternal complications (p=0.004. The difference in pregnancy complicationsbetween both groups was significant (p<0.001Conclusion: The present study shows that low dose warfarin (5 mg/day or less may be safeduring the first trimester of pregnancy. Maternal adverse events are low when pregnant womenwith mechanical heart valves remain on a warfarin regimen. The risk of embryopathy does notnecessarily increase.

  5. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes of Silzone Era St. Jude Medical Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J Matthew; Zhao, Yue; Williams, Judson; O'Brien, Sean; Dokholyan, Rachel; Gammie, James; Edwards, Fred; Loyo-Berrios, Nilsa; Canos, Daniel; Gross, Thomas; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Peterson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Since the voluntary recall of St. Jude Medical (SJM) Silzone impregnated heart valves, no large-scale study has examined their long-term outcomes. Using Medicare-linked records from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (1993-2004), the clinical outcomes were evaluated through eight years among those patients who received SJM mechanical heart valves during the Silzone era (March 1998 to December 1999; n = 3,775), relative to those in both the pre-Silzone era (January 1993 to February 1998; n = 13,570) and the post-Silzone era (January 2000 to December 2004; n = 6,882). An inverse probability weighting was used to balance the observed differences in case mix. During the Silzone era, 79% of all implanted mechanical heart valves were manufactured by SJM. By eight years post-implantation, the most common adverse events in this Medicare-linked cohort (median age 71 years) were death (43.5%) and thromboembolism (14.7%), while valve reoperation (1.7%) and endocarditis (1.4%) were less common. Patients treated during the Silzone era experienced a lower associated risk of mortality to eight years than those in both the pre-Silzone era (adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-0.98) and post-Silzone era (adjusted HR 0.92, CI 0.67-0.98), while the adjusted eight-year risks of reoperation, thromboembolism and endocarditis were similar across the three eras for the overall cohort and among both aortic valve and mitral valve patients. Medicare patients who received SJM mechanical heart valves during the Silzone era experienced similar clinical outcomes as those treated before or after the Silzone era. These data do not substantiate continued public health concerns associated with Silzone era valve prostheses among older individuals.

  6. Relationships between melanocytes, mechanical properties and extracellular matrix composition in mouse heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Flavia; Kruithof, Boudewijn Pt; Balani, Kanthesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Gaussin, Vinciane; Kos, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Heart valves are complex structures composed of organized layers of extracellular matrix, and interstitial and overlying endothelial cells. In this article, we present the specific localization of a population of melanocytes within the murine heart valves at ages important for their post-natal development. In all stages analyzed in our study, melanocytes were found in high numbers populating the atrial aspect of the tricuspid and mitral leaflets. The pulmonary valve did not present melanocytes. To characterize a putative role for the valve melanocytes, the dynamic nanomechanical properties of tricuspid leaftets containing large numbers or no melanocytes were measured. The stiffness coefficient of hyperpigmented leaflets was higher (11.5 GPa) than the ones from wild-type (7.5 GPa) and hypopigmented (5.5 GPa) leaflets. These results suggest that melanocytes may contribute to the mechanical properties of the heart valves. The arrangement of extracellular matrix molecules such as Collagen I and Versican B is responsible for the mechanical characteristics of the leaflets. Melanocytes were found to reside primarily in areas of Versican B expression. The patterns of expression of Collagen I and Versican B were not, however, disrupted in hyper or hypopigmented leaflets. Melanocytes may affect other extracellular matrix molecules to alter the valves' microenvironment.

  7. Anticoagulant independent mechanical heart valves: viable now or still a distant holy grail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Aurelio; Gray, Richard J; Stupka, Jonathan C; Emken, Michael R; Scotten, Lawrence N; Siegel, Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Valvular heart disease remains a large public health problem for all societies; it attracts the attention of public health organizations, researchers and governments. Valve substitution is an integral part of the treatment for this condition. At present, the choice of valve prosthesis is either tissue or mechanical. Tissue valves have become increasingly popular in spite of unresolved problems with durability, hemodynamics, cost and need for anticoagulation therapy. As a consequence, mechanical valve innovation has virtually ceased; the last successful mechanical design is 25 years old. We postulate that with improved technology, knowledge and experience gained over the last quarter century, the best possible solution to the problem of valve substitution can be achieved with a mechanical valve that is anticoagulant independent, durable, hemodynamically and cost efficient. At present, it is possible to design, test and produce a valve that can accomplish these goals.

  8. Mechanisms of function and disease of natural and replacement heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Frederick J

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been substantial progress toward understanding the mechanisms of heart valve function and dysfunction. This review summarizes an evolving conceptual framework of heart valve functional structure, developmental biology, and pathobiology and explores the implications of key insights. I emphasize: (a) valve cell and extracellular matrix biology and the impact of biomechanical factors on function, homeostasis, environmental adaptation, and key pathological processes; (b) the role of developmental processes, valvular cell behavior, and extracellular matrix remodeling in congenital and acquired valve abnormalities; and (c) the cell/matrix biology of degeneration in replacement tissue valves. I also summarize how these considerations may ultimately inform the potential for prevention and treatment of major diseases and potentially therapeutic regeneration of the cardiac valves. Recent advances and opportunities for research and clinical translation are highlighted.

  9. T Cell Response in Patients with Implanted Biological and Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barbarash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at assessing T cell subsets of peripheral blood from recipients of long-term functioning (more than 60 months biological and mechanical heart valve prostheses. The absolute and relative number of CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets was analyzed: naïve (N, CD45RA+CD62L+, central memory (CM, CD45RA−CD62L+, effector memory (EM, CD45RA−CD62L−, and terminally differentiated CD45RA-positive effector memory (TEMRA, CD45RA+CD62L− in 25 persons with biological and 7 with mechanical prosthesis compared with 48 apparently healthy volunteers. The relative and absolute number of central memory and naïve CD3+CD8+ in patients with biological prosthesis was decreased (p<0.001. Meanwhile the number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ was increased (p<0.001. Patients with mechanical prosthesis had increased absolute and relative number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ cells (p=0.006. Also the relative number of CD3+CD4+ cells was reduced (p=0.04. We assume that altered composition of T cell subsets points at development of xenograft rejection reaction against both mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses.

  10. Neurohumoral mechanisms associated with orthostasis: Reaffirmation of the significant contribution of the heart rate response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A Convertino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inability to compensate for acute central hypovolemia underlies the clinical development of orthostatic hypotension and instability (e.g., syncope. Although neuro-humoral control of both cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance contributes to hemodynamic stability during orthostasis, a notion has been proposed that the failure of adequate peripheral vascular constriction rather than cardiac responses represents the primary mechanism the development of orthostatic intolerance. This review article provides an opportunity to present compelling evidence captured over the past 30 years in our laboratory to support the concept that neural-mediated tachycardia during orthostasis in healthy individuals represents a critical response to tolerating acute reduction in central blood volume in addition to, and independent of, peripheral vascular constriction. In this review paper, data are presented from experiments using graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP as a method to induce orthostatic intolerance in two experimental human models: 1 comparison of heart rate and autonomic responses in individuals with relatively high and low tolerance to LBNP; and 2 vagal and sympathetic blockade of cardiac neural control. These experiments revealed that: 1 greater elevations in heart rate are associated with higher orthostatic (LBNP tolerance; 2 higher orthostatic heart rate is associated with greater sympathetic nerve activity and withdrawal of vagally-mediated cardiac baroreflex response; and 3 nonspecific sympathetic blockade causes a pronounced reduction in heart rate and LBNP tolerance. Cardiac parasympathetic withdrawal contributes to protection against development of hypotension during the initial seconds of transition to an orthostatic challenge, while the primary mechanism by which tachycardia defends orthostatic stability in healthy subjects for extended durations is mediated predominantly through sympathetic adrenergic control.

  11. Sadness and broken hearts: neurohumoral mechanisms and co-morbidity of ischemic heart disease and psychological depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A K; Grippo, A J

    2006-11-01

    Heart disease and depression are highly co-morbid. Clinical and experimental research over the past 70 years has led to several neurohumoral hypotheses of causative factors present under the conditions of either heart failure or of psychological depression. Some of these hypothesized factors are common to both disorders and are therefore attractive candidates to account for the high incidence of co-occurrence of depression and heart disease. One experimental approach to study the co-morbidity of heart failure and depression has been to study the behavioral, biochemical and physiological changes in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in heart failure induced by experimental myocardial infarction. Our studies have led us to focus on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Both of these families of humoral factors are elevated in human heart failure and in depression and the two experimental models we have studied. The demonstrated validity of each of these models will be of great value in elucidating the nature of the actions and interactions of these humoral agents as they contribute to the co-morbid conditions of heart failure and depression.

  12. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Ferreira Azevedo

    Full Text Available Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart's structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT and competitive training (CT on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10. Heart rate (ECG and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine-0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol-500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg. Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n and sympathetic (m modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography and cardiac structure (echocardiography were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value decreased in CT (P≤0.05. Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (P<0.05 as well as diastolic function. We observed an inverse correlation between left ventricular diastolic diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass with intrinsic heart rate. Blood pressure and BRS were similar in both trainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings.

  13. Obstructive Thrombosis of Left-Sided Mechanical Heart Valves: Clinical Profile and Thrombolytic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakasu, Arumugam; Jayachandran, Avinash; Gopinath Nayar, Pradeep; Meyyappan, Chokkalingam; Narayan, Ganesh; Basha Abdul Bari, Ahamed; Johnson Samuel, Prince

    2017-05-01

    Thrombosis of a mechanical prosthetic heart valve is a potentially life-threatening complication associated with a high mortality. Although thrombolytic therapy has been considered highly beneficial in this situation, very few studies have been conducted to monitor the effectiveness of such thrombolytic therapy among Asian populations. Hence, the study aim was to evaluate the clinical profile, efficacy and safety of the thrombolytic agent streptokinase (SK) in patients with obstructive thrombosis of a left-sided mechanical heart valve. Patients (n = 30) with left-sided mechanical heart valve thrombosis (LSMHVT) who had been managed with SK during the past four years were included in this retrospective study. Clinical features such as presenting symptoms based on NYHA functional class, prosthetic valve position, oral anticoagulant compliance, International Normalized Ratio (INR) and imaging methods including fluoroscopy, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were evaluated. In addition, the effectiveness and complications of SK were analyzed. The majority of patients presented with advanced NYHA class (III and IV, each 40%). Obstructive thromboses were observed at the mitral prosthesis in 70% of cases, at the aortic prosthesis in 27%, and at both valves in 3%. All patients underwent TTE, but fluoroscopy was used more often than TEE. Despite compliance with oral anticoagulation therapy, a sub-therapeutic INR was observed in 40% of cases at the time of presentation. Overall, thrombolysis was successful in 80% of patients using intravenous SK, with 100% success in patients in NYHA classes I-III and 42% for NYHA class IV. Moreover, embolic complications occurred in only a small number of patients. In patients with obstructive thrombosis of LSMHVT, intravenous SK was effective and should be considered as first choice in patients in NYHA classes I-III, and as an acceptable alternative in those in NYHA class IV.

  14. Pregnancy Outcome in Women with Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves Treated with Unfractionated Heparin (UFH) or Enoxaparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Khalid Abd Aziz Mohamad; Saad, Ahmed Samy; Abdelshafy, Mohammed

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out to determine the maternal (including thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications) and fetal outcomes (including miscarriage, stillbirth, baby death, and live birth) in women with mechanical heart valves managed with therapeutic doses of unfractionated heparin (UFH) versus enoxaparin during pregnancy. This is a prospective comparative, nonrandomized study. Pregnant women with mechanical heart valves presenting to high-risk pregnancy unit of Benha University Hospital, Egypt were treated with UFH 15,000 U/12 h versus enoxaparin (Clexane) 1 mg/kg SC/12 h during pregnancy and the results were analyzed. 40 pregnant women were included in the study. In 20 pregnant women, anticoagulation was with UFH, and 20 pregnant women received enoxaparin. One (3 %) thrombotic complication occurred with enoxaparin treatment. Noncompliance or subtherapeutic levels contributed to this outcome in this case. Antenatal hemorrhage occurred in 4 (10 %) and postpartum hemorrhagic complications in 5 (12.5 %) pregnancies. Of the 32 pregnant women who continued after 20 weeks' gestation, 100 % (17/17) of the women taking predominantly UFH had a surviving infant compared with 93 % (14/15) of the women taking primarily enoxaparin (p = 0.25). One intrauterine fetal death occurred in the enoxaparin group. There was no significant difference in the live birth rates between the two groups (p = 0.31). Compliance with therapeutic dose of UFH during pregnancy in women with mechanical heart valves is associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis and good fetal outcomes, but meticulous monitoring is essential.

  15. Acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valve sounds for early detection of malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, Nele; Defever, Korijn; Bielen, Paul; Flameng, Willem; Vander Sloten, Jos; Sas, Paul; Meuris, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical heart valves carry the disadvantage of lifelong antithrombotic therapy, due to the high risk of thrombus formation on the valve surface. Current diagnostic methods are incapable of detecting thrombus formation in an early stage. This article investigates a new diagnostic method, based on the analysis of the acoustic signal produced by the valve. This method should be capable of early detection of malfunction, thus permitting targeted medication and reducing valve-related complications and mortality. A measurement setup assuring optimal signal quality was developed, and a signal analysis program was implemented and validated on an in vitro mock circulatory loop. Next, four sheep were implanted with a bileaflet mechanical valve. The signals of their valves developing thrombosis were assessed on a weekly basis before explantation. Three sheep were sacrificed shortly after detection of malfunction according to the newly developed method. In each case, thrombus or membrane formation was detected on the leaflets upon explantation. In one sheep, no malfunction was found in the analysis, which was also confirmed by the condition of the valve upon explantation. These preliminary results indicate that acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valves permits early detection of valvular malfunction. Further research with more in vitro and animal testing is required to statistically validate these findings. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Review of numerical methods for simulation of mechanical heart valves and the potential for blood clotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Mohamad Shukri; Ismail, Farzad; Tamagawa, Masaaki; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Wiriadidjaja, Surjatin; Basri, Adi Azrif; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2017-09-01

    Even though the mechanical heart valve (MHV) has been used routinely in clinical practice for over 60 years, the occurrence of serious complications such as blood clotting remains to be elucidated. This paper reviews the progress that has been made over the years in terms of numerical simulation method and the contribution of abnormal flow toward blood clotting from MHVs in the aortic position. It is believed that this review would likely be of interest to some readers in various disciplines, such as engineers, scientists, mathematicians and surgeons, to understand the phenomenon of blood clotting in MHVs through computational fluid dynamics.

  17. Respiratory induced heart rate variability during slow mechanical ventilation Marker to exclude brain death patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Vondra, Vlastimil; Kružliak, P.; Šrámek, V.; Cundrle, I.; Leinveber, P.; Adamek, M.; Zvoníček, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 129, 7-8 (2017), s. 251-258 ISSN 0043-5325 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MZd NS10105 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : critical illness * sedation * brain death * respiratory rate variability * heart rate variability * mechanical ventilation Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Medical engineering Impact factor: 0.974, year: 2016

  18. Mechanism of the negative inotropic effect of naringin in mouse heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alvarez-Collazo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Naringin (NRG is the major flavonoid (flavanone glycoside in grapefruit juice. Its biological activity has been only partially characterized and little is known about the mechanism of the negative inotropic action of this flavonoid. Aims: To evaluate the effects of NRG on the surface electrogram (ECG and the force of contraction (FC of mice hearts as well as on the sodium (INa, calcium (ICaL and Na+ – Ca2+ exchange (INaCaX currents of enzymatically isolated mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes. Methods: ECG and FC were recorded on mouse hearts perfused in a Langendorff column. Ventricular cardiomyocytes were enzimatically dissociated and ionic currents recorded with the patch-clamp technique. Results: NRG increased RR interval and shortened corrected QT only at high concentrations (30-100 µM. However, at a fixed heart rate, it decreased FC with an IC50 of 0.4 µM. NRG reduced INa with an IC50 of 0.07 µM but with a maximal inhibition of 60 %. NRG also depressed ICaL with an IC50 of 0.013 µM and increased its fast inactivation time constant. The effects on ICaL were not voltage-dependent. INaCaX was not affected by NRG. Conclusions: Our results indicate that NRG exerts a negative inotropic effect in mice hearts that could be explained by a decrease in INa and ICaL. These actions should be taken into account when considering this molecule either as a dietetic supplement or as a template to develop therapeutic agents for human diseases.

  19. Signaling mechanisms regulating fibroblast activation, phenoconversion and fibrosis in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jessica; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) maintain the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) through myocardial remodelling. The remodelling process can become dysregulated during various forms of heart disease which leads to an overall accumulation of ECM. This results in cardiac fibrosis which increases the risk of heart failure in many patients. During heart disease, quiescent CFs undergo phenoconversion to an activated cell type called cardiac myofibroblasts (CMFs). Factors influencing phenoconversion include transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) which via SMADs (small mothers against decapentaplegic) activates the myofibroblast marker gene αSMA (α smooth muscle actin). Signaling molecules as diverse as NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (Nox4) and Wnt have been found to interact with TGF-β signalling via SMADs. Pathways, including FAK/TAK/JNK and PI3K/Akt/rac have also been implicated in activating phenoconversion of fibroblasts. Another major contributor is mechanical stress exerted on CFs by ECM changes, which involves activation of ERK and subsequent αSMA expression. Other factors, such as the mast cell protease tryptase and the seeding density also affect the phenoconversion of fibroblast cultures in vitro. Further, reversal of myofibroblast phenotype has been reported by a negative regulator of TGF-β, Ski, as well as the hormone relaxin and the second messenger cAMP. Targeting the signaling molecules involved in promoting phenoconversion of CFs to CMFs presents a possible method of controlling cardiac fibrosis. Here, we provide a brief review of signaling mechanisms responsible for phenoconversion and identify critical targets for the treatment of cardiac fibrosis.

  20. An Integrative Model of the Cardiovascular System Coupling Heart Cellular Mechanics with Arterial Network Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements. PMID:23960442

  1. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  2. Bileaflet mechanical heart valve closing sounds: in vitro classification by phonocardiographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagno, Andrea; Anzil, Federico; Buselli, Roberto; Pesavento, Elena; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Pengo, Vittorio; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino

    2009-01-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves, which exhibit hemodynamic performance fairly similar to that of native valves, can be investigated by the analysis of their closing sounds. Signal spectra calculated from the closing sounds are characterized by specific features that are suitable for the functional evaluation of the valves. Five commercial bileaflet mechanical heart valves were studied under different conditions that were simulated in vitro using a Sheffield pulse duplicator for the aortic position. The closing sounds were acquired by means of a phonocardiographic apparatus, analyzed by a specifically implemented algorithm, and were statistically compared. This article was aimed at classifying the investigated valves on the basis of their signal spectra: different profiles were identified, depending on the working conditions; moreover, closing sound reproducibility and intensity allowed the ranking of valve performances with respect to the "noise" produced by valve closure. In particular, results demonstrated which valves were characterized by the lowest noise (i.e., the Medtronic Advantage and St. Jude Regent valves) and which were characterized by the highest reproducibility (OnX, Medtronic Advantage, and St. Jude Regent valves) under the examined experimental conditions.

  3. Comparison of platelet activation through hinge vs bulk flow in mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients which is believed to be initiated by platelet activation. Platelets can be activated by the elevated shear stresses in the bulk flow during the systole phase or the flow through the hinge during the diastole. However, the importance of platelet activation by the bulk flow vs the hinge in MHVs has yet to be studied. Here, we investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanisms to the activation of platelets in MHs by performing simulation of the flow through a 25mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in a straight aorta. Two different gap sizes (250 and 150 micrometer) are used in this study. The simulations are done using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm for FSI solver on overset grids. The platelet activation through the hinge for different gap sizes is compared to the activation in the bulk flow using two platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of the results. Our results for all gap sizes using different activation models show that the integration of platelet activation caused by the bulk flow is several times higher in comparison to the activation through the hinge. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  4. Heart rescue: the role of mechanical circulatory support in the management of severe refractory cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Gabriel T; Baker, Joshua N; Parks, Kimberly A

    2012-10-01

    Cardiogenic shock is present in 3.5% of patients presenting with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite advances in therapy, mortality remains high, approaching 70% in some settings. Recent management strategies have incorporated the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), which has been associated with better survival in nonrandomized trials. MCS is increasingly used in the acute setting and has become an important treatment modality for cardiogenic shock. Small studies have demonstrated improved survival when MCS is instituted early in the management of cardiogenic shock. Numerous case reports support the benefit of MCS for various causes of cardiogenic shock, including acute myocardial infarction, cardiac allograft rejection, myocarditis and refractory arrhythmias. This article will review novel strategies in the management of cardiogenic shock including percutaneous MCS (intra-aortic balloon pump, Impella, TandemHeart, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) and surgically implanted devices (CentriMag) that are used for short-term management. We will review the mechanisms involved in cardiogenic shock and discuss management and device selection strategies.

  5. Outcome of left heart mechanical valve replacement in West African children - A 15-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamatey Martin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The West African sub-region has poor health infrastructure. Mechanical valve replacement in children from such regions raises important postoperative concerns; among these, valve-related morbidity and complications of lifelong anticoagulation are foremost. Little is known about the long-term outcome of mechanical valve replacement in West Africa. We sought to determine the outcome of mechanical valve replacement of the left heart in children from this sub-region. Method We conducted a retrospective review of all consecutive left heart valve replacements in children ( Results One hundred and fourteen patients underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR, aortic valve replacement (AVR or mitral and aortic valve replacements (MAVR. Their ages ranged from 6-18 years (13.3 ± 3.1 years. All patients were in NYHA class III or IV. Median follow up was 9.1 years. MVR was performed in 91 (79.8% patients, AVR in 13 (11.4% and MAVR in 10 (8.8% patients. Tricuspid valve repair was performed concomitantly in 45 (39.5% patients. There were 6 (5.3% early deaths and 6 (5.3% late deaths. Preoperative left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction Conclusion Mechanical valve replacement in West African children has excellent outcomes in terms of mortality, valve-related events, and reoperation rate. Preoperative left ventricular dysfunction is the primary determinant of mortality within the first 2 years of valve replacement. The risk of valve-related complications is acceptably low. Anticoagulation is well tolerated with a very low risk of bleeding even in this socioeconomic setting.

  6. The radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril on radiation induced-heart damage in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seung Hee; Lee, Kyung Ja; Koo, Hea Soo [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    Captopril (angiotension converting enzyme inhibitor) is known to have a radioprotective effect in the lungs, intestines and skin, but its effect in the heart is unclear. To investigate the radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril in the heart, the histopathological changes and immunohistochemical stains were compared with radiation alone, and radiation combined with captopril, in the rats. The histopathological changes and immunohistochemical stains (TNF {alpha} , TGF {beta} 1, PDGF and FGF2) were examined in the radiation alone and the combined captopril and radiation groups, 2 and 8 weeks after irradiation. Each group consisted of 8 to 10 rats (Sprague-Dawley). Irradiation (12.5 Gy) was given to the left hemithorax in a single fraction. Captopril (50 mg/Kg/d) mixed with water, was given orally and continuously from the first week prior to, up to the 8th week of the experiment. In the radiation alone group, the ventricle at 2 weeks after irradiation showed prominent edema ({rho} = 0.082) and fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.018) compared to the control group. At 8 weeks, the edema was decreased and fibrosis increased compared to those at 2 weeks. The histopathological changes of the combined group were similar to those of the control group, due to the reduced radiation toxicity at 2 and 8 weeks. The endocardial fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.047) in the atrium, and the interstitial fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.019) and edema ({rho} = 0.042) of the ventricle were reduced significantly in the combined group compared to those in the radiation alone group at 2 weeks. The expressions of TNF- {alpha} , TGF- {beta} 1, PDGF and FGF-2 in the radiation alone group were more increased than in the control group, especially in the pericardium and endocardium of the atrium at 2 weeks. At 8 weeks, the pericardial TNF- {alpha} and TGF- {beta} 1, in the radiation alone group continuously increased. The expressions of TNF- {alpha} , TGF- {beta} 1, and PDGF were decreased in the combined

  7. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Allows Accurate Measurement of Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valve Leaflet Closing Angles Compared With Fluoroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, Dominika; Symersky, Petr; Vonken, Evert-Jan P. A.; Provoost, Esther; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) leaflet restriction measurements with fluoroscopy measurements in commonly used mechanical prosthetic heart valves (PHVs). Methods: Four mechanical PHVs (ON-X, Carbomedics, St. Jude, and Medtronic Hall)

  8. Comparative statistical mechanics of myosin molecular motors in rat heart, diaphragm and tracheal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Blanc, François-Xavier; Joseph, Thierry; Geraets, Bart; Krokidis, Xénophon; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2011-10-01

    Statistical mechanics establishes a link between microscopic properties of matter and its bulk properties. A. Huxley's equations (1957) [1] provide the necessary phenomenological formalism to use statistical mechanics. We compared statistical mechanics in rat diaphragm in tetanus (tet; n=10) and twitch (tw; n=12) modes, in heart in twitch mode (n=20), and in tracheal smooth muscle in tetanus mode (TSM; n=10). This powerful tool makes it possible to determine: (i) statistical entropy (S) which is related to the dispersal of energy and represents a measure of the degree of disorder in muscular system; (ii) thermodynamic force A/T (chemical affinity A and temperature T); (iii) thermodynamic flow (υ); (iv) entropy production rate (A/T×υ), which quantifies irreversible chemical processes generated by myosin crossbridge (CB) molecular motors. All muscles studied operated near equilibrium, i.e., Atype. All studied muscles differed in terms of statistical entropy, chemical affinity, and entropy production rate. Stimulation mode (tet and tw) modulated CB kinetics and statistical mechanics. All muscle types operated near equilibrium and in a stationary linear regime. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Is there a suitable method of anticoagulation in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Humza T; Sepehripour, Amir H; Shipolini, Alex R; McCormack, David J

    2012-09-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol in order to identify the mode of anticoagulation that has the best safety profile for both the mother and the foetus in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. A total of 281 papers were identified using the reported search, of which eight represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results are tabulated. The reported measures were foetal mortality, maternal mortality, congenital abnormalities and embryopathy, and maternal thromboembolic and haemorrhagic complications. The medical orthodoxy has warned of the combination of oral anticoagulation and pregnancy due to the well-documented warfarin embryopathy. Yet only one of the reported papers identified a greater incidence of foetal aberrations among warfarin use, with the highest reported rate being 6.4% and two of the assessed papers reporting no embryopathy at all. Foetal mortality with oral anticoagulation use ranged from 1.52 to 76%. All reported publications demonstrated a superior maternal outcome with warfarin use, with a range of thromboembolic events from 0 to 10% in comparison with 4 to 48% where heparin was used. Thus, it is concluded that warfarin is a more durable anticoagulant with a better maternal outcome despite it carrying a greater foetal risk. Although, in contrast to previous teaching, the risks of embryopathy are not the major drawback of oral anticoagulation. Heparin is consistently less effective, but may be preferred for the superior foetal outcome. Heparin usage during the first trimester reduces the foetal risk but is still associated with an adverse maternal outcome. While the focus for clinicians looking after pregnant women with mechanical heart valves may be to prevent maternal thromboembolic complications, the overriding concern for many women is to avoid any harm to their unborn child, even when this

  10. Role of vortices in cavitation formation in the flow across a mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien; Liu, Jia-Shing; Lo, Chi-Wen; Hwang, Ned H

    2008-07-01

    Cavitation occurs during mechanical heart valve closure when the local pressure drops below vapor pressure. The formation of stable gas bubbles may result in gaseous emboli, and secondarily cause transient ischemic attacks or strokes. It is noted that instantaneous valve closure, occluder rebound and high-speed leakage flow generate vortices that promote low-pressure regions in favor of stable bubble formation; however, to date no studies have been conducted for the quantitative measurement and analysis of these vortices. A Björk-Shiley Monostrut (BSM) monoleaflet valve was placed in the mitral position of a pulsatile mock circulatory loop. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and pico coulomb (PCB) pressure measurements were applied. Flow field measurements were carried out at t = -5, -3, -1, -0.5, 0 (valve closure), 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1.19, 1.44, 1.69, 1.94, 2, 2.19, 2.54, 2.79, 3.04, 3.29, 3.54, 5 and 10 ms. The vortices were quantitatively analyzed using the Rankine vortex model. A single counter-clockwise vortex was The instantaneous formation of cavitation bubbles at mechanical heart valve (MHV) closure, which subsequently damage blood cells and valve integrity, is a well-known and widely studied phenomenon (1-4). Contributing factors seem to include the water-hammer, squeeze flow and Venturi effects, all of which are short-lived. Both, Dauzat et al. (5) and Sliwka et al. (6) have detected high-intensity transient signals (HITS) with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the carotid and cerebral arteries of MHV recipients, while Deklunder (7) observed clinical occurrences of cerebral gas emboli that were not seen with bioprosthetic valves. These detected over the major orifice, while a pair of counter-rotating vortices was found over the minor orifice. Velocity profiles were consistent with Rankine vortices. The vortex strength and magnitude of the pressure drop peaked shortly after initial occluder-housing impact and rapidly decreased after 0.5 ms, indicating viscous

  11. Application of wavelet analysis to the phonocardiographic signal of mechanical heart valve closing sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagno, Andrea; Anzil, Federico; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Pengo, Vittorio; Ruggeri, Alfredo; Gerosa, Gino

    2009-03-01

    Heart valve disorders, caused by congenital defects, rheumatic fever, calcification, myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases, often require native valves to be replaced by bio-prosthetic devices or mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Among MHVs, bileaflet valves are usually preferred for their hemodynamic features, similar to physiological ones, and their durability, but they are prone to complications due to thromboembolic events. Due to the asynchronous closure of the leaflets, bileaflet MHVs are also known to produce closing sounds typically characterized by the presence of two peaks in the time domain. The detection of this "double click" in the signal may be useful for the early diagnosis of bileaflet MHV malfunction. The closing sound is actually a non-stationary signal that can be properly explored by means of time-frequency analysis. This paper describes a preliminary approach to the investigation of bileaflet MHV closing sounds performed by Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) analysis. Signals were collected from 3 patients immediately after surgery by means of the Myotis 3C, which is a traditional phonocardiographic apparatus. Signals were analyzed by two algorithms: one embedded in the Myotis 3C, based on the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT); and one specifically created for the purposes of the present study, based on CWT. The performance of these algorithms was compared and the results showed that the proposed CWT technique correctly classifies as ''double'' a large number of clicks that are recognized as ''single'' by the Myotis 3C.

  12. Mechanisms of right heart disease in pulmonary hypertension (2017 Grover Conference Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asosingh, Kewal; Erzurum, Serpil

    2018-01-01

    Current dogma is that pathological hypertrophy of the right ventricle is a direct consequence of pulmonary vascular remodeling. However, progression of right ventricle dysfunction is not always lung-dependent. Increased afterload caused by pulmonary vascular remodeling initiates the right ventricle hypertrophy, but determinants leading to adaptive or maladaptive hypertrophy and failure remain unknown. Ischemia in a hypertrophic right ventricle may directly contribute to right heart failure. Rapidly enlarging cardiomyocytes switch from aerobic to anaerobic energy generation resulting in cell growth under relatively hypoxic conditions. Cardiac muscle reacts to an increased afterload by over-activation of the sympathetic system and uncoupling and downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors. Recent studies suggest that β blocker therapy in PH is safe, well tolerated, and preserves right ventricle function and cardiac output by reducing right ventricular glycolysis. Fibrosis, an evolutionary conserved process in host defense and wound healing, is dysregulated in maladaptive cardiac tissue contributing directly to right ventricle failure. Despite several mechanisms having been suggested in right heart disease, the causes of maladaptive cardiac remodeling remain unknown and require further research.

  13. A new concept in the sewing rings for mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Mathew V; Umasankar, Payanam R; Sabareeswaran, Arumugam; Shenoy, Sachin J; Subban, Vijayakumar; Joseph, Mathew K

    2012-08-01

    Valve-associated complications challenge the quality of life and longevity after heart valve replacement. Inappropriate healing may be a contributing factor. To evaluate a new design mechanical heart valve in an animal model. The new valve was fabricated by substituting the sewing ring with an inbuilt suture ridge and an overlying fabric flap. It improved the effective orifice area. Animal experiments were performed on pigs to compare this valve with standard valve models. The animals were kept on dual antiplatelet drugs. Six of the 8 test animals survived the observation period of 140 days compared to 2 of the 6 controls. Among the test valves, one had thrombosis and 3 had significant tissue hyperplasia, whereas 5 control valves had thrombosis associated with significant tissue hyperplasia. Three test valves had paravalvular defects compared to none in the control group. Histology showed good tissue incorporation of the fabric flap of the test valves, whereas the control valves had tissue infiltration limited to the peripheral fabric layer of the sewing ring. The new valve has improved effective orifice area, and the animal study showed better survival, good healing, and a lower incidence of thrombosis and tissue hyperplasia.

  14. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  15. What fans the fire: insights into mechanisms of leptin in metabolic syndrome-associated heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are one of the most devastating risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The obesity gene product leptin plays a central role in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. The physiological and pathophysiological roles of leptin in cardiovascular system have been investigated extensively since its discovery in 1994. In addition to its well-established metabolic effects, more recent evidence have depicted a rather pivotal role of leptin in inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and tissue remodeling en route to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and insulin resistance. Under physiological condition, leptin is known to reduce appetite, promote energy expenditure, increase sympathetic activity, facilitate glucose utilization and improve insulin sensitivity. In addition, leptin may regulate cardiac and vascular function through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. However, hyperleptinemia usually occurs with progressively increased body weight and metabolic syndrome development, leading to a state of global or selective leptin resistance. Both central and peripheral leptin resistance may be present under pathophysiological conditions such as inflammation, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and a cadre of other cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, obesity, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In this review, we will discuss cardiovascular actions of leptin related to various components of metabolic syndrome. Particular emphasis will be given to insights derived from therapeutic interventions with lifestyle modification, cardiovascular drugs, anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drugs.

  16. Quality metrics for high order meshes: analysis of the mechanical simulation of the heart beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamata, Pablo; Roy, Ishani; Blazevic, Bojan; Crozier, Andrew; Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Hose, D Rod; Smith, Nicolas P

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a computational mesh is an important characteristic for stable and accurate simulations. Quality depends on the regularity of the initial mesh, and in mechanical simulations it evolves in time, with deformations causing changes in volume and distortion of mesh elements. Mesh quality metrics are therefore relevant for both mesh personalization and the monitoring of the simulation process. This work evaluates the significance, in meshes with high order interpolation, of four quality metrics described in the literature, applying them to analyse the stability of the simulation of the heart beat. It also investigates how image registration and mesh warping parameters affect the quality and stability of meshes. Jacobian-based metrics outperformed or matched the results of coarse geometrical metrics of aspect ratio or orthogonality, although they are more expensive computationally. The stability of simulations of a complete heart cycle was best predicted with a specificity of 61%, sensitivity of 85%, and only nominal differences were found changing the intra-element and per-element combination of quality values. A compromise between fitting accuracy and mesh stability and quality was found. Generic geometrical quality metrics have a limited success predicting stability, and an analysis of the simulation problem may be required for an optimal definition of quality.

  17. Hemodynamic Performance and Thrombogenic Properties of a Superhydrophobic Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, David L.; Vahabi, Hamed; Bui, Hieu; Movafaghi, Sanli; Moore, Brandon; Kota, Arun K.; Popat, Ketul; Dasi, Lakshmi P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore how blood-material interactions and hemodynamics are impacted by rendering a clinical quality 25 mm St. Jude Medical Bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) superhydrophobic (SH) with the aim of reducing thrombo-embolic complications associated with BMHVs. Basic cell adhesion is evaluated to assess blood-material interactions, while hemodynamic performance is analyzed with and without the SH coating. Results show that a SH coating with a receding contact angle (CA) of 160º strikingly eliminates platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the surface. Alternatively, many platelets attach to and activate on pyrolytic carbon (receding CA=47), the base material for BMHVs. We further show that the performance index increases by 2.5% for coated valve relative to an uncoated valve, with a maximum possible improved performance of 5%. Both valves exhibit instantaneous shear stress below 10 N/m2 and Reynolds Shear Stress below 100 N/m2. Therefore, a SH BMHV has the potential to relax the requirement for antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug regimens typically required for patients receiving MHVs by minimizing blood-material interactions, while having a minimal impact on hemodynamics. We show for the first time that SH-coated surfaces may be a promising direction to minimize thrombotic complications in complex devices such as heart valves. PMID:27098219

  18. Time-Resolved Micro PIV in the Pivoting Area of the Triflo Mechanical Heart Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennemann, Bernhard M; Rösgen, Thomas; Carrel, Thierry P; Obrist, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    The Lapeyre-Triflo FURTIVA valve aims at combining the favorable hemodynamics of bioprosthetic heart valves with the durability of mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The pivoting region of MHVs is hemodynamically of special interest as it may be a region of high shear stresses, combined with areas of flow stagnation. Here, platelets can be activated and may form a thrombus which in the most severe case can compromise leaflet mobility. In this study we set up an experiment to replicate the pulsatile flow in the aortic root and to study the flow in the pivoting region under physiological hemodynamic conditions (CO = 4.5 L/min / CO = 3.0 L/min, f = 60 BPM). It was found that the flow velocity in the pivoting region could reach values close to that of the bulk flow during systole. At the onset of diastole the three valve leaflets closed in a very synchronous manner within an average closing time of 55 ms which is much slower than what has been measured for traditional bileaflet MHVs. Hot spots for elevated viscous shear stresses were found at the flanges of the housing and the tips of the leaflet ears. Systolic VSS was maximal during mid-systole and reached levels of up to 40 Pa.

  19. The Renal Nerves in Chronic Heart Failure: Afferent and Efferent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Marie Schiller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF. Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent

  20. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a procedure that opens clogged arteries. Repair the heart valve . This procedure can often make your heart function ... heart muscle. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) . These are mechanical pumps that surgeons insert to help the heart ...

  1. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  2. Simulations of the hinge micro flow field of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helene; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2006-11-01

    Studies have shown that bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV) promote blood cell damage and thromboembolic events due to their non-physiologic hemodynamics. Clinical reports and recent in-vitro experiments suggest that these complications are mainly associated with the hemodynamic stresses of flow through the valve hinge regions. To date, hinge hemodynamics has been largely studied using experimental approaches. This study aims at numerically simulating the pulsatile flow through the hinge region of a BMHV. The numerical technique uses a Cartesian sharp interface immersed boundary methodology and a hybrid staggered/non staggered control volume method. The hinge and leaflet dimensions are obtained from Micro Computed Tomography of an actual clinical bileaflet valve and the leaflet motion is provided as prescribed boundary conditions based on experimental measurements. Calculations will be presented for pulsatile flow conditions and reveal a complex three dimensional flow pattern throughout the entire cardiac cycle.

  3. Experimental evaluation of mechanical heart support system based on viscous friction disc pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Chernyavskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Experimental evaluation of the viscous friction disk pump efficiency, studying the relationship between inter-disk clearance and sizes of input and output ports and pump performance parameters.Materials and methods. To assess the characteristics and to optimize the disk friction pump design the pump model and experimental stand were created. Pump dimensions were set on the basis of medical and biological requirements for mechanical heart support systems and with due consideration of the experimental studies of our colleagues from Pennsylvania. Flow volume of the working fluid was measured by float rotameter Krohne VA-40 with measurement error of not more than 1%. The pressure values in the hydrodynamic circuit were measured using a monitor manufactured by Biosoft-M. Expansion device allowed changing the flow resistance of the system simulating the total peripheral resistance of the circulatory system.Results. Linear direct correlation between the pump performance and the pressure drop of liquid being created at the inlet and outlet of the pump was obtained. The required flow rate (5–7 l/min and pressure (90–100 mmHg were reached when the rotor speed was in the range of 2500–3000 rev/min. It has been shown that the increase of the inlet diameter to 15 mm has not resulted in a significant increase in the pump performance, and that the highest efficiency values can be obtained for the magnitude of inter-disk gap of 0.4–0.5 mm.Conclusion. Designed and manufactured experimental disc pump model for pumping fluid has showed the fundamental possibility to use this model as a system for mechanical support of the heart.

  4. Antithrombin III is associated with acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Kilo, Juliane; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael; Mair, Peter; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2017-06-01

    There are few data on the role of liver dysfunction in patients with end-stage heart failure supported by mechanical circulatory support. The aim of our study was to investigate predictors for acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support. A consecutive 164 patients with heart failure with New York Heart Association class IV undergoing mechanical circulatory support were investigated for acute liver failure using the King's College criteria. Clinical characteristics of heart failure together with hemodynamic and laboratory values were analyzed by logistic regression. A total of 45 patients (27.4%) with heart failure developed subsequent acute liver failure with a hospital mortality of 88.9%. Duration of heart failure, cause, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of vasopressors, central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary pulsatility index, cardiac index, and transaminases were not significantly associated with acute liver failure. Repeated decompensation, atrial fibrillation (P failure in univariate analysis only. In multivariable analysis, decreased antithrombin III was the strongest single measurement indicating acute liver failure (relative risk per %, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.93; P = .001) and remained an independent predictor when adjustment for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was performed (relative risk per %, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.99; P = .031). Antithrombin III less than 59.5% was identified as a cutoff value to predict acute liver failure with a corresponding sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 87%. In addition to the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, decreased antithrombin III activity tends to be superior in predicting acute liver failure compared with traditionally thought predictors. Antithrombin III measurement may help to identify patients more precisely who are developing acute liver failure during mechanical

  5. Mitochondrial damage: An important mechanism of ambient PM2.5 exposure-induced acute heart injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ruijin; Kou, Xiaojing; Geng, Hong; Xie, Jingfang; Tian, Jingjing; Cai, Zongwei; Dong, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PM 2.5 induces heart mitochondrial morphological damage of rats. • Mitochondrial fission/fusion gene expression is important regulation mechanism. • Proinflammatoy cytokine level changes are accompanied with mitochondrial damage. • Alterations in oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis are focused on. - Abstract: Epidemiological studies suggested that ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) exposure was associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism, especially the mitochondrial damage mechanism, of PM 2.5 -induced heart acute injury is still unclear. In this study, the alterations of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial fission/fusion gene expression, oxidative stress, calcium homeostasis and inflammation in hearts of rats exposed to PM 2.5 with different dosages (0.375, 1.5, 6.0 and 24.0 mg/kg body weight) were investigated. The results indicated that the PM 2.5 exposure induced pathological changes and ultra-structural damage in hearts such as mitochondrial swell and cristae disorder. Furthermore, PM 2.5 exposure significantly increased specific mitochondrial fission/fusion gene (Fis1, Mfn1, Mfn2, Drp1 and OPA1) expression in rat hearts. These changes were accompanied by decreases of activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), Na + K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase and increases of levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) as well as levels of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in rat hearts. The results implicate that mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress, cellular homeostasis imbalance and inflammation are potentially important mechanisms for the PM 2.5 -induced heart injury, and may have relations with cardiovascular disease

  6. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  7. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems. PMID:25694852

  8. Anticoagulation management in patients with mechanical heart valves having pacemaker or defibrillator insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, S; Schoenberg, J; Divakara Menon, S; Spyropoulos, A C; Healey, J S; Eikelboom, J W

    2013-04-01

    In patients with a high risk for stroke and having invasive procedures with a high risk for bleeding it is unclear how anticoagulant therapy should be managed. We reviewed data from all patients with mechanical heart valves, who had elective insertion or replacement of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) during the past 8years at our hospital. Data on anticoagulant treatment, pocket hematoma and thromboembolic complications were captured. Of the 111 patients reviewed, 68 (61%) had a mechanical valve in the mitral position with or without other valves replaced and 43 (39%) had a mechanical valve only in the aortic position. Fifty-nine (53%) were undergoing replacement for their device. Six patients received a tapered warfarin regimen and 102 received preoperative bridging anticoagulation of whom 12 also received postoperative bridging. One stroke occurred 40days after pacemaker replacement in a patient with mitral mechanical valve and without postoperative bridging. Six patients (5.5%) developed pocket hematoma without a significant association to postoperative bridging, type of mechanical valve or to type of device. Predictors for pocket hematoma appeared to be replacement surgery (odds ratio 12.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-228) and an international normalized ratio of 1.5 or higher on the day of surgery (odds ratio 8.4; 95% CI, 0.96-68.1). We found a low risk for stroke in the absence of postoperative bridging. For patients with device replacement surgery reversal of the anticoagulant effect at the time of procedure might reduce the risk for pocket hematoma, but this requires prospective evaluation including the risk of thromboembolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term results of mechanical and biological heart valves in dialysis and non-dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, A; Boedeker, R H; Rosendahl, U P; Niemann, B; Haberer, S; Roth, P; Ennker, J A C

    2011-12-01

    We wanted to answer the question whether biological heart valves are inferior compared to mechanical heart valves in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Between 01/1996 und 12/2006, 44 of 3293 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) in a single institution suffered from dialysis-dependent ESRD and underwent a follow-up investigation after 1.9 years (median). Twelve (28.9 %) of these patients received a biological, 32 (71.1 %) of these patients a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. To evaluate a possible influence of the valve type (biological/mechanical) on survival, uni- and multivariate logistic regression was used. ESRD patients after AVR had a relatively poor short-term (30-day mortality: 22.7 %) and long-term survival (median survival time: 24.7 months; 95 % CI: 0.2-47.7 months), irrespective of the type of heart valve prosthesis (hazard ratio for mortality depending on heart valve type in dialysis patients: 1.31, P = 0.400). Dialysis-dependent patients were not reoperated due to valve-related reasons. The long-term survival of dialysis-dependent patients after AVR is low (5-year survival: 29.5 %) irrespective of the type of heart valve prosthesis. Therefore, the use of biological AVR is not contraindicated in this group of patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Cardiac Embryology and Molecular Mechanisms of Congenital Heart Disease – A Primer for Anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloesel, Benjamin; DiNardo, James A.; Body, Simon C.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is diagnosed in 0.4% to 5% of live births and presents unique challenges to the pediatric anesthesiologist. Furthermore, advances in surgical management have led to improved survival of those patients, and many adult anesthesiologists now frequently take care of adolescents and adults who have previously undergone surgery to correct or palliate congenital heart lesions. Knowledge of abnormal heart development on the molecular and genetic level extends and improves the anesthesiologist's understanding of congenital heart disease. In this paper we aim to review current knowledge pertaining to genetic alterations and their cellular effects that are involved in the formation of congenital heart defects. Given that congenital heart disease can currently only occasionally be traced to a single genetic mutation, we highlight some of the difficulties that researchers face when trying to identify specific steps in the pathogenetic development of heart lesions. PMID:27541719

  11. Numerical investigation of the performance of three hinge designs of bileaflet mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Hélène A; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-11-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the nonphysiologic mechanical stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Relating hinge flow features to design features is, therefore, essential to ultimately design BMHVs with lower TEC rates. This study aims at simulating the pulsatile three-dimensional hinge flows of three BMHVs and estimating the TEC potential associated with each hinge design. Hinge geometries are constructed from micro-computed tomography scans of BMHVs. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Leaflet motion and flow boundary conditions are extracted from fluid-structure-interaction simulations of BMHV bulk flow. The numerical results are analyzed using a particle-tracking approach coupled with existing blood damage models. The gap width and, more importantly, the shape of the recess and leaflet are found to impact the flow distribution and TEC potential. Smooth, streamlined surfaces appear to be more favorable than sharp corners or sudden shape transitions. The developed framework will enable pragmatic and cost-efficient preclinical evaluation of BMHV prototypes prior to valve manufacturing. Application to a wide range of hinges with varying design parameters will eventually help in determining the optimal hinge design.

  12. A motivational counseling approach to improving heart failure self-care: mechanisms of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Dickson, Victoria V; Hoke, Linda; McMahon, Janet P; Reis, Brendali F; Sayers, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Self-care is an integral component of successful heart failure (HF) management. Engaging patients in self-care can be challenging. Fifteen patients with HF enrolled during hospitalization received a motivational intervention designed to improve HF self-care. A mixed method, pretest posttest design was used to evaluate the proportion of patients in whom the intervention was beneficial and the mechanism of effectiveness. Participants received, on average, 3.0 +/- 1.5 home visits (median 3, mode 3, range 1-6) over a three-month period from an advanced practice nurse trained in motivational interviewing and family counseling. Quantitative and qualitative data were used to judge individual patients in whom the intervention produced a clinically significant improvement in HF self-care. Audiotaped intervention sessions were analyzed using qualitative methods to assess the mechanism of intervention effectiveness. Congruence between quantitative and qualitative judgments of improved self-care revealed that 71.4% of participants improved in self-care after receiving the intervention. Analysis of transcribed intervention sessions revealed themes of 1) communication (reflective listening, empathy); 2) making it fit (acknowledging cultural beliefs, overcoming barriers and constraints, negotiating an action plan); and, 3) bridging the transition from hospital to home (providing information, building skills, activating support resources). An intervention that incorporates the core elements of motivational interviewing may be effective in improving HF self-care, but further research is needed.

  13. Measurements of steady flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using stereoscopic PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Chris; Sullivan, Pierre; Ethier, C Ross

    2011-03-01

    Computational modeling of bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BiMHV) flow requires experimentally validated datasets and improved knowledge of BiMHV fluid mechanics. In this study, flow was studied downstream of a model BiMHV in an axisymmetric aortic sinus using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The inlet flow was steady and the Reynolds number based on the aortic diameter was 7600. Results showed the out-of-plane velocity was of similar magnitude as the transverse velocity. Although additional studies are needed for confirmation, analysis of the out-of-plane velocity showed the possible presence of a four-cell streamwise vortex structure in the mean velocity field. Spatial data for all six Reynolds stress components were obtained. Reynolds normal stress profiles revealed similarities between the central jet and free jets. These findings are important to BiMHV flow modeling, though clinical relevance is limited due to the idealized conditions chosen. To this end, the dataset is publicly available for CFD validation purposes.

  14. Assessment of left atrial volume and mechanical function in ischemic heart disease: a multi slice computed tomography study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Kofoed, Klaus F; Møller, Jacob E

    2010-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) maximal volume contains prognostic information in patients with heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. However, only few studies have investigated the detailed mechanical function of the LA in these patients. We assessed the feasibility of evaluating LA volume and mechani...

  15. Exercise training enhances baroreflex control of heart rate by a vagal mechanism in rabbits with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Li; Kulakofsky, Jay; Zucker, Irving H

    2002-06-01

    Moderate exercise training (Ex) enhances work capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated the autonomic components of resting heart rate (HR) and the baroreflex control of HR in conscious, instrumented rabbits with pacing-induced CHF after Ex. Sham and CHF rabbits were exercise trained for 4 wk at 15-18 m/min, 6 days/wk. Arterial pressure and HR were recorded before and after metoprolol (1 mg/kg iv) or after atropine (0.2 mg/kg iv). Mean arterial pressure was altered by infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. The data were fit to a sigmoid (logistic) function. Baseline HRs were 266.5 +/- 8.4 and 232.1 +/- 1.6 beats/min in CHF and CHF Ex rabbits, respectively (P baroreflex slope (1.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 5.6 +/- 0.7 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P baroreflex slope to 4.9 +/- 0.3 from 1.7 +/- 0.3 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1) in unblocked rabbits (P baroreflex function in sham animals. After metoprolol, baroreflex slope was significantly increased in CHF Ex rabbits (1.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 3.0 +/- 0.2 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P baroreflex slope or HR range between CHF Ex and CHF rabbits. These data support the view that enhancement of baroreflex control of HR after Ex is due to an augmentation of vagal tone.

  16. Two-dimensional FSI simulation of closing dynamics of a tilting disc mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, V; Udaykumar, H S; Herbertson, L H; Deutsch, S; Manning, K B; Chandran, K B

    2010-03-01

    The fluid dynamics during valve closure resulting in high shear flows and large residence times of particles has been implicated in platelet activation and thrombus formation in mechanical heart valves. Our previous studies with bi-leaflet valves have shown that large shear stresses induced in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing results in relatively high platelet activation levels whereas flow between the leaflets results in shed vortices not conducive to platelet damage. In this study we compare the result of closing dynamics of a tilting disc valve with that of a bi-leaflet valve. The two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction analysis of a tilting disc valve closure mechanics is performed with a fixed grid Cartesian mesh flow solver with local mesh refinement, and a Lagrangian particle dynamic analysis for computation of potential for platelet activation. Throughout the simulation the flow remains in the laminar regime and the flow through the gap width is marked by the development of a shear layer which separates from the leaflet downstream of the valve. Zones of re-circulation are observed in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing on the major orifice region of the tilting disc valve and are seen to be migrating towards the minor orifice region. Jet flow is observed at the minor orifice region and a vortex is formed which sheds in the direction of fluid motion as observed in experiments using PIV measurements. The activation parameter computed for the tilting disc valve, at the time of closure was found to be 2.7 times greater than that of the bi-leaflet mechanical valve and was found to be in the vicinity of the minor orifice region mainly due to the migration of vortical structures from the major to the minor orifice region during the leaflet rebound of the closing phase.

  17. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Conversion of Ischemic Stroke in a Patient with Mechanical Heart Valve: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Micheal Jace Tarver; Tyler Schmidt; Michael T. Koltz

    2018-01-01

    The authors present a unique case of recurrent stroke, discovered to be secondary to hemorrhagic conversion of microemboli from a mechanical aortic valve despite anticoagulation with Coumadin. The complexity of this case was magnified by the patient’s young age, a mechanical heart valve (MHV), and a need for anticoagulation to maintain MHV patency in a setting of potentially life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for hemorrhagic conve...

  18. Deep RNA sequencing reveals dynamic regulation of myocardial noncoding RNAs in failing human heart and remodeling with mechanical circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Yamada, Kathryn A; Patel, Akshar Y; Topkara, Veli K; George, Isaac; Cheema, Faisal H; Ewald, Gregory A; Mann, Douglas L; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2014-03-04

    Microarrays have been used extensively to profile transcriptome remodeling in failing human heart, although the genomic coverage provided is limited and fails to provide a detailed picture of the myocardial transcriptome landscape. Here, we describe sequencing-based transcriptome profiling, providing comprehensive analysis of myocardial mRNA, microRNA (miRNA), and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expression in failing human heart before and after mechanical support with a left ventricular (LV) assist device (LVAD). Deep sequencing of RNA isolated from paired nonischemic (NICM; n=8) and ischemic (ICM; n=8) human failing LV samples collected before and after LVAD and from nonfailing human LV (n=8) was conducted. These analyses revealed high abundance of mRNA (37%) and lncRNA (71%) of mitochondrial origin. miRNASeq revealed 160 and 147 differentially expressed miRNAs in ICM and NICM, respectively, compared with nonfailing LV. Among these, only 2 (ICM) and 5 (NICM) miRNAs are normalized with LVAD. RNASeq detected 18 480, including 113 novel, lncRNAs in human LV. Among the 679 (ICM) and 570 (NICM) lncRNAs differentially expressed with heart failure, ≈10% are improved or normalized with LVAD. In addition, the expression signature of lncRNAs, but not miRNAs or mRNAs, distinguishes ICM from NICM. Further analysis suggests that cis-gene regulation represents a major mechanism of action of human cardiac lncRNAs. The myocardial transcriptome is dynamically regulated in advanced heart failure and after LVAD support. The expression profiles of lncRNAs, but not mRNAs or miRNAs, can discriminate failing hearts of different pathologies and are markedly altered in response to LVAD support. These results suggest an important role for lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of heart failure and in reverse remodeling observed with mechanical support.

  19. Fetal heart development in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model: the role of mechanical and nonmechanical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Baptista, Maria J; Pedrosa, Carla; Estevão-Costa, José; Flake, Alan W; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2003-10-01

    In congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), it was recently shown that early and late gestational lung underdevelopment is caused by nonmechanical and mechanical factors, respectively. Heart underdevelopment, which might predict lung hypoplasia, is commonly attributed to mechanical factors. The authors analyzed whether nonmechanical and mechanical factors affect cardiac growth and correlations between lung and heart weights during gestation. Left-sided CDH was induced in pregnant Wistar rats by administration of nitrofen on E9.5. At selected gestational ages (E18, E20, and E22), the lungs and heart were harvested, weighed, and analyzed for DNA and protein contents. Left lung and heart weights were correlated at those gestational ages. Two experimental groups: nitrofen without CDH (nitrofen), and nitrofen with CDH (CDH), were compared with normal controls. At E18, both nitrofen-exposed groups presented similar and significant left lung (LL) hypoplasia. As gestation progressed (E20 and E22), in the nitrofen group left lung (LL) hypoplasia decreased, whereas in the CDH group LL hypoplasia was exacerbated relative to normal controls. In contrast, at E18 and E20, heart-to-body weight ratios as well as cardiac DNA and protein contents were reduced significantly in all animals exposed to nitrofen, with no significant differences observed between nitrofen and CDH groups. As gestation progressed, the difference between cardiac parameters in nitrofen-exposed and normal control rats diminished, and at E22 no significant differences were documented. In the CDH group, significant correlations were seen between lung and heart weights at E18 (r = 0.65; P <.05) and E20 (r = 0.4; P <.05), whereas at term gestation (E22) no significant correlation was observed (r = 0.21, not significant). Nonmechanical factors, which might be directed by nitrofen, play a role in the pathogenesis of lung and heart hypoplasia manifested precociously in fetal life, whereas mechanical compression might

  20. The influence of different inflow configurations on computational fluid dynamics in a novel three-leaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Schubert, Kathrin; Jamali, Ashkan; Scharfschwerdt, Michael

    2018-03-30

    A novel mechanical heart valve was developed with a special focus on avoiding anticoagulation. Computational fluid dynamics were used for the research design. Here, the effect of different anatomical inflow geometries on flow characteristics is evaluated. Flow and pressure simulations were performed on a novel 3-leaflet mechanical heart valve in a fully open position at 2 flow rates related to the peak and end-systolic flow. The computational fluid dynamics model was designed according to 4 different (1 cylindrical, 3 conical with increasing diameter) anatomical configurations of the left ventricular outflow tract derived from an inverse heart model. With increasing inflow diameter, the flow velocity decreased for both flow rates, from 1543 mm/s in cylindrical configuration to 1475 mm/s in conical configuration for a flow rate of 18 l/min. However, there was no further decrease for the inflow diameters 38 and 48 mm. The velocity profile became broader with increasing inflow diameter and the maximal pressure decreased. At the leading edge, velocity almost stagnated, while the pressure increased and the reflection point moved downstream. No occurrence of dead space was observed with the different configurations and flow rates. An analysis of different anatomical inflow configurations by computational fluid dynamic simulations showed a more homogenous velocity profile and lower flow velocity values with increasing inflow diameter up to 38 mm in this novel 3-leaflet mechanical heart valve.

  1. Patterns of Palliative Care Referral in Patients Admitted With Heart Failure Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskar, Katie J; Celi, Leo Anthony; McDermid, Robert C; Walley, Keith R; Russell, James A; Boyd, John H; Rush, Barret

    2018-04-01

    Palliative care is recommended for advanced heart failure (HF) by several major societies, though prior studies indicate that it is underutilized. To investigate patterns of palliative care referral for patients admitted with HF exacerbations, as well as to examine patient and hospital factors associated with different rates of palliative care referral. Retrospective nationwide cohort analysis utilizing the National Inpatient Sample from 2006 to 2012. Patients referred to palliative care were compared to those who were not. Patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of HF requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) were included. A cohort of non-HF patients with metastatic cancer was created for temporal comparison. Between 2006 and 2012, 74 824 patients underwent MV for HF. A referral to palliative care was made in 2903 (3.9%) patients. The rate of referral for palliative care in HF increased from 0.8% in 2006 to 6.4% in 2012 ( P care referral in patients with cancer increased from 2.9% in 2006 to 11.9% in 2012 ( P care ( P care. The use of palliative care for patients with advanced HF increased during the study period; however, palliative care remains underutilized in this setting. Patient factors such as race and SES affect access to palliative care.

  2. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  3. Effects of Pannus Formation on the Flow around a Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojin; Choi, Haecheon; Kweon, Jihoon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Young-Hak

    2013-11-01

    A pannus, an abnormal layer of fibrovascular tissue observed on a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV), induces dysfunctions of BMHV such as the time delay and incomplete valve closing. We numerically simulate the flows around an intra-annular type BMHV model with and without pannus formation, respectively, and investigate the flow and bileaflet-movement modifications due to the pannus formation. Simulations are conducted at a physiological condition (mean flow rate of 5 l/min, cycle duration of 866 ms, and the Reynolds number of 7200 based on the inflow peak bulk velocity and inflow diameter). We model the pannus as an annulus with fixed outer radius and vary the inner radius of the pannus. Our preliminary results indicate that the flow field changes significantly and the bileaflet does not close properly due to the pannus formation. The detailed results will be given at the final presentation. Supported by the NRF Programs (NRF-2011-0028032, NRF-2012M2A8A4055647).

  4. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  5. Comparison of in vitro flows past a mechanical heart valve in anatomical and axisymmetric aorta models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2017-06-01

    Flow characteristics past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve were measured under physiological flow conditions in a straight tube with an axisymmetric expansion, similar to vessels used in previous studies, and in an anatomical model of the aorta. We found that anatomical features, including the three-lobed sinus and the aorta's curvature affected significantly the flow characteristics. The turbulent and viscous stresses were presented and discussed as indicators for potential blood damage and thrombosis. Both types of stresses, averaged over the two axial measurement planes, were significantly lower in the anatomical model than in the axisymmetric one. This difference was attributed to the lower height-to-width ratio and more gradual contraction of the anatomical aortic sinus. The curvature of the aorta caused asymmetries in the velocity and stress distributions during forward flow. Secondary flows resulting from the aorta's curvature are thought to have redistributed the fluid stresses transversely, resulting in a more homogeneous stress distribution in the anatomical aortic root than in the axisymmetric root. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of modelling accurately the aortic geometry in experimental and computational studies of prosthetic devices. Moreover, our findings suggest that grafts used for aortic root replacement should approximate as closely as possible the shape of the natural sinuses.

  6. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  7. Shexiang Baoxin Pills for Coronary Heart Disease in Animal Models: Preclinical Evidence and Promoting Angiogenesis Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Jian Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP originated from a classical TCM Fufang Suhexiang Pill for chest pain with dyspnea in the Southern Song Dynasty (1107–110 AD. Here, we aimed to evaluate preclinical evidence and possible mechanism of SBP for experimental coronary heart disease (CHD. Studies of SBP in animal models with CHD were identified from 6 databases until April 2016. Study quality for each included article was evaluated according to the CAMARADES 10-item checklist. Outcome measures were myocardial infarction area, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and microvessel count (MVC. All the data were analyzed by using RevMan 5.1 software. As a consequence, 25 studies with 439 animals were identified. The quality score of studies ranged from 2 to 5, with the median of 3.6. Meta-analysis of seven studies showed more significant effects of SBP on the reduction of the myocardial infarction area than the control (P < 0.01. Meta-analysis of eight studies showed significant effects of SBP for increasing VEGF expression compared with the control (P < 0.01. Meta-analysis of 10 studies indicated that SBP significantly improved MVC compared with the control (P < 0.01. In conclusion, these findings preliminarily demonstrated that SBP can reduce myocardial infarction area, exerting cardioprotective function largely through promoting angiogenesis.

  8. Estimation of viscous dissipative stresses induced by a mechanical heart valve using PIV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Pei; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-03-01

    Among the clinical complications of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), hemolysis was previously thought to result from Reynolds stresses in turbulent flows. A more recent hypothesis suggests viscous dissipative stresses at spatial scales similar in size to red blood cells may be related to hemolysis in MHVs, but the resolution of current instrumentation is insufficient to measure the smallest eddy sizes. We studied the St. Jude Medical (SJM) 27 mm valve in the aortic position of a pulsatile circulatory mock loop under physiologic conditions with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Assuming a dynamic equilibrium assumption between the resolved and sub-grid-scale (SGS) energy flux, the SGS energy flux was calculated from the strain rate tensor computed from the resolved velocity fields and the SGS stress was determined by the Smagorinsky model, from which the turbulence dissipation rate and then the viscous dissipative stresses were estimated. Our results showed Reynolds stresses up to 80 N/m2 throughout the cardiac cycle, and viscous dissipative stresses below 12 N/m2. The viscous dissipative stresses remain far below the threshold of red blood cell hemolysis, but could potentially damage platelets, implying the need for further study in the phenomenon of MHV hemolytic complications.

  9. Mechanical circulatory support challenges in pediatric and (adult) congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Martin; Lorts, Angela; Conway, Jennifer

    2018-03-20

    Increased miniaturization of ventricular assist devices (VADs) and new mechanical support strategies (MCS) has increased the use of MCS in the pediatric and congenital heart disease (CHD) population. This comes with the need for care providers specialized in this field to determine optimal patient and device selection, and to improve outcomes and decrease complication rates for new innovative strategies. A review of the published literature in this field is timely and relevant. There has been a rapid evolution of using adult designed continuous flow VADS to support children and adults with CHD (ACHD). Patient selection for patients with CHD is complex because of patient size and anatomical diversity and, therefore, makes decision-making complex and unique when compared to general adult practice. Outcomes for children depend on size and diagnosis with neonates with single ventricle physiology being the highest risk candidates. This also holds true for ACHD, in which VAD outcomes in patients with two ventricle physiology are comparable to non-ACHD patients. In children, there is an increased use of continuous flow devices and a growing experience with outpatient management. Patients with CHD especially when associated with single ventricle physiologies, remain a challenge when it comes to MCS/VAD placement but successful durable VAD implantation with discharge home has been reported.

  10. Vitamin D Biology in Heart Failure : Molecular Mechanisms and Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura M. G.; van der Harst, P.; van Gilst, W. H.; de Boer, R. A.

    Vitamin D has recently been suggested as an important mediator of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. In patients with heart failure, low vitamin D levels are associated with adverse outcome and correlate with established clinical correlates and biomarkers. Many

  11. Myocardial atrophy and chronic mechanical unloading of the failing human heart: implications for cardiac assist device-induced myocardial recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakos, Nikolaos A; Selzman, Craig H; Sachse, Frank B; Stehlik, Josef; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Catino, Anna; Alharethi, Rami; Reid, Bruce B; Miller, Dylan V; Salama, Mohamed; Zaitsev, Alexey V; Shibayama, Junko; Li, Hui; Fang, James C; Li, Dean Y; Drakos, Stavros G

    2014-10-14

    In animal models of heterotopic transplantation, mechanical unloading of the normal, nonhypertrophic heart results in atrophy. Primarily on the basis of these animal data, the notion that chronic left ventricular assist device (LVAD)-induced unloading will result in atrophy has dominated the clinical heart failure field, and anti-atrophic drugs have been used to enhance the cardiac recovery potential observed in some LVAD patients. However, whether unloading-induced atrophy in experimental normal heart models applies to failing and hypertrophic myocardium in heart failure patients unloaded by continuous-flow LVADs has not been studied. The study examined whether mechanical unloading by continuous-flow LVAD leads to myocardial atrophy. We prospectively examined myocardial tissue and hemodynamic and echocardiographic data from 44 LVAD patients and 18 untransplanted normal donors. Cardiomyocyte size (cross-sectional area) decreased after LVAD unloading from 1,238 ± 81 μm(2) to 1,011 ± 68 μm(2) (p = 0.001), but not beyond that of normal donor hearts (682 ± 56 μm(2)). Electron microscopy ultrastructural evaluation, cardiomyocyte glycogen content, and echocardiographic assessment of myocardial mass and left ventricular function also did not suggest myocardial atrophy. Consistent with these findings, t-tubule morphology, cytoplasmic penetration, and distance from the ryanodine receptor were not indicative of ongoing atrophic remodeling during LVAD unloading. Molecular analysis revealed no up-regulation of proatrophic genes and proteins of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Structural, ultrastructural, microstructural, metabolic, molecular, and clinical functional data indicated that prolonged continuous-flow LVAD unloading does not induce hypertrophy regression to the point of atrophy and degeneration. These findings may be useful in designing future investigations that combine LVAD unloading and pharmaceutical therapies as a bridge to recovery of the failing heart

  12. [Mechanism of heart and lung injury induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in both young and old mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yanni; Fu, Longsheng; Qian, Yisong; Jiang, Mingjin; He, Libiao; Ouyang, Aijun; Zheng, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Objective To study the mechanism of heart and lung injury after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were divided into young and old groups according to their ages, the former being 5-6 months old and the latter being 20-21 months old. Each group was divided into five subgroups subjected to sham operation, middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1-hour ischemia followed by 1-, 12-, 24-, 48-hour reperfusion. At different reperfusion time, HE and TUNEL staining were used to observe the morphological changes of heart and lung tissues; meanwhile, chemical colorimetry was performed to determine the changes of cardiac Na + -K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase; the lung indexes were evaluated; the levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κBp65, p-NF-κBp65, IκBα, p-IκBα were detected by Western blotting; the levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were determined by ELISA; and the release of NO was examined by colorimetry. Results We observed inflammatory responses in the lung tissues of young and old mice at 24-hour reperfusion and 1-hour reperfusion, respectively, and hemorrhage in the heart tissues of young and old mice at 24-hour reperfusion and 12-hour reperfusion, respectively.Lung tissues showed earlier response to the stimulation of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion than heart tissues did. Meanwhile, the results of Na + -K + -ATPase, Ca 2+ -ATPase, lung index, NF-κB signaling pathway and inflammatory cytokines in young and old mice were consistent with histological changes of heart and lung tissues. Conclusion Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion can cause heart and lung tissue injury in the old mice, and energy metabolism and inflammation cascade are the main mechanisms of the injury.

  13. Left ventricular remodeling in the post-infarction heart: a review of cellular, molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajarsa, Jason J; Kloner, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    As more patients survive myocardial infarctions, the incidence of heart failure increases. After an infarction, the human heart undergoes a series of structural changes, which are governed by cellular and molecular mechanisms in a pathological metamorphosis termed "remodeling." This review will discuss the current developments in our understanding of these molecular and cellular events in remodeling and the various pharmacological, cellular and device therapies used to treat, and potentially retard, this condition. Specifically, this paper will examine the neurohormonal activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and its molecular effects on the heart. The emerging understanding of the extra-cellular matrix and the various active molecules within it, such as the matrix metalloproteinases, elicits new appreciation for their role in cardiac remodeling and as possible future therapeutic targets. Cell therapy with stem cells is another recent therapy with great potential in improving post-infarcted hearts. Lastly, the cellular and molecular effects of left ventricular assist devices on remodeling will be reviewed. Our increasing knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling enables us not only to better understand how our more successful therapies, like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, work, but also to explore new therapies of the future.

  14. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation.

  15. Numerical analysis of the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves at different implantation angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yee Han; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Kabinejadian, Foad; Su, Boyang; Kim, Sangho; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-09-01

    The effects of the implantation angle of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) on the sinus region and downstream flow profiles were investigated. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of BMHVs were performed under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions. The study aim was to examine how the flow fields of different aortic sinus shapes and the downstream aortic arch geometry would be affected by implantation angle. Two geometric models of sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus; and a three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries, namely a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. A 29 mm St. Jude Medical BMHV geometric model was used and positioned at four different angles (0 degrees, 30 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees). The simulation results showed variation in downstream flow profiles at different implantation angles. Generally, at position Z = 1D along the centerline (where Z refers to the axis normal to the x-y plane and D is the inlet diameter), the triple-jet structures were observed with a slight shift of the center jet for three-sinus aortic cases. Apparent differences were observed at position Z = 2D and 4D, such as higher velocity profiles at the inner arch wall. The flow field downstream of the valve implanted at 0 degrees (anatomic position) showed the smallest overall asymmetry at peak systole, while the flow field downstream of the valve implanted at 90 degrees (anti-anatomic position) exhibited high regions of recirculation. Valve orientation was found not to affect the shear stress distribution significantly in the downstream aorta, and this was in agreement with the findings of earlier studies.

  16. Cavitation phenomena in mechanical heart valves: studied by using a physical impinging rod system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-10-01

    When studying mechanical heart valve cavitation, a physical model allows direct flow field and pressure measurements that are difficult to perform with actual valves, as well as separate testing of water hammer and squeeze flow effects. Movable rods of 5 and 10 mm diameter impinged same-sized stationary rods to simulate squeeze flow. A 24 mm piston within a tube simulated water hammer. Adding a 5 mm stationary rod within the tube generated both effects simultaneously. Charged-coupled device (CCD) laser displacement sensors, strobe lighting technique, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high fidelity piezoelectric pressure transducers measured impact velocities, cavitation images, squeeze flow velocities, vortices, and pressure changes at impact, respectively. The movable rods created cavitation at critical impact velocities of 1.6 and 1.2 m/s; squeeze flow velocities were 2.8 and 4.64 m/s. The isolated water hammer created cavitation at 1.3 m/s piston speed. The combined piston and stationary rod created cavitation at an impact speed of 0.9 m/s and squeeze flow of 3.2 m/s. These results show squeeze flow alone caused cavitation, notably at lower impact velocity as contact area increased. Water hammer alone also caused cavitation with faster displacement. Both effects together were additive. The pressure change at the vortex center was only 150 mmHg, which cannot generate the magnitude of pressure drop required for cavitation bubble formation. Cavitation occurred at 3-5 m/s squeeze flow, significantly different from the 14 m/s derived by Bernoulli's equation; the temporal acceleration of unsteady flow requires further study.

  17. Two monitoring methods of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with mechanical heart valve prothesis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe; Wang, Zhiping; Ou, Jingsong; Xu, Yingqi; Yang, Song; Zhang, Xi

    2012-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with warfarin has become the standard therapy for the patients with mechanical heart valve prothesis. The monitoring method of self-monitoring or self-management was promising to optimize the use of warfarin, but most of previous studies have included patients with various indications of OAT, which made it difficult to extrapolate the results to the specific patient population with mechanical heart valve prostheses. This study was intended to evaluate the new and traditional monitoring methods in patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. Relevant literature finished before Dec. 2010 were searched through a number of digital databases. And then they were pooled by RevMan 4.2 and R 2.13.0 in three fields: rate within the target range, test frequency and occurrence rate of poor events. Five randomized control trials with a total of 2,219 patients were identified. Pooled estimates showed reductions in thromboembolic events (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.35-0.77; P = 0.0012) and all-cause mortality (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29-0.86; P = 0.0115). No difference was noted in major and minor haemorrhage. All trials reported improvements in the mean proportion of international normalized ratios in range. Self-monitoring and self-management can improve the quality of OAT in the patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. The patients spend more time within the therapeutic range resulting in decreases in thromboembolic events and mortality, with no increase in haemorrhage. However, self-monitoring and self-management was not feasible for all patients, and require identification and education of suitable candidates. The success of self-monitoring and self-management method depends on consistent, regular, and frequent testing.

  18. Use of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate in Patients during Heart Transplantation after Implantation of a Left Ventricular Mechanical Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Lomivorotov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation in patients after implantation of mechanical cardiac support devices entails an extremely high risk for perioperative bleeding. Recombinant activated coagulation factor VII is presently used to reduce the volume of bleeding in this patient group. There are parallel data on its administration-induced thromboembolic events in the literature. This paper describes a case of using a prothrombin complex concentrate in a patient during explantation of a left ventricular bypass system and subsequent orthotopic heart transplantation in the presence of significant hypocoagulation. At the end of a surgery, 1200 IU of the agent was used at a remaining bleeding rate of more than 1000 ml/hour. Within the first 24 hours after surgery, the rate of discharge drainage was less than 100 ml/hour. A control plain chest X-ray study revealed massive left-sided hydrothorax on day 2 postsurgery. The left pleural cavity was revised under thoracoscopic guidance and 1000 ml of blood clots were evacuated. Although the administration of prothrombin complex concentrate did not guard against re-intervention, its use seems a promising strategy in life-threatening bleedings in patients after explantation of mechanical cardiac support devices. Further multicenter investigations are required to determine the efficacy and safety of prothrom-bin complex concentration in cardiac surgery. Key words: Recombinant activated coagulation factor VII, prothrombin complex concentration, mechanical cardiac support device, orthotopic heart transplantation.

  19. Vorticity dynamics of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in an axisymmetric aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi, L. P.; Ge, L.; Simon, H. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Yoganathan, A. P.

    2007-06-01

    We present comprehensive particle image velocimetry measurements and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of physiological, pulsatile flow through a clinical quality bileaflet mechanical heart valve mounted in an idealized axisymmetric aorta geometry with a sudden expansion modeling the aortic sinus region. Instantaneous and ensemble-averaged velocity measurements as well as the associated statistics of leaflet kinematics are reported and analyzed in tandem to elucidate the structure of the velocity and vorticity fields of the ensuing flow-structure interaction. The measurements reveal that during the first half of the acceleration phase, the flow is laminar and repeatable from cycle to cycle. The valve housing shear layer rolls up into the sinus and begins to extract vorticity of opposite sign from the sinus wall. A start-up vortical structure is shed from the leaflets and is advected downstream as the leaflet shear layers become wavy and oscillatory. In the second half of flow acceleration the leaflet shear layers become unstable and break down into two von Karman-like vortex streets. The onset of vortex shedding from the valve leaflets is responsible for the growth of significant cycle-to-cycle vorticity oscillations. At peak flow, the housing and leaflet shear layers undergo secondary instabilities and break down rapidly into a chaotic, turbulent-like state with multiple small-scale vortical structures emerging in the flow. During the deceleration and closing phases all large-scale coherent flow features disappear and a chaotic small-scale vorticity field emerges, which persists even after the valve has closed. Probability density functions of the leaflet position during opening and closing phases show that the leaflet position fluctuates from cycle to cycle with larger fluctuations evident during valve closure. The DNS is carried out by prescribing the leaflet kinematics from the experimental data. The computed instantaneous vorticity fields are in very good

  20. Anticoagulation for pregnant women with mechanical heart valves: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Rohan; Ostro, Jackie; Shah, Prakesh S; Silversides, Candice K; Malinowski, Ann; Murphy, Kellie E; Sermer, Mathew; Shehata, Nadine

    2017-05-14

    To review maternal and foetal outcomes in women with mechanical heart valves (MHVs) treated with vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs), first-trimester heparin followed by VKAs (sequential treatment), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) during pregnancy, in order to inform practice. Medline, Embase and Central were searched from inception until February 2016. Two reviewers independently screened 1786 titles, reviewed 110 full-texts and extracted data and assessed risk-of-bias from 46 articles. Pooled incidence (95% confidence intervals) was calculated for maternal and foetal outcomes. Included studies had a moderate or high risk-of-bias. With VKAs, sequential treatment and LMWH, maternal mortality occurred in 0.9% (0.4-1.4), 2.0% (0.8-3.1) and 2.9% (0.2-5.7), thromboembolic complications in 2.7% (1.4-4.0), 5.8% (3.8-7.7) and 8.7% (3.9-13.4), livebirths in 64.5% (48.8-80.2), 79.9% (74.3-85.6) and 92.0% (86.1-98.0) and anticoagulant-related foetal/neonatal adverse events (embryopathy or foetopathy) in 2.0% (0.3-3.7), 1.4% (0.3-2.5) and 0%, respectively. When UFH is used throughout pregnancy, 11.2% (2.8-19.6) suffered thromboembolic complications. Foetal loss and adverse events occurred with first-trimester warfarin doses ≤ 5 mg/day, although there were more livebirths [83.6% (75.8-91.4) vs. 43.9% (32.8-55.0)] and fewer foetal anomalies [2.3% (0.7-4.0) vs. 12.4% (3.3-21.6)] with lower doses than with warfarin > 5 mg/day. VKAs are associated with fewest maternal complications but also with fewest livebirths. Sequential treatment does not eliminate anticoagulant-related foetal/neonatal adverse events. LMWH is associated with the highest number of livebirths. The safety of UFH throughout pregnancy and first-trimester warfarin  ≤ 5 mg/day remains unconfirmed. © The Author 2017. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  1. Acute heart failure : Multiple clinical profiles and mechanisms require tailored therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Felker, G. Michael; Zaca, Valerio; Bugatti, Silvia; Lombardi, Carlo; Bettari, Luca; Voors, Adrian A.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Cas, Livio Dei

    2010-01-01

    Acute heart failure (HF) is the most common diagnosis at discharge in patients aged >65 years. It carries a dismal prognosis with a high in-hospital mortality and very high post-discharge mortality and re-hospitalization rates. It is a complex clinical syndrome that cannot be described as a single

  2. Mechanism of antifibrillatory action of Org 7797 in regionally ischemic pig heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, M. J.; Wilms-Schopman, F.; Opthof, T.

    1990-01-01

    Org 7797 is effective against ventricular fibrillation (VF) induced during ischemia. In Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, application of three premature stimuli to nonischemic myocardium between 3 and 5 min after coronary occlusion always resulted in VF in the absence of drug. In no instance when Org

  3. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure : mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Macdougall, Iain C.

    Anemia and iron deficiency are common in patients with heart failure (HF), and are associated with worse symptoms and adverse outcomes in this population. Although the two can occur together, anemia in HF is often not caused by iron deficiency, and iron deficiency can be present without causing

  4. Hemodynamic Characterization of a Mouse Model for Investigating the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Neotissue Formation in Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Iyore A; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Best, Cameron A; Stuber, Alexander J; Shah, Kejal V; Austin, Blair F; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Lee, Yong-Ung; Lincoln, Joy; Trask, Aaron J; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized allograft heart valves have been used as tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV) scaffolds with promising results; however, little is known about the cellular mechanisms underlying TEHV neotissue formation. To better understand this phenomenon, we developed a murine model of decellularized pulmonary heart valve transplantation using a hemodynamically unloaded heart transplant model. Furthermore, because the hemodynamics of blood flow through a heart valve may influence morphology and subsequent function, we describe a modified loaded heterotopic heart transplant model that led to an increase in blood flow through the pulmonary valve. We report host cell infiltration and endothelialization of implanted decellularized pulmonary valves (dPV) and provide an experimental approach for the study of TEHVs using mouse models.

  5. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  6. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne van Geemen

    Full Text Available There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  7. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L. F.; Oomen, Pim J. A.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W. J. T.; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Goumans, Marie-José T. H.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation–but more pronounced in aortic valves–the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age. PMID:26867221

  8. Ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony and resynchronization therapy in heart failure: a new indication for Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool radionuclide ventriculography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, G. Aernout; Verberne, Hein J.; Burri, Haran; Ratib, Osman; Righetti, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In patients with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction and conduction disease, ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony has been demonstrated. To date, resynchronization by biventricular pacing is increasingly used since it improves ventricular function and exercise capacity in patients with heart

  9. Comparison of mechanical and biological prostheses when used to replace heart valves in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travancas, Paulo R; Dorigo, Ana H; Simões, Luiz C; Fonseca, Sandra C; Bloch, Kátia V; Herdy, Gesmar V

    2009-04-01

    To assess the outcomes in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever of the implantation of mechanical as opposed to biological heart valves. We assessed 73 patients with rheumatic heart disease under the age of 18 years, who underwent replacement of heart valves between January, 1996, and December, 2005, at the National Institute of Cardiology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the group, 71 patients survived, and were divided into a group of 52 receiving mechanical prostheses, and 19 with biological prostheses. We compared endpoints between the groups in terms of mortality, reoperation, haemorrhage, and stroke. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the Mantel (log-rank) test. Overall mortality was 8.2%. In those receiving mechanical prostheses, 2 (3.8%) patients died, 5 (9.6%) underwent reoperation, 2 (3.8%) suffered severe haemorrhage, and 3 (5.8%) had strokes. In those receiving biological valves, 2 (10.5%) patients died, and 4 (21%) underwent reoperation. After 2, 4, and 8 years, overall survival was 96%, 93% and 86%, respectively, with a borderline difference between the groups (p = 0.06). The probabilities of remaining free from reoperation (p = 0.13), and from combined endpoints, showed no statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.28). Patients with mechanical prostheses had lower mortality and required fewer reoperations, but when all combined endpoints were considered, the groups did not differ. The biological prosthesis proved to be a good option for cardiac surgery in children and adolescents with difficulties or risks of anticoagulation.

  10. Cardiac Rotational Mechanics As a Predictor of Myocardial Recovery in Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Chronic Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonios, Michael J; Koliopoulou, Antigone; Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Taleb, Iosif; Stehlik, Josef; Xu, Weining; Wever-Pinzon, James; Catino, Anna; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Horne, Benjamin D; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Adamopoulos, Stamatis N; Fang, James C; Selzman, Craig H; Bax, Jeroen J; Drakos, Stavros G

    2018-04-01

    Impaired qualitative and quantitative left ventricular (LV) rotational mechanics predict cardiac remodeling progression and prognosis after myocardial infarction. We investigated whether cardiac rotational mechanics can predict cardiac recovery in chronic advanced cardiomyopathy patients. Sixty-three patients with advanced and chronic dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing implantation of LV assist device (LVAD) were prospectively investigated using speckle tracking echocardiography. Acute heart failure patients were prospectively excluded. We evaluated LV rotational mechanics (apical and basal LV twist, LV torsion) and deformational mechanics (circumferential and longitudinal strain) before LVAD implantation. Cardiac recovery post-LVAD implantation was defined as (1) final resulting LV ejection fraction ≥40%, (2) relative LV ejection fraction increase ≥50%, (iii) relative LV end-systolic volume decrease ≥50% (all 3 required). Twelve patients fulfilled the criteria for cardiac recovery (Rec Group). The Rec Group had significantly less impaired pre-LVAD peak LV torsion compared with the Non-Rec Group. Notably, both groups had similarly reduced pre-LVAD LV ejection fraction. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, pre-LVAD peak LV torsion of 0.35 degrees/cm had a 92% sensitivity and a 73% specificity in predicting cardiac recovery. Peak LV torsion before LVAD implantation was found to be an independent predictor of cardiac recovery after LVAD implantation (odds ratio, 0.65 per 0.1 degrees/cm [0.49-0.87]; P =0.014). LV rotational mechanics seem to be useful in selecting patients prone to cardiac recovery after mechanical unloading induced by LVADs. Future studies should investigate the utility of these markers in predicting durable cardiac recovery after the explantation of the cardiac assist device. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: Insights into mechanisms and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi B; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Shah, Sanjiv J; Butler, Javed

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) often coexist, and the outcomes of patients who have both AF and HF are considerably worse than those with either condition in isolation. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous clinical entity and accounts for approximately one-half of current HF. At least one-third of patients with HFpEF are burdened by comorbid AF. The current understanding of the relationship between AF and HFpEF is limited, but the clinical implications are potentially important. In this review, we explore 1) the pathogenesis that drives AF and HFpEF to coexist; 2) pharmacologic therapies that may attenuate the impact of AF in HFpEF; and 3) future directions in the management of this complex syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of synchronized change in ultrasonic integrated backscatter across human heart wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobinai, Yumi; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic integrated backscatter (IB) from the heart wall, which has been employed for quantitative tissue characterization of the myocardium, is known to have cyclic variation-a decrease in systole and an increase in diastole. In the present study, by tracking the measurement position of the myocardium and compensating for the movement due to the heartbeat, IB and its temporal variation were obtained from the same site with a high temporal resolution of 1.73 ms. In an in vivo study on a healthy subject, the temporal variation of IB values homogeneously changed across the heart wall, especially during the slow filling and the atrial systole phases. This new finding shows that the IB value reflects a small movement of the myocardium of about 5 mm/s. Thus, the proposed measurement has a potential for quantitative and accurate evaluation of the contraction and relaxation of the myocardium.

  13. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Saponaro, Vittorio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Martino, Carmela [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Logrieco, Gaetano [Department of Surgery, Hospital ' F. Miulli' 70021 AcquaViva delle Fonti, Bari (Italy); Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Madeddu, Paolo [Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine, Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol BS2 8WH (United Kingdom); Rossi, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, University of Camerino, 63100 Ascoli Piceno (Italy); Ribatti, Domenico [Department of Human Anatomy, University of Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy); Crovace, Antonio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy); Alessandri, Giulio, E-mail: cisiamo2@yahoo.com [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  14. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa; Saponaro, Vittorio; Martino, Carmela; Logrieco, Gaetano; Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona; Madeddu, Paolo; Rossi, Giacomo; Ribatti, Domenico; Crovace, Antonio; Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Alessandri, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50x10(6) of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  15. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on lung mechanics of babies after operation for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, J J; Hatch, D J; Kerr, A A; Taylor, B

    1975-01-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on lung mechanics was investigated in 12 babies after operation for severe congenital heart disease. At the time of study all babies were receiving or being weaned from ventilatory support and had abnormally low lung volume or compliance. During CPAP there was a fall in the pulmonary resistance which, with a slight decrease in minute ventilation, resulted in a significant decrease in the work of breathing. It is suggested that lowering the oxygen cost of breathing may contribute to the improvement in arterial oxygenation seen when CPAP is used. PMID:801862

  16. Outcomes of mechanical valves in the pulmonic position in patients with congenital heart disease over a 20-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Ju; Kim, Young-Hwue; Ko, Jae-Kon; Park, In-Sook; Seo, Dong Man

    2013-04-01

    Homografts or bioprosthetic valves have been preferred in the pulmonic position in patients with congenital heart disease. However, unsatisfactory long-term results have aroused interest in the use of mechanical valves. In this study, we investigated the long-term outcomes of mechanical valves implanted in the pulmonic position. The medical records of 37 patients (27 male, 73%) who underwent 38 mechanical pulmonary valve replacements between October 1988 and February 2011 were reviewed, retrospectively. The median age of patients was 13.5 years (range, 7 months to 23 years), and the median number of prior operations per patient was 2 (range, 0 to 5). Tetralogy of Fallot was the most common diagnosis (n=23). The median valve size was 23 mm (range, 17 to 27 mm), and the median follow-up duration after pulmonary valve replacement was 24.6 months (range, 1.3 months to 22.5 years). Events were defined as the following: valve failure, thrombosis, embolism, bleeding, reoperation, and death. There was no in-hospital mortality, but there were 2 late deaths (1 heart failure and 1 traffic accident at 10.8 months and 8.7 years postoperatively, respectively). Excluding the traffic accident death, survival rates were 97%, 97%, and 97%, at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Freedom from thromboembolism or bleeding events was 92%, 92%, and 78.8%, at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Two reoperations were performed at 6.8 and 10.2 years postoperatively. Freedom from reoperation was 100%, 100%, and 85.7%, at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Durability of mechanical valve in pulmonic position was excellent. Thromboembolism or bleeding events due to anticoagulation therapy were rare. In growing patients who have undergone prior sternotomies requiring a pulmonary valve replacement, a mechanical valve could be an attractive option. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Heart Diseases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Yaqi Shen; Zhuqing Shen; Shanshan Luo; Wei Guo; Yi Zhun Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as a third gaseous mediator along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), though it was originally considered as a malodorous and toxic gas. H2S is produced endogenously from cysteine by three enzymes in mammalian tissues. An increasing body of evidence suggests the involvement of H2S in different physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have shown that H2S has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, a...

  18. Evaluation of shear stress accumulation on blood components in normal and dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, S; Maleki, H; Hassan, I; Kadem, L

    2012-10-11

    Evaluating shear induced hemodynamic complications is one of the major concerns in design of the mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The monitoring of these events relies on both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Currently, numerical approaches are mainly based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. A more straightforward evaluation can be based on the Lagrangian analysis of the whole blood. As a consequence, Lagrangian meshfree methods are more adapted to such evaluation. In this study, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a fully meshfree particle method originated to simulate compressible astrophysical flows, is applied to study the flow through a normal and a dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). The SPH results are compared with the reference data. The accumulation of shear stress patterns on blood components illustrates the important role played by non-physiological flow patterns and mainly vortical structures in this issue. The statistical distribution of particles with respect to shear stress loading history provides important information regarding the relative number of blood components that can be damaged. This can be used as a measure of the response of blood components to the presence of the valve implant or any implantable medical device. This work presents the first attempt to simulate pulsatile flow through BMHVs using SPH method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation and Inhibition of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Is a Mechanism That Links the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus With That of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2017-10-17

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of diabetes mellitus and heart failure are closely intertwined, such that worsening of one condition is frequently accompanied by worsening of the other; the degree of clinical acceleration is marked when the 2 coexist. Activation of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the heart and vasculature (NHE1 isoform) and the kidneys (NHE3 isoform) may serve as a common mechanism that links both disorders and may underlie their interplay. Insulin insensitivity and adipokine abnormalities (the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes mellitus) are characteristic features of heart failure; conversely, neurohormonal systems activated in heart failure (norepinephrine, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and neprilysin) impair insulin sensitivity and contribute to microvascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Each of these neurohormonal derangements may act through increased activity of both NHE1 and NHE3. Drugs used to treat diabetes mellitus may favorably affect the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure by inhibiting either or both NHE isoforms, and drugs used to treat heart failure may have beneficial effects on glucose tolerance and the complications of diabetes mellitus by interfering with the actions of NHE1 and NHE3. The efficacy of NHE inhibitors on the risk of cardiovascular events may be enhanced when heart failure and glucose intolerance coexist and may be attenuated when drugs with NHE inhibitory actions are given concomitantly. Therefore, the sodium-hydrogen exchanger may play a central role in the interplay of diabetes mellitus and heart failure, contribute to the physiological and clinical progression of both diseases, and explain certain drug-drug and drug-disease interactions that have been reported in large-scale randomized clinical trials. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The Effects and Mechanism of Atorvastatin on Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (PH-LHD is one of the most common forms of PH, termed group 2 PH. Atorvastatin exerts beneficial effects on the structural remodeling of the lung in ischemic heart failure. However, few studies have investigated the effects of atorvastatin on PH due to left heart failure induced by overload.Group 2 PH was induced in animals by aortic banding. Rats (n = 20 were randomly divided into four groups: a control group (C, an aortic banding group (AOB63, an atorvastatin prevention group (AOB63/ATOR63 and an atorvastatin reversal group (AOB63/ATOR50-63. Atorvastatin was administered for 63 days after banding to the rats in the AOB63/ATOR63 group and from days 50 to 63 to the rats in the AOB63/ATOR50-63 group.Compared with the controls, significant increases in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary arteriolar medial thickening, biventricular cardiac hypertrophy, wet and dry weights of the right middle lung, percentage of PCNA-positive vascular smooth muscle cells, inflammatory infiltration and expression of RhoA and Rho-kinase II were observed in the AOB63 group, and these changes concomitant with significant decreases in the percentage of TUNEL-positive vascular smooth muscle cells. Treatment of the rats in the AOB63/ATOR63 group with atorvastatin at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day significantly decreased the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary arteriolar medial thickness, inflammatory infiltration, percentage of PCNA-positive cells and pulmonary expression of RhoA and Rho-kinase II and significantly augmented the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells compared with the AOB63 group. However, only a trend of improvement in pulmonary vascular remodeling was detected in the AOB63/ATOR50-63 group.Atorvastatin prevents pulmonary vascular remodeling in the PH-LHD model by down-regulating the expression of RhoA/Rho kinase, by inhibiting the proliferation and increasing the

  1. Assessment of Left Ventricular Mechanics in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkikh Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new ultrasound technology for assessment of left ventricular (LV strain in the longitudinal, radial, and circumferential directions and the LV area strain at rest and during dobutamine stressechocardiography in patients with intermediate pretest probability of ischemic heart disease (IHD. Analysis was performed for the first time using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (4D Strain. It was shown that in patients with single-artery left anterior descending artery (LAD and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX stenosis of 50% and more, the decreases in the global LV strain in the longitudinal, radial, and circumferential directions as well as in the LV strain area were observed at peak dobutamine stress in 4D Strain mode. Assessment of global LV strain in 4D Strain mode during dobutamine test had low sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing single-vessel coronary artery disease.

  2. Fluid structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liang; Bor, Iman; Dasi, Lakshmi; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2006-11-01

    MHVs are widely used as prosthetics for dysfunctional heart valves. All current MHV designs, however, are prone to thrombus formation, which is believed to be strongly associated with the non-physiological hemodynamics patterns and elevated shear stress level induced by the valve; it is, therefore, of enormous practical importance to study the hemodynamics through MHVs. Here we present an FSI solver modeling the physiological MHV hemodynamics. The solver uses a strong coupling scheme for the FSI problem and a recently developed curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method for flow simulation. The FSI solver is applied to model an in-vitro MHV hemodynamics measurement. The experimental pulsatile flow waveform with peak Reynolds number of 4000 is specified at the inlet and the flow is modeled by DNS. The results, including the dynamics of wake vortical structure, shear distribution and leaflet kinematics, are validated against the experimental data.

  3. The increasing importance of percutaneous mechanical circulatory assist device therapy in heart failure management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Weis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Advances in medical and surgical care have made it possible for an increasing number of patients with Congenital Heart disease (CHD to live into adulthood. Transposition of the great vessels (TGV is the most common cyanotic congenital cardiac disease where the right ventricle serves as systemic ventricle. It is not uncommon for these patients to have systemic ventricular failure requiring transplantation. Study Design: Hemodynamic decompensation in these patients can be swift and difficult to manage. Increasingly percutaneous LVAD′s such as the Impella (Abiomed, Mass, USA are gaining popularity in these situations owing to their relative ease of placement, both in and outside of the operating room. Conclusion: In this paper we demonstrate that Impella (IMP CP placement through the axillary artery approach shows to be suitable option for short term cardiac support and improvement of end organ perfusion in anticipation of cardiac transplantation.

  4. The Fluid Mechanics of Transcatheter Heart Valve Leaflet Thrombosis in the Neosinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Prem A; Raghav, Vrishank; Sharma, Rahul; Condado, Jose F; Okafor, Ikechukwu U; Rami, Tanya; Kumar, Gautam; Thourani, Vinod H; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Makkar, Raj R; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2017-10-24

    Transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis has been increasingly reported. In these studies, thrombus quantification has been based on a 2-dimensional assessment of a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Postprocedural, 4-dimensional, volume-rendered CT data of patients with CoreValve, Evolut R, and SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve replacement enrolled in the RESOLVE study (Assessment of Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Bioprosthetic Valve Dysfunction With Multimodality Imaging and Its Treatment with Anticoagulation) were included in this analysis. Patients on anticoagulation were excluded. SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve/Evolut R patients with and without hypoattenuated leaflet thickening were included to study differences between groups. Patients were classified as having THV thrombosis if there was any evidence of hypoattenuated leaflet thickening. Anatomic and THV deployment geometries were analyzed, and thrombus volumes were computed through manual 3-dimensional reconstruction. We aimed to identify and evaluate risk factors that contribute to THV thrombosis through the combination of retrospective clinical data analysis and in vitro imaging in the space between the native and THV leaflets (neosinus). SAPIEN 3 valves with leaflet thrombosis were on average 10% further expanded (by diameter) than those without (95.5±5.2% versus 85.4±3.9%; P thrombosis, the thrombus volume increased linearly with implant depth ( R 2 =0.7, P thrombosis is a multifactorial process involving foreign materials, patient-specific blood chemistry, and complex flow patterns, our study indicates that deployed THV geometry may have implications on the occurrence of thrombosis. In addition, a supraannular neosinus may reduce thrombosis risk because of reduced flow stasis. Although additional prospective studies are needed to further develop strategies for minimizing thrombus burden, these results may help identify patients at higher thrombosis risk and aid in the development of next-generation devices

  5. TRPA1 mediates changes in heart rate variability and cardiac mechanical function in mice exposed to acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurhanewicz, Nicole; McIntosh-Kastrinsky, Rachel; Tong, Haiyan; Ledbetter, Allen; Walsh, Leon; Farraj, Aimen; Hazari, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Short-term exposure to ambient air pollution is linked with adverse cardiovascular effects. While previous research focused primarily on particulate matter-induced responses, gaseous air pollutants also contribute to cause short-term cardiovascular effects. Mechanisms underlying such effects have not been adequately described, however the immediate nature of the response suggests involvement of irritant neural activation and downstream autonomic dysfunction. Thus, this study examines the role of TRPA1, an irritant sensory receptor found in the airways, in the cardiac response of mice to acrolein and ozone. Conscious unrestrained wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) and TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice implanted with radiotelemeters were exposed once to 3 ppm acrolein, 0.3 ppm ozone, or filtered air. Heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded continuously before, during and after exposure. Analysis of ECG morphology, incidence of arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV) were performed. Cardiac mechanical function was assessed using a Langendorff perfusion preparation 24 h post-exposure. Acrolein exposure increased HRV independent of HR, as well as incidence of arrhythmia. Acrolein also increased left ventricular developed pressure in WT mice at 24 h post-exposure. Ozone did not produce any changes in cardiac function. Neither gas produced ECG effects, changes in HRV, arrhythmogenesis, or mechanical function in KO mice. These data demonstrate that a single exposure to acrolein causes cardiac dysfunction through TRPA1 activation and autonomic imbalance characterized by a shift toward parasympathetic modulation. Furthermore, it is clear from the lack of ozone effects that although gaseous irritants are capable of eliciting immediate cardiac changes, gas concentration and properties play important roles. - Highlights: • Acute acrolein exposure causes autonomic imbalance and altered CV function in mice. • TRPA1 mediates acrolein-induced autonomic nervous system cardiac

  6. [Pharmacological and mechanical support of the myocardium in perioperative period in cardio-surgical patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Ziuliaeva, T P; Fedulova, S V; Molochnikov, I O; Fominykh, M V; Poliakova, P V; Dzemeshkevich, S L

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a retrospective study devoted to the combined methods of myocardial support in cardiosurgical patients with chronic heart failure (III-IY FC according to NYHA) and low myocardial reserves capacity (LVEF 28.3 +/- 9.4%). This methods include pharmacologic (Levosimendan) and mechanical support (IABP). During the work we have analyzed data of 116 patients and measured pressure in the pulmonary artery (mmHg), end-systolic volume (ESV ml), end-diastolic volume (ED, ml), stroke volume output (SVO, ml), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, %). We evaluated the level of valvular insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension (PH) and BNP concentration (pg/ml). The following indications for the usage of pharmacological and/or mechanical myocardial support were identified: I) Preventive usage of pharmacological and/or mechanical myocardial support is recommended for patients with CHF III-IY FC (NYHA) and low left ventricular EF(< or = 35%), significant valvular insufficiency, PH, PICS (postinfarction cardiosclerosis); 2) The certain method of the support can be chosen with the help of Levosimendan infusion testing; 3) In case one of the above mentioned indications (point 1) or in case of mild reaction to levosimendan infusion in patients with the lesions of more than 2 coronary arteries (including the trunk of the left coronary artery) the usage of combined support is recommended; 4) In case of < or = 6 scores according to EUROSCORE scale, lesions of 2 or more coronary arteries, tricuspid insufficiency (TriI), PH, and high pressure in pulmonary artery (higher than the 2nd degree), high end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume of LV the isolated usage of levosimendan is recommended; 5) In case of significant ischemic heart disease, PICS, lesions of more than 2 coronary arteries, (including the trunk of the left coronary artery) but without significant decrease of pressure in the pulmonary artery, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and TriI the

  7. Left ventricular mechanics in humans with high aerobic fitness: adaptation independent of structural remodelling, arterial haemodynamics and heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Eric J; McDonnell, Barry; Thompson, Jane; Stone, Keeron; Bull, Tom; Houston, Rory; Cockcroft, John; Shave, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with high aerobic fitness have lower systolic left ventricular strain, rotation and twist (‘left ventricular (LV) mechanics’) at rest, suggesting a beneficial reduction in LV myofibre stress and more efficient systolic function. However, the mechanisms responsible for this functional adaptation are not known and the influence of aerobic fitness on LV mechanics during dynamic exercise has never been studied. We assessed LV mechanics, LV wall thickness and dimensions, central augmentation index (AIx), aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), blood pressure and heart rate in 28 males (age: 21 ± 2 years SD) with a consistent physical activity level (no change >6 months). Individuals were examined at rest and during exercise (40% peak exercise capacity) and separated post hoc into a moderate and high aerobic fitness group (: 49 ± 5 and 63 ± 7 ml kg−1 min−1, respectively, P 0.05). However, for the same AIx, the high group had significantly lower LV apical rotation (P = 0.002) and LV twist (P = 0.003) while basal rotation and strain indices did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). We conclude that young males with high aerobic fitness have lower LV apical rotation at rest and during submaximal exercise that can occur without changes in gross LV structure, arterial haemodynamics or heart rate. The findings suggest a previously unknown type of physiological adaptation of the left ventricle that may have important implications for exercise training in older individuals and patient populations in which exercise training has previously failed to show clear benefits for LV function. PMID:22431336

  8. Dynamic expression profiles of MMPs/TIMPs and collagen deposition in mechanically unloaded rat heart: implications for left ventricular assist device support-induced cardiac alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Yu-Xian; Du, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Quan-Ge; Tian, Ying-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) ameliorate heart failure by reducing preload and afterload. However, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition after application of LVADs is not clearly defined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ECM remodeling after mechanical unloading in a rat heart transplant model. Sixty male Lewis rats were subjected to abdominal heterotopic heart transplantation, and the transplanted hearts were pressure- and volume-unloaded. The age- and weight- matched male Lewis rats who had undergone open thoracic surgeries were used as the control. Left ventricle ECM accumulation and the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured on the third, seventh, and fourteenth days after transplantation/sham surgery. Compared with the control group, myocardial ECM deposition significantly increased on the seventh and fourteenth days after heart transplantation (P < 0.05) and peaked on the 14th day. The gelatinase activity as well as mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 significantly increased after transplantation (P < 0.05). Both mRNA and protein levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 significantly increased compared with those of the control group. Mechanical unloading may lead to adverse remodeling of the ECM of the left ventricle. The underlying mechanism may due to the imbalance of the MMP/TIMP system, especially the remarkable upregulation of TIMPs in the pressure and volume unloaded heart.

  9. Effects of simulated microgravity on circadian rhythm of caudal arterial pressure and heart rate in rats and their underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CHEN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the circadian rhythm of rats' caudal arterial pressure and heart rate, and their underlying mechanism. Methods  Eighteen male SD rats (aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to control (CON and tail suspension (SUS group (9 each. Rats with tail suspension for 28 days were adopted as the animal model to simulate microgravity. Caudal arterial pressure and heart rate of rats were measured every 3 hours. The circadian difference of abdominal aorta contraction was measured by aortic ring test. Western blotting was performed to determine and compare the protein expression level of clock genes such as Per2 (Period2, Bmal1 (Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocatorlike and dbp (D element binding protein in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and abdominal aorta of rats in CON and SUS group at different time points. Results  Compared with CON group, the caudal arterial pressure, both systolic and diastolic pressure, decreased significantly and the diurnal variability disappeared, meanwhile the heart rate increased obviously and also the diurnal variability disappeared in rats of SUS group. Compared with CON group, the contraction reactivity of abdominal aorta decreased with disappearence of the diurnal variability, and also the clock genes expression in SCN and abdominal aorta showed no diurnal variability in rats of SUS group. Conclusion  Simulated microgravity may lead to circadian rhythm disorders in rats' cardiovascular system, which may be associated with the changes of the clock genes expression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.06

  10. Pulmonary Right Ventricular Resynchronization in Congenital Heart Disease: Acute Improvement in Right Ventricular Mechanics and Contraction Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Jan; Kovanda, Jan; Ložek, Miroslav; Tomek, Viktor; Vojtovič, Pavel; Gebauer, Roman; Kubuš, Peter; Krejčíř, Miroslav; Lumens, Joost; Delhaas, Tammo; Prinzen, Frits

    2017-09-01

    Electromechanical discoordination may contribute to long-term pulmonary right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in patients after surgery for congenital heart disease. We sought to evaluate changes in RV function after temporary RV cardiac resynchronization therapy. Twenty-five patients aged median 12.0 years after repair of tetralogy of Fallot and similar lesions were studied echocardiographically (n=23) and by cardiac catheterization (n=5) after primary repair (n=4) or after surgical RV revalvulation for significant pulmonary regurgitation (n=21). Temporary RV cardiac resynchronization therapy was applied in the presence of complete right bundle branch block by atrial-synchronized RV free wall pacing in complete fusion with spontaneous ventricular depolarization using temporary electrodes. The q-RV interval at the RV free wall pacing site (mean 77.2% of baseline QRS duration) confirmed pacing from a late activated RV area. RV cardiac resynchronization therapy carried significant decrease in QRS duration ( P right bundle branch block QRS morphology, increase in RV filling time ( P =0.002), pulmonary artery velocity time integral ( P =0.006), and RV maximum +dP/dt ( P right bundle branch block, RV cardiac resynchronization therapy carried multiple positive effects on RV mechanics, synchrony, and contraction efficiency. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. High-resolution measurement of the unsteady velocity field to evaluate blood damage induced by a mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofiore, Alessandro; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the potential of prosthetic heart valves to generate abnormal flow and stress patterns, which can contribute to platelet activation and lysis according to blood damage accumulation mechanisms. High-resolution velocity measurements of the unsteady flow field, obtained with a standard particle image velocimetry system and a scaled-up model valve, are used to estimate the shear stresses arising downstream of the valve, accounting for flow features at scales less than one order of magnitude larger than blood cells. Velocity data at effective spatial and temporal resolution of 60 μm and 1.75 kHz, respectively, enabled accurate extraction of Lagrangian trajectories and loading histories experienced by blood cells. Non-physiological stresses up to 10 Pa were detected, while the development of vortex flow in the wake of the valve was observed to significantly increase the exposure time, favouring platelet activation. The loading histories, combined with empirical models for blood damage, reveal that platelet activation and lysis are promoted at different stages of the heart cycle. Shear stress and blood damage estimates are shown to be sensitive to measurement resolution.

  12. Experimental investigation of the flow field past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in pulsatile flow within an anatomical aorta model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2011-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) has been mounted at the inlet of an anatomical model of the human aorta, and placed within a mock circulation loop that simulates physiological flow conditions. The working fluid matches the refractive index of silicone, from which the aorta model and other parts of the test section are made, and the viscosity of blood. Flow characteristics past the BMHV are measured using stereoscopic and planar particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry. In contrast to previous experiments, in which heart valves have been tested in simplified aortic geometries, this arrangement permits the study of the dependence of flow past the valve upon recirculation in the sinuses of Valsalva, the flow rate through the coronary arteries, and the aorta curvature. The effect of valve orientation will also be investigated with the objective to determine a hemodynamically optimal configuration with potential benefits to implantation procedures. The measured viscous shear stress distribution will be analyzed towards predicting the initiation of thrombosis in patients and identifying regions of stagnation, which could facilitate thrombus attachment.

  13. A time-dependent numerical analysis of flow in a mechanical heart valve: Comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkanis, Vasileios; Housiadas, Christos

    2010-06-01

    There is a great need to fabricate heart valves that have similar haemodynamic properties with the natural ones. Towards this goal, we examine the dynamics of fluid flow in a mechanical heart valve with one leaflet. The fluid is incompressible and Newtonian and the leaflet is a neo-Hookean material. The Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method is used to model the fluid-leaflet interaction, and the system of equations is solved using the Finite Element method. The pseudo solid approach along with a set of algebraic equations are used to deform the mesh, while care is taken to avoid remeshing of the domain, at the moment of valve closure. The computational results are compared against the experimental results, and we find an excellent agreement for the time period of valve closure, the time the valve is fully opened, and the value of the maximum valve opening angle. This study indicates that the present model is capable of describing the valve dynamics in physiological geometries.

  14. Modulation of the transducer function of Na+,K+-ATPase: new mechanism of heart remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, Ekaterina V; Kipenko, Anna V; Pasatetskaya, Natalia A; Penniyaynen, Valentina A; Krylov, Boris V

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous digitalis-like factors were found in the mammalian and human blood. It was the starting point for the elucidation of the new non-pumping function of the Na + ,K + -ATPase. It was previously well known that Na + ,K + -ATPase is a pharmacological target receptor for cardiac glycosides (J.C. Skou. 1957. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 23: 394-401). We have investigated the trophotropic effects of such agents as ouabain, epinephrine, norepinephrine, atenolol, and comenic acid using the organotypic tissue culture combined with the reconstruction of optical cross sections and confocal microscopy. It was shown that the growth zone of organotypic culture forms a multidimensional structure. Our results indicate that the cardiac glycoside ouabain applied in endogenous concentrations (10 -8 , 10 -10 mol/L) can modulate transducer function of Na + ,K + -ATPase and control the cell growth and proliferation. It was also shown that Src-kinase is involved in "endogenous" ouabain activated intracellular pathways as a series unit. Epinephrine (10 -9 -10 -14 mol/L) and comenic acid (10 -6 -10 -10 mol/L) were demonstrated to modulate the growth of 10- to 12-day-old chicken embryo cardiac tissue explants in a dose-dependent manner. Epinephrine and comenic acid regulate growth and proliferation of the cardiac tissue via receptor-mediated modulation Na + ,K + -ATPase as a signal transducer. The trophotropic effects of the investigated agents specifically control the heart remodeling phenomenon.

  15. Exercise training enhances baroreflex sensitivity by an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Tarek M; Liu, Dongmei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-03-01

    Exercise training (EX) has become an important modality capable of enhancing the quality of life and survival of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although 4 wk of EX in animals with CHF evoked a reduction in renal sympathetic nerve activity and ANG II plasma levels and an enhancement in baroreflex sensitivity at rest (Liu JL, Irvine S, Reid IA, Patel KP, Zucker IH, Circulation 102: 1854-1862, 2000; Liu JL, Kulakofsky J, Zucker IH, J Appl Physiol 92: 2403-2408, 2002), it is unclear whether these phenomena are causally related. CHF was induced in rabbits by ventricular pacing (360-380 beats/min) for 3 wk. CHF rabbits were EX for 4 wk at 15-18 m/min, 6 days/wk, 30-40 min/day. Three groups of rabbits were studied: CHF (with no EX), CHF-EX, and CHF-EX + ANG II infusion [in which ANG II levels were kept at or near levels observed in CHF (non-EX) rabbits by subcutaneous osmotic minipump infusion]. EX prevented the increase in plasma ANG II levels shown in CHF rabbits. CHF and CHF-EX + ANG II infusion rabbits had significantly depressed baroreflex sensitivity slopes (P baroreflex function in CHF after EX are due to the concomitant reduction in ANG II and angiotensin receptors in the central nervous system.

  16. Mechanical approach in the management of advanced acute and chronic heart failure: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Carr, Cornelia; AlKhulaifi, Abdulaziz

    2015-02-01

    Despite the progress in medical therapy, advanced heart failure (AHF) remains a global epidemic with high morbidity and mortality. Novel cardiac support strategies such as pharmacologic agents, mechanical circulatory support (MCS), and cell- or matrix-based therapies are promising for these patients. The indications, types, and timing of MCS implantation depend to a large extent on the presentation, clinical status of the patient, underlying etiology, and long-term prospects. The presence or absence of end-organ damage has a significant impact on prognosis following MCS initiation. Although many patients with acute AHF may have end-organ damage, their prospect of recovery, once appropriate therapy is instituted, is better than for patients who had AHF for longer periods of time. We consider the multidisciplinary approaches used for the management of AHF and the novel cardiac support strategies (eg, MCS). Appropriate selection of patient, device, time, and end point is essential for better outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Flow Structure Downstream of a Mechanical Heart Valve during Systole: Investigation Using High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshkai, Peter; Haji-Esmaeili, Farida

    2007-11-01

    High speed digital particle image velocimetry is employed to study turbulent flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve during systolic and diastolic phases of a cardiac cycle. Unsteady vortex shedding from the valve's leaflets displays distinct characteristic frequencies, depending on the opening angle of each leaflet. Small- and large-scale transverse oscillations of the separated shear layers are studied using global quantitative flow imaging approach. Implementation of high-speed digital particle image velocimetry technique yields quantitative information about vortex shedding frequencies and trajectories of the shed vortices downstream of the valve. Turbulent flow structures including jet-like regions and shed vortices are characterized in terms of patterns of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity, vorticity, and streamline topology.

  18. Numerical investigation on effect of aortic root geometry on flow induced structural stresses developed in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, S. S.; Nasif, M. S.; Said, M. A. M.; Kadhim, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    Structural stresses developed in an artificial bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) due to pulsed blood flow may cause valve failure due to yielding. In this paper, von-Mises stresses are computed and compared for BMHV placed in two types of aortic root geometries that are aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses and with axisymmetric bulb, at different physiological blood flow rates. With BMHV placed in an aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, the von-Mises stresses developed in the valve were found to be up to 47% higher than BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric bulb under similar physiological conditions. High velocity vectors and therefore high von-Mises stresses have been observed for BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, that can lead to valve failure.

  19. The role of the sewing ring in tissue healing: a pathologic study of explanted mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Mathew V; Sabareeswaran, Arumugam; Kanchanamala, Muniraj; Balachandran, Seetharaman; Mogileswari, Dhananjayan; Subban, Vijayakumar

    2012-03-01

    Serious complications may occur after heart valve replacement, and many such patients will require reoperation. The study aim was to identify the pattern of tissue response around the sewing ring of those valves that have been explanted as a result of various valve-associated complications. A total of 51 mechanical heart valves (MHVs) was explanted from 45 patients who had undergone reoperation for valve-related complications. The examination of the valves included an analysis of the operative findings, macroscopic findings, histopathology, and dissection of the sewing ring. The extent of tissue hyperplasia was variable around the sewing rings of valves explanted for various pathologies. In pannus, the hyperplastic tissue extended into the valve orifice and produced an obstruction to flow, whereas in thrombosed valves the thrombus was attached to the tissue at the annulus. In non-infective pathologies, the histology revealed cellular infiltration that was limited to the peripheral fabric layers of the sewing ring, though the extent of infiltration was not increased with the duration of implantation. In prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), the surrounding hyperplastic tissue was granulomatous, but cellular infiltration into the sewing ring was absent. The dissection of various models of explanted valves revealed that different types of filler and fixing mechanisms had increased the bulk of the sewing ring. Tissue hyperplasia of varying extent occurs around the sewing ring after MHV implantation. The cellular elements grow into the peripheral layers, but not the deeper layers, of the sewing ring. In PVE, there was an absence of cellular infiltration into the sewing ring.

  20. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  1. Mitochondrial damage: An important mechanism of ambient PM{sub 2.5} exposure-induced acute heart injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijin; Kou, Xiaojing; Geng, Hong; Xie, Jingfang; Tian, Jingjing [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental & Resource Sciences, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Cai, Zongwei, E-mail: zwcai@hkbu.edu.hk [State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental & Resource Sciences, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • PM{sub 2.5} induces heart mitochondrial morphological damage of rats. • Mitochondrial fission/fusion gene expression is important regulation mechanism. • Proinflammatoy cytokine level changes are accompanied with mitochondrial damage. • Alterations in oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis are focused on. - Abstract: Epidemiological studies suggested that ambient fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) exposure was associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism, especially the mitochondrial damage mechanism, of PM{sub 2.5}-induced heart acute injury is still unclear. In this study, the alterations of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial fission/fusion gene expression, oxidative stress, calcium homeostasis and inflammation in hearts of rats exposed to PM{sub 2.5} with different dosages (0.375, 1.5, 6.0 and 24.0 mg/kg body weight) were investigated. The results indicated that the PM{sub 2.5} exposure induced pathological changes and ultra-structural damage in hearts such as mitochondrial swell and cristae disorder. Furthermore, PM{sub 2.5} exposure significantly increased specific mitochondrial fission/fusion gene (Fis1, Mfn1, Mfn2, Drp1 and OPA1) expression in rat hearts. These changes were accompanied by decreases of activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase and increases of levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) as well as levels of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in rat hearts. The results implicate that mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress, cellular homeostasis imbalance and inflammation are potentially important mechanisms for the PM{sub 2.5}-induced heart injury, and may have relations with cardiovascular disease.

  2. Why increased nuchal translucency is associated with congenital heart disease: a systematic review on genetic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, N.B.; Bekker, M.N.; Groot, C.J. de; Christoffels, V.M.; Haak, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    This overview provides insight into the underlying genetic mechanism of the high incidence of cardiac defects in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency (NT). Nuchal edema, the morphological equivalent of increased NT, is likely to result from abnormal lymphatic development and is strongly

  3. Anticoagulation in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves : the new ESC guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    In pregnant women with a mechanical valve prosthesis, anticoagulation therapy is challenging because of the risk of embryopathy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA's), while unfractioned heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) are associated with a higher risk of valve thrombosis [1]. The

  4. The rise of [Na(+)] (i) during ischemia and reperfusion in the rat heart-underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Iwan A; Xiao, Xiao-hui; Ju, Yue-kun; Allen, David G

    2007-09-01

    Intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) rises in the heart during ischemia, and on reperfusion, there is a transient rise followed by a return toward control. These changes in [Na(+)](i) contribute to ischemic and reperfusion damage through their effects on Ca(2+) overload. Part of the rise of [Na(+)](i) during ischemia may be caused by increased activity of the cardiac Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE1), activated by the ischemic rise in [H(+)](i). In support of this view, NHE1 inhibitors reduce the [Na(+)](i) rise during ischemia. Another possibility is that the rise of [Na(+)](i) during ischemia is caused by Na(+) influx through channels. We have reexamined these issues by use of two different NHE1 inhibitors, amiloride, and zoniporide, in addition to tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks voltage-sensitive Na(+) channels. All three drugs produced cardioprotection after ischemia, but amiloride (100 microM) and TTX (300 nM) prevented the rise in [Na(+)](i) during ischemia, whereas zoniporide (100 nM) did not. Both amiloride and zoniporide prevented the rise of [Na(+)](i) on reperfusion, whereas TTX was without effect. In an attempt to explain these differences, we measured the ability of the three drugs to block Na(+) currents. At the concentrations used, TTX reduced the transient Na(+) current (I (Na)) by 11 +/- 2% while amiloride and zoniporide were without effect. In contrast, TTX largely eliminated the persistent Na(+) current (I (Na,P)) and amiloride was equally effective, whereas zoniporide had a substantially smaller effect reducing I (Na,P) to 41 +/- 8%. These results suggest that part of the effect of NHE1 inhibitors on the [Na(+)](i) during ischemia is by blockade of I (Na,P). The fact that a low concentration of TTX eliminated the rise of [Na(+)](i) during ischemia suggests that I (Na,P) is a major source of Na(+) influx in this model of ischemia.

  5. Biomedical engineering support. Annual progress report, August 15, 1974--August 14, 1975. [/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-powered mechanical heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolff, W.J.; Smith, L.M.; Sandquist, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    The major responsibility of the Institute for Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah under the ERDA Artificial Heart Program has been to provide in vitro and in vivo experimental data and evaluation of the anatomical fitting, accommodation, performance and adequacy of the artificial heart system and its components as they are developed in the ERDA Program and provided to the Institute for study. The Institute also has the responsibility of designing, constructing and testing the blood handling components of the Blood Pump and insuring reliability, durability and satisfactory performance of these system components. During the reporting period, nine total heart replacement experiments were performed in calves using the ERDA Blood Pump powered by an electric motor implanted in the abdomen. Results of the experiments are given. Ultimately the mechanical heart will be powered by a radioisotope heat source. (TFD)

  6. Twenty years' single-center experience with mechanical heart valves: a critical review of anticoagulation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nooten, Guido J; Caes, Frank; François, Katrien; Van Bellleghem, Yves; Bové, Thierry; Vandenplas, Guy; Taeymans, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Since January 1990, a variety of mechanical valves (St. Jude Medical, CarboMedics, ATS Medical) have been implanted routinely at the authors' institution. The study aim was to analyze, retrospectively, the 20-year clinical results of those mechanical valves, and to challenge the anticoagulation policy employed over the years. Between January 1990 and December 2008, a total of 2,108 mechanical valves was inserted into 1,887 consecutive patients (1,346 aortic, 725 mitral, 27 tricuspid, 10 pulmonary). The mean age of the patients was 63 +/- 13.2 years, and the majority (61%) were males. Preoperatively, 71% the patients were in NYHA class > or = III (average 3.01). The most frequent comorbidities included: atrial fibrillation (n = 594), coronary disease (n = 567) and diabetes (n = 398). The follow up (99% complete) totaled 13,721 patient-years (pt-yr), and ranged from 12 to 241 months (average 84 months). In-hospital mortality was 5.2% (n = 98, 14 valve-related). Of the 629 late deaths, the majority were cardiac (n = 276). Survival (Kaplan-Meier estimation) was significantly better for aortic valve patients compared to mitral or multiple valve replacement (Mantel-Cox, p valve thrombosis 0.31, thromboembolism 1.08, and bleeding 0.91. However, as repeated events occurred in several patients, the hazard function was not constant. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression model) showed age > 70 years (p or = III (p II as significant risk factors for thromboembolism, while long-acting coumadin and NYHA class > II were significant risk factors for bleeding. This 20-year experience demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes for patients with mechanical prostheses, with no valve structural failure and an acceptable incidence of adverse events. INR values between 2-2.5 for aortic valve patients, and 3-3.5 for mitral valve patients, yielded the fewest major adverse events.

  7. Mental health status of patients with mechanical aortic valves, with ventricular assist devices and after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Claudia; Kaps, Josefine; Hartmann, Armin; Zeh, Wolfgang; Anjarwalla, Anna Lena; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Siepe, Matthias; Joos, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Mental health is a complex construct, in which emotional aspects and quality of life are central. It has been assessed in patients after heart transplantation (HTX) and occasionally in those with ventricular assist devices (VADs). However, there are no studies that compare patients with primary HTX with those with HTX ending VAD support. Evidence for patients with mechanical aortic valve replacement is also limited. We compared mental outcome for these four groups for the first time. We also focused on the question of an artificial device, i.e. VAD or mechanical aortic valve, as distinct from a biological graft, i.e. HTX. Two questionnaires were applied: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the German version consists of two subscales for anxiety and for depression, and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, the German version contains two subscales for physical and for mental performance measuring quality of life. We included 46 patients with mechanical aortic valve replacement, 55 after HTX and 22 on support by a long-term VAD. The HTX group consisted of 38 patients with primary HTX and 17 recipients who were on VAD support before transplantation. The index operation was at least 6 months ago. HTX patients suffered less from anxiety and depression than patients with mechanical aortic valve replacement or those on VAD. HTX patients had higher scores on the physical scale but not on the mental component scale of the 12-item Short Form Health Survey compared with VAD patients. Conversely, patients with mechanical aortic valve replacement did worse with regard to mental but not physical performance compared with HTX patients. VAD and mechanical aortic valve replacement patients differed only with regard to physical condition, but not with regard to anxiety, depression and mental status. HTX patients with and without VAD support before transplantation achieved similar values on all scales. Mental scales did not correlate with age or time after surgery. HTX

  8. Mechanical dispersion is associated with poor outcome in heart failure with a severely depressed left ventricular function and bundle branch blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Ivan; Janicijevic, Aleksandra; Dimic, Aleksandra; Stefanovic, Milica; Vidakovic, Radosav; Putnikovic, Biljana; Neskovic, Aleksandar N

    2018-03-01

    Bundle branch blocks (BBB)-related mechanical dyssynchrony and dispersion may improve patient selection for device therapy, but their effect on the natural history of this patient population is unknown. A total of 155 patients with LVEF ≤ 35% and BBB, not treated with device therapy, were included. Mechanical dyssynchrony was defined as the presence of either septal flash or apical rocking. Contraction duration was assessed as time interval from the electrocardiographic R-(Q-)wave to peak longitudinal strain in each of 17 left ventricular segments. Mechanical dispersion was defined as either the standard deviation of all time intervals (dispersion SD ) or as the difference between the longest and shortest time intervals (dispersion delta ). Patients were followed for cardiac mortality during a median period of 33 months. Mechanical dyssynchrony was not associated with survival. More pronounced mechanical dispersion delta was found in patients with dyssynchrony than in those without. In the multivariate regression analysis, patients' functional class, diabetes mellitus and dispersion delta were independently associated with mortality. Mechanical dispersion, but not dyssynchrony, was independently associated with mortality and it may be useful for risk stratification of patients with heart failure (HF) and BBB. Key Messages Mechanical dispersion, measured by strain echocardiography, is associated with poor outcome in heart failure with a severely depressed left ventricular function and bundle branch blocks. Mechanical dispersion may be useful for risk stratification of patients with heart failure and bundle branch blocks.

  9. Multidetector-row computed tomography allows accurate measurement of mechanical prosthetic heart valve leaflet closing angles compared with fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchá, Dominika; Symersky, Petr; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; Provoost, Esther; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) leaflet restriction measurements with fluoroscopy measurements in commonly used mechanical prosthetic heart valves (PHVs). Four mechanical PHVs (ON-X, Carbomedics, St. Jude, and Medtronic Hall) were imaged in a pulsatile model using fluoroscopy and 64-detector-row computed tomography. Five image acquisitions of each PHV without (1) and with (4) restricted leaflet closure were made. Three observers measured closure angles on fluoroscopy and MDCT. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. Interobserver agreement was high in restricted and non-restricted leaflets on both modalities (ICCs >0.995). MDCT and fluoroscopy showed high agreements (ICCs >0.989). Median MDCT closure angle measurements differed at most -2 to +2 degrees from fluoroscopy in the restricted and -1 to +2 degrees in the non-restricted leaflets. MDCT allows measurement of leaflet motion with a maximal median discrepancy of 2 degrees. Both MDCT and fluoroscopy detect restricted leaflet closure with great accuracy.

  10. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Conversion of Ischemic Stroke in a Patient with Mechanical Heart Valve: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheal Jace Tarver

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a unique case of recurrent stroke, discovered to be secondary to hemorrhagic conversion of microemboli from a mechanical aortic valve despite anticoagulation with Coumadin. The complexity of this case was magnified by the patient’s young age, a mechanical heart valve (MHV, and a need for anticoagulation to maintain MHV patency in a setting of potentially life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for hemorrhagic conversion post-cerebral ischemia; however, the pathophysiology underlying endothelial cell dysfunction causing red blood cell extravasation is an active area of basic and clinical research. The need for randomized clinical trials to aid in the creation of standardized treatment protocol continues to go unmet. Consequently, there is marked variation in therapeutic approaches to treating intracranial hemorrhage in patients with an MHV. Unfortunately, patients with an MHV are considered at high thromboembolic (TE risk, and these patients are often excluded from clinical trials of acute stroke due to their increased TE potential. The authors feel this case represents an example of endothelial dysfunction secondary to microthrombotic events originating from an MHV, which caused ischemic stroke with hemorrhagic conversion complicated by the need for anticoagulation for an MHV. This case offers a definitive treatment algorithm for a complex clinical dilemma.

  11. Hemolymph circulation in insect sensory appendages: functional mechanics of antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Sushma; Hillyer, Julián F

    2014-09-01

    Mosquito antennae provide sensory input that modulates host-seeking, mating and oviposition behaviors. Thus, mosquitoes must ensure the efficient transport of molecules into and out of these appendages. To accomplish this, mosquitoes and other insects have evolved antennal accessory pulsatile organs (APOs) that drive hemolymph into the antennal space. This study characterizes the structural mechanics of hemolymph propulsion throughout the antennae of Anopheles gambiae. Using intravital video imaging, we show that mosquitoes possess paired antennal APOs that are located on each side of the head's dorsal midline. They are situated between the frons and the vertex in an area that is dorsal to the antenna but ventral to the medial-most region of the compound eyes. Antennal APOs contract in synchrony at 1 Hz, which is 45% slower than the heart. By means of histology and intravital imaging, we show that each antennal APO propels hemolymph into the antenna through an antennal vessel that traverses the length of the appendage and has an effective diameter of 1-2 μm. When hemolymph reaches the end of the appendage, it is discharged into the antennal hemocoel and returns to the head. Because a narrow vessel empties into a larger cavity, hemolymph travels up the antenna at 0.2 mm s(-1) but reduces its velocity by 75% as it returns to the head. Finally, treatment of mosquitoes with the anesthetic agent FlyNap (triethylamine) increases both antennal APO and heart contraction rates. In summary, this study presents a comprehensive functional characterization of circulatory physiology in the mosquito antennae. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Comparison of hinge microflow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves implanted in different sinus shape and downstream geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yee Han; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Su, Boyang; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) hinge microflow fields is a crucial step in heart valve engineering. Earlier in vitro studies of BMHV hinge flow at the aorta position in idealized straight pipes have shown that the aortic sinus shapes and sizes may have a direct impact on hinge microflow fields. In this paper, we used a numerical study to look at how different aortic sinus shapes, the downstream aortic arch geometry, and the location of the hinge recess can influence the flow fields in the hinge regions. Two geometric models for sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus and an idealized three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries: a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. The flow fields of a 29-mm St Jude Medical BMHV with its four hinges were investigated. The simulations were performed throughout the entire cardiac cycle. At peak systole, recirculating flows were observed in curved downsteam aortic arch unlike in straight downstream pipe. Highly complex three-dimensional leakage flow through the hinge gap was observed in the simulation results during early diastole with the highest velocity at 4.7 m/s, whose intensity decreased toward late diastole. Also, elevated wall shear stresses were observed in the ventricular regions of the hinge recess with the highest recorded at 1.65 kPa. Different flow patterns were observed between the hinge regions in straight pipe and curved aortic arch models. We compared the four hinge regions at peak systole in an aortic arch downstream model and found that each individual hinge did not vary much in terms of the leakage flow rate through the valves.

  13. Right heart dysfunction and failure in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: mechanisms and management. Position statement on behalf of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Thomas M; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Bauersachs, Johann; Borlaug, Barry A; Celutkiene, Jelena; Coats, Andrew J S; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Guazzi, Marco; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Heymans, Stephane; Hill, Loreena; Lainscak, Mitja; Lam, Carolyn S P; Lund, Lars H; Lyon, Alexander R; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Paulus, Walter J; Pieske, Burkert; Piepoli, Massimo F; Ruschitzka, Frank; Rutten, Frans H; Seferovic, Petar M; Solomon, Scott D; Shah, Sanjiv J; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Wachter, Rolf; Tschöpe, Carsten; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2018-01-01

    There is an unmet need for effective treatment strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Until recently, attention in patients with HFpEF was almost exclusively focused on the left side. However, it is now increasingly recognized that right heart dysfunction is common and contributes importantly to poor prognosis in HFpEF. More insights into the development of right heart dysfunction in HFpEF may aid to our knowledge about this complex disease and may eventually lead to better treatments to improve outcomes in these patients. In this position paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the Committee on Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of right heart dysfunction and failure in patients with HFpEF. Finally, potential treatment strategies, important knowledge gaps and future directions regarding the right side in HFpEF are discussed. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Mechanisms increasing n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Tobias; Rupp, Heinz; Alter, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Due to ambiguous findings on cardiovascular benefits of systemic omega-3 fatty acid therapy, endogenous mechanisms contributing to local organ-specific concentrations of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) were examined. Using gas chromatography, 43 fatty acids were analyzed in atrial and ventricular myocardium and in pericardial fluid of male Wistar rats. To examine the endogenous fatty acid metabolism, precursors were administered into the pericardial sac. Pro- and anti-inflammatory actions were induced by talc or fenofibrate, respectively. Physical exercise and a sedentary obese state were used for increased beta-oxidation. DHA (22:6n-3) was increased in ventricular when compared with atrial myocardium (9.0 ± 2.1% vs. 4.7 ± 1.0%, p acid (24:5n-3) in atrial myocardium, which is a key precursor of DHA. In contrast, proinflammatory stimulation of the n-6 HUFA pathway did not influence the n-3 metabolism. Exercise- and obesity-induced increased beta-oxidation, the finalizing step of DHA synthesis, was associated with increased ventricular DHA concentrations (6.7 ± 1.0% vs. 8.4 ± 1.2%, p < 0.01). It is concluded that the endogenous metabolism contributes markedly to myocardial HUFA concentrations. The findings are supposed to influence the efficacy of oral HUFA treatment and provide a rationale for divergent findings of previous trials on omega-3 therapy.

  15. Maternal and Fetal Outcomes of Anticoagulation in Pregnant Women With Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Zachary L; Dominguez-Islas, Clara P; Otto, Catherine M; Stout, Karen K; Krieger, Eric V

    2017-06-06

    Anticoagulation for mechanical heart valves during pregnancy is essential to prevent thromboembolic events. Each regimen has drawbacks with regard to maternal or fetal risk. This meta-analysis sought to estimate and compare the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves who received different methods of anticoagulation. Studies were identified using a Medline search including all publications up to June 5, 2016. Study inclusion required reporting of maternal death, thromboembolism, and valve failure, and/or fetal spontaneous abortion, death, and congenital defects in pregnant women treated with any of the following: 1) a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) throughout pregnancy; 2) low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) throughout pregnancy; 3) LMWH for the first trimester, followed by a VKA (LMWH and VKA); or 4) unfractionated heparin for the first trimester, followed by a VKA (UFH and VKA). A total of 800 pregnancies from 18 publications were included. Composite maternal risk was lowest with VKA (5%), compared with LMWH (16%; ratio of averaged risk [RAR]: 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 7.5), LMWH and VKA (16%; RAR: 3.1; 95% CI: 1.2 to 7.5), or UFH and VKA (16%; RAR: 3.1; 95% CI: 1.5 to 7.1). Composite fetal risk was lowest with LMWH (13%; RAR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.8), compared with VKA (39%), LMWH and VKA (23%), or UFH and VKA (34%). No significant difference in fetal risk was observed between women taking ≤5 mg daily warfarin and those with an LMWH regimen (RAR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.3 to 2.4). VKA treatment was associated with the lowest risk of adverse maternal outcomes, whereas the use of LMWH throughout pregnancy was associated with the lowest risk of adverse fetal outcomes. Fetal risk was similar between women taking ≤5 mg warfarin daily and women treated with LMWH. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodistribution of radioactive organocations and cationic technetium complexes - implications to the uptake mechanism of potential heart-affine radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Shyre, R.; Seifert, S.; Guethert, I.; Kretschmar, M.; Kampf, G.; Knop, G.; Mohnike, W.; Schmidt, J.

    1986-01-01

    The biodistribution of various 14 C labeled organocations (ammonium, phosphonium) and cationic technetium complexes (TcCl 2 DMPE 2 ,TcDMPE 3 + ) was studied in rats to find potential relations between the chemical composition, structure, molecular size, lipophilicity and heart uptake. All of the radioactive cations were distributed in a similar manner, but with different biokinetics. Molecules containing several electronegative atoms in their ligand structure, e.g. nitrogen or oxygen which enhance polarity, were rapidly accumulated, but washed out again with resultant transient and diminished heart uptake. More highly lipophilic materials, by contrast, showed more extensive accumulation and persistent retention in the heart. The effect of human serum albumin on heart uptake was studied in a perfused heart model. Strong albumin binding prevented extensive heart uptake. This undesirable effect was neutralized by adding detergents to the perfusion bath. Evidence from these animal experiments was considered in the development of a new heart-seeking technetium compound (Tc-DPO), which is characterized by rapid accumulation in the human heart and substantially delayed washout. Heart images with minimal overlap of the inferoposterior wall and the right liver lobe were available in no more than 10 minutes p.i. in both planar and SPECT modes. A deficit in the inferior region was much more clearly defined than on the corresponding Thallium image. (Author)

  17. St Jude Epic heart valve bioprostheses versus native human and porcine aortic valves - comparison of mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejs, Martins; Stradins, Peteris; Lacis, Romans; Ozolanta, Iveta; Pavars, Janis; Kasyanov, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    The major problem with heart valve bioprostheses made from chemically treated porcine aortic valves is their limited longevity caused by gradual deterioration, which has a causal link with valve tissue mechanical properties. To our best knowledge, there are no published studies on the mechanical properties of modern, commercially available bioprostheses comparing them to native human valves. The objective of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of St Jude Epic bioprostheses and to compare them with native human and porcine aortic valves. Leaflets from eight porcine aortic valves and six Epic bioprostheses were analyzed using uni-axial tensile tests in radial and circumferential directions. Mechanical properties of human valves have been previously published by our group. Results are represented as mean values+/-S.D. Circumferential direction. Modulus of elasticity of Epic bioprostheses in circumferential direction at the level of stress 1.0 MPa is 101.99+/-58.24 MPa, 42.3+/-4.96 MPa for native porcine and 15.34+/-3.84 MPa for human aortic valves. Ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 5.77+/-1.94 MPa, human valves have ultimate stress of 1.74+/-0.29 MPa and porcine 1.58+/-0.26 MPa. Ultimate strain in circumferential direction is highest for human valves 18.35+/-7.61% followed by 7.26+/-0.69% for porcine valves and 5.95+/-1.54% for Epic bioprostheses. Radial direction. Modulus of elasticity in radial direction is 9.18+/-1.81 MPa for Epic bioprostheses, 5.33+/-0.61 MPa for native porcine, and 1.98+/-0.15 MPa for human aortic valve leaflets. In the radial direction ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 0.7+/-0.21 MPa followed by native porcine valves 0.55+/-0.11 MPa and 0.32+/-0.04 MPa for human valves. For human valves ultimate strain is 23.92+/-4.87%, for native porcine valves 8.57+/-0.8% and 7.92+/-1.74% for Epic bioprostheses. Epic bioprostheses have non-linear stress-strain behavior similar to native valve tissue, but they

  18. Numerical study of the influence of the hinge gap width on the hinge flow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helene; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2008-11-01

    Previous clinical and in-vitro studies have shown that the complex non-physiologic hemodynamics occurring in the hinge region of bileaflet mechanical heart valves promotes blood cell damage and thrombus formation. Modifying the hinge design could improve the flow and thus reduce the associated blood cell trauma. This study aims at investigating numerically the effect of the hinge gap width on the flow field. The governing equations are solved using a Cartesian sharp interface immersed boundary method coupled with a hybrid staggered/non staggered control volume approach. The hinge dimensions are obtained from MicroComputed Tomography of a clinical valve. The leaflet motion and inlet velocity profile are imposed based on the Fluid-Structure Interaction simulations of the bulk flow of a valve placed under aortic physiologic conditions. 3D pulsatile flows through two hinge designs are presented along with their Lagrangian analysis. The hinge gap width is shown to have a strong influence on the flow, and thus on blood cell trauma.

  19. Timing of anticoagulant re-initiation following intracerebral hemorrhage in mechanical heart valves: Survey of neurosurgeons and thrombosis experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKherayf, Fahad; Xu, Yan; Westwick, Harrison; Moldovan, Ioana Doina; Wells, Philip S

    2017-03-01

    While oral anticoagulation (OAC) is universally indicated for patients with mechanical heart valves (MHVs), OAC resumption following anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is an area of uncertainty. We sought to determine the practice preferences of North American neurosurgeons and thrombosis experts on optimal timing of OAC re-initiation. A cross-sectional survey was disseminated to North American members of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Demographic factors, as well as a clinical scenario with 14 modifiable clinical risk factors were included in the survey. 504 physicians completed our survey (response rate 34.3%). Majority of participants were affiliated with academic centres, and managed≤10 ICH patients with MHV per year. There was wide distribution in response in optimal timing for OAC resumption following an ICH: 59% and 60% preferred to re-start OAC between 3 and 14 days following the hemorrhagic event (median of 6-7 days). Smaller hemorrhages (valve prosthesis, caged-ball valves and multiple valves prompted earlier OAC resumption. Wide variation in the current practice of neurosurgeons and thrombosis specialists exist when they encounter patients with ICH and MHV, though decisions were influenced by patient- and valve-related factors. As our observed variation likely reflects the immense gap in current evidence, prospective randomized trials in this population are therefore urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of a new Implicit Coupling Algorithm for the Partitioned Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerel, Sebastiaan; Degroote, Joris; Claessens, Tom; Vierendeels, Jan

    2010-06-01

    We present a newly developed Fluid-Structure Interaction coupling algorithm to simulate Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves dynamics in a partitioned way. The coupling iterations between the flow solver and the leaflet motion solver are accelerated by using the Jacobian with the derivatives of the pressure and viscous moments acting on the leaflets with respect to the leaflet acceleration. This Jacobian is used in the leaflet motion solver when new positions of the leaflets are computed during the coupling iterations. The Jacobian is numerically derived from the flow solver by applying leaflet perturbations. Instead of calculating this Jacobian every time step, the Jacobian is extrapolated from previous time steps and a recalculation of the Jacobian is only done when needed. The efficiency of our new algorithm is subsequently compared to existing algorithms which use fixed relaxation and dynamic Aitken Δ2 relaxation in the coupling iterations when the new positions of the leaflets are computed. Results show that dynamic Aitken Δ2 relaxation outperforms fixed relaxation. Moreover, during the opening phase of the valve, our new algorithm needs fewer subiterations per time step to achieve convergence than the method with Aitken Δ2 relaxation. Thus, our newly developed FSI coupling scheme outperforms the existing coupling schemes.

  1. Experimental study on the Reynolds and viscous shear stress of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a pneumatic ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwansung; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Our group is currently developing a pneumatic ventricular assist device (PVAD). In general, the major causes of hemolysis in a pulsatile VAD are cavitation, and Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in the mechanical heart valve (MHV). In a previous study, we investigated MHV cavitation. To select the optimal bileaflet valve for our PVAD, in the current study, we investigated RSS and viscous shear stress (VSS) downstream of three different types of commercial bileaflet valves by means of 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV). To carry out flow visualization inside the blood pump and near the valve, we designed a model pump with the same configuration as that of our PVAD. Three types of bileaflet valves (i.e., the ATS valve, the St. Jude valve, and the Sorin Bicarbon valve) were mounted at the aortic position of the model pump, and flow was visualized according to the PIV method. The maximum flow velocity and RSS of the Sorin Bicarbon valve were lower than those of the other two bileaflet valves. The maximum VSS was only 1% of the maximum RSS. Thus, the effect of VSS on blood cell trauma was neglected. The Sorin Bicarbon valve exhibited relatively low levels of RSS, and was therefore considered to be the best valve for our PVAD among the three valves tested.

  2. Association of homocysteine and smoking with cerebral microemboli in patients with mechanical heart valves: a transcranial Doppler study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Alicia; Azarpazhooh, M Reza; Munoz, Claudio; Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Quantz, Mackenzie A; Spence, J David

    2017-12-01

    Microembolic signals (MES) on transcranial Doppler (TCD) predict stroke and cognitive decline. Plasma levels of total homocysteine (tHcy), a prothrombotic factor, are higher in patients with microemboli in carotid stenosis and in patients with paradoxical embolism. In this study we assessed the association between the level of tHcy and the number of MES in patients with mechanical heart valves (MHVs). TCD monitoring was performed to detect MES before and after breathing 100% oxygen and repeated every 2-4 weeks up to six times. Twenty-five patients with MHVs (mean age: 63.60±10.15 years) participated in this study; 15 were men (66.47±7.25 years) and 10 were women (59.30±12.60 years). In total, there were 126 study visits. In multiple regression, higher tHcy was associated with more MES in both preoxygenation (OR 1.34 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.68, P=0.009)) and postoxygenation (OR 1.40 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.83, P=0.01)) phases. Current smoking and the length of time between the operation and monitoring also correlated with a higher number of MES before and after breathing oxygen, particularly in women. Higher tHcy and smoking were associated with a higher MES count in both preoxygenation and postoxygenation phases. Because smoking can be stopped and hyperhomocysteinaemia is treatable, these are clinically important findings.

  3. Efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparin in patients with mechanical heart valves: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, D; David, C; Santos, A T; Costa, J; Pinto, F J; Ferreira, J J

    2014-05-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are not approved for patients with mechanical heart valves (MHVs). However, in several guidelines, temporary LMWH off-label use in this clinical setting is considered to be a valid treatment option. Therefore, we reviewed the efficacy and safety of LMWHs in patients with MHVs. MEDLINE and CENTRAL databases were searched from inception to June 2013. Review articles and references were also searched. We included experimental and observational studies that compared LMWHs with unfractionated heparin (UFH) or vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Data were analyzed and pooled to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for thromboembolic and major bleeding events. Statistical heterogeneity was evaluated with the I(2) -test. Nine studies were included: one randomized controlled trial (RCT) and eight observational studies, with a total of 1042 patients. No differences were found between LMWHs and UFH/VKAs in the risk of thromboembolic events (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.27-1.68; I(2) = 9%) or major bleeding events (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.36-1.19; I(2) = 0%). The best evidence available might support the temporary use of LMWHs as a prophylactic treatment option in patients with MHVs. However, conclusions are mostly based on observational data (with large CIs), and an adequately powered RCT is urgently needed in this clinical setting. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Percutaneous Mechanical Circulation Support Combined with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (oxyRVAD) in Secondary Right Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Philipp M; Hörsch, Sabrina I; Seiler, Frederik; Kamp, Annegret; Becker, Sören L; Lensch, Christian; Conzelmann, Lars O; Haake, Hendrik; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Bals, Robert; Kredel, Markus; Langer, Frank; Wilkens, Heinrike; Trudzinski, Franziska C

    2018-02-06

    Right heart failure (RHF) because of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequently encountered clinical problem with high mortality. The last resort, if pharmacological therapy fails, is mechanical circulatory support. There is a lack of percutaneous systems to support the right ventricle (RV). Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is widely used as a bailout in acute RHF in non-left ventricular assist device patients. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation does not unload the left ventricle and may cause failure of the left ventricle if used for a longer period of time. We report the long-term use of an ECMO-based percutaneous right ventricular assist system (oxyRVAD) capable to deliver up to 6 L/min of blood flow with a returning cannula placed in the main pulmonary artery used in RHF originating from PH with poor oxygenation. We present a series of four patients on oxyRVAD (mean treatment duration 15 ± 7.6 days). Patients benefited from the system clinically; however, two patients eventually died while on oxyRVAD. Nevertheless, we provide a proof-of-concept of this system in PH patients, which is feasible and might provide a useful "bridge-to-recovery" or "bridge-to-transplant" option in the management of patients with severe RHF because of PH.

  5. Unsteady fluid dynamics of several mechanical prosthetic heart valves using a two component laser Doppler anemometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, T; Modi, V J

    1997-10-01

    Five typical mechanical heart valves (Starr-Edwards, Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (c-c), Björk-Shiley monostrut, Bicer-Val, and St. Jude Medical) were tested in the mitral position under the pulsatile flow condition. The test program included measurements of velocity and turbulent stresses at 5 downstream locations. The study was carried out using a sophisticated cardiac simulator in conjunction with a highly sensitive 2 component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) system. The continuous monitoring of parametric time histories revealed useful details about the complex flow and helped to establish the locations and times of the peak parameter values. Based upon the nondimensional presentation of data, the following general conclusions can be made. First, all the 5 valve designs created elevated turbulent stresses during the accelerating and peak flow phases, presenting the possibility of thromboembolism and perhaps hemolysis. Second, the difference in valve configuration seemed to affect the flow characteristics; third, the bileaflet design of the St. Jude valve appeared to create a lower turbulence stress level.

  6. Using Coexpression Protein Interaction Network Analysis to Identify Mechanisms of Danshensu Affecting Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqi Huo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza, known as Danshen, has attracted worldwide interest for its substantial effects on coronary heart disease (CHD. Danshensu (DSS is one of the main active ingredients of Danshen on CHD. Although it has been proven to have a good clinical effect on CHD, the action mechanisms remain elusive. In the current study, a coexpression network-based approach was used to illustrate the beneficial properties of DSS in the context of CHD. By integrating the gene expression profile data and protein-protein interactions (PPIs data, two coexpression protein interaction networks (CePIN in a CHD state (CHD CePIN and a non-CHD state (non-CHD CePIN were generated. Then, shared nodes and unique nodes in CHD CePIN were attained by conducting a comparison between CHD CePIN and non-CHD CePIN. By calculating the topological parameters of each shared node and unique node in the networks, and comparing the differentially expressed genes, target proteins involved in disease regulation were attained. Then, Gene Ontology (GO enrichment was utilized to identify biological processes associated to target proteins. Consequently, it turned out that the treatment of CHD with DSS may be partly attributed to the regulation of immunization and blood circulation. Also, it indicated that sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 (SLC9A3, Prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (PTGS2, Oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1, and fibrinogen gamma chain (FGG may be potential therapeutic targets for CHD. In summary, this study provided a novel coexpression protein interaction network approach to provide an explanation of the mechanisms of DSS on CHD and identify key proteins which maybe the potential therapeutic targets for CHD.

  7. Integrated Modules Analysis to Explore the Molecular Mechanisms of Phlegm-Stasis Cementation Syndrome with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Kuo; Jiang, Li-Jie; Hu, Jing-Qing; Zhou, Xue-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been the leading cause of death for several decades globally, IHD patients usually hold the symptoms of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome (PSCS) as significant complications. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSCS complicated with IHD have not yet been fully elucidated. Materials and Methods: Network medicine methods were utilized to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of IHD phenotypes. Firstly, high-quality IHD-associated genes from both human curated disease-gene association database and biomedical literatures were integrated. Secondly, the IHD disease modules were obtained by dissecting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) topological modules in the String V9.1 database and the mapping of IHD-associated genes to the PPI topological modules. After that, molecular functional analyses (e.g., Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses) for these IHD disease modules were conducted. Finally, the PSCS syndrome modules were identified by mapping the PSCS related symptom-genes to the IHD disease modules, which were further validated by both pharmacological and physiological evidences derived from published literatures. Results: The total of 1,056 high-quality IHD-associated genes were integrated and evaluated. In addition, eight IHD disease modules (the PPI sub-networks significantly relevant to IHD) were identified, in which two disease modules were relevant to PSCS syndrome (i.e., two PSCS syndrome modules). These two modules had enriched pathways on Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (hsa04620) and Renin-angiotensin system (hsa04614), with the molecular functions of angiotensin maturation (GO:0002003) and response to bacterium (GO:0009617), which had been validated by classical Chinese herbal formulas-related targets, IHD-related drug targets, and the phenotype features derived from human phenotype ontology (HPO) and published biomedical literatures. Conclusion: A network medicine

  8. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  9. Relation of mechanical dyssynchrony with underlying cardiac structure and performance in chronic systolic heart failure: implications on clinical response to cardiac resynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wai Hong Wilson; Mullens, Wilfried; Borowski, Allen G; Tong, Wilson; Shrestha, Kevin; Troughton, Richard W; Martin, Maureen G; Kassimatis, Kathleen; Agler, Debbie; Jasper, Sue; Grimm, Richard A; Starling, Randall C; Klein, Allan L

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (VMD) and echocardiographic indices of cardiac remodelling. We evaluated 219 ambulatory patients with chronic systolic heart failure [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) Heart Association functional classes II-IV] who underwent echocardiographic evaluation. The presence of dyssynchrony was defined by Bader criteria (intra-VMD > 40 ms and/or inter-VMD > 38 ms). In our study cohort, 59% of patients had evidence of dyssynchrony (including 44% with intra-VMD and 38% with inter-VMD, and 20% with both). Inter-VMD correlated with QRS width (r = 0.48, P chronic systolic heart failure, evidence of mechanical dyssynchrony is prevalent but the underlying cardiac structure and performance may influence the degree of inter-VMD more so than intra-VMD. Our data suggest that the extent of inter-VMD is directly related to the degree of dilatation of the heart but inversely to diastolic dysfunction.

  10. Strategies and outcomes of periprocedural bridging therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin in patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Jacqueline M; Majeed, Ammar; Mattsson, Eva; Schulman, Sam; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) undergoing invasive procedures often receive periprocedural bridging with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The bridging strategies used in real-life and the predictors for bleeding and thrombosis are not well studied. We retrospectively assessed patients with MHV that underwent invasive procedures requiring vitamin K antagonist interruption and LMWH bridging. Thromboembolic and bleeding events occurring up to 30 days after the procedures were recorded. Predictors of major bleeding events (MBEs) were analyzed with logistic regression. We evaluated 547 patients with MHV who underwent 275 procedures during a 6.5-year period. Bridging with LMWH was used in 185 procedures in a total of 117 patients. Combined pre- and post-operative bridging was the most frequently employed (63 %). Doses of LMWH were prophylactic in 96 (52 %) of the procedures and therapeutic in 89 (48 %). The procedure-related bleeding risk was evaluated as high in 70 (38 %) and low in 115 (62 %) of the procedures. There was a trend to more frequent use of prophylactic doses (61 %) in high-risk surgery, and more therapeutic doses (53 %) in low-risk ones. There were 36 bleeding episodes, 21 (11 % of procedures) of which were classified as MBEs, but there were no thromboembolic events. Most MBEs (n = 14; 67 %) occurred in surgeries with high bleeding risk. In the multivariate analysis, the bleeding risk of the surgery itself was the only independent predictor for MBEs. For patients with MHV receiving perioperative bridging with LMWH, the major predictor for MBE is the bleeding risk of the surgery.

  11. Anticoagulation Regimens During Pregnancy in Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe; Fan, Jin; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Ma, Jun; Lin, Yu-Bi; Ma, Shao-Hong; Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Ou, Jing-Song; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Managing anticoagulation in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves remains challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of 4 regimens in these women. Relevant studies published before June 2015 were collected in several databases and analyzed with RevMan version 5.3 and SPSS version 19.0. Four regimens were defined as follows: a regimen of a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) throughout pregnancy; a heparin (H)/VKA regimen using VKAs except for unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) during 6-12 weeks of pregnancy; a LMWH regimen of adjusted LMWH doses throughout pregnancy; and a UFH regimen of adjusted UFH doses throughout pregnancy. The low warfarin dose in the VKA regimen was defined as 5 mg/d or less. Fifty-one studies comprising 2113 pregnancies in 1538 women were included. The rate of fetal wastage was significantly higher in the high warfarin dose subgroup than in the low dose one. Compared with the H/VKA regimen, the rate of maternal major thromboembolic event in the low-dose VKA regimen group was significantly lower, although the fetal outcomes were similar. Compared with the H/VKA regimen, the rate of fetal wastage in the LMWH regimen group was significantly lower, and the maternal outcomes were similar. The UFH regimen presented the worst maternal and fetal outcomes. In the absence of large prospective trials, this meta-analysis showed that the VKA regimen should be best for pregnant women with a low warfarin dose, and the H/VKA regimen might be reasonable for those with a high warfarin dose. The LMWH regimen could be used for those who refuse VKA. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thromboembolism, major bleeding and mortality in patients with mechanical heart valves- a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaf, Ashkan; Grzymala-Lubanski, Bartosz; Stagmo, Martin; Lövdahl, Susanna; Wieloch, Mattias; Själander, Anders; Svensson, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Low incidences of thromboembolism (TE) and bleeding in patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) have previously been reported. This study assesses the incidence of and clinical risk factors predicting TE, major bleeding and mortality in a clinical setting. All 546 patients undergoing anticoagulation treatment due to MHV replacement at hospitals in Malmö and Sundsvall in Sweden were monitored during 2008-2011 and the incidence of TE, major bleeding and mortality was prospectively followed. There were 398, 122 and 26 patients in the aortic group (AVR), mitral (MVR) group and the combined aortic/mitral valve group respectively. The incidence of TE was 1.8 and 2.2 per 100 patient-years in the AVR group MVR group respectively. The corresponding incidences of bleeding were 4.4 and 4.6, respectively. Independent predictor of thromboembolism was vascular disease (Odds ratio {OR}: 4.2; 95% CI: 1.0-17.4). Predictor of bleeding was previous bleeding (OR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4-5.3). Independent predictors of mortality was age (Hazard ratio {HR}: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.00-1.05), hypertension (HR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.3-4.5), diabetes (HR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.3-4.3) and alcohol overconsumption (HR: 5.2; 95% CI: 1.7-15.9). Standardized mortality/morbidity ratio for mortality and AMI was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.8-1.2) and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.5-1.2) respectively. The incidence of TE and major bleeding in this unselected clinical population exceeds that of previously reported retrospective and randomized trials. Despite this, mortality is equal to that of the general population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inspiratory muscle strength training in infants with congenital heart disease and prolonged mechanical ventilation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara K; Bleiweis, Mark S; Neel, Cimaron R; Martin, A Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) has been shown to improve maximal pressures and facilitate ventilator weaning in adults with prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV). The purposes of this case report are: (1) to describe the rationale for IMST in infants with MV dependence and (2) to summarize the device modifications used to administer training. Two infants with congenital heart disease underwent corrective surgery and were referred for inspiratory muscle strength evaluation after repeated weaning failures. It was determined that IMST was indicated due to inspiratory muscle weakness and a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. In order to accommodate small tidal volumes of infants, 2 alternative training modes were devised. For infant 1, IMST consisted of 15-second inspiratory occlusions. Infant 2 received 10-breath sets of IMST through a modified positive end-expiratory pressure valve. Four daily IMST sets separated by 3 to 5 minutes of rest were administered 5 to 6 days per week. The infants' IMST tolerance was evaluated by vital signs and daily clinical reviews. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and rate of pressure development (dP/dt) were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures included the resting breathing pattern and MV weaning. There were no adverse events associated with IMST. Infants generated training pressures through the adapted devices, with improved MIP, dP/dt, and breathing pattern. Both infants weaned from MV to a high-flow nasal cannula, and neither required subsequent reintubation during their hospitalization. This case report describes pediatric adaptations of an IMST technique used to improve muscle performance and facilitate weaning in adults. Training was well tolerated in 2 infants with postoperative weaning difficulty and inspiratory muscle dysfunction. Further systematic examination will be needed to determine whether IMST provides a significant performance or weaning benefit.

  14. Evaluation of the marker of hypercoagulability prothrombin fragment F 1+2 in patients with mechanical or biological heart valve prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Claudia Natália

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether patients with heart valve prostheses and similar International Normalized Ratios (INR have the same level of protection against thromboembolic events, that is, whether the anticoagulation intensity is related to the intensity of hypercoagulability supression. METHODS: INR and plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2 were assessed in blood samples of 27 patients (7 with mechanical heart valves and 20 with biological heart valves and 27 blood samples from healthy donors that were not taking any medication. RESULTS: Increased levels of F1+2 were observed in blood samples of 5 patients with heart valve prostheses taking warfarin. These findings reinforce the idea that even though patients may have INRs, within the therapeutic spectrum, they are not free from new thromboembolic events. CONCLUSION: Determination of the hypercoagulability marker F1+2 might result in greater efficacy and safety for the use of oral anticoagulants, resulting in improved quality of life for patients.

  15. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  16. Use of the Frog Heart Preparation to Teach Students about the Spontaneous Mechanical Activity of the Vena Cava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Brent J. F.; Goodman, Ian; Moran, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Most undergraduate physiology texts describe veins simply as reservoirs for blood and conduits for return of blood to the heart. This article describes a laboratory exercise that can be performed by students to demonstrate that veins are much more than reservoirs and conduits for blood flow: they possess a dynamic rhythmic contraction. In this…

  17. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves : quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. Methods

  18. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall

  19. Plasma Amino Acid Abnormalities in Chronic Heart Failure. Mechanisms, Potential Risks and Targets in Human Myocardium Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Aquilani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to measure arterial amino acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, and relate them to left ventricular function and disease severity. Amino acids (AAs play a crucial role for heart protein-energy metabolism. In heart failure, arterial AAs, which are the major determinant of AA uptake by the myocardium, are rarely measured. Forty-one subjects with clinically stable CHF (New York Heart Association (NYHA class II to IV were analyzed. After overnight fasting, blood samples from the radial artery were taken to measure AA concentrations. Calorie (KcalI, protein-, fat-, carbohydrate-intake, resting energy expenditure (REE, total daily energy expenditure (REE × 1.3, and cardiac right catheterization variables were all measured. Eight matched controls were compared for all measurements, with the exception of cardiac catheterization. Compared with controls, CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels, of which both their number and reduced rates are related to Heart Failure (HF severity. Arterial aspartic acid correlated with stroke volume index (r = 0.6263; p < 0.0001 and cardiac index (r = 0.4243; p = 0.0028. The value of arterial aspartic acid (µmol/L multiplied by the cardiac index was associated with left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.3765; p = 0.0076. All NYHA groups had adequate protein intake (≥1.1 g/kg/day and inadequate calorie intake (KcalI < REE × 1.3 was found only in class IV patients. This study showed that CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels directly related to clinical disease severity and left ventricular dysfunction.

  20. Valveless pumping mechanics of the embryonic heart during cardiac looping: Pressure and flow through micro-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, D L; Johnson, B; Garrity, D; Dasi, L P

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular development is influenced by the flow-induced stress environment originating from cardiac biomechanics. To characterize the stress environment, it is necessary to quantify flow and pressure. Here, we quantify the flow field in a developing zebrafish heart during the looping stage through micro-particle imaging velocimetry and by analyzing spatiotemporal plots. We further build upon previous methods to noninvasively quantify the pressure field at a low Reynolds number using flow field data for the first time, while also comparing the impact of viscosity models. Through this method, we show that the atrium builds up pressure to ~0.25mmHg relative to the ventricle during atrial systole and that atrial expansion creates a pressure difference of ~0.15mmHg across the atrium, resulting in efficient cardiac pumping. With these techniques, it is possible to noninvasively fully characterize hemodynamics during heart development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transporting newborn infants with suspected duct dependent congenital heart disease on low‐dose prostaglandin E1 without routine mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Kathryn A Browning; Barr, Peter; West, Maureen; Hopper, Neil W; White, Jennifer P; Badawi, Nadia

    2007-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the safety of transporting newborn infants with suspected duct dependent congenital heart disease (CHD) treated with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) without routine mechanical ventilation. Methods A retrospective population‐based audit of newborn infants with suspected CHD transported on PGE1 by the New South Wales newborn and paediatric Transport Service from 1995 through 2005. Results Mechanical ventilation was not used prior to treatment with PGE1 in 94 (31%) of the 300 infants. The indications for mechanical ventilation in the remaining 206 infants (69%) included elective mechanical ventilation because of the intention to use PGE1 (n  =  125) and severe hypoxaemia, acidosis or cardiorespiratory failure prior to commencing PGE1 (n  =  81). 16 (17%) of the 94 infants who were not ventilated initially required mechanical ventilation before transport because of apnoea, which developed within one hour of commencing PGE1. 2 (2.6%) of the 78 infants transported without mechanical ventilation developed apnoea in transit and both were receiving ⩾15 ng/kg/min of PGE1. Apnoea was more likely to occur in non‐ventilated infants when the PGE1 infusion rate was ⩾15 ng/kg/min compared with Newborn infants with suspected duct dependent CHD treated with low dose PGE1 (mechanical ventilation for safe transport. PMID:16905574

  2. Transporting newborn infants with suspected duct dependent congenital heart disease on low-dose prostaglandin E1 without routine mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning Carmo, Kathryn A; Barr, Peter; West, Maureen; Hopper, Neil W; White, Jennifer P; Badawi, Nadia

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the safety of transporting newborn infants with suspected duct dependent congenital heart disease (CHD) treated with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) without routine mechanical ventilation. A retrospective population-based audit of newborn infants with suspected CHD transported on PGE1 by the New South Wales newborn and paediatric Transport Service from 1995 through 2005. Mechanical ventilation was not used prior to treatment with PGE1 in 94 (31%) of the 300 infants. The indications for mechanical ventilation in the remaining 206 infants (69%) included elective mechanical ventilation because of the intention to use PGE1 (n = 125) and severe hypoxaemia, acidosis or cardiorespiratory failure prior to commencing PGE1 (n = 81). 16 (17%) of the 94 infants who were not ventilated initially required mechanical ventilation before transport because of apnoea, which developed within one hour of commencing PGE1. 2 (2.6%) of the 78 infants transported without mechanical ventilation developed apnoea in transit and both were receiving >or=15 ng/kg/min of PGE1. Apnoea was more likely to occur in non-ventilated infants when the PGE1 infusion rate was >or=15 ng/kg/min compared with Newborn infants with suspected duct dependent CHD treated with low dose PGE1 (mechanical ventilation for safe transport.

  3. Ethical dilemma: offering short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for terminally ill children who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Venkat; Costello, John P; Peer, Syed M; Klugman, Darren; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-04-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in terminally ill pediatric patients who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation requires careful deliberation. We present the case of a 16-year-old female with a relapse of acute lymphoid leukemia and acute-on-chronic cardiomyopathy who received short-term ECMO therapy. In addition, we highlight several ethical considerations that were crucial to this patient's family-centered care and demonstrate that this therapy can be accomplished in a manner that respects patient autonomy and family wishes.

  4. D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zheng, X; Long, Y; Wu, M; Chen, Y; Yang, J; Liu, Z; Zhang, Z

    2017-10-01

    Essentials Low anticoagulation intensity reduces bleeding but increases thrombosis during warfarin therapy. Elevated D-dimer level is associated with increased thrombosis events. D-dimer can be used to find potential thrombosis in those receiving low intensity therapy. D-dimer-guided therapy may be the optimal strategy for those with mechanical heart valve replacement. Background Controversies remain regarding the optimal anticoagulation intensity for Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement despite guidelines having recommended a standard anticoagulation intensity. Objectives To investigate whether D-dimer could be used to determine the optimal anticoagulation intensity in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement. Patients/Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled clinical study. A total of 748 patients following mechanical heart valve replacement in Wuhan Asia Heart Hospital were randomized to three groups at a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1. Patients in two control groups received warfarin therapy based on constant standard intensity (international normalized ratio [INR], 2.5-3.5; n = 250) and low intensity (INR, 1.8-2.6; n = 248), respectively. In the experimental group (n = 250), warfarin therapy was initiated at low intensity, then those with elevated D-dimer levels were adjusted to standard intensity. All patients were followed-up for 24 months until the occurrence of endpoints, including bleeding events, thrombotic events and all-cause mortality. Results A total of 718 patients were included in the analysis. Fifty-three events occurred during follow-up. There was less hemorrhage (3/240 vs. 16/241; hazard ratio [HR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.45) and all-cause mortality (4/240 vs. 12/241; HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.87) observed in the D-dimer-guided group than in the standard-intensity group. A lower incidence of thrombotic events was also observed in the D-dimer-guided group when compared with the

  5. Mechanical Circulatory Support for Advanced Heart Failure: Are We about to Witness a New “Gold Standard”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Capoccia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs for the treatment of advanced heart failure has played a significant role as a bridge to transplant and more recently as a long-term solution for non-eligible candidates. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs, based on axial and centrifugal design, are currently the most popular devices in view of their smaller size, increased reliability and higher durability compared to pulsatile flow left ventricular assist devices (PF-LVADs. The trend towards their use is increasing. Therefore, it has become mandatory to understand the physics and the mathematics behind their mode of operation for appropriate device selection and simulation set up. For this purpose, this review covers some of these aspects. Although very successful and technologically advanced, they have been associated with complications such as pump thrombosis, haemolysis, aortic regurgitation, gastro-intestinal bleeding and arterio-venous malformations. There is perception that the reduced arterial pulsatility may be responsible for these complications. A flow modulation control approach is currently being investigated in order to generate pulsatility in rotary blood pumps. Thrombus formation remains the most feared complication that can affect clinical outcome. The development of a preoperative strategy aimed at the reduction of complications and patient-device suitability may be appropriate. Patient-specific modelling based on 3D reconstruction from CT-scan combined with computational fluid dynamic studies is an attractive solution in order to identify potential areas of stagnation or challenging anatomy that could be addressed to achieve the desired outcome. The HeartMate II (axial and the HeartWare HVAD (centrifugal rotary blood pumps have been now used worldwide with proven outcome. The HeartMate III (centrifugal is now emerging as the new promising device with encouraging preliminary results. There are now

  6. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  7. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  8. Imidazoline receptors in the heart: a novel target and a novel mechanism of action that involves atrial natriuretic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaddam-Daher

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stimulation of sympathetic nervous activity contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension, leading to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, arrhythmias and cardiac death. Moxonidine, an imidazoline antihypertensive compound that preferentially activates imidazoline receptors in brainstem rostroventrolateral medulla, suppresses sympathetic activation and reverses LVH. We have identified imidazoline receptors in the heart atria and ventricles, and shown that atrial I1-receptors are up-regulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, and ventricular I1-receptors are up-regulated in hamster and human heart failure. Furthermore, cardiac I1-receptor binding decreased after chronic in vivo exposure to moxonidine. These studies implied that cardiac I1-receptors are involved in cardiovascular regulation. The presence of I1-receptors in the heart, the primary site of production of natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, cardiac hormones implicated in blood pressure control and cardioprotection, led us to propose that ANP may be involved in the actions of moxonidine. In fact, acute iv administration of moxonidine (50 to 150 µg/rat dose-dependently decreased blood pressure, stimulated diuresis and natriuresis and increased plasma ANP and its second messenger, cGMP. Chronic SHR treatment with moxonidine (0, 60 and 120 µg kg-1 h-1, sc for 4 weeks dose-dependently decreased blood pressure, resulted in reversal of LVH and decreased ventricular interleukin 1ß concentration after 4 weeks of treatment. These effects were associated with a further increase in already elevated ANP and BNP synthesis and release (after 1 week, and normalization by 4 weeks. In conclusion, cardiac imidazoline receptors and natriuretic peptides may be involved in the acute and chronic effects of moxonidine.

  9. Obesity and Natriuretic Peptides, BNP and NT-proBNP: Mechanisms and Diagnostic Implications for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Madamanchi, Chaitanya; Alhosaini, Hassan; Sumida, Arihiro; Runge, Marschall S.

    2014-01-01

    Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of heart failure (HF) in recent years. Cardiac biomarkers are an essential tool for clinicians: point of care B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) and its N-terminal counterpart (NT-proBNP) levels help distinguish cardiac from non-cardiac causes of dyspnea and are also useful in the prognosis and monitoring of the efficacy of therapy. One of the major limitations of HF biomarkers is in obese patients where the relationshi...

  10. A numerical analysis on the curved bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) : leaflet motion and blood flow in an elastic blood vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jin Seok; Kim, Chang Nyung; Choi, Choeng Ryul

    2005-01-01

    In blood flow passing through the Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) and elastic blood vessel, hemolysis and platelet activation causing thrombus formation can be seen owing to the shear stress in the blood. Also, fracture and deformation of leaflets can be observed depending on the shape and material properties of the leaflets which is opened and closed in a cycle. Hence, comprehensive study is needed on the hemodynamics which is associated with the motion of leaflet and elastic blood vessel in terms of fluid-structure interaction. In this paper, a numerical analysis has been performed for a three-dimensional pulsatile blood flow associated with the elastic blood vessel and curved bileaflet for multiple cycles in light of fluid-structure interaction. From this analysis fluttering phenomenon and rebound of the leaflet have been observed and recirculation and regurgitation have been found in the flow fields of the blood. Also, the pressure distribution and the radial displacement of the elastic blood vessel have been obtained. The motion of the leaflet and flow fields of the blood have shown similar tendency compared with the previous experiments carried out in other studies. The present study can contribute to the design methodology for the curved bileaflet mechanical heart valve. Furthermore, the proposed fluid-structure interaction method will be effectively used in various fields where the interaction between fluid flow and structure are involved

  11. Sheet-Like Remodeling of the Transverse Tubular System in Human Heart Failure Impairs Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Functional Recovery by Mechanical Unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Thomas; Navankasattusas, Sutip; Ahmad, Azmi; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Xu, Weining David; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Bonios, Michael J; Taleb, Iosif; Li, Dean Y; Selzman, Craig H; Drakos, Stavros G; Sachse, Frank B

    2017-04-25

    Cardiac recovery in response to mechanical unloading by left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has been demonstrated in subgroups of patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Hallmarks of HF are depletion and disorganization of the transverse tubular system (t-system) in cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated remodeling of the t-system in human end-stage HF and its role in cardiac recovery. Left ventricular biopsies were obtained from 5 donors and 26 patients with chronic HF undergoing implantation of LVADs. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy and computational image analysis were applied to assess t-system structure, density, and distance of ryanodine receptor clusters to the sarcolemma, including the t-system. Recovery of cardiac function in response to mechanical unloading was assessed by echocardiography during turndown of the LVAD. The majority of HF myocytes showed remarkable t-system remodeling, particularly sheet-like invaginations of the sarcolemma. Circularity of t-system components was decreased in HF versus controls (0.37±0.01 versus 0.46±0.02; P 1 µm did not improve after mechanical unloading. In addition, calcium transients were recorded in field-stimulated isolated human cardiomyocytes and analyzed with respect to local t-system density. Calcium release in HF myocytes was restricted to regions proximal to the sarcolemma. Local calcium upstroke was delayed (23.9±4.9 versus 10.3±1.7 milliseconds; P human HF presents a characteristic novel phenotype consisting of sheet-like invaginations of the sarcolemma. Our results suggest that the remodeled t-system impairs excitation-contraction coupling and functional recovery during chronic LVAD unloading. An intact t-system at the time of LVAD implantation may constitute a precondition and predictor for functional cardiac recovery after mechanical unloading. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. FIVE-YEAR EXPERIENCE IN PERIPHERAL VENOARTERIAL EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION AS A METHOD OF MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT IN POTENTIAL HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO is one of the most widely used methods of temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS during the preparation and performance of heart transplant surgery (HT [Barth E. et al., 2012; Kittleson M.M. et al., 2011].Aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using peripheral VA ECMO as a method of mechanical circulatory support in potential heart transplant recipients that urgently required transplantation.Materials and methods. The study included 125 potential heart transplant recipients (107 (86% men and 18 (14% women aged from 12 to 72 (43 ± 1.2 years with a peripheral VA ECMO system installed within the period from April 01, 2011 till August 12, 2016. The indication for the start of its use was rapidly progressing congestive heart failure (CHF of level 1 or 2 by the INTERMACS scale. Femoral blood vessel cannulation was performed using both open (surgical and closed (puncture methods. 23 and 25 F venous cannulae were utilized for femoral vein cannulation, and 15 and 17 F arterial cannulae were utilized for femoral artery cannulation. In all cases superfi cial femoral artery catheterization (14 F single-lumen catheter or cannulation (8 or 10 F arterial cannula was performed in the descending (anterograde direction for the prevention of lower limb ischemia on the side of the femoral artery cannulation.Results. The peripheral cannulation method was used to perform VA ECMO in 100% (n = 125 observations. In 69 (55.2% patients the severity of progressive CHF corresponded to INTERMACS level 1; in 51 (40.8% cases it corresponded to INTERMACS level 2. During VA ECMO the average volumetric extracorporeal circulation fl ow rate ranged from 2.2 to 4.5 (3.2 ± 0.4 l/min or 1.6 ± 0.2 l/min/m2 with the average rotation speed of the centrifugal pump of 3.216 ± 105 rpm. 113 (90.4% of 125 potential recipients underwent HT. The duration of VA ECMO prior to HT (n

  13. [Establishment pharmacological research platform for "Concurrent treatment of the brain and heart" and its application on dissecting mechanism of Danhong injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Yun-Ru; Li, Xue; Shao, Qing; Wang, Yi-Min; Zhao, Tao; Zhao, Chao; Zhao, Bu-Chang; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    The Concurrent treatment of the brain and heart (CTBH) theory is proposed based on traditional Chinese medical theory and clinical practice. In this study, a framework for the pharmacological research platform was established to investigate the principles of concurrent treatment of the brain and heart. The platform for CTBH includes several key techniques for network modeling, discovery of active substances, dissecting mechanism of action and investigation of pharmacokinetic property of TCM. Taking network modeling of CTBH as an example, using database search, literature mining, network construction and module analysis, the that network modules closely associated with the pathological progress of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were identified, while further functional enrichment analysis of these modules indicated that the key biological processes included oxidative stress, metabolism and inflammation. GSK3B, NOTCH1, CDK4 were identified as key nodes in these network modules. The above-mentioned platform was applied to construct component-biomolecules network of Danhong injection for the identification of common targets and pathways. Among them, GSK3B had the highest correlation with the composition of Danhong injection in the network, and the biological function of whose cluster was related to cell oxidative stress. Based upon results of network analysis, validation experiments suggested that Danhong injection significantly improved the survival rate of oxidative injured myocardial cells and nerve cells, and the protective effect was related to the increase of phosphorylated GSK3β protein expression. Moreover, extracts of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Carthami Flos exerted the synergisticcytoprotective effect. The results indicated that the mechanism of treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases of Danhong injection could be studied through network modeling and other methods. In summary, the proposed pharmacological

  14. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  15. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  16. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  17. TRPA1 mediates changes in heart rate variability and cardiac mechanical function in mice exposed to acrolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-term exposure to ambient air pollution is linked with adverse cardiovascular effects. While previous research focused primarily on particulate matter-induced responses, gaseous air pollutants also contribute to cause short-term cardiovascular effects. Mechanisms underlying ...

  18. Organized Mobility and Relational Turnover as Context for Social Mechanisms: A Dynamic Invariant at the Heart of Stability from Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Lazega, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    This chapter offers a neostructural perspective on how organized mobility and relational turnover (OMRT) constitute important dimensions of the social context in which social mechanisms are deployed. They determine many of the characteristics of those mechanisms. As an illustration, White [HC. Chains of opportunity: system models of mobility in organizations. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, (1970)] analysis of “mobility in loops” (p. 380) is combined with Snijders [TAB. “Models for l...

  19. Effects of Mechanical Ventilation on Heart Geometry and Mitral Valve Leaflet Coaptation During Percutaneous Edge-to-Edge Mitral Valve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Johannes; Zhang, Yingying; Seizer, Peter; Magunia, Harry; Henning, Andreas; Riemlova, Veronika; Patzelt, Tara A E; Hansen, Marc; Haap, Michael; Riessen, Reimer; Lausberg, Henning; Walker, Tobias; Reutershan, Joerg; Schlensak, Christian; Grasshoff, Christian; Simon, Dan I; Rosenberger, Peter; Schreieck, Juergen; Gawaz, Meinrad; Langer, Harald F

    2016-01-25

    This study sought to evaluate a ventilation maneuver to facilitate percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair (PMVR) and its effects on heart geometry. In patients with challenging anatomy, the application of PMVR is limited, potentially resulting in insufficient reduction of mitral regurgitation (MR) or clip detachment. Under general anesthesia, however, ventilation maneuvers can be used to facilitate PMVR. A total of 50 consecutive patients undergoing PMVR were included. During mechanical ventilation, different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) were applied, and parameters of heart geometry were assessed using transesophageal echocardiography. We found that increased PEEP results in elevated central venous pressure. Specifically, central venous pressure increased from 14.0 ± 6.5 mm Hg (PEEP 3 mm Hg) to 19.3 ± 5.9 mm Hg (PEEP 20 mm Hg; p 4.9 mm at PEEP of 10 mm Hg resulted in a significant reduction of PMVR procedure time (152 ± 49 min to 116 ± 26 min; p = 0.05). In this study, we describe a novel ventilation maneuver improving mitral valve coaptation length during the PMVR procedure, which facilitates clip positioning. Our observations could help to improve PMVR therapy and could make nonsurgical candidates accessible to PMVR therapy, particularly in challenging cases with functional MR. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Application of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves in the Polish Ventricular Assist Device: Physical and Numerical Study and First Clinical Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malota, Zbigniew; Sadowski, Wojciech; Krzyskow, Marek; Stolarzewicz, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    The Polish ventricular assist device (Polvad) has been used successfully in clinical contexts for many years. The device contains two single-disc valves, one at the inlet and one at the outlet connector of the pneumatic pump. Unfortunately, in recent years, a problem has occurred with the availability of single-disc valves. This article presents the possibility of using bileaflet mechanical heart valve prostheses in the Polvad to avoid a discontinuity in clinical use. The study is based on experimental and numerical simulations and comparison of the distribution of flow, pressure, and stress (wall, shear, and turbulent) inside the Polvad chamber and the inlet/outlet connectors fitted with Sorin Monodisc and Sorin Bicarbon Fitline valves. The type and orientation of the inlet valve affects valve performance and flow distribution inside the chamber. Near-wall flow is observed for single-disc valves. In the case of bileaflet valves, the main jet is directed more centrally, with lower shear stress but higher turbulent stress in comparison with single-disc valves. For clinical usage, a 45° orientation of the bileaflet inlet valve was chosen, as this achieves good washing of the inlet area near the membrane paste surface. The Polvad with bileaflet valves has now been used successfully in our clinic for over a year and will continue to be used until new assist devices for heart support are developed. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A new dynamic 3D virtual methodology for teaching the mechanics of atrial septation as seen in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Houyel, Lucile; Almange, Claude; Anderson, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Learning embryology remains difficult, since it requires understanding of many complex phenomena. The temporal evolution of developmental events has classically been illustrated using cartoons, which create difficulty in linking spatial and temporal aspects, such correlation being the keystone of descriptive embryology. We synthesized the bibliographic data from recent studies of atrial septal development. On the basis of this synthesis, consensus on the stages of atrial septation as seen in the human heart has been reached by a group of experts in cardiac embryology and pediatric cardiology. This has permitted the preparation of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphic objects for the anatomical components involved in the different stages of normal human atrial septation. We have provided a virtual guide to the process of normal atrial septation, the animation providing an appreciation of the temporal and morphologic events necessary to separate the systemic and pulmonary venous returns. We have shown that our animations of normal human atrial septation increase significantly the teaching of the complex developmental processes involved, and provide a new dynamic for the process of learning.

  2. Mechanical Ventricular Assistance as Destination Therapy for End-Stage Heart Failure: Has it become a first line therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eBonacchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage heart failure have poor quality of life and prognosis.Therapeutic options are scarce and not available for all:only few patients can be transplanted and several medical and surgical strategies have shown limited ability to influence prognosis and quality of life. In the past years, technological progress has realized devices capable of providing appropriate hemodynamic stabilization and recovery of secondary organ failure.In the recent years,these devices are assessed and discussed as definitive treatment for patients who do not qualify for transplantation or/and instead to transplantation (destination therapy.This indication is increasingly considered following the results of newest clinical study reporting long-term survival without device correlated adverse events using last generation devices, and acceptable quality of life.The current knowledge about Destination Therapy and some original data from the DAVID Study (an Italian multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the patient’s survival rate and quality of life of patients implanted with these new devices as long-term support or destination therapy are summarized.

  3. Fluctuation of Dynamic Diastolic Function Relative to Static Cardiac Structure - New Insights Into the Underlying Mechanism of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshida, Shiro; Shinoda, Yukinori; Ikeoka, Kuniyasu; Minamisaka, Tomoko; Fukuoka, Hidetada; Inui, Hirooki; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2017-04-25

    The mechanisms of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) need to be clarified immediately.Methods and Results:We examined diastolic function relative to arterial elasticity among hypertensive patients with preserved EF. Diastolic elastance (EdI)/effective arterial elastance (EaI), EdI/EaI=E/e'/(0.9×systolic blood pressure [SBP]) was significantly more impaired in women than in men among patients ≥75 years. The higher EdI/EaI value in elderly women implies they are intermittently exposed to higher left ventricular filling pressure relative to SBP during daily life. Highly fluctuating impairment of diastolic function relative to arterial elasticity may predispose elderly women to pulmonary edema.

  4. Pregnancy outcomes in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves: a prospective descriptive population based study using the United Kingdom Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, S; Clarke, B; Tower, C L; Hay, Crm; Knight, M

    2017-08-01

    To describe the incidence of mechanical prosthetic heart valves (MPHV) in pregnancy in the UK; rates of maternal and fetal complications in this group of women, and whether these vary with the anticoagulation used during pregnancy. Prospective descriptive population-based study. All consultant-led maternity units in the UK. All women with an MPHV who were pregnant between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2015. Collection and analysis of anonymous data relating to pregnancy management and outcome, using the UKOSS notification and data collection system. Maternal death, serious maternal morbidity, poor fetal outcome. Data were obtained for 58 women giving an estimated incidence of 3.7 (95% CI 2.7-4.7) per 100 000 maternities. There were five maternal deaths (9%); a further 24 (41%) suffered serious maternal morbidity. There was a poor fetal outcome from 26 (47%) pregnancies. Only 16 (28%) women had a good maternal and good fetal outcome. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was used throughout pregnancy by 71% of women. Of these, 83% required rapid dose escalation in the first trimester. Monitoring regimens lacked consistency. This study has estimated the incidence of MPHV in pregnant women in the UK. It includes the largest cohort managed with LMWH throughout pregnancy reported to date. It demonstrates a high rate of maternal death, and serious maternal and fetal morbidity. Women with MPHVs, and their clinicians need to appreciate the significant maternal and fetal risks involved in pregnancy. Care should be concentrated in specialist centres. High rates of poor maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Influence of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 Polymorphisms on Daily Acenocoumarol Dose Requirement in South Indian Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, S R; Bharath, G; Manjunath, C N; Christopher, Rita

    2017-10-01

    Chronic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients who undergo valve replacement with mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulation. Acenocoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist has a narrow therapeutic range and wide inter-individual variability. Our aim was to investigate the influence of polymorphisms of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genes on the mean daily dose requirement of acenocoumarol. 205 chronic RHD patients, with mechanical heart valves and on acenocoumarol therapy, were recruited. Genotyping for VKORC1 (-1639G>A and 1173C>T) and CYP2C9 (*2 & *3 alleles) polymorphisms was done by PCR-RFLP. There was complete linkage disequilibrium between VKORC1 polymorphisms (r 2 = 0.98, D' = 1.0, LOD = 74.02). VKORC1 genotype distribution for GG/CC, GA/CT, and AA/TT were 57.6%, 36.1%, and 6.3%, respectively. CYP2C9 genotype distribution for *1/*1, *1/*3, *1/*2, *2/*2, and *2/*3 were 78.5%, 14.1%, 6.3%, 0.5%, and 0.5%, respectively. Patients with a wild type of both VKORC1 (-1639GG and 1173CC) and CYP2C9 gene variants required higher acenocoumarol dose compared to those with mutant genotype ( P = 0.023 and P = 0.008 respectively). On combined genotype analysis, patients having a combination of wild type of VKORC1 with wild type of CYP2C9 (44.4%) required higher daily dose compared to patients bearing heterozygous VKORC1 (-1639GA & 1173CT) with wild type of CYP2C9 (30.2%, P = 0.008). Presence of a mutant allele of VKORC1 (-1639A & 1173T) and CYP2C9 genes increased the odds of requiring a lower mean dosage of acenocoumarol. Studying the combination of genotypes in RHD patients could predict acenocoumarol dose requirement more accurately.

  6. Effect of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation on functional capacity after heart valve replacement: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaro Afrânio de Araújo-Filho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: During cardiac surgery, several factors contribute to the development of postoperative pulmonary complications. Non-invasive ventilation is a promising therapeutic tool for improving the functionality of this type of patient. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional capacity and length of stay of patients in a nosocomial intensive care unit who underwent prophylactic non-invasive ventilation after heart valve replacement. METHOD: The study was a controlled clinical trial, comprising 50 individuals of both sexes who were allocated by randomization into two groups with 25 patients in each group: the control group and experimental group. After surgery, the patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and then participated in standard physical therapy, which was provided to the experimental group after 3 applications of non-invasive ventilation within the first 26 hours after extubation. For non-invasive ventilation, the positive pressure was 10 cm H2O, with a duration of 1 hour. The evaluation was performed on the 7th postoperative day/discharge and included a 6-minute walk test. The intensive care unit and hospitalization times were monitored in both groups. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (REBeC: RBR number 8bxdd3. RESULTS: Analysis of the 6-minute walk test showed that the control group walked an average distance of 264.34±76 meters and the experimental group walked an average distance of 334.07±71 meters (p=0.002. The intensive care unit and hospitalization times did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSION: Non-invasive ventilation as a therapeutic resource was effective toward improving functionality; however, non-invasive ventilation did not influence the intensive care unit or hospitalization times of the studied cardiac patients.

  7. Combined heart-kidney transplantation after total artificial heart insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; Ihnken, K A; Sasevich, M; Trento, A; Ramzy, D; Esmailian, F; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Arabia, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first single-center report of 2 consecutive cases of combined heart and kidney transplantation after insertion of a total artificial heart (TAH). Both patients had advanced heart failure and developed dialysis-dependent renal failure after implantation of the TAH. The 2 patients underwent successful heart and kidney transplantation, with restoration of normal heart and kidney function. On the basis of this limited experience, we consider TAH a safe and feasible option for bridging carefully selected patients with heart and kidney failure to combined heart and kidney transplantation. Recent FDA approval of the Freedom driver may allow outpatient management at substantial cost savings. The TAH, by virtue of its capability of providing pulsatile flow at 6 to 10 L/min, may be the mechanical circulatory support device most likely to recover patients with marginal renal function and advanced heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Aqueous Calyx Extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa Lowers Blood Pressure and Heart Rate via Sympathetic Nervous System Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, B; Oyeniyi, Y J; Mojiminiyi, F B O; Isezuo, S A; Alada, A R A

    2014-12-29

    The antihypertensive effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) has been validated in animals and man. This study tested the hypothesis that its hypotensive effect may be sympathetically mediated. The cold pressor test (CPT) and handgrip exercise (HGE) were performed in 20 healthy subjects before and after the oral administration of 15mg/Kg HS. The blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses were measured digitally. Mean arterial pressure (MAP; taken as representative BP) was calculated. Results are expressed as mean ±SEM. P<0.05 was considered significant. CPT without HS resulted in a significant rise in MAP and HR (111.1±2.1mmHg and 100.8±2.0/min) from the basal values (97.9±1.9mmHg and 87.8±2.1/min; P<0.0001 respectively). In the presence of HS, CPT-induced changes (ΔMAP=10.1±1.7mmHg; ΔHR= 8.4±1.0/min) were significantly reduced compared to its absence (ΔMAP= 13.2±1.2mmHg; ΔHR= 13.8±1.6/min; P<0.0001 respectively). The HGE done without HS also resulted in an increase in MAP and HR (116.3±2.1mmHg and 78.4±1.2/min) from the basal values (94.8±1.6mmHg and 76.1±1.0/min; p<0.0001 respectively). In the presence of HS the HGE-induced changes (ΔMAP= 11.5±1.0mmHg; ΔHR= 3.3±1.0/min) were significantly decreased compared to its absence (ΔMAP=21.4±1.2mmHg; ΔHR= 12.8±2.0/min; P<0.0001 respectively). The CPT and HGE -induced increases in BP and HR suggest Sympathetic nervous system activation. These increases were significantly dampened by HS suggesting, indirectly, that its hypotensive effect may be due to an attenuation of the discharge of the sympathetic nervous system.

  9. Current Management of Congestive Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Druck, Maurice N.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and outlines treatment based on the mechanism and hemodynamics of heart failure. He discusses vasodilator therapy, ACE inhibitors in heart failure, and initiation of treatment. The paper concludes with a short discussion of methods of treating refractory heart failure.

  10. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  11. Pulmonary venous hypertension and mechanical strain stimulate monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release and structural remodelling of the lung in human and rodent chronic heart failure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, John E S; Lyon, Alexander R; Shao, Dongmin; Hector, Lauren R; Xu, Hua; O'Gara, Peter; Pinhu, Liao; Chambers, Rachel C; Wort, S John; Griffiths, Mark J D

    2014-12-01

    The burden of chronic heart failure (HF) is rising owing to an increased survivorship after myocardial infarction (MI). Pulmonary structural remodelling in patients with HF may protect against oedema while causing dyspnoea, the predominant symptom associated with HF. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in HF are poorly understood. We hypothesised that pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) following MI provides a mechanical stimulus for structural remodelling of the lung via monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) and Ea.Hy 926 cells exposed to cyclic mechanical strain (CMS) in vitro were analysed for MCP-1 expression and activation of signalling intermediates. HF was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats 16 weeks after MI; a cohort was rescued with AAV9.SERCA2a gene therapy to reduce PVH. HLMVEC and Ea.Hy 926 cells exposed to CMS upregulated MCP-1 gene expression and protein release in an extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 dependent manner. Supernatants from these experiments stimulated fibroblast (human fetal lung fibroblast -1) and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Total lung collagen, a marker of structural remodelling, and MCP-1 gene expression were increased in the lungs of rats with post-MI HF. SERCA2a gene therapy that attenuated PVH after MI was associated with lower levels of lung collagen and MCP-1 gene expression in the lung. Mechanical strain associated with PVH may stimulate pulmonary structural remodelling through ERK 1/2 dependent induction of MCP-1. These findings provide insights into the pathophysiology of lung remodelling in HF and highlight novel, potential therapeutic targets. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part in support groups for people with heart disease . Outlook (Prognosis) After a heart attack, you have a higher ... P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  13. Anticoagulation for the Pregnant Patient with a Mechanical Heart Valve, No Perfect Therapy: Review of Guidelines for Anticoagulation in the Pregnant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Richardson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart valve replacement with a mechanical valve requires lifelong anticoagulation. Guidelines currently recommend using a vitamin K antagonist (VKA such as warfarin. Given the teratogenic effects of VKAs, it is often favorable to switch to heparin-derived therapies in pregnant patients since they do not cross the placenta. However, these therapies are known to be less effective anticoagulants subjecting the pregnant patient to a higher chance of a thrombotic event. Guidelines currently recommend pregnant women requiring more than 5 mg a day of warfarin be switched to alternative therapy during the first trimester. This case report highlights a patient who was switched to alternative therapy during her first pregnancy and suffered a devastating cerebrovascular accident (CVA. Further complicating her situation was during a subsequent pregnancy; this patient continued warfarin use during the first trimester and experienced multiple transient ischemic attacks (TIAs. This case highlights the increased risk of thrombotic events in pregnant patients with mechanical valves. It also highlights the difficulty of providing appropriate anticoagulation for the pregnant patient who has experienced thrombotic events on multiple anticoagulants.

  14. Echocardiographic evaluation and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide measurement of patients hospitalized for heart failure during weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaud, E; Erickson, M; Grenouillet-Delacre, M; Beauvieux, M-C; Coste, P; Durrieu-Jaïs, C; Hilbert, G; Castaing, Y; Vargas, F

    2012-04-01

    Weaning patients with heart failure who have required mechanical ventilation remains challenging. We evaluated echocardiographic indexes and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as markers of acute cardiac dysfunction before and after spontaneous breathing trials (SBT) in such patients to assess their ability to predict subsequent successful extubation. Forty-four patients who underwent their first SBT were prospectively included. Plasma levels of NT-proBNP and transthoracic echocardiography indices including cardiac index, E/A ratio and E/Ea ratio were recorded immediately before commencing and just before the end of SBT. Ten patients (22.7%) failed their SBT. No significant difference was observed concerning baseline echocardiographic data and NT-proBNP level between the patients who succeeded the SBT or those that failed. Cardiac index increased significantly at end-SBT in patients who passed (3.3 [3.06-3.77] vs. 3 [2.68-3.3] L/min/m(2), Pfailed. E/Ea ratio (16.8 [8.5-27.3] vs. 10.7 [6.7-20.5], P=0.006) and NT-proBNP level (8199 [3106-10949] vs. 4200 [1855-7125] pg/mL, P=0.004) increased significantly in those who failed the SBT, in contrast to the weaning success group where they remained unchanged. Neither NT-proBNP level nor the studied echocardiographic indices before SBT were able to predict SBT outcome in patients presenting with severe heart failure. Failure to increase the cardiac index and increases in both E/Ea ratio and NT-proBNP levels were seen at end-SBT in patients who failed the SBT, and may reflect failure of myocardial reserve to cope with the stress of SBT.

  15. Should the automatic exposure control system of CT be disabled when scanning patients with endoaortic stents or mechanical heart valves? A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Spadavecchia, Chiara; Zanardo, Moreno; Secchi, Francesco; Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To estimate the impact of endoaortic stents/mechanical heart valves on the output of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system and CT radiation dose. In this phantom study, seven stents and two valves were scanned with varying tube voltage (80/100/120 kVp), AEC activation (enabled/disabled) and prosthesis (present/absent), for a total of 540 scans. For each prosthesis, the dose-length product (DLP) was compared between scans with the AEC enabled and disabled. Percentage confidence levels for differences due to the prosthesis were calculated. Differences between results with the AEC enabled and disabled were not statistically significant (p ≥ 0.059). In the comparison with and without the prosthesis, DLP was unchanged at 80 kVp and 100 kVp, while a slight increase was observed at 120 kVp. The radiation dose varied from 1.8 mGy to 2.4 mGy without the prosthesis and from 1.8 mGy to 2.5 mGy with the prosthesis (confidence level 37-100%). The effect of the prosthesis on the AEC system was negligible and not clinically relevant. Therefore, disabling the AEC system when scanning these patients is not likely to provide a benefit. • CT-AEC system is not impaired in patients with endoaortic prostheses/heart valves. • Negligible differences may be observed only at 120 kVp. • Disabling the AEC system in these patients is not recommended.

  16. Induction of autophagy markers is associated with attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic heart failure patients undergoing mechanical unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Duryee, Michael J; Shahshahan, Hamid R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R; Mishra, Paras K

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is ubiquitous in all forms of heart failure and cardioprotective miR-133a is attenuated in human heart failure. Previous reports from heart failure patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation demonstrated that autophagy is upregulated in the LV of the failing human heart. Studies in the murine model show that diabetes downregulates miR-133a. However, the role of miR-133a in the regulation of autophagy in diabetic hearts is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes exacerbates cardiac autophagy by inhibiting miR-133a in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. The miRNA assay was performed on the LV of 15 diabetic (D) and 6 non-diabetic (ND) heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. Four ND with highly upregulated and 5 D with highly downregulated miR-133a were analyzed for autophagy markers (Beclin1, LC3B, ATG3) and their upstream regulators (mTOR and AMPK), and hypertrophy marker (beta-myosin heavy chain) by RT-qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our results demonstrate that attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic hearts is associated with the induction of autophagy and hypertrophy, and suppression of mTOR without appreciable difference in AMPK activity. In conclusion, attenuation of miR-133a contributes to the exacerbation of diabetes mediated cardiac autophagy and hypertrophy in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation.

  17. Should the automatic exposure control system of CT be disabled when scanning patients with endoaortic stents or mechanical heart valves? A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Zanardo, Moreno; Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Spadavecchia, Chiara [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Cantone, Marie Claire [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Milano (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Science for Health, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    To estimate the impact of endoaortic stents/mechanical heart valves on the output of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system and CT radiation dose. In this phantom study, seven stents and two valves were scanned with varying tube voltage (80/100/120 kVp), AEC activation (enabled/disabled) and prosthesis (present/absent), for a total of 540 scans. For each prosthesis, the dose-length product (DLP) was compared between scans with the AEC enabled and disabled. Percentage confidence levels for differences due to the prosthesis were calculated. Differences between results with the AEC enabled and disabled were not statistically significant (p ≥ 0.059). In the comparison with and without the prosthesis, DLP was unchanged at 80 kVp and 100 kVp, while a slight increase was observed at 120 kVp. The radiation dose varied from 1.8 mGy to 2.4 mGy without the prosthesis and from 1.8 mGy to 2.5 mGy with the prosthesis (confidence level 37-100%). The effect of the prosthesis on the AEC system was negligible and not clinically relevant. Therefore, disabling the AEC system when scanning these patients is not likely to provide a benefit. (orig.)

  18. Should the automatic exposure control system of CT be disabled when scanning patients with endoaortic stents or mechanical heart valves? A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Zanardo, Moreno; Secchi, Francesco; Spadavecchia, Chiara; Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the impact of endoaortic stents/mechanical heart valves on the output of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system and CT radiation dose. In this phantom study, seven stents and two valves were scanned with varying tube voltage (80/100/120 kVp), AEC activation (enabled/disabled) and prosthesis (present/absent), for a total of 540 scans. For each prosthesis, the dose-length product (DLP) was compared between scans with the AEC enabled and disabled. Percentage confidence levels for differences due to the prosthesis were calculated. Differences between results with the AEC enabled and disabled were not statistically significant (p ≥ 0.059). In the comparison with and without the prosthesis, DLP was unchanged at 80 kVp and 100 kVp, while a slight increase was observed at 120 kVp. The radiation dose varied from 1.8 mGy to 2.4 mGy without the prosthesis and from 1.8 mGy to 2.5 mGy with the prosthesis (confidence level 37-100%). The effect of the prosthesis on the AEC system was negligible and not clinically relevant. Therefore, disabling the AEC system when scanning these patients is not likely to provide a benefit. (orig.)

  19. Thromboembolism in pregnancy: challenges and controversies in the prevention of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism and management of anticoagulation in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Thromboembolism in pregnancy is an important clinical issue. Despite identification of maternal and pregnancy-specific risk factors for development of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism, limited data are available to inform on optimal approaches for prevention. The relatively low overall prevalence of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism has prompted debate about the validity of recommendations, which are mainly based on expert opinion, and have resulted in an increased use of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy and postpartum. A pragmatic approach is required in the absence of more robust data. Anticoagulation management of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves is particularly challenging. Continuation of therapeutic anticoagulation during pregnancy is essential to prevent valve thrombosis. Warfarin, the most effective anticoagulant, is associated with adverse fetal outcomes, including embryopathy and stillbirth. Fetal outcome is improved with therapeutic-dose low-molecular-weight heparin, but there may be more thromboembolic complications. More intensive anticoagulation, targeting higher trough anti-Xa levels, may reduce the risk of valve thrombosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scale-up of an unsteady flow field for enhanced spatial and temporal resolution of PIV measurements: application to leaflet wake flow in a mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofiore, Alessandro; Donohue, Eilis M.; Quinlan, Nathan J.

    2011-07-01

    A scale-up approach is developed to enhance effective spatial and temporal resolution of PIV measurements. An analysis shows that complete similarity can be maintained for certain unsteady flows and that all types of error in PIV are either reduced or unaffected by scale-up. Implementation and results are described for flow through a mechanical heart valve (MHV), in which high resolution is necessary to advance understanding of the effects of small-scale flow structure on blood cells. With a large-scale model geometry and a low-viscosity model fluid, spatial and temporal resolutions are increased by factors of 5.8 and 118, respectively, yielding the finest resolution to date for MHV flow. Measurements near the downstream tip of a valve leaflet detect eddies as small as 400 μm shed in the leaflet wake. Impulsively started flow exhibits vortex shedding frequencies broadly consistent with the literature on flat-plate and aerofoil wakes, while the physiological unsteady flow waveform promotes 40% higher frequency at peak flow.

  1. The Relationship Between Coronary Heart Disease (CHD and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD: Key Mechanisms and the Role of Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne O’Neil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Various trials have been conducted evaluating depression management programs for patients with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. However, to date, the most effective way to manage this co-morbidity in the real world setting remains unclear. To better understand the past successes and failures of previous trials and subsequently develop suitable interventions that target key components of health related quality of life (HRQOL such as mental, physical and vocational functioning, we first need to understand the mechanisms underpinning the relationship between the two conditions. This paper will draw on the key literature in this field as identified by psychiatric, medical and social sciences databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, OVID, Medline available up to January 2012, with the aim to conduct a narrative review which explores: the aetiological relationship between depression and CHD; its association with HRQOL; the relationship between CHD, depression and vocational functioning; and the impact of depression treatment on these outcomes. Key recommendations are made regarding the management of this prevalent co-morbidity in clinical settings.

  2. The heart and the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Krag, Aleksander

    2009-01-01

    to secure perfusion of vital organs. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, physical and/or pharmacological stress may reveal a reduced cardiac performance with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysical abnormalities, termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Pathophysiological mechanisms include reduced......Cardiac failure affects the liver and liver dysfunction affects the heart. Chronic and acute heart failure can lead to cardiac cirrhosis and cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis. These conditions may impair liver function and treatment should be directed towards the primary heart disease and seek...

  3. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital for 7 to 21 days after a heart transplant. The first 24 to 48 hours will likely be in ... follow your self-care instructions. Biopsies of the heart muscle are ... after transplant, and then less often after that. This helps ...

  4. Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinematics analysis method of a novel 3-DOF wind tunnel mechanism based on cable-driven parallel mechanism is provided. Rodrigues' parameters are applied to express the transformation matrix of the wire-driven mechanism in the paper. The analytical forward kinematics model is described as three quadratic equations using three Rodridgues' parameters based on the fundamental theory of parallel mechanism. Elimination method is used to remove two of the variables, so that an eighth-order polynomial with one variable is derived. From the equation, the eight sets of Rodridgues' parameters and corresponding Euler angles for the forward kinematical problem can be obtained. In the end, numerical example of both forward and inverse kinematics is included to demonstrate the presented forward-kinematics solution method. The numerical results show that the method for the position analysis of this mechanism is effective.

  5. Do neonatal mouse hearts regenerate following heart apex resection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Ganesalingam, Suganya; Jensen, Charlotte Harken

    2014-01-01

    strains and found no evidence of complete regeneration. Ideally, new functional cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells should be formed in the necrotic area of the damaged heart. Here, damaged hearts were 9.8% shorter and weighed 14% less than sham controls. In addition......, the resection border contained a massive fibrotic scar mainly composed of nonmyocytes and collagen disposition. Furthermore, there was a substantial reduction in the number of proliferating cardiomyocytes in AR hearts. Our results thus question the usefulness of the AR model for identifying molecular mechanisms...... underlying regeneration of the adult heart after damage....

  6. Optimal elastomeric scaffold leaflet shape for pulmonary heart valve leaflet replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M; Wagner, William R; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-22

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological...

  8. Timing of vitamin K antagonist re-initiation following intracranial hemorrhage in mechanical heart valves: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKherayf, Fahad; Xu, Yan; Gandara, Esteban; Westwick, Harrison; Moldovan, Ioana Doina; Wells, Philip S

    2016-08-01

    While evidence supports resumption of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among mechanical heart valve (MHV) patients presenting with anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), ideal timing of resumption is uncertain. To determine the optimal timing of VKA re-initiation and its associated clinical outcomes. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies published from January 1950 to August 2015. We extracted data on the location of initial ICH, use of cranial surgery, presence of atrial fibrillation, MHV type and position, number of MHVs, and timing of VKA resumption. Outcomes including valve thrombosis, thromboembolic events or ICH recurrence were recorded. Meta-regression analysis was conducting with controlling for covariates. We calculated absolute risks, and assessed the effect of anticoagulant resumption timing on ICH recurrence. 23 case-series and case-reports were identified. Overall ICH recurrence was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-25%), while valve thrombosis and ischemic strokes occurred at 7% (95% CI, 3%-17%) and 12% (95% CI, 5%-23%) respectively. A trend towards lower ICH recurrence was observed with delayed VKA resumption (slope estimate -0.2154, p=0.10). Recurrence rate ranged from 50% with VKA resumption at 3days to 0% with resumption at 16days. Among patients with MHV, there is inadequate data to suggest an optimal timing of VKA re-initiation following an ICH, though delayed restart appears to be protective against recurrence but is associated with higher risk of thrombosis. Our analysis suggests 4-7days might be an ideal time with least risk of thrombosis or ICH recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing in Patients with Mechanical Heart Valve Replacement Under the Fee-for-Service System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Jin; Kim, Ho-Sook; Oh, Minkyung; Kim, Eun-Young; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2017-10-01

    Although studies assessing the cost effectiveness of genotype-guided warfarin dosing for the management of atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have been reported, no publications have addressed genotype-guided warfarin therapy in mechanical heart valve replacement (MHVR) patients or genotype-guided warfarin therapy under the fee-for-service (FFS) insurance system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of genotype-guided warfarin dosing in patients with MHVR under the FFS system from the Korea healthcare sector perspective. A decision-analytic Markov model was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of genotype-guided warfarin dosing compared with standard dosing. Estimates of clinical adverse event rates and health state utilities were derived from the published literature. The outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the range of plausible results. In a base-case analysis, genotype-guided warfarin dosing was associated with marginally higher QALYs than standard warfarin dosing (6.088 vs. 6.083, respectively), at a slightly higher cost (US$6.8) (year 2016 values). The ICER was US$1356.2 per QALY gained. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there was an 82.7% probability that genotype-guided dosing was dominant compared with standard dosing, and a 99.8% probability that it was cost effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of US$50,000 per QALY gained. Compared with only standard warfarin therapy, genotype-guided warfarin dosing was cost effective in MHVR patients under the FFS insurance system.

  10. VKORC1-1639G>A, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G genotype, body weight, and age are important predictors for warfarin maintenance doses in patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qiang; Kong, Yan; Schneede, Jörn; Xiao, Ying-Bin; Chen, Lin; Zhong, Qian-Jin; Wang, Xue-Feng; Hao, Jia; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Jing-Jin

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the contribution of genetic polymorphisms of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 gene VKORC1-1639G>A, cytochrome P450 2C9 gene (CYP2C9), EPHXI, and clinical factors to warfarin sensitivity in southwest Chinese Han patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. A total of 127 patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses who have been followed up at our department during the past 23 years were enrolled in this study and compared to a control group that consisted of 133 randomly selected healthy blood donors. These Chinese patients met stable warfarin dosage requirements and had reached the target international normalized ratio (INR) of 1.5-2.0. PCR and direct sequencing were carried out to identify the polymorphisms of VKORC1-1639G>A (rs9923231), CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910), CYP2C9 IVS3-65G>C (rs9332127), and EPHX1691A>G (rs4653436). In addition, total and free (non-protein-bound) warfarin concentrations were analyzed. There were great interindividual differences in warfarin maintenance dosage (ranging from 0.6 to 8.4 mg/day) among the 127 patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. VKORC1-1639G>A, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G polymorphism, body weight, and age were found to affect the dose demands. Multiple linear regression models incorporating genetic polymorphisms of VKORC1, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G, and the nongenetic factors of age and body weight were developed, and explained up to 76.8% of the total variation (adjusted R (2) of 0.743) in warfarin maintenance doses in southwest Chinese patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses.

  11. False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was

  12. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  13. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not be able to receive contrast) Recently placed artificial joints Certain types of vascular stents Worked with ...

  14. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Fatigue Heart attack Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... graph show each step of an electrical signal's journey through the heart. EKG The image shows the ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  16. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stories that unite us in a shared journey toward better heart health. Hear from our new ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  17. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  18. About Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Heart Attacks Updated:Jan 11,2018 A heart attack is ... coronary artery damage leads to a heart attack . Heart Attack Questions and Answers What is a heart attack? ...

  19. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:May 8,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  20. Cardiac mechanics and ventricular twist by three-dimensional strain analysis in relation to B-type natriuretic peptide as a clinical prognosticator for heart failure patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dimensional (3D echocardiography-derived measurements of myocardial deformation and twist have recently advanced as novel clinical tools. However, with the exception of left ventricular ejection fraction and mass quantifications in hypertension and heart failure populations, the prognostic value of such imaging techniques remains largely unexplored. METHODS: We studied 200 subjects (mean age: 60.2±16 years, 54% female, female n = 107 with known hypertension (n = 51, diastolic heart failure (n = 61, or systolic heart failure (n = 30, recruited from heart failure outpatient clinics. Fifty-eight healthy volunteers were used as a control group. All participants underwent 3D-based myocardial deformation and twist analysis (Artida, Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan. We further investigated associations between these measures and brain natriuretic peptide levels and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The global 3D strain measurements of the healthy, hypertension, diastolic heart failure, and systolic heart failure groups were 28.03%, 24.43%, 19.70%, and 11.95%, respectively (all p<0.001. Global twist measurements were estimated to be 9.49°, 9.77°, 8.32°, and 4.56°, respectively. We observed significant differences regarding 3D-derived longitudinal, radial, and global 3D strains between the different disease categories (p<0.05, even when age, gender, BMI and heart rate were matched. In addition, 3D-derived longitudinal, circumferential, and 3D strains were all highly correlated with brain natriuretic peptide levels (p<0.001. At a mean 567.7 days follow-up (25th-75th IQR: 197-909 days, poorer 3D-derived longitudinal, radial, and global 3D strain measurements remained independently associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular related death or hospitalization due to heart failure, after adjusting for age, gender, and left ventricular ejection fraction (all p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: 3D-based strain analysis may be a

  1. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  2. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth ...

  3. Experience with left ventricular assist device usage in the treatment of end-stage heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Todurov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure potentially developing in most of heart diseases is a progressive process associated with high morbidity and mortality. Almost 3/4 of patients die within five years after first hospitalization because of heart failure. The main treatment for patients with terminal heart failure is heart transplantation. Left ventricular assist device is a main alternative to heart transplantation. We present case of long-term mechanical support applied in patients with heart failure class IV NYHA, refractory to medical therapy. Long-term implantation of mechanical heart support system may serve as an effective bridge to heart transplantation in patients with advanced congestive heart failure.

  4. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Heart attack ...

  6. Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may need to have a pacemaker. Rarely, the tricuspid valve can become damaged by the endomyocardial biopsy procedure; if that happens it will need to be repaired or replaced. Patients with congenital heart disease who have had a coarctation repair or problems ...

  7. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  8. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) and Allison ...

  9. Study of Regulatory Mechanisms of Activity of Cardiovascular System by Method of Mathematical Analysis of Heart Rhythm in Workers of Chemical Manufactures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachkova, T. V.; Berseneva, I. A.; Zavaltseva, O. A.; Mishina, O. S.

    2018-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study of heart rate variability indices of workers engaged in the production of phenol-formaldehyde plastics and plastics at the «Karbodin» plant. 112 people aged from 20 to 50 years were studied: control group-workers with experience up to 1 year, practically healthy (n = 30), 1 group-workers with work experience up to 5 years (n = 40), 2 group workers with work experience from 5 to 10 years (n = 42). As a result of the study, violations of the functioning of the heart regulation system were revealed, depending on the length of employment. The effectiveness of the method for studying the regulation of the physiological functions of the circulatory system as well as the early diagnosis of occupational pathology has been established.

  10. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  11. Physiologic Changes in the Heart Following Cessation of Mechanical Ventilation in a Porcine Model of Donation After Circulatory Death: Implications for Cardiac Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C W; Lillico, R; Sandha, J; Hasanally, D; Wang, F; Ambrose, E; Müller, A; Rachid, O; Li, Y; Xiang, B; Le, H; Messer, S; Ali, A; Large, S R; Lee, T W; Dixon, I M C; Lakowski, T M; Simons, K; Arora, R C; Tian, G; Nagendran, J; Hryshko, L V; Freed, D H

    2016-03-01

    Hearts donated following circulatory death (DCD) may represent an additional source of organs for transplantation; however, the impact of donor extubation on the DCD heart has not been well characterized. We sought to describe the physiologic changes that occur following withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy (WLST) in a porcine model of DCD. Physiologic changes were monitored continuously for 20 min following WLST. Ventricular pressure, volume, and function were recorded using a conductance catheter placed into the right (N = 8) and left (N = 8) ventricles, and using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, N = 3). Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction occurred following WLST, and was associated with distension of the right ventricle (RV) and reduced cardiac output. A 120-fold increase in epinephrine was subsequently observed that produced a transient hyperdynamic phase; however, progressive RV distension developed during this time. Circulatory arrest occurred 7.6±0.3 min following WLST, at which time MRI demonstrated an 18±7% increase in RV volume and a 12±9% decrease in left ventricular volume compared to baseline. We conclude that hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and a profound catecholamine surge occur following WLST that result in distension of the RV. These changes have important implications on the resuscitation, preservation, and evaluation of DCD hearts prior to transplantation. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Clinical trial design and rationale of the Multicenter Study of MagLev Technology in Patients Undergoing Mechanical Circulatory Support Therapy With HeartMate 3 (MOMENTUM 3) investigational device exemption clinical study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatley, Gerald; Sood, Poornima; Goldstein, Daniel; Uriel, Nir; Cleveland, Joseph; Middlebrook, Don; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2016-04-01

    The HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist system (LVAS; St. Jude Medical, Inc., formerly Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) was recently introduced into clinical trials for durable circulatory support in patients with medically refractory advanced-stage heart failure. This centrifugal, fully magnetically levitated, continuous-flow pump is engineered with the intent to enhance hemocompatibility and reduce shear stress on blood elements, while also possessing intrinsic pulsatility. Although bridge-to-transplant (BTT) and destination therapy (DT) are established dichotomous indications for durable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, clinical practice has challenged the appropriateness of these designations. The introduction of novel LVAD technology allows for the development of clinical trial designs to keep pace with current practices. The prospective, randomized Multicenter Study of MagLev Technology in Patients Undergoing Mechanical Circulatory Support Therapy With HeartMate 3 (MOMENTUM 3) clinical trial aims to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the HeartMate 3 LVAS by demonstrating non-inferiority to the HeartMate II LVAS (also St. Jude Medical, Inc.). The innovative trial design includes patients enrolled under a single inclusion and exclusion criteria , regardless of the intended use of the device, with outcomes ascertained in the short term (ST, at 6 months) and long term (LT, at 2 years). This adaptive trial design includes a pre-specified safety phase (n = 30) analysis. The ST cohort includes the first 294 patients and the LT cohort includes the first 366 patients for evaluation of the composite primary end-point of survival to transplant, recovery or LVAD support free of debilitating stroke (modified Rankin score >3), or re-operation to replace the pump. As part of the adaptive design, an analysis by an independent statistician will determine whether sample size adjustment is required at pre-specified times during the study. A further 662

  13. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Agustina Creus; María R. Ferreira; María E. Oliva; Yolanda B. Lombardo

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in ?-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SR...

  14. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle becomes ...

  15. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which could relieve angina. Heart Valve Repair or Replacement For the heart to work well, blood must ... have blood flowing through it. Heart-Lung Bypass Machine The image shows how a heart-lung bypass ...

  16. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  17. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  18. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-08-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through 'reawakening' pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure.

  19. Ventricular assist device in univentricular heart physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Gianluca; Gandolfo, Fabrizio; Carotti, Adriano; Amodeo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The use of mechanical cardiac assistance is well established as a bridge to orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) or to recovery for patients with congestive heart failure, however, the experience in single ventricle (SV) physiology is still limited. We report two cases of mechanical assistance in patients with SV physiology: a 2-year old male with hypoplastic left heart syndrome who underwent Norwood Stage I and II followed by HF and a 4-year old female with a univentricular heart who developed a severe right ventricular dysfunction 2 years after a cavopulmonary shunt. Mechanical support utilizing ventricular assist devices (VADs) is considered a valid tool to bridge patients with congestive heart failure to either OHT or to recovery. Increasing experience and improved outcomes utilizing this technology in children with biventricular hearts have led to considering employing these devices in failing SV treatment. We present 2 cases of terminally ill children with SV who were assisted with a VAD.

  20. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Biological heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubotaru, Anatol; Cebotari, Serghei; Tudorache, Igor; Beckmann, Erik; Hilfiker, Andres; Haverich, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac valvular pathologies are often caused by rheumatic fever in young adults, atherosclerosis in elderly patients, or by congenital malformation of the heart in children, in effect affecting almost all population ages. Almost 300,000 heart valve operations are performed worldwide annually. Tissue valve prostheses have certain advantages over mechanical valves such as biocompatibility, more physiological hemodynamics, and no need for life-long systemic anticoagulation. However, the major disadvantage of biological valves is related to their durability. Nevertheless, during the last decade, the number of patients undergoing biological, rather than mechanical, valve replacement has increased from half to more than three-quarters for biological implants. Continuous improvement in valve fabrication includes development of new models and shapes, novel methods of tissue treatment, and preservation and implantation techniques. These efforts are focused not only on the improvement of morbidity and mortality of the patients but also on the improvement of their quality of life. Heart valve tissue engineering aims to provide durable, "autologous" valve prostheses. These valves demonstrate adaptive growth, which may avoid the need of repeated operations in growing patients.

  2. Effect of immersion, submersion, and scuba diving on heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Schipke, J; Pelzer, M

    2001-01-01

    Background—Heart rate variability (HRV) describes the cyclic variations in heart rate and offers a non-invasive tool for investigating the modulatory effects of neural mechanisms elicited by the autonomic nervous system on intrinsic heart rate.

  3. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  4. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help prevent your first heart attack. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent ... blood to flow to the heart muscle. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Treatment for a heart attack usually includes ...

  5. Hemodynamic and Mechanical Properties of the Proximal Aorta in Young and Middle-Aged Adults With Isolated Systolic Hypertension: The Dallas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yuichiro; Neeland, Ian J; Ayers, Colby; Peshock, Ronald; Berry, Jarett D; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Greenland, Philip; Mitchell, Gary F; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess characteristic impedance (Z c ) of the proximal aorta in young and middle-aged individuals with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH). Z c is an index of aortic stiffness relative to aortic size. In the Dallas Heart Study, 2001 untreated participants 18 to 64 years of age (mean age: 42.3 years; 44% black race) were divided into the following groups based on office blood pressure (BP) measurements: (1) optimal BP (systolic BP [SBP] hypertension (SBP hypertension (SBP ≥140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg; n=178). Z c , aortic arch pulse wave velocity, and minimum ascending aortic size were quantified using cardiovascular magnetic resonance. In multivariable-adjusted linear models, Z c was highest in the ISH group compared with the optimal BP, isolated diastolic hypertension, or systolic-diastolic hypertension groups (103.2±4.0 versus 68.3±2.1, 75.4±6.0, and 88.9±4.8 dyne*seconds/cm 5 , respectively; all P hypertension, or systolic-diastolic hypertension groups (6.3±0.3 versus 4.3±0.1, 4.4±0.4 and 5.5±0.3 m/s, respectively; all P 0.2). Results were similar in a subgroup of 1551 participants 18 to 49 years of age. In a multiracial population-based sample, we found evidence of a mismatch between proximal aortic stiffness and diameter in young and middle-aged adults with ISH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Differences in collagen cross-linking between the four valves of the bovine heart: a possible role in adaptation to mechanical fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldous, Ian G; Veres, Samuel P; Jahangir, Alireza; Lee, J Michael

    2009-06-01

    Hydrothermal isometric tension (HIT) testing and high-performance liquid chromatography were used to assess the molecular stability and cross-link population of collagen in the four valves of the adult bovine heart. Untreated and NaBH(4)-treated tissues under isometric tension were heated in a water bath to a 90 degrees C isotherm that was sustained for 5 h. The denaturation temperature (T(d)), associated with hydrogen bond rupture and molecular stability, and the half-time of load decay (t(1/2)), associated with peptide bond hydrolysis and intermolecular cross-linking, were calculated from acquired load/temperature/time data. An unpaired group of samples of the same population was biochemically assayed for the types and quantities of enzymatic cross-links present. Tissues known to endure higher in vivo transvalvular pressures had lower T(d) values, suggesting that molecular stability is inversely related to in vivo loading. The treated inflow valves (mitral and tricuspid) had significantly lower t(1/2) values than did treated outflow valves (aortic and pulmonary), suggesting lower overall cross-linking in the inflow valves. Inflow valves were also found to fail during HIT testing significantly more often than outflow valves, also suggestive of a decreased cross-link population. Inflow valves may be remodeling at a faster rate and may be at an earlier state of molecular "maturity" than outflow valves. At the molecular level, the thermal stability of collagen is associated with in vivo loading and may be influenced by the mature, aldimine-derived cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine. We conclude that the valves of the heart utilize differing, location-specific strategies to resist biomechanical fatigue loading.

  7. Left ventricular vs. biventricular mechanical support: Decision making and strategies for avoidance of right heart failure after left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandel, Michael; Krabatsch, Thomas; Falk, Volkmar

    2015-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are safer and provide better survival and better quality of life than biventricular assist devices (BVADs) but end-stage heart failure often involves both ventricles, even if its initial cause was left-sided heart disease. Right ventricular failure (RVF) is also a severe complication in about 25% of patients receiving an LVAD, with high perioperative morbidity (renal, hepatic or multi-organ failure) and mortality. Patients who receive an RV assist device (RVAD) only days after LVAD insertion fare much worse than those who receive an RVAD simultaneously with LVAD implantation. Temporary RVAD support in LVAD recipients with high risk for postoperative RVF can avoid permanent BVAD support. Thus, patients who definitely need a BVAD should already be identified preoperatively or at least intra-operatively. However, although the initial biochemical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic patient profiles at admission may suggest the need for a BVAD, many risk factors may be favorably modified by various strategies that may result in avoidance of RVF after LVAD implantation. This article summarizes the knowledge of risk factors for irreversible RVF after LVAD implantation and strategies to optimize RV function (preoperatively, intra-operatively and post-operatively) aimed to reduce the number of BVAD implantations. Special attention is focused on assessment of RV size, geometry and function in relation to loading conditions with the goal of predicting preoperatively the RV changes which might be induced by RV afterload reduction with the LVAD. The review also provides a theoretical and practical basis for clinicians intending to be engaged in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of heavy cigarette smoking on heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagirci, Goksel; Cay, Serkan; Karakurt, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular events related with several mechanisms. The most suggested mechanism is increased activity of sympathetic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been shown to be independent and powerful...

  9. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R.; Oliva, María E.; Lombardo, Yolanda B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  10. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Creus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO, was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia. A reference group consumed a control diet (CD all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA and diacylglycerol (DAG contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1 activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 were analyzed. Results show that: (a the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats.

  11. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R; Oliva, María E; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2016-01-28

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats.

  12. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  13. Coping in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farcaş, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of patients with chronic heart failure is influencedby the type of coping with chronic heart disease. We employed the COPEquestionnaire to identify the mechanisms of coping and analyze theparameters involved. Our results show that heart failure patients use mainly emotion-based coping (acceptance, seeking emotional support, religion. Independent variables that influence the type of coping mechanisms include gender, anxiety, depression and decreased quality of life. Identification of disadaptive mechanisms should become an important step in a complex management program devised by a multidisciplinary team.

  14. High Altitude and Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yalcin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, situations associated with high altitude such as mountaineering, aviation increasingly draw the attention of people. Gas pressure decreases and hypoxia is encountered when climbing higher. Physiological and pathological responses of human body to different heights are different. Therefore, physiological and pathological changes that may occur together with height and to know the clinical outcomes of these are important . Acute mountain sickness caused by high altitude and high altitude cerebral edema are preventable diseases with appropriate precautions. Atmospheric oxygen decreasing with height, initiates many adaptive mechanisms. These adaptation mechanisms and acclimatization vary widely among individuals because of reasons such as environmental factors, exercise and cold. High altitude causes different changes in the cardiovascular system with various mechanisms. Although normal individuals easily adapt to these changes, this situation can lead to undesirable results in people with heart disease. For this reason, it should be known the effective evaluation of the people with known heart disease before traveling to high altitude and the complications due to the changes with height and the recommendations can be made to these patients. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 211-222

  15. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J

    2014-10-01

    Heart valve replacements improve symptoms and life expectancy but may have potential problems. Biological replacements have limited durability but do not require anticoagulation and are usually used for the relatively elderly. Mechanical valves have a virtually zero primary failure rate but require anticoagulation and are usually used for the relatively younger patient. Transcatheter valves are used for patients in whom conventional surgery is not technically feasible or who have significant comorbidities. This article discusses the management of patients after valve replacement and discusses future developments. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aorta Ebstein anomaly Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Transposition of the ... through the middle Cardiac catheterization Heart, front view Tetralogy of Fallot Clubbing Cyanotic heart disease References Bernstein D. Cyanotic ...

  18. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  19. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  20. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  1. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  2. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  3. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  4. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  5. From developmental biology to heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campione, M.; Moorman, A. F.; Kelly, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of cardiac development have fuelled research into cellular approaches to myocardial repair of the damaged heart. In this collection of reviews we present recent advances into the basic mechanisms of heart development and the resident and non-resident progenitor cell

  6. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  7. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, I.Chen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Ling [Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Taichung (China); Wang, Kuo-Yang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of General Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, Taichung (China); Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiological Technology, Taichung (China)

    2009-04-15

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Bjoerk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders. (orig.)

  8. Na(+)-H+ exchange inhibition protects against mechanical, ultrastructural, and biochemical impairment induced by low concentrations of lysophosphatidylcholine in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, A N; Haist, J V; Karmazyn, M

    1997-01-01

    Lysophophatidylcholine (LysoPC) accumulates rapidly in the ischemic myocardium and is an important mediator of ischemia-induced cell injury. Na(+)-H+ exchange (NHE) inhibition has been demonstrated to protect the ischemic and reperfused myocardium. We determined whether NHE inhibition can also modulate cardiotoxicity produced by LysoPC (3 and 5 mumol/L) in isolated rat hearts. At 3 mumol/L, LysoPC produced a depression in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and elevation in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), which were 19 +/- 7% and 1290 +/- 205% of pre-LysoPC values, respectively, after 30 minutes of treatment. In the presence of the NHE inhibitor 4-isopropyl-3-methylsulfonylbenzoyl-guanidine methanesulfonate (HOE 642, 5 mumol/L), LVDP was reduced to only 80.8 +/- 8.6%, and LVEDP increased to 270 +/- 32% (P .05). In myocytes superfused with bicarbonate-free buffer subjected to acid loading by NH4Cl pulsing, pH recovery (as measured by acid flux) was significantly stimulated by 3 mumol/L LysoPC, indicative of NHE activation. Our study shows that cardiac injury produced by low concentrations of LysoPC can be effectively attenuated by NHE inhibition. The results also suggest that the beneficial effects of NHE inhibitors on the ischemic myocardium may be, at least partially, mediated by inhibiting the deleterious effects of LysoPC.

  9. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, I.Chen; Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Ling; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Bjoerk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders. (orig.)

  10. Comparison between Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) and Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) for the Urgent Reversal of Warfarin in Patients with Mechanical Heart Valves in a Tertiary Care Cardiac Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariborz Farsad, Bahram; Golpira, Reza; Najafi, Hamideh; Totonchi, Ziae; Salajegheh, Shirin; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Hashemian, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) reverse oral anticoagulants such as Warfarin. We compared the standard dosage of FFP and PCC in terms of efficacy and safety for patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing interventional procedures while receiving Warfarin. Fifty patients were randomized (25 for each group) with mechanical heart valves [international normalized ratio (INR) >2.5]. FFP dosage was administered based on body weight (10-15 mL/Kg), while PCC dosage was administered based on both body weight and target INR. INR measurements were obtained at different time after PCC and FFP infusion. The mean ± SD of INR pre treatment was not significantly different between the PCC and FFP groups. However, over a 48-hour period following the administration of PCC and FFP, 76% of the patients in the PCC group and only 20% of the patients in the FFP group reached the INR target. Five (20%) patients in the PCC group received an additional dose of PCC, whereas 17 (68%) patients in the FFP group received a further dose of FFP (P=0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in Hb and Hct before and during a 48-hour period after PCC and FFP infusion. As regards safety monitoring and adverse drug reaction screening in the FFP group, the INR was high (INR > 2.5) in 86% of the patients. There was no report of hemorrhage in both groups. PCC reverses anticoagulation both effectively and safely while having the advantage of obviating the need to extra doses.

  11. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  13. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids and diuretics Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask your ... of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  14. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Similar mechanisms of fatty acid transfer from human anal rodent fatty acid-binding proteins to membranes: liver, intestine, heart muscle, and adipose tissue FABPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storch, J.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Hsu, K.T.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are thought to be important for the transport and metabolism of fatty acids in numerous cell types. The transfer of FA from different members of the FABP family to membranes has been shown to occur by two distinct mechanisms, an aqueous

  16. Pediatric heart allocation and transplantation in Eurotransplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jacqueline M; Thul, Josef; De Pauw, Michel; Delmo Walter, Eva; Strelniece, Agita; Green, Dave; de Vries, Erwin; Rahmel, Axel; Bauer, Juergen; Laufer, Guenther; Hetzer, Roland; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Meiser, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric heart allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) has evolved over the past decades to better serve patients and improve utilization. Pediatric heart transplants (HT) account for 6% of the annual transplant volume in ET. Death rates on the pediatric heart transplant waiting list have decreased over the years, from 25% in 1997 to 18% in 2011. Within the first year after listing, 32% of all infants (heart transplant. Survival after transplantation improved over the years, and in almost a decade, the 1-year survival went from 83% to 89%, and the 3-year rates increased from 81% to 85%. Improved medical management of heart failure patients and the availability of mechanical support for children have significantly improved the prospects for children on the heart transplant waiting list. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. Take heart!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  18. Deterministic Approach to Detect Heart Sound Irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mengko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method to detect heart sound that does not require machine learning is proposed. The heart sound is a time series event which is generated by the heart mechanical system. From the analysis of heart sound S-transform and the understanding of how heart works, it can be deducted that each heart sound component has unique properties in terms of timing, frequency, and amplitude. Based on these facts, a deterministic method can be designed to identify each heart sound components. The recorded heart sound then can be printed with each component correctly labeled. This greatly help the physician to diagnose the heart problem. The result shows that most known heart sounds were successfully detected. There are some murmur cases where the detection failed. This can be improved by adding more heuristics including setting some initial parameters such as noise threshold accurately, taking into account the recording equipment and also the environmental condition. It is expected that this method can be integrated into an electronic stethoscope biomedical system.

  19. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. The Autonomic Nervous System Regulates the Heart Rate through cAMP-PKA Dependent and Independent Coupled-Clock Pacemaker Cell Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Joachim; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Zhang, Jin; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) generate spontaneous action potentials (APs) that control the cardiac rate. The brain modulates SANC automaticity, via the autonomic nervous system, by stimulating membrane receptors that activate (adrenergic) or inactivate (cholinergic) adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, these opposing afferents are not simply additive. We showed that activation of adrenergic signaling increases AC-cAMP/PKA signaling, which mediates the increase in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., positive chronotropic modulation). However, there is a limited understanding of the underlying internal pacemaker mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between cholinergic receptors and the decrease in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., negative chronotropic modulation). We hypothesize that changes in AC-cAMP/PKA activity are crucial for mediating either decrease or increase in the AP firing rate and that the change in rate is due to both internal and membrane mechanisms. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, PKA activity and AP firing rate were tightly linked in response to either adrenergic receptor stimulation (by isoproterenol, ISO) or cholinergic stimulation (by carbachol, CCh). To identify the main molecular targets that mediate between PKA signaling and pacemaker function, we developed a mechanistic computational model. The model includes a description of autonomic-nervous receptors, post- translation signaling cascades, membrane molecules, and internal pacemaker mechanisms. Yielding results similar to those of the experiments, the model simulations faithfully reproduce the changes in AP firing rate in response to CCh or ISO or a combination of both (i.e., accentuated antagonism). Eliminating AC-cAMP-PKA signaling abolished the core effect of autonomic receptor stimulation on the AP firing rate. Specifically, disabling the phospholamban modulation of the SERCA activity resulted in a significantly reduced effect

  1. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Left ventricular-only pacing in heart failure patients with normal atrioventricular conduction improves global function and left ventricular regional mechanics compared with biventricular pacing: an adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin V; Gage, Ryan M; Curtin, Antonia E; Gorcsan, John; Bank, Alan J

    2017-10-01

    Right ventricular (RV) pacing can impair left ventricular (LV) function. When timed with native RV activation, LV-only pacing may cause greater improvements in LV function than biventricular pacing. This study compared the chronic effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) on LV mechanics between biventricular pacing and LV-only pacing in patients with normal atrioventricular (AV) conduction. The Adaptive CRT (aCRT) algorithm provides LV-only pacing timed with native RV activation when the AV interval is normal (≤200 ms during sinus rhythm). We studied patients from the aCRT trial with normal AV conduction at their baseline visit and compared changes in cardiac function after 12 months of treatment with conventional biventricular or mostly (≥80%) LV-only pacing. Speckle tracking echocardiography was used to assess LV myocardial strain before and after treatment. Despite similar improvements in Packer's clinical composite scores and LV volumes, LV-only paced patients (n = 70) had a greater improvement in LV ejection fraction (8.5 ± 11.3% vs. 5.5 ± 10.3%, P = 0.038) and global LV radial strain (6.3 ± 8.6% vs. 4.0 ± 10.1%, P = 0.046) than those randomized to biventricular pacing (n = 91). Strain was improved to a greater extent near the RV pacing lead, in septal and apical regions (P heart failure patients with normal AV conduction, LV-only pacing timed with native RV activation may result in greater improvements in LV ejection fraction and myocardial strain compared with biventricular pacing due to better apical and septal function. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Metabolomics and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmiena, Aliki A; Ng, Theodore W; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease accounts for nearly half of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Aetiologies relating to heart disease are complex, but dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and inflammation are cardinal features. Despite preventative measures and advancements in treatment regimens with lipid-lowering agents, the high prevalence of heart disease and the residual risk of recurrent events continue to be a significant burden to the health sector and to the affected individuals and their families. The development of improved risk models for the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular events in addition to new therapeutic strategies to address this residual risk are required if we are to continue to make inroads into this most prevalent of diseases. Metabolomics and lipidomics are modern disciplines that characterize the metabolite and lipid complement respectively, of a given system. Their application to ischaemic heart disease has demonstrated utilities in population profiling, identification of multivariate biomarkers and in monitoring of therapeutic response, as well as in basic mechanistic studies. Although advances in magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry technologies have given rise to the fields of metabolomics and lipidomics, the plethora of data generated presents challenges requiring specific statistical and bioinformatics applications, together with appropriate study designs. Nonetheless, the predictive and re-classification capacity of individuals with various degrees of risk by the plasma lipidome has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we summarize evidence derived exclusively by metabolomic and lipidomic studies in the context of ischaemic heart disease. We consider the potential role of plasma lipid profiling in assessing heart disease risk and therapeutic responses, and explore the potential mechanisms. Finally, we highlight where metabolomic studies together with complementary -omic disciplines may make further

  4. Effect of mibefradil on heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J; de Kam, PJ; Haaksma, J; Crijns, HJGM; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Mibefradil was recently withdrawn from the market because of an unfavorable clinical profile in patients with chronic heart failure. Although drug interactions appear to play a role, other mechanisms such as proarrhythmia and autonomic deterioration could also be relevant. Chronic heart

  5. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  6. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  7. A promoter polymorphism -945C>G in the connective tissue growth factor in heart failure patients with mechanical circulatory support: a new marker for bridge to recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Maximilian G; Schmidt, Gunther; Steinhoff, Laura; Perrot, Andreas; Drews, Thorsten; Dandel, Michael; Krabatsch, Thomas; Hetzer, Roland; Potapov, Evgenij V

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) creates improvement of cardiac function in a small portion of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM). Among other factors, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy seems to represent an important prerequisite for MCS-related cardiac recovery. We have previously shown that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) leads to adaptive cardiomyocyte hypertrophy associated with a protective cardiac function in transgenic mice. To test whether a functional genetic variant in the CTGF promoter impacts MCS-related cardiac recovery, three groups of iDCM patients with and without cardiac recovery on MCS were genotyped. The CTGF promoter variant (c.-945C>G) was analysed in 314 patients with iDCM receiving medical treatment only (Group I). Forty-nine iDCM patients who were either weaned from MCS for more than 6 months (Group II; n=20) or bridged to cardiac transplantation (Group III: n=29) were also genotyped. Patients on MCS were followed up for at least 12 months. Clinical characteristics and outcome on MCS were correlated with the respective genotypes. The c.-945C>G allele frequencies in 314 iDCM patients (Group I) were similar to controls deposited in the HapMap database or those published in a recent study. There were no differences in allele prevalence between patients with mild to moderate iDCM (Group I) compared with patients with severe iDCM requiring MCS (Groups II and III). Intriguingly, 50% of patients who were weaned from MCS (Group II) were homozygous for the G allele compared with only 17.2% of patients included in Group III, which is a significant difference (P=0.03). Homozygosity of the promoter-activating G allele in the CTGF_c.-945C>G variant is overrepresented in patients with cardiac recovery on MCS when compared with iDCM patients without cardiac recovery. Further studies are needed to evaluate c.-945C>G as a genetic predictor for clinical outcome on MCS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  8. Distinct phases of cardiomyocyte differentiation regulate growth of the zebrafish heart.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pater, E.M.; Clijsters, L.; Marques, S.R.; Lin, Y.F.; Garavito-Aguilar, Z.V.; Yelon, D.; Bakkers, J.

    2009-01-01

    Amongst animal species, there is enormous variation in the size and complexity of the heart, ranging from the simple one-chambered heart of Ciona intestinalis to the complex four-chambered heart of lunged animals. To address possible mechanisms for the evolutionary adaptation of heart size, we

  9. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  10. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  11. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle. Contrast material ("dye") is ...

  12. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  13. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  14. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  15. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  16. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  17. The role of flow in the morphodynamics of embryonic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    Nature has shown us that some hearts do not require valves to achieve unidirectional flow. In its earliest stages, the vertebrate heart consists of a primitive tube that drives blood through a simple vascular network nourishing tissues and other developing organ systems. We have shown that in the case of the embryonic zebrafish heart, an elastic wave resonance mechanism based on impedance mismatches at the boundaries of the heart tube is the likely mechanism responsible for the valveless pumping behavior. When functioning normally, mature heart valves prevent intracardiac retrograde blood flow; before valves develop there is considerable regurgitation, resulting in oscillatory flow between the atrium and ventricle. We show that reversing flows are particularly strong stimuli to endothelial cells and that heart valves form as a developmental response to oscillatory blood flow through the maturing heart.

  18. Working Model Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  19. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  20. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with a reduction in morbidity and mortality.3. Clinical picture. The symptoms of heart failure are ... crepitations and a third heart sound gallop, are more predictive, but none of them are 100% diagnostic. Therefore ... some abnormality) in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. A normal ECG should prompt an ...

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  2. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  3. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass ... pacemaker - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  4. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Khairy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy.

  5. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  6. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Heart Failure Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... mean that the heart has stopped beating. Heart Failure in the United States About 5.7 million ...

  7. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Limited-Access Heart Surgery Article Info En español Thousands of heart surgeries ... with cardiovascular disease. What is minimally invasive heart surgery? In minimally invasive heart surgery, surgeons take steps ...

  8. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  9. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Heart Attack Heart Attack Also known as Myocardial infarction Leer en español ... or years after the procedure. Other Treatments for Heart Attack Other treatments for heart attack include: Medicines Medical ...

  10. Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart Month: Ambient air particle pollution increases short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Older-people, those with pre-existing heart disease and lung disease and diabetes are at higher risk. Mechanisms are under investigation and are likely related to oxidative stress, inflammation and effects on autonomic control. Improvements in air pollution levels reduce health impacts and increase life expectancy. Reductions of short-term exposure in those at highest risk are predicted to mitigate adverse health effects. EPA regularly evaluates the standards, health risks and issues improved standards when needed. Public health action is needed along with EPA standards to reduce the public health burden of short- and long-term adverse health effects of air pollution. Health risks remain and need to be addressed through integrated efforts of public health, health care, environmental health, individuals and communities. Presented at Webinar for the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, February 2, 2017, Chapel Hill, NC- This webinar provided an update of environmental health information related to the effects of air pollution and heart and blood vessel disease. Such information is critically important for the Clean Air Agencies to understand as it provides the justification of their actions.

  11. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  12. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  13. Gene expression analysis of zebrafish heart regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ling Lien

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hearts cannot regenerate. In contrast, zebrafish hearts regenerate even when up to 20% of the ventricle is amputated. The mechanism of zebrafish heart regeneration is not understood. To systematically characterize this process at the molecular level, we generated transcriptional profiles of zebrafish cardiac regeneration by microarray analyses. Distinct gene clusters were identified based on temporal expression patterns. Genes coding for wound response/inflammatory factors, secreted molecules, and matrix metalloproteinases are expressed in regenerating heart in sequential patterns. Comparisons of gene expression profiles between heart and fin regeneration revealed a set of regeneration core molecules as well as tissue-specific factors. The expression patterns of several secreted molecules around the wound suggest that they play important roles in heart regeneration. We found that both platelet-derived growth factor-a and -b (pdgf-a and pdgf-b are upregulated in regenerating zebrafish hearts. PDGF-B homodimers induce DNA synthesis in adult zebrafish cardiomyocytes. In addition, we demonstrate that a chemical inhibitor of PDGF receptor decreases DNA synthesis of cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo during regeneration. Our data indicate that zebrafish heart regeneration is associated with sequentially upregulated wound healing genes and growth factors and suggest that PDGF signaling is required.

  14. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  15. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  16. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  19. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rujic, Dragana; Sundbøll, Jens; Tofig, Bawer Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) are commonly encountered arrhythmias and include atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia, and focal atrial tachycardia. These tachycardias share several clinical features as well as similar manage...

  20. High School, Hemorrhage, and a (Mechanical) Heart:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    , “resortification”—the compounding effects of diminishing opportunities in fisheries and the community’s geographic remoteness from much of Cape Cod and larger metropolitan areas. The closure of the local high school, a bellwether of change, emblemized this local transformation. Additionally, corporeal imagery, (e......, in its examination of the mobility of fishing access and residents out of a place, new capital into a place, and the material emblems of a community whose future is in question....

  1. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Connection forms for beating the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mensch, Arthur; Piuze, Emmanuel; Lehnert, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    We combine recent work on modeling cardiac mechanics using a finite volume method with the insight that heart wall myofiber orientations exhibit a particular volumetric geometry. In our finite vol- ume mechanical simulation we use Maurer-Cartan one-forms to add a geometrical consistency term...... to control the rate at which myofiber ori- entation changes in the direction perpendicular to the heart wall. This allows us to estimate material properties related to both the passive and active parameters in our model. We have obtained preliminary results on the 4 canine datasets of the 2014 mechanics...... challenge using the FEBio software suite. In ongoing work we are validating and improving the model using rat heart (ex-vivo DTI and in-vivo tagging) MRI datasets, from which we have estimated strain tensors....

  3. Therapeutic options in chronic heart failure. Findings on chest X-ray; Nicht medikamentoese Therapieoptionen der chronischen Herzinsuffizienz. Befunde in der Projektionsradiografie des Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granitz, M.R.; Meissnitzer, T.; Meissnitzer, M.W.; Hergan, K.; Altenberger, J.; Granitz, C. [Uniklinikum Salzburg - Landeskrankenhaus (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    The contribution covers drugless therapeutic options for chronic heart failure: the implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the interventional catheter treatment of functional mitral insufficiency, and mechanical heart supporting systems and heart transplantation.

  4. Research and Implementation of Heart Sound Denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yutai; Wang, Yanxiang

    Heart sound is one of the most important signals. However, the process of getting heart sound signal can be interfered with many factors outside. Heart sound is weak electric signal and even weak external noise may lead to the misjudgment of pathological and physiological information in this signal, thus causing the misjudgment of disease diagnosis. As a result, it is a key to remove the noise which is mixed with heart sound. In this paper, a more systematic research and analysis which is involved in heart sound denoising based on matlab has been made. The study of heart sound denoising based on matlab firstly use the powerful image processing function of matlab to transform heart sound signals with noise into the wavelet domain through wavelet transform and decomposition these signals in muli-level. Then for the detail coefficient, soft thresholding is made using wavelet transform thresholding to eliminate noise, so that a signal denoising is significantly improved. The reconstructed signals are gained with stepwise coefficient reconstruction for the processed detail coefficient. Lastly, 50HZ power frequency and 35 Hz mechanical and electrical interference signals are eliminated using a notch filter.

  5. Evaluation of a Heart Transplant Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Jin; Kim, Kyung Hee; Hong, Suk Keun; Hankins, Shelley

    2017-11-04

    Heart transplantation is the best option for irreversible and critically advanced heart failure. However, limited donor pool, the risk of rejection, infection, and right ventricular dysfunction in short-term post-transplant period, as well as, the development of coronary allograft vasculopathy and malignancy in the long-term post-transplant period limits the utility of heart transplantation for all comers with advanced heart failure. Therefore, selection of appropriate candidates is very important for the best short and long-term prognosis. In this article, we discuss the principles of selection of candidates and compare to the recently updated International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) listing criteria with the goal of updating current clinical practice. We found that while most of the recommendations in the new listing criteria are continuous with the previous criteria, updated recommendations are made on the risk stratification models in choosing transplantation candidates. Recommendation on hepatic dysfunction is not directly included in the updated ISHLT listing criteria; however, adoption of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and modified MELD scores in the evaluation of risk are suggested in recent studies. In conclusion, evaluation of patient selection for heart transplantation should be comprehensive and individualized with respect to indications and the risk of comorbidities of candidates. With the advancement of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), the selection of heart transplantation candidate is continuously evolving and widened. MCS as bridge to candidacy should be considered when the candidate has potentially reversible risk factors for transplantation.

  6. Heart Valve Biomechanics and Underlying Mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Salma; Ferrari, Giovanni; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Heart valves control unidirectional blood flow within the heart during the cardiac cycle. They have a remarkable ability to withstand the demanding mechanical environment of the heart, achieving lifetime durability by processes involving the ongoing remodeling of the extracellular matrix. The focus of this review is on heart valve functional physiology, with insights into the link between disease-induced alterations in valve geometry, tissue stress, and the subsequent cell mechanobiological responses and tissue remodeling. We begin with an overview of the fundamentals of heart valve physiology and the characteristics and functions of valve interstitial cells (VICs). We then provide an overview of current experimental and computational approaches that connect VIC mechanobiological response to organ- and tissue-level deformations and improve our understanding of the underlying functional physiology of heart valves. We conclude with a summary of future trends and offer an outlook for the future of heart valve mechanobiology, specifically, multiscale modeling approaches, and the potential directions and possible challenges of research development. PMID:27783858

  7. "The Heart Game"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Marcus; Rasmussen, Jack Ord; Grönvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application (“The Heart Game”) using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project. Materials and Methods: A prototype game was developed via...... (interviews, participant observations, focus group interviews, and workshop) was used. Interviews with three healthcare professionals and 10 patients were carried out over a period of 2 weeks in order to evaluate the use of the prototype. Results: The heart patients reported the application to be a useful...... activities. Conclusions: “The Heart Game” concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated...

  8. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  9. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  10. Can the Drosophila model help in paving the way for translational medicine in heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lisha

    2016-10-15

    Chronic heart failure is a common consequence of various heart diseases. Mechanical force is known to play a key role in heart failure development through regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In order to understand the complex disease mechanism, this article discussed a multi-disciplinary approach that may aid the illustration of heart failure molecular process. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using anatomically oriented, marrow stromal cell-based, stented, tissue-engineered heart valves: technical considerations and implications for translational cell-based heart valve concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weber, Benedikt; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sebastien; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Wolint, Petra; Scherman, Jacques; Bettex, Dominique; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Falk, Volkmar; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    single-leaflet prolapse was detected in two, which was primarily related to the leaflet design. No stent dislocation, migration or affection of the mitral valve was observed. For the first time, we demonstrate the technical feasibility of a transapical TEHV delivery into the aortic valve position using a commercially available and clinically applied transapical implantation system that allows for exact anatomical positioning. Our data indicate that the combination of TEHV and a state-of-the-art transapical delivery system is feasible, representing an important step towards translational, transcatheter-based TEHV concepts.

  12. Heart rate variability interventions for concussion and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Conder, Robert L.; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated ...

  13. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-03-11

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues.

  14. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. De novo acute heart failure and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Astrid; Empe, Klausn; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B

    2015-04-24

    Heart failure is one of the most common diseases of adults in Europe, with an overall prevalence of 1-2%. Among persons aged 60 and above, its prevalence is above 10% in men and 8% in women. Acute heart failure has a poor prognosis; it is associated with a high rate of rehospitalization and a 1-year mortality of 20-30%. This review is based on pertinent literature, including guidelines, retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. There are different types of acute heart failure; the basic diagnostic assessment is performed at once and consists of ECG, echocardiography, and the measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) and troponin levels. The most common causes of decompensation are arrhythmia, valvular dysfunction, and acute cardiac ischemia, each of which accounts for 30% of cases. The potential indication for immediate revascularization should be carefully considered in cases where acute heart failure is due to coronary heart disease. The basic treatment of acute heart failure is symptomatic, with the administration of oxygen, diuretics, and vasodilators. Ino-tropic agents, vasopressors, and temporary mechanical support for the circulatory system are only used to treat cardiogenic shock. The treatment of acute heart failure is markedly less evidence-based than that of chronic heart failure. Newer treatment approaches that are intended to improve outcomes still need to be tested in multicenter trials.

  16. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eRamchandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. Heart failure is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of heart failure has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity has also been recorded in animal models of heart failure. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during heart failure. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed.

  18. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human heart by art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  20. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure can be defined as a clinical syndrome in which a structural or functional cardiac abnormality impairs the capacity of the ventricle to fill or eject enough blood for the requirements of the body. Acute heart failure syndrome represents a complex, heterogeneous set of clinical conditions, all with the common.

  1. Making more heart muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.; Kruithof, Boudewijn P. T.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Postnatally, heart muscle cells almost completely lose their ability to divide, which makes their loss after trauma irreversible. Potential repair by cell grafting or mobilizing endogenous cells is of particular interest for possible treatments for heart disease, where the poor capacity for

  2. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  3. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  4. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ...

  5. Hypothyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters.

  6. Heart Truth for Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of developing heart disease, such as diabetes, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity. But there’s good ... your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and diabetes. Try to do at least 30 minutes of ...

  7. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  8. Tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filová, E; Straka, F; Mirejovský, T; Masín, J; Bacáková, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently-used mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses have several disadvantages. Mechanical prostheses, based on carbon, metallic and polymeric components, require permanent anticoagulation treatment, and their usage often leads to adverse reactions, e.g. thromboembolic complications and endocarditis. Xenogenous and allogenous biological prostheses are associated with immune reaction, thrombosis and degeneration, and thus they have a high rate of reoperation. Biological prostheses of autologous origin, such as pulmonary autografts, often burden the patient with a complicated surgery and the risk of reoperation. Therefore, efforts are being made to prepare bioartificial heart valves with an autologous biological component by methods of tissue engineering. They should be biocompatible, durable, endowed with appropriate mechanical properties and able to grow with a child. For this purpose, scaffolds composed of synthetic materials, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(caprolactone), poly(4-hydroxybutyrate), hydrogels or natural polymers, e.g. collagen, elastin, fibrin or hyaluronic acid, have been seeded with autologous differentiated, progenitor or stem cells. Promising results have been obtained with nanostructured scaffolds, and also with cultivation in special dynamic bioreactors prior to implantation of the bioartificial grafts into an animal organism.

  9. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area there is an approximate 50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  10. Biomechanical properties of native and tissue engineered heart valve constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Ragaert, Kim; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Selimović, Seila; Paul, Arghya; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-06-27

    Due to the increasing number of heart valve diseases, there is an urgent clinical need for off-the-shelf tissue engineered heart valves. While significant progress has been made toward improving the design and performance of both mechanical and tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs), a human implantable, functional, and viable TEHV has remained elusive. In animal studies so far, the implanted TEHVs have failed to survive more than a few months after transplantation due to insufficient mechanical properties. Therefore, the success of future heart valve tissue engineering approaches depends on the ability of the TEHV to mimic and maintain the functional and mechanical properties of the native heart valves. However, aside from some tensile quasistatic data and flexural or bending properties, detailed mechanical properties such as dynamic fatigue, creep behavior, and viscoelastic properties of heart valves are still poorly understood. The need for better understanding and more detailed characterization of mechanical properties of tissue engineered, as well as native heart valve constructs is thus evident. In the current review we aim to present an overview of the current understanding of the mechanical properties of human and common animal model heart valves. The relevant data on both native and tissue engineered heart valve constructs have been compiled and analyzed to help in defining the target ranges for mechanical properties of TEHV constructs, particularly for the aortic and the pulmonary valves. We conclude with a summary of perspectives on the future work on better understanding of the mechanical properties of TEHV constructs. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a Normal Heart and a Heart With Tetralogy of Fallot Figure A shows the structure and blood flow ... shows a heart with the four defects of tetralogy of Fallot. Babies and children who have tetralogy of Fallot ...

  12. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007488.htm Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... supply blood and oxygen to the heart. A heart attack can occur if a blood clot stops the ...

  13. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 An important part of ... This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  15. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanical ventilation and dobutamine were used ..... Comparison of CAD risk factors in the present study with HF studies from SSA and other parts of the world ... CAD = coronary artery disease; HF = heart failure; SSA = sub-Saharan Africa; SA = South Africa; THESUS-HF = The Sub-Saharan Africa Survey of Heart Failure; ...

  16. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain. PMID:25324790

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of sup(99m)Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure. (orig.) [de

  19. Heart Rate and Increased Intravascular Volume

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, M.; Kára, T.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Špinarová, L.; Meluzín, J.; Toman, J.; Řiháček, I.; Šumbera, J.; Fráňa, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2003), s. 137 - 140 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/02/1339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : kidneys * heart rate * atrial mechanisms Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  20. Intermittent straining accelerates the development of tissue properties in engineered heart valve tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Boerboom, R.A.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves lack sufficient amounts of functionally organized structures and consequently do not meet in vivo mechanical demands. To optimize tissue architecture and hence improve mechanical properties, various in vitro mechanical conditioning protocols have been proposed, of

  1. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D.; Taylor, Robert L.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  2. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  3. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  4. Heart sound cancellation from lung sound record using cyclostationarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Tang, Hong; Qiu, Tianshuang; Park, Yongwan

    2013-12-01

    From the mechanism of heart sound generation, it is known that heart sounds are cyclic following the frequency of the heartbeat. This paper proposes a short-time cyclic frequency spectrum to calculate the instantaneous cycle frequency (ICF) of heart sounds as an estimation of the frequency of the heartbeat. Heart sounds in a lung sound record are detected with the assistance of ICF. Lung sounds (LSs) are recovered by removing heart sounds from the LS record. An LS record is the only input signal source; no other reference signal is necessary. Evaluation by visual inspection, auditory listening and spectral analysis all show that heart sounds are successfully cancelled without hampering the main components of lung sounds. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  6. Heart Failure as an Aging-Related Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei

    2018-01-27

    The molecular pathophysiology of heart failure, which is one of the leading causes of mortality, is not yet fully understood. Heart failure can be regarded as a systemic syndrome of aging-related phenotypes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway, both of which are key regulators of aging, have been demonstrated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Circulating C1q was identified as a novel activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, promoting systemic aging-related phenotypes including sarcopenia and heart failure. On the other hand, p53 induces the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in the failing heart. In these molecular mechanisms, the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes (e,g,. endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, macrophages) deserves mentioning. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology underlying heart failure, focusing on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway.

  7. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  8. ST2 IN REJECTION OF THE TRANSPLANTED HEART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current literature devoted to the analysis of prognostic role of ST2 biomarker in rejection of the transplanted heart. ST2 is one of the most promising diagnostic markers of the development and severity of heart failure as well as the mortality risk in patients with cardiovascular diseases. ST2 is expressed in cardiomyocytes in response to a variety of pathological processes and mechanical damage to the heart, which allows diagnosing cardiovascular diseases before clinical manifestations. Presumably, measuring the level of ST2 in heart transplant may have diagnostic and prognostic value in the assessment of graft and risk of rejection. Currently, accumulated clinical data on the role of given biomarker in heart transplantation are not enough, and further research on the relation of ST2 levels with different clinical and laboratory parameters in heart recipients is necessary. 

  9. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Pietro; Cortese, Francesca; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Moncelli, Michele; Iacoviello, Massimo; Cecere, Annagrazia; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Caldarola, Pasquale; Scrutinio, Domenico; Lagioia, Rocco; Riccioni, Graziano; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists). The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. PMID:24940047

  10. A heart model with multiple chambers for myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretschner, D.P.; Hundeshagen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A heart model is portrayed which consists from individual segments to be filled with activity. The mechanics allow to vary the position in order to generate different positions for evaluation of the scintigraphic systems performance. (orig.) [de

  11. Altered carnitine transport in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.; Reibel, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously observed reduced carnitine levels in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for reduced myocardial carnitine content, carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats 3 weeks following surgery and perfused at 60 mm Hg aortic pressure with buffer containing various concentrations of L- 14 C-carnitine. Carnitine uptake by control and hypertrophied hearts was linear throughout 30 minutes of perfusion with 40 μM carnitine. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by 25% in hypertrophied hearts at each time point examined. The reduction in uptake by hypertrophied hearts was also evident when hearts were perfused with 100 or 200 μM carnitine. When 0.05 mM mersalyl acid was included in the buffer to inhibit the carrier-mediated component of transport, no difference in carnitine uptake was observed indicating that the transport of carnitine by diffusion was unaltered in the hypertrophied myocardium. Carrier-mediated carnitine uptake (total uptake - uptake by diffusion) was significantly reduced by approximately 40% in hypertrophied hearts at all concentrations examined. Thus, the reduction in carnitine content in the pressure-overload hypertrophied rat heart appears to be due to a reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake by the heart

  12. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenhofer Jost, Christine H.; Schmidt, Dörthe; Huebler, Michael; Balmer, Christian; Noll, Georg; Caduff, Rosmarie; Greutmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx) has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger's syndrome) has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future. PMID:23577237

  13. Genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Gelb, Bruce D

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this review is to highlight recent discoveries in the field of genetics as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). Recent advancements in next generation sequencing technology and tools to interpret this growing body of data have allowed us to refine our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that result in CHD. From multiple different study designs, the genetic lesions that cause CHD are increasingly being elucidated. Of the more novel findings, a forward genetic screen in mice has implicated recessive inheritance and the ciliome broadly in CHD pathogenesis. The developmental delays frequently observed in patients with CHD appear to result from mutations affecting genes that overlap heart and brain developmental regulation. A meta-analysis has provided clarity, discriminating pathologic from incidental copy number variations and defining a critical region or gene. Recent technological advances have rapidly expanded our understanding of CHD genetics, and support the applicability to the clinical domain in both sporadic and inherited disease. Though significant gaps remain, genetic lesions remain the primary explanation for CHD pathogenesis, although the precise mechanism is likely multifactorial.

  14. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your doctors and loved ones may help bring you peace of mind. You may have already discussed heart transplantation and the use of a ventricular assist device with your doctor. At some point, you will ...

  16. Anatomy of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the arterial and venous circulatory subsystems. The importance of capillaries lies in their very thin walls. ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  17. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  18. Heart Health for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... Español In Chinese - In Korean - In Vietnamese - In French Creole You may think heart disease only affects men. This is not ...

  19. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). Eur Heart J . ... A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, ...

  20. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  1. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants and Training Grants and Training ...

  2. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transporting smaller loads and making more trips. The engine — or in this case, your heart — has to ... to go to Johannesburg and go to a game park for the day,” Gandy said. Plane Precautions ...

  3. Alcohol and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're a heavy drinker, statistics show that cutting back can help reduce your stroke risk. Be ... and Heart Disease Healthy Eating • Healthy Eating Home • Nutrition AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  4. Heart and vascular services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintain body temperature, among other things. CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE Cardiovascular medicine refers to the branch of health care that specializes in the treatment of diseases or conditions dealing with the heart and vascular systems. Common ...

  5. American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Americans live with heart disease, stroke or a cardiovascular condition. Your donation will help us save and improve their lives with research, education and emergency care. Warning Signs If you or someone else is ...

  6. Stress and your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  7. Stress and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Stress and Heart Health Updated:Jan 8,2018 When ... therapist in your community. Last reviewed 6/2014 Stress Management • Home • How Does Stress Affect You? Introduction ...

  8. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine to treat high blood pressure). A high fasting blood sugar level (or you're on medicine ... find out whether routine testing for DHD will benefit people who have diabetes but no heart disease ...

  9. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... Get Well" card and paying a visit. Can Kids Get Heart Disease? Kids usually don't have ...

  10. Clinical use of novel biomarkers in heart failure : towards personalized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitter, Daniela; Cotter, Gadi; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Biomarkers play an important role in heart failure. They provide us information about the mechanisms involved in specific types of heart failure and can identify patients at higher risk. Although the majority of biomarker studies in heart failure focus on their prognostic value, the clinical

  11. A novel approach in cross-linking of bioprosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaerts, Fransiscus Joannes Leonardus

    2007-01-01

    Due to some form of heart valve disease, approximately 250000 patients worldwide undergo surgery to receive a new heart-valve each year. In about 70% of the cases a mechanical heart valve is used despite the fact that permanent anticoagulant therapy for the patient is required. The remaining 30% of

  12. Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Cury, Patricia; Demarchi, Lea M.F.; Coelho, Verônica; Abel, Lúcia; Lopez, Ana P.; Oshiro, Sandra Emiko; Aliotti, Selma; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M.A.; Tanaka, Ana C.; Kalil, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Heart lesions of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients contain T-cell clones that recognize heart proteins and streptococcal M peptides. To functionally characterize heart-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we evaluated their cytokine profile, both directly in situ and in T-cell lines derived from the heart (HIL). Interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 expressions were characterized in 20 heart tissue infiltrates from 14 RHD patients by immunohistochemistry. IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, and IL-10-positive cells were consistently predominant, whereas IL-4 was scarce in the valves. In agreement with these data, the in vitro experiments, in which 13 HILs derived from heart samples of eight patients were stimulated with M5 protein and the immunodominant M5 (81-96) peptide, IL-4 was detected in HIL derived from the atrium (three of six) but not from the valve (zero of seven). IFN-γ and IL-10 production were detected in culture supernatants in 11 of 13 and 6 of 12 HILs, respectively. The predominant IFN-γ and TNF-α expression in the heart suggests that Th1-type cytokines could mediate RHD. Unlike in reversible myocardium inflammation, the significantly lower IL-4 expression in the valvular tissue (P = 0.02) may contribute to the progression of the RHD leading to permanent valvular damage (relative risk, 4.3; odds ratio, 15.8). The lack of IL-4 in vitro production by valve-derived HIL also emphasizes the more severe tissue destruction in valves observed in RHD. PMID:15509528

  13. Music and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Diuretics in heart failure: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basraon, Jagroop; Deedwani, Prakash C

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses the role of diuretics in heart failure by focusing on different classifications and mechanisms of action. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of diuretics are elucidated. The predominant discussion highlights the use of loop diuretics, which are the most commonly used drugs in heart failure. Different methods of using this therapy in different settings along with a comprehensive review of the side-effect profile are highlighted. Special situations necessitating adjustment and the phenomenon of diuretic resistance are explained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Radiation-induced damage of the Wistar Rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilliers, G.D.; Lochner, A.

    1993-01-01

    A time sequence study was performed on Wistar rats to investigate the early effects of radiation on the mechanical function and energy metabolism of the heart. Two series of rats were exposed to 20 Gy electron irradiation to a field including the heart and approximately a third of the lungs. The hearts were excised at varying time intervals (8-180 days) post irradiation. In one series of hearts the mechanical function was measured using the isolated perfused working rat heart model. At the end of the perfusion the hearts were freeze-clamped for analysis of the high energy phosphate contents (ATP, ADP, AMP and creatine phosphate). In the second series, mitochondria were isolated and the oxidative phosphorylation function measured polarographically (substrate: glutamate). Maximal depression of mechanical function was observed at 60 days post irradiation. Thereafter the work performance of these hearts improved significantly, almost reaching control levels after 180 days. The mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function (as measured on the total mitochondrial population) was significantly depressed 30-120 days post irradiation. As in the case of the mechanical changes, the depression was transient and after 180 days post irradiation, values similar to those of controls were obtained. Myocardial high energy phosphates remained unaltered throughout the experiment. (author)

  16. Theory of heart biomechanics, biophysics, and nonlinear dynamics of cardiac function

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Peter; McCulloch, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interest in studying the heart from the perspective of the physical sciences: mechanics, fluid flow, electromechanics. This volume is the result of a workshop held in July 1989 at the Institute for Nonlinear Sciences at the University of California at San Diego that brought together scientists and clinicians with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who shared an interest in the heart. The chapters were prepared by the invited speakers as didactic reviews of their subjects but also include the structure, mechanical properties, and function of the heart and the myocardium, electrical activity of the heart and myocardium, and mathematical models of heart function.

  17. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/Adult Congenital Heart Association Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M.; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S.; Daniels, Curt J.; Fuller, Stephanie M.P.N.; Honein, Margaret A.; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S.; Landzberg, Michael J.; Mahle, William T.; Mann, Douglas L.; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W.; Pearson, Gail D.; Starling, Randall C.; Tringali, Glenn R.; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C.; Califf, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD (ACHD). The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary Working Group to identify high-impact research questions in ACHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy. PMID:27102511

  18. Investigation of the fibrotic effect of the dopamine agonist "Cabergoline" on the porcine heart valve

    OpenAIRE

    Kekewska, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the side effect mechanisms of cabergoline and other ergoline compounds that cause fibrotic changes in heart valves. Heart valve fibrosis occurs during treatment of Parkinson’s disease and may cause regurgitation and even heart failure. To this date, surgical replacement with artificial valves is the only long term treatment option for patients with diseased heart valves. These pathological changes were observed in association with other influences on the s...

  19. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  20. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.