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Sample records for single-donor platelet transfusions

  1. Platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The statement printed below was agreed at a consensus conference on platelet transfusion organised by the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and held in Edinburgh in November 1997. We publish this statement at the request of the organising committee to bring it to the attention of physicians who do not read the haematological literature. The statement will also appear in the British Journal of Haematology in 1998 with the scientific evidence upon which it is based.

  2. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patients...... who received a single series of blood transfusions. They received mostly saline-adenine-glucose+mannitol red blood cell components (poor in leukocytes and platelets) in connection with cardiac surgery. Platelet-specific antibodies were detected with the platelet ELISA and the monoclonal...... immunization. CONCLUSION: There was a low incidence of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions in this group of patients. This is similar to the results of some previous studies in multiply transfused patients, but not with those of others who found a higher incidence....

  3. Neonatal thrombocytopenia and platelets transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonates often develop thrombocytopenia at some time during hospital stay. Platelet transfusion are frequently given to them and are likely to result in unnecessary transfusion. Material and Methods: Thus, we analyzed thrombocytopenia in neonates, its prevalence, and relationship if any, between clinical condition and platelet transfusion in neonates, which would have been helpful in developing guidelines and/or protocols for platelet transfusion (and reducing the donor exposure in neonates. Results: A total of 870 neonates who were admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU with various morbidities had platelets count done; of these, 146 (16.7% neonate revealed thrombocytopenia. Discussion: Low birth weight babies (P 0.009 and babies born with mother having hypertension (P 0.04 showed significant thrombocytopenia. Neonates with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR diagnosed during antenatal screening showed lower platelet count (P 0.022. Neonates having associated illness, such as sepsis, gastrointestinal, and respiratory problems, and on vasopressor drugs were found to be associated with low platelet count. Conclusion: In our study, 16.40% of thrombocytopenic neonates required platelet transfusion either alone or with other blood component during their stay in NICU.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of transfusion of platelet components prepared with pathogen inactivation treatment in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, C.F.; Botteman, M.F.; Gao, X.; Weissfeld, J.L.; Postma, Maarten; Pashos, C.L.; Triulzi, D.; Staginnus, U.; Gao, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    Background: The intercept Blood System (IBS) for platelets has been developed to reduce pathogen transmission risks during transfusions. Objective: This study was a comprehensive economic analysis of the cost-effectiveness of using the IBS for single-donor apheresis platelets (AP) and random-donor

  5. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  6. Platelet transfusion for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Craig H; DomBourian, Melkon G; Millward, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is a critical and often necessary aspect of managing cancer. Low platelet counts frequently lead to bleeding complications; however, the drugs used to combat malignancy commonly lead to decreased production and destruction of the very cell whose function is essential to stop bleeding. The transfusion of allogeneic platelet products helps to promote hemostasis, but alloimmunization may make it difficult to manage other complications associated with cancer. The literature relating to platelet transfusion in patients with cancer was reviewed. Platelet storage, dosing, transfusion indications, and transfusion response are essential topics for health care professionals to understand because many patients with cancer will require platelet transfusions during the course of treatment. The workup and differentiation of non-immune-mediated compared with immune-mediated platelet refractoriness are vital because platelet management is different between types of refractoriness. A combination of appropriate utilization of platelet inventory and laboratory testing coupled with communication between those caring for patients with cancer and those providing blood products is essential for effective patient care.

  7. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed.

  8. French Haemovigilance Data on Platelet Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, Béatrice; Vo Mai, Mai-Phuong; Caldani, Cyril

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Agence Française de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (Afssaps; French Health Products Safety Agency) is responsible, through its hemovigilance unit, for the organization and the functioning of the national hemovigilance network. In accordance with the French law, it receives all data on adverse transfusion reactions regardless of their severity. With the aim of evaluating the tolerance of two kinds of labile blood products (LBP), pooled platelet concentrates (PP) and apheresis platelet concentrates (APC), we screened the French national database from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006. We observed that the number of transfusion incident reports is more than twice as high with APC (8.61:1,000 LBP) than with PP (4.21:1,000 LBP). The difference between these two ratios is statistically significant as shown by chi-square test (e = 21.00 with α = 5%). The risk to suffer adverse reactions of any type, except for alloimmunization, is higher with APC, and the major type of diagnosis related to APC is allergic reaction (1:200 APC issued) even if those allergic reactions are rarely serious. The new French National Hemovigilance Commission should impel a working group evaluating this topic and above all the impact of additive solutions which have been used since 2005 to put forward preventives measures.

  9. Platelet utilization in the developing world: strategies to optimize platelet transfusion practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anupam; Agarwal, Prashant

    2009-10-01

    There is perennial shortage of blood and blood components in most of the developing world. The resources are inadequate in terms of meeting the ever growing demand of blood components especially platelets. A poor health care system has led to underdevelopment of blood transfusion services which ultimately affect the transfusion practices. There is a paucity of comprehensive data on the platelet usage from the developing countries which is reflective of their modest development in blood component therapy. This is in sharp contrast to the fast pace of development in platelet transfusion practice in developed world where platelet substitutes are to become a reality for clinical use in near future. In developing world a considerable heterogeneity exists for platelet transfusion practices between countries, and even within countries in hospitals where this precious resource is available. This variation in existing practices can partly be explained by factors like individual preferences, lack of any hospital transfusion policy with regard to platelet transfusion, problems of platelet availability, etc. There is a need to implement best platelet transfusion practices as platelet products are scarcely available and expensive. Few interventions are emphasized in this article in the context of improving the status of platelet utilization in developing countries.

  10. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  11. Progress in bio-manufacture of platelets for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heazlewood, Shen Y; Nilsson, Susan K; Cartledge, Kellie; Be, Cheang Ly; Vinson, Andrew; Gel, Murat; Haylock, David N

    2017-11-01

    Blood transfusion services face an ever-increasing demand for donor platelets to meet clinical needs. Whilst strategies for increasing platelet storage life and improving the efficiency of donor platelet collection are important, in the longer term, platelets generated by bio-manufacturing processes will be required to meet demands. Production of sufficient numbers of in vitro-derived platelets for transfusion represents a significant bioengineering challenge. In this review, we highlight recent progress in this area of research and outline the main technical and biological obstacles that need to be met before this becomes feasible and economic. A critical consideration is assurance of the functional properties of these cells as compared to their fresh, donor collected, counterparts. We contend that platelet-like particles and in vitro-derived platelets that phenotypically resemble fresh platelets must deliver the same functions as these cells upon transfusion. We also note recent progress with immortalized megakaryocyte progenitor cell lines, molecular strategies for reducing expression of HLA Class I to generate universal donor platelets and the move to early clinical studies with in vitro-derived platelets.

  12. Fatal Clostridium perfringens sepsis from a pooled platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C P; Hartley, S; Orchard, K; Hughes, G; Brett, M M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A

    1998-03-01

    A male patient with acute myeloid leukaemia received a pooled platelet preparation prepared by Optipress system on the last day of its shelf life. The patient collapsed after two-thirds of the contents had been transfused. Clostridium perfringens was isolated from the platelet bag within 18 h of the acute event. Metronidazole, gentamicin and Clostridium antiserum were then administered in addition to the broad spectrum antibiotics started previously. However, the patient died 4 days after the platelets were transfused. The cause of death was given as cardiovascular shock, entirely compatible with an overwhelming bacteraemic and septic episode. A coroner's verdict of accidental death due to transfusion of a contaminated unit of platelets was recorded. On subsequent investigation Cl. perfringens type A serotype PS68,PS80 (identical to that found in the platelet bag) was cultured from the venepuncture site of the arm of one of the donors who contributed towards the platelet pool. The donor had two young children and frequently changed nappies. Faecal contamination of the venepuncture site was the suspected source for the transmission of Cl. perfringens, an organism commonly found in the soil and intestinal tract of humans. This case dramatically highlights the consequences of transfusing a bacterially contaminated unit. It is vital that such incidents are investigated and reported so that the extent of transfusion-associated bacterial transmission can be monitored and preventative measures taken if possible.

  13. Thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and role of platelet transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Jayashree

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The study was designed to find out the incidence of thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and to correlate thrombocytopenia with other parameters like renal failure, hepatic failure and bleeding manifestation like adult respiratory distress syndrome and to assess the role of platelet transfusion. Materials and Methods : 50 cases of leptospirosis during the month of July and August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Criteria for selection were Lepto Tek Dri - dot test positive cases of the clinically suspected cases of Leptospirosis. Degree of thrombocytopenia was categorized as severe, moderate and mild. Presence of thrombocytopenia was clinically correlated with parameters like renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction and hemorrhagic manifestations (mainly ARDS. Role of platelet transfusion was assessed with reference to presence and degree of thrombcytopenia and hemorrhagic manifestations. Results : Out of total 50 patients 26 were male and 24 were females. Major bleeding manifestation in the form of ARDS was seen in 15 (30% of patients. 28 (56% patients had thrombocytopenia and 22 (44% patients had normal platelet counts. Total number of patients with renal dysfunction was 24 (48%. Only four (18.18% patients with normal platelet counts had renal dysfunction while 20 (71.42% patients with thrombocytopenia had renal dysfunction. Only two (9.09% patients with normal platelet counts and 48 (46.42% patients with thrombocytopenia had hepatorenal dysfunction. Total number of patients with ARDS was 15 (30%. Of these two (13.33% had normal platelet count while 13 (86.6% patients were thrombocytopenic. Total 47 units of platelets were transfused to 12 patients in our study. Of these seven patients with severe thrombocytopenia required total 28 units, two patients with moderate thrombocytopenia required total seven units and patients with mild thrombocytopenia were transfused total 12 units of platelets. Conclusion : It is important to anticipate and

  14. Pathogen reduction technologies: The pros and cons for platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magron, Audrey; Laugier, Jonathan; Provost, Patrick; Boilard, Eric

    2018-01-01

    The transfusion of platelets is essential for diverse pathological conditions associated with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders. To maintain optimal platelet quality and functions, platelets are stored as platelet concentrates (PCs) at room temperature under continuous agitation-conditions that are permissive for microbial proliferation. In order to reduce these contaminants, pathogen reduction technologies (PRTs) were developed by the pharmaceutical industry and subsequently implemented by blood banks. PRTs rely on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids. These technologies were initially introduced for the treatment of plasma and, more recently, for PCs given the absence of a nucleus in platelets. Several studies verified the effectiveness of PRTs to inactivate a broad array of bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, the safety of PRT-treated platelets has been questioned in other studies, which focused on the impact of PRTs on platelet quality and functions. In this article, we review the literature regarding PRTs, and present the advantages and disadvantages related to their application in platelet transfusion medicine.

  15. Pressure-aided transfusion of platelets: does it affect the platelets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Stissing, Trine; Maansson, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    In massively bleeding patients, pressure infusers are used for transfusion of red blood cells and plasma but not for platelets (PLTs) due to an assumed negative effect on the PLTs. This study examined whether pressure-aided in vitro transfusion affected the number, activation state, and/or functi...... of the PLTs as measured by flow cytometry and thrombelastography (TEG)....

  16. Glycans and glycosylation of platelets: current concepts and implications for transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Wandall, Hans H

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Platelet products are currently stored at room temperature, because refrigeration causes their rapid clearance from the circulation upon transfusion. Glycans have recently been emphasized as important determinants for the clearance of refrigerated platelets. The present review ...... the risk of transfusion-mediated sepsis and accelerates platelet deterioration, limiting platelet shelf life. Recent evidence suggests that glycoengineering of platelets might allow for their cold storage, significantly improving the quality of platelet products....

  17. How do I … manage the platelet transfusion-refractory patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juskewitch, Justin E; Norgan, Andrew P; De Goey, Steven R; Duellman, Patti M; Wakefield, Laurie L; Gandhi, Manish J; Stubbs, James R; Kreuter, Justin D

    2017-12-01

    Platelet transfusion-refractoriness is a challenging and expensive clinical scenario seen most often in patients with hematologic malignancies. Although the majority of platelet transfusion-refractory cases are due to nonimmune causes, a significant minority are caused by alloimmunization against Class I human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) or human platelet antigens (HPAs). Such platelet transfusion-refractory patients can be effectively managed with appropriate antigen-negative products. Our institution has developed a diagnostic and management algorithm for the platelet transfusion-refractory patient with an early focus on identifying those cases caused by immune-mediated factors. Using physical platelet cross-matches to initially classify platelet transfusion-refractory patients as immune-mediated or not, cross-match-compatible inventory is then provided to immune-mediated patients, whereas subsequent HLA (with or without HPA) testing is performed. Our blood donor program performs Class I HLA typing of all repeat platelet donors to facilitate the identification of antigen-negative platelet units (virtual cross-matching) as well as the recruitment of HLA-matched donors. The platelet transfusion-refractoriness algorithm realizes an initial net cost savings once two apheresis platelets are saved from use for each newly identified, immune-mediated platelet transfusion-refractory patient. An algorithm utilizing physical platelet cross-matches, Class I HLA and HPA antibody testing, and upfront Class I HLA typing of platelet donors leads to overall resource savings and improved clinical management for platelet transfusion-refractory patients. © 2017 AABB.

  18. CD40 ligand (CD154) involvement in platelet transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahler, J; Spinelli, S; Phipps, R; Blumberg, N

    2012-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are commonly used treatments that occasionally lead to adverse reactions. Clinical trials, in vitro and animal studies have been performed to try to understand the causes of such reactions. Multiple studies have shown that the supernatant fraction of platelet concentrates contain prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory mediators. The origin of these mediators was first ascribed to white blood cells contaminating the platelet preparation. However, the accumulation of bioactive mediators after leukoreduction focused attention on platelets themselves during storage. Numerous cytokines, chemokines and prostaglandins are released in stored platelet concentrates. We have focused on a powerful mediator called soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, formally known as CD154) as a seminal contributor to adverse reactions. sCD40L can bind and signal the surface receptor, CD40, which is present on various types of human cells including white blood cells, vascular cells and fibroblasts. Downstream results of sCD40L/CD40 signaling include pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, prothrombotic mediator release, adherence and transmigration of leukocytes to endothelium and other undesirable vascular inflammatory events. Increased plasma levels of sCD40L can be detected in conditions such as myocardial infarction, stroke, unstable angina, high cholesterol, or other cardiovascular conditions. In retrospective studies, correlations were made between increased sCD40L levels of platelet concentrates and adverse transfusion reactions. We hypothesize that transfusion of partially activated, CD40L-expressing platelets along with sCD40L into a recipient with damaged or dysfunctional vascular tissue results in a "double-hit", thus inciting inflammation and vascular damage in the recipient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute intravascular hemolysis in two patients transfused with dry-platelet units obtained from the same ABO incompatible donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbonesi, M; De Luigi, M C; Lercari, G; Florio, G; Bruni, R; Van Lint, M T; Occhini, D

    2000-09-01

    Since 1989 we have been collecting dry-platelets on a routine basis. Dry-platelets are those collected along with 25-30 ml of contaminating plasma cell with separators such as the Amicus, AS 104 and the Excel Pro. Platelets are resuspended in non plasma media for storage and for at least 60 hours their viability and functionality are not impaired. In this article we report on two hemolytic crises determined by two O Rh D + units of single donor platelets (SPD) taken from the same donor in a double-apheresis session. The two split units were administered to two A Rh D + patients suffering from metastatic breast cancer and severe aplastic anemia (SAA) respectively. In both cases the hemolytic reaction was of the intravascular type, with a drop in hemoglobin (Hgb) level from 8.6 to 5.4 and from 8.8 down to 5.3 g/dl respectively. From the patients' RBC only alpha agglutinins were eluted and donor's indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was negative with extended panel RBCs. In the first case the clinical course after erythroexchange (Erex) was uneventful whereas in the second one, that suffering from SAA, after Erex, acute renal failure and shock did complicate the clinical course and the patient died seven days after the incriminated platelet transfusion.

  20. Platelet transfusion does not improve outcomes in patients with brain injury on antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmacher, Jeremy L; Reynolds, Cassandra; Patel, Mayur; Maluso, Patrick; Holland, Seth; Gamsky, Nathaniel; Moore, Henry; Acquista, Elizabeth; Carrick, Matthew; Amdur, Richard; Hancock, Heather; Metzler, Michael; Dunn, Julie; Sarani, Babak

    2018-01-01

    Platelet dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with worse outcomes. The efficacy of platelet transfusion to reverse antiplatelet medication (APM) remains unknown. Thrombelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) assesses platelet function. We hypothesize that platelet transfusion can reverse the effects of APM but does not improve outcomes following TBI. An observational study at six US trauma centres was performed. Adult patients on APM with CT evident TBI after blunt injury were enrolled. Demographics, brain CT and TEG-PM results before/after platelet transfusion, length of stay (LOS), and injury severity score (ISS) were abstracted. Sixty six patients were enrolled (89% aspirin, 50% clopidogrel, 23% dual APM) with 23 patients undergoing platelet transfusion. Transfused patients had significantly higher ISS and admission CT scores. Platelet transfusion significantly reduced platelet inhibition due to aspirin (76.0 ± 30.2% to 52.7 ± 31.5%, p clopidogrel-associated inhibition (p = 0.07). Platelet transfusion was associated with longer length of stay (7.8 vs. 3.5 days, p < 0.01), but there were no differences in mortality. Platelet transfusion significantly decreases platelet inhibition due to aspirin but is not associated with change in outcomes in patients on APM following TBI.

  1. Transfused stored platelets have the same haemostatic function as circulating native platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, W. W. H.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Veeger, N. J. G. M.; de Wolf, J. Th. M.

    Background and objectives As thrombelastography (R) (TEG) measures haemostasis in whole blood, we used this instrument to study whether transfused platelets (PLTs) have the same haemostatic function compared to native circulating PLTs. Further, we studied the effect of storage time on the

  2. Effects of autologous platelet transfusion on platelet inhibition in ticagrelor-treated and clopidogrel-treated subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, R; Carlson, G F; Nylander, S; Andersson, T L G

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Limited data on hemostatic benefits of platelet transfusion (PT) exist. 44 healthy subjects had a single dose of ticagrelor or clopidogrel ± autologous PT post-dosing. PT did not reverse ticagrelor's antiplatelet effects and had minimal impact post clopidogrel. Post-ticagrelor, PT is unlikely to be beneficial, and the benefits post-clopidogrel are unknown. Background Antiplatelet agents increase bleeding risk. Few data on hemostatic benefits of platelet transfusion exist. Objective To assess the effect of autologous platelet transfusion on ticagrelor-mediated and clopidogrel-mediated platelet inhibition in a single-center, open-label, randomized, cross-over study (NCT01744288). Methods Forty-four healthy subjects received ticagrelor (180 mg) or clopidogrel (600 mg; two functional CYP2C19 alleles [*1 or *17] required) with or without platelet transfusion (14-day washout). Subjects received one autologous platelet apheresis unit (approximately six pooled donor platelet units) 24 h (n = 15) or 48 h (n = 13) after ticagrelor or 48 h after clopidogrel (n = 16). Platelet apheresis was conducted 72 h before transfusion. Aspirin (81 mg per day) was taken from after apheresis until 24 h before transfusion. P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs) and inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) induced by ADP were measured. Results Mean age and body mass index were 30 years (standard deviation [SD] 6 years) and 26.9 kg m(-2) (SD 4.0 kg m(-2) ), respectively; 98% of subjects were men, and 39 of 44 completed treatment. Platelet transfusion 24 h after ticagrelor had minimal effects on IPA or PRU values within 48 h after transfusion. Platelet transfusion 48 h after ticagrelor also had minimal effects on IPA or PRU values at most post-transfusion times. Platelet transfusion 48 h after clopidogrel, versus no transfusion, had a small reversing effect on IPA (24 h, 36 h, and 48 h) and PRU values (12 h, 24 h, and 36 h) after transfusion. Conclusions Autologous platelet transfusion is

  3. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. (Secteur d' Hemobiologie Transfusion, Paris (France))

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  4. Perspectives on the use of biomaterials to store platelets for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Chandrasekar, Keerthana; Johnson, Lacey; Whitelock, John M; Marks, Denese C; Irving, David O; Lord, Megan S

    2016-06-27

    Platelets are routinely stored enabling transfusions for a range of conditions. While the current platelet storage bags, composed of either polyvinylchloride or polyolefin, are well-established, the storage of platelets in these bags beyond 7 days reduces platelet viability below clinically usable levels. New materials and coatings that promote platelet respiration while not supporting platelet adhesion or activation have started to emerge, with the potential to enable platelet storage beyond 7 days. This review focuses on the literature describing currently used biomaterials for platelet storage and emerging materials that are showing promise for improving platelet storage.

  5. [Managing of platelet transfusion refractoriness of haematological malignancies. Experience IPC-EFSAM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, I; Ladaique, P

    2014-11-01

    The platelet refractoriness is a complication of transfusion treatments potentially dramatic in onco-haematology. Chemo-treatment of haematological malignancies or packs of allogeneic bone marrow transplants require iterative platelet transfusion requirements. The discovery of a platelet refractoriness along with its support should be the most reactive as possible but also adapted to the cause. In the case of allo-immunization, it may be expected. The purpose of this presentation is to recall the different etiologies and perform a feedback on the support transfusion platelet of onco-haematology adult patients at Institut Paoli-Calmettes (IPC) in partnership with the EFSAM. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Distinct differences in platelet production and function between neonates and adults: implications for platelet transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Stanworth, Simon; Josephson, Cassandra; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2013-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among sick neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Among neonates, preterm infants are the subgroup at highest risk for thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage, which is frequently intracranial. Although there is no evidence of a relationship between platelet (PLT) count and occurrence of major hemorrhage, preterm infants are commonly transfused prophylactically when PLT counts fall below an arbitrary limit, and this threshold is usually higher than for older infants or adults. This liberal practice has been influenced by the observation that, in vitro, neonatal PLTs are hyporeactive in response to multiple agonists. However, full-term infants exhibit normal to increased primary hemostasis due to factors in neonatal blood that enhance the PLT-vessel wall interaction. Additionally, cardiorespiratory problems are considered the main etiologic factors in the development of neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage. In this review, we will discuss the developmental differences that exist in regard to PLT production and function, as well as in primary hemostasis in preterm and term neonates, and the implications of these developmental differences to transfusion medicine. PLT transfusions are not exempt of risk, and a better understanding of the PLT function and the hemostatic profile of premature infants and their changes over time and in response to illness is the starting point to design randomized controlled trials to define optimal use of PLT transfusions in premature neonates. Without these future trials, the marked disparities in PLT transfusion practice in neonates between hospitals and countries will remain over time. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of pathogen inactivation for platelet transfusions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, MJ; van Hulst, M; De Wolf, JTM; Botteman, M; Staginnus, U

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate cost-effectiveness of pathogen inactivation for platelet transfusions in the Netherlands. We used decision tree analysis to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the addition of pathogen inactivation of pooled platelets to standard procedures for platelet

  8. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I

    2015-01-01

    and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood was sampled before, 1 and 24 h after platelet transfusion. Primary and secondary haemostasis was evaluated by whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate) and thromboelastography (TEG). Endothelial biomarkers (s......·005). CONCLUSION: Platelet transfusion improved haemostasis, whereas post-transfusion increases in sCD40L were associated with endothelial damage, indicating that transfused platelets and platelet-derived pro-inflammatory mediators may have opposite effects on the endothelium....

  9. Comparison of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of central lines in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Desborough, Michael; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-12-02

    Patients with a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) often require the insertion of central lines (central venous catheters (CVCs)). CVCs have a number of uses; these include: administration of chemotherapy; intensive monitoring and treatment of critically-ill patients; administration of total parenteral nutrition; and long-term intermittent intravenous access for patients requiring repeated treatments. Current practice in many countries is to correct thrombocytopenia with platelet transfusions prior to CVC insertion, in order to mitigate the risk of serious procedure-related bleeding. However, the platelet count threshold recommended prior to CVC insertion varies significantly from country to country. This indicates significant uncertainty among clinicians of the correct management of these patients. The risk of bleeding after a central line insertion appears to be low if an ultrasound-guided technique is used. Patients may therefore be exposed to the risks of a platelet transfusion without any obvious clinical benefit. To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to the insertion of a central line in patients with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 23 February 2015. We included RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in patients of any age with thrombocytopenia requiring insertion of a CVC. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. One RCT was identified that compared different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of a CVC in people with chronic liver disease. This study is still recruiting participants (expected recruitment: up to 165 participants

  10. Disseminated fusariosis and endogenous fungal endophthalmitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following platelet transfusion possibly due to transfusion-related immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ku

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a case of disseminated fusariosis with endogenous endophthalmitis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Transfusion-associated immune modulation secondary to platelet transfusion could play an important role in the pathophysiology of this case. Case Presentation A 9 year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pancytopenia and disseminated Intravascular coagulation was given platelet transfusion. He developed disseminated fusariosis and was referred to the ophthalmology team for right endogenous endophthalmitis. The infection was controlled with aggressive systemic and intravitreal antifungals. Conclusion Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are predisposed to endogenous fungal endophthalmitis. Transfusion-associated immune modulation may further increase host susceptibility to such opportunistic infections.

  11. Factors influencing platelet transfusion refractoriness in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Sanz, Jaime; Freiria, Carmen; Santiago, Marta; Villalba, Ana; Gómez, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Montoro, Juan; Piñana, Jose Luis; Lorenzo, José Ignacio; Puig, Nieves; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Carpio, Nelly

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered a risk factor for development of platelet transfusion refractoriness. The objective of this study was to assess the platelet transfusion refractoriness rate in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from different sources. We retrospectively reviewed the charts and transfusion records of patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation at our institution between 2013 and 2015. The evaluation of post-transfusion platelet count was assessed for each transfusion given, from day of progenitor infusion to day 30 after transplantation. Of 167 patients included in this study, 101 received peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and 66 received umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). Overall, the percentage of platelet transfusions with a 14-h CCI lower than 5000 was 59.3%, being these data significantly higher for UCBT (67.6%) than for PBSCT (31.0%). Seventy-eight percent of patients underwent UCBT become refractory, while 38.6% of patients who received PBSCT were refractory. Factors associated to platelet refractoriness were lower CD34+ cell dose infused, higher number of antibiotics used, presence of anti-HLA I antibodies, and reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Platelet refractoriness is a frequent and complex adverse event and remains a therapeutic challenge in the management of patients undergoing HSCT. There is a higher rate of platelet refractoriness in patients who received UCBT as compared to patients who received PBSCT.

  12. Allergic transfusion reactions to platelets are more commonly associated with prepooled than apheresis components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Tormey, C A; Capetillo, A; Maitta, R W

    2013-11-01

    Transfusions of pooled or apheresis platelets are seen as equally effective in increasing platelet counts with similar rates of transfusion reactions. It has been suggested that allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) to platelets are associated with recipient and donor factors. In this study, we assessed differences in ATR rates among individuals who received platelet components at two academic medical centres. A total of 45 189 leukoreduced platelet products were transfused during the study period of which 31 748 were apheresis units and 13 441 were pooled units. Transfusion reactions were reported in 0·6% (277 of 45 189) of platelet transfusions. The reaction rate was significantly higher in pooled (102 of 13 441) than in apheresis (175 of 31 748) (0·76% vs. 0·55%, respectively, P = 0·01) components. However, an analysis of reactions by categories indicated that only the ATR rate was significantly higher in pooled (55 of 13 441) products as compared with apheresis (76 of 31 748) (0·41% vs. 0·24%, respectively, P = 0·0029) platelets. Moreover, there was no difference in the rate of ABO mismatch between pooled and apheresis products. Our data indicate that pooled platelet components are associated with higher ATR rates than apheresis platelets, suggesting that these components may not be completely equivalent from the standpoint of adverse events. Further investigation is needed to address whether differences in ATRs are related to the pooling process or the extent of donor antigen exposure. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  13. Single-donor granulocyte transfusions for improving the outcome of high-risk pediatric patients with known bacterial and fungal infections undergoing stem cell transplantation: a 10-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolajeva, O; Mijovic, A; Hess, D; Tatam, E; Amrolia, P; Chiesa, R; Rao, K; Silva, J; Veys, P

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections remain a significant cause of transplant-related mortality following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Granulocyte transfusions (GTs) may reduce the neutropenic period after SCT and prevent further progression of the existing infection (that is, therapeutic GT) in addition to standard antibacterial and antifungal therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed on 28 consecutive pediatric SCT recipients who received at least one dose of GT between March 2003 and November 2013 at a single institution. All donors were conditioned with G-CSF+dexamethasone with harvest performed 12-18 h later. Indications for SCT were acute leukemia in 46% (13/28) and severe aplastic anemia in 21% (6/28). The main indications for GT were invasive fungal disease in 50%, bacterial infection in 21% and co-morbidities with predicted reduced tolerance to sepsis in 18% (5/28). The median number of GT was 6 (range 1-14) with a median dose of 3.56 × 10(10) granulocytes infused. The median increment in ANC was 1.06 × 10(9)/L and correlated with the granulocyte dose infused. Adverse reactions observed were mild and infrequent. Sixty-four percent of patients (18/28) are alive with only 2 of the 10 deaths being related to progression of infection. In addition there was a low overall incidence of grade 3-4 acute mucositis and a very low incidence (7%) of acute GvHD grade 3-4. Single-donor GTs afford protection to children undergoing SCT at additional risk of infection and may reduce the overall incidence of severe GvHD.

  14. Use of Aspirin and P2Y12 Response Assays in Detecting Reversal of Platelet Inhibition With Platelet Transfusion in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury on Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Parry, Phillip V; Bauer, Joshua S; Zusman, Benjamin E; Panczykowski, David M; Puccio, Ava M; Okonkwo, David O

    2017-01-01

    At present, guidelines are lacking on platelet transfusion in patients with a traumatic intracranial bleed and history of antiplatelet therapy. The aspirin and P2Y 12 response unit (ARU and PRU, respectively) assays detect the effect of aspirin and P2Y 12 inhibitors in the cardiac population. To describe the reversal of platelet inhibition after platelet transfusion using the ARU and PRU assays in patients with traumatic brain injury. Between 2010 and 2015, we conducted a prospective comparative cohort study of patients presenting with a positive head computed tomography and a history of antiplatelet therapy. ARU and PRU assays were performed on admission and 6 hours after transfusion, with a primary end point of detection of disinhibition after platelet transfusion. One hundred seven patients were available for analysis. Seven percent of patients taking aspirin and 27% of patients taking clopidogrel were not therapeutic on admission per the ARU and PRU, respectively. After platelet transfusion, 51% of patients on any aspirin and 67% of patients on any clopidogrel failed to be reversed. ARU increased by 71 ± 76 per unit of apheresis platelets for patients taking any aspirin, and PRU increased by 48 ± 46 per unit of apheresis platelets for patients taking any clopidogrel. A significant percentage of patients taking aspirin or clopidogrel were not therapeutic and thus would be unlikely to benefit from a platelet transfusion. In patients with measured platelet inhibition, a single platelet transfusion was not sufficient to reverse platelet inhibition in almost half.

  15. Role of platelet transfusion in children with bleeding in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingam, Mahalakshmy

    2015-12-01

    The indications for platelet transfusion in dengue fever are clearly defined in World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines (2011) for dengue fever, but physicians face practical difficulty in its implementation in an epidemic setting. On one hand there is an intense social pressure created by the panic-struck parents to transfuse platelets in presence of bleeding and on the other hand there is a need for its judicious use as the requirement is more than its availability. The study was aimed to assess the clinico-hematological parameters, and the requirement and need for platelet transfusion in children with dengue fever. All children (0-12 yr of age) diagnosed and confirmed with dengue fever at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry between 1 August 2012 and 31 January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised WHO guidelines for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen- based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies and the data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. Out of 261 cases of dengue fever, hemorrhagic manifestations were observed in 52 children (19.9%), which mainly included petechiae (38.5%), gum bleeding (34.6%) and melena (26.9%). Thrombocytopenia was seen in 211 (80.8%) cases. Bleeding manifestations were present in 20(39.2%), 8(15.7%), 13(25.5%) and 11(21.6%) cases with platelet count 1.50,000/mm3 respectively. Bleeding manifestations did not always correlate with platelet count in non-severe dengue infection in comparison to severe dengue infection. The most common mode of presentation of severe dengue infection was shock with 102(39.1%) cases and among them only 22 children (21.6%) had bleeding. About 17 children (6.5%) with severe dengue infection required platelet transfusion and out of them, 12 children (70.6%) had a platelet count <20,000/ mm3 whereas five children (29.4%) had platelet count in the range of 20,000-50,000/mm3. Platelet transfusion was required

  16. Transfusão de plaquetas: do empirismo ao embasamento científico Platelet transfusion: from empiricism to scientific evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline A. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in Brazilian blood transfusion therapy with a growing number of scientific publications, an increased number of repeat donors and a decline in serological ineligibility, a lack of conformity in the application of pre-transfusion tests that may compromise transfusion safety is still observed at transfusion agencies in the fringes of the blood transfusion therapy system. Additionally, although high rates of platelet transfusion refractoriness and significant rates of alloimmunization have been demonstrated in the international literature, few Brazilian centers have been concerned with the study of platelet alloimmunization and even fewer centers have evaluated the efficacy of platelet concentrate transfusion. As more than one million Brazilians, including many repeat blood donors, are listed in the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry (Redome, why not grant transfusion therapy services access to the HLA typing of these blood and marrow donors after obtaining their consent? And why not make use of the Redome data to evaluate the HLA compatibility of donors for alloimmunized patients who are candidates for bone marrow transfusion and who have already been typed? These measures, together with the identification of ABO and HPA antigens, will permit a complete assessment of platelet immunology, will guarantee the transfusion safety of this blood component, and will put Brazil at the same level as the so-called developed countries in terms of transfusion medicine.

  17. Inhibiting GPIbα shedding preserves post-transfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets after prolonged storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenchun; Liang, Xin; Syed, Anum K.; Jessup, Paula; Church, William R.; Ware, Jerry; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Li, Renhao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The platelet storage lesion accelerates platelet clearance after transfusion, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Although inhibiting sheddase activity hampers clearance of platelets with storage lesion, the target platelet protein responsible for ectodomain shedding-induced clearance is not definitively identified. Monoclonal antibody 5G6 was developed recently to bind specifically human platelet receptor GPIbα and inhibit its shedding but not shedding of other receptors. Here, the role of GPIbα shedding in platelet clearance after transfusion was addressed. Approach and Results Both human leukoreduced apheresis-derived platelets and transgenic mouse platelets expressing human GPIbα (hTg) were stored at room temperature in the presence and absence of 5G6 Fab fragment. At various time points aliquots of stored platelets were analyzed and compared. 5G6 Fab inhibited GPIbα shedding in both platelets during storage and preserved higher level of GPIbα on the platelet surface. Compared with age-matched control platelets, 5G6 Fab-stored platelets exhibited similar levels of platelet activation, degranulation, and agonist-induced aggregation. 5G6 Fab-stored hTg platelets exhibited significantly higher post-transfusion recovery and in vivo hemostatic function in recipient mice than control platelets. Consistently 5G6 Fab-stored 8-day-old human platelets produced similar improvement in post-transfusion recovery in immunodeficient mice and in ex vivo thrombus formation over collagen under shear flow. Conclusions Specific inhibition of GPIbα shedding in the stored platelets improves post-transfusion platelet recovery and hemostatic function, providing clear evidence for GPIbα shedding as a cause of platelet clearance. These results suggest that specific inhibition of GPIbα shedding may be utilized to optimize platelet storage conditions. PMID:27417583

  18. Effects of skin disinfection method, deviation bag, and bacterial screening on clinical safety of platelet transfusions in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Dirk; Curvers, Joyce; de Kort, Wim L A M; Hoekstra, Tiny; van der Poel, Cees L; Beckers, Erik A M; Marcelis, Jan H

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products is a great hazard for development of fatal transfusion reactions. Bacterial screening of platelet concentrates (PC) by aerobic and anaerobic culturing (BacT/ALERT, bioMérieux) was introduced in the Netherlands in October 2001. In November 2002, a nationwide, uniform skin cleansing method was introduced with a double-swab disinfection with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol. One location routinely used an integrated diversion bag to collect the first 20 to 30 mL. Over the calendar years 2002 and 2003, in total 113,093 PCs derived from pooled buffy coats were screened. After introduction of the new disinfection method, 0.85 percent were initially positive. This was a small reduction compared to the previous disinfection methods under which 0.95 percent were initially positive. The location with use of the diversion bag showed a significantly lower frequency of bacterial contamination, with 0.50 percent before and 0.37 percent after introduction of 70 percent isopropyl alcohol. In addition 8000 apheresis PCs were also screened, showing 24 initially positive samples (0.30%). The use of the diversion bag and, to a lesser extent, the use of double swabs with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol, led to a reduction of contamination. As expected, predominant contamination with resident skin bacteria was reduced. The combination of diversion bag and new disinfection led to a frequency of initial positive results for pooled five-donor PCs, which is similar to that of single-donor apheresis PCs. Furthermore, the bacterial detection system and associated product recall procedures have been shown to be effective in preventing transfusion of contaminated PCs and/or related red cells, especially for rapidly growing bacteria.

  19. Platelet transfusion versus standard care after acute stroke due to spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage associated with antiplatelet therapy (PATCH): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; de Gans, Koen; Koopman, Maria M.; Brand, Anneke; Majoie, Charles B.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Marquering, Henk A.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; de Haan, Rob J.; Roos, Yvo B.; Reitsma, J. B.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Touzé, E.; Lasne, D.; François, A.; Baharoglu, Irem; Zinkstok, Sanne; Coutinho, Jonathan; Boers, Merel; Geuskens, Ralph; Hart, Groene; Bloodbank, Sanquin; Koopman, Rianne; de Graaf, Reinier; Aerden, Leo; Vermeer, Sarah; Schreuder, Tobien; Schuiling, Wouter; Haag, Den; Bienfait, Henriette; Bakker, Stef; Ziekenhuis, Canisius Wilhelmina; Klijn, Catharina; Bronner, Irene; Ziekenhuis, St Elisabeth; de Kort, Paul; Raaijmakers, Dianne; Visser, Marieke; Ziekenhuis, Catharina; Keizer, Koos; Jansen, Ben; Ziekenhuis, Kruis; van der, Willem; Rooyer, Fergus; Verhey, Hans; Macleod, Mary Joan; Joyson, Anu; Reed, Matthew; Burgess, Seona; Mead, Gillian; Hart, Simon; Muir, Keith; Welch, Angela; Baird, Sally; Smith, Wilma; Huang, Xuya; Moreton, Fiona; Cheripelli, Bharath; El Tawil, Salwa; Baird, Tracey; Duncan, George; Nazir, Fozia; Birschel, Phil; Selvarajah, Johann; Dennis, Martin; Samarasekera, Neshika; Ramsay, Scott; Jackson, Katherine; Ferrigno, Marc; Susen, Sophie; Rossi, Costanza; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Bodenant, Marie; Jacquet, Clémence; Oune, Fanny Ben; Ouk, Thavarak; Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Ozkul, Ozlem; Fetter, Damien; Duchez, Veronique Le Cam; Soufi, Hicham; Sibon, Igor; Desbruxelles, Sabrina; Renou, Pauline; Ledure, Sylvain; Neau, Philippe; Lamy, Matthias; Timsit, Serge; Viakhireva, Irina; Zuber, Mathieu; Tamazyan, Ruben; Lambert, Claire Join; Alamowitch, Sonia; Favrole, Pascal; Gerotziafas, Grigorios; Mazighi, Mikael; Stapf, Christian; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Daubail, Benoit; Delpont, Benoit; Resch, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusion after acute spontaneous primary intracerebral haemorrhage in people taking antiplatelet therapy might reduce death or dependence by reducing the extent of the haemorrhage. We aimed to investigate whether platelet transfusion with standard care, compared with standard care alone,

  20. Bacterial contamination of platelet products in the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzad, Baghi Baghban; Farshad, Baghban; Zahra, Bamzadeh; Nahid, Akbari; Mahsa, Khosravi Bakhtiari

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Overall the risk of transfusion transmitted infections has decreased, especially viral infections like HIV and hepatitis B and C. Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components, however, remains a common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality. Platelets pose a special risk given their preservation methods. The incidence of these episodes needs to be assessed and updated on regular basis to accurately manage the risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial infections. Method: 2,000 platelet samples from the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan were examined randomly during a 5-month period by bacterial culture and molecular tests. Four platelet samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria, giving a rate of contamination of 500 (0.2%) of tested platelets. Isolated bacteria included one each of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Conclusion: Our study underlines the need for additional safety procedures like bacterial screening and pathogen reduction technology to further decrease the risk of transfusion associated bacterial infections.

  1. Platelet and not erythrocyte microparticles are procoagulant in transfused thalassaemia major patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouti, Imane; Cointe, Sylvie; Robert, Stéphane; Judicone, Coralie; Loundou, Anderson; Driss, Fathi; Brisson, Alain; Steschenko, Dominique; Rose, Christian; Pondarré, Corinne; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Badens, Catherine; Dignat-George, Françoise; Lacroix, Romaric; Thuret, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The level of circulating platelet-, erythrocyte-, leucocyte- and endothelial-derived microparticles detected by high-sensitivity flow cytometry was investigated in 37 β-thalassaemia major patients receiving a regular transfusion regimen. The phospholipid procoagulant potential of the circulating microparticles and the microparticle-dependent tissue factor activity were evaluated. A high level of circulating erythrocyte- and platelet-microparticles was found. In contrast, the number of endothelial microparticles was within the normal range. Platelet microparticles were significantly higher in splenectomized than in non-splenectomized patients, independent of platelet count (P microparticle level (P microparticles were not related to splenectomy, appear to be devoid of proper procoagulant activity and no relationship between their production and haemolysis, dyserythropoiesis or oxidative stress markers could be established. Intra-microparticle labelling with anti-HbF antibodies showed that they originate only partially (median of 28%) from thalassaemic erythropoiesis. In conclusion, when β-thalassaemia major patients are intensively transfused, the procoagulant activity associated with thalassaemic erythrocyte microparticles is probably diluted by transfusions. In contrast, platelet microparticles, being both more elevated and more procoagulant, especially after splenectomy, may contribute to the residual thrombotic risk reported in splenectomized multi-transfused β-thalassaemia major patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sonorheometry assessment of platelet function in cardiopulmonary bypass patients: Correlation of blood clot stiffness with platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activity, aspirin usage, and transfusion risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Francesco; Lin-Schmidt, Xiefan; Bhamidipati, Castigliano; Haverstick, Doris M; Walker, William F; Ailawadi, Gorav; Lawrence, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Impaired platelet function may underlie bleeding associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and at present is incompletely evaluated with existing diagnostic technologies. Sonorheometry (SR) is a recently developed ultrasound-based technology that quantifies hemostasis and platelet activity from a blood sample by measuring ex vivo clot stiffness (S). We hypothesized that impaired platelet-fibrin interactions as assessed by SR would correlate with transfusion during CPB and history of prior aspirin therapy. Thirty-nine patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were enrolled following informed consent (University of Virginia IRB#14050) in a prospective observational pilot study to assess pre-operative platelet function and transfusion frequency. To assess platelet activity, abciximab was added to blood prior to SR and native S versus abciximab treated S created a differential test for platelet activity. Patient blood samples were activated with kaolin and SR was then used to measure clot stiffness. Patients were transfused with blood products as directed by clinical practice, with the surgical team blinded to SR results. Blood clot stiffness with and without abciximab, was compared in a ratio test (S/Sabciximab) named the Platelet Function Index (PFI). PFI was hypothesized to be positively correlated with platelet contributions through integrin αIIbβ3 to clot stiffness. PFI for CPB subjects was lower for those receiving transfusions than those not receiving transfusions (paspirin therapy was lower than for those not on aspirin therapy (paspirin effects on risk of surgical bleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Serratia marcescens strains implicated in adverse transfusion reactions form biofilms in platelet concentrates and demonstrate reduced detection by automated culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco-Stewart, V S; Brown, E E; Parr, C; Kalab, M; Jacobs, M R; Yomtovian, R A; Ramírez-Arcos, S M

    2012-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in adverse transfusion reactions associated with contaminated platelet concentrates. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the ability of S. marcescens to form surface-attached aggregates (biofilms) could account for contaminated platelet units being missed during screening by the BacT/ALERT automated culture system. Seven S. marcescens strains, including biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative control strains and five isolates recovered from contaminated platelet concentrates, were grown in enriched Luria-Bertani medium and in platelets. Biofilm formation was examined by staining assay, dislodging experiments and scanning electron microscopy. Clinical strains were also analysed for their ability to evade detection by the BacT/ALERT system. All strains exhibited similar growth in medium and platelets. While only the biofilm-positive control strain formed biofilms in medium, this strain and three clinical isolates associated with transfusion reactions formed biofilms in platelet concentrates. The other two clinical strains, which had been captured during platelet screening by BacT/ALERT, failed to form biofilms in platelets. Biofilm-forming clinical isolates were approximately three times (Pmarcescens strains associated with transfusion reactions form biofilms under platelet storage conditions, and initial biofilm formation correlates with missed detection of contaminated platelet concentrates by the BacT/ALERT system. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  4. Platelet concentrates for topical use: bedside device and blood transfusion technology. Quality and versatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzini, Piero; Balbo, Valeria; Mazzucco, Laura

    2012-06-01

    More or less after a decade of experimental and pioneering manual procedures to prepare platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for topical use, several portable and bedside devices were made available to prepare the PRP at the point-of-care. This technical opportunity increased the number of patients who got access to the treatment with autologous PRP and PRP-gel. Since topical treatment of tissue with PRP and PRP-gel was restricted to autologous preparation, blood transfusion centers that professionally prepare donor-derived platelet concentrates were not able to cover the overwhelming request for autologous PRP supply. Principally for logistic and organization reasons blood transfusion centers usually fail the challenge of prompt delivery of PRP to the physician over large territory. Nevertheless the blood bank production of platelet concentrates is associated with high standardization and quality controls not achievable from bedside and portable devices. Furthermore it easy to demonstrate that high-volume blood bank-produced platelet concentrates are less expensive than low-volume PRP produced by portable and bedside devices. Taking also in consideration the ever-increasing safety of the blood components, the relationship between bedside device-produced and blood-bank-produced PRP might be reconsidered. Here we discuss this topic concluding that the variety of sources of PRP production is an opportunity for versatility and that, ultimately, versatility is an opportunity for the patient's care.

  5. An active haemovigilance programme characterizing the safety profile of 7437 platelet transfusions prepared with amotosalen photochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselaer, J C; Cazenave, J P; Lambermont, M; Garraud, O; Hidajat, M; Barbolla, L; Tardivel, R; Defoin, L; Waller, C; Mendel, I; Raidot, J P; Kandel, G; De Meuter, R; Fabrigli, P; Dehenau, D; Arroyo, J L; Padrón, F; Gouezec, H; Corral, M; Jacquet, M; Sundin, D; Lin, L; Corash, L

    2008-05-01

    An active haemovigilance programme was implemented to survey adverse events (AE) associated with transfusion of platelets photochemically treated with amotosalen and ultraviolet A (PCT-PLT). The results of 5106 transfusions have already been reported. Here we report the results of an additional 7437 PCT-PLT transfusions. The focus of this ongoing haemovigilance programme is to document all AEs associated with PCT-PLT transfusion. Data collected for AEs include: time of event after starting transfusion, clinical descriptions, vital signs, results from radiographs and bacterial cultures, event severity (Grade 0-4) and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. One thousand four hundred patients (mean 60 years, range 1-96) received PCT-PLT transfusions. The majority of the patients (53.4%) had haematology-oncology diseases and required conventional chemotherapy (44.8%) or stem cell transplantation (8.6%). Sixty-eight PCT-PLT transfusions were associated with AE. Acute transfusion reactions (ATR), classified as an AE possibly related, probably related, or related to PCT-PLT transfusions were infrequent (n = 55, 55/7437 = 0.7%) and most were of Grade 1 severity. Thirty-nine patients (39/1400 = 2.8%) experienced one or more ATRs. The most frequently reported signs/symptoms were chills, fever, urticaria, dyspnoea, nausea and vomiting. Five AEs were considered severe (> or = Grade 2); however, no causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion was found. Repeated exposure to PCT-PLT did not increase the likelihood of an ATR. No cases of transfusion-related acute lung injury and no deaths due to PCT-PLT transfusions were reported. Routine transfusion of PCT-PLT is well-tolerated in a wide range of patients. ATRs related to PCT-PLT transfusion were infrequent and most were of mild severity.

  6. Alloimmunization against platelets, granulocytes and erythrocytes in multi-transfused patients in Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesi, Mohammad Reza; Louni Aligoudarzi, Samira; Bigdeli, Razieh; Lashgari, Marzieh; Mazaheri, Hoda; Asgary, Vahid

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at alloantibody screening, determination of the types of these antibodies in multiple-transfused patients with chronic hematologic diseases. This descriptive study was performed on 240 patients with chronic hematological diseases referred to public hospitals in Iran. Single blood sample was taken and tested for the presence of antibodies. In case of a positive antibody screening, antibody identification was performed using granulocyte agglutination test (GAT), granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test (GIIFT), platelet indirect immunofluorescence test (PIIFT), monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) and panel cells. Out of 240 patients, 105 patients (43.75 %) had been alloimmunized. The incidence of alloantibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) in positive alloantibodies patients were 84.76% (89/105). The most common alloantibody was against antigens of the kell (anti-K) and Rh (anti-E) and (anti D) systems (46.66%, 18.09% and 11.43% respectively). The overall incidence of anti- human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies were 65.7% (69/105). Polymorphonuclear (PMN)-specific antibodies were found in 6.66% (7/105). Also from 105 patients, 14 patients had alloantibodies against platelet. In general, it is recommend that to decrease the rate of alloantibody synthesis, the packed cells should be cross matched for minor blood groups especially for Rh (E) and kell. In addition, the use of leukodepleted blood products can decrease the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet (PLT), PMN and HLA antigens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Kou, Yuntong; Taha, Mariam; Kalab, Miloslav; Ronholm, Jennifer; Schlievert, Patrick M; Cahill, Michael P; Skeate, Robert; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra

    2017-05-01

    Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units. © 2017 AABB.

  8. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-09-30

    Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients with bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding.This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004 and updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. We have now split this review into four smaller reviews looking at these questions individually; this review is the first part of the original review. To determine whether a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given when patient bleeds) is as effective and safe as a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding, usually when the platelet count falls below a given trigger level) in patients with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent or treat bleeding in patients with malignant haematological disorders receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or undergoing HSCT. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We identified seven RCTs that compared

  9. Apheresis technology correlates with bacterial contamination of platelets and reported septic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anne F; Dy, Beth A; DeMerse, Barbara; Wagner, Stephen J; Stramer, Susan L; O'Neill, E Mary; Herron, Ross M

    2017-12-01

    Apheresis technology to collect platelet (PLT) components differs among devices. We evaluated the relationship of the plateletpheresis device with bacterial contamination and reported septic transfusion reactions. Plateletpheresis was performed using Amicus (Fenwal, a Fresenius Kabi Company) or Trima (Trima Accel, TerumoBCT) from 2010 to 2014. All donations used inlet-line sample diversion and were tested by quality control (QC; Day 1) aerobic culture. Rates of bacterial contamination and septic reactions to PLTs were calculated for both devices. During the 5-year study period, plateletpheresis collections using Amicus and Trima devices totaled 1,486,888 and 671,955 donations, respectively. The rate of confirmed-positive bacterial cultures of apheresis PLT donations was significantly higher with Amicus than with Trima (252 vs. 112 per 106 donations [odds ratio {OR}, 2.3; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.8-2.9]). Septic transfusion reactions were caused by 30 apheresis PLT units from 25 contaminated Amicus procedures and three apheresis PLT units from three contaminated Trima procedures. The overall rate of septic reactions was significantly higher with apheresis PLT components collected with Amicus than with Trima (16.8 vs. 4.5 per 106 donations [OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1-12.5]). All apheresis PLT components implicated in septic transfusion reactions had negative QC culture results incubated through Day 5 (i.e., false negatives). Apheresis technology affects bacterial contamination of plateletpheresis collections. The device-specific, higher rate of confirmed-positive bacterial culture results also correlated with a significantly higher rate of reported septic transfusion reactions to apheresis PLTs. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Statistical analysis plan for the PlAtelet Transfusion in Cerebral Haemorrhage (PATCH) trial: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Cordonnier, Charlotte; de Haan, Rob J.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Use of antiplatelet therapy shortly before stroke due to spontaneous primary intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is associated with higher case fatality in comparison to ICH without prior antithrombotic drug use. The PlAtelet Transfusion in Cerebral Haemorrhage (PATCH) trial aimed to assess

  11. Comparison of two platelet transfusion strategies to minimize ABO-nonidentical transfusion, outdating, and shortages using a computer-simulated "virtual blood bank".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackups, Ronald; Kymes, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion of ABO-incompatible platelets (PLTs) is associated with reduced PLT recovery and a risk of transfusion reactions. However, a policy of transfusing only ABO-identical PLTs may increase wastage due to product outdating. A prospective study attempting to compare the effects of different ABO compatibility strategies could be costly and disruptive to a blood bank's operations. We designed a "virtual blood bank," a stochastic computer program that models the stocking and release of products to meet demand for PLT transfusion in a simulated hospital population. ABO-nonidentical transfusions (ABOni), outdates, and inventory shortages were recorded and compared under two different transfusion strategies: ABO-First, a strategy that prioritizes transfusion of ABO-identical PLTs, and Age-First, a strategy that minimizes outdating by transfusing products closest to expiration. The ABO-First strategy resulted in fewer ABOni but more outdates than the Age-First strategy. Under conditions that mimic a large hospital blood bank, the ABO-First strategy was more cost-effective overall than the Age-First strategy if avoiding an ABOni is valued at more than $19 to $26. For a small blood bank, the ABO-First strategy was more cost-effective if avoiding an ABOni is valued at more than $104 to $123. Based on a virtual blood bank computer simulation, the cost of avoiding an ABOni using the ABO-First strategy varies greatly by size of institution. Individual blood banks must carefully consider these management strategies to determine the most cost-effective solution. © 2014 AABB.

  12. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen–UVA photochemical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT™ Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0–4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0·6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0·4%) and urticaria (41, 0·2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. PMID:25981525

  13. IgE- and IgG mediated severe anaphylactic platelet transfusion reaction in a known case of cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic reactions occur commonly in transfusion practice. However, severe anaphylactic reactions are rare; anti-IgA (IgA: Immunoglobulin A in IgA-deficient patients is one of the well-illustrated and reported causes for such reactions. However, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction through blood component transfusion may be caused in parasitic hyperimmunization for IgG and IgE antibodies. Case Report: We have evaluated here a severe anaphylactic transfusion reaction retrospectively in an 18year-old male, a known case of cerebral malaria, developed after platelet transfusions. The examination and investigations revealed classical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis along with a significant rise in the serum IgE antibody level and IgG by hemagglutination method. Initial mild allergic reaction was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction after the second transfusion of platelets. Conclusion: Based on these results, screening of patients and donors with mild allergic reactions to IgE antibodies may help in understanding the pathogenesis as well as in planning for preventive desensitization and measures for safe transfusion.

  14. Transfusion of platelets, but not of red blood cells, is independently associated with nosocomial infections in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engele, Leo J; Straat, Marleen; van Rooijen, Ingeborg H M; de Vooght, Karen M K; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bos, Lieuwe D J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2016-12-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with nosocomial infection in the critically ill patients. However, this association may be confounded by length of stay, as prolonged intensive care unit (ICU stay) increases both risk of infection and risk of transfusion. Also, it is not known whether specific blood products have differential risks. In this prospective multicentre cohort study, the risk of bacterial infections associated with transfusion products in critically ill (ICU) patients was determined in an integrated statistical model, using Cox proportional hazard analysis to account for attrition bias. In all acutely admitted patients with a length of stay of >48 h between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012, the occurrence of nosocomial infections in the ICU was prospectively monitored using CDC criteria. Of 3502 screened patients, 476 (13.6 %) developed a nosocomial infection. These patients had higher APACHE IV scores, had longer ICU length of stay and were more frequently transfused compared to patients without an infection. Logistic regression showed that RBC transfusion was a risk factor for infection [odds ratio (OR) 1.98, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.54-2.55, p infection [hazard ratio (HR) 1.36, 95 % CI 1.10-1.69, p = 0.004] and between platelet transfusion and infection (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.18-1.81, p infection independently from other transfusion products (HR 1.40, 95 % CI 1.03-1.90, p = 0.03). In critically ill patients, transfusion of platelets, but not of RBCs and plasma, is an independent risk factor for acquiring a nosocomial infection.

  15. Report on the 15th International Society of Blood Transfusion platelet immunology workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, U J; Kiefel, V; Kroll, H; Bein, G; Santoso, S

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the 15th ISBT Platelet Immunology Workshop was to evaluate the detection of free platelet-reactive autoantibodies from ITP patients by the use of a standardized MAIPA protocol, to compare sensitivity and specificity of antibody detection for anti-HPA-1a and serologically difficult-to-assess antibodies against HPA-3, to identify whether anti-HPA-1a titration results can be compared between laboratories, and to evaluate HPA genotyping methods. Workshop materials were shipped from the organizing laboratory in Giessen, Germany. Thirty laboratories from 19 countries participated. Results for the detection of autoantibodies differed greatly between the laboratories and no consensus was reached for one of the two sera. Detection and titration of antibodies against HPA-1a, in contrast, gave largely congruent results. Serologically difficult-to-assess antibodies recognizing HPA-3a and HPA-3b were not detected by many laboratories. For genotyping, good agreement was achieved. Detection of HPA-1a antibodies, titration of anti-HPA-1a, and HPA genotyping are well performed in most participating laboratories. The workshop has identified two specific areas with room and need for improvement: the detection of autoantibodies and the detection of HPA-3 alloantibodies. Recommendations of the Working Party on techniques that can help to overcome these problems are desirable. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications.

  17. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19,175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen-UVA photochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-11-01

    A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT(™) Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0-4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19,175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0.6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0.4%) and urticaria (41, 0.2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. © 2015 The Authors ISBT Science Series published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  18. In vitro and in vivo characterization of ultraviolet light C-irradiated human platelets in a 2 event mouse model of transfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhi

    Full Text Available UV-based pathogen reduction technologies have been developed in recent years to inactivate pathogens and contaminating leukocytes in platelet transfusion products in order to prevent transfusion-transmitted infections and alloimmunization. UVC-based technology differs from UVA or UVB-based technologies in that it uses a specific wavelength at 254 nm without the addition of any photosensitizers. Previously, it was reported that UVC irradiation induces platelet aggregation and activation. To understand if UVC-induced changes of platelet quality correlate with potential adverse events when these platelets are transfused into animals, we used a 2-event SCID mouse model in which the predisposing event was LPS treatment and the second event was infusion of UVC-irradiated platelets. We analyzed lung platelet accumulation, protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as an indication of lung injury, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 release in mice received UVC-irradiated or untreated control platelets. Our results showed UVC-irradiated platelets accumulated in lungs of the mice in a dose-dependent manner. High-doses of UVC-irradiated platelets were sequestered in the lungs to a similar level as we previously reported for UVB-irradiated platelets. Unlike UVB-platelets, UVC-platelets did not lead to lung injury or induce MIP-2 release. This could potentially be explained by our observation that although UVC treatment activated platelet surface αIIbβ3, it failed to activate platelet cells. It also suggests lung platelet accumulation and subsequent lung damage are due to different and separate mechanisms which require further investigation.

  19. Fate in humans of the plasticizer, DI (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, arising from transfusion of platelets stored in vinyl plastic bags. [plasticizer migration into human blood from vinyl plastic bags during transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R. J.; Schiffer, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Platelet concentrates were shown to contain 18-38 mg/100 ml of a phthalate plasticizer (DEHP) which arose by migration from the vinyl plastic packs in which the plateletes were prepared and stored. Transfusion of these platelets into 6 adult patients with leukemia resulted in peak blood plasma levels of DEHP ranging from 0.34 - 0.83 mg/100 ml. The blood levels fell mono-exponentially with a mean rate of 2.83 percent per minute and a half-life of 28.0 minutes. Urine was assayed by a method that would measure unchanged DEHP as well as all phthalic acid-containing metabolities. In two patients, at most 60 and 90% of the infused dose, respectively, was excreted in the urine collected for 24 hours post-transfusion. These estimates, however, could be high due to the simultaneous excretion of DEHP remaining from previous transfusions or arising from uncontrolled environmental exposures.

  20. Fate in humans of the plasticizer, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, arising from transfusion of platelets stored in vinyl plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R J; Schiffer, C A

    1976-01-01

    Platelet concentrates were shown to contain 18 to 38 mg/dl of a phthalate plasticizer (DEHP) which arose by migration from the vinyl plastic packs in which the platelets were prepared and stored. Transfusion of these platelets into six adult patients with leukemia resulted in peak blood plasma levels of DEHP ranging from 0.34 to 0.83 mg/dl (approximately 0.02 mg/dl plasma per mg DEHP administered per square meter of surface area). The blood levels fell monoexponentially with a mean rate of 2.83 per cent per minute and a half-life of 28.0 minutes. Urine was assayed by a method that would measure unchanged DEHP as well as all phthalic acid-containing metabolites. In two patients, at most 60 and 90 per cent of the infused dose, respectively, was excreted in the urine collected for 24 hours posttransfusion. These estimates, however, could be high due to the simultaneous excretion of DEHP remaining from previous transfusions or arising from uncontrolled environmental exposures.

  1. Acute lung injury after platelet transfusion in a patient with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Karoli

    2014-01-01

    ventilation. Greater knowledge and increased awareness especially amongst the clinicians regarding TRALI is needed for prevention and treatment of this potentially severe complication of blood/component transfusion.

  2. Post-transfusion purpura in an African-American man due to human platelet antigen-5b alloantibody: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynce Filipa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-transfusion purpura is a rare immunohematological disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia following transfusion of blood components and induced by an alloantibody against a donor platelet antigen. It occurs primarily in women sensitized by pregnancy and is most commonly caused by anti-human platelet antigen-1a antibodies. Here, we describe what we believe to be the first documented case of an African-American man who developed post-transfusion purpura due to an anti-human platelet antigen-5b alloantibody after receiving multiple blood products. Case presentation A 68-year-old African-American man initially admitted with atrial flutter was started on anticoagulation treatment, which was complicated by severe hematemesis. On days 4 and 5 of hospitalization, he received six units of packed red blood cells, and on days 4, 13 and 14 he received plasma. His platelet count began to drop on day 25 and on day 32 reached a nadir of 7 × 109/L. His platelet count increased after receiving intravenous immune globulin. An antibody with reactivity to human platelet antigen-5b was detected by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassay. Our patient was homozygous for human platelet antigen-5a. Conclusion This case emphasizes the importance of including post-transfusion purpura in the differential diagnosis for both men and women with acute onset of thrombocytopenia following transfusion of blood products. The prompt recognition of this entity is crucial for initiation of the appropriate management.

  3. Antibodies against human platelet alloantigens and human leucocyte antigen class 1 in Saudi Arabian multiparous women and multi-transfused patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ouda, Sarah K.; Al-Banyan, Abdulmajeed A.; Al-Gahtani, Farjah H.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Al-Dakhil, Lateefa O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of alloimmunization against human platelet antigens (HPAs) and human leucocyte antigen class 1 (HLA1) in multiparous women and multi-transfused patients. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between January and August 2013, on 50 multiparous women with no history of previous blood transfusion recruited from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, and 50 patients, who received multiple platelet transfusions, recruited from the Hematology/Oncology Ward, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: The frequency of alloimmunization among multiparous pregnant women was 76%, as follows: 16% against HLA1 only, 8% against HPAs only, 52% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. In multi-transfused patients, the rate of alloimmunization was 42% as follows: 2% against HLA1 only, 22% against HPAs only, 18% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. The frequency of alloimmunization increases with the number of pregnancies, but not with the number of platelet transfusions. Conclusion: Alloimmunization against HPAs and HLA1 is very common among Saudi multiparous women and multi-transfused patients, which encourages the search for the extent of the possible complications in the fetus and newborn and in multitransfused patients and how to prevent their occurrence. PMID:25987107

  4. A Platelet Substitute: The Plateletsome to be Used in Transfusion Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-25

    arachidonic acid200-500uM induced) was measured with a dual channel aggregometer. Blood was anticoagu- lated with Na citrate(0.011M) and platelet rich plasma...incubated with buffer, cryoprecipitate, collagen, fibrin - ogen, or fibronectin. Liposomes were preincubated with buffer or plasma. Following incubation at...liposome preparations in vivo. Discussion Th-ecomplex nature of platlet physiology makes the development of an artificial platelet a formidable task. In

  5. Alternative agents to prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chaimani, Anna; Trivella, Marialena; Vyas, Paresh; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    Background People with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow failure are vulnerable to bleeding. Platelet transfusions have limited efficacy in this setting and alternative agents that could replace, or reduce platelet transfusion, and are effective at reducing bleeding are needed. Objectives To compare the relative efficacy of different interventions for patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternative treatments to platelet transfusions. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 27 April 2016. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), desmopressin (DDAVP), recombinant factor XIII (rFXIII), recombinant interleukin (rIL)6 or rIL11, or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard of care or platelet transfusion). We excluded people undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transfusion. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We estimated summary risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We planned to use summary mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. All summary measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We could not perform a network meta-analysis because the included studies had important differences in the baseline severity of disease for the participants and in the number of participants undergoing chemotherapy. This raised important

  6. Temperature cycling improves in vivo recovery of cold-stored human platelets in a mouse model of transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Gelderman, Monique P; Farrell, John; Vostal, Jaroslav G

    2013-06-01

    Platelet (PLT) storage at room temperature (RT) is limited to 5 days to prevent growth of bacteria, if present, to high levels. Storage in cold temperatures would reduce bacterial proliferation, but cold-exposed PLTs are rapidly cleared from circulation by the hepatic Ashwell-Morell (AM) receptor, which recognizes PLT surface carbohydrates terminated by β-galactose. We cycled storage temperature between 4 and 37°C to preserve PLT function and reduce bacterial growth. Temperature-cycled (TC) human PLTs were stored at 4°C for 12 hours and then incubated at 37°C for 30 minutes before returning back to cold storage. PLTs stored at RT or at 4°C (COLD) or TC for 2, 5, and 7 days were infused into SCID mice and the in vivo recovery was determined at 5, 20, and 60 minutes after transfusion. PLTs stored for 2 days in COLD had significantly lower in vivo recoveries than RT PLTs. TC PLTs had improved recoveries over COLD and comparable to RT PLTs. After 5- and 7-day storage, TC PLTs had better recoveries than RT and COLD PLTs. PLT surface β-galactose was increased significantly for both COLD and TC PLTs compared to RT. Blocking of the AM receptor by asialofetuin increased COLD but not TC PLT recovery. TC cold storage may be an effective method to store PLTs without loss of in vivo recovery. The increased β-galactose exposure in TC PLTs suggests that mechanisms in addition to AM receptors may mediate clearance of cold-stored PLTs. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. platelets

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    Joanna Saluk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are the smallest, depleted of nucleus blood cells which contain a typical cellular organelles including the mitochondria, so that have active metabolism. Platelets possess the highly organized cytoskeleton, specific secretory granules and unique membrane receptors system responsible for their high reactivity. The key role of blood platelets is to maintain normal hemostasis, but they also play important roles in inflammation, immune processes and the cancer progression. The anucleated, small platelets occur in representatives of all clusters of mammals, so it seems to be an adaptation feature. In other vertebrates similar hemostatic functions are played by large nucleated platelets, which are much more weakly reactive. Small, reactive platelets, appearing in the evolution of mammals, allowed the formation of clots faster and slower blood loss in case of injury, but also increased the risk of thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases. Daily the human body forms about 1x1011 platelets, which are produced by a process of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of the cytoplasm of mature megakaryocytes. The emergence of platelets is the final stage of megakaryocyte differentiation and is followed by formation of the direct precursors called proplatelets. The anucleated platelets are regarded as terminally differentiated cells, which are not capable of further cell division. However, despite the absence of a nucleus, in blood platelets the synthesis and transcription of mitochondrial DNA and protein synthesis occurring on the basis of mRNA from megakaryocytes has been confirmed. However, recent studies published in 2012 show that the platelets are capable not only of the process of protein synthesis, but also of generation of new cells, which are functionally and structurally similar to the parent platelets.

  8. Low level of procoagulant platelet microparticles is associated with impaired coagulation and transfusion requirements in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis Agerlin; Johansson, Pär Ingemar; Sørensen, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following activation, platelets release small vesicles called platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs). PMPs accelerate thrombin generation and thus clot formation at sites of injury by exposing the procoagulant membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS). The role of PMPs in coagulop......BACKGROUND: Following activation, platelets release small vesicles called platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs). PMPs accelerate thrombin generation and thus clot formation at sites of injury by exposing the procoagulant membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS). The role of PMPs...

  9. Anti-Platelet Therapy is Associated With Decreased Transfusion-Associated Risk of Lung Dysfunction, Multiple Organ Failure, and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Chin, Theresa L.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Maier, Ronald; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; Sauaia, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pre-hospital anti-platelet therapy (APT) was associated with reduced incidence of acute lung dysfunction, multiple organ failure (MOF), and mortality in blunt trauma patients. Design Secondary analysis of a cohort enrolled in the NIGMS Trauma Glue Grant database. Setting Multicenter study including 9 US level-1 trauma centers. Patients A total of 839 severely injured blunt trauma patients at risk for MOF (age >45 years, base deficit > 6 mEq/L or systolic blood pressure head injuries were excluded. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcomes were lung dysfunction (defined as grades 2–3 by the Denver MOF score), MOF (Denver MOF score>3), and mortality. Patients were documented as on APT if taking acetylsalicylic acid, clopidogrel, and/or ticlopidine. Fifteen percent were taking APT prior to injury. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 30 (interquartile range, IQR: 22–51), mean age 61 ± 0.4 years and median red blood cells (RBC) volume transfused was 1700 ml (IQR: 800–3150ml). Overall, 63% developed lung dysfunction, 19% had MOF, and 21% died. After adjustment for age, gender, comorbidities, blood products, crystalloid/12hrs, presence of any head injury, ISS, and 12hrs base deficit >8 mEq/L, 12 hrs RBC transfusion was associated with a significantly smaller risk of lung dysfunction and MOF among the group receiving APT compared to those not receiving it (lung dysfunction p=0.0116, MOF p=0.0291). In addition, APT had a smaller risk (albeit not significant, p=0.06) of death for patients receiving RBC compared to those not on APT after adjustment for confounders, Conclusions Pre-injury APT therapy is associated with a decreased risk of lung dysfunction, MOF, and possibly mortality in high-risk blunt trauma patients who received blood transfusions. These findings suggest platelets have a role in organ dysfunction development and have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:23263579

  10. Fresh-frozen plasma, pathogen-reduced single-donor plasma or bio-pharmaceutical plasma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstern, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Three types of therapeutic plasma are available that differ in their manufacturing processes, composition, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Quarantine-stored, not pathogen-reduced fresh-frozen plasma (QFFP) is prepared from single whole blood or plasma donations. The manufacture of pathogen-reduced single-donor plasmas such as methylene blue-light treated (MLP) or amotosalen-ultraviolet light treated plasma (ALP) involves the addition of a chemical followed by irradiation and subsequent removal of the chemical. Both plasma types show substantial fluctuation of clotting factor and inhibitor levels according to interindividual variations, and both carry the risk of inducing transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI). Photo-oxidation in pathogen-reduced single-donor plasmas reduces clottable fibrinogen and other clotting factors markedly, and there is a lack of clear evidence showing whether this is harmful or not. MLP also appears to be less effective clinically than QFFP. Like clotting factor or inhibitor concentrates, solvent/detergent-treated plasmas (SDP) are bio-pharmaceutical preparations derived from large plasma pools, and variations in plasma protein levels from batch-to-batch are for that reason low. The SD manufacturing process inevitably involves a considerable reduction of plasmin inhibitor (PI), and moderate reduction of all other clotting factors and inhibitors in the final plasma bags. Clinical studies and broad clinical use have however shown that this does not significantly reduce clinical efficacy or increase adverse events. SDPs obviously do not induce TRALI and the risk of allergic reactions is significantly lower than for QFFP. Common to all three plasma types is that the time between donation and freezing the plasma, and whether plasma from whole blood or apheresis plasma is used as starting material, are decisive determinants for the clotting factor and inhibitor potencies in the final bags. Plasma frozen 3-6h after donation, and apheresis

  11. Low hemorrhage-related mortality in trauma patients in a Level I trauma center employing transfusion packages and early thromboelastography-directed hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sørensen, Anne Marie Møller; Larsen, Claus F

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemorrhage accounts for most preventable trauma deaths, but still the optimal strategy for hemostatic resuscitation remains debated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of adult trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center. Demography, Injury Severity Score......% with blunt trauma). Overall 28-day mortality was 12% with causes of death being exsanguinations (14%), traumatic brain injury (72%, two-thirds expiring within 24 hr), and other (14%). One-fourth, 16 and 15% of the patients, received red blood cells (RBCs), plasma, or platelets (PLTs) within 2 hours from....... Nonsurvivors had lower clot strength by kaolin-activated TEG and TEG functional fibrinogen and lower kaolin-tissue factor-activated TEG α-angle and lysis after 30 minutes compared to survivors. None of the TEG variables were independent predictors of massive transfusion or mortality. CONCLUSION: Three...

  12. A retrospective analysis of massive blood transfusion and post-operative complications in patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kulkarni, Atul

    2016-04-01

    Anaesthetic management of patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries is challenging. We wanted to evaluate the effects of pre-operative co-morbid conditions, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion, haemodynamic instability on post-operative complications and hospital outcomes in patients after such surgeries. We collected data from the patient files, anaesthesia records and the electronic medical records about pre-operative morbidities, intraoperative management, complications, blood loss, fluid therapy and blood products transfused. We also collected data on post-operative complications, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and status at discharge. Data were summarised using percentages for categorical data and mean and median for continuous data. The mean blood loss was 4567.44 ml (range 1200-16,000 ml); 95% of all patients received blood transfusion. Twenty patients needed massive blood transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma was needed in 17 patients while 1 patient needed single donor platelets. Haemodynamic instability was present in 38 patients, of which 8 needed continuous vasopressor infusion. Nineteen patients were ventilated post-operatively. Coagulopathy occurred in 22 patients while thrombocytopaenia was seen in 6 patients. The median ICU LOS was 3 (1-6) days, and median hospital stay was 17 (6-53) days. All patients were discharged alive. Supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries are associated with massive intraoperative blood loss and transfusion. Common complications include anaemia, coagulopathy and hyperbilirubinaemia and prolonged ICU stay. Meticulous care, anticipating the complications with timely treatment can lead to excellent outcomes.

  13. Transfusion practices in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Trichur Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  14. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-16

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  15. Single-donor islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatum JA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jacob A Tatum,* Max O Meneveau,* Kenneth L Brayman Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, The University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disorder of the endocrine pancreas that currently affects millions of people in the United States. Although the disease can be managed with exogenous insulin administration, the ultimate cure for the condition lies in restoring a patient’s ability to produce their own insulin. Islet cell allotransplantation provides a means of endogenous insulin production. Though far from perfected, islet transplants are now a proven treatment for type 1 diabetics. However, proper patient selection is critical for achieving optimal outcomes. Given the shortage of transplantable organs, selecting appropriate candidates for whom the procedure will be of greatest benefit is essential. Although many of those who receive islets do not retain insulin independence, grafts do play a significant role in preventing hypoglycemic episodes that can be quite detrimental to quality of life and potentially fatal. Additionally, islet transplant requires lifelong immunosuppression. Antibodies, both preformed and following islet infusion, may play important roles in graft outcomes. Finally, no procedure is without inherent risk and islet transfusions can have serious consequences for recipients’ livers in the form of both vascular and metabolic complications. Therefore, patient-specific factors that should be taken into account before islet transplantation include aims of therapy, sensitization, and potential increased risk for hepatic and portal-venous sequelae. Keywords: islet transplantation, diabetes mellitus type 1, brittle diabetes, single donor, patient

  16. Analysis of complications after blood components' transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timler, Dariusz; Klepaczka, Jadwiga; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Bogusiak, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Complications after blood components still constitute an important clinical problem and serve as limitation of liberal-transfusion strategy. The aim of the study was to present the 5-year incidence of early blood transfusions complications and to assess their relation to the type of the transfused blood components. 58,505 transfusions of blood components performed in the years 2006-2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data concerning the amount of the transfused blood components and the numbers of adverse transfusion reactions reported to the Regional Blood Donation and Treatment Center (RBDTC) was collected. 95 adverse transfusion reactions were reportedto RBDTC 0.16% of alldonations (95/58 505) - 58 after PRBC transfusions, 28 after platelet concentrate transfusions and 9 after FFP transfusion. Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions constitute respectively 36.8% and 30.5% of all complications. Nonhemolyticand allergic reactions are the most common complications of blood components transfusion and they are more common after platelet concentrate transfusions in comparison to PRBC and FFP donations.

  17. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this page, ... There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ...

  18. Defining an appropriate leucoreduction strategy by serial assessment of cytokine levels in platelet concentrates prepared by different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daljit Kaur

    2015-01-01

    single donor apheresis platelets.

  19. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety.

  20. Transfusion Practice in Military Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    acido - sis (Cosgriff et al., 1997; Brohi et al., 2007). Extensive injury causes consumption of coagulation factors and platelets, so that in polytrauma...transfused trauma patient: hypothermia and acidoses revisited. Journal of Trauma, 42, 857 861. Counts, R.B., Haisch, C., Simon, T.L., Maxwell, N.G

  1. Transfusion management of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaz, Beth H; Dente, Christopher J; Harris, Robert S; MacLeod, Jana B; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-06-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the "lethal triad" of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggressive transfusion intervention and resuscitation with blood components that approximate whole blood significantly decrease mortality. In this context, MTPs are a key element of "damage control resuscitation," which is defined as the systematic approach to major trauma that addresses the lethal triad mentioned above. MTPs using adequate volumes of plasma, and thus coagulation factors, improve patient outcome. The ideal amounts of plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate and other coagulation factors given in MTPs in relationship to the red blood cell transfusion volume are not known precisely, but until prospective, randomized, clinical trials are performed and more clinical data are obtained, current data support a target ratio of plasma:red blood cell:platelet transfusions of 1:1:1. Future prospective clinical trials will allow continued improvement in MTPs and thus in the overall management of patients with trauma.

  2. Platelet transfusion—the new immunology of an old therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eStolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet derived lipids are implicated in transfusion related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes.This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long employed therapy.

  3. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT. They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014.

  4. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rekha; Hansda, Upendra

    2014-09-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014.

  5. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Update on massive transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  7. Extension of platelet concentrate storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T L; Nelson, E J; Carmen, R; Murphy, S

    1983-01-01

    Extension of the storage time of platelet concentrates in a satellite bag which is part of a new blood bag system was studied by reinfusing autologous 51Cr-labeled platelets into normal volunteers, and measuring postinfusion platelet counts and bleeding times in patients requiring platelet transfusions. This satellite bag, made of polyvinylchloride plasticized with a new agent, was found to protect platelet concentrates against fall of pH better than other containers studied. This protection was felt to be due to the greater gas permeability of the new plastic. Mean in vivo recovery and half-life (greater than 31% and 3.3 days, respectively) of autologous reinfused platelets were satisfactory following 5 days of storage. Following 7 days of storage, mean recovery was 41 percent and half-life was 2.8 days. Peripheral platelet count increments in patients following platelet transfusions with concentrates stored 4 to 7 days in the new plastic were comparable to increments following transfusion of platelets stored 2 to 3 days in the other plastics studied. Bleeding times shortened in three of four patients receiving platelet concentrates stored from 4 to 6 days in the new plastic. Platelet concentrates stored in the new bag at 20 to 24 degrees C with flat-bed or elliptical agitation could be transfused for up to 5 days following phlebotomy with acceptable clinical results. The new plastic container is promising for storage of platelet concentrates for up to 7 days. Due to the higher pH of 50-ml platelet concentrates stored in bags made with the new plastic, the concentrates were superior at any storage interval to those stored in bags made of the other plastics studied.

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticle Labeling of Human Platelets from Platelet Concentrates for Recovery and Survival Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Konstanze; Wesche, Jan; Palankar, Raghavendra; Schlüter, Rabea; Bakchoul, Tamam; Greinacher, Andreas

    2017-10-11

    Platelets are the smallest blood cells and important for hemostasis. Platelet concentrates (PC) are medicinal products transfused to prevent or treat bleeding. Typically, platelets in PCs are assessed by in vitro tests for their function. However, in vivo testing of these platelets is highly desirable. To distinguish transfused platelets from patients or probands own cells after PC transfusions within the scope of clinical studies, platelets need to be efficiently labeled with minimal preactivation prior to transfusion. Here we report on a method for improved cell uptake of ferucarbotran magnetic nanoparticles contained in Resovist, an FDA-approved MRI contrast agent, by modifying the nanoparticle shell with human serum albumin (HSA). Both HSA-ferucarbotran nanoparticles and magnetically labeled platelets were produced according to EU-GMP guidelines. Platelet function after labeling was evaluated by light transmission aggregometry and by determination of expression of CD62P as platelet activation marker. Magnetic labeling does not impair platelet function and platelets showed reasonable activation response to agonists. Platelet survival studies in NOD/SCID-mice resulted in comparable survival behavior of magnetically labeled and nonlabeled platelets. Additionally, labeled platelets can be recovered from whole blood by magnetic separation.

  9. Pathogen-Reduced, Extended Platelet Storage in Platelet Additive Solution (PAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    evaluated, as a potentially preferred product for battlefield polytrauma. This was once standard-of-care in transfusion medicine , but was abandoned...Sound Blood Center, led by Dr. Sherrill J. Slichter, have extensive experience in studying platelet biology and transfusion medicine . Dr. Slichter’s...unit Platelet Concentration   Volume   Platelet yield   Blood Gases (pH and pCO2, PO2, HC03)   Glucose and Lactate   P-selectin

  10. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  11. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won [Department of Microbiology, Division of Life Sciences, Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Gyu-Jin, E-mail: jinrho@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  12. Massive transfusion in traumatic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jonathan; Wilcox, Susan R; Raja, Ali S

    2013-04-01

    Hemorrhage after trauma is a common cause of death in the United States and globally. The primary goals when managing traumatic shock are the restoration of oxygen delivery to end organs, maintenance of circulatory volume, and prevention of ongoing bleeding through source control and correction of coagulopathy. Achieving these goals may require massive transfusion of blood products. Although use of blood products may be lifesaving, dose-related adverse effects are well described. Complications of massive transfusion include interdependent derangements such as coagulopathy, hypothermia, acidosis, and electrolyte abnormalities, as well as infectious and immunomodulatory phenomena. This article explores the pathogenesis, implications, prevention, and treatment of these complications through the use of massive transfusion protocols. Particular attention is given to the optimal ratio of blood products transfused in large volume resuscitation and prevention of secondary coagulopathy. Observational data indicate that the development and use of a massive transfusion protocol may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with large-volume resuscitation of patients with hemorrhagic shock. Such protocols should include a pre-defined ratio of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets transfused; most commonly, the ratio used is 1:1:1. Additionally, such protocols should monitor for and correct hypothermia, hypofibrinogenemia, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Dengue viremia in blood donors in Northern India: Challenges of emerging dengue outbreaks to blood transfusion safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana Mangwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backdround: Emerging infectious diseases pose threats to the general human population; including recipients of blood transfusions. Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. Screening blood for dengue antigens in dengue-endemic countries would be costly and should, therefore, be recommended only after careful assessment of risk for infection and cost. Aim: A prospective study was conducted to establish the magnitude of the threat that dengue poses to blood safety where it is sporadic with seasonal variations, to quantify risk and to assess that whether screening is feasible and cost-effective. Materials and Methods: Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 antigen test was done on 1709 donations during dengue outbreak in the months August to November 2013 as an additional test using Bio-Rad Platelia Dengue NS1AG test kit which is one step sandwich format microplate enzyme immunoassay using murine monoclonal antibodies for capture and revelation. Chi-square test was used to find statistical significance. Results and Conclusions: Majority cases were whole blood, replacement, male donors with 76.10% donors in <35 years age group. About 17.85% were single donor platelet donations. NS1 antigen in all donors was negative. In the past, dengue affected mainly children who do not donate blood. With the changing trend, mean age of infection increased affecting the population that does donate blood, further reducing blood donation pool. Further studies need to be done in different geographic regions of the country during dengue transmission season to establish maximum incidence of viremic donations, rates of transfusion transmission and clinical consequences in recipients. If risk is found to be substantial, decision will be taken by the policymakers at what threshold screening should be instituted to ensure safe blood transfusion.

  14. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of 98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  15. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  16. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A A ... his or her body. continue What Is a Blood Transfusion? A transfusion is a simple medical procedure that ...

  17. Prevention and management of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hauck-Dlimi B; Achenbach S; Strobel J; Eckstein R; Zimmermann R

    2014-01-01

    Barbara Hauck-Dlimi, Susanne Achenbach, Julian Strobel, Reinhold Eckstein, Robert Zimmermann Department of Transfusion Medicine and Haemostaseology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Transfusion of blood components, transplantations, and exchange of blood between mother and child during pregnancy or at birth can lead to alloimmunization. Because of its clinical relevance, this review brings into focus alloimmunization against red blood cells, human platelet antigens, ...

  18. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Das; Upendra Hansda

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and u...

  19. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients.

  20. ESPRE: Expert System for Platelet Request Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sielaff, B H; Scott, E.; Connelly, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    ESPRE, a knowledge-based system designed to facilitate good platelet transfusion practices, is under development at the University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic. This microcomputer based decision support system aids Blood Bank personnel in evaluating requests for platelet transfusions. Because of a direct link with the laboratory computers, most patient data need not be entered manually, but rather can be accessed directly. ESPRE uses a combination of frames and rules during its inference ...

  1. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batman, B.; van Bladel, E. R.; van Hamersveld, M.; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M; Korporaal, S. J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/275174395; Urbanus, R. T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818402; Roest, M.; Boven, Leonie A; Fijnheer, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085299731

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric

  2. PHYSIOLOGIC TRANSFUSION TRIGGERS AND MASSIVE TRANSFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Tánczos Krisztian; Molnár Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion is often a life saving intervention, but can also be harmful. Restrictive transfusion protocols have recently been developed with a post transfusion target haemoglobin level of 70-100 g/l. Whether haemoglobin level on its own is enough to guide our transfusion policy is an important issue. This review was aimed to look at other possible, so called physiological indicators of blood transfusion what clinicians can be used in addition to haemoglobin during their everyday practi...

  3. Transfusion medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  4. [Importance of haemovigilance and reports on transfusion reaction in blood component therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujić, Jasmina; Gulan, Zdravko; Budakov, Zorana

    2012-01-01

    Application of blood and blood components throughout decades is very successful and mostly safe procedure in patients' therapy. However, it may lead to unfavourable effects, such as transfusion reactions. In the period from 2000 to 2009, 180 transfusion reactions were reported at the Department of Clinical Transfusion of the Service for Blood Transfusion of Vojvodina in Novi Sad. The aetiology of transfusion reactions was determined by examining pre-transfusion and post-transfusion sample of patient's blood and by examining the unit of blood component that induced reaction. Out of 180 reported transfusion reactions, 98 (54.4%) were febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, 69 (38.3%) allergic reactions and 2 (1.11%) haemolytic reactions. Blood components that caused most of transfusion reactions were erythrocytes (62.4%), fresh frozen plasma (11.2%) and platelets (14.4%). All patients underwent multiple transfusions. The fact that only 0.13% transfusion reactions were reported, compared with data from literature (2-15%), points to the lack of regular reporting of transfusion reactions, as well as the fact that there is only one report of delayed transfusion reaction. To improve and make blood transfusion safer it is necessary to respect all pre-transfusion procedures, constant follow up of blood transfusion must be done and patients with diagnosed non-haemolytic transfusion reaction should be given leukocyte reduced blood components.

  5. Epidemiology of massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, M A; Chiesa, F; Vasan, S K

    2015-01-01

    .4% among women transfused for obstetrical bleeding. Mortality increased gradually with age and among all patients massively transfused at age 80 years, only 26% were alive [TABLE PRESENTED] after 5 years. The relative mortality, early after transfusion, was high and decreased with time since transfusion...... transfusion due to obstetrical bleeding constituted 2.6%. Median age at massive transfusion was 67 years and two thirds of the patients were male. The median number of blood components transfused per massive transfusion episode was 22. RBCs formed the majority of blood components transfused. However...

  6. [Allergic transfusion reactions in a patient with multiple food allergies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, E; Schöniger, M; Münz, M; Hiefinger-Schindlbeck, R

    2012-07-01

    A 13-year-old girl with an osteosarcoma was treated by surgery and chemotherapy. During three transfusions of apheresis platelet concentrates allergic reactions occurred, partly in spite of premedication with an antihistamine and a corticoid. As the patient declared to be allergic to some foods, in-vitro tests for allergen-specific IgE antibodies were performed and showed markedly positive results for specific IgE to carrot and celery, less so to hazelnut, peanut and a lot of other food antigens. The donor of one of the unsuitable platelet concentrates remembered when questioned, that he had eaten carrots and chocolate with hazelnuts during the evening before platelet donation. Two washed platelet concentrates were transfused without any problem. Furthermore, transfusions of nine red blood cell concentrates and one unit of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma were well tolerated. Patients should be asked for allergies previous to transfusions to be alert to allergic reactions in patients with a positive history of food or drug allergies. If premedication with antihistamines does not prevent severe allergic transfusion reactions, transfusion of washed platelet concentrates and of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma can be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Clinica use of platelet additive solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhenen, Dick J

    2007-12-01

    Randomised clinical trial (RCT) to study the clinical efficacy and safety of new platelet products using platelet additive solutions are scarce. In this paper a number of recent RCT's is discussed. It can be the start of a development where new transfusion products enter a RCT before the product is applied in clinical practice.

  8. Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Soo Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

  9. Transfusion Medicine Problems and Solutions for the Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

    OpenAIRE

    Luban, Naomi L.C.; McBride, Eileen; Ford, Jason C.; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an integral part of the care of children with oncologic and hematologic conditions. The complexity of transfusion medicine may however lead to challenges for pediatric hematologists/oncologists. In this review, three commonly encountered areas of transfusion medicine are explored. The approach to the investigation and management of suspected platelet refractoriness is reviewed. The unique transfusion related challenges encountered by children undergoing stem cel...

  10. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions Print A A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. As ...

  11. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or ... have liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  12. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI – acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury is defined as acute respiratory failure which develops during or within 6 hours after transfusion of a blood component in a patient with no risk factors for respiratory insufficiency. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is diagnosed based on clinical manifestation and by excluding other causes of acute lung injury. Unambiguous diagnosis is difficult. Looking for anti-HLA and/or anti-HNA antibodies in donors and sometimes in recipients plays an important role in lab tests. Negative antibody findings, either in a donor or in a recipient, do not exclude transfusion-related acute lung injury, which, however, does not exempt from performing leukocyte antibody tests since they are extremely important for transfusion-related acute lung injury prophylaxis. The ways to prevent this reaction include: disqualifying donors with anti-HLA/HNA antibodies, screening for antibodies in multiparous women and in individuals after transfusion, modifying the way blood components are prepared and limiting blood transfusion in clinical practice. The paper presents a case of a 38-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia, hospitalised at the Department of Internal Diseases and Haematology of the Military Institute of Medicine for subsequent courses of chemotherapy. During treatment, the patient had red cells and platelets concentrates transfused several times with no transfusion-related reactions. Eight days after the last chemotherapy infusion, the patient developed high temperature and her platelet count was 14 × 103 /mL. Therefore, the patient received a platelet concentrate again. About 1 hour after transfusion, the patient complained about chest pain and dyspnoea. She needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray revealed lung oedema with no signs of left ventricular failure. Once other causes of acute lung injury were excluded, transfusion-related acute lung injury was diagnosed.

  13. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scheepers

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  14. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, E; Leisewitz, A L; Thompson, P N; Christopher, M M

    2011-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  15. Postoperative infection and natural killer cell function following blood transfusion in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L S; Andersen, A J; Christiansen, P M

    1992-01-01

    The frequency of infection in 197 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery and having either no blood transfusion, transfusion with whole blood, or filtered blood free from leucocytes and platelets was investigated in a prospective randomized trial. Natural killer cell function was measured...... before operation and 3, 7 and 30 days after surgery in 60 consecutive patients. Of the patients 104 required blood transfusion; 48 received filtered blood and 56 underwent whole blood transfusion. Postoperative infections developed in 13 patients transfused with whole blood (23 per cent, 95 per cent...... confidence interval 13-32 per cent), in one patient transfused with blood free from leucocytes and platelets (2 per cent, 95 per cent confidence interval 0.05-11 per cent) and in two non-transfused patients (2 per cent, 95 per cent confidence interval 0.3-8 per cent) (P less than 0.01). Natural killer cell...

  16. First Indian initiative for preparation of low-titer group “O” single-donor platelets with platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: O group SDPs can be prepared with PAS and the beneficial effects were significant with respect to antibody titers. Quality parameters were well maintained. Availability of PAS units has benefitted patients.

  17. Platelet proteins cause basophil histamine release through an immunoglobulin-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donna Dong-Young; Muskaj, Igla; Savage, William

    2017-07-01

    A general understanding of allergic transfusion reaction mechanisms remains elusive. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, but none have been compared experimentally. We used histamine release (HR) from healthy human donor basophils to model allergic transfusion reactions. Platelet component supernatant (plasma), platelet lysate, and manipulated platelet lysates (dialyzed, delipidated, trypsinized, mild heat-inactivated, and ultracentrifuged) were used to characterize allergic stimuli. Immunoglobulin-dependent mechanisms were investigated through cell surface immunoglobulin depletion and ibrutinib signaling inhibition. HR induced by platelet mitochondria was compared with HR by platelet lysate with or without DNase treatment. Robust, dose-responsive HR to platelet lysate was observed in two of eight nulliparous, never-transfused, healthy donors. No HR was observed with plasma. Among manipulated platelet lysates, only trypsin treatment significantly reduced HR (39% reduction; p = 0.008). HR in response to platelet lysate significantly decreased with either cell surface immunoglobulin depletion or ibrutinib pretreatment. Platelet mitochondria induced minimal basophil HR, and DNase treatment did not inhibit platelet lysate-induced HR. Type I immediate hypersensitivity to platelet proteins may be an allergic transfusion reaction mechanism. Prior sensitization to human proteins is not required for basophil responses to platelet proteins. Further study into the relative contributions of hypersensitivity to platelet versus plasma proteins in transfusion is warranted. © 2017 AABB.

  18. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet transfusions total >2.17 million apheresis-equivalent units per year in the United States and are derived entirely from human donors, despite clinically significant immunogenicity, associated risk of sepsis, and inventory shortages due to high demand and 5-day shelf life. To take advantage of known physiological drivers of thrombopoiesis, we have developed a microfluidic human platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow stiffness, extracellular matrix composition, micro-channel size, hemodynamic vascular shear stress, and endothelial cell contacts, and it supports high-resolution live-cell microscopy and quantification of platelet production. Physiological shear stresses triggered proplatelet initiation, reproduced ex vivo bone marrow proplatelet production, and generated functional platelets. Modeling human bone marrow composition and hemodynamics in vitro obviates risks associated with platelet procurement and storage to help meet growing transfusion needs. PMID:25606631

  19. [Blood components and good practices in transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Georges

    2015-02-01

    Each year, more than three millions of blood components are transfused to more than five hundred thousand patients in France. The optimal use of blood components requires that physicians prescribing blood components master the clinical indications of red blood cells concentrates, platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma. In addition, physicians in charge of blood component prescription should provide adequate pre- and post-transfusion information to their patients. Compliance of blood components administration in patients with safety guidelines contributes as well to their optimal use. In addition, for each blood component transfused, a proper evaluation of its safety and its efficacy should be done. Finally, a regular evaluation of transfusion practice in hospital services were blood components are used, through audits made in cooperation with their blood component provider, either blood transfusion centre or the hospital blood bank, enables to appreciate the level of compliance with safety and clinical guidelines, and more globally how the transfusion process is mastered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfusion Related Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen Osborn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This exercise is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents and medical students and learners from other specialties (internal medicine, family medicine, anesthesia. Introduction: About 85 million red blood cell units are transfused worldwide each year. Transfusion reactions can complicate up to 8% of blood transfusions and can range from benign to life threatening. An emergency physician must be able to discuss the risks and benefits of blood transfusion with patients, as well as manage the associated complications of blood transfusion. Objectives: At the end of this didactic session, the learner will be able to: 1 list the various transfusion reactions and their approximate incidence; 2 understand the pathophysiology behind each transfusion reaction; 3 describe the management for each type of transfusion reaction; and 4 discuss the plan for prevention of future transfusion reactions. Method: This is a classic team based learning exercise (cTBL.

  1. PHYSIOLOGIC TRANSFUSION TRIGGERS AND MASSIVE TRANSFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tánczos Krisztián

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is often a life saving intervention, but can also be harmful. Restrictive transfusion protocols have recently been developed with a post transfusion target haemoglobin level of 70–100 g/l. Whether haemoglobin level on its own is enough to guide our transfusion policy is an important issue. This review was aimed to look at other possible, so called physiological indicators of blood transfusion what clinicians can be used in addition to haemoglobin during their everyday practice. In the second part of the paper the problems of the management of massive bleeding are reviewed. In both cases, a complex approach is requiredtaking into consideration physiological changes in order to individualize treatment and hence avoid harm that can be caused by unnecessary transfusion of blood products.

  2. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  3. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  4. Comparison of platelets characteristics according to various processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Karpova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date different techniques of platelet concentrates (PC preparation and processing are proposed to achieve the best efficiency of transfusions and to minimize the risks post-transfusion reactions. However, data on the impact of different approaches to PC preparation and processing on morphological and functional characteristics of platelets and, as a consequence, the clinical efficacy of transfusions is controversial. In this paper we analyzed the impact of the platelet storage solution and different methods of pathogen inactivation (X-rays, UV-irradiation after photosensitization with riboflavin on morphological and functional parameters of platelets. Our findings allow optimizing the technology of preparation and processing of PC to achieve greater effectiveness of transfusion therapy.

  5. Comparison of platelets characteristics according to various processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Karpova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date different techniques of platelet concentrates (PC preparation and processing are proposed to achieve the best efficiency of transfusions and to minimize the risks post-transfusion reactions. However, data on the impact of different approaches to PC preparation and processing on morphological and functional characteristics of platelets and, as a consequence, the clinical efficacy of transfusions is controversial. In this paper we analyzed the impact of the platelet storage solution and different methods of pathogen inactivation (X-rays, UV-irradiation after photosensitization with riboflavin on morphological and functional parameters of platelets. Our findings allow optimizing the technology of preparation and processing of PC to achieve greater effectiveness of transfusion therapy.

  6. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  7. Fluid Resuscitation and Massive Transfusion Protocol in Pediatric Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanović Vesna; Budić Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children due to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock and its consequences, anemia and hypovolemia, decrease oxygen delivery, due to which appropriate transfusion and volume resuscitation are critical. Guidelines for massive transfusion, in the pediatric trauma, have not been defined yet. Current data indicate that early identification of coagulopathy and its treatment with RBSs, plasma and platelets in a 1:1:1 unit ra...

  8. Massive transfusion and nonsurgical hemostatic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P; Weiss, Brendan M; Reid, Thomas J; Bolan, Charles D; Bolan, Charles E

    2008-07-01

    Hemorrhage in trauma is a significant challenge, accounting for 30% to 40% of all fatalities, second only to central nervous system injury as a cause of death. However, hemorrhagic death is the leading preventable cause of mortality in combat casualties and typically occurs within 6 to 24 hrs of injury. In cases of severe hemorrhage, massive transfusion may be required to replace more than the entire blood volume. Early prediction of massive transfusion requirements, using clinical and laboratory parameters, combined with aggressive management of hemorrhage by surgical and nonsurgical means, has significant potential to reduce early mortality. Although the classification of massive transfusion varies, the most frequently used definition is ten or more units of blood in 24 hrs. Transfusion of red blood cells is intended to restore blood volume, tissue perfusion, and oxygen-carrying capacity; platelets, plasma, and cryoprecipitate are intended to facilitate hemostasis through prevention or treatment of coagulopathy. Massive transfusion is uncommon in civilian trauma, occurring in only 1% to 3% of trauma admissions. As a result of a higher proportion of penetrating injury in combat casualties, it has occurred in approximately 8% of Operation Iraqi Freedom admissions and in as many as 16% during the Vietnam conflict. Despite its potential to reduce early mortality, massive transfusion is not without risk. It requires extensive blood-banking resources and is associated with high mortality. This review describes the clinical problems associated with massive transfusion and surveys the nonsurgical management of hemorrhage, including transfusion of blood products, use of hemostatic bandages/agents, and treatment with hemostatic medications.

  9. PAS or plasma for storage of platelets? A concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, P F

    2016-10-01

    Platelet additive solutions (PASs) are becoming increasingly popular for storage of platelets, and PAS is steadily replacing plasma as the storage medium of platelets. PASs are electrolyte solutions intended for storage of platelets, and they are used to modulate the quality of the platelets by adding specific ingredients. All currently available PASs contain acetate. Acetate reduces the amount of glucose that is oxidised into lactic acid and thereby prevents the lowering of pH, which decreases platelet quality. Furthermore, the oxidation of acetate leads to the production of bicarbonate, which serves as buffer. The presence of potassium and magnesium in PAS prevents the lowering of pH and reduces the degree of spontaneous activation of the platelets during storage. In the hospital, platelets stored in PAS result in about half of the number of allergic transfusion reactions as compared with platelets in plasma. Recovery and survival after transfusion, as well as corrected count increments, are at least as good for platelets in PAS as for plasma, and recent data suggest they may even be better. Therefore, with the current generation of PASs, PAS should be preferred over the use of plasma for the storage of platelet concentrates. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  10. Transfusion Therapy in Critically Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Tsung Chang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units are commonly indicated for blood transfusion due to many reasons. Children are quite different from adults during growth and development, and that should be taken into consideration. It is very dif-ficult to establish a universal transfusion guideline for critically ill children, especially preterm neonates. Treating underlying disease and targeted replacement therapy are the most effective approaches. Red blood cells are the first choice for replacement therapy in decompensated anemic patients. The critical hemoglobin concentration may be higher in critically ill children for many reasons. Whole blood is used only in the following conditions or diseases: (1 exchange transfusion; (2 after cardiopulmonary bypass; (3 extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (4 massive transfusion, especially in multiple component deficiency. The characteristics of hemorrhagic diseases are so varied that their therapy should depend on the specific needs associated with the underlying disease. In general, platelet transfusion is not needed when a patient has platelet count greater than 10,000/mm3 and is without active bleeding, platelet functional deficiency or other risk factors such as sepsis. Patients with risk factors or age less than 4 months should be taken into special consideration, and the critical thrombocyte level will be raised. Platelet transfusion is not recommended in patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenia due to acceleration of platelet destruction without active bleeding or life-threatening hemorrhage. There are many kinds of plasma-derived products, and recombinant factors are commonly used for hemorrhagic patients due to coagulation factor deficiency depending on the characteristics of the diseases. The most effective way to correct disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC is to treat the underlying disease. Anticoagulant ther-apy is very important; heparin is the

  11. Epidemiology of Massive Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Chiesa, Flaminia; Vasan, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is an increasing focus on massive transfusion, but there is a paucity of comprehensive descriptions of the massively transfused patients and their outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence rate of massive transfusion, patient characteristics, and the mort...

  12. Leukocyte and plasma activation profiles in chronically transfused patients with a history of allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Magali J; Shih, Hank; Schubert, Richard; Wong, Wendy; Andrews, Jennifer; Jeng, Michael; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2017-11-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions are drawbacks to the benefits of transfusion. Classically, allergic transfusion reactions depend on histamine release from mast cells or basophils, but other leukocyte subsets may also be important. Thus, we propose to better define the exact leukocyte subsets involved in allergic transfusion reactions. The overall objective of the current study was to compare the activation of specific peripheral blood leukocyte subsets (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in a cohort of 13 patients who received chronic transfusions and had a history of allergic transfusion reactions compared with a control group of patients who received chronic transfusions and had no history of allergic transfusion reactions. Leukocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry at baseline and after red blood cell transfusion, and cytokine levels in platelet-free plasma collected at the same time points were measured by Luminex assay. Flow cytometry and cytokine profiles before and after transfusion did not differ significantly between patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p > 0.05). However, post-transfusion samples from both groups showed a decrease in CD63 expression in basophils, monocytes, and eosinophils and a decrease in CD45 expression in all leukocyte subsets compared with pretransfusion samples. Interleukin 10 levels increased after transfusion in the group with a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p = 0.0469), and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) was significantly decreased post-transfusion in all patients (p = 0.0122). None of the leukocyte subsets from patients who had a history of allergic transfusion reactions significantly increased in activation either before or after transfusion. All leukocyte subsets from patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions decreased in their activation profile upon

  13. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  14. Hemostatic Function of Apheresis Platelets Stored at 4 deg C and 22 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    although not at 72 h, suggesting cold storage may be acceptable for therapeutic transfusion (i.e., therapy for active hemorrhage) (14). In recent years...RT for 30 min and gently massaged before testing commenced. Apheresis platelets were centrifuged for 10 min at 3,000g to obtain platelet poor plasma...for therapeutic , as opposed to prophylactic transfusion when im- mediate hemostasis is required. As platelets stored in plasma metabolize glucose via

  15. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED......). Inclusion criteria were trauma team activation and arterial cannula insertion on arrival. Blood samples were analyzed by multiple electrode aggregometry initiated by thrombin receptor agonist peptide 6 (TRAP) or collagen using a Multiplate device. Blood was sampled median 65 min after injury; median injury...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...

  16. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  17. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  18. Transfusion transmitted malaria in three major blood banks of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... into the circulatory system of one person from another person. In transfusion, the recipients receive whole blood or parts of blood like red blood cells (RBCs), platelets plasma or other components of the blood. Blood trans-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: j62ahmed@yahoo.com. Tel: +92-91-9217703.

  19. The prevalence and assessment of blood transfusions in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajieh Borna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion is common in infants. Due to the weakened immune system of newborns and the risk of blood transfusion complications, it is necessary to pay more attention following or after to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of blood transfusions in hospitalized neonates. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 1106 infants admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Mustafa Khomeini University Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from spring 2009 to 2012. Frequency and the reason for of blood components transfusion including fresh frozen plasma, platelets, whole blood, packed red blood cells, cryoprecipitate and relationship with gestational age, sex, birth weight, Apgar score, duration of hospitalization, use of mechanical ventilation were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS statistical software, version 16 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA and statistical test, chi-square test, independent t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Among 1106 infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, 221 infants (%19.98 received blood products. 82 of all (37% were female and 139 (%63 were female. 113 (51% of neonate were preterm and 108 (48% were term. From 361 times of blood transfusions, 121 infant (54.75% received at least one blood product. The frequency of blood transfusion was between 39 and 1 times, with an average of 3.65 times per infant. Frequency of fresh frozen plasma infusion was 173 (47.9%, packed cell 122 (33%, platelet 32 (8.8%, cryoprecipitate 20 (5.1% and whole blood 3 unit (0.83%. The most common causes for fresh frozen plasma transfusion was replacement therapy 140 (80%, for packed cell, to correct symptomatic anemia 68 (55.6%, for platelet transfusions was to prevent bleeding in  neonates with thrombocytopenia 20 (62.5% and cryoprecipitate for bleeding caused by DIC in 18 infant (90%. There was significant relation between frequency of

  20. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  1. Ensuring that blood transfusion sets administer an effective dose of functional blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S; Nightingale, M J; Cardigan, R

    2013-08-01

    Proposed changes to ISO 1135-4 will require that blood transfusion administration sets are demonstrated by the manufacturers to be suitable for the range of cellular and plasma blood components for which they are designated. To design a test protocol to asses the depletion of the blood components by transfusion sets and damage and activation of blood components during their passage through the set. Transfusion giving sets (CareFusion Ref no. 60895 180311 and Fresenius Ref no. 2900032) were assessed by comparing samples of the blood component taken prior to and after passage through the transfusion set in strict accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. As well as depletion of red cells, platelets and FVIIIc, the following markers of damage/activation were assessed: red cells-supernatant haemolysis and potassium; FFP-prothrombin fragments 1 and 2 and fibrinopeptide A and platelets-pH, CD62P, CD63 and sP-selectin. The CareFusion and the Fresenius transfusion sets gave less than 5% depletion of blood components and caused negligible and clinically insignificant effects on red cells, platelet concentrates and FFP. A practical test protocol has been established to assess the depletion, damage to and activation of the key constituents of commonly requested blood components. This protocol would provide a valuable addition to ISO 1135-4 in assuring the suitability of transfusion sets. © 2013 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  2. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transfusion medicine problems and solutions for the pediatric hematologist/oncologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luban, Naomi L C; McBride, Eileen; Ford, Jason C; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-07-01

    Blood component transfusion is an integral part of the care of children with oncologic and hematologic conditions. The complexity of transfusion medicine may however lead to challenges for pediatric hematologists/oncologists. In this review, three commonly encountered areas of transfusion medicine are explored. The approach to the investigation and management of suspected platelet refractoriness is reviewed. The unique transfusion related challenges encountered by children undergoing stem cell transplantation are also discussed. Finally, issues arising out of the care of children with hemoglobinopathies are explored, with an emphasis on the incidence of allo- and autoimmunization. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prevention and management of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauck-Dlimi B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Hauck-Dlimi, Susanne Achenbach, Julian Strobel, Reinhold Eckstein, Robert Zimmermann Department of Transfusion Medicine and Haemostaseology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Transfusion of blood components, transplantations, and exchange of blood between mother and child during pregnancy or at birth can lead to alloimmunization. Because of its clinical relevance, this review brings into focus alloimmunization against red blood cells, human platelet antigens, human leukocyte antigens, and human neutrophil antigens. In principle, an individual is able to develop antibodies after exposure to a nonautogenous antigen, but these cells actually induce alloimmunization only for a minority of patients. An individual producing alloantibodies after having contact with foreign antigens depends on various factors, such as genetic predisposition, underlying diseases, the patient's immune status, and clinical immune modulation. When alloimmunization has occurred, it could lead to problems for future transfusions or transplantations. Keywords: transfusion, alloimmunization, prevention

  5. Dual roles for hepatic lectin receptors in the clearance of chilled platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Grewal, Prabhjit K; Wandall, Hans H

    2009-01-01

    -GlcNAc moieties by galactosylation prevents clearance of short-term-cooled platelets, this strategy is ineffective after prolonged refrigeration. We report here that prolonged refrigeration increased the density and concentration of exposed galactose residues on platelets such that hepatocytes, through Ashwell-Morell...... transfusion. Inhibition of chilled platelet clearance by both beta(2) integrin and Ashwell-Morell receptors may afford a potentially simple method for storing platelets in the cold....

  6. Effective ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates in teflon bags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capon, S.M.; Sacher, R.A.; Deeg, H.J. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Several plastic materials used in blood storage were evaluated for their ability to transmit ultraviolet B (UVB) light. A plastic bag manufactured from sheets of transparent Teflon efficiently (78-86%) transmitted UVB light and was employed in subsequent functional studies of lymphocytes and platelets exposed to UVB light while contained in these bags. In vitro experiments showed a UVB dose-dependent abrogation of lymphocyte responder and stimulator functions, with concurrent preservation of platelet aggregation responses. In a phase I pilot study, UVB-treated platelet concentrates were administered to four bone marrow transplant recipients. Adverse effects attributable to the transfusions were not observed, and patients showed clinically effective transfusion responses. No patient developed lymphocytotoxic HLA or platelet antibodies. These studies suggest that platelets can be effectively irradiated with UVB light in a closed system. However, numerous variables, including container material, volume and composition of contents, steady exposure versus agitation, and exact UV wavelength, must be considered.

  7. Consequences of Transfusing Blood Components in Patients With Trauma: A Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Transfusion of blood components is often required in resuscitation of patients with major trauma. Packed red blood cells and platelets break down and undergo chemical changes during storage (known as the storage lesion) that lead to an inflammatory response once the blood components are transfused to patients. Although some evidence supports a detrimental association between transfusion and a patient's outcome, the mechanisms connecting transfusion of stored components to outcomes remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide critical care nurses with a conceptual model to facilitate understanding of the relationship between the storage lesion and patients' outcomes after trauma; outcomes related to trauma, hemorrhage, and blood component transfusion are grouped according to those occurring in the short-term (≤30 days) and the long-term (>30 days). Complete understanding of these clinical implications is critical for practitioners in evaluating and treating patients given transfusions after traumatic injury. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Fluid Resuscitation and Massive Transfusion Protocol in Pediatric Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children due to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock and its consequences, anemia and hypovolemia, decrease oxygen delivery, due to which appropriate transfusion and volume resuscitation are critical. Guidelines for massive transfusion, in the pediatric trauma, have not been defined yet. Current data indicate that early identification of coagulopathy and its treatment with RBSs, plasma and platelets in a 1:1:1 unit ratio, and limited use of crystalloids may improve survival in pediatric trauma patients.

  9. Comparison of haemostatic function of PAS-C-platelets vs. plasma-platelets in reconstituted whole blood using impedance aggregometry and thromboelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hout, F M A; Bontekoe, I J; de Laleijne, L A E; Kerkhoffs, J-L; de Korte, D; Eikenboom, J; van der Bom, J G; van der Meer, P F

    2017-08-01

    There are concerns about the haemostatic function of platelets stored in platelet additive solution (PAS). Aim of this study was to compare the haemostatic function of PAS-C-platelets to plasma-platelets in reconstituted whole blood. In our experiment, whole blood was reconstituted with red blood cells, solvent-detergent (SD) plasma and either PAS-C-platelets or plasma-platelets (n = 7) in a physiological ratio. On storage days 2, 5, 8 and 13, the agonist-induced aggregation (multiple electrode aggregometry), clot formation (thromboelastography) and agonist-induced CD62P responsiveness (flow cytometry) were measured. Samples with PAS-C-platelets showed significantly lower aggregation than plasma-platelets when induced with adenosine diphosphate, -6 U (95% confidence interval: -8; -4) or thrombin receptor-activating protein, -15 U (-19; -10). Also when activated with collagen and ristocetin, the PAS-C-platelets showed less aggregation, although not statistically significant. All samples with PAS-C-platelets showed significantly lower agonist-induced CD62P responsiveness than samples with plasma-platelets. However, there was no difference regarding all TEG parameters. Our findings demonstrate that the function - aggregation and CD62P responsiveness - of PAS-C-platelets in reconstituted whole blood is inferior to that of plasma-platelets, which may have implications in the setting of massive transfusions. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  11. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, B; van Bladel, E R; van Hamersveld, M; Pasker-de Jong, P C M; Korporaal, S J A; Urbanus, R T; Roest, M; Boven, L A; Fijnheer, R

    2017-11-01

    Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric evaluation of platelet function might aid the clinician in identifying patients at risk of bleeding. This evaluation can be performed within the hour and is not hampered by low platelet count. Our objective was to assess a possible correlation between bleeding and platelet function in thrombocytopenic haemato-oncological patients. Inclusion was possible for admitted haemato-oncology patients aged 18 years and above. Furthermore, an expected need for platelet transfusions was necessary. Bleeding was graded according to the WHO bleeding scale. Platelet reactivity to stimulation by either adenosine diphosphate (ADP), cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-xL), PAR1- or PAR4-activating peptide (AP) was measured using flow cytometry. A total of 114 evaluations were available from 21 consecutive patients. Platelet reactivity in response to stimulation by all four studied agonists was inversely correlated with significant bleeding. Odds ratios (OR) for bleeding were 0·28 for every unit increase in median fluorescence intensity (MFI) [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·11-0·73] for ADP; 0·59 [0·40-0·87] for CRP-xL; 0·59 [0·37-0·94] for PAR1-AP; and 0·43 [0·23-0·79] for PAR4-AP. The platelet count was not correlated with bleeding (OR 0·99 [0·96-1·02]). Agonist-induced platelet reactivity was significantly correlated to bleeding. Platelet function testing could provide a basis for a personalized transfusion regimen, in which platelet transfusions are limited to those at risk of bleeding. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. The German Haemovigilance System--reports of serious adverse transfusion reactions between 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Stanislawski, B; Lohmann, A; Günay, S; Heiden, M; Funk, M B

    2009-12-01

    Data of the German Haemovigilance System were collected from 1997 to 2007 and assessed on the basis of pre-defined safety standards. Suspected cases of serious adverse reactions following transfusions reported to the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut were evaluated on the basis of national criteria, and the definitions of International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) in compliance with defined causality criteria. The suspected cases were rated as confirmed and unconfirmed transfusion reactions. Assessment of causality took into consideration the clinical course of the adverse reaction and, if necessary, information about donation and manufacturing. Of the 5128 suspected serious adverse reactions, 1603 could be confirmed. Referring to the absolute figures, acute transfusion reactions (e.g. allergic reactions, hypotension and dyspnoea) were recorded most frequently, followed by transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), haemolytic reactions, transfusion-related bacterial infections and virus infections. The majority of the 52 transfusion-related fatalities (14 each) were due to TRALI and acute transfusion reactions (mostly severe allergic reactions). Referred to the blood products administered, immune TRALI cases and TRALI-related fatal courses were most frequently reported after administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (15/10(6) and 3.5/10(6) units, respectively), transfusion-related bacterial infections after administration of platelet concentrates (7/10(6) units), acute haemolytic transfusion reactions after administration of red blood cell concentrates (2.3/10(6)units) and acute transfusion reactions after administration of red blood cell or platelet concentrates (7.8/10(6) and 13/10(6) units, respectively). Despite the high safety standard required for blood products in Germany, there is still room for reducing the frequency of isolated cases of transfusion reactions by targeted action.

  13. Chemotherapy induced thrombocytopenia treated by four types of platelets concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ljubinka I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Serious adverse event of anticancer chemotherapy is glanulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia which can decrease efficiency of final therapy results. After many years, platelet concentrates transfusion (PCT is still researching problem without sure standpoint. The aim: To determine whether there is a difference in the clinical efficiency in the use of 4 types of platelet applied for transfusion; - to ascertain whether platelet count increase expressed as corrected count increment (CCI, is a better parameter for the evaluation of platelet transfusion efficiency than the bleeding time (Bt, as the only readily assessable in vivo platelet function related parameter. Subjects and methods: This paper is a part of academic (noncommercial IV phase observational nointervetion study. Investigation included 78 patients diagnosed with malignant lymphoma and metastatic solid tumors, transfused by platelet concentrates. Patients were devided into 4 groups, based on the type of platelet concentrates used for transfusion. Results: Patients, were transfused with total number of 647 PC units (235 units were non-leukodepleted and 412 units were leukodepleted. Mean number of PC transfusions per patient was 8.3 PC units, and 4.8 PC unit per one transfusion episode. Before PCT: platelets values were: 18.1 x109/L ±13.1, Bt 8.4±6.1min, and after PCT were 28.2 x109/L ±22.1, 4.7±4.4 min respectively ((p<0.01. Mean CCI value was 13.8±30.4. CCI was corrected in 196/129 PCT and Bt in 122/129 PCT. After supportive therapy using PCs Bt was corrected and became similar in all 4 groups. Discussion: Clinical output is the most important parameter for treatment decision because many patients can tolerate prolonged periods of profound thrombocytopenia without serious bleeding problems. Conclusion: In all 4 investigated groups of patients bleeding time was a far better parameter compared with CCI for the PC therapy efficiency. Authors suggest to be careful and follow

  14. Could Microparticles Be the Universal Quality Indicator for Platelet Viability and Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Maurer-Spurej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High quality means good fitness for the intended use. Research activity regarding quality measures for platelet transfusions has focused on platelet storage and platelet storage lesion. Thus, platelet quality is judged from the manufacturer’s point of view and regulated to ensure consistency and stability of the manufacturing process. Assuming that fresh product is always superior to aged product, maintaining in vitro characteristics should preserve high quality. However, despite the highest in vitro quality standards, platelets often fail in vivo. This suggests we may need different quality measures to predict platelet performance after transfusion. Adding to this complexity, platelets are used clinically for very different purposes: platelets need to circulate when given as prophylaxis to cancer patients and to stop bleeding when given to surgery or trauma patients. In addition, the emerging application of platelet-rich plasma injections exploits the immunological functions of platelets. Requirements for quality of platelets intended to prevent bleeding, stop bleeding, or promote wound healing are potentially very different. Can a single measurable characteristic describe platelet quality for all uses? Here we present microparticle measurement in platelet samples, and its potential to become the universal quality characteristic for platelet production, storage, viability, function, and compatibility.

  15. Transfusion-transmitted infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Florian; Castelli, Damiano; Marincola, Francesco; Dodd, Roger Y; Brander, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens. PMID:17553144

  16. Transfusion-transmitted infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodd Roger Y

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens.

  17. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets. Scientific report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia plays an important role in the development of the post-irradiation hemorrhagic syndrome. Although destruction of platelet precursors in bone marrow is a major effect of high-dose radiation exposure, the effects of radiation on preformed platelets are unclear. The latter is also of concern with respect to blood-banking practices since platelets are often irradiated at doses in the range of 20-50 Gy before transfusions to prevent graft-versus-host disease. With increasing emphasis on allogenic and autologous bone-marrow transplantation, transfusions of irradiated platelets are likely to rise. Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  18. Quality assessment of platelet concentrates prepared by platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC and apheresis-PC methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ravindra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC, and apheresis-PC were prepared and their quality parameters were assessed. Study Design: In this study, the following platelet products were prepared: from random donor platelets (i platelet rich plasma - platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, and (ii buffy coat poor- platelet concentrate (BC-PC and (iii single donor platelets (apheresis-PC by different methods. Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: swirling, volume of the platelet concentrate, platelet count, WBC count and pH. Results: A total of 146 platelet concentrates (64 of PRP-PC, 62 of BC-PC and 20 of apheresis-PC were enrolled in this study. The mean volume of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 62.30±22.68 ml, 68.81±22.95 ml and 214.05±9.91 ml and ranged from 22-135 ml, 32-133 ml and 200-251 ml respectively. The mean platelet count of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 7.6±2.97 x 1010/unit, 7.3±2.98 x 1010/unit and 4.13±1.32 x 1011/unit and ranged from 3.2-16.2 x 1010/unit, 0.6-16.4 x 1010/unit and 1.22-8.9 x 1011/unit respectively. The mean WBC count in PRP-PC (n = 10, BC-PC (n = 10 and apheresis-PC (n = 6 units was 4.05±0.48 x 107/unit, 2.08±0.39 x 107/unit and 4.8±0.8 x 106/unit and ranged from 3.4 -4.77 x 107/unit, 1.6-2.7 x 107/unit and 3.2 - 5.2 x 106/unit respectively. A total of 26 units were analyzed for pH changes. Out of these units, 10 each were PRP-PC and BC-PC and 6 units were apheresis-PC. Their mean pH was 6.7±0.26 (mean±SD and ranged from 6.5 - 7.0 and no difference was observed among all three types of platelet concentrate. Conclusion: PRP-PC and BC-PC units were comparable in terms of swirling, platelet count per unit and pH. As expected, we found WBC contamination to be less in BC-PC than PRP-PC units. Variation in volume was more in BC-PC than PRP-PC units and this suggests that further standardization is required for preparation of BC

  19. Sixty years of blood transfusion: a memoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    Paul Schmidt was born in 1925 into the Greatest Generation. Events during military service decided him on the study of medicine. Early research training in red cell preservation that continued during his medical studies opened a 20-year career at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Beginning in 1954 at the Blood Bank of the NIH Clinical Center, he had exposure to the pioneers who had translated transfusion's wartime beginnings into civilian applications. Work inside the unique NIH clinical research atmosphere together with many of his students provided a fertile field for the growth of what has become transfusion medicine. Topics described range from early studies on platelets and on hepatitis to the background in Washington health politics leading to the National Blood Policy. National and global organizational activity and a second career in community blood service added to his 65 years of experience. The story as transfusion history is presented as a template for future progress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J; Filipescu, D; Kozek-Langenecker, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (p......RBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. METHODS: We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month...... period in 2013. RESULTS: The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone...

  1. Cytokines in platelet concentrates: a comparison of apheresis platelet (haemonetics) and filtered and unfiltered pooled buffy-coat derived platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, M J; Wadhwa, M; Thorpe, R

    1997-03-01

    Variable degrees of platelet activation, shape changes, microvesiculation and fragmentation may occur during collection, processing and storage of platelet concentrates (PCs), contributing to different rate of platelet storage lesion. Leukocytes contribute to both the frequency of transfusion reactions and the acceleration of the rate of platelet storage lesion hence leukocyte removal of platelet concentrates has been introduced to overcome these problems. However transfusion reaction can still occur with the use of leuko-reduced products and it is not fully elucidated that the rate of storage lesion is equivalent for filtered and unfiltered counter parts. This issue has been addressed in this manuscript comparing the generation of cytokines during storage in PCs derived from pooled buffy coat with the standard apheresis products, with a similar level of leukocyte contamination. The EDTA-induced shape change in platelet was used as an index of platelet functional integrity. In addition IL-8 and TGF beta were used as indicators of filtration process-inducing stimulation of cytokines. Our results clearly indicate that a rapid disc/spheric conversion occurs during storage of buffy-coat derived PC, and while prestorage filtration reduces both IL-8 content immediately after filtration and at the end of platelet shelf life but such a process may lead to slight enhancement of the rate of TGF beta generation indicating that any additional process may have some bearing in stimulation of TGF beta release.

  2. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. I imagined the faces of many different strangers, taking time out of their day… their jobs… ... thing to do for another human being. A stranger. Someone’s platelets made their way to Phil that ...

  3. Does platelet administration affect mortality in elderly head-injured patients taking antiplatelet medications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Douglas M; Monson, Benjamin; Butler, Karyn L; Fortuna, Gerald R; Saxe, Jonathan M; Dolan, James P; Markert, Ronald J; McCarthy, Mary C

    2009-11-01

    A significant portion of patients sustaining traumatic brain injury (TBI) take antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), which have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In an attempt to alleviate the risk of increased bleeding, platelet transfusion has become standard practice in some institutions. This study was designed to determine if platelet transfusion reduces mortality in patients with TBI on antiplatelet medications. Databases from two Level I trauma centers were reviewed. Patients with TBI 50 years of age or older with documented preinjury use of clopidogrel or aspirin were included in our cohort. Patients who received platelet transfusions were compared with those who did not to assess outcome differences between them. Demographics and other patient characteristics abstracted included Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, hospital length of stay, and warfarin use. Three hundred twenty-eight patients comprised the study group. Of these patients, 166 received platelet transfusion and 162 patients did not. Patients who received platelets had a mortality rate of 17.5 per cent (29 of 166), whereas those who did not receive platelets had a mortality rate of 16.7 per cent (27 of 162) (P = 0.85). Transfusion of platelets in patients with TBI using antiplatelet therapy did not reduce mortality.

  4. Analysis of leucocyte antibodies, cytokines, lysophospholipids and cell microparticles in blood components implicated in post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, K; Uhrynowska, M; Łopacz, P; Wróbel, A; Smoleńska-Sym, G; Guz, K; Lachert, E; Ostas, A; Brojer, E

    2015-01-01

    Post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea (PTR) are major causes of morbidity and death after blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are most dangerous, while transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a milder respiratory distress. We investigated blood components for immune and non-immune factors implicated in PTR. We analysed 464 blood components (RBCs, PLTs, L-PLTs, FFP) transfused to 271 patients with PTR. Blood components were evaluated for 1/antileucocyte antibodies, 2/cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, sCD40L, 3/lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), 4/microparticles (MPs) shed from plateletes (PMPs), erythrocytes (EMPs) and leucocytes (LMPs). Anti-HLA class I/II antibodies or granulocyte-reactive anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 18.2% of blood components (RBC and FFP) transfused to TRALI and in 0.5% of FFP transfused to TAD cases. Cytokines and LysoPCs concentrations in blood components transfused to PTR patients did not exceed those in blood components transfused to patients with no PTR. Only EMPs percentage in RBCs transfused to patients with TRALI was significantly higher (P Blood Transfusion.

  5. Recurrent menorrhagia in an adolescent with a platelet secretion defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Xiomara M; Bercaw-Pratt, Jennifer L; Yee, Donald L; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2011-04-01

    Although von Willebrand disease is the most common inherited bleeding disorder, platelet function disorders are less well recognized as a cause of bleeding. We report a case of menorrhagia caused by an unsuspected platelet secretion defect. A 13-year-old Asian female, with unknown family history, presented with menorrhagia not responsive to intravenous conjugated estrogens, requiring transfusion of 7 units of packed red blood cells. Initial screening tests for bleeding disorders were normal; however, due to high clinical suspicion, further specific testing with platelet aggregometry was performed, which revealed a platelet secretion defect. The prevalence of platelet secretion defects in adolescents with menorrhagia is unknown, but may be higher than currently recognized. When screening tests are normal, yet suspicion remains high for an underlying hemostatic disorder, platelet aggregometry must be performed. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Platelet Function Tests Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Also Known As Platelet Aggregation Studies PFT Platelet Function Assay PFA Formal Name Platelet Function Tests This ...

  7. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  8. Effect of Cold Storage on Shear-induced Platelet Aggregation and Clot Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    components after open heart surgery in children . Blood. 1991; 77:930 936. 15. Holme S, Heaton A. In vitro platelet aging at 22-C is reduced compared to in...Circulation and hemostatic effectiveness of platelets stored at 4 C or 22 C: studies in aspirin -treated normal volunteers. Transfusion. 1976;16:20 23. J

  9. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. National variation in transfusion strategies in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Svenningsen, Peter Olsen; Fabricius, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An optimal transfusion strategy for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) has yet to be established. The national guidelines contain recommendations for patients with life-threating bleeding in general, but no specific recommendations for patients with UGIB. We...... hypothesised that there are variations in transfusion strategies for patients with UGIB across the Danish regions. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, register-based, analysis on transfusions given to all patients with non-variceal UGIB in Denmark in 2011-2013. We compared the results from the five regions...... in Denmark in order to discover regional differences. RESULTS: A total of 5,292 admissions with treatment for non-variceal UGIB were identified, and analysis was made for the total group and a massive transfusions group (330 admissions). In the Capital Region, transfusion of platelets was more likely than...

  11. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.; Accurso, Giuseppe; Ahrens, Norbert; Akan, Mert; Åkeröy, Kristin; Aksoy, Omur; Alanoğlu, Zekeriyye; Alfredo, Merten; Alkis, Neslihan; Almeida, Valentina; Alousi, Mohammed; Alves, Claudia; Amaral, Joana; Ambrosi, Xavier; Ana, Izquierdo; Anastase, Denisa; Andersson, Mona; Andreou, Antonis; Anthopoulos, Georgios; Apanaviciute, Daiva; Arbelaez, Alejandro; Arcade, Anne-Laure; Arion-Balescu, Carmen; Arun, Oguzhan; Azenha, Marta; Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Baeten, Wannes; Balandin, Alina; Barquero López, Marta; Barsan, Victoria; Bascuas, Begona; Basora, Misericordia; Baumann, Holger; Bayer, Andreas; Bell, Andrea; Belmonte Cuenca, Julio; Bengisun, Zuleyha Kazak; Bento, Carlos; Beran, Maud; Bermudez Lopez, Maria; Bernardino, Ana; Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese; Bigat, Zekiye; Bilshiene, Diana; Bilska, Marcela; Bisbe Vives, Elvira; Biscioni, Tamara; Björn, Heyse; Blom, Tommi; Bogdan Prodan, Alexandru; Bogdanovic Dvorscak, Matea; Boisson, Matthieu; Bolten, Jens; Bona, Francesco; Borg, Francis; Boros, Cristian; Borys, Michał; Boveroux, Pierre; Boztug Uz, Neval; Brettner, Florian; Brisard, Laurent; Britta, De Waal; Browne, Gail; Budow, Kristin; Buerkle, Hartmut; Buggy, Donal; Cain, Alistair; Calancea, Esenia; Calarasu, Florenta; Calder, Verity; Camci, Ali Emre; Campiglia, Laura; Campos, Beatriz; Camps, Angela; Carlos, Delgado; Carreira, Claudia; Carrilho, Alexandre; Carvalho, Peter; Cassinello, Concepcion; Cattan, Anat; Cenni, Leonardo; Cerny, Vladimir; Ceyda Meço, Başak; Chesov, Ion; Chishti, Ahmed; Chupin, Anne-Marie; Cikova, Andrea; Cindea, Iulia; Cintula, Daniel; Ciobanasu, Roxana; Clements, Deborah; Cobiletchi, Serghei; Coburn, Mark; Coghlan, Liz; Collyer, Thomas; Copotoiu, Sanda Maria; Copotoiu, Ruxandra; Corneci, Dan; Cortegiani, Andrea; Coskunfirat, O. Koray; Costea, Dan; Czuczwar, Mirosław; Davies, Katy; de Baerdemaeker, Luc; de Hert, Stefan; Debernardi, Felicino; Decagny, Sylvie; Deger Coskunfirat, Nesil; Diana, Toma; Diana, Gómez Martinez; Dias, Sandra; Dickinson, Matthew; Dobisova, Anna; Dragan, Anca; Droc, Gabriela; Duarte, Sonia; Dunk, Nigel; Ekelund, Kim; Ekmekçi, Perihan; Elena, Ciobanu; Ellimah, Tracey; Espie, Laura; Everett, Lynn; Ferguson, Andrew; Fernandes, Melissa; Fernández, J. A.; Ferner, Marion; Ferreira, Daniel; Ferrie, Rosemary; Filipescu, Daniela; Flassikova, Zora; Fleischer, Andreas; Font, A.; Galkova, Katarina; Garcia, Irene; Garner, Matt; Gasenkampf, Andrey; Gelmanas, Arunas; Gherghina, Viorel; Gilsanz, Fernando; Giokas, George; Goebel, Ulrich; Gomes, Piedade; Gonçalves Aguiar, José Manuel; Gonzalez Monzon, Veronica; Gottschalk, André; Gouraud, Jean-Pierre; Gramigni, Elena; Grintescu, Ioana; Grynyuk, Andriy; Grytsan, Alexey; Guasch, Emilia; Gustin, Denis; Hans, Grégory; Harazim, Hana; Hervig, Tore; Hidalgo, Francisco; Higham, Charley; Hirschauer, Nicola; Hoeft, Andreas; Innerhofer, Petra; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, Nicole; Jacobs, Stefan; Jakobs, Nicolas; Jamaer, Luc; James, Sarah; Jawad, Monir; Jesus, Joana; Jhanji, Shaman; Jipa Lavina, Nicoleta; Jokinen, Johanna; Jovanovic, Gordana; Jubera, Maria Pilar; Kahn, David; Karjagin, Juri; Kasnik, Darja; Katsanoulas, Konstantinos; Kelle, Hened; Kelleher, Mortimer; Kessler, Florian; Kirigin, Borana; Kiskira, Olga; Kivik, Peeter; Klimi, Pelagia; Klučka, Jozef; Koers, Lena; Kontrimaviciut, Egle; Koopman-van Gemert, A. W. M. M.; Korfiotis, Demetrios; Kosinová, Martina; Koursoumi, Eygenia; Kozek Langenecker, Sibylle; Kranke, Peter; Kresic, Marina; Krobot, Renatas; Kropman, Lucienne; Kulikov, Alexander; Kvolik, Slavica; Kvrgic, Ivana; Kyttari, Aikaterini; Lagarto, Filipa; Lance, Marcus D.; Laufenberg, Rita; Lauwick, Severine; Lecoq, Jean-Pierre; Leech, Leech; Lidzborski, Lionel; Liliana, Henao; Linda, Filipe; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Lopes, Ana; Lopez, Luis; Lopez Alvarez, Alexo; Lorenzi, Irene; Lorre, Gilbert; Lucian, Horhota; Lupis, Tamara; Lupu, Mary Nicoleta; Macas, Andrius; Macedo, Ana; Maggi, Genaro; Mallett, Susan; Mallor, Thomas; Manoleli, Alexandra; Manolescu, Rely; Manrique, Susana; Maquoi, Isabelle; Marios-Konstantinos, Tasoulis; Markovic Bozic, Jasmina; Markus W, Hollmann; Marques, Margarida; Martinez, Raul; Martinez, Ever; Martínez, Esther; Martinho, Helder; Martins, Diogo; Martires, Emilia; Martus, Peter; Matias, Francisco; Matot, Idit; Mauff, Susanne; Meale, Paula; Meier, Jens; Merz, Hannah; Meybohm, Patrick; Militello, Maria Grazia; Mincu, Natalia; Miranda, Maria Lina; Mirea, Liliana; Moghildea, Victoria; Moise, Alida; Molano Diaz, Pablo; Moltó, Luís; Monedero, Pablo; Moral, Victoria; Moreira, Zélia; Moret, Enrique; Mulders, Freya; Munteanu, Anna Maria; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Nair, Ashok; Neskovic, Vojislava; Ninane, Vincent; Nitu, Denisa; Oberhofer, Dagmar; Odeberg-Wernerman, Suzanne; Oganjan, Juri; Omur, Dilek; Orallo Moran, Marian Angeles; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Pacasová, Rita; Paklar, Nataša; Pandazi, Ageliki; Papaspyros, Fotios; Paraskeuopoulos, Tilemachos; Parente, Suzana; Paunescu, Marilena Alina; Pavičić Šarić, Jadranka; Pereira, Filipa; Pereira, Elizabete; Pereira, Luciane; Perry, Chris; Petri, Attila; Petrovic, Uros; Pica, Silvia; Pinheiro, Filipe; Pinto, José; Pinto, Fernando; Piwowarczyk, Paweł; Platteau, Sofie; Poeira, Rita; Popescu, Ravzan; Popica, Georgian; Poredos, Peter; Prasser, Christopher; Preckel, Benedikt; Prospiech, Audrey; Pujol, Roger; Raimundo, Ana; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Rakic, Dragana; Ramadan, Mohammed; Ramazanoğlu, Atilla; Rantis, Athanasios; Raquel, Ferrandis; Rätsep, Indrek; Real, Catia; Reikvam, Tore; Reis, Ligia; Rigal, Jean-Christophe; Rohner, Anne; Rokk, Alar; Roman Fernandez, Adriana; Rosenberger, Peter; Rossaint, Rolf; Rozec, Bertrand; Rudolph, Till; Saeed, Yousif; Safonov, Sergej; Saka, Esra; Samama, Charles Marc; Sánchez López, Óscar; Sanchez Perez, David; Sanchez Sanchez, Yvan Enrique; Sandeep, Varma; Sandu, Madalina Nina; Sanlı, Suat; Saraiva, Alexandra; Scarlatescu, Ecaterina; Schiraldi, Renato; Schittek, Gregor; Schnitter, Bettina; Schuster, Michael; Seco, Carlos; Selvi, Onur; Senard, Marc; Serra, Sofia; Serrano, Helena; Shmigelsky, Alexander; Silva, Luisa; Simeson, Karen; Singh, Rita; Sipylaite, Jurate; Skitek, Kornel; Skok, Ira; Smékalová, Olga; Smirnova, Nadezda; Sofia, Machado; Soler Pedrola, Maria; Söndergaard, Sören; Sõrmus, Alar; Sørvoll, Ingvild Hausberg; Soumelidis, Christos; Spindler Yesel, Alenka; Stefan, Mihai; Stevanovic, Ana; Stevikova, Jordana; Stivan, Sabina; Štourač, Petr; Striteska, Jana; Strys, Lydia; Suljevic, Ismet; Tania, Moreno; Tareco, Gloria; Tena, Beatriz; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Tifrea, Marius; Tikuisis, Renatas; Tolós, Raquel; Tomasi, Roland; Tomescu, Dana; Tomkute, Gabija; Tormos, Pilar; Trepenaitis, Darius; Troyan, Galina; Unic-Stojanovic, Dragana; Unterrainer, Axel; Uranjek, Jasna; Valsamidis, Dimitrios; van Dasselaar, Nick; van Limmen, Jurgen; van Noord, Peter; van Poorten, J. F.; Vanderlaenen, Margot; Varela Garcia, Olalla; Velasco, Ana; Veljovic, Milic; Vera Bella, Jorge; Vercauteren, Marcel; Verdouw, Bas; Verenkin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Tomas; Vieira, Helena; Villar, Tania; Visnja, Ikic; Voje, Minca; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Von Langen, Daniel; Vorotyntsev, Sergiy; Vujanovič, Vojislav; Vukovic, Rade; Watt, Philip; Werner, Eva; Wernerman, Jan; Wittmann, Maria; Wright, Margaret; Wunder, Christian; Wyffels, Piet; Yakymenko, Yevgen; Yıldırım, Çiğdem; Yılmaz, Hakan; Zacharowski, Kai; Záhorec, Roman; Zarif, Maged; Zielinska-Skitek, Ewa; Zsisku, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and

  12. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  13. Combination of recombinant factor VIIa and fibrinogen corrects clot formation in primary immune thrombocytopenia at very low platelet counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole H; Stentoft, Jesper; Radia, Deepti

    2013-01-01

    Haemostatic treatment modalities alternative to platelet transfusion are desirable to control serious acute bleeds in primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study challenged the hypothesis that recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) combined with fibrinogen concentrate may correct whole...

  14. Context-dependent risks and benefits of transfusion in the critically ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harahsheh Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yusrah Harahsheh,1,2 Kwok M Ho1,3,4 1Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, 2School of Medicine & Pharmacology, 3School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, 4School of Veterinary & Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs and other blood products to critically ill patients is common. Blood products are expensive, and not without risks. Recent evidence from high-quality multicenter randomized controlled trials confirmed the safety of allogeneic RBC transfusions, including the use of aged RBCs, and mild to moderate anemia for most stable and nonbleeding critically ill patients. Emerging evidence suggests that a liberal RBC transfusion target may have potential divergent effects on patient outcomes depending on their clinical context, with possible harms for patients with gastrointestinal bleeding due to portal hypertension and, conversely, benefits for patients with severe underlying cardiovascular diseases. Despite an apparent increased risk of bleeding in critically ill patients with deranged coagulation parameters and thrombocytopenia, recent studies suggested that fresh frozen plasma (FFP and platelet transfusions may not be beneficial and, indeed, also not very effective in correcting these abnormalities. As for patients who have active severe critical bleeding, use of empirical 1:1:1 RBC: platelets: FFP transfusion appears justifiable in an attempt to reduce deaths as a result of exsanguination. In conjunction with platelet count and fibrinogen concentration, whole blood viscoelastic and platelet function tests are particularly useful to assist clinicians to rationalize FFP and platelet transfusions, when imminent death from exsanguination is not anticipated. Because the risks and benefits of blood product transfusion are heavily context-dependent, a thorough consideration of the characteristics and clinical status of the patients, in

  15. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties is the need of the hour and it will help in making

  16. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR, 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR, 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI. Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical

  17. Platelet antibody detection by flow cytometry: an effective method to evaluate and give transfusional support in platelet refractoriness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bonet Bub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune platelet refractoriness is mainly caused by human leukocyte antigen antibodies (80-90% of cases and, to a lesser extent, by human platelet antigen antibodies. Refractoriness can be diagnosed by laboratory tests and patients should receive compatible platelet transfusions. A fast, effective and low cost antibody-screening method which detects platelet human leukocyte/platelet antigen antibodies is essential in the management of immune platelet refractoriness. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test to screen for immune platelet refractoriness. METHODS: A group of prospective hematologic patients with clinically suspected platelet refractoriness treated in a referral center in Campinas, SP during July 2006 and July 2011 was enrolled in this study. Platelet antibodies were screened using the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test. Anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies were detected by commercially available methods. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the immunofluorescence test were determined taking into account that the majority of antiplatelet antibodies presented human leukocyte antigen specificity. RESULTS: Seventy-six samples from 32 female and 38 male patients with a median age of 43.5 years (range: 5-84 years were analyzed. The sensitivity of the test was 86.11% and specificity 75.00% with a positive predictive value of 75.61% and a negative predictive value of 85.71%. The accuracy of the method was 80.26%. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test has a high correlation with the anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies. Despite a few limitations, the method seems to be efficient, fast and feasible as the initial screening for platelet antibody detection and a useful tool to crossmatch platelets for the transfusional support of patients with immune platelet refractoriness.

  18. Haemovigilance in a general university hospital: need for a more comprehensive classification and a codification of transfusion-related events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, M A; Schneider, P; Vu, D-H; Tissot, J-D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the transfusion-related events recorded in a general university hospital. The method we used was retrospective analysis of the data collected between 1999 and 2003. The incidence of transfusion reactions (n = 394) was 4.19 per 1000 blood products distributed: 59% (n = 231) were febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions; 22% (n = 88) were caused by allergy; 5% (n = 21) were caused by bacterial infection; and 14% (n = 54) were classified as other reactions. Platelet concentrates gave rise to a significantly greater number of reactions than erythrocyte concentrates and fresh-frozen plasma. Transfusion errors and near-miss events were also observed and were analysed separately. A series of transfusion-related events, such as haemosiderosis, metabolic disturbances or volume overload, were not reported. Our experience prompts us to propose a more comprehensive classification and codification of transfusion-related events.

  19. Platelet function changes as monitored by cone and plate(let) analyzer during beating heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Snir, Eitan; Brill, Alex; Varon, David

    2004-01-01

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) is believed to reduce cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)-related complications, including platelet damage. A hypercoagulable state instead of coagulopathy has been reported following OPCAB surgeries due to CPB. Whether platelet function is changed when the injurious effect of CPB is eliminated was investigated. Platelet function was determined with the cone and plate(let) analyzer (CPA) method. The 2 parameters, average size (AS) and surface coverage (SC) of platelet aggregates, were measured with the CPA method to assess platelet aggregation and adhesion. These parameters were evaluated, and their values were compared at several stages of OPCAB surgery. The correlations of postoperative bleeding with platelet function at different stages of the surgery and with other factors, such as platelet count, hematocrit, and transfusions, were studied. Both AS and SC increased during several stages of the operation, and postoperative values (mean +/- SD) were significantly higher than preoperative values (30.4 +/- 8.1 microm 2 versus 23.3 +/- 6.9 microm 2 for AS [ P =.02] and 7.6% +/- 3.6% versus 5.2% +/- 1.8% for SC [ P =.04]). The mean total bleeding volume was 875 micro 415 mL. Preoperative AS and SC were the only parameters significantly ( P =.01) and linearly ( r = 0.7) related to postoperative bleeding. An increased platelet function, as determined by the CPA method, is found following OPCAB surgery. This phenomenon is probably at least partially responsible for the thrombogenic state after OPCAB surgery. Lack of platelet injury attributed to CPB may divert the system toward a more thrombogenic state. Preoperative platelet function, as evaluated by the CPA method, is an independent risk factor determining postoperative bleeding.

  20. Application of an optimized flow cytometry-based quantification of Platelet Activation (PACT): Monitoring platelet activation in platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicken, Cécile H; Roest, Mark; Henskens, Yvonne M C; de Laat, Bas; Huskens, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that flow cytometry is a reliable test to quantify platelet function in stored platelet concentrates (PC). It is thought that flow cytometry is laborious and hence expensive. We have optimized the flow cytometry-based quantification of agonist induced platelet activation (PACT) to a labor, time and more cost-efficient test. Currently the quality of PCs is only monitored by visual inspection, because available assays are unreliable or too laborious for use in a clinical transfusion laboratory. Therefore, the PACT was applied to monitor PC activation during storage. The optimized PACT was used to monitor 5 PCs during 10 days of storage. In brief, optimized PACT uses a ready-to-use reaction mix, which is stable at -20°C. When needed, a test strip is thawed and platelet activation is initiated by mixing PC with PACT. PACT was based on the following agonists: adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6). Platelet activation was measured as P-selectin expression. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was performed as a reference. Both PACT and LTA showed platelet function decline during 10-day storage after stimulation with ADP and collagen/CRP; furthermore, PACT showed decreasing TRAP-induced activation. Major differences between the two tests are that PACT is able to measure the status of platelets in the absence of agonists, and it can differentiate between the number of activated platelets and the amount of activation, whereas LTA only measures aggregation in response to an agonist. Also, PACT is more time-efficient compared to LTA and allows high-throughput analysis. PACT is an optimized platelet function test that can be used to monitor the activation of PCs. PACT has the same accuracy as LTA with regard to monitoring PCs, but it is superior to both LTA and conventional flow cytometry based tests with regard to labor-, time- and cost efficiency.

  1. Optimization of platelet concentrate quality: application of proteomic technologies to donor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Culibrk, Brankica; Karwal, Simrath; Slichter, Sherrill J; Devine, Dana V

    2012-12-05

    Quality management of blood products is essential for blood banking. It is influenced by both processing and donor characteristics and assured by monitoring routine in vitro parameters to defined product specifications. However, these measures correlate poorly with the in vivo behavior of transfused platelets and cannot be used to select optimal donors. Since radiolabeled platelet recovery and survival studies are expensive and time consuming, there is an ongoing search for simpler measures that predict platelet transfusion outcomes. We performed a pilot study using semi-qualitative proteomics to assess changes in the platelet protein profile of donors with either acceptable or unacceptable in vivo radiolabeled autologous platelet recovery and survival measurements. Proteins changing during a 9-day storage period included cytoskeletal elements talin, vinculin and moesin as well as signal transduction proteins 14-3-3, RhoGDI and Rap1. Two of nine donations exhibited a decrease in these proteins and poor in vivo platelet recovery and survival whereas the remaining donors showed acceptable platelet recovery and survival and expected protein profiles. Analyses revealed a significant correlation between protein levels of Rap1 and RhoGDI during storage and platelet recovery and survival. This study provides for the first time preliminary data showing evidence of the utility of protein profiling to predict platelet transfusion quality. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghataliya, Kunal J; Kapadia, Jigar D; Desai, Mira K; Mehariya, K M; Rathod, G H; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Gajjar, M D

    2017-01-01

    Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events. To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed. A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in

  3. A pilot study to assess the hemostatic function of pathogen-reduced platelets in patients with thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Simonsen, Anne Catrine; Brown, Peter de Nully

    2013-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) support is critical to the care of patients with thrombocytopenia, but allogeneic transfusions carry risk. Pathogen reduction mitigates some transfusion risks, but effects on PLT function remain a concern. This clinical pilot study assessed the effect of pathogen reduction technology...

  4. Potential contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage associated molecular patterns in transfusion products to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome after multiple transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jon D; Lee, Yann-Leei L; Pastukh, Viktor M; Capley, Gina; Muscat, Cherry A; Muscat, David C; Marshall, Michael L; Brevard, Sidney B; Gillespie, Mark N

    2017-06-01

    Massive transfusions are accompanied by an increased incidence of a particularly aggressive and lethal form of acute lung injury (delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury) which occurs longer than 24 hours after transfusions. In light of recent reports showing that mitochondrial (mt)DNA damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and that their abundance in the sera of severely injured or septic patients is predictive of clinical outcomes, we explored the idea that mtDNA DAMPs are present in transfusion products and are associated with the occurrence of delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury. We prospectively enrolled fourteen consecutive severely injured patients that received greater than three units of blood transfusion products and determined if the total amount of mtDNA DAMPs delivered during transfusion correlated with serum mtDNA DAMPs measured after the last transfusion, and whether the quantity of mtDNA DAMPs in the serum-predicted development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We found detectable levels of mtDNA DAMPs in packed red blood cells (3 ± 0.4 ng/mL), fresh frozen plasma (213.7 ± 65 ng/mL), and platelets (94.8 ± 69.2), with the latter two transfusion products containing significant amounts of mtDNA fragments. There was a linear relationship between the mtDNA DAMPs given during transfusion and the serum concentration of mtDNA fragments (R = 0.0.74, p DAMPs in serum measured at 24 hours after transfusion predicted the occurrence of ARDS (9.9 ± 1.4 vs. 3.3 ± 0.9, p DAMPs administered during transfusion may be a determinant of serum mtDNA DAMP levels, and that serum levels of mtDNA DAMPs after multiple transfusions may predict the development of ARDS. Collectively, these findings support the idea that mtDNA DAMPs in transfusion products significantly contribute to the incidence of ARDS after massive transfusions. Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level II.

  5. Cryoprecipitate transfusion: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Henna Wong, Nicola Curry Oxford Haemophilia and Thrombosis Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK Abstract: Cryoprecipitate is prepared by controlled thawing of frozen plasma and is a rich source of fibrinogen, FVIII, von Willebrand factor, Factor XIII, and fibronectin. It is mainly transfused in Western countries as a concentrated source of fibrinogen replacement for acquired hypofibrinogenemia. During major bleeding, fibrinogen is the first clotting protein to be depleted to critically low levels. Increasing recognition of the importance of maintaining fibrinogen levels in bleeding has led to significant interest in appropriate fibrinogen supplementation. This review presents an overview of the indications, use and evidence for cryoprecipitate transfusion in hemorrhage, how it may promote hemostasis, and recent developments in extended thaw cryoprecipitate. Keywords: cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen, hypofibrinogenemia, major hemorrhage, bleeding

  6. Post-transfusion purpura treated with plasma exchange by haemonetics cell separator. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B; Morling, N; Rosenkvist, J

    1978-01-01

    A case of post-transfusion purpura in a 61-year-old, multiparous female with a platelet alloantibody (anti-Zwa) in her serum is reported. The patient was successfully treated with plasma exchange by means of a Haemonetics 30 cell separator and corticosteroids. Compared with other therapeutic meas...

  7. Clinical Decision Support Reduces Overuse of Red Blood Cell Transfusions: Interrupted Time Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassakian, Steven Z; Yackel, Thomas R; Deloughery, Thomas; Dorr, David A

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is the most common procedure in hospitalized patients in the US. Growing evidence suggests that a sizeable percentage of these transfusions are inappropriate, putting patients at significant risk and increasing costs to the health care system. We performed a retrospective quasi-experimental study from November 2008 until November 2014 in a 576-bed tertiary care hospital. The intervention consisted of an interruptive clinical decision support alert shown to a provider when a red blood cell transfusion was ordered in a patient whose most recent hematocrit was ≥21%. We used interrupted time series analysis to determine whether our primary outcome of interest, rate of red blood cell transfusion in patients with hematocrit ≥21% per 100 patient (pt) days, was reduced by the implementation of the clinical decision support tool. The rate of platelet transfusions was used as a nonequivalent dependent control variable. A total of 143,000 hospital admissions were included in our analysis. Red blood cell transfusions decreased from 9.4 to 7.8 per 100 pt days after the clinical decision support intervention was implemented. Interrupted time series analysis showed that significant decline of 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.07; P clinical decision support tool. There was no statistical change in the rate of platelet transfusion resulting from the intervention. The implementation of an evidence-based clinical decision support tool was associated with a significant decline in the overuse of red blood cell transfusion. We believe this intervention could be easily replicated in other hospitals using commercial electronic health records and a similar reduction in overuse of red blood cell transfusions achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Characteristics of transfusion recipients in Bordeaux University Hospital. A descriptive study using hospital claims and haemovigilance system databases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pommerol, M; Gilleron, V; Kostrzewa, A; Roger, I; Boiron, J-M; Salmi, L-R

    2010-10-01

    The steady increase of the blood demand since 2001 requires to study the clinical characteristics of blood components recipients. The objective was to describe patients transfused in 2006 in Bordeaux University Hospital, and to identify the diseases which justified the transfusion practice, using French hospital claims database. Data from haemovigilance system were linked to hospital claims databases in order to describe patients transfused in 2006. To target diseases related to transfusion, a list of diagnoses considered as markers for transfusion was drawn up, and validated by physicians prescribing blood components. Among the 100,004 patients admitted to hospital in 2006, 6275 (6.3%) received blood components; 46,727 blood units were transfused to these patients, including 67% of red blood cell, 13% of platelet concentrates and 20% of fresh-frozen plasma; 69% of blood units were prescribed in medical wards, 30% in surgery wards and 1% in gynaecology and obstetrics. The main diagnoses associated with blood transfusion were circulatory complications after cardiac surgery (80% of patients with this diagnosis were transfused), bone marrow aplasia (76% of patients), anaemia (55%), and gastro-intestinal bleeding (48%). The highest numbers of blood units were transfused to patients with hypovolemic, traumatic or postoperative shock, anaemia, hemopathy, or coagulation disorders. This study provided a clinical profile of the transfused patients. Data collected could be used to plan blood collection and to define objectives and resources of healthcare establishments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Supportive transfusion therapy in cancer patients with acquired defects of hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Augusto B; Intini, Daniela; Lattuada, Antonella; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa; Sacchi, Elisabetta; Russo, Umberto

    2014-05-01

    Bleeding occurs in approximately 10% of patients with cancer: supportive transfusion therapy with Platelets Concentrates (PC), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates is often required for the cessation and prevention of the bleeding episodes. The most frequent causes of bleeding in cancer is thrombocytopenia followed by liver insufficiency with or without vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the inappropriate or excessive use of anticoagulants. Other acquired hemostatic defects such as acquired hemophilia (AHA) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) are rare but they can be life-threatening. Thrombocytopenia in cancer patients may be the consequence of marrow invasion, chemotherapy or platelet auto-antibodies; patients with severe hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia, must be treated with PC and carefully followed to assess refractoriness to PC. The management of the other acquired defects of hemostasis usually requires the use of FFP and specific plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates. PC, FFP and plasma-derived concentrates can induce complications and/or adverse events in cancer patients: these include mainly allergic (ALR) or anaphylactic reactions (ANR), Transfusion-Associated Graft-Versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD), Trasfusion-transmitted bacteriemia (TTB), Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (AHTR), Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR). Therefore, modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients are recommended to reduce the risk of these complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transfusion management and immunohematologic complications in liver transplantation: experience of a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Carpio, Nelly; Moscardo, Federico; Lancharro, Aima; Cano, Isabel; Moya, Angel; López-Andujar, Rafael; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has traditionally been associated with major blood loss and consequently high blood transfusion requirements. Our objective was to analyze transfusion management and incidence of immunohematologic complications in patients undergoing LT at our institution. A retrospective analysis of immunohematologic events and transfusion outcomes was carried out at La Fe University Hospital in Valencia. Data from 654 patients were reviewed: 654 underwent only one LT while 36 underwent second LT. Patients received a median of 3 red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, 2 platelets concentrates (PCs) and 2 fresh frozen plasma units (FFPs). Variables significantly influencing RBC transfusions were: the MELD score, hemoglobin levels, and the platelet counts before LT. 27 patients (4.1%) had a positive antibody screening before transplant. Immunohematologic events occurred in 8% of the patients, mostly in the first month after LT, and involved hemolysis in 13 cases. Mortality was significantly higher in patients developing immunohematologic disorders (42.8 vs. 18.3%; p Transfusion management of patients that underwent LT can be complicated by immunohematologic problems. Blood banks should implement the DAT test in each transfusion to detect them.

  11. Blood wastage management in a regional blood transfusion centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, H; Taghvai, N

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of blood component wastage before and after interventions at Yazd Blood Transfusion Center. The growing need for blood components along with blood safety issues and rising costs constantly pressurise blood centres to improve their efficiency. Reducing the quantity of discarded blood at all stages of the supply chain can decrease the total costs. Data on discarded blood components were extracted from the database of Yazd Blood Transfusion Center. Multiple interventions, including implementation of wastage management standard operating procedures and reduction of red blood cells (RBCs) inventory level, were implemented. Discard rates of blood components in the 3 years after intervention (2013-2015) were compared with the discard rates in the 3 years before interventions. The total wastage rate of blood components decreased by almost 60%. Discard rates of RBCs, platelets and plasma decreased from 9·7%, 18·5% and 5·4% to 2·9%, 10·5% and 2·3%, (P < 0·001) after intervention, respectively. The most prevalent reason for discarding units was expiration of RBCs and platelets. Plasma units were discarded mostly due to technical faults during processing. The cost saving of reduction in blood wastage was estimated to be 1,500,000 dollars. Interventions had a significant impact on the reduction of blood wastage with respect to both cost and blood supply saving. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  12. Quality Assessment of Established and Emerging Blood Components for Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Denese C.

    2016-01-01

    Blood is donated either as whole blood, with subsequent component processing, or through the use of apheresis devices that extract one or more components and return the rest of the donation to the donor. Blood component therapy supplanted whole blood transfusion in industrialized countries in the middle of the twentieth century and remains the standard of care for the majority of patients receiving a transfusion. Traditionally, blood has been processed into three main blood products: red blood cell concentrates; platelet concentrates; and transfusable plasma. Ensuring that these products are of high quality and that they deliver their intended benefits to patients throughout their shelf-life is a complex task. Further complexity has been added with the development of products stored under nonstandard conditions or subjected to additional manufacturing steps (e.g., cryopreserved platelets, irradiated red cells, and lyophilized plasma). Here we review established and emerging methodologies for assessing blood product quality and address controversies and uncertainties in this thriving and active field of investigation. PMID:28070448

  13. Transfusion reactions in pediatric compared with adult patients: a look at rate, reaction type, and associated products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Fredrick D; Woods, Marcella; Arnold, Shanna; Young, Pampee P

    2015-03-01

    The majority of reports on transfusion reactions address adult patients. Less is known about the types, incidence, and other clinical details of transfusion reactions in pediatric populations. Furthermore, to our knowledge, there have been no previous reports directly comparing these aspects between adults and pediatric patient populations to assess if there are differences. Between the period of January 1, 2011, and February 1, 2013, all reported adult and pediatric transfusion reactions at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) were evaluated by transfusion medicine clinical service. The information was subsequently shared with the hemovigilance database. Data provided to hemovigilance included age, sex, blood product associated with the reaction, severity of the reaction, and the type of transfusion reactions. These were collated with hospital and blood bank information system-acquired data on overall admission and product transfusion. A total of 133,671 transfusions were performed at VUMC during the study period including 20,179 platelet (PLT) transfusions, 31,605 plasma transfusions, 79,933 red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, and 2154 cryoprecipitate transfusions. Over the same period, 108 pediatric and 277 adult transfusion reactions were recorded. This corresponds to an incidence of 6.2 reactions per 1000 transfusions within the pediatric (age reactions per 1000 transfusions within the adult population. In both adult and pediatric populations, transfusion reactions were most commonly associated with PLT, followed by RBC, and then plasma transfusions. Within the pediatric population, subset analysis identified multiple differences when compared to the adult population, including an increased incidence of allergic transfusion reactions (2.7/1000 vs. 1.1/1000, p reactions (1.9/1000 vs. 0.47/1000, p reactions (0.29/1000 vs. 0.078/1000, p reaction incidence was the same between sexes in adults, in pediatric patients, reactions were more common in male

  14. Transfusion support in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-organ transplantation continues to grow as a treatment modality. Transfusion support remains an integral part of solid-organ transplantation, imparting demands on the transfusion service not only quantitatively in terms of blood product support, but also due to the unique requirements for specialized blood components, the complex serologic problems, and the immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient.

  15. Transfusion support in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    TVSP Murthy

    2007-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation continues to grow as a treatment modality. Transfusion support remains an integral part of solid-organ transplantation, imparting demands on the transfusion service not only quantitatively in terms of blood product support, but also due to the unique requirements for specialized blood components, the complex serologic problems, and the immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient.

  16. Transfusion Management of Trauma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shaz, Beth H.; Christopher J. Dente; Harris, Robert S.; MacLeod, Jana B.; Hillyer, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the “lethal triad” of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggre...

  17. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with a clinical history of sexual transmission of HIV-1 from a single donor reveals transmission of highly distinct variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClure Myra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To combat the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, a successful vaccine will need to cope with the variability of transmissible viruses. Human hosts infected with HIV-1 potentially harbour many viral variants but very little is known about viruses that are likely to be transmitted, or even if there are viral characteristics that predict enhanced transmission in vivo. We show for the first time that genetic divergence consistent with a single transmission event in vivo can represent several years of pre-transmission evolution. Results We describe a highly unusual case consistent with a single donor transmitting highly related but distinct HIV-1 variants to two individuals on the same evening. We confirm that the clustering of viral genetic sequences, present within each recipient, is consistent with the history of a single donor across the viral env, gag and pol genes by maximum likelihood and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo based phylogenetic analyses. Based on an uncorrelated, lognormal relaxed clock of env gene evolution calibrated with other datasets, the time since the most recent common ancestor is estimated as 2.86 years prior to transmission (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 4.54 years. Conclusion Our results show that an effective design for a preventative vaccine will need to anticipate extensive HIV-1 diversity within an individual donor as well as diversity at the population level.

  18. [Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, J-F; Canivet, N; Courbil, R; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2007-05-01

    Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees (TSHC) were initially created in the public health care sector. Nowadays, they are also a mandatory committee of private health care institutions. The members of the TSHC, as well as the way the committee is driven and organized, are defined by law. The aim of the committee is focused on the management of transfusion safety and haemovigilance. The TSHC takes part in the improvement of the safety of transfused patients, and monitors the applying of haemovigilance rules. It also handles the training of all staff members involved in the blood transfusion process.

  19. Bioactive substance accumulation and septic complications in a burn trauma patient: effect of perioperative blood transfusion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H J; Reimert, C M; Dybkjaer, E

    1997-01-01

    Evidence has emerged that suggests adverse effects to perioperative homologous blood transfusion are related to the age of the blood products. Recently, time-dependent accumulation of bioactive substances in red cell suspensions, standard platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma during storage...... cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX), neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were drawn frequently from the patient before, during and after the operations, and from all transfused red cell, platelet and fresh frozen plasma units. Urine was sampled every hour during...... the first operation for analyses of ECP and EPX excretion. All analyses were performed by ELISA and RIA methods, and results compared to patient outcome. The patient received a total of 48 and 8 SAGM blood, 6 and 0 platelet and 12 and 4 fresh frozen plasma units at the two operations, respectively...

  20. Transfusion packages for massively bleeding patients: the effect on clot formation and stability as evaluated by Thrombelastograph (TEG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Bochsen, L.; Stensballe, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of administering a transfusion package encompassing 5 red blood cells (RBC), 5 fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and 2 platelet concentrates (PC) on clot formation and stability as evaluated by Thrombelastograph (TEG) in 10 patients presenting with massive bleeding. Blood...... was successful and 6 of these patients survived. The result indicates that an early balanced transfusion strategy maintains haemostatic competence in massively bleeding patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  1. Five-day storage of platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, G; Sherring, V A; Tittley, P

    1984-01-01

    The short 72-hour shelf-life of platelet concentrates stored in standard PL146 (Fenwal) plastic bags often results in shortages of platelets. This 3-day limitation is based on the biochemical and physiological changes that occur during storage and that result in decreased viability and survival after transfusion. We assessed both in vitro and in vivo function of platelet concentrates stored for 3 and 5 days in two new plastic packs: PL732 (Fenwal) and CLX (Cutter). The concentrate pH was maintained above 7.0 in both bags and there was little change in platelet count or size following 5 days of storage. Aggregation response to adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and collagen was maintained well. The PCO2 values indicated good gas escape with lower values after 5 days of storage than at 0 time. Lactate accumulation and glucose utilization were also lower in these new bags. Autologous survivals of chromium-labeled platelets stored for 5 days were 6.0 days (PL732) and 5.1 days (CLX), which are equal to or better than those found for platelets stored for 3 days in PL146. Posttransfusion increments in thrombocytopenic patients were acceptable; 49 percent after 1 hour and 31 percent after 24 hours for concentrates stored in CLX and 44 percent after 1 hour and 28 percent after 24 hours for concentrates stored in PL732. Both of these new bags, which contain different types of plasticizers, provide an environment that results in an improved product and will permit 5-day storage of platelet concentrates; these two benefits will help to alleviate the difficulties in supply of platelet concentrates.

  2. Acquired red blood cell alloantibodies in transfused patients of 80 years or over: a 2008-2013 national haemovigilance survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, Pierre; Barday, Grégory; Py, Jean-Yves; Meyer, Francis

    2017-05-01

    As transfusion in the elderly patients has increased over the last decades, and with the aim of improving blood policy, post-transfusion red blood cell alloimmunisation, a delayed serological transfusion reaction, was investigated in patients 80 years old or over. For every adverse reaction to a transfusion, a report is sent to the French haemovigilance database. All cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation reported in the haemovigilance database were collected, and an analysis was performed on those cases in transfused patients 80 years old or over. There were 11,625 reports of red blood cell alloimmunisation from 1 January, 2008 to 31 December, 2013, of which 3,617 (31.1%) occurred in patients 80 years old or over. Among this subgroup, red blood cell concentrates were the most frequently involved blood component (3,482 reports, 96.3%). Red blood cell alloimmunisation after transfusion of platelet concentrates was also notified (132 reports, 3.7%). Anti-KEL1 was the most frequent antibody (874 reports, 24.2%). The imputability of the blood component was certain in 2,340 cases (64.7%) and probable in 1,078 (29.8%). In 2013, the incidence of red blood cell alloimmunisation was 4.14 per 1,000 transfused patients aged 80 years old or over. In a 6-year national survey in which 40,570 reports were made, there were 3,617 cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation in transfused recipients of 80 years old or over. This delayed serological transfusion reaction is not rare. Red blood cell concentrates were predominantly involved, but cases caused by platelet concentrates were also described. In order to prevent alloimmunisation in the elderly, several factors must be evaluated before transfusing matched red blood cell concentrates: the patient's age, pathology and its outcome, the type of transfusion support (chronic or not), life expectancy, and blood product availability.

  3. Acquired red blood cell alloantibodies in transfused patients of 80 years or over: a 2008–2013 national haemovigilance survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, Pierre; Barday, Grégory; Py, Jean-Yves; Meyer, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Background As transfusion in the elderly patients has increased over the last decades, and with the aim of improving blood policy, post-transfusion red blood cell alloimmunisation, a delayed serological transfusion reaction, was investigated in patients 80 years old or over. Materials and methods For every adverse reaction to a transfusion, a report is sent to the French haemovigilance database. All cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation reported in the haemovigilance database were collected, and an analysis was performed on those cases in transfused patients 80 years old or over. Results There were 11,625 reports of red blood cell alloimmunisation from 1 January, 2008 to 31 December, 2013, of which 3,617 (31.1%) occurred in patients 80 years old or over. Among this subgroup, red blood cell concentrates were the most frequently involved blood component (3,482 reports, 96.3%). Red blood cell alloimmunisation after transfusion of platelet concentrates was also notified (132 reports, 3.7%). Anti-KEL1 was the most frequent antibody (874 reports, 24.2%). The imputability of the blood component was certain in 2,340 cases (64.7%) and probable in 1,078 (29.8%). In 2013, the incidence of red blood cell alloimmunisation was 4.14 per 1,000 transfused patients aged 80 years old or over. Discussion In a 6-year national survey in which 40,570 reports were made, there were 3,617 cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation in transfused recipients of 80 years old or over. This delayed serological transfusion reaction is not rare. Red blood cell concentrates were predominantly involved, but cases caused by platelet concentrates were also described. In order to prevent alloimmunisation in the elderly, several factors must be evaluated before transfusing matched red blood cell concentrates: the patient’s age, pathology and its outcome, the type of transfusion support (chronic or not), life expectancy, and blood product availability. PMID:27416567

  4. transfusion transmissible viral infections among potential blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Key words: Transfusion Transmissible Infections, HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Blood Donors,. University College Hospital (UCH), ELISA. INTRODUCTION. The most common diseases transmitted in blood transfusions are viral infections. Transfusion- transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus ...

  5. In vitro viability effects on apheresis and buffy-coat derived platelets administered through infusion pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandgren P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Per Sandgren,1,2 Veronica Berggren,3 Carl Westling,1,2 Viveka Stiller1 1Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 3Department of Neonatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Different infusion pump systems as well as gravity infusion have been widely used in neonatal transfusion. However, the limited number of published studies describing the use of infusion pumps on platelets illustrates the necessity for more robust data.Methods: To evaluate the potential in vitro effects on the cellular, metabolic, functional and phenotypic properties of platelets, we set up a four-arm paired study simultaneously comparing the use of different infusion pumps (Alaris® CC/GP with unexposed platelets. The platelet units (n=8 were either produced by the apheresis technique and suspended in 100% plasma or derived from buffy coats to yield platelet units stored in approximately 30% plasma and 70% SSP+. Fresh and 5-day old platelets were tested.Results: Regardless of the production system or storage time used, no significant differences were observed in glucose and lactate concentration, pH, adenosine triphosphate levels, response to extent of shape change, hypotonic shock response reactivity, and CD62P expression. Similarly, no differences were observed in expression of the conformational epitope on glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, determined using procaspase-activating compound 1, or in the expression of CD42b and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in a comparison between platelets administered through infusion pumps versus unexposed platelets.Conclusion: Using Alaris CC/GP infusion pumps had no influence on the cellular, functional, and phenotypic in vitro properties of platelets. This fact seems not to be affected by different production systems or storage time.Keywords: platelets, neonatal platelet transfusion

  6. Immunological aspects of blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, A

    2000-09-01

    Donor selection based on blood group phenotypes, and blood processing such as leukocyte-depletion, gamma-irradiation or washing to remove plasma, are approaches for therapeutic or preventive use to manage the immunological complications of transfusion. Indications for specific components are prescribed in guidelines provided by (inter)national Transfusion Societies. Although the use of guidelines and protocols is in line with modern medicine, these can create a state of tension with the political sense of values to improve the viral safety of blood products and with the commercial exploitation of pooled plasma-products.A century of blood transfusion therapy has facilitated cancer treatment and advanced surgical interventions. The transfusion product has improved progressively, although mostly in response to disasters such as wars and AIDS. Every blood transfusion interacts with the immune system of the recipient. There are, however, very few quantitative figures to estimate the consequences. This review is based on the available literature on the clinical consequences of transfusion induced immunization and modulation. To a large degree the clinical consequences of transfusion induced immune effects are still a mystery.A blood transfusion is a medical intervention, which in many cases remains experimental with respect to the benefit/risk ratio. Ideally, this uncertainty should be communicated to patients and every transfusion included in a study. Such studies preferentially should be randomized because the perceived need for transfusion is associated with clinical conditions with a worse prognosis than those that do not receive transfusion. This difference may mask the interpretation of the transfusion effect. Since the blood supply services in almost all Western countries have been reorganized and nationalized, or at least operate to national quality standards, the measurement of risk: benefit of transfusion, whether political or evidence-based, needs to be

  7. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    titles and abstracts of trials identified, and relevant trials were evaluated in full text for eligibility. Two reviewers then independently extracted data on methods, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias from included trials. random effects models were used to estimate risk ratios and mean...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  8. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi A. Goubran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient's immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure.

  9. Blood transfusion exposure in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Although essential for the evaluation of blood transfusion safety, the prevalence of blood transfusion in the general population is not presently known. This study estimated the exposure to blood transfusion in the general Scandinavian population.......Although essential for the evaluation of blood transfusion safety, the prevalence of blood transfusion in the general population is not presently known. This study estimated the exposure to blood transfusion in the general Scandinavian population....

  10. Non-polar lipids accumulate during storage of transfusion products and do not contribute to the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A L; Vervaart, M A T; van Bruggen, R; de Korte, D; Nieuwland, R; Kulik, W; Vlaar, A P J

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of non-polar lipids arachidonic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE and 15-HETE during storage of transfusion products may play a role in the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress after transfusion. We investigated non-polar lipid accumulation in red blood cells (RBCs) stored for 42 days, plasma stored for 7 days at either 4 or 20°C and platelet (PLT) transfusion products stored for 7 days. Furthermore, we investigated whether transfusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids induces TRALI in a 'two-hit' human volunteer model. All products were produced following Dutch Blood Bank protocols and are according to European standards. Non-polar lipids were measured with high-performance liquid chromotography followed by mass spectrometry. All non-polar lipids increased in RBCs after 21 days of storage compared to baseline. The non-polar lipid concentration in plasma increased significantly, and the increase was even more pronounced in products stored at 20°C. In platelets, baseline levels of 5-HETE and 15-HETE were higher than in RBCs or plasma. However, the non-polar lipids did not change significantly during storage of PLT products. Infusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids did not induce TRALI in LPS-primed human volunteers. We conclude that non-polar lipids accumulate in RBC and plasma transfusion products and that accumulation is temperature dependent. Accumulation of non-polar lipids does not appear to explain the onset of TRALI (Dutch Trial Register - NTR4455). © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  12. Secretome profiling of apheresis platelet supernatants during routine storage via antibody-based microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Mustafa, Shakhawan A; Sterzer, Viktor; Celik, Hatice; Keski, Sahime; Khorramshahi, Omid; Movassaghi, Kamran; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2017-01-06

    Platelet storage lesions (PSLs) occur during platelet concentrate (PC) storage. Adverse transfusion reactions (ATRs) have been demonstrated to be more frequent in older PCs and removal of the supernatant prior to transfusion reduces their occurrence. Proteomic profiling of PC supernatants was thus performed to identify proteins associated with PSLs and ATRs. Twenty-four PCs were investigated daily from day 0 to day 9 for platelet pre-activation (PPA), platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (PEVs), and platelet function. Using antibody microarrays, 673 extracellular proteins were analysed in PC supernatants on days 0, 3, 5, 7, and 9. During 5days of storage, PPA and PEVs continuously increased (PPlatelet function was observed to remain stable within the first 5days (P=0.1751) and decreased thereafter. Comparison of all time points to day 0 revealed the identification of 136 proteins that were significantly changed in abundance during storage, of which 72 were expressed by platelets. Network analysis identified these proteins to be predominantly associated with exosomes (P=4.61×10-8, n=45 genes) and two clusters with distinct functions were found with one being associated with haemostasis and the other with RNA binding. These findings may provide an explanation for ATRs. Changes in platelet concentrate (PC) supernatants during storage have been so far only poorly addressed and high abundant proteins burden the identification of quantitative changes in the secretome. We applied a high-throughput antibody microarray allowing for the sensitive quantification of 673 extracellular factors. PCs account for the highest number of adverse transfusion reactions (ATRs). ATRs have been demonstrated to be more frequent in older PCs and removal of the supernatant prior to transfusion reduces their occurrence. Comprehensive interpretation of the changing proteins in the secretome during platelet storage under blood banking conditions may help to identify mechanisms leading to the

  13. Transfusion medicine on American television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J K

    2014-02-01

    Television is a beloved American pastime and a frequent American export. As such, American television shapes how the global public views the world. This study examines how the portrayal of blood transfusion and blood donation on American television may influence how domestic and international audiences perceive the field of transfusion medicine. American television programming of the last quarter-century was reviewed to identify programmes featuring topics related to blood banking/transfusion medicine. The included television episodes were identified through various sources. Twenty-seven television episodes airing between 1991 and 2013 were identified as featuring blood bank/transfusion medicine topics. Although some accurate representations of the field were identified, most television programmes portrayed blood banking/transfusion medicine inaccurately. The way in which blood banking/transfusion medicine is portrayed on American television may assist clinicians in understanding their patient's concerns about blood safety and guide blood collection organisations in improving donor recruitment. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. Platelet activation by riboflavin and UV light: is it really the other side of the coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Lanti, Alessandro; Fiorelli, Eleonora; Palazzo, Gloria; Guiducci, Giorgia; Messina, Francesca; De Masi, Alessandra; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Chiru, Oana Marilena; Cerrone, Paola; Antonelli, Maddalena; Adorno, Gaspare

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays transfusion safety is still put at risk by contamination of pathogens. The Mirasol PRT System blocks the replication of pathogens and white blood cells. Our goal was to quantify the activation of platelets after treatment with the Mirasol device. From September to December 2013, 131 platelet collections were studied using a simple flow cytometric strategy. There was a significant correlation between the percentage of platelet activated before and after the treatment. Our results induced us to think that the activation of platelets after treatment was acceptable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  16. Desmopressin use for minimising perioperative blood transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J; Oakland, Kathryn; Brierley, Charlotte; Bennett, Sean; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    -quality evidence) and for total blood loss (very low-quality evidence) due to large differences in baseline blood loss. Consequently, these outcomes were not pooled and were reported in subgroups. Compared with placebo, DDAVP may slightly decrease the total volume of red cells transfused in adult cardiac surgery (mean difference (MD) -0.52 units, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.96 to -0.08 units; 14 trials, 957 participants), but may lead to little or no difference in orthopaedic surgery (MD -0.02, 95% CI -0.67 to 0.64 units; 6 trials, 303 participants), vascular surgery (MD 0.06, 95% CI -0.60 to 0.73 units; 2 trials, 135 participants), or hepatic surgery (MD -0.47, 95% CI -1.27 to 0.33 units; 1 trial, 59 participants). DDAVP probably leads to little or no difference in the total number of participants transfused with blood (risk ratio (RR) 0.96, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.06; 25 trials; 1806 participants) (moderate-quality evidence). Whether DDAVP decreases total blood loss in adult cardiac surgery (MD -135.24 mL, 95% CI -210.80 mL to -59.68 mL; 22 trials, 1358 participants), orthopaedic surgery (MD -285.76 mL, 95% CI -514.99 mL to -56.53 mL; 5 trials, 241 participants), or vascular surgery (MD -582.00 mL, 95% CI -1264.07 mL to 100.07 mL; 1 trial, 44 participants) is uncertain because the quality of evidence is very low. DDAVP probably leads to little or no difference in all-cause mortality (Peto odds ratio (pOR) 1.09, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.34; 22 trials, 1631 participants) or in thrombotic events (pOR 1.36, 95% CI, 0.85 to 2.16; 29 trials, 1984 participants) (both low-quality evidence). DDAVP versus placebo or no treatment for people with platelet dysfunction Compared with placebo, DDAVP may lead to a reduction in the total volume of red cells transfused (MD -0.65 units, 95% CI -1.16 to -0.13 units; 6 trials, 388 participants) (low-quality evidence) and in total blood loss (MD -253.93 mL, 95% CI -408.01 mL to -99.85 mL; 7 trials, 422 participants) (low-quality evidence). DDAVP probably leads

  17. HAEMOVIGILANCE AND SAFE BLOOD TRANSFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjeta Potočnik

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Haemovigilance is a system consisting of the detection, collecting and analysis of information regarding unwanted and unexpected effects of blood transfusion that make it possible to take action in order to improve blood trasfusion safety. In a broader sense, it is defined as a set of surveillance procedures covering the whole transfusion chain from the collection of blood to the follow-up of recipients. In some European countries a haemovigilance system based on legislation was introduced during the last ten years, European Haemovigilance Network was organised and some results from the existing surveillance systems were reported. The paper presents haemovigilance activities in Slovenia.Conclusions. In Slovenia, many elements of haemovigilance are already included in the blood transfusion chain, but no unique system of data collection exists. We expect a new legislation on blood transfusion to help us with introducing a data collection system, analysis and activities in order to further improve blood transfusion safety.

  18. Transfusion in critically ill children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, E L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products is a cornerstone in managing many critically ill children. Major improvements in blood product safety have not diminished the need for caution in transfusion practice. In this review, we aim to discuss the interplay between benefits and potential adverse effects...... of transfusion in critically ill children by including 65 papers, which were evaluated based on previously agreed selection criteria. Current practice on transfusing critically ill children is mainly founded on the basis of adult studies, common practices with cut-off values, and expert opinions, rather than...... evidence-based medicine. Paediatric patients have explicit physiological challenges and requirements to be addressed. Critically ill children often suffer from anaemia, have substantial iatrogenic blood loss with subsequent transfusions, and are at a higher risk of complications, often due to human errors...

  19. Comparison of Platelet Transfusion as Fresh Whole Blood Versus Apheresis Platelets for Massively Transfused Combat Trauma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Prospective trials will be necessary before consideration of FWB in the routine management of civilian trauma. However, in austere environments where standard...casualties in austere environments where component products such as plasma or PLTs are unavailable. In such circumstances, the US military has acquired... Blackstone EH. Duration of red-cell storage and complications after cardiac surgery. N Engl J Med 2008; 358:1229-39. 42. Hondow JA, Russell WJ, Duncan

  20. Clinical transfusion practice update: haemovigilance, complications, patient blood management and national standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Wood, Erica M; Cole-Sinclair, Merrole F

    2013-09-16

    Blood transfusion is not without risk. Although the risks of HIV and hepatitis transmission have diminished, haemovigilance programs highlight that other significant transfusion hazards remain. Sepsis from bacterial contamination is the most common residual infectious hazard in developed countries, and events due to clerical error are problematic. Unnecessary transfusions should be avoided. New national guidelines on patient blood management (PBM) emphasise holistic approaches, including strategies to reduce transfusion requirements. Perioperative PBM should incorporate preoperative haemoglobin and medication optimisation, intraoperative blood conservation, and consideration of restrictive postoperative transfusion and cell-salvage techniques. When massive transfusion is required, hospitals should implement massive transfusion protocols. These protocols reduce mortality, improve communication and facilitate adequate provision of blood products. They should include multidisciplinary team involvement and guidelines for use of blood components and adjunctive agents. Although fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell and platelet to red blood cell ratios of ≥ 1 : 2 appear to reduce mortality in trauma patients who receive massive transfusion, there is insufficient evidence to recommend specific ratios. Systematic reviews have found no significant benefit of recombinant activated factor VII in critical bleeding, and an increase in thromboembolic events; specialist haematology advice is therefore recommended when considering use of this agent. The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards address use of blood and blood products, and provide important transfusion principles for adoption by all clinicians. Storage of red cells in additive solution results in changes, known as the "storage lesion", and studies to determine the clinical effect of the age of blood at transfusion are ongoing.

  1. Thromboelastograph with Platelet Mapping(TM) predicts postoperative chest tube drainage in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohsin; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Mais, Alec M; Leyvi, Galina

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of Thromboelastograph with Platelet Mapping (TEG-PM(TM)) to predict postoperative bleeding tendency in patients with a history of recent anti-platelet therapy undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A retrospective analysis. Association between predictor variables (MAADP [maximum amplitude produced by adenosine diphosphate], MAAA [maximum amplitude produced by arachidonic acid], percent of platelets inhibited by clopidogrel, percent of platelets inhibited by aspirin) and the outcomes as elevated chest tube drainage (CTD) and blood transfusion were investigated by logistic regression model. CTD was considered elevated if it was ≥ 600 mL within 12 hours after surgery. A university hospital. Patients on antiplatelet therapy scheduled to undergo CABG that had TEG-PM(TM) done as a point-of-care test. None. A total of 78 patients had preoperative TEG-PM(TM) test and on-pump CABG surgeries performed on the same day. Among them, 20 patients (25.6%) had elevated CTD. Decreased MAADP (odds ratio [OR] 0.94), increased percent inhibition of platelets by clopidogrel (OR 1.03), and lower body mass index (BMI) (OR 0.78) were significantly associated with elevated CTD. The same parameters were also associated with platelets transfusion: MAADP (OR 0.94), percent of inhibition of platelets by clopidogrel (OR 1.03) and BMI (OR 0.77). TEG-PM(TM) parameters and BMI are predictive of elevated CTD and platelets transfusion. A 1 mm decrease in MAADP increases the likelihood of elevated CTD and the likelihood of platelets transfusion by 6% whereas 1 unit decrease in BMI is associated with an increased likelihood of elevated CTD and platelets transfusion by 22% and 23% respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood genotyping for improved outcomes in chronic transfusion patients: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutner JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jose Mauro Kutner,1 Mariza Mota,1 Fabiana Conti,1 Lilian Castilho1,2 1Hemotherapy and Cell Therapy Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Hemocentro Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil Abstract: Blood transfusions are life sustaining in chronically transfused patients. However, certain complications, such as alloimmunization to red blood cells, can create challenges in the management of those patients. Routine phenotyping of blood recipients and the use of phenotype-matched blood units for transfusion have been useful to lower the occurrence of red cell alloantibodies in chronically transfused individuals. Nevertheless, extensive phenotyping is expensive, laborious, and cannot be performed in certain situations. The molecular understanding of blood groups has enabled the design of assays that may be used to better guide matched red blood cell transfusions. This review summarizes key findings related to red cell alloimmunization, the already identified and potential future benefits of blood group genotyping, and how molecular typing is being incorporated in the blood bank's routine to improve clinical and long-term outcomes in chronically transfused patients. Keywords: blood group genotyping, chronically transfused patients, platelet genotyping, RBC alloimmunization

  3. The Role of Platelets and ε-Aminocaproic Acid in Arthrogryposis, Renal Dysfunction, and Cholestasis (ARC) Syndrome Associated Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Angela C; Lombel, Rebecca M; Pipe, Steven W; Shavit, Jordan A

    2016-03-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a rare disorder associated with platelet abnormalities resembling gray platelet syndrome. Affected patients have normal platelet numbers but abnormal morphology and function. Bleeding symptomatology ranges from postprocedural to spontaneous life-threatening hemorrhage. We report a patient with ARC syndrome and compound heterozygous mutations in VPS33B (vacuolar protein sorting 33B) who presented with significant bleeding requiring numerous admissions and transfusions. She was treated with prophylactic platelet transfusions and ε-aminocaproic acid. This was well-tolerated and significantly decreased transfusion requirements and admissions for bleeding. Our experience provides support for consideration of prophylactic measures in these patients as well as the possibility of using prophylaxis in related disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Isolation of dental pulp stem cells from a single donor and characterization of their ability to differentiate after 2 years of cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulaimani, Reem S; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M; Alnabaheen, May S; Ashri, Nahid Y

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the viability and differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from single donors after 2 years of cryopreservation.   This prospective study was conducted between October 2010 and February 2014 in the Stem Unit, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Seventeen teeth extracted from 11 participants were processed separately to assess the minimum tissue weight needed to yield cells for culturing in vitro. Cell stemness was evaluated before passage 4 using the colony forming unit assay, immunofluorescence staining, and bi-lineage differentiation. Dental pulp stem cells  were cryopreserved for 2 years. Post-thaw DPSCs were cultured until senescence and differentiated toward osteogenic, odontogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages.   Viable cells were isolated successfully from 6 of the 11 participants. Three of these 6 cultured cell lines were identified as DPSCs. A minimum of 0.2 g of dental pulp tissue was required for successful isolation of viable cells from a single donor. Post-thaw  DPSCs successfully differentiated towards osteogenic, odontogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. The post-thaw DPSCs were viable in vitro up to 70 days before senescence. There was no significant difference between the cells.   Within the limitations of this investigation, viable cells from dental pulp tissue were isolated successfully from the same donor using a minimum of 2 extracted teeth. Not all isolated cells from harvested dental pulp tissue had the characteristics of DPSCs. Post-thaw DPSCs maintained their multi-lineage differentiation capacity.

  5. Comparison of growth factor and platelet concentration from commercial platelet-rich plasma separation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Tiffany N; Pouliot, Michael A; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Dragoo, Jason L

    2011-02-01

    Clinical studies claim that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) shortens recovery times because of its high concentration of growth factors that may enhance the tissue repair process. Most of these studies obtained PRP using different separation systems, and few analyzed the content of the PRP used as treatment. This study characterized the composition of single-donor PRP produced by 3 commercially available PRP separation systems. Controlled laboratory study. Five healthy humans donated 100 mL of blood, which was processed to produce PRP using 3 PRP concentration systems (MTF Cascade, Arteriocyte Magellan, Biomet GPS III). Platelet, white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell, and fibrinogen concentrations were analyzed by automated systems in a clinical laboratory, whereas ELISA determined the concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor αβ and ββ (PDGF-αβ, PDGF-ββ), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). There was no significant difference in mean PRP platelet, red blood cell, active TGF-β1, or fibrinogen concentrations among PRP separation systems. There was a significant difference in platelet capture efficiency. The highest platelet capture efficiency was obtained with Cascade, which was comparable with Magellan but significantly higher than GPS III. There was a significant difference among all systems in the concentrations of WBC, PDGF-αβ, PDGF-ββ, and VEGF. The Cascade system concentrated leukocyte-poor PRP, compared with leukocyte-rich PRP from the GPS III and Magellan systems. The GPS III and Magellan concentrate leukocyte-rich PRP, which results in increased concentrations of WBCs, PDGF-αβ, PDGF-ββ, and VEGF as compared with the leukocyte-poor PRP from Cascade. Overall, there was no significant difference among systems in the platelet concentration, red blood cell, active TGF-β1, or fibrinogen levels. Products from commercially available PRP separation systems produce differing concentrations of

  6. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    1999-01-01

    of sVEGF was determined in nonfiltered and prestorage white cell-reduced whole blood (WB), buffy coat-depleted saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGM) blood, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and buffy coat-derived platelet (BCP) pools obtained from volunteer, healthy blood donors. As a control, total content....... The potential content of VEGF in various blood components for transfusion was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Soluble VEGF (sVEGF, isotype 165) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in serum and plasma samples and in lysed cells from healthy volunteers. Subsequently, total content......: In the healthy volunteers, median total sVEGF content was 97 (range, 20-303) pg per mL in serum and 19 (13-37) pg per mL in plasma (n = 12, p plasma, and 95 (78...

  7. Transfusion of shed mediastinal blood reduces the use of allogenic blood transfusion without increasing complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkersen, Lars; Tang, Mariann; Grunnet, Niels; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2011-03-01

    Reduced use of allogenic blood components is a key issue in cardiac surgery. Several methods to conserve blood have been used; reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood (RSMB) has found widespread acceptance, but the efficacy and safety are still debated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of RSMB on the use of allogenic blood components and selected complications. Six hundred and twenty-three consecutive cardiac surgery patients in three successive periods, of whom patients in the middle period did not receive RSMB due to manufacturer delivery problems, were evaluated. Patients and procedures were characterized by EuroSCORE. Prospective collected data were: units of transfused allogenic blood, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelets, postoperative blood loss and postoperative complications such as dialysis, re-operation due to bleeding, sternal infection and stroke. Length of stay in ICU was used as a general indicator of perioperative complications. The number of patients receiving allogenic blood in periods with RSMB was significantly lower (36.5% versus 54.9%, ptransfused blood units was lower in patients receiving RSMB (2.07 versus 3.41, p=0.029), while FFP (1.34 versus 2.01, p=0.11) and platelets (0.58 versus 0.95, p=0.05) were not statistically significantly different. Postoperative bleeding was lower (759 versus 967 ml, p=0.032) in the periods with RSMB. Patients receiving RSMB were less transfused with allogenic blood and had less postoperative drainage, while the frequency of observed postoperative complications was not different from patients who did not receive RSMB.

  8. Flow cytometric assessment of canine erythrocytes and platelets for dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidi, Cynthia de A; Takahira, Regina K; Gerlach, John A; Davis, John M; Schwartz, Kenneth A; Scott, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    In human medicine, transfusion of ABO-mismatched platelets has been associated with shortened platelet survival and refractoriness to platelet transfusion because of expression of certain blood group antigens on platelets. It remains unknown if canine platelets express dog erythrocyte antigens (DEAs). The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric assay for DEA 1.1 and determine whether DEA 1.1 is present on canine platelets. Blood was collected from 172 clinically healthy dogs. Platelets and erythrocytes from each dog were tested for DEA 1.1 by flow cytometry using anti-DEA 1.1 blood-typing sera. Erythrocytes from each dog were also assessed for DEA 1.1 using a standard tube-typing test (T1) and using a second tube method (T2), if the flow cytometric and T1 results differed. Using flow cytometry, DEA 1.1 was detected on erythrocytes of all 110 dogs shown by T1 or T2 testing to be DEA 1.1-positive. Initial results of the T1 test had a diagnostic accuracy of 93% (160 correct/172 tests). The frequency of erythrocyte DEA 1.1 positivity in previously untyped dogs (n = 118) was 56%. DEA 1.1 expression was not detected on platelets from DEA 1.1-positive dogs. Flow cytometry was a reliable method for detection of DEA 1.1 on canine erythrocytes. The absence of DEA 1.1 on platelets from DEA 1.1-positive dogs suggests that their platelets do not express DEA 1.1 and will not induce production of anti-DEA 1.1 antibodies that might lead to platelet refractoriness or reactions to a subsequent transfusion of DEA 1.1-positive erythrocytes. © 2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Survey of hemostasis management and transfusion in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, P; Benítez, I; Sánchez-Carrillo, F; León, A; Álamo, J M; Gómez, M A

    2016-02-01

    To determine the management of haemostasis and transfusion practice in the field of liver transplantation in Spain. A questionnaire was developed for physicians in anaesthesiology of all centres performing liver transplantation in Spain. The information required made reference to the 12 months prior to its distribution, from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Data were collected from 24 centres in which liver transplantation is performed in Spain. Only 46% reported that they had protocols or practice guidelines for the management of haemostasis, and 83% of hospitals responded that they knew the percentage of transfused patients, but only 57% knew the mean transfusion. Regarding the degree of satisfaction with the management of haemostasis/coagulation, 50% said they were not satisfied. Thromboelastometry was used as an additional method of preoperative monitoring in only 8% of the centres and intra-operatively in one-third. Less than half (46%) of the centres performed preoperative correction of coagulation deficits based on conventional tests. The mean number of packed red cells used was ≤4 in 57% of centres. Consumption of fresh frozen plasma was highly variable, while 100% of centres consumed less than 4 pools of platelets per patient. There is a wide variability in the management of haemostasis and transfusion practice among Spanish centres. There are no guidelines or they are not widely used. The mean use of transfused blood products remain high. There was a decrease in centres using new methods of monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of mortality in trauma patients following massive blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangarajan Kanchana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : This study was designed to find out the factors influencing mortality in trauma patients receiving massive blood transfusion (MBT. Materials and Methods : Records of all patients admitted during December 2007 to November 2008 at a Level I Trauma Center emergency and who underwent massive transfusion (≥10 units of packed red cells in 24 h were retrospectively analyzed. Death during the hospital stay was considered as the study outcome and various demographic, laboratory, and clinical parameters were included as its potential determinants. Statistical Analysis : Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to identify the risk factors associated with mortality. Results : Of the 4054 transfused patients who were admitted to the trauma center during the study period, 71 (1.8% patients underwent massive transfusion. Of this, there were 37 survivors and 34 nonsurvivors (48%. The median overall ISS was 27 (22-34. The patients who died had shorter mean length of hospital stay, shorter mean duration of intensive care unit (ICU stay, and low admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS compared to the survivors (P < 0.01. The mean prothrombin time (PT and the mean activated partial thromboplastin time was significantly high (P < 0.01 among nonsurvivors. Total leukocyte count (TLC ≥ 10,000 cells/cubic mm, GCS ≤ 8, the presence of coagulopathy and major vascular surgery were the four independent determinants of mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis. The FFP:PRBC (fresh frozen plasma:packed red cells ratio and PC:PRBC (platelet concentrate:packed red cells ratio calculated in our study was not statistically significant in correlation to the in hospital mortality. Conclusions : Overall mortality among the MBT patients was comparable with the studies in the literature. Mortality is not affected by the amount of packed red cells given in the first 12 h and the total number of packed red cells transfused. Prospective

  11. Thromboelastography-based transfusion algorithm reduces blood product use after elective CABG: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Koray; Isbir, Cemil S; Tetik, Sermin; Atalan, Nazan; Tekeli, Atike; Aljodi, Maher; Civelek, Ali; Arsan, Sinan

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding and allogeneic transfusion remain constant problems in cardiac surgical procedures. In this study, we aimed to test the role of a routine thromboelastography (TEG)-based algorithm on bleeding and transfusions in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients (n = 224) undergoing elective CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively randomized into two groups according to transfusion strategy: in group 1 (clinician-directed transfusion, n = 110) need for blood transfusion was based on clinician's discretion and standard coagulation tests and in group 2 (TEG algorithm group, n = 114) kaolin-activated (k) TEG-based algorithm-guided perioperative transfusion management. Transfusion, blood loss, and outcome data were recorded. There were no differences in consumption of packed cell units, blood loss, re-exploration for bleeding, and early clinical outcome between the groups. Patients in the TEG group had significantly lower median units of fresh frozen plasma and platelets compared with the other group (p = 0.001). The median number of total allogeneic units transfused (packed cells and blood products) was significantly reduced in the TEG group compared with the other group (median 2, range 1-3 units vs. median 3, range 2-4 units, respectively, p = 0.001). The need for tranexamic acid was significantly diminished in the TEG group compared with the other group (10.3% vs. 19%, respectively, p = 0.007). Our results show that routine use of a kTEG-guided algorithm reduces the consumption of blood products in patients undergoing elective CABG. Adopting such an algorithm into routine management of these patients may help to improve clinical outcome and reduce the potential risks of transfusion-related complications and total costs after CABG.

  12. Truth about Transfusions (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with certain types of cancers or bleeding problems. Not Just Any Blood Will Do Hospitals have to be careful when they give a blood transfusion. People have different blood types — and not all ...

  13. HAEMOVIGILANCE AND SAFE BLOOD TRANSFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Marjeta Potočnik

    2004-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance is a system consisting of the detection, collecting and analysis of information regarding unwanted and unexpected effects of blood transfusion that make it possible to take action in order to improve blood trasfusion safety. In a broader sense, it is defined as a set of surveillance procedures covering the whole transfusion chain from the collection of blood to the follow-up of recipients. In some European countries a haemovigilance system based on legislation was i...

  14. Inactivation of Zika virus in platelet components using amotosalen and ultraviolet A illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Felicia; Laughhunn, Andrew; Lanteri, Marion C; Aubry, Maite; Musso, Didier; Stassinopoulos, Adonis

    2017-08-01

    Concerned over the risk of Zika virus (ZIKV) transfusion transmission, public health agencies recommended the implementation of mitigation strategies for its prevention. Those strategies included the use of pathogen inactivation for the treatment of plasma and platelets. The efficacy of amotosalen/ultraviolet A to inactivate ZIKV in plasma had been previously demonstrated, and the efficacy of inactivation in platelets with the same technology was assumed. These studies quantify ZIKV inactivation in platelet components using amotosalen/ultraviolet A. Platelet components were spiked with ZIKV, and ZIKV infectious titers and RNA loads were measured by cell culture-based assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction in spiked platelet components before and after photochemical treatment using amotosalen/ultraviolet A. The mean ZIKV infectivity titers and RNA loads in platelet components before inactivation were either 4.9 log10 plaque forming units per milliliter, or 4.4 log10 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter and 7.5 log10 genome equivalents per milliliter, respectively. No infectivity was detected immediately after amotosalen/ultraviolet A treatment. No replicative virus remained after treatment, as demonstrated by multiple passages on Vero cell cultures; and ZIKV RNA was not detected from the first passage after inactivation. Additional experiments in this study demonstrated efficient inactivation to the limit of detection in platelets manufactured in 65% platelet additive solution, 35% plasma, or 100% plasma. As previously demonstrated for plasma, robust levels of ZIKV inactivation were achieved in platelet components. With inactivation of higher levels of ZIKV than those reported in asymptomatic, RNA-reactive blood donors, the pathogen-inactivation system using amotosalen/ultraviolet A offers the potential to mitigate the risk of ZIKV transmission by plasma and platelet transfusion. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  15. Building a New Transfusion Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, John R; Hayden, Brenda K; Cruz-Cody, Virginia G; Louzon, Max J; Tuott, Erin E; Sen, Nina E; Gary, Roxann; Ramos, Patrick J; Daniel-Johnson, Jennifer A; Metcalf, Ryan A; Pagano, Monica B

    2017-08-01

    For over 60 years, Harborview Medical Center (HMC) in Seattle has received its blood components and pretransfusion testing from a centralized transfusion service operated by the regional blood supplier. In 2011, a hospital-based transfusion service (HBTS) was activated. After 5 years of operation, we evaluated the effects of the HBTS by reviewing records of hospital blood use, quality system events, blood product delivery times, and costs. Furthermore, the effects of in-house expertise on laboratory medicine resident and medical laboratory scientist student training, as well as regulatory and accrediting agency concerns, were reviewed. Blood use records from 2003 to 2015 demonstrated large reductions in blood component procurement, allocation, transfusion, and wastage with decreases in costs temporally related to the change in service. The turnaround time for thawed plasma for trauma patients decreased from 90 to 3 minutes. Transfusion medicine education metrics for residents and laboratory technology students improved significantly. HMC researchers brought in $2 million in transfusion research funding. HMC successfully transitioned to an HBTS, providing world-class primary transfusion support to a level 1 trauma center. Near-term benefits in patient care, education, and research resulted. Blood support became faster, safer, and cheaper.

  16. Patterns of Adverse Transfusion Reactions in a Tertiary Care Centre of North India: A Step Towards Hemovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Rajni; Aggarwal, Shikha; Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Thakur, Kusum K

    2017-06-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products is a double edged sword, so it should be used judiciously. The primary aim of the centralized Haemovigilance Program is to improve transfusion safety. To determine the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions (ATRs) in recipients of blood and blood components. Prospective study from January 2014 till April 2015 was done. ATRs reported to the Department of Transfusion Medicine were recorded and analyzed on the basis of their clinical features and lab tests. During the study period 25,099 units of blood and blood components were transfused and 100 ATRs (0.40 %) were reported. The incidence of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) was maximum (73 %) followed by allergic reactions (24 %), bacterial sepsis (1 %), hypotension due to ACE inhibitors (1 %) and acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AHTR) (1 %). Of all the reported ATRs, 76 % occurred with packed red cells, 15 % occurred with whole blood, while platelets and Fresh Frozen Plasma transfusions were responsible for 8 % and 1 %, respectively. The majority of the reactions were FNHTRs followed by allergic reactions. Reporting of all adverse events and continuous medical education to medical and paramedical staff will help in strengthening hemovigilance system.

  17. In vitro detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetouane, Yasmine; Dubourg, Gregory; Gallian, Pierre; Delerce, Jeremy; Levasseur, Anthony; Flaudrops, Christophe; Chabrière, Eric; Chiaroni, Jacques; Raoult, Didier; Camoin-Jau, Laurence

    2017-11-01

    Platelet concentrates are at risk of transfusion-related sepsis. The microbial detection methods currently available have reached their limits, as they do not completely prevent transfusion-related bacterial contamination.The aim of this study was to develop a new strategy to detect the risk of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In vitro, platelet concentrates were seeded with known concentrations of bacterial strains. Protein mass profiles were acquired by using a Microflex MALDI-TOF instrument. Dedicated 'Platelet' software was used as a spectrum subtraction tool to reveal specific peaks caused by the presence of pathogens in samples. The MALDI-TOF spectra of platelets were characterized and the reproducibility over time, regardless of the blood donor, was demonstrated with a positive predictive value of 100 %. In addition, the negative predictive value of the total number of specific peaks to predict contamination was 100 %. Detecting bacteria in platelet concentrates using the MALDI-TOF approach and analysing spectra with the Platelet software present the advantage of combining the precocity of results and sufficient sensitivity (10 c.f.u. ml-1). Further research will be conducted to compare this novel method with the current conventional method in order to validate our results, the objective being to reduce the risk of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination.

  18. Improvement of Treatment Outcomes after Implementation of a Massive Transfusion Protocol: A Level I Trauma Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Andrew; Fischer, Peter; Sing, Ronald; Templin, Megan; Avery, Michael; Christmas, A Britton

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of the implementation of an institutional massive transfusion protocol (MTP) for resuscitation with a 1:1:1 transfusion ratio of packed red blood cell (PRBC), fresh frozen plasma, and platelet units. In a Level I trauma center database, all trauma admissions (2004-2012) that received massive transfusions (≥10 units PRBCs in the first 24 hours) were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic data, transfusion ratios, and outcomes were compared before (PRE) and after (POST) MTP implementation in May 2008. Age, sex, and mechanism of injury were similar between 239 PRE and 208 POST trauma patients requiring massive transfusion. Transfusion ratios of fresh frozen plasma:PRBC and platelet:PRBC increased after MTP implementation. Among survivors, MTP implementation shortened hospital length of stay from 31 to 26 days (P = 0.04) and intensive care unit length of stay from 31 to 26 days (P = 0.02). Linear regression identified treatment after (versus before) implementation of MTP as an independent predictor of decreased ventilator days after adjusting for age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and chest Abbreviated Injury Score (P < 0.0001). Modest improvement in ratios likely does not account for all significant improvements in outcomes. Implementing a standardized protocol likely impacts automation, efficiency, and/or timeliness of product delivery.

  19. Is automated platelet counting still a problem in thrombocytopenic blood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Antônio Gomes Oliveira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Reliable platelet counting is crucial for indicating prophylactic platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the precision and accuracy of platelet counting for thrombocytopenic patients, using four different automated counters in comparison with the Brecher & Cronkite reference method recommended by the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH. TYPE OF STUDY: Automated platelet counting assessment in thrombocytopenic patients. SETTING: Hematology Laboratory, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, and the Hematology Division of Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Brecher & Cronkite reference method and four different automated platelet counters. PARTICIPANTS: 43 thrombocytopenic patients with platelet counts of less than 30,000/µl RESULTS: The ADVIA-120 (Bayer, Coulter STKS, H1 System (Technicom-Bayer and Coulter T-890 automatic instruments presented great precision and accuracy in relation to laboratory thrombocytopenic samples obtained by diluting blood from normal donors. However, when thrombocytopenic patients were investigated, all the counters except ADVIA (which is based on volume and refraction index showed low accuracy when compared to the Brecher & Cronkite reference method (ICSH. The ADVIA counter showed high correlation (r = 0.947. However, all counters showed flags in thrombocytopenic samples. CONCLUSION: The Brecher & Cronkite reference method should always be indicated in thrombocytopenic patients for platelet counts below 30,000 plt /µl obtained in one dimensional counters.

  20. Impact of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution with Autoplasma Transfusion on Hemostatic Parameters during Abdominal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sheikina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH with autoplasma transfusion on hemostatic parameters during cesarean section. Subjects and methods. The study covered 119 patients in whom ANH was used during cesarean section. Group 1 included 62 women undergoing ANH with autoplasma transfusion; Group 2 (control comprised 57 pregnant women receiving ANH only. Examination of the hemostatic system involved studies of the plasma link, thromboelastogram readings, vascular platelet hemostasis and evaluation of intravascular thrombogenesis. Results. Transfusion of stored autoplasma as a hemostatic component during ANH favored the development of moderate hypercoagulation due to a significant increase in fibrinogen concentrations by 8%, r+k shortening by 11%, and a rise in the thrombodynamic potential index by 12%. A statistically significant difference has been found in the results between the groups at a stage of surgical hemostasis, which proves the best hemostat-ic effect of ANH used with autoplasma transfusion. Conclusion. The study has demonstrated that the combined use of ANH and autoplasma transfusion contributes to the stabilization of the blood coagulation potential during cesarean section and extends the feasibilities of ANH when the volume of intraoperative blood loss is as high as 25% of the circulating blood volume. Key words: cesarean section, acute normovolemic hemodilution, autoplasma transfusion, coagulation potential.

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Megakaryocytes and Platelets for Disease Modeling and Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Sara; Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; French, Deborah L; Gadue, Paul

    2017-10-05

    Platelets, derived from megakaryocytes, are anucleate cytoplasmic discs that circulate in the blood stream and play major roles in hemostasis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are used in a variety of medical settings to prevent life-threatening thrombocytopenia because of cancer therapy, other causes of acquired or inherited thrombocytopenia, and trauma. Currently, platelets used for transfusion purposes are donor derived. However, there is a drive to generate nondonor sources of platelets to help supplement donor-derived platelets. Efforts have been made by many laboratories to generate in vitro platelets and optimize their production and quality. In vitro-derived platelets have the potential to be a safer, more uniform product, and genetic manipulation could allow for better treatment of patients who become refractory to donor-derived units. This review focuses on potential clinical applications of in vitro-derived megakaryocytes and platelets, current methods to generate and expand megakaryocytes from pluripotent stem cell sources, and the use of these cells for disease modeling. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Enhancing Transfusion Safety: Nurse’s Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriazi Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite strict clinical measures, there are distinct steps in transfusion process which require acute attention.The nurse is responsible for insuring that the right unit is administered to the right patient. Knowledge of risks is essential toadminister and monitor transfusions safely.Aim: This study summarizes the available data concerning transfusion adverse events and provides theoretical and technicalaspects for improving transfusion practice.Methodology: A systematic review in PubMed, MedLine and MDConsult database was conducted. The research limitsincluded English texts, referring to transfusion risks and technological means aiming at transfusion safety.Results: Blood transfusion is a medical intervention that saves lives and improves the quality of life. The regulations forensuring the availability and assuring the quality of the blood component cannot avoid transfusion errors, placing patients atrisk. Most frequent errors are attributed to practitioners involved in the clinical transfusion process. Based on reports toSerious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT the risk of transfusion error is estimated at 1:16,500. Over the last years severalcommittees have recommended guidance for enhancing the safety of blood ordering and administration. Moreover, newtechnology like barcode on patient wristband manages to improve the performance in each step.Conclusion: Safe transfusion process depends on a series of linked processes and nurses should take specific measuresreferring to pre- and post-transfusion stage. Technological innovations could help patients in need of transfusion therapy.

  3. Hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Oliveri, Roberto S; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2012-01-01

    Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists although recently, the concept of hemostatic resuscitation, i.e., providing large amount of blood products to critically injured patients in an im......Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists although recently, the concept of hemostatic resuscitation, i.e., providing large amount of blood products to critically injured patients...... in an immediate and sustained manner as part of an early massive transfusion protocol has been introduced. The aim of the present review was to investigate the potential effect on survival of proactive administration of plasma and/or platelets (PLT) in trauma patients with massive bleeding....

  4. Platelet function in stored heparinised autologous blood is not superior to in patient platelet function during routine cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf C G Gallandat Huet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In cardiac surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and unfractionated heparin have negative effects on blood platelet function. In acute normovolemic haemodilution autologous unfractionated heparinised blood is stored ex-vivo and retransfused at the end of the procedure to reduce (allogeneic transfusion requirements. In this observational study we assessed whether platelet function is better preserved in ex vivo stored autologous blood compared to platelet function in the patient during CPB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We measured platelet aggregation responses pre-CPB, 5 min after the start of CPB, at the end of CPB, and after unfractionated heparin reversal, using multiple electrode aggregometry (Multiplate® with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP and ristocetin activated test cells. We compared blood samples taken from the patient with samples taken from 100 ml ex-vivo stored blood, which we took to mimick blood storage during normovolemic haemodilution. Platelet function declined both in ex-vivo stored blood as well as in blood taken from the patient. At the end of CPB there were no differences in platelet aggregation responses between samples from the ex vivo stored blood and the patient. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Ex vivo preservation of autologous blood in unfractionated heparin does not seem to be profitable to preserve platelet function.

  5. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether platelet count, plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width. (PDW) and their ratios can predict mortality in hospitalised children. Methods: Children who died during hospital stay were the cases. Controls were age matched children admitted contempora- neously.

  6. Early Whole Blood for Patients Requiring Massive Transfusion after Major Trauma. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    platelet transfusions in the first three hours after arrival in the WB group. This analysis identified a disparity in non-survivable traumatic brain ...mass) was identified using validated cut points. Adipose tissue compartments analyzed included subcutaneous (SAT), visceral ( VAT ), and intramuscular...volumes in patients that did not have a severe traumatic brain injury. We are currently in the process of completing the follow-ups to the community

  7. The absolute recommendation of chamber Neubauer method for platelets counting instead of indirect methods in severe thrombocytopenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Raimundo Antônio Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and precise platelet counting is crucial for recommending platelets transfusion for thrombocytopenic patients, principally when platelet counts are bellow 30,000/µl. As most laboratories still use the indirect methods for confirming low automated platelet counts, this work compared two indirect methods used in practice (Fonio and Nosanchunk et al. with the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology recommended direct method (Brecher and Cronkite. The obtained data show that the indirect methods present low precision and accuracy, and that the direct method should always be employed in severe thrombocytopenic samples thanks to its high precision.

  8. Early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis predict transfusion of packed red blood cells in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shane A; Livingston, Michael H; Merritt, Neil H

    2016-05-01

    Severely injured pediatric trauma patients often present to hospital with early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis. These derangements are associated with poor outcomes, but it is unclear to what degree they predict transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBC). We retrospectively identified pediatric trauma patients from a level 1 trauma center from 2006 to 2013. Inclusion criteria were age less than 18years, Injury Severity Score greater than 12, and pRBC transfusion within 24h of admission. We identified 96 pediatric trauma patients who underwent pRBC transfusion within 24h of presentation to hospital. On admission, 43% of these patients had one or more signs of coagulopathy, and 81% had metabolic acidosis. Size of pRBC transfusion in the first 24h ranged from 3 to 177mL/kg (mean 29mL/kg), and nineteen patients (20%) underwent massive transfusion (>40ml/kg in 24h). Univariate analysis indicated that size of pRBC transfusion was associated with initial base excess (r=0.46), international normalized ratio (r=0.35), partial thromboplastin time (r=0.41), fibrinogen (r=0.46), and BIG score (Base deficit, INR, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), r=0.36). Platelet count, age, GCS, and direct versus referred presentation were not predictive. Multivariable linear regression confirmed that coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis remained predictive after adjusting for direct versus referred presentation (R(2)=0.30). Early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis predict size of pRBC transfusion among pediatric trauma patients. Further research is needed to develop massive transfusion protocols and guidelines for activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Standardization of platelet releasate products for clinical applications in cell therapy: a mathematical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Francesco; Polesel, Jerry; Battiston, Monica; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Zanolin, Stefania; Da Ponte, Alessandro; Astori, Giuseppe; Durante, Cristina; Mazzucato, Mario

    2017-05-19

    Standardized animal-free components are required for manufacturing cell-based medicinal products. Human platelet concentrates are sources of growth factors for cell expansion but such products are characterized by undesired variability. Pooling together single-donor products improves consistency, but the minimal pool sample size was never determined. Supernatant rich in growth factors (SRGF) derived from n = 44 single-donor platelet-apheresis was obtained by CaCl2 addition. n = 10 growth factor concentrations were measured. The data matrix was analyzed by a novel statistical algorithm programmed to create 500 groups of random data from single-donor SRGF and to repeat this task increasing group statistical sample size from n = 2 to n = 20. Thereafter, in created groups (n = 9500), the software calculated means for each growth factor and, matching groups with the same sample size, the software retrieved the percent coefficient of variation (CV) between calculated means. A 20% CV was defined as threshold. For validation, we assessed the CV of concentrations measured in n = 10 pools manufactured according to algorithm results. Finally, we compared growth rate and differentiation potential of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASC) expanded by separate SRGF pools. Growth factor concentrations in single-donor SRGF were characterized by high variability (mean (pg/ml)-CV); VEGF: 950-81.4; FGF-b: 27-74.6; PDGF-AA: 7883-28.8; PDGF-AB: 107834-32.5; PDGF-BB: 11142-48.4; Endostatin: 305034-16.2; Angiostatin: 197284-32.9; TGF-β1: 68382-53.7; IGF-I: 70876-38.3; EGF: 2411-30.2). In silico performed analysis suggested that pooling n = 16 single-donor SRGF reduced CV below 20%. Concentrations measured in 10 pools of n = 16 single SRGF were not different from mean values measured in single SRGF, but the CV was reduced to or below the threshold. Separate SRGF pools failed to differently affect ASC growth rate (slope pool A = 0.6; R(2) = 0.99; slope pool B = 0

  10. [Transfusion safety: state of the arts (ART)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Neila; Baccouche, Hela; Mahjoub, Sonia; Khayati, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Blood transfusion is a high risk activity. To evaluate transfusion safety in planned cardiac surgery. This study was conducted in the blood bank of the Rabta Hospital in two phases: a phase to observe transfusion acts followed by corrective actions and a phase to evaluate the impacts of these corrections on the transfusion practices. Characteristics of the potentially transfused patients, the eventually prescribed, dispensed and transfused blood products and transfusion practices were studied. During the observation phase, 70 patients were enrolled, 51 potentially transfused. Weaknesses concerned the mention of phenotype and transfusion history when ordering blood components as well as the double ABO/D group typing, the phenotype and the cross match performing. Final bedside controls were done in a wrong way. The distribution and the blood administration were established respectively for 208 and 232 blood products. The traceability was established for 86 blood products. During the evaluation phase, 30 patients were enrolled, 15 potentially transfused. Improvement was achieved in the transfusion history notification, phenotype and antibodies screen performing and cross matching. Optimisation of blood transfusion can be conceived only with collaboration between the different transfusion structures.

  11. Transfusion medicine in American undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Julie K; Weston, Christine M; King, Karen E

    2011-11-01

    Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in American hospitals, and transfusions are commonly ordered by physicians without formal training in transfusion medicine. Several transfusion medicine curricula have been proposed, including those developed through the Transfusion Medicine Academic Awards (TMAA). To our knowledge, no comprehensive study has assessed how transfusion medicine is incorporated into undergraduate medical education. We conducted an online survey to determine the manner in which transfusion medicine is incorporated into American undergraduate medical education. The survey was e-mailed to administrators of medical education at all of the 129 American medical schools accredited by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Eighty-six (67%) of the 129 identified medical school administrators responded. Seventy-one (83%) of the 86 administrators reported that their undergraduate medical education curriculum provides didactic lectures in transfusion medicine, with 48% of medical schools providing 1 or 2 hours of lecture-based instruction. A minority reported small group sessions devoted to transfusion medicine topics. While a slim majority reported the availability of transfusion medicine electives, only one of 84 administrators reported that such a rotation is required. Seventy-six of 83 (92%) administrators were unfamiliar with either the 1989 or the 1995 TMAA transfusion medicine curricula. Transfusion medicine content in American undergraduate medical education is variable and the influence of the TMAA program on contemporary medical school curricula is questionable. Future efforts in this area should focus on standardizing and improving undergraduate medical education in transfusion medicine. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Coagulopathy is prevalent and associated with adverse outcomes in transfused pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Shaz, Beth H; Pereira, Greg; Atkins, Elizabeth; Johnson, Karen K; Bao, Gaobin; Easley, Kirk A; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate coagulopathy in pediatric trauma patients on presentation to the emergency department, and to quantify the relationship with mortality. Pediatric trauma patients requiring a blood transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets, or cryoprecipitate) within 24 hours of arrival were included. Coagulation values on emergency department arrival were analyzed, as were clinical details and outcome. A total of 102 children (mean age, 6 years; mean injury severity score 22, mean Glascow Coma Scale 7, 80% blunt trauma victims) were studied over a 4 year period. An abnormal prothrombin time was found in 72%, partial thromboplastin time in 38%, fibrinogen in 52%, hemoglobin in 58%, and platelet count in 23%. An abnormal prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and platelet count were strongly associated with mortality (P=.005, .001, and Coagulopathy is prevalent in pediatric trauma patients ill enough to require a transfusion and is strongly associated with mortality. Studies are needed to determine whether early coagulation factor replacement and the institution of massive transfusion protocols may improve outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  14. Blood transfusion and coagulopathy in geriatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mador, Brett; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Hollands, Simon; Rizoli, Sandro

    2017-03-29

    Trauma resuscitation has undergone a paradigm shift with new emphasis on the early use of blood products and increased proportions of plasma and platelets. However, it is unclear how this strategy is applied or how effective it is in the elderly population. The study aim is to identify differences in transfusion practices and the coagulopathy of trauma in the elderly. Data was prospectively collected on all consecutive patients that met trauma activation criteria at a Level I trauma centre. Data fields included patient demographics, co-morbidities, injury and resuscitation data, laboratory values, thromboelastography (TEG) results, and outcome measures. Elderly patients were defined as those 55 and older. Propensity-score matched analysis was completed for patients receiving blood product transfusion. Patients were matched by gender, mechanism, injury severity score (ISS), head injury, and time from injury. Total of 628 patients were included, of which 142 (23%) were elderly. Elderly patients were more likely to be female (41% vs. 24%), suffer blunt mechanism of trauma (96% vs. 80%), have higher ISS scores (mean 25.4 vs. 21.6) and mortality (19% vs. 8%). Elderly patients were significantly more likely to receive a blood transfusion (42% vs. 30%), specifically for red cells and plasma. Propensity-matched analysis resulted in no difference in red cell transfusion or mortality. Despite the broad similarities between the matched cohorts, trauma coagulopathy as measured by TEG was less commonly observed in the elderly. Our results suggest that elderly trauma patients are more likely to receive blood products when admitted to a trauma centre, though this may be attributed to under-triage. The results also suggest an altered coagulopathic response to traumatic injury which is partially influenced by increased anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication use in the geriatric population. It is not clear whether the acute coagulopathy of trauma is equivalent in geriatric

  15. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery [1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion.

  16. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhesus monkey platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  18. Blood transfusion practice: facts and fallacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M

    1976-01-24

    Practical problems and potential dangers associated with blood transfusion have led to the introduction of modifications in transfusion practice and the search for blood substitutes. Many of these changes, promoted by the pharmaceutical industry, have been of questionable value.

  19. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000-20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  20. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and com...

  1. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W.; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  2. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Luc H; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2014-10-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Liver Transplantation without Perioperative Transfusions Single-Center Experience Showing Better Early Outcome and Shorter Hospital Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Goldaracena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Significant amounts of red blood cells (RBCs transfusions are associated with poor outcome after liver transplantation (LT. We report our series of LT without perioperative RBC (P-RBC transfusions to evaluate its influence on early and long-term outcomes following LT. Methods. A consecutive series of LT between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed. P-RBC transfusion was defined as one or more RBC units administrated during or ≤48 hours after LT. We divided the cohort in “No-Transfusion” and “Yes-Transfusion.” Preoperative status, graft quality, and intra- and postoperative variables were compared to assess P-RBC transfusion risk factors and postoperative outcome. Results. LT was performed in 127 patients (“No-Transfusion” = 39 versus “Yes-Transfusion” = 88. While median MELD was significantly higher in Yes-Transfusion (11 versus 21; P=0.0001 group, platelet count, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin were significantly lower. On multivariate analysis, the unique independent risk factor associated with P-RBC transfusions was preoperative hemoglobin (P<0.001. Incidence of postoperative bacterial infections (10 versus 27%; P=0.03, median ICU (2 versus 3 days; P=0.03, and hospital stay (7.5 versus 9 days; P=0.01 were negatively influenced by P-RBC transfusions. However, 30-day mortality (10 versus 15% and one- (86 versus 70% and 3-year (77 versus 66% survival were equivalent in both groups. Conclusions. Recipient MELD score was not a predictive factor for P-RBC transfusion. Patients requiring P-RBC transfusions had worse postoperative outcome. Therefore, maximum efforts must be focused on improving hemoglobin levels during waiting list time to prevent using P-RBC in LT recipients.

  4. Proposed Formulae for Determining Blood Transfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood replacement remains a crucial component of the treatment of severe anaemia irrespective of the cause. The transfusion of an adequate amount of blood is important to prevent under- or over-transfusion. Existing formulae used for the calculation of blood transfusion requirements, while being useful, still ...

  5. Health economics of blood transfusion safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Marinus van

    2008-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS disaster in transfusion medicine shaped the future agendas for blood transfusion safety. More than ever before, the implementation of interventions which could improve blood transfusion safety was driven merely by availability of technology. The introduction of new expensive

  6. Transfusion data: from collection to reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, L.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/410959243

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important medical treatment for many and diverse patients groups, saving lives but sometimes also causing adverse transfusion reactions in transfusion recipients. For this reason blood use should ideally be as low as possible. The fact that significant differences exist in

  7. Bacterial contamination of platelet components not detected by BacT/ALERT®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, M A; Fenning, S; Maguire, K A; Morris, K G

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the possible causes for false negative results in BacT/ALERT® 3D Signature System despite bacterial contamination of platelet units. The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) routinely extends platelet component shelf life to 7 days. Components are sampled and screened for bacterial contamination using an automated microbial detection system, the BacT/ALERT® 3D Signature System. We report on three platelet components with confirmed bacterial contamination, which represent false negative BacT/ALERT® results and near-miss serious adverse events. NIBTS protocols for risk reduction of bacterial contamination of platelet components are described. The methodology for bacterial detection using BacT/ALERT® is outlined. Laboratory tests, relevant patient details and relevant follow-up information are analysed. In all three cases, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the platelet residue and confirmed on terminal sub-culture using BacT/ALERT®. In two cases, S. aureus with similar genetic makeup was isolated from the donors. Risk reduction measures for bacterial contamination of platelet components are not always effective. Automated bacterial culture detection does not eliminate the risk of bacterial contamination. Visual inspection of platelet components prior to release, issue and administration remains an important last line of defence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  8. Evaluation of amotosalem treated platelets over 7 days of storage with an automated cytometry assay panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diquattro, M; De Francisci, G; Bonaccorso, R; Tagliavia, A M; Marcatti, M; Palma, B; Agliastro, R

    2013-12-01

    Pathogen Inactivation allows to overcome microbial contamination and growth related to storage of platelets concentrates (PC) at room temperature. The aim of our study was to evaluate the platelet storage lesion extending the storage period of pathogen inactivated platelet concentrates over 7 days using an automated cytometry assay panel. We analyzed 43 concentrates subjected to pathogen inactivation (CPPI) at 3, 5 and 7 days evaluating: platelet count, mean platelet volume, platelets at low optical density, platelets at high density, GPIIb-IIIa glycoprotein, platelet microparticles, lactate dehydrogenase. The collection bags (Fenwal) and the IBS kit made in PL2410/PL2411 are approved for the conservation of PC up to 7 days. Data analysis was performed with anova test. All the parameters except small platelets and PMP were statistically different among day 7 vs. 3 and day 7 vs. 5. Our study showed a progressive modification of pathogen inactivated platelet concentrates observed up to 7 days. The persistence of the secretory pool and the presence of the platelet membrane fibrinogen receptor suggest the persistence of a potential hemostatic efficacy. Clinical studies are necessary to directly correlate this type of analysis to 24 h recovery or survival of transfused platelets in humans. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Patient Safety in Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Simão Teles

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Patient safety is a new area gaining ground and many followers. In the past two decades, many international organizations have developed initiatives to increase knowledge in this area. We might consider that patient safety focuses on the study of the impact of adverse events resulting from the provision of health care for patients. This dimension cuts across all healthcare areas because every care is always underlying the risk-benefit binomial. Transfusional medicine is no exception. Transfusion safety includes not only the safety of blood and blood components as a therapeutic product, but also the safety of the transfusion process. The transfusion process involves a large set of steps and actors, which generates a complex network of processes’ interactions and multidisciplinary professionals. This complexity provides an environment prone to the occurrence of adverse events. The majority of these events are the result of errors occurring throughout the transfusion chain and may have a negative impact on the health of the patient. Errors can trigger adverse reactions in patients with varying consequences, which can range from 'minor' situations, through various states of morbidity and even death.

  10. Transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Stramer, Susan L.; Carneiro-Proietti, A. B. F.; Martins, M. L.; Lopes da Silva, S. N.; Ribeiro, M.; Proietti, F. A.; Reesink, Henk W.

    2009-01-01

    A spectrum of blood-borne infectious agents is transmitted through transfusion of infected blood donated by apparently healthy and asymptomatic blood donors. The diversity of infectious agents includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1/2), human

  11. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition also can cause anemia. There are many types of anemia, including aplastic , Fanconi , hemolytic , i ron-deficiency , and sickle cell anemias and thalassemia (thal-ah-SE-me-ah). A bleeding disorder, such as ... transfusion, a technician tests your blood to find out what blood type you have (that is, A, B, AB, or ...

  12. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus in blood donors: investigation of type-specific differences in serologic reactivity and rate of alanine aminotransferase abnormalities. Transfusion 1993;. 33: 7-13. 45. McFarlane IG, Smith HM, Johnson PJ, Bray GP, Vergani 0, Williams R. Hepatitis. C virus antibodies in chronic active hepatitis: pathogenetic factor or false-.

  13. Transfusion: -80°C Frozen Blood Products Are Safe and Effective in Military Casualty Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Noorman

    Full Text Available The Netherlands Armed Forces use -80°C frozen red blood cells (RBCs, plasma and platelets combined with regular liquid stored RBCs, for the treatment of (military casualties in Medical Treatment Facilities abroad. Our objective was to assess and compare the use of -80°C frozen blood products in combination with the different transfusion protocols and their effect on the outcome of trauma casualties.Hemovigilance and combat casualties data from Afghanistan 2006-2010 for 272 (military trauma casualties with or without massive transfusions (MT: ≥6 RBC/24hr, N = 82 and non-MT: 1-5 RBC/24hr, N = 190 were analyzed retrospectively. In November 2007, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP; 4:3:1 RBC:Plasma:Platelets for ATLS® class III/IV hemorrhage was introduced in military theatre. Blood product use, injury severity and mortality were assessed pre- and post-introduction of the MTP. Data were compared to civilian and military trauma studies to assess effectiveness of the frozen blood products and MTP.No ABO incompatible blood products were transfused and only 1 mild transfusion reaction was observed with 3,060 transfused products. In hospital mortality decreased post-MTP for MT patients from 44% to 14% (P = 0.005 and for non-MT patients from 12.7% to 5.9% (P = 0.139. Average 24-hour RBC, plasma and platelet ratios were comparable and accompanying 24-hour mortality rates were low compared to studies that used similar numbers of liquid stored (and on site donated blood products.This report describes for the first time that the combination of -80°C frozen platelets, plasma and red cells is safe and at least as effective as standard blood products in the treatment of (military trauma casualties. Frozen blood can save the lives of casualties of armed conflict without the need for in-theatre blood collection. These results may also contribute to solutions for logistic problems in civilian blood supply in remote areas.

  14. Transfusion: -80°C Frozen Blood Products Are Safe and Effective in Military Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Badloe, John F.; Hess, John R.; Hoencamp, Rigo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Netherlands Armed Forces use -80°C frozen red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and platelets combined with regular liquid stored RBCs, for the treatment of (military) casualties in Medical Treatment Facilities abroad. Our objective was to assess and compare the use of -80°C frozen blood products in combination with the different transfusion protocols and their effect on the outcome of trauma casualties. Materials and Methods Hemovigilance and combat casualties data from Afghanistan 2006–2010 for 272 (military) trauma casualties with or without massive transfusions (MT: ≥6 RBC/24hr, N = 82 and non-MT: 1–5 RBC/24hr, N = 190) were analyzed retrospectively. In November 2007, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP; 4:3:1 RBC:Plasma:Platelets) for ATLS® class III/IV hemorrhage was introduced in military theatre. Blood product use, injury severity and mortality were assessed pre- and post-introduction of the MTP. Data were compared to civilian and military trauma studies to assess effectiveness of the frozen blood products and MTP. Results No ABO incompatible blood products were transfused and only 1 mild transfusion reaction was observed with 3,060 transfused products. In hospital mortality decreased post-MTP for MT patients from 44% to 14% (P = 0.005) and for non-MT patients from 12.7% to 5.9% (P = 0.139). Average 24-hour RBC, plasma and platelet ratios were comparable and accompanying 24-hour mortality rates were low compared to studies that used similar numbers of liquid stored (and on site donated) blood products. Conclusion This report describes for the first time that the combination of -80°C frozen platelets, plasma and red cells is safe and at least as effective as standard blood products in the treatment of (military) trauma casualties. Frozen blood can save the lives of casualties of armed conflict without the need for in-theatre blood collection. These results may also contribute to solutions for logistic problems in civilian blood supply in

  15. A comparison of adverse reaction rates for PAS C versus plasma platelet units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Claudia S; Stubbs, James; Schwartz, Joseph; Francis, Richard; Goss, Cheryl; Cushing, Melissa; Shaz, Beth; Mair, David; Brantigan, Barbara; Heaton, W Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Plasma constituents have been implicated in some types of platelet (PLT) transfusion reactions. Leukoreduced apheresis PLTs stored in InterSol have 65% less plasma than apheresis PLTs stored in 100% plasma (PPs). This study compared transfusion reaction rates in InterSol PLTs (PLT additive solution [PAS] C) versus PPs. The study design was an open-label, nonrandomized retrospective review. Statistical methods were applied to substantiate noninferiority and superiority of PAS C compared to PP in terms of transfusion reaction rates. Adverse reactions (ARs) were categorized using the Biovigilance Component of the National Healthcare Safety Network. Active surveillance was used to monitor all transfusions, both with ARs and without ARs. A total of 14,005 transfusions from six study sites were included, with 9845 PP transfusions given to 2202 patients and 4160 PAS C to 1444 patients. A total of 165 ARs were reported. Percentages of transfusions with ARs were 1.37% for PPs, 0.55% for PAS C, and 1.13% overall. The relative risk (RR) for PAS C versus PPs was calculated as 0.403 with an upper confidence limit (UCL) of 0.663. Overall, ARs with the highest incidence were allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), at 0.66 and 0.40% of total transfusions reported, respectively. The relative risks (UCLs) for ATRs and FNHTRs, respectively, were 0.350 (0.686) and 0.336 (0.827). PAS C PLTs were statistically superior and noninferior to PPs with respect to the transfusion-related AR rate. PAS C noninferiority and superiority were also demonstrated for ATRs and FNHTRs, separately. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Irradiation of platelets with UV-B light exposes fibrinogen binding sites via an intracellular mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwijk Kooy, M. van; Borghuis, L.; Prooijen, H.C. van; Aarts-Riemens, M.I.; Akkerman, J.W.N. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1990-12-01

    This study provides evidence that UV-B induced aggregation is mediated by a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent process of fibrinogen binding to an intact glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex on platelet membranes. Although UV-induced platelet aggregation is independent of thromboxane A{sub 2} formation and ADP secretion, it requires metabolic energy, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} and a low cyclic-AMP level. Thus, UV-B irradiation causes platelet aggregation by exposing fibrinogen binding sites via an intracellular mechanism. Since the amount of bound fibrinogen following UVI is relatively low (about 2300 molecules/platelet) and the binding remains reversible, its effect on platelet behaviour after transfusion may be minor. (author).

  17. Mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio as a risk stratification tool in the assessment of severity of acute ischemic stroke. ... The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a laboratory marker associated with platelet function and activity. Increased MPV in thromboembolic disease is reflected as an important ...

  18. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P J; Frederiksen, H; Hvas, A-M

    2017-01-01

    Essentials •Platelet function may influence bleeding risk in thrombocytopenia, but useful tests are needed. •A flow cytometric platelet aggregation test independent of the patient platelet count was made. •Platelet aggregation was reduced in thrombocytopenic patients with hematological cancer....... •High platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary Background Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count...

  19. Blood Product Utilization Among Trauma and Nontrauma Massive Transfusion Protocols at an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eshan U; Ness, Paul M; Marshall, Christi E; Gniadek, Thomas; Efron, David T; Miller, Peter M; Zeitouni, Joseph A; King, Karen E; Bloch, Evan M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2017-09-01

    Hospital-wide massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) primarily designed for trauma patients may lead to excess blood products being prepared for nontrauma patients. This study characterized blood product utilization among distinct trauma and nontrauma MTPs at a large, urban academic medical center. A retrospective study of blood product utilization was conducted in patients who required an MTP activation between January 2011 and December 2015 at an urban academic medical center. Trauma MTP containers included 6 red blood cell (RBC) units, 5 plasma units, and 1 unit of apheresis platelets. Nontrauma MTP containers included 6 RBC and 3 plasma units. There were 334 trauma MTP activations, 233 nontrauma MTP activations, and 77 nontrauma MTP activations that subsequently switched to a trauma MTP ("switched activations"). All nontrauma MTP activations were among bleeding patients who did not have a traumatic injury (100% [233/233]). Few patients with a nontrauma activation required ad hoc transfusion of RBC units (1.3% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.3%-3.7%]) or plasma (3.4% [95% CI, 1.5%-6.7%]), and only 45.5% (95% CI, 39.0%-52.1%) required ad hoc transfusion of apheresis platelets. Compared to trauma and switched activations, nontrauma activations transfused a lower median number of RBC, plasma, and apheresis platelet units (P use of hospital-wide nontrauma MTPs are warranted since an MTP designed for nontrauma patient populations may yield a key strategy to optimize blood product utilization in comparison to a universal MTP for both trauma and nontrauma patients.

  20. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE Platelet Function Assay : Performance and Clinical Utility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Wei

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate. Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (% of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91 and collagen (r=0.88. Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions.

  1. Preparation of small volume, leuko and erythrocyte very poor platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbonesi, M; Angelini, G; Malfanti, L; Lercari, G; Fella, M; Calderisi, S; Anselmo, A; Balistreri, M

    1986-05-01

    Recently developed automated discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) separators can produce leuko- and erythrocyte-poor platelet concentrates (PC). According to general experience with these machines it is difficult to obtain more than 4 X 10(11) platelets, though a second program set up by Coffe et al. appears to produce PC containing approximately 5 X 10(11) platelets suspended in a plasma volume of 390 ml. At our center we employed a new Dideco cell separator equipped with the surge pump and a technique developed for the production of small volume, RBC and WBC-very poor PC. In 60 routine procedures we obtained the following results: mean processing time 87 +/- 11 minutes; final volume of PC 136 +/- 19 ml, with a mean platelet yield of 5.21 X 10(11) platelets. WBC contamination was 1.8 X 10(8) (93% lymphocytes) and RBC were 3.1 X 10(8). Plasma volume as well as WBC and RBC contamination were reduced by recirculating PC after the 6th pass. The demand for single donor platelet concentrates (PC) is increasing progressively. Recently developed automated cell separators can produce leukocyte (WBC) and erythrocyte (RBC) poor PC. With these machines it may be difficult to obtain PC containing at least 4 X 10(11) platelets and less than 1 X 10(9) leukocytes (1, 2, 3) since donor variables such as hematocrit, precounts, buffy coat formation and initial plasma light transmission are of paramount importance for the efficiency of the program. At our center a prototype discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) cell separator equipped with the surge pump was studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Surfactants reduce platelet-bubble and platelet-platelet binding induced by in vitro air embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, David M; Armstead, Stephen C; Mardini, Feras

    2005-12-01

    The effect of gas bubbles on platelet behavior is poorly characterized. The authors assessed platelet-bubble and platelet-platelet binding in platelet-rich plasma in the presence and absence of bubbles and three surface-active compounds. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from blood drawn from 16 volunteers. Experimental groups were surfactant alone, sparging (microbubble embolization) alone, sparging with surfactant, and neither sparging nor surfactant. The surfactants were Pluronic F-127 (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), Perftoran (OJSC SPC Perftoran, Moscow, Russia), and Dow Corning Antifoam 1510US (Dow Corning, Midland, MI). Videomicroscopy images of specimens drawn through rectangular glass microcapillaries on an inverted microscope and Coulter counter measurements were used to assess platelet-bubble and platelet-platelet binding, respectively, in calcium-free and recalcified samples. Histamine-induced and adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet-platelet binding were measured in unsparged samples. Differences between groups were considered significant for P bubbles in sparged, surfactant-free samples. With sparging and surfactant, few platelets adhered to bubbles. Numbers of platelet singlets and multimers not adherent to bubbles were different (P surfactant. No significant platelet-platelet binding occurred in uncalcified, sparged samples, although 20-30 platelets adhered to bubbles. Without sparging, histamine and adenosine diphosphate provoked platelet-platelet binding with and without surfactants present. Sparging causes platelets to bind to air bubbles and each other. Surfactants added before sparging attenuate platelet-bubble and platelet-platelet binding. Surfactants may have a clinical role in attenuating gas embolism-induced platelet-bubble and platelet-platelet binding.

  3. EVALUATION OF QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE INDICATORS OF SUBSTITUTIONARY TRANSFUSION THERAPY IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available  Relevance. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is one of methods to care patients with malignancy, hematologic and hereditary diseases; in most cases, it requires prolonged and massive substitutionary transfusion therapy. Analysis of effectiveness, cost and need for blood components in different types of HSCT would allow blood transfusion department for more accurate planning in blood output.Objective  – to determine the need for blood components in different types of HSCT.Material and methods. From December 2000 to December 2015, 851 patients with malignancies, hematologic and hereditary diseases who underwent 915 HSCT (54repeatedly were included into the study.Results. Substitutionary transfusion therapy was required in 849 HSCT (92.8% of cases Red blood cell-containing blood components were used in 842 HSCT (92%, platelet containing – in 795 HSCT (86.8%, fresh frozen plasma – in 228 HSCT (24.9%. The total number of blood transfusion in 1 case of autologous HSCT was 14.7 doses, in allogeneic HSCT – 18.5 (p=0,01. On average, transfusion therapy for one recipient of autologous HSCT cost – 57 817.4 RUB, for recipient of allogeneic HSCT – 181 710.3 RUB. The need for blood components was increased in the presence of progression/relapse of the underlying disease (p=0.0001, allogeneic HSCT compared to autologous HSCT (p=0.0001, in patients with a long history of transfusion (more than 30 blood transfusions.Conclusion. Substitutionary transfusion therapy is a key factor increasing the effectiveness of treatment with the help of HSCT by prevention and treatment of anemic syndrome and hemorrhagic complications. Allogeneic HSCT compared to autologous HSCT was associated with significantly higher financial expenditure for providing substitutionary transfusion therapy.

  4. The effect of pathogen reduction technology (Mirasol) on platelet quality when treated in additive solution with low plasma carryover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Winter, K M; Reid, S; Hartkopf-Theis, T; Marschner, S; Goodrich, R P; Marks, D C

    2011-10-01

    Pathogen reduction technologies (PRT) for platelets are now compatible with both plasma and platelet additive solutions (PAS). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PRT on the platelet storage lesion, in the presence of PAS with low plasma carryover. PRT-treated (Mirasol) and untreated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates prepared in 28% plasma/PAS-IIIM were evaluated using in vitro cell quality parameters on days 1, 2, 5, and 7 post-collection. At day 5, there were no significant differences between control and PRT treated platelets for swirl, viability, pO(2) , pCO(2) , mean platelet volume and adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation. PRT treatment did not affect the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, PRT resulted in a decrease in pH and enhancement of platelet glycolysis and activation, evidenced by increased glucose consumption and lactate production rates, increased expression of CD62P, CD63, annexin V staining and increased secretion of cytokines (P < 0.05). Hypotonic shock response and aggregation in response to collagen were also significantly reduced in PRT treated platelets (P < 0.05). Despite the observed differences in platelet metabolism and activation observed following PRT treatment in PAS and low plasma carryover, the results suggest that treatment and storage of platelets in PAS is no more detrimental to platelets than treatment and storage in plasma. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian-Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P  0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion, especially in plasma and RBC use. In future, comprehensive measures should be implemented in order to improve the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion.

  6. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas′ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply.

  7. Analysis of pediatric adverse reactions to transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughi, Sarah; Perez, Gabriela; Whitaker, Barbee I; Fung, Mark K; Stotler, Brie

    2018-01-01

    Children are known to be physiologically and biochemically different from adults. However, there are no multi-institutional studies examining the differences in the frequency, type, and severity of transfusion reactions in pediatric versus adult patients. This study aims to characterize differences between pediatric and adult patients regarding adverse responses to transfusions. This is a retrospective data analysis of nine children's hospitals and 35 adult hospitals from January 2009 through December 2015. Included were pediatric and adult patients who had a reported reaction to transfusion of any blood component. Rates are reported as per 100,000 transfusions for comparison between pediatric and adult patients. Pediatric patients had an overall higher reaction rate compared to adults: 538 versus 252 per 100,000 transfusions, notably higher for red blood cell (577 vs. 278 per 100,000; p reactions, febrile nonhemolytic reactions, and acute hemolytic reactions were observed in pediatric patients. Adults had a higher rate of delayed serologic transfusion reactions, delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, and transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Pediatric patients had double the rate of transfusion reactions compared to adults. The nationally reported data on reaction rates are consistent with this study's findings in adults but much lower than the observed rates for pediatric patients. Future studies are needed to address the differences in reaction rates, particularly in allergic and febrile reactions, and to further address blood transfusion practices in the pediatric patient population. © 2017 AABB.

  8. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  9. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  10. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  11. Laboratory investigation of platelet function in patients with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, S; Economou, M; Vyzantiadis, T-A; Teli, A; Vlachaki, E; Neokleous, N; Kargioti, A; Vakalopoulou, S; Garypidou, V; Gombakis, N; Papachristou, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate platelet function in patients with thalassaemia and to detect any relation to chelation treatment (deferasirox or deferiprone/deferiprone plus desferioxamine). Thirty-three transfusion-dependent patients with thalassaemia were included. The investigation consisted of aggregation testing of platelet-rich plasma by light transmission aggregometry (LTA) with the use of 5 agonists as well as the global test of haemostasis by means of the PFA-100 platelet function analyser. In 66.67% of the patients, there was reduced LTA to at least one agonist and in 18.18% there was reduced LTA to two or more agonists. The PFA-100 test was prolonged in 60.6% of the cases. An abnormal LTA and a prolonged PFA-100 time were recorded in 33.3% of the patients and 27.4% had a normal aggregation and PFA-100 test. No correlation between chelation regimen and either LTA or PFA-100 test was found. The abnormal LTA can be explained either by the release of ADP from the haemolysed red blood cells, which leads to defective platelet aggregation, or by the presence of two platelet populations. An in vitro effect without an in vivo impact could be an alternative explanation. In patients with thalassaemia, the reduced LTA and the prolonged PFA-100 closure time could be an in vitro effect and has a close correlation to the bleeding phenotype of each patient. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Prognostic Significance of Blood Transfusion in Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Patients without Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate whether blood transfusions affect overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM patients without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 181 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups: 68 patients in the transfused group and 113 patients in the nontransfused group. Statistical analyses showed that there were significant differences in ECOG scoring, Ig isotype, platelet (Plt counts, hemoglobin (Hb level, serum creatinine (Scr level, and β2-microglobulin (β2-MG level between the two groups. Univariate analyses showed that higher International Staging System staging, Plt counts < 100 × 109/L, Scr level ≥ 177 μmol/L, serum β2-MG ≥ 5.5 μmol/L, serum calcium (Ca ≥ 2.75 mmol/L, and thalidomide use were associated with both OS and PFS in MM patients. Age ≥ 60 was associated with OS and Ig isotype was associated with PFS in MM patients. Moreover, blood transfusion was associated with PFS but not OS in MM patients. Multivariate analyses showed that blood transfusion was not an independent factor for PFS in MM patients. Our preliminary results suggested that newly diagnosed MM patients may benefit from a liberal blood transfusion strategy, since blood transfusion is not an independent impact factor for survival.

  13. Blood donation and blood transfusion in Spain (1997 – 2007): the effects of demographic changes and universal leucoreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Erce, José A.; Campos, Arturo; Muñoz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective As epidemiological information is useful in planning the provision and assessing the efficiency of product use, we reviewed Spanish data on population, blood donation and blood component transfusion from 1997 to 2007, and the possible effect of universal leucoreduction. Methods Data on the Spanish population were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics, whereas data on blood donation and blood component transfusion were acquired from the Spanish Ministry of Health. Results During the study period, the Spanish population increased by 5.6 million persons (14.4%), and blood donation by 28.1%, although the amount of red blood cells (RBC) obtained increased by only 21.5% whereas RBC transfusions increased by 28.3%. The RBC transfusion rate was significantly higher after the implementation of universal leucoreduction (2002 – 2006) than during the pre-leucoreduction period (1997 – 2001) (differ ence = 2.54 units/1,000 population/year; 95%CI 1.81 – 3.27; P<0.001). We also observed statistical ly, but not clinically, significant differences for platelet and plasma transfusions. Conclusion The increase observed in the RBC transfusion index after implementation of universal leucoreduction may have been due to a reduction of the haemoglobin content in the RBC units. Our data on blood use do, therefore, seem to add to the case against universal leucoreduction, which has led to an incremental cost for unknown, but probably slight, benefits for patients. PMID:20383303

  14. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today′ s scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs, selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  15. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g...... and SAPS II and SOFA-score on day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to transfuse patients with septic shock was likely affected by disease severity and bleeding, but haemoglobin level was the only measure that consistently differed between transfused and non-transfused patients....

  16. Cancer incidence in blood transfusion recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions may influence the recipients' cancer risks both through transmission of biologic agents and by modulation of the immune system. However, cancer occurrence in transfusion recipients remains poorly characterized. METHODS: We used computerized files from Scandinavian...... blood banks to identify a cohort of 888,843 cancer-free recipients transfused after 1968. The recipients were followed from first registered transfusion until the date of death, emigration, cancer diagnosis, or December 31, 2002, whichever came first. Relative risks were expressed as ratios......, the standardized incidence ratios for cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and respiratory and urinary tracts and for squamous cell skin carcinoma remained elevated beyond 10 years after the transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The marked increase in cancer risk shortly after a blood transfusion may...

  17. Autologous blood transfusion - a review | Charles | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discovery of HIV and other transfusion-transmissible infections has increased the demand for alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion. One such alternative is autologous transfusion. This review presents an analysis of autologous transfusion. We conclude that autologous transfusion should form part of a strategy to ...

  18. Platelet counts and mean platelet volume amongst elderly Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determining reference values of Platelet Counts, Mean Platelet Volume and the relationship between the Platelet Count and Mean Platelet Volume. These parameters were determined from 400 healthy elderly subjects comprising 210 males and 190 females. with a mean age of 69.4±7.9 years . 400 young adults were used ...

  19. Antiplatelet antibody may cause delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torii Y

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Yoshitaro Torii1, Toshiki Shimizu1, Takashi Yokoi1, Hiroyuki Sugimoto1, Yuichi Katashiba1, Ryotaro Ozasa1, Shinya Fujita1, Yasushi Adachi2, Masahiko Maki3, Shosaku Nomura11The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, 3First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old woman with lung cancer developed delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI syndrome after transfusion of plasma- and leukoreduced red blood cells (RBCs for gastrointestinal bleeding due to intestinal metastasis. Acute lung injury (ALI recurred 31 days after the first ALI episode. Both ALI episodes occurred 48 hours after transfusion. Laboratory examinations revealed the presence of various antileukocyte antibodies including antiplatelet antibody in the recipient's serum but not in the donors' serum. The authors speculate that antiplatelet antibodies can have an inhibitory effect in the recipient, which can modulate the bona fide procedure of ALI and lead to a delay in the onset of ALI. This case illustrates the crucial role of a recipient's platelets in the development of TRALI.Keywords: delayed TRALI syndrome, recurrence, anti-platelet antibody

  20. A comparison of the pharmacological profiles of prasugrel and ticagrelor assessed by platelet aggregation, thrombus formation and haemostasis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugidachi, A; Ohno, K; Ogawa, T; Jakubowski, JA; Hashimoto, M; Tomizawa, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prasugrel is a third-generation thienopyridine prodrug and ticagrelor is a non-competitive P2Y12 receptor antagonist. In their phase 3 studies, both agents reduced rates of ischemic events relative to treatment with clopidogrel. Experimental Approach The pharmacodynamic profile of anti-platelet effects of prasugrel was compared with that of ticagrelor in rats. Key Results The active metabolite of prasugrel was less potent than ticagrelor and its active metabolite on platelet aggregation in vitro. In contrast, prasugrel was a more potent antiplatelet agent than ticagrelor on ex vivo platelet aggregation: their ED50 values at peak for ADP 20 μmol·L−1 were 1.9 and 8.0 mg·kg−1, respectively. Prasugrel's inhibition of platelet aggregation was maintained for up to 24 h after administration, but ticagrelor's duration of action was substantially shorter. Prasugrel and ticagrelor significantly inhibited thrombus formation with ED50 values of 1.8 and 7.7 mg·kg−1, respectively. Both agents also prolonged bleeding times (ED200 values of 3.0 and 13 mg·kg−1 respectively) suggesting that at equivalent levels of inhibition of platelet aggregation, the agents would show comparable antithrombotic activity with similar bleeding risk. Platelet transfusion significantly increased blood platelet numbers similarly in prasugrel- and ticagrelor-treated rats. In the prasugrel-treated group, platelet transfusion caused significant shortening of bleeding time, while in the ticagrelor-treated group, platelet transfusion showed no influence on bleeding time under the experimental conditions employed. Conclusions and Implications Prasugrel and ticagrelor showed several differences in their pharmacological profiles and these disparities may reflect their differing reversibility and/or pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:23347039

  1. A comparison of the pharmacological profiles of prasugrel and ticagrelor assessed by platelet aggregation, thrombus formation and haemostasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugidachi, A; Ohno, K; Ogawa, T; Jakubowski, Ja; Hashimoto, M; Tomizawa, A

    2013-05-01

    Prasugrel is a third-generation thienopyridine prodrug and ticagrelor is a non-competitive P2Y12 receptor antagonist. In their phase 3 studies, both agents reduced rates of ischemic events relative to treatment with clopidogrel. The pharmacodynamic profile of anti-platelet effects of prasugrel was compared with that of ticagrelor in rats. The active metabolite of prasugrel was less potent than ticagrelor and its active metabolite on platelet aggregation in vitro. In contrast, prasugrel was a more potent antiplatelet agent than ticagrelor on ex vivo platelet aggregation: their ED50 values at peak for ADP 20 μmol·L(-1) were 1.9 and 8.0 mg·kg(-1) , respectively. Prasugrel's inhibition of platelet aggregation was maintained for up to 24 h after administration, but ticagrelor's duration of action was substantially shorter. Prasugrel and ticagrelor significantly inhibited thrombus formation with ED50 values of 1.8 and 7.7 mg·kg(-1) , respectively. Both agents also prolonged bleeding times (ED200 values of 3.0 and 13 mg·kg(-1) respectively) suggesting that at equivalent levels of inhibition of platelet aggregation, the agents would show comparable antithrombotic activity with similar bleeding risk. Platelet transfusion significantly increased blood platelet numbers similarly in prasugrel- and ticagrelor-treated rats. In the prasugrel-treated group, platelet transfusion caused significant shortening of bleeding time, while in the ticagrelor-treated group, platelet transfusion showed no influence on bleeding time under the experimental conditions employed. Prasugrel and ticagrelor showed several differences in their pharmacological profiles and these disparities may reflect their differing reversibility and/or pharmacokinetic profiles. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Implications of a switch to a 100% apheresis platelet supply for patients and for blood donors: a risk benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, T; Alt-Mayer, T; Greinacher, A; Bux, J

    2016-11-01

    A 100% apheresis platelet supply is considered to increase transfusion safety by lowering donor exposures for transfusion recipients. We performed a risk benefit analysis to contrast the reduction of donor exposures and the risk of contaminated blood products in the nation-wide inventory with the donor risks associated with a switch to a 100% apheresis platelet supply in Germany. Donor exposures and the number of contaminated blood products resulting from HIV-like, HBV-like, HCV-like pathogens and two theoretical agents with infection rates of 10 and 1000 in 100 000, respectively, were calculated for a 100% apheresis platelet supply in Germany based on the 2006-2012 hemovigilance reports. These numbers were compared with the current mixed platelet supply of pooled and apheresis platelets. Moreover, additional donation time and apheresis donor complications resulting from a 100% apheresis platelet supply were estimated. Per million total blood products (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma), a 100% apheresis platelet supply would reduce donor exposures by 87 100 and the number of contaminated blood products ranging from 0·8 to 871·1. On the other hand, this requires additional 29 478 apheresis donations, 3·4 years additional donor time, and would be associated with 58 additional donor complications, respectively. A 100% apheresis platelet supply would reduce donor exposures and the number of contaminated blood products in the inventory, but would increase apheresis complications in donors. Potential risks for patients must be carefully weighed against the risks for donors, dependent on the specific pathogen scenario. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  3. The ratio of fibrinogen to red cells transfused affects survival in casualties receiving massive transfusions at an army combat support hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinger, Harry K; Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Salinas, Jose; Martini, Wenjun Z; Hess, John R; Dubick, Michael A; Simon, Clayton D; Beekley, Alec C; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2008-02-01

    To treat the coagulopathy of trauma, some have suggested early and aggressive use of cryoprecipitate as a source of fibrinogen. Our objective was to determine whether increased ratios of fibrinogen to red blood cells (RBCs) decreased mortality in combat casualties requiring massive transfusion. We performed a retrospective chart review of 252 patients at a U.S. Army combat support hospital who received a massive transfusion (>or=10 units of RBCs in 24 hours). The typical amount of fibrinogen within each blood product was used to calculate the fibrinogen-to-RBC (F:R) ratio transfused for each patient. Two groups of patients who received either a low (or=0.2 g fibrinogen/RBC Unit) F:R ratio were identified. Mortality rates and the cause of death were compared between these groups, and logistic regression was used to determine if the F:R ratio was independently associated with survival. Two-hundred and fifty-two patients who received a massive transfusion with a mean (SD) ISS of 21 (+/-10) and an overall mortality of 75 of 252 (30%) were included. The mean (SD) F:R ratios transfused for the low and high groups were 0.1 grams/Unit (+/-0.06), and 0.48 grams/Unit (+/-0.2), respectively (p < 0.001). Mortality was 27 of 52 (52%) and 48 of 200 (24%) in the low and high F:R ratio groups respectively (p < 0.001). Additional variables associated with survival were admission temperature, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, International Normalized Ratio (INR), base deficit, platelet concentration and Combined Injury Severity Score (ISS). Upon logistic regression, the F:R ratio was independently associated with mortality (odds ratio 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.171-0.812, p = 0.013). The incidence of death from hemorrhage was higher in the low F:R group, 23/27 (85%), compared to the high F:R group, 21/48 (44%) (p < 0.001). In patients with combat-related trauma requiring massive transfusion, the transfusion of an increased fibrinogen: RBC ratio was independently associated

  4. Advantages of outsourcing the transfusion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triulzi, D J

    1997-12-01

    Pressures to reduce costs are forcing hospitals to examine alternative delivery systems for transfusion services. An outsourcing arrangement for the transfusion service can be an attractive option, providing benefits not only in terms of economics, but also in terms of quality and medical support. Successful centralized testing models in Pittsburgh and Seattle have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. When properly implemented, an outsourcing arrangement for transfusion services can improve patient care and reduce costs.

  5. Cancer incidence in blood transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus; Reilly, Marie; Tran, Trung Nam; Titlestad, Kjell Einar; Shanwell, Agneta; Jersild, Casper; Adami, Johanna; Wikman, Agneta; Gridley, Gloria; Wideroff, Louise; Nyrén, Olof; Melbye, Mads

    2007-12-19

    Blood transfusions may influence the recipients' cancer risks both through transmission of biologic agents and by modulation of the immune system. However, cancer occurrence in transfusion recipients remains poorly characterized. We used computerized files from Scandinavian blood banks to identify a cohort of 888,843 cancer-free recipients transfused after 1968. The recipients were followed from first registered transfusion until the date of death, emigration, cancer diagnosis, or December 31, 2002, whichever came first. Relative risks were expressed as ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of cancers, that is, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), using incidence rates for the general Danish and Swedish populations as a reference. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 5,652,918 person-years of follow-up, 80,990 cancers occurred in the transfusion recipients, corresponding to a SIR of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44 to 1.46). The SIR for cancer overall decreased from 5.36 (95% CI = 5.29 to 5.43) during the first 6 months after transfusion to 1.10 or less for follow-up periods more than 2 years after the transfusion. However, the standardized incidence ratios for cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and respiratory and urinary tracts and for squamous cell skin carcinoma remained elevated beyond 10 years after the transfusion. The marked increase in cancer risk shortly after a blood transfusion may reflect the presence of undiagnosed occult cancers with symptoms that necessitated the blood transfusion. The continued increased risk of tobacco- and alcohol-related cancers suggests that lifestyle and other risk factors related to conditions prompting transfusion rather than transfusion-related exposures per se are important to the observed cancer occurrence in the recipients.

  6. Prevention of Post Transfusion Hepatitis Employing Sensitive Assay for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening(Topics in Transfusion Medicine 1990 : Autologous Transfusion and Post-Transfusion Hepatitis)

    OpenAIRE

    小島, 秀男; 大竹, 幸子; 富樫, 和枝; 石口, 重子; 山田, 恵子; 品田, 章二; Kojima, Hideo; Ohtake, Sachiko; Togashi, Kazue; Ishiguchi, Shigeko; Yamada, Keiko; Shinada, Shoji

    1990-01-01

    Post transfusion Hepatitis (PTH) is one of serious side effects and some times lead to fulminant hepatic failure in case transfused blood contain very low level (under the sensitivity of usual screening method) of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Redcross blood center and blood transfusion devision of our hospital have been employed reverse passive hemmaglutination method (RPHA) for HBsAg screening. Authors employed EIA for sensitive HBsAg test system and compared with RPHA method. Of 2,255 sera from...

  7. Pictorial representation of transfusion over the years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    The writings of the 17th and 19th centuries about experiments and debates about transfusion were often analyzed and discussed in articles and books, but an analysis of illustrations of transfusion during this pioneering epoch can throw new light on the subject. The first transfusion attempts were as sensational as they were spectacular, and their illustration permitted both focusing attention and giving a scientific iconography, almost technical, to doctors and scholars of the time. We describe several illustrations of historical transfusions and point out common characteristics and differences, through the major elements used by illustrators. Nineteen illustrations are shown and commented upon. The transfusion imagery, through the representation of the three actors of transfusion (recipient, donor, doctor) varied considerably over time, as did representation of the procedures of transfusion. This series of illustrations over three centuries reveals what the use and function of picturing transfusion over the course of time were: on the one hand, a didactic intent, in offering a documentary source concerning procedures and necessary instruments, and on the other, the function of legitimization, representing the act with a subtext such as numbered titles or in a scientific article, brought transfusion into the category of technical practices that were regulated by rules.

  8. Current good manufacturing practices for transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazama, K

    1996-10-01

    Transfusion medicine is most tightly controlled in the US by CGMPs that are written as regulations, guidances, and quality management documents. Because the US regulatory scheme requires that each unit of human blood donated for transfusion (and other purposes) be documented from the moment of donor registration until the last component of that donation is finally disposed of, there is precious little that remains solely within the discretion of the treating physician who orders transfusions for her or his patients. An additional complication for transfusion medicine specialists is that the search for the requirements must extend to all possible areas of information, including the possibly unexpected source within the private sector.

  9. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  10. Is blood transfusion necessary in all patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation associated postpartum hemorrhage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksever Celik, Hale; Celik, Engin; Ozdemir, Ismail; Ozge Savkli, Ayse; Sanli, Kamuran; Gorgen, Husnu

    2017-11-07

    The diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in obstetrics is complicated owing to physiological changes, particularly during late pregnancy and the postpartum period. Therefore, a pregnancy-modified DIC score that includes only three components of the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) DIC score has been constructed. Our aim was to determine how many blood-transfused postpartum women actually had the diagnosis of overt DIC according to the modified ISTH score and had the correct indications for blood transfusion. We retrospectively analyzed 279 women who had received transfusion of at least two units of blood for postpartum hemorrhage. We used the modified ISTH score for DIC, which is based on platelet count, fibrinogen concentration, and prothrombin time (PT) differences. A total score of 26 points or higher indicated overt DIC, whereas a score lower than 26 points represented nonovert DIC. According to the modified ISTH score, 100 of the 279 patients (35.8%) had overt DIC, with a median DIC score of 37.0. Thirty-five percent of patients in the overt DIC group and 25.7% in the nonovert DIC group had received more than four units of blood. The levels of PT and activated partial thromboplastin time were higher, and the fibrinogen level was lower in patients with overt DIC. According to the modified ISTH score, we found that blood transfusion was unnecessary in 179 of the 279 postpartum women (64.1%). If this scoring system is used to determine which patients should be transfused, unnecessary transfusions and their related risks and complications will be prevented.

  11. Hemostatic resuscitation for massive bleeding: the paradigm of plasma and platelets--a review of the current literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists. Recent studies indicate a possible survival benefit in patients receiving a higher ratio of plasma and platelets (PLTs) to red blood cells (RBCs...

  12. Hemostatic resuscitation for massive bleeding: the paradigm of plasma and platelets--a review of the current literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists. Recent studies indicate a possible survival benefit in patients receiving a higher ratio of plasma and platelets (PLTs) to red blood cells (RBCs)...

  13. Early Platelet Dysfunction: An Unrecognized Role in the Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Thomas, Scott; Sauaia, Angela; Evans, Ed; Harr, Jeffrey; Silliman, Christopher C.; Ploplis, Victoria; Castellino, Francis J.; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of platelet dysfunction, using an end-point of assembly into a stable thrombus, following severe injury. Background: Although the current debate on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has focused on the consumption or inhibition of coagulation factors, the question of early platelet dysfunction in this setting remains unclear. Study Design Prospective platelet function in assembly and stability of the thrombus was determined within 30 minutes of injury using whole blood samples from trauma patients at the point of care employing thrombelastography (TEG)-based platelet functional analysis. Results There were 51 patients in the study. There were significant differences in the platelet response between trauma patients and healthy volunteers such that there was impaired aggregation to these agonists. In trauma patients, the median ADP inhibition of platelet function was 86.1% (IQR: 38.6–97.7%), compared to 4.2 % (IQR 0–18.2%) in healthy volunteers. Following trauma, the impairment of platelet function in response to AA was 44.9% (IQR 26.6–59.3%), compared to 0.5% (IQR 0–3.02%) in volunteers (Wilcoxon non parametric test ptrauma, before significant fluid or blood administration. These data suggest a potential role for early platelet transfusion in severely injured patients at risk for postinjury coagulopathy. PMID:22520693

  14. Dietary α-linolenic acid increases the platelet count in ApoE-/- mice by reducing clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivala, Simona; Reiner, Martin F; Lohmann, Christine; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M; Beer, Juerg H

    2013-08-08

    Previously we reported that dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) reduces atherogenesis and inhibits arterial thrombosis. Here, we analyze the substantial increase in platelet count induced by ALA and the mechanisms of reduced platelet clearance. Eight-week-old male apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed a 0.21g% cholesterol diet complemented by either a high- (7.3g%) or low-ALA (0.03g%) content. Platelet counts doubled after 16 weeks of ALA feeding, whereas the bleeding time remained similar. Plasma glycocalicin and glycocalicin index were reduced, while reticulated platelets, thrombopoietin, and bone marrow megakaryocyte colony-forming units remained unchanged. Platelet contents of liver and spleen were substantially reduced, without affecting macrophage function and number. Glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) shedding, exposure of P-selectin, and activated integrin αIIbβ3 upon activation with thrombin were reduced. Dietary ALA increased the platelet count by reducing platelet clearance in the reticulo-endothelial system. The latter appears to be mediated by reduced cleavage of GPIb by tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme and reduced platelet activation/expression of procoagulant signaling. Ex vivo, there was less adhesion of human platelets to von Willebrand factor under high shear conditions after ALA treatment. Thus, ALA may be a promising tool in transfusion medicine and in high turnover/high activation platelet disorders.

  15. [Blood transfusion and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Blood transfusion is essential in current medical treatment. In the era of selling blood, around 50% of recipients seemed to be infected by hepatitis virus. After the establishment of the blood donation system and many safety measures, the risk of blood contamination has decreased markedly; however, blood products still have a risk of known and unknown pathogens. In this manuscript, we discuss the remaining problems of HBV and HIV-1. As emerging infectious diseases, we examine Trypanosoma crusi, West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus, and Dengue virus. Finally, XMRV is exemplified as a rumored virus. Gathering accurate information about pathogens and preparing for outbreaks in advance are crucial for blood safety.

  16. INFECTIOUS-DISEASE TESTING FOR BLOOD-TRANSFUSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DESFORGES, JF; ATHARI, F; COOPER, ES; JOHNSON, CS; LEMON, SM; LINDSAY, KL; MCCULLOUGH, J; MCINTOSH, K; ROSS, RK; WHITSETT, CF; WITTES, J; WRIGHT, TL

    1995-01-01

    Objective.-To provide physicians and other transfusion medicine professionals with a current consensus on infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. Participants.-A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member consensus panel representing the fields of hematology, infectious disease, transfusion

  17. Accurate costs of blood transfusion: a microcosting of administering blood products in the United Kingdom National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Elizabeth A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Staves, Julie; Mundy, Nicola; Skelly, Jane; Radford, Kelly; Stanworth, Simon J

    2018-01-30

    In an environment of limited health care resources, it is crucial for health care systems which provide blood transfusion to have accurate and comprehensive information on the costs of transfusion, incorporating not only the costs of blood products, but also their administration. Unfortunately, in many countries accurate costs for administering blood are not available. Our study aimed to generate comprehensive estimates of the costs of administering transfusions for the UK National Health Service. A detailed microcosting study was used to cost two key inputs into transfusion: transfusion laboratory and nursing inputs. For each input, data collection forms were developed to capture staff time, equipment, and consumables associated with each step in the transfusion process. Costing results were combined with costs of blood product wastage to calculate the cost per unit transfused, separately for different blood products. Data were collected in 2014/15 British pounds and converted to US dollars. A total of 438 data collection forms were completed by 74 staff. The cost of administering blood was $71 (£49) per unit for red blood cells, $84 (£58) for platelets, $55 (£38) for fresh-frozen plasma, and $72 (£49) for cryoprecipitate. Blood administration costs add substantially to the costs of the blood products themselves. These are frequently incurred costs; applying estimates to the blood components supplied to UK hospitals in 2015, the annual cost of blood administration, excluding blood products, exceeds $175 (£120) million. These results provide more accurate estimates of the total costs of transfusion than those previously available. © 2018 AABB.

  18. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. Aims: To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. Settings and Design: Setting: A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. Design: A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. Subjects and Methods: An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. Results: The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Conclusions: Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion. PMID:25886107

  19. Platelet-associated CD40/CD154 mediates remote tissue damage after mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Lapchak

    Full Text Available Several innate and adaptive immune cell types participate in ischemia/reperfusion induced tissue injury. Amongst them, platelets have received little attention as contributors in the process of tissue damage after ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury. It is currently unknown whether platelets participate through the immunologically important molecules including, CD40 and when activated, CD154 (CD40L, in the pathogenesis of I/R injury. We hypothesized that constitutive expression of CD40 and activation-induced expression of CD154 on platelets mediate local mesenteric and remote lung tissue damage after I/R injury. Wild type (WT; C57BL/6J, CD40 and CD154 deficient mice underwent mesenteric ischemia for 30 minutes followed by reperfusion for 3 hours. WT mice subjected to mesenteric I/R injury displayed both local intestinal and remote lung damage. In contrast, there was significantly less intestinal damage and no remote lung injury in CD40 and CD154 deficient mice when compared to WT mice. Platelet-depleted WT mice transfused with platelets from CD40 or CD154 deficient mice failed to reconstitute remote lung damage. In contrast, when CD40 or CD154 deficient mice were transfused with WT platelets lung tissue damage was re-established. Together, these findings suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in local and remote tissue injury and also identify platelet-expressed CD40 and/or CD154 as mediators of remote tissue damage.

  20. Multiple transfusion fail to provoke antibodies against blood cell antigens in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, A M; Strauss, R G; Goeken, N; Knox, L

    1986-01-01

    We conducted studies of both red cell (RBC) and leukocyte (WBC) antibody formation in infants following multiple transfusions given during the first weeks of life. Fifty-three infants received 683 RBC transfusions from 503 different donors, plus 62 platelet, 4 granulocyte, and 53 fresh-frozen plasma units during the first 4 months of life. Three hundred fifty serum samples were obtained before, during, and after the transfusions. None of the infants formed unexpected RBC antibodies when tested at 37 degrees C by a two-cell low-ionic-strength solution antibody screen that included an anti-globulin phase. Twenty posttransfusion serums were negative when tested at room temperature. Lymphocytotoxic and granulocytotoxic WBC antibodies were measured in posttransfusion serums from 13 infants, and none were found. Despite exposure to many RBC and WBC antigens, no infants produced alloantibodies against blood cell antigens. Thus, immunologically mediated transfusion reactions should be quite rare in young infants, and this study supports recommendations of the American Association of Blood Banks Standards to omit repeat RBC compatibility testing during the first 4 months of life in infants whose initial RBC antibody screens reveal no unexpected antibodies.

  1. Use of remote blood releasing system for red cell transfusion in hospice care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Ying Chan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is quite common to have advanced cancer or end-stage renal disease patients for regular or even frequent blood transfusion in palliative care. However, due to geographical reason in some hospice centers, blood transfusion is sometimes difficult if blood bank is closed during non-office hour or not available. Methods: Here, we reported a new blood releasing system, that is, remote blood releasing system, that could be used safely by nursing staff alone when the blood bank was closed during the night time and holiday. Results: On-call nursing staff could collect red cells successful in these two cases. Conclusion: The new blood releasing system seems useful. However, larger sample sizes and longer period of study are required to estimate its efficacy and safety. The provision of antibody-positive red cells and platelet remained a limitation of this system.

  2. Platelet desialylation is a novel mechanism and a therapeutic target in thrombocytopenia during sepsis: an open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Feng; Li, Xiao-Li; Fan, Kai-Liang; Yu, Ying-Yi; Gong, Jing; Geng, Shu-Ying; Liang, Ya-Feng; Huang, Ling; Qiu, Ji-Hua; Tian, Xing-Han; Wang, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yu, Qing-Xia; Zhang, Yuan-Feng; Lin, Peng; Wang, Li-Na; Li, Xin; Hou, Ming; Liu, Lu-Yi; Peng, Jun

    2017-05-11

    Studies in murine models suggested that platelet desialylation was an important mechanism of thrombocytopenia during sepsis. First, we performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study that enrolled septic patients with or without thrombocytopenia to determine the association between platelet desialylation and thrombocytopenia in patients with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Gender- and age-matched healthy adults were selected as normal controls in analysis of the platelet desialylation levels (study I). Next, we conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the patients who had severe sepsis with thrombocytopenia (platelet counts ≤50 × 10 9 /L) were randomly assigned to receive antimicrobial therapy alone (control group) or antimicrobial therapy plus oseltamivir (oseltamivir group) in a 1:1 ratio (study II). The primary outcomes were platelet desialylation level at study entry, overall platelet response rate within 14 days post-randomization, and all-cause mortality within 28 days post-randomization. Secondary outcomes included platelet recovery time, the occurrence of bleeding events, and the amount of platelets transfused within 14 days post-randomization. The platelet desialylation levels increased significantly in the 127 septic patients with thrombocytopenia compared to the 134 patients without thrombocytopenia. A platelet response was achieved in 45 of the 54 patients in the oseltamivir group (83.3%) compared with 34 of the 52 patients in the control group (65.4%; P = 0.045). The median platelet recovery time was 5 days (interquartile range 4-6) in the oseltamivir group compared with 7 days (interquartile range 5-10) in the control group (P = 0.003). The amount of platelets transfused decreased significantly in the oseltamivir group compared to the control group (P = 0.044). There was no difference in the overall 28-day mortality regardless of whether oseltamivir was used. The Sequential Organ

  3. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold DM, Patriquin C, Toltl LJ, Nazi I, Smith J, Kelton J. Diseases of platelet number: immune thrombocytopenia, neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and posttransfusion purpura. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ ...

  4. PROGRESS IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICES IN KENYA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... blood transfusion services in Nairobi region and to oversee all the regional and satellite blood transfusion ... national and regional BTC's satellite centres were operating along the Trans African highway in ... clinics units. Recruitment unit carries out donor education, mobilisation, recruitment and retention of.

  5. Perioperative Haemorrhage and Transfusion in Musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Musculoskeletal tumor surgery in the West African subregion is rapidly evolving. These procedures are associated with significant blood losses necessitating large amount of transfusion, of which there is inadequate documentation. Allogeneic blood transfusion has been associated with ...

  6. [Transfusion in elderly: Take account frailty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, R; Novella, J-L; Jaïdi, Y

    2017-09-01

    The conjunction of the demographic aging and the increase in the frequency of anemia with the advancing age, mean that the number of globular concentrates delivered each year increases with a consequent heavy pressure on blood collection. The etiologies of anemia in the elderly are often multifactorial and their investigation is an indispensable step and prior to any treatment. Transfusion thresholds, particularly in the elderly, are gradually evolving and a so-called restrictive strategy is now favored. Immediate and delayed complications of transfusion are more frequent in the elderly due to vulnerability factors associated with frailty and the risk of multiple transfusions. The screening of complications related to transfusion of RBCs is essential and makes it possible to avoid their recurrence. The impact of transfusion on the quality of life of elderly patients is not obvious and is a controversial issue. In addition, transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is accompanied by an increase in health expenditure and an increase in morbidity and mortality, whose risks can be reduced through alternatives to transfusion. Longitudinal studies, including elderly subjects, would allow a better understanding of the issues involved in the transfusion of RBCs in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Knowledge and Acceptance of Autologous Blood Transfusion.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Homologous blood transfusion carries a well-documented array of risks especially in an HIV endemic environment like Nigeria. It is therefore imperative to consider other forms of restoring blood volume in surgical patients. Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is one of the ways the problem of HIV transmission ...

  8. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  9. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  10. Storage of apheresis platelet concentrates after manual replacement of >95% of plasma with PAS 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A; McMillan, L; Radwanski, K; Blatchford, O; Min, K; Petrik, J

    2014-10-01

    Recently, a glucose- and bicarbonate-containing additive solution termed PAS 5 demonstrated acceptable 7-day platelet storage after >95% plasma replacement with PAS on the day of collection (Day 0). In this study, we examined platelet storage in >95% PAS 5 after manual washing of Day 1 apheresis platelets in plasma collected using either the Amicus or Trima plateletpheresis devices. Triple platelet donations in plasma were obtained from Amicus (n = 10) and Trima (n = 10) plateletpheresis devices and stored overnight before being centrifuged and manually processed into three units with the following storage media: 100% plasma, >95% PAS 5 or 65% PAS 5/35% plasma. Platelet units were sampled on Days 1, 5 and 7 of storage using a range of tests recommended by the UK guidelines. The majority of in vitro assay results for platelets in PAS 5 were similar to results in paired 100% plasma platelets (controls). The pH of PAS 5 stored platelet units was above the UK recommended guidelines of 7·4 by Day 5. PAS 5 platelets were no more activated than controls as evidenced by comparable soluble P-selectin levels and CD62p and CD42b expression. PAS 5 platelets also exhibited adhesion and aggregation profiles higher than (Day 1) or comparable to (Days 5 and 7) controls as measured by Impact R. The 7-day in vitro storage parameters investigated were comparable between >95% PAS 5 and 100% plasma platelets derived from both Amicus and Trima plateletpheresis devices, with the exception that lactose dehydrogenase release rate and pH were significantly higher in PAS 5 units. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusrawati .

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPeningkatan mortalitas pada kembar monokorion disebabkan oleh adanya anastomosis vaskuler pada plasenta yang menyebabkan Twin to Twin Transfussion syndrome.Berikut laporan kasus yang ditangani di RS. DR. M. Djamil Padang. Kasus 1: Seorang pasien usia 28 tahun dengan diagnosa MP3 gravid preterm 33-34 minggu dengan Twin To Twin Transfusion Syndrom, Dari pemeriksaan USG didapatkan kesan: Gemelli, gravid 33-34 minggu dengan TTTS. Pasien diterminasi secara SCTPP. Bayi pertama lahir perempuan, dengan: BB: 1400 grams, PB: 44 cm, A / S: 8/9, Bayi ke II: perempuan, BB: 1000 grams, PB: 38 cm, A / S: 6/7, Hb janin I: 16,9 g/dl dan Hb janin II : 11,3 g/dl. Kedua bayi dirawat di bagian perinatology. Bayi pertama bertahan hidup dengan beberapa kelainan kongenital yaitu VSD dan Hemangioma Orbita. Bayi kedua meninggal pada usia 7 hari dengan susp. Sepsis. Hingga saat ini, bayi ini masih kontrol rutin ke poliklinik RS. DR. M. Djamil Padang. Kasus 2: Seorang pasien usia 31 tahun dengan diagnosa MP5 parturient aterm kala II dengan gemelli. Pasien melahirkan spontan. Bayi pertama lahir perempuan dengan: BB: 3200 grams, PB: 48cm, A / S: 8/9, Bayi ke II perempuan : BB: 2100 grams, PB: 44 cm, A / S: 7/8. Kadar Hb bayi I : 17,6 g/dl dan bayi II: 14,1 g/dl. Plasenta lahir secara spontan lengkap 1 buah, berat 1150 gr, ukuran 20x19 x3 cm, panjang kedua tali pusat masing-masing 60 cm, insersi paracentralis,Monokhorion-Monoamnion. Kesan: TTTS.Kata kunci: twin to twin transfusion sindrom, ultrasonografi, monokorionAbstractIncreased mortality in monochorionic fetus caused by vascular anastomosis in the placenta that causes Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndromes (TTTS. Reporting two cases experienced and taken care in our hospital. Case1: a woman 28 years old was diagnosed with MP3 preterm pregnancy 33-34 weeks with Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndromes.Ultrasound impression: Gemelli gravid 33-34 weeks with TTTS. The patient was terminated by SCTPP. The first baby was female

  12. Patient inclusion in transfusion medicine: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman MT

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark T Friedman,1 Peyman Bizargity,1 Sandra Gilmore,2 Arnold Friedman3 1Blood Bank and Transfusion Medicine Service, Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai St Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital Center, 2Patient Blood Management Program, Center for Blood Management and Bloodless Medicine and Surgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, 3Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Patients may have differing perceptions about blood transfusions based on their backgrounds, values, education levels, or cultural or religious beliefs, which may or may not be accurate. Unfortunately, despite the fact that transfusions are associated with a number of infectious and noninfectious risks, and in spite of the fact that there are ethical, accreditation, and regulatory requirements to provide information regarding transfusion risks, benefits, and alternatives to patients, transfusion consent remains inconsistently obtained. This can partly be attributed to the fact that clinicians may take on a paternalistic approach to transfusion decisions as well as to the fact that many clinicians have knowledge gaps in transfusion medicine that prevent them from obtaining transfusion consent adequately. As a result, unlike the case with other medical and surgical therapies, most patients are not included in the making of informed decisions regarding the need for transfusion versus alternative therapies, leading to many situations in which the transfusions provide little benefit to them. Recently however, a number of organizations, such as the American Association of Blood Banks and The Joint Commission in the US, have promoted multidisciplinary, evidence-based treatment strategies that aim to minimize the need for blood transfusion, the so-called patient blood management (PBM protocols. PBM strategies are expected to improve blood utilization through optimization of patients who may need

  13. Preaggregation reactions of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, A R

    1981-09-01

    Whether platelet volume increases during the morphological changes preceding aggregation has been investigated. Previous research is controversial; resistive-counting techniques reveal an increase, centrifugal methods do not. Platelets were sized with a computerized, resistive-particle counter before and after incubation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Resistive volume increased by 14% (p less than 0.001) in the absence of EDTA, and only 7% in its presence (ADP, 10 micro M). EDTA inhibited platelet volume changes, whether these were shrinking induced by warming or swelling by ADP. Handling of platelets, such as during centrifugation, also caused particle swelling. Particle density decreased after ADP exposure, without release of serotonin, suggesting uptake of water. Platelet shape was experimentally manipulated to test the hypothesis that resistive volume changes stem from artifacts of particle shape. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that colchicine, chlorpromazine, and a temperature cycle of 0 degrees to 37 degrees all caused extensive alteration from the disc shape. Subsequent exposure to ADP increased resistive volume, and in the case of chlorpromazine, no long pseudopodia were extruded. It is concluded that preaggregation reactions of platelets can be associated with an increase in particle volume, and that earlier research based on centrifugation and the presence of ETA failed to reveal the increase because of inhibitory and apparent swelling effects.

  14. [Documents and transfusion acts: heterogeneous practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damais-Cépitélli, A; Lassale, B

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion is currently a delegated medical act in patient care services. Blood transfusion safety depends on the strict respect of processes from the prescription of blood products and required patient immuno-hematology exams to the administration of blood products and follow-up of the patient. We conducted a survey among haemovigilance correspondents to establish the documents needed to practice blood transfusion. Blood products delivery depends on the hospitals local organizations and blood products traceability relies on hospitals levels of computerization. We notice heterogeneous practices. Consequently, an updating of the December 15th 2003 circular relative to the transfusion act seems necessary and could thus lead to blood transfusions homogenous practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The residual risk of transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus infection associated with leucodepleted blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, C R; Wong, J; Polizzotto, M N; Faddy, H; Keller, A J; Pink, J

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus poses a risk to transfusion safety as its transmission to an immunocompromised recipient may lead to significant clinical sequelae. Once infection is established, it is lifelong and generally asymptomatic. Strategies to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted CMV (TT-CMV) include donor serological testing and blood component leucodepletion to deplete the transmissible reservoir. We estimate the residual risk for non-CMV antibody screened, leucodepleted (LD-only) fresh blood components. We established an approach to estimate the risk of TT-CMV under various scenarios. We estimated the probability of an infectious component, for both red cells and platelets, as a function of the observed WBC filter failure rate and the probability that such a unit was also contaminated with infectious virus. Using this model, the estimated combined residual risk of LD-only red cell and platelet units was very low, 1 in 13 575 000 (95%CI:1 in 1 344 167 000-1 in 1 730 000) as was the individual residual risk estimate for LD-only red cells, 1 in 7 790 000 (95%CI: 1 in 771 307 000-1 in 993 000) and LD-only platelets, where a zero risk was estimated (95%CI: 0-1 in 1 074 000). We describe a novel approach to assess the residual risk of LD-only components. This can be applied generally using local data. Our risk estimate for LD-only blood components in Australia is below the threshold of 1 in 1 million, generally considered negligible. This provides a useful indicator of the relative safety of LD-only components to assist clinical decisions when serologically screened inventory is unavailable. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Hanne H; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Steinmetz, Jacob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Wade, Charles E

    2016-12-09

    The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group; nearly half received both RBCs and plasma) whereas 182 patients only received in-hospital blood products (RBCs, Plasma and Platelets) within 6 hours of admission (IH group). PH patients had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, more penetrating injuries, lower systolic blood pressures, lower hemoglobin levels, lower platelet counts and greater acidosis upon ED admission than the IH group (all p plasma, more pre-hospital plasma transfusion was tendency towards improved rTEG variables. When adjusting for pre-hospital RBC, pre-hospital plasma was associated with significantly higher rTEG MA (p = 0.012) at hospital admission. After adjusting for pre-hospital RBCs, pre-hospital plasma transfusion was independently associated with increased rTEG MA, as well as arrival indices of shock and hemodynamic instability. Besides more severe injury and worse clinical presentation, the group that received pre-hospital transfusion had early and late mortality similar to patients not transfused pre-hospital. These data suggest that early administration of plasma can provide significant hemostatic and potential

  17. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  18. Fibrinogen and platelet contributions to clot formation: implications for trauma resuscitation and thromboprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblith, Lucy Z; Kutcher, Matthew E; Redick, Brittney J; Calfee, Carolyn S; Vilardi, Ryan F; Cohen, Mitchell Jay

    2014-02-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) is used to diagnose perturbations in clot formation and lysis that are characteristic of acute traumatic coagulopathy. With novel functional fibrinogen (FF) TEG, fibrin- and platelet-based contributions to clot formation can be elucidated to tailor resuscitation and thromboprophylaxis. We sought to describe the longitudinal contributions of fibrinogen and platelets to clot strength after injury, hypothesizing that low levels of FF and a low contribution of fibrinogen to clot strength on admission would be associated with coagulopathy, increased transfusion requirements, and worse outcomes. A total of 603 longitudinal plasma samples were prospectively collected from 251 critically injured patients at a single Level 1 trauma center from 0 hour to 120 hours. TEG maximal amplitude (MA), FF MA, FF levels, von Clauss fibrinogen, and standard coagulation measures were performed in parallel. Percentage contributions of FF (%MA(FF)) and platelets (%MA(platelets)) were calculated as each MA divided by overall kaolin TEG MA. Coagulopathic patients (international normalized ratio ≥ 1.3) had significantly lower admission %MA(FF) than noncoagulopathic patients (24.7% vs. 31.2%, p Coagulopathy and plasma transfusion were associated with a lower %MA(FF). Despite this importance of fibrinogen, platelets had a greater contribution to clot strength at all time points after injury. This suggests that attention to these relative contributions should guide resuscitation and thromboprophylaxis and that antiplatelet therapy may be of underrecognized importance to thromboprophylaxis after trauma. Prognostic study, level III.

  19. All clinically-relevant blood components transmit prion disease following a single blood transfusion: a sheep model of vCJD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra McCutcheon

    Full Text Available Variant CJD (vCJD is an incurable, infectious human disease, likely arising from the consumption of BSE-contaminated meat products. Whilst the epidemic appears to be waning, there is much concern that vCJD infection may be perpetuated in humans by the transfusion of contaminated blood products. Since 2004, several cases of transfusion-associated vCJD transmission have been reported and linked to blood collected from pre-clinically affected donors. Using an animal model in which the disease manifested resembles that of humans affected with vCJD, we examined which blood components used in human medicine are likely to pose the greatest risk of transmitting vCJD via transfusion. We collected two full units of blood from BSE-infected donor animals during the pre-clinical phase of infection. Using methods employed by transfusion services we prepared red cell concentrates, plasma and platelets units (including leucoreduced equivalents. Following transfusion, we showed that all components contain sufficient levels of infectivity to cause disease following only a single transfusion and also that leucoreduction did not prevent disease transmission. These data suggest that all blood components are vectors for prion disease transmission, and highlight the importance of multiple control measures to minimise the risk of human to human transmission of vCJD by blood transfusion.

  20. Deferasirox chelation therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent MDS: a 'real-world' report from two regional Italian registries: Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie and Registro Basilicata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurillo, Luca; Breccia, Massimo; Buccisano, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa; Niscola, Pasquale; Trapè, Giulio; Tatarelli, Caterina; D'Addosio, Ada; Latagliata, Roberto; Fenu, Susanna; Piccioni, Anna Lina; Fragasso, Alberto; Aloe Spiriti, Maria A; Refrigeri, Marco; Criscuolo, Marianna; Musto, Pellegrino; Venditti, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    Deferasirox (DFX) is an orally administered iron chelator approved for use in patients with transfusion-dependent iron overload due to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The safety and efficacy of DFX has been explored in clinical trial settings, but there is little data on unselected patients with MDS. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety, compliance, efficacy and effect on haematopoiesis of DFX in a large 'real-world' MDS population. One hundred and eighteen patients with transfusion-dependent MDS were treated with DFX across 11 centres in Italy. Serum ferritin levels, haematological response, dosing, adverse events and transfusion dependence were recorded at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months following initiation of treatment. DFX reduced mean serum ferritin levels from 1790 to 1140 ng/mL (P < 0.001), with 7.1% of patients achieving transfusion independence. Significant haematological improvement was seen in erythroid (17.6%), platelet (5.9%) and neutrophil counts (7.1%). Adverse events were reported in 47.5% of patients, including gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Regression analysis showed that higher starting doses of DFX are associated with transfusion independence at 24 months. DFX is a safe, effective treatment for transfusion-dependent MDS that can lead to transfusion independence and haematological improvement in a subset of patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. All Clinically-Relevant Blood Components Transmit Prion Disease following a Single Blood Transfusion: A Sheep Model of vCJD

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Christopher; Tan, Boon Chin; Smith, Antony; Groschup, Martin H.; Hunter, Nora; Hornsey, Valerie S.; MacGregor, Ian R.; Prowse, Christopher V.; Turner, Marc; Manson, Jean C.

    2011-01-01

    Variant CJD (vCJD) is an incurable, infectious human disease, likely arising from the consumption of BSE-contaminated meat products. Whilst the epidemic appears to be waning, there is much concern that vCJD infection may be perpetuated in humans by the transfusion of contaminated blood products. Since 2004, several cases of transfusion-associated vCJD transmission have been reported and linked to blood collected from pre-clinically affected donors. Using an animal model in which the disease manifested resembles that of humans affected with vCJD, we examined which blood components used in human medicine are likely to pose the greatest risk of transmitting vCJD via transfusion. We collected two full units of blood from BSE-infected donor animals during the pre-clinical phase of infection. Using methods employed by transfusion services we prepared red cell concentrates, plasma and platelets units (including leucoreduced equivalents). Following transfusion, we showed that all components contain sufficient levels of infectivity to cause disease following only a single transfusion and also that leucoreduction did not prevent disease transmission. These data suggest that all blood components are vectors for prion disease transmission, and highlight the importance of multiple control measures to minimise the risk of human to human transmission of vCJD by blood transfusion. PMID:21858015

  2. Storage time of platelet concentrates and risk of a positive blood culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuger, Aukje L; Rostgaard, Klaus; Middelburg, Rutger A

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concern of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections has been the major hurdle to extend shelf life of platelet (PLT) concentrates. We aimed to investigate the association between storage time and risk of positive blood cultures at different times after transfusion. STUDY DESIGN AN......, transfusion of a single old PLT concentrate may decrease this risk the following day....... culture among recipients of PLTs stored 6 to 7 days (old) to those receiving fresh PLTs (1-5 days), using Poisson regression models. We considered cumulative exposures in windows of 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. RESULTS: A total of 9776 patients received 66,101 PLT transfusions. The incidence rate ratio (IRR......) of a positive blood culture the day after transfusion of at least one old PLT concentrate was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.09) compared to transfusion of fresh PLT concentrates. The incidence rate of a positive blood culture was lower the day after receiving one old compared to one fresh PLT...

  3. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  4. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-11-01

    The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322,580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21,413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a 'back to basics' approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Function and platelet count in thrombocyte concentrate (TC during the storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elida Marpaung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Evaluasi terhadap pemberian transfusi belum dilakukan secara optimal baik di hulumaupun di hilir. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui pengaruh waktu penyimpanan terhadap perubahanpH, jumlah trombosit, dan fungsi agregasi yang terjadi pada trombosit pada beberapa hari penyimpanan.Metode: Disain penelitian potong lintang terhadap sample kantong konsentrat trombosit yang yang telahlolos skrining infeksi penyakit menular melalui transfusi darah. Pengujian yang dilakukan ialah terhadappH, jumlah trombosit dan fungsi agregasi terhadap sampel pada tiga waktu pengujian pada hari ke-0, ketiga, dan ke lima penyimpanan.Hasil: Pada 50 sampel kantong konsentrat trombosit didapatkan kenaikan pH pada hari ke tigapenyimpanan kantong trombosit yang disertai penurunan pada hari ke lima. Hal serupa ditemui pulapada jumlah trombosit. Sementara penurunan fungsi agregasi trombosit ditemukan lebih awal pada harike tiga penyimpanan dan didapatkan nilai rendah pada hampir semua sampel.Kesimpulan: Ketiga parameter yaitu pH, jumlah trombosit, dan fungsi agregasi mengalami penurunanpada hari kelima. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia;2015;6:48-51Kata kunci: thrombocyte, concentrate, pH, agregasi, waktu penyimpanan. AbstractBackground: Evaluation for platelet transfusion is not optimal for this moment even in upstream at theblood center or in downstream at the hospital. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect ofstorage time to changes in pH, platelet count and function that occurs on platelet aggregation duringdifferent time storage.Methods: The study design was cross-sectional on selected bags of platelet concentrates that have passedthe screening for infection transmitted through blood transfusions. The regular assessment in UTDD forPC has been done every month by random sampling with three parameters pH, platelets count and volumein the bag of blood. The testing for pH, platelet count, and aggregation functions for 50 samples

  6. Desmopressin improves platelet activity in acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidech, Andrew M; Maas, Matthew B; Levasseur-Franklin, Kimberly E; Liotta, Eric M; Guth, James C; Berman, Micheal; Rosenow, Joshua M; Lindholm, Paul F; Bendok, Bernard R; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Bernstein, Richard A; Kwaan, Hau C

    2014-08-01

    Minimizing hematoma growth in high-risk patients is an attractive strategy to improve outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage. We tested the hypothesis that desmopressin (DDAVP), which improves hemostasis through the release of von Willebrand factor, improves platelet activity after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with reduced platelet activity on point-of-care testing alone (5), known aspirin use alone (1), or both (8) received desmopressin 0.4 μg/kg IV. We measured Platelet Function Analyzer-epinephrine (Siemens AG, Germany) and von Willebrand factor antigen from baseline to 1 hour after infusion start and hematoma volume from the diagnostic to a follow-up computed tomographic scan. We enrolled 14 patients with of mean age 66.8±14.6 years, 11 (85%) of whom were white and 8 (57%) were men. Mean Platelet Function Analyzer-epinephrine results shortened from 192±18 seconds pretreatment to 124±15 seconds (P=0.01) 1 hour later, indicating improved plate activity. von Willebrand factor antigen increased from 242±96% to 289±103% activity (P=0.004), indicating the expected increase in von Willebrand factor. Of 7 (50%) patients who received desmopressin within 12 hours of intracerebral hemorrhage symptom onset, changes in hematoma volume were modest, -0.5 (-1.4 to 8.4) mL and only 2 had hematoma growth. One patient had low blood pressure and another had a new fever within 6 hours of desmopressin administration. Intravenous desmopressin was well tolerated and improved platelet activity after acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Larger studies are needed to determine its potential effects on reducing hematoma growth versus platelet transfusion or placebo. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00961532. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. The transfusion medicine we want.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics.This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

  8. Comparison of harvesting methods and clinical application of apheresis platelet concentrates with additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Karpova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet concentrates (PC are used worldwide in the fields of oncology, oncohaematology and bone marrow transplantation. One of the main tasks of clinical transfusiology is the development and improvement of technologies aimed to increase quality and safety of PC. In particular, such technologies are represented by using of platelet additive solutions (PAS. The main advantages of this approach are: a reduction of immune and non-immune transfusion reactions risk, an improvement of pathogen inactivation quality and enhancing a clinical effect of PC transfusions after storage. Numerous different PAS and methodologies of their application are suggested to date. In this review we have described and classified recent data on different PAS and the benefits of their clinical application.

  9. A second-generation blood substitute (Perfluorodichlorooctane emulsion) generates spurious elevations in platelet counts from automated hematology analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuignet, O Y; Wood, B L; Chandler, W L; Spiess, B D

    2000-03-01

    Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFEs) appear as platelets in automated cell counters, which may affect samples from thrombocytopenic patients (less than 100,000/microL). Therefore, we mixed clinically relevant concentrations of perfluorodichlorooctane (Oxyfluor(R); Hemagen, Inc., St. Louis, MO) in vitro with whole blood samples ranging from 0 to 150,000 platelets/microL and compared a new counter that uses optical platelet recognition (Abbott CellDyn 3200; Santa Clara, CA) with conventional electroimpedance-based counters (Abbott CellDyn 3500 and CellDyn 1700). We found that emulsion particles appear as small-sized platelets either in diluent or in blood. The emulsion results in a reproducible overestimate of the platelet counts, of greater importance as PFE concentration increases, and as the actual platelet count of the blood samples decreases. The new optical technology yields smaller overestimates but, even at low PFE concentrations, gives an unacceptable relative error at platelet counts near the transfusion thresholds recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists guidelines for blood component therapy. Unexpected interference in the leukocyte and erythrocyte channels is also reported. Experimental limitations preclude extrapolation of these findings to other automated cell counters, because differences in technology or software may affect their capacity to separate PFE particles from platelets. Perfluorocarbons are being investigated under conditions in which thrombocytopenia is likely to occur. In this in vitro study, we demonstrate significant overestimates in platelet counts from automated cell counters at clinically relevant perfluorocarbon concentrations in thrombocytopenic blood samples.

  10. Continued decline in blood collection and transfusion in the United States–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Katherine D.; Sapiano, Mathew R. P.; Haass, Kathryn A.; Savinkina, Alexandra A.; Baker, Misha L.; Chung, Koo-Whang; Henry, Richard A.; Berger, James J.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2011 and 2013, the National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey (NBCUS) revealed declines in blood collection and transfusion in the United States. The objective of this study was to describe blood services in 2015. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The 2015 NBCUS was distributed to all US blood collection centers, all hospitals performing at least 1000 surgeries annually, and a 40% random sample of hospitals performing 100 to 999 surgeries annually. Weighting and imputation were used to generate national estimates for units of blood and components collected, deferred, distributed, transfused, and outdated. RESULTS Response rates for the 2015 NBCUS were 78.4% for blood collection centers and 73.9% for transfusing hospitals. In 2015, 12,591,000 units of red blood cells (RBCs) (95% confidence interval [CI], 11,985,000–13,197,000 units of RBCs) were collected, and 11,349,000 (95% CI, 10,592,000–11,747,000) were transfused, representing declines since 2013 of 11.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Total platelet units distributed (2,436,000; 95% CI, 2,230,000–2,642,000) and transfused (1,983,000; 95% CI, 1,816,000=2,151,000) declined by 0.5% and 13.1%, respectively, since 2013. Plasma distributions (3,714,000; 95% CI, 3,306,000–4,121,000) and transfusions (2,727,000; 95% CI, 2,594,000–2,859,000) in 2015 declined since 2013. The median price paid per unit in 2015—$211 for leukocyte-reduced RBCs, $524 for apheresis platelets, and $54 for fresh frozen plasma—was less for all components than in 2013. CONCLUSIONS The 2015 NBCUS findings suggest that continued declines in demand for blood products resulted in fewer units collected and distributed Maintaining a blood inventory sufficient to meet routine and emergent demands will require further monitoring and understanding of these trends. PMID:28591469

  11. Bacterial contamination of blood components: Norwegian strategies in identifying donors with higher risk of inducing septic transfusion reactions in recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Sofie Strand; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard; Reikvam, Håkon

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components remains the most common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality, even in developed countries. This yet unresolved complication is seen more often in platelet transfusions, as platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature, in gas permeable containers with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from relatively low undetectable levels, at the beginning of storage time, to relatively high virulent bacteria titers and endotoxin generation, at the end of shelf life. Accordingly, several combined strategies are introduced and implemented to at least reduce the potential risk of bacterial contaminated products for transfusion. These embody: improved donors arms cleaning; bacterial avoidance by diversion of the first portion of collection; reducing bacterial growth through development of newer storage media for longer platelet shelf life; bacterial load reduction by leucoreduction/viral inactivation, in some countries and eliminating the use potentially contaminated units through screening, through current available testing procedures, though none are not yet fully secure. We have not seen the same reduction in bacterial associated transfusion infections as we have observed for the sharp drop in transfusion associated transmission rates of HIV and hepatitis B and C. This great viral reduction is not only caused by the introduction of newer and more sensitive and specific detection methods for different viruses, but also the identification of donor risk groups through questionnaires and personal interviews. While search for more efficient methods for identifying potential blood donors with asymptomatic bacteremia, as well as a better way for detecting bacteria in stored blood components will be continuing, it is necessary to establish more standardized guidelines for the recognition the adverse reactions in recipients of potentially contaminated units

  12. Online reporting system for transfusion-related adverse events to enhance recipient haemovigilance in Japan: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Chikako; Kato, Hidefumi; Otsubo, Hiroko; Takamoto, Shigeru; Okada, Yoshiaki; Taneichi, Maiko; Okuma, Kazu; Sagawa, Kimitaka; Hoshi, Yasutaka; Tasaki, Tetsunori; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Yonemura, Yuji; Iwao, Noriaki; Tanaka, Asashi; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Momose, Shun-Ya; Kitazawa, Junichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Akio; Nomura, Hisako; Yasoshima, Hitoshi; Ohkusa, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2013-02-01

    A surveillance system for transfusion-related adverse reactions and infectious diseases in Japan was started at a national level in 1993, but current reporting of events in recipients is performed on a voluntary basis. A reporting system which can collect information on all transfusion-related events in recipients is required in Japan. We have developed an online reporting system for transfusion-related events and performed a pilot study in 12 hospitals from 2007 to 2010. The overall incidence of adverse events per transfusion bag was 1.47%. Platelet concentrates gave rise to statistically more adverse events (4.16%) than red blood cells (0.66%) and fresh-frozen plasma (0.93%). In addition, we found that the incidence of adverse events varied between hospitals according to their size and patient characteristics. This online reporting system is useful for collection and analysis of actual adverse events in recipients of blood transfusions and may contribute to enhancement of the existing surveillance system for recipients in Japan. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Transfusion-associated circulatory overload in Ireland: a review of cases reported to the National Haemovigilance Office 2000 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccin, Andrea; Cronin, Marina; Brady, Róisín; Sweeney, Jackie; Marcheselli, Luigi; Lawlor, Emer

    2015-06-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an increasingly reported condition but symptoms and signs are still unrecognized. We present a review of the incidence and clinical features of TACO reported to the National Haemovigilance Office at the Irish Blood Transfusion Service. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 1071 cases of serious transfusion-related reactions were reported, of which 221 (21%) cases were TACO. A total of 2,000,684 blood components were issued, with a TACO incidence of one in 9177. The TACO incidence per red blood cells, plasma, and platelet components issued was one in 8000, one in 16,000, and one in 57,884, respectively. The majority of cases (68%, n = 151) were elderly patients, while no sex difference was seen. Twenty-eight (13%) patients experienced severe morbidity; 31 (14%) deaths were reported, of which five (2%) were considered due to TACO and the other deaths considered due to and underlying conditions, which in most cases were cardiovascular (76%). An increased risk of mortality was found in patients on diuretics either before transfusion as part of their routine therapy or given as pretransfusion medication (odds ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-6.01). In 19 (21%) cases, TACO reaction was due to human error. The strong association between TACO and human errors supports the role of hemovigilance and of adequate transfusion medicine teaching for preventing morbidity and mortality associated with TACO. © 2014 AABB.

  14. Transfusion regimens in thalassemia intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Karakas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia intermedia (TI is a heterogeneous disease, in terms of both clinical manifestations and underlying molecular defects. Some TI patients are asymptomatic until adult life, whereas others are symptomatic from early childhood. In contrast with patients with Thalassemia major (TM, the severity of anemia is less and the patients do not require transfusions during at least the first few years of life. Many patients with TI, especially older ones, have been exposed to the multiple long-term effects of chronic anemia and tissue hypoxia and their compensatory reactions, including enhanced erythropoiesis and increased iron absorption. Bone marrow expansion and extramedullary hematopoiesis lead to bone deformities and liver and spleen enlargement. Therapeutic strategies in TI are not clear and different criteria are used to decide the initiation of transfusion and chelation therapy, modulation of fetal hemoglobin production, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on an individual basis. The clinical picture of well-treated TM patients with regular transfusionchelation therapy is better from TI patients who have not received adequate transfusion therapy. There is a significant role of early blood transfusion to prevent and treat complications commonly associated with TI, such as extramedullary erythropoiesis and bone deformities, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leg ulcers, gallstones, pseudoxantoma elasticum, hyperuricosuria, gout and pulmonary hypertension, which are rarely seen in thalassemia major. Nowadays, indications of transfusion in patients with TI are chronic anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL, bone deformities, growth failure, extramedullary erythropoiesis, heart failure, pregnancy and preparation for surgical procedures. Conclusion: Adequate (regular or tailored transfusion therapy is an important treatment modality for increasing the quality of life in patients with thalassemia intermedia during childhood. 就临床表象和潜在的分子缺

  15. Highly Efficient Prion Transmission by Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbière, Fabien; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Schelcher, François; Vilette, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Lacroux, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of v-CJD by blood and blood derived products by transfusion rely on infectious titers measured in rodent models of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) using intra-cerebral (IC) inoculation of blood components. To address the biological relevance of this approach, we compared the efficiency of TSE transmission by blood and blood components when administrated either through transfusion in sheep or by intra-cerebral inoculation (IC) in transgenic mice (tg338) over-expressing ovine PrP. Transfusion of 200 µL of blood from asymptomatic infected donor sheep transmitted prion disease with 100% efficiency thereby displaying greater virulence than the transfusion of 200 mL of normal blood spiked with brain homogenate material containing 103ID50 as measured by intracerebral inoculation of tg338 mice (ID50 IC in tg338). This was consistent with a whole blood titer greater than 103.6 ID50 IC in tg338 per mL. However, when the same blood samples were assayed by IC inoculation into tg338 the infectious titers were less than 32 ID per mL. Whereas the transfusion of crude plasma to sheep transmitted the disease with limited efficacy, White Blood Cells (WBC) displayed a similar ability to whole blood to infect recipients. Strikingly, fixation of WBC with paraformaldehyde did not affect the infectivity titer as measured in tg338 but dramatically impaired disease transmission by transfusion in sheep. These results demonstrate that TSE transmission by blood transfusion can be highly efficient and that this efficiency is more dependent on the viability of transfused cells than the level of infectivity measured by IC

  16. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF): surgical adjuvants, preparations for in situ regenerative medicine and tools for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Tomasz; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2012-06-01

    The recent developement of platelet concentrate for surgical use is an evolution of the fibrin glue technologies used since many years. The initial concept of these autologous preparations was to concentrate platelets and their growth factors in a plasma solution, and to activate it into a fibrin gel on a surgical site, in order to improve local healing. These platelet suspensions were often called Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) like the platelet concentrate used in transfusion medicine, but many different technologies have in fact been developed; some of them are even no more platelet suspensions, but solid fibrin-based biomaterials called Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF). These various technologies were tested in many different clinical fields, particularly oral and maxillofacial surgery, Ear-Nose-Throat surgery, plastic surgery, orthopaedic surgery, sports medicine, gynecologic and cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. This field of research unfortunately suffers from the lack of a proper accurate terminology and the associated misunderstandings, and the literature on the topic is quite contradictory. Indeed, the effects of these preparations cannot be limited to their growth factor content: these products associate many actors of healing in synergy, such as leukocytes, fibrin matrix, and circulating progenitor cells, and are in fact as complex as blood itself. If platelet concentrates were first used as surgical adjuvants for the stimulation of healing (as fibrin glues enriched with growth factors), many applications for in situ regenerative medicine and tissue engineering were developed and offer a great potential. However, the future of this field is first dependent on his coherence and scientific clarity. The objectives of this article is to introduce the main definitions, problematics and perspectives that are described in this special issue of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology about platelet concentrates.

  17. The Platelet and Platelet Function Testing in Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Greg G. C.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    Patients who have liver disease commonly present with alterations in platelet number and function. Recent data have questioned the contribution of these changes to bleeding complications in these patients. Modern tests of platelet function revealed compensatory mechanisms for the decreased platelet

  18. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV), Platelet Distribution Width (PDW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thrombocytopenia has been shown to predict mortality. We hypothesize that platelet indices may be more useful prognostic indicators. Our study subjects were children one month to 14 years old admitted to our hospital. Aim: To determine whether platelet count, plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV) ...

  19. Reproducibility of Manual Platelet Estimation Following Automated Low Platelet Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab S Al-Hosni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Manual platelet estimation is one of the methods used when automated platelet estimates are very low. However, the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation has not been adequately studied. We sought to assess the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation following automated low platelet counts and to evaluate the impact of the level of experience of the person counting on the reproducibility of manual platelet estimates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, peripheral blood films of patients with platelet counts less than 100 × 109/L were retrieved and given to four raters to perform manual platelet estimation independently using a predefined method (average of platelet counts in 10 fields using 100× objective multiplied by 20. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC as a method of reproducibility assessment. Results: The ICC across the four raters was 0.840, indicating excellent agreement. The median difference of the two most experienced raters was 0 (range: -64 to 78. The level of platelet estimate by the least-experienced rater predicted the disagreement (p = 0.037. When assessing the difference between pairs of raters, there was no significant difference in the ICC (p = 0.420. Conclusions: The agreement between different raters using manual platelet estimation was excellent. Further confirmation is necessary, with a prospective study using a gold standard method of platelet counts.

  20. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to the...

  1. Urticarial Reactions In Multi Transfused Patients In University Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study was aimed at determining the pattern of urticarial transfusion reactions (UTR) among patients who received multiple blood transfusions at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) from 1997 2001. Materials and Methods: A total of 154 multi transfused patients who received transfusions ...

  2. Indications for Blood Transfusion among Children in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is prevalent among children in our environment, often necessitating blood transfusions. Knowledge of the common reasons for blood transfusion and institution of preventive measures is likely to reduce transfusion rate in the region. We undertook a review of indications for blood transfusion in children ...

  3. False-positive pregnancy test after transfusion of solvent/detergent-treated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilma-Stohlawetz, Petra; Wreford-Bush, Tim; Mills, Francesca; Davidson, Fiona; Kursten, Friedrich W; Jilma, Bernd; Birchall, Janet

    2017-12-01

    The transmission of pathogens, antibodies, and proteins is a possible consequence of blood product transfusion. A female patient had an unexpected positive serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin result, indicative of pregnancy, after she had received a transfusion with 1 unit of platelet concentrate, 4 units of red blood cells, and 4 units of pooled solvent/detergent-treated plasma (Octaplas). To investigate the possibility of passive transfusion of β-human chorionic gonadotropin from the plasma transfusion, one additional unit from the same batch was thawed and analyzed. To validate the β-human chorionic gonadotropin assay for use in solvent/detergent-treated plasma and to investigate any interference in the assay, dilution experiments were performed using the implicated plasma batch diluted with male and non-pregnant female sera. Also, plasma from a known pregnant woman was diluted with Octaplas (tested negative for β-human chorionic gonadotropin) and with a male serum to validate the assay for use in solvent/detergent-treated plasma. The implicated solvent/detergent-treated plasma had a mean β-human chorionic gonadotropin level of 91.5 mIU/mL. Results from the dilution experiments revealed an excellent correlation (r > 0.99) between β-human chorionic gonadotropin measurement in solvent/detergent-treated plasma and male serum and no over or under recovery of the expected results. Further measurements of β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels in the female recipient revealed an estimated half-life of 6 hours. This case demonstrates the importance of considering the possibility of passive transmission of analytes to a patient from the transfusion of blood products. Furthermore, the measurement of β-human chorionic gonadotropin is valid in solvent/detergent-treated plasma using a Roche Cobas analyzer. © 2017 AABB.

  4. Transfusion premedication practices among pediatric health care practitioners in Canada: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solh, Ziad; Chan, Anthony K C; Heddle, Nancy M

    2016-09-01

    Although not supported by strong evidence, premedication (pretransfusion medication) is commonly prescribed to patients who have had a transfusion reaction. The research questions were: 1) What are Canadian pediatric practitioners' views and practices regarding premedication and 2) what are barriers to reducing premedication overuse in pediatrics? An online survey targeted hematology/oncology, emergency medicine, general surgery, intensive care, and cardiac intensive care practitioners in all 16 Canadian pediatric tertiary hospitals. The survey included four sections: demographic, clinical, future directions, and organizational questions. Fifty-five individuals from 15 of 16 pediatric tertiary care sites completed the survey: 53 physicians and two nurse practitioners. More than half of the respondents (55%; 30/55) were pediatric hematology/oncology providers, and 35% (19/55) were directors of their respective divisions. Eighty-seven percent of respondents estimated that they premedicate up to 25% of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, and 13% premedicate 26% to 50% RBC transfusions. Proportions were similar for platelet transfusions. Most respondents reported that trainees are involved in transfusion and premedication order decisions. Seven percent believe that their hospital does not use leukoreduction and 27% are not sure. Sixty-five percent of respondents were not aware of a clinical practice guideline or a standard order set (SOS) at their institution: 51% are interested in having both available. Factors influencing the decision to premedicate and barriers to change were identified. Premedication practices are variable in Canadian pediatric academic hospitals. Evidence-based premedication clinical practice guidelines and SOS could be explored as a way to standardize practices. There were perceived educational and institutional barriers to practice change. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Impact of blood products on platelet function in patients with traumatic injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Hanne Hee; Grand, Alexandra G; Viggers, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    in response to five agonists. Function was corrected for alterations in count. In vitro studies were conducted in the blood of normal subjects to assess the effect of dilutions with AB donor plasma on PLT function. RESULTS: Forty-six patients were enrolled, with 87% requiring a transfusion. Median Injury...... donors. CONCLUSIONS: Within hours of injury a decrease in both PLT count and function occurs, that is aggravated with the administration of blood products, with transfusion of PLTs showing the greatest effect. The effect on PLT function of allogenic transfused plasma appears to be highly donor related.......BACKGROUND: Reductions in platelet (PLT) count and function are associated with poor outcomes in trauma patients. We proposed to determine if patients expected to receive blood products have a decrease in PLT function higher than expected based on the reduction in PLT count, and if the reduction...

  6. PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE SAFETY OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION AND VIRTUAL TRANSFUSION LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rožman

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even though blood transfusion is a relatively safe form of therapy, because of the eventual administrative errors in the transfusion chain between the blood donor and the recipient of blood, transfusion errors still occur. Therefore, it is imperative to ensure an utmost extent of safety and reliability of all transfusion related procedures. The safety of blood transfusion can be improved by preventive actions, i.e. implementation of the total quality management concept, haemovigilance and virtual transfusion laboratory. In the resulting system, the information web, robotics, computer sciences and communication technologies ensure safe and reliable identification of the patients, blood donors, corresponding test samples and blood products. Apart form this; the modern technologies enable the automation of laboratory testing, the integrity of laboratory results and enable an optimal use of blood.Conclusions. For an improved transfusion safety in Slovenia, adoption of corresponding prevention as well as haemovigilance is necessary. Identification errors can be prevented by implementation of the wristbands systems with the code bars for the tagging of the patient and his biological samples, whereas the administrative errors in the blood bank and transfusion laboratory can be prevented by implementation of information systems and automation.We assume that the virtual transfusion laboratory will become an integral part of the new Slovenian transfusion web and will speed up, unify and simplify today’s methods of ordering and administering blood products. To the attending physician, it will enable the choice of optimal transfusion therapy schedule and at the same time, it will enable the supervision of individual orders, deviations and indications, all of which is needed in order to analyse and improve the quality and the costs of the treatment. These services represent the first obligatory step for the modernisation of the transfusion

  7. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    OpenAIRE

    Scheepers, E.; A.L. Leisewitz; P.N. Thompson; M. M. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was ...

  8. Selective Inhibition of ADAM17 Efficiently Mediates Glycoprotein Ibα Retention During Ex Vivo Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Shinji; Murata, Takahiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakamura, Sou; Jono-Ohnishi, Ryoko; Hirose, Hidenori; Sawaguchi, Akira; Nishimura, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Naoshi; Eto, Koji

    2016-10-05

    : Donor-independent platelet concentrates for transfusion can be produced in vitro from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, culture at 37°C induces ectodomain shedding on platelets of glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), the von Willebrand factor receptor critical for adhesive function and platelet lifetime in vivo, through temperature-dependent activation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17). The shedding can be suppressed by using inhibitors of panmetalloproteinases and possibly of the upstream regulator p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), but residues of these inhibitors in the final platelet products may be accompanied by harmful risks that prevent clinical application. Here, we optimized the culture conditions for generating human iPSC-derived GPIbα(+) platelets, focusing on culture temperature and additives, by comparing a new and safe selective ADAM17 inhibitor, KP-457, with previous inhibitors. Because cultivation at 24°C (at which conventional platelet concentrates are stored) markedly diminished the yield of platelets with high expression of platelet receptors, 37°C was requisite for normal platelet production from iPSCs. KP-457 blocked GPIbα shedding from iPSC platelets at a lower half-maximal inhibitory concentration than panmetalloproteinase inhibitor GM-6001, whereas p38 MAPK inhibitors did not. iPSC platelets generated in the presence of KP-457 exhibited improved GPIbα-dependent aggregation not inferior to human fresh platelets. A thrombus formation model using immunodeficient mice after platelet transfusion revealed that iPSC platelets generated with KP-457 exerted better hemostatic function in vivo. Our findings suggest that KP-457, unlike GM-6001 or p38 MAPK inhibitors, effectively enhances the production of functional human iPSC-derived platelets at 37°C, which is an important step toward their clinical application. This study is a tip for overcoming a practical but critical barrier for manufacturing human

  9. Effect of Blood Transfusions on the Outcome of Very Low Body Weight Preterm Infants under Two Different Transfusion Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: Both criteria of PRBC transfusion had similar clinical outcomes, although liberal transfusion resulted in a greater amount of blood transfused and a low reticulocyte count at 30 days of age. We suggest restrictive criteria for minimizing the overall amount of transfusion to less than 30 mL may be a better way of preventing CLD in VLBW infants.

  10. Biology of Platelet Purinergic Receptors and Implications for Platelet Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Koupenova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleated cells present only in mammals. Platelets mediate intravascular hemostatic balance, prevent interstitial bleeding, and have a major role in thrombosis. Activation of platelet purinergic receptors is instrumental in initiation of hemostasis and formation of the hemostatic plug, although this activation process becomes problematic in pathological settings of thrombosis. This review briefly outlines the roles and function of currently known platelet purinergic receptors (P1 and P2 in the setting of hemostasis and thrombosis. Additionally, we discuss recent novel studies on purinergic receptor distribution according to heterogeneous platelet size, and the possible implication of this distribution on hemostatic function.

  11. Transfusion syndromes in monochorionic multiplets: An overview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twin‑to‑twin transfusion syndromes (TTTS) are unique prenatal complications of monochorionic multiplets and manifest as twin oligohydramnios polyhydramnios sequence (TOPS), twin anaemia polyhydramnios sequence (TAPS) and twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAPS). These grave complications are ...

  12. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  13. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusions: efficacy, risks, alternatives and indications

    OpenAIRE

    Madjdpour, C.; Spahn, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Careful assessment of risks and benefits has to precede each decision on allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Currently, a number of key issues in transfusion medicine are highly controversial, most importantly the influence of different transfusion thresholds on clinical outcome. The aim of this article is to review current evidence on blood transfusions, to highlight ‘hot topics' with respect to efficacy, outcome and risks, and to provide the reader with transfusion guidelines. In a...

  14. Risk factors for blood transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, E M; Clyde, C T; Zmistowski, B M; Restrepo, C; Williams, G R; Namdari, S

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is little information about the need for peri-operative blood transfusion in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of transfusion and its predisposing factors, and to establish a blood conservation strategy. We identified all patients who had undergone shoulder arthroplasty at our hospital between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. The rate of transfusion was determined from the patient's records. While there were exceptions, patients typically underwent transfusion if they had a level of haemoglobin of transfusion. High- and low-risk cohorts for transfusion were identified from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 1174 shoulder arthroplasties performed on 1081 patients, 53 cases (4.5%) required transfusion post-operatively. Predictors of blood transfusion were a lower pre-operative haematocrit (p transfusion. In total 48 of the 436 (11%) shoulder arthroplasties with a pre-operative haematocrit transfusion compared with five of the 738 (0.70%) shoulder arthroplasties with a haematocrit above this level. We found that transfusion was needed less frequently than previously described for shoulder arthroplasty. Patients with a pre-operative haematocrit blood transfusion, while those with a haematocrit above this level are unlikely to require transfusion. The rate of transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty is under 5%, and those with a pre-operative haematocrit greater than or equal to 39.6% have a very low likelihood (transfusion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Blood Transfusion Delay and Outcome in County Hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julius; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Gachau, Susan; Makone, Boniface; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Mbevi, George; Chepkirui, Mercy; Malla, Lucas; Oliwa, Jacquie; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2017-02-08

    Severe anemia is a leading indication for blood transfusion and a major cause of hospital admission and mortality in African children. Failure to initiate blood transfusion rapidly enough contributes to anemia deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines delays in accessing blood and outcomes in transfused children in Kenyan hospitals. Children admitted with nonsurgical conditions in 10 Kenyan county hospitals participating in the Clinical Information Network who had blood transfusion ordered from September 2013 to March 2016 were studied. The delay in blood transfusion was calculated from the date when blood transfusion was prescribed to date of actual transfusion. Five percent (2,875/53,174) of admissions had blood transfusion ordered. Approximately half (45%, 1,295/2,875) of children who had blood transfusion ordered at admission had a documented hemoglobin transfusions, 82% were administered and documented in clinical records, and three-quarters of these (75%, 1,760/2,352) were given on the same day as ordered but these proportions varied from 71% to 100% across the 10 hospitals. Children who had a transfusion ordered but did not receive the prescribed transfusion had a mortality of 20%, compared with 12% among those transfused. Malaria-associated anemia remains the leading indication for blood transfusion in acute childhood illness admissions. Delays in transfusion are common and associated with poor outcomes. Variance in delay across hospitals may be a useful indicator of health system performance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  17. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A C; D'addario, V

    2009-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a condition unique to monochorionic pregnancies, although very few case reports described the syndrome in dichorionic placentas. The aetiology of TTTS relies in the presence of at least 1 arterio-venous placental anastomosis, through which unequal blood exchange from one twin (donor) to the co-twin (recipient) occurs. The diagnosis of TTTS relies on the sonographic detection of oligohydramnios in the donor's sac and polyhydramnios in the recipient's sac in the second trimester, although signs of TTTS are present since the first trimester. Treatment options for TTTS include serial amnioreduction, septostomy, selective feticide of the apparently sick twin, and selective photocoagulation of placental vessels (SLPCV). Because of the growing evidence that SLPCV is the most efficacious therapy compared to amnioreduction with/without septostomy, the authors reviewed in details the effects of SLPCV on fetal growth and circulation. The authors further explore literature with regard to the prognostic factors. Finally, because Quintero staging system is actually under debate, they discuss the most recent findings on this topic and propose a new staging system to assess severity of TTTS at presentation (Rossi staging system). New topics for future research, which would probably further clarify the natural history of TTTS, are also proposed.

  18. Mean Platelet Volume

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Chest Disease, Bolu, Turkey. E-mail: abanttip14@gmail.com. Telephone number: +903742534618. Fax number: +903742534615 effective and should have wide spread acceptance. At present, none of the available diagnostic tests meets all these criteria. The mean platelet volume (MPV) is potentially one of.

  19. Desmopressin for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D A; Moxey, A J; Carless, P A; O'Connell, D; McClelland, B; Henderson, K M; Sly, K; Laupacis, A; Fergusson, D

    2001-01-01

    Public concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted re-consideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques designed to minimise transfusion requirements. To examine the evidence for the efficacy of desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin), in reducing perioperative blood loss and the need for red cell transfusion in patients who do not have congenital bleeding disorders. Articles were identified by: computer searches of OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Current Contents (to August 2000) and web sites of international health technology assessment agencies (to May 1998). References in the identified trials and review articles were checked and authors contacted to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled parallel group trials in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to DDAVP, or to a control group, who did not receive the intervention. Trial quality was assessed using criteria proposed by Schulz et al. (1995) and Jadad et al. (1996). The principal outcomes were: the number of patients exposed to red cells, and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Fourteen trials of DDAVP (N=1034) reported data on the proportion of patients exposed to allogeneic RBC transfusion. In subjects treated with DDAVP the relative risk of exposure to peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusion was 0.98 (95%CI: 0.88 to 1.10) compared with control. In DDAVP-treated patients the relative risk of requiring re-operation due to bleeding was 0.56 (95%CI: 0.18 to 1.73). There was no statistically significant effect overall for mortality and non-fatal myocardial infarction in DDAVP-treated patients compared with control (RR=1.53: 95%CI: 0.58 to 4.05) and (RR=1.52: 95%CI: 0.67 to 3.49) respectively. There is no convincing evidence that desmopressin minimises perioperative allogeneic RBC transfusion in patients who do not

  20. The effects of aprotinin on blood product transfusion associated with thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seigne, P W

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of aprotinin on blood product use and postoperative complications in patients undergoing thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: A university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen patients who underwent elective or urgent thoracic aortic surgery. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The total number of units of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets was significantly less in the group that received aprotinin (p = 0.01, 0.04, and 0.01). The intraoperative transfusion of packed red blood cells and platelets, collection and retransfusion of cell saver, and postoperative transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were also significantly less in the aprotinin group (p = 0.01, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.05). No patient in either group sustained renal dysfunction or a myocardial infarction. Two patients who had not received aprotinin suffered from chronic postoperative seizures, and one patient who had received aprotinin sustained a perioperative stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose aprotinin administration significantly decreases blood product transfusion requirements in the setting of thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, and it does not appear to be associated with renal or myocardial dysfunction.

  1. Plasma-depleted platelet concentrates prepared with a new washing solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Shibata, K; Kora, S

    1993-01-01

    In certain clinical situations, complete removal of the plasma proteins from the platelet concentrates (PCs) is necessary by washing prior to transfusion. A simple electrolyte solution with a pH of 6.5 was developed for washing PCs. The platelet-rich plasma collected with acid-citrate-dextrose solution by apheresis in a 0.6-liter polyolefin bag was centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant plasma from pelleted platelet buttons, 200 ml of a washing solution consisting of 90 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl2, 17 mM NaH2PO4, 8 mM Na2HPO4, 23 mM Na acetate, 17 mM Na3 citrate, 23.5 mM glucose, 2 mM adenine, 0.1% dextran, and 28.8 mM maltose (pH 6.5) was added to the pelleted platelet button. Steam sterilization of the solution was carried out under nitrogen to avoid caramelization of glucose. After resuspension of the pelleted platelet button with a washing solution and a second centrifugation, Seto additive solution (Seto sol, pH 7.4) was introduced into the bag to resuspend the platelet buttons for storage for 3 days at 22 degrees C. All of these procedures were completed within 3 h using a sterile docking device. In washed PCs, 99.1% of the plasma was removed and platelet recovery was 96%. The washed PCs were compared for 3 days with plasma-poor PCs consisting of 11% plasma and 89% Seto solution. There were no significant differences in percent hypotonic shock response, aggregation, energy metabolism, and morphology of platelets between the two groups during 3 days, except for significant swelling of 3-day-old platelets in washed PCs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The Impact of Preoperative Variables on Intraoperative Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements During Orthotopic Liver Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbal, Mohammad Hossein; Samadi, Kazem; Khosravi, Mohammad Bagher; Sahmeddini, Mohammad Ali; Ghaffaripoor, Sina; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Shokrizadeh, Sakineh

    2017-10-12

    Liver transplant traditionally and potentially is associated with the risk of massive blood loss and transfusion, which can adversely affect transplant outcomes. Many variables influence the amount of bleeding, and these can be categorized as patient related, surgery related, and graft related. We aimed to assess the effects of these variables on the amount of bleeding and transfusion during liver transplant; predicting the risk of massive blood loss can help transplant teams to select and manage patients more effectively. We retrospectively studied 754 patients who underwent liver transplant from 2013 to 2016 and analyzed more than 20 variables that could influence the volume of blood loss and packed cell transfusion. We found that at least 4 variables are strongly and independently correlated with blood loss volume: age, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, warm ischemia time, and total bilirubin. Furthermore, intraoperative blood loss had a weak but clinically important correlation with the underlying disease (ie, the cause of liver cirrhosis). Some variables, including international normalized ratio, platelet count, albumin, serum urea nitrogen, creatinine level, sodium level, and the amount of ascites, could be considered as 'dependent' and weak predictors of massive blood loss. Sex of patient, cold ischemia time, surgery technique, and history of previous abdominal surgery were not correlated with the amount of bleeding. With the use of the variables identified, we can properly select patients and surgical teams and promptly use modalities for decreasing and managing blood loss.

  3. Clinicians' satisfaction with a hospital blood transfusion service: a marketing analysis of a monopoly supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, S J; McClelland, D B; Murphy, W G

    1993-12-01

    One of the objectives of the NHS reforms is to improve customer focus within the health service. In a study to assess the quality of customer service provided by the Edinburgh and South East Scotland Blood Transfusion Service a 19 item questionnaire survey of the main clinical users of the service was performed to ascertain their satisfaction, measured on a 5 point anchored scale, with important aspects of the service, including medical consultation, diagnostic services, blood and blood components or products and their delivery, and general satisfaction with the service. Of 122 clinicians in medical and surgical disciplines in five hospitals in Edinburgh, 72 (59%) replied. Fourteen (22%) indicated dissatisfaction with any aspect of the medical consultation service, owing to inadequate follow up of clinical contacts and unsatisfactory routing of incoming calls. Diagnostic services were criticised for the presentation, communication, and interpretation of results. The restricted availability of whole blood, the necessity to order platelets and plasma through the duty blood transfusion service doctor, and the use of a group and screen policy, attracted criticism from a small number of clinicians. Ten of 68 respondents expressed dissatisfaction with delivery of blood and components to the wards and theatres. The findings indicate that the clinicians served by this blood transfusion service are largely satisfied with the service. Changes are being implemented to improve reporting of laboratory results and measures taken to improve liaison with clinicians.

  4. Blood transfusion : Transfusion-related acute lung injury: back to basics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening disease affecting the lungs. TRALI can develop within 6 hours after transfusion and almost all patients with TRALI require mechanical ventilation at the intensive care department. Nevertheless up to 40% of patients do not recover

  5. Comparison of platelet counting technologies in equine platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Caitlin M; Werre, Stephen R; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2015-04-01

    (1) To compare the performance of 4 platelet counting technologies in equine platelet concentrates and (2) to evaluate the ability of the Magellan platelet rich plasma (PRP) system to concentrate equine platelets. Experimental study to assess method agreement. Adult mixed breed horses (n = 32). Acid citrate dextrose-A anti-coagulated whole blood was collected and PRP produced using the Magellan system according to the manufacturer's instructions. Platelets were quantified using 4 counting methods: optical scatter (Advia 2120), impedance (CellDyn 3700), hand counting, and fluorescent antibody flow cytometry. Platelet concentrations were compared using Passing and Bablok regression analyses and mixed model ANOVA. Significance was set at P CellDyn 3700. Systematic and proportional biases were observed between these 2 automated methods when analyzed by regression analysis of the larger sample size. No bias (systematic or proportional) was observed among any of the other counting methods. Despite the bias detected between the 2 automated systems, there were no significant differences on average among the 4 counting methods evaluated, based on the ANOVA. The Magellan system consistently generated high platelet concentrations as well as higher than expected WBC concentrations. The Magellan system delivered desirably high platelet concentrations; however, WBC concentrations may be unacceptably high for some orthopedic applications. All 4 platelet counting methods tested were equivalent on average and therefore suitable for quantifying platelets in equine PRP used for clinical applications. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Transfusion treatment impact in the improvement of haematological parameters in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliriane Bunjaku

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transfusion treatment (TT is necessary in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB for lost blood substitution. This study was aimed at assessing the changes in haematological parameters  (hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, white cell count, platelet count and prothrombin time before and after TT in anaemic patients with GIB in order to analyse the effect of this treatment.Methods: There have been included 293 patients with GIB (the average age was 57.3, ranged from 18-89 years who were treated with TT at the Internal Clinic at the University Clinical Center Prishtina during oneyear period. Data for applied blood product and results of the coagulation screen (PT were collected from the Kosovo’s Blood Transfusion Center (KBTC.Results: TT has been carried out in 404 episodes, with 714 units of concentrated red blood cells (78.6%, 189 units of fresh frozen plasma (20.8% and concentrated platelets (0.6%, with an average dose 3.1 fortransfunded patients. Average values of Hb before and after TT were 71.8 g/L and 81.4 g/L, respectively; while the average values of hematocrite before and after TT were 22.9% and 25.6%, respectively. The averageerythrocytes count before TT was 2.6 respectively after treatment 2.8(pConclusions: Having in mind difficult clinical and unsustainable situation in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, the Transfusion Treatment resulted in the considerable improvement of the specific blood indicators.

  7. Transfusion treatment impact in the improvement of haematological parameters in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliriane Bunjaku

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transfusion treatment (TT is necessary in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB for lost blood substitution. This study was aimed at assessing the changes in haematological parameters  (hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, white cell count, platelet count and prothrombin time before and after TT in anaemic patients with GIB in order to analyse the effect of this treatment.Methods: There have been included 293 patients with GIB (the average age was 57.3, ranged from 18-89 years who were treated with TT at the Internal Clinic at the University Clinical Center Prishtina during oneyear period. Data for applied blood product and results of the coagulation screen (PT were collected from the Kosovo’s Blood Transfusion Center (KBTC.Results: TT has been carried out in 404 episodes, with 714 units of concentrated red blood cells (78.6%, 189 units of fresh frozen plasma (20.8% and concentrated platelets (0.6%, with an average dose 3.1 fortransfunded patients. Average values of Hb before and after TT were 71.8 g/L and 81.4 g/L, respectively; while the average values of hematocrite before and after TT were 22.9% and 25.6%, respectively. The averageerythrocytes count before TT was 2.6 respectively after treatment 2.8(p<0.0001. The PT was carried out in the 43% of patients with GIB before treatment with FFP, but after that only in 2% of cases.Conclusions: Having in mind difficult clinical and unsustainable situation in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, the Transfusion Treatment resulted in the considerable improvement of the specific blood indicators.

  8. Platelet apoptosis by cld-induced glycoportein Ibα clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wal, Dianne E; Du, V X; Lo, KS

    2010-01-01

    take part in apoptosis regulation. Objectives and methods: We investigated whether GPIbα-clustering induces platelet apoptosis through 14-3-3 proteins during cold (4 h 0 °C)-rewarming (1 h 37 °C). Results: During cold-rewarming, 14-3-3 proteins associate with GPIbα and dissociate from Bad inducing Bad......-dephosphorylation and activation. This initiates pro-apoptosis changes in Bax/Bcl-xL and Bax-translocation to the mitochondria, inducing cytochrome c release. The result is activation of caspase-9, which triggers phosphatidylserine exposure and platelet phagocytosis by macrophages. Responses are prevented by N......-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GN), which blocks GPIbα-clustering, and by O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, which removes extracellular GPIbα. Conclusions: Cold-rewarming triggers apoptosis through a GN-sensitive GPIbα-change indicative of receptor clustering. Attempts to improve platelet transfusion by cold-storage should focus...

  9. Storage of platelets: effects associated with high platelet content in platelet storage containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksson, Hans; Sandgren, Per; Sjödin, Agneta; Hultenby, Kjell

    2012-04-01

    A major problem associated with platelet storage containers is that some platelet units show a dramatic fall in pH, especially above certain platelet contents. The aim of this study was a detailed investigation of the different in vitro effects occurring when the maximum storage capacity of a platelet container is exceeded as compared to normal storage. Buffy coats were combined in large-volume containers to create primary pools to be split into two equal aliquots for the preparation of platelets (450-520×10(9) platelets/unit) in SSP+ for 7-day storage in two containers (test and reference) with different platelet storage capacity (n=8). Exceeding the maximum storage capacity of the test platelet storage container resulted in immediate negative effects on platelet metabolism and energy supply, but also delayed effects on platelet function, activation and disintegration. Our study gives a very clear indication of the effects in different phases associated with exceeding the maximum storage capacity of platelet containers but throw little additional light on the mechanism initiating those negative effects. The problem appears to be complex and further studies in different media using different storage containers will be needed to understand the mechanisms involved.

  10. Quality indicators for Transfusion Medicine in Spain: a survey among hospital transfusion services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romon, Iñigo; Lozano, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Background Transfusion services in the European Union must implement quality management systems to improve quality. Quality indicators (QI) play a key role in quality management because they can supply important information about the performance of the transfusion service, which can then be used for benchmarking. However, little is known about the actual use of QI in hospitals. We tried to ascertain the use and characteristics of QI in Spanish hospital transfusion services. Materials and methods We performed a survey among transfusion services in order to learn which QI they use. We classified indicators into categories and concepts, according to the steps of the transfusion process or the activities the indicators referred to. Results Seventy-six hospitals (17.9% of the hospitals actively transfusing in the country) reported 731 QI. Twenty-two of them (29%) were tertiary level hospitals. The number of indicators per hospital and by activity varied greatly. QI were assigned to some basic categories: transfusion process (23% of indicators), transfusion activity and stock management (22%), haemovigilance (20%), stem cell transplantation (9%), transfusion laboratory (9%), quality management system (8%), blood donation (3.4%), apheresis and therapeutic activities (2.5%) and immunohaematology of pregnancy (2%). Discussion Although most hospitals use QI in their quality management system and share a core group of indicators, we found a great dispersion in the number and characteristics of the indicators used. The use of a commonly agreed set of QI could be an aid to benchmarking among hospitals and to improving the transfusion process. PMID:27483486

  11. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ramos de Oliveira Trugilho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet

  12. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugilho, Monique Ramos de Oliveira; Hottz, Eugenio Damaceno; Brunoro, Giselle Villa Flor; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Salazar, Gustavo Adolfo; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patrícia T; Perales, Jonas

    2017-05-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P) translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet proteome in dengue

  13. Blood utilization: fostering an effective hospital transfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Carolyn Hyatt; Macivor, Duncan C

    2012-03-01

    An effective hospital transfusion culture should encourage clinicians to consider the possibility of transfusion in their patients well before the need actually arises, and to plan ahead in an attempt to use blood products most efficiently. Strategies for improved blood utilization include timely and adequate preoperative assessment of risk, optimization of baseline hemoglobin, anticipation of potential transfusion problems, intraoperative techniques to minimize blood loss, blood conservation technologies, transfusion guidelines and targeted therapy, point of care testing, and massive transfusion protocols. Attention to these elements promotes a safe and cost-effective transfusion culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  15. Hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär I Johansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists although recently, the concept of hemostatic resuscitation, i.e., providing large amount of blood products to critically injured patients in an immediate and sustained manner as part of an early massive transfusion protocol has been introduced. The aim of the present review was to investigate the potential effect on survival of proactive administration of plasma and/or platelets (PLT in trauma patients with massive bleeding. Materials and Methods: English databases were searched for reports of trauma patients receiving massive transfusion (10 or more red blood cell (RBC within 24 hours or less from admission that tested the effects of administration of plasma and/or PLT in relation to RBC concentrates on survival from January 2005 to November 2010. Comparison between highest vs lowest blood product ratios and 30-day mortality was performed. Results: Sixteen studies encompassing 3,663 patients receiving high vs low ratios were included. This meta-analysis of the pooled results revealed a substantial statistical heterogeneity (I 2 = 58% and that the highest ratio of plasma and/or PLT or to RBC was associated with a significantly decreased mortality (OR: 0.49; 95% confidence interval: 0.43-0.57; P<0.0001 when compared with lowest ratio. Conclusion: Meta-analysis of 16 retrospective studies concerning massively transfused trauma patients confirms a significantly lower mortality in patients treated with the highest fresh frozen plasma (FFP and/or PLT ratio when compared with the lowest FFP and/or PLT ratio. However, optimal ranges of FFP: RBC and PLT : RBC should be established in randomized controlled trials.

  16. MOBILE MULTIMEDIA TERMINAL IN TRANSFUSION PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Meža

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the administrative errors in the transfusion chain between the blood donor and the patient, transfusion errors still occur. Usually, they are caused by the misidentifications of the patient, his blood samples and respective blood components. A reliable identification can only be reached by an appropriate informatization of the whole process by implementation of information networks and communication technologies.Methods. An information system covering all modern standards of safety and enabling integrity of patient records as well as faster and efficient transfusion was prepared. The system is enabling the rational use of the blood as well as assuring the obligatory haemoviligilance, as foreseen by the current law. The whole system is modular, consisting of terminals, supportive equipment, networking systems and servers. Additional hardware are the electronic code bar readers. Mobile terminals (Palm Pocket PCs are wirelessly connected to the data network using the IEEE 802.11b WLAN technology in a wireless connection. All elements are included into the communication network with the servers contain data bases of blood donors, blood components and the patients; they execute the algorithms of the blood transfusion process support and enable the authentication. At the same time they enable the corresponding interfaces adapted to the users and terminals. For the connection of elements, corresponding interfaces are used.Results. The application is supporting the whole system of ordering, issuing and transfusion of a blood component. Its main characteristics are the bar-coded wristband for patient identification, coding of the blood samples with the same bar code that is unmistakably connected with the patient, and electronic ordering of blood component via a handheld device at the patient’s side. By means of which identity of the patient and the blood component can be matched right before the intended transfusion. Similarly, the

  17. Absence of Transfusion-Associated Microchimerism in Pediatric and Adult Recipients of Leukoreduced and Gamma Irradiated Blood Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rosa; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Wen, Li; Montalvo, Leilani; Schechterly, Cathy; Colvin, Camilla; Alter, Harvey J.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-associated microchimerism (TA-MC), the persistence of significant levels of donor leukocytes in blood recipients for prolonged periods, has been demonstrated following non-leukoreduced and leukoreduced transfusion to patients with severe traumatic injury. Development of TA-MC has not been rigorously studied in settings that do not involve massive trauma where the blood is leukoreduced and irradiated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A cohort of 409 prospectively followed medical and surgical adult and pediatric female recipients of leukoreduced and mostly irradiated allogeneic red blood cell and platelet transfusions were evaluated to determine development of TA-MC. Four and eight-week post-transfusion samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Y-chromosome sequences in leukocyte DNA, the marker for microchimeric cells in female blood recipients. Repeat testing was performed on Y-chromosome positive samples to confirm microchimerism (MC), and subsequent post-transfusion samples were tested to investigate persistence of MC. RESULTS On initial testing, forty of 207 (19%) adult and forty-four of 202 (22%) pediatric female blood recipients demonstrated low level MC. On repeat testing of these and additional specimens, twelve (3%) recipients demonstrated low level transient MC, but none had persistent TA-MC similar to that seen in transfused trauma patients. CONCLUSION Persistence of MC was not demonstrated in adult and pediatric recipients of leukoreduced and mostly irradiated blood components. The risk of TA-MC appears to be dependent on the clinical setting and is rare other than in patients sustaining severe traumatic injury. PMID:21981710

  18. Early increase in DcR2 expression and late activation of caspases in the platelet storage lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenchette, S; Moutet, M; Benguella, M; N'Gondara, J P; Guigner, F; Coffe, C; Corcos, L; Bettaieb, A; Solary, E

    2001-10-01

    Platelet transfusion is widely used to prevent bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. The maximal storage duration of platelet concentrates is usually 5 days, due to the platelet storage lesion that impairs their functions when stored for longer times. Some of the morphological and biochemical changes that characterize this storage lesion are reminiscent of cell death by apoptosis. The present study analyzed whether proteins involved in nucleated cell apoptosis could play a role in the platelet storage lesion. Storage of leukocyte-depleted platelets obtained by apheresis is associated with a late and limited activation of caspases, mainly caspase-3. This event correlates with an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim in the particulate fraction and a slight and late release of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein Diablo/Smac in the cytosol. Platelets do not express the death receptors Fas, DR4 and DR5 on their plasma membrane, while the expression of the decoy receptor DcR2 increases progressively during platelet storage. Addition of low concentrations of the cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide accelerates platelet caspase activation during storage, an effect that is partially prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Altogether, DcR2 expression on the plasma membrane is an early event while caspase activation is a late event during platelet storage. These observations suggest that caspases are unlikely to account for the platelet storage lesion. As a consequence, addition of caspase inhibitors may not improve the quality of platelet concentrates stored in standard conditions.

  19. Transfusion and blood donation on the screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danic, Bruno; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2008-05-01

    In the 20th century, blood transfusion has become an indispensable therapy in carrying out and improving many medical and surgical applications. Its scope of influence goes well beyond that of medicine, because blood donation, an action with high social significance, is completely connected to progress in the field. The purpose of this research was to study, through films that show transfusion or blood donation, the impression that has been given to the public in the course of the 20th century and its sociologic impact. To accomplish this, we have used various sources from Histories of Cinema and from the Internet to identify films from different countries and from different epochs that touch on this theme. With these two components, the act of donation and the act of transfusion, the relatively short history of blood transfusion is distinguished by upheavals in both the medical and the sociopolitical fields of the past century. Movies, the most commonly shared cultural event and mirror of society, have simultaneously gone through their first century by showing the diversity of our feelings and the human condition. Through various cinematographic references, the authors offer an analysis of the use, by the Seventh Art, of values and illustrations that use blood donation and transfusion.

  20. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. © 2012 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  1. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A successful experience of the Iranian blood transfusion organization in improving accessibility and affordability of plasma derived medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegini, Azita; Torab, Seyed Ardeshir; Pourfatollah, Ali Akbar

    2017-02-01

    Plasma is the liquid part of blood. It is estimated 21.6 million liters of plasma collect from Whole blood annually. From these plasma, 4.2 million liters transfuse, 8.1 million liters fractionate, 9.3 million liters waste. Nowadays, blood products and PDM (plasma derived medicine) consider as essential medicine in modern health care and transfusion medicine. Iranian blood transfusion organization as a non-profit organization was established in 1974 in order to centralize all blood transfusion activities from donor recruitment to distribution of blood components to hospitals. Iran is the only country in EMR region with the rate of 20-29.9 blood donations per 1000 population and reached 100% voluntary non-remunerated blood donation in 2007. RBCs and platelets demand are much more than FFPs so the IBTO was faced the surplus plasma that could cause surplus plasma wastage. Simultaneously, hospitals need more plasma derived medicine especially albumin, IVIG, factor VIII, factor IX. IBTO was faced the challenges such as Fractionators selection, Plasma volume shipment, Contract duration, Product profile, Multiple External audits, Cold chain maintenance, Transporting plasma across international borders, NAT test. To overcome plasma wastage and storage of PDM. IBTO involved toll manufacturing in 2005 and not only prevents plasma wastage but also save MOH (ministry of health) budget. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Platelet immunology in fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2014-10-01

    Up to date, perception of platelets has changed from key players in coagulation to multitaskers within the immune network, connecting its most diverse elements and crucially shaping their interplay with invading pathogens such as fungi. In addition, antimicrobial effector molecules and mechanisms in platelets enable a direct inhibitory effect on fungi, thus completing their immune capacity. To precisely assess the impact of platelets on the course of invasive fungal infections is complicated by some critical parameters. First, there is a fragile balance between protective antimicrobial effects and detrimental reactions that aggravate the fungal pathogenesis. Second, some platelet effects are exerted indirectly by other immune mediators and are thus difficult to quantify. Third, drugs such as antimycotics, antibiotics, or cytostatics, are commonly administered to the patients and might modulate the interplay between platelets and fungi. Our article highlights selected aspects of the complex interactions between platelets and fungi and the relevance of these processes for the pathogenesis of fungal infections.

  4. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818208; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion

  5. Creation, implementation, and maturation of a massive transfusion protocol for the exsanguinating trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Timothy C; Young, Pampee P; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A

    2010-06-01

    The majority of trauma patients (>90%) do not require any blood product transfusion and their mortality is transfusion (MT), defined as >10 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) in 24 hours. In addition, more than 25% of these patients will arrive to emergency departments with evidence of trauma-associated coagulopathy. With this combination of massive blood loss and coagulopathy, it has become increasingly more common to transfuse early the trauma patients and with a combination of PRBC, plasma, and platelets. Given the inherent uncertainties common early in the care of patients with severe injuries, the efficient administration of massive amounts of PRBC and clotting factors tends to work best in a predefined, protocol driven system. Our purpose here is to (1) define the problem of massive hemorrhage and coagulopathy in the trauma patient, (2) identify which group of patients this type of protocol should be applied, (3) describe the extensive coordination required to implement this multispecialty MT protocol, (4) explain in detail how the MT was developed and implemented, and (5) emphasize the need for a robust performance improvement or quality improvement process to monitor the implementation of such a protocol and to help identify problems and deliver feedback in a "real-time" fashion. The successful implementation of such a complex process can only be accomplished in a multispecialty setting. Input and representation from departments of Trauma, Critical Care, Anesthesiology, Transfusion Medicine, and Emergency Medicine are necessary to successfully formulate (and implement) such a protocol. Once a protocol has been agreed upon, education of the entire nursing and physician staff is equally essential to the success of this effort. Once implemented, this process may lead to improved clinical outcomes and decreased overall blood utilization with extremely small wastage of vital blood products.

  6. [From donor to recipient: transfusion chain specificities in the French ultra-marine areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, P; Ould Amar, K

    2013-05-01

    Besides specific organisational requirements, the transfusional chain in French ultra-marine areas has specificities related to the epidemiology of infectious diseases and to population characteristics. We focus on some of these sociodemographic and medical peculiarities: the challenge of autosufficiency in relation to demographic trends; epidemiologic risks associated to emergent viruses such as dengue and Chikungunya, and the strategies that had been implemented to face last outbreaks; inappropriate selection criteria for eligibility to blood donation (biologic characteristics of Afro-Caribbeans not taken into account for the low hemoglobin deferral threshold; absence of guidelines for the screening of hemoglobinopathies AS/AC, present in 8% of the target population); specific indications for transfusion, such as platelet use in dengue fever or RBC transfusion in sickle cell disease. Due to the high polymorphism of erythrocyte antigens in Afro-Caribbeans, intra-ethnic transfusion facilitates compatibility for common antigens, but is responsible for the emergence of allo-antibodies difficult to identify in the absence of specific antisera or panels; molecular typing of erythrocyte antigens would allow detection of those patients at risk for immunization, expressing variant antigens or lacking high frequency antigens, as well as the characterization of RBC expressing immunogenic so called low frequency antigens. In an era of periodic emergence of new viruses in Europe (dengue, Chikungunya, West Nile virus...) and with the spreading of diseases with high transfusional requirements, such as sickle cell disease, ultra-marine services represent laboratories for the study of future trends and problems in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Factor XIII-guided treatment algorithm reduces blood transfusion in burn surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, João Miguel Gonçalves Valadares de Morais; Alves, Joana; Conde, Patrícia; Xambre, Fátima; Almeida, Emanuel; Marques, Céline; Luís, Mariana; Godinho, Ana Maria Mano Garção; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2018-01-20

    Major burn surgery causes large hemorrhage and coagulation dysfunction. Treatment algorithms guided by ROTEM ® and factor VIIa reduce the need for blood products, but there is no evidence regarding factor XIII. Factor XIII deficiency changes clot stability and decreases wound healing. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of factor XIII correction and its repercussion on transfusion requirements in burn surgery. Randomized retrospective study with 40 patients undergoing surgery at the Burn Unit, allocated into Group A those with factor XIII assessment (n = 20), and Group B, those without assessment (n = 20). Erythrocyte transfusion was guided by a hemoglobin trigger of 10g.dL -1 and the other blood products by routine coagulation and ROTEM ® tests. Analysis of blood product consumption included units of erythrocytes, fresh frozen plasma, platelets, and fibrinogen. The coagulation biomarker analysis compared the pre- and post-operative values. Group A (with factor XIII study) and Group B had identical total body surface area burned. All patients in Group A had a preoperative factor XIII deficiency, whose correction significantly reduced units of erythrocyte concentrate transfusion (1.95 vs. 4.05, p = 0.001). Pre- and post-operative coagulation biomarkers were similar between groups, revealing that routine coagulation tests did not identify factor XIII deficiency. There were no recorded thromboembolic events. Correction of factor XIII deficiency in burn surgery proved to be safe and effective for reducing perioperative transfusion of erythrocyte units. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced Transfusion During OLT by POC Coagulation Management and TEG Functional Fibrinogen: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pietri, Lesley; Ragusa, Francesca; Deleuterio, Annalisa; Begliomini, Bruno; Serra, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation are at high risk of bleeding complications. Several Authors have shown that thromboelastography (TEG)-based coagulation management and the administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduce the need for blood transfusion. We conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort observational study (Modena Polyclinic, Italy) on 386 consecutive patients undergoing liver transplantation. We assessed the impact on resource consumption and patient survival after the introduction of a new TEG-based transfusion algorithm, requiring also the introduction of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test and a maximum amplitude of functional fibrinogen thromboelastography transfusion cutoff (7 mm) to direct in administering fibrinogen (2012-2014, n = 118) compared with a purely TEG-based algorithm previously used (2005-2011, n = 268). After 2012, there was a significant decrease in the use of homologous blood (1502 ± 1376 vs 794 ± 717 mL, P < 0.001), fresh frozen plasma (537 ± 798 vs 98 ± 375 mL, P < 0.001), and platelets (158 ± 280 vs 75 ± 148 mL, P < 0.005), whereas the use of fibrinogen increased (0.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.4 ± 1.8 g, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30-day and 6-month survival between the 2 groups. The implementation of a new coagulation management method featuring the addition of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test to the TEG test according to an algorithm which provides for the administration of fibrinogen has helped in reducing the need for transfusion in patients undergoing liver transplantation with no impact on their survival.

  9. Creation, Implementation, and Maturation of a Massive Transfusion Protocol for the Exsanguinating Trauma Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Timothy C.; Young, Pampee P.; Holcomb, John B.; Cotton, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of trauma patients (>90%) do not require any blood product transfusion and their mortality is trauma patients will receive a massive transfusion (MT), defined as >10 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) in 24 hours. In addition, more than 25% of these patients will arrive to emergency departments with evidence of trauma-associated coagulopathy. With this combination of massive blood loss and coagulopathy, it has become increasingly more common to transfuse early the trauma patients and with a combination of PRBC, plasma, and platelets. Given the inherent uncertainties common early in the care of patients with severe injuries, the efficient administration of massive amounts of PRBC and clotting factors tends to work best in a predefined, protocol driven system. Our purpose here is to (1) define the problem of massive hemorrhage and coagulopathy in the trauma patient, (2) identify which group of patients this type of protocol should be applied, (3) describe the extensive coordination required to implement this multispecialty MT protocol, (4) explain in detail how the MT was developed and implemented, and (5) emphasize the need for a robust performance improvement or quality improvement process to monitor the implementation of such a protocol and to help identify problems and deliver feedback in a “real-time” fashion. The successful implementation of such a complex process can only be accomplished in a multispecialty setting. Input and representation from departments of Trauma, Critical Care, Anesthesiology, Transfusion Medicine, and Emergency Medicine are necessary to successfully formulate (and implement) such a protocol. Once a protocol has been agreed upon, education of the entire nursing and physician staff is equally essential to the success of this effort. Once implemented, this process may lead to improved clinical outcomes and decreased overall blood utilization with extremely small wastage of vital blood products. PMID:20539192

  10. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Sarah B; Stansbury, Lynn G; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-10-01

    In 2008, we reviewed the practical interface between transfusion medicine and the surgery and critical care of severely injured patients. Reviewed topics ranged from epidemiology of trauma to patterns of resuscitation to the problems of transfusion reactions. In the interim, trauma specialists have adopted damage control resuscitation and become much more knowledgeable and thoughtful about the use of blood products. This new understanding and the resulting changes in clinical practice have raised new concerns. In this update, we focus on which patients need damage control resuscitation, current views on the optimal form of damage control resuscitation with blood products, the roles of newer blood products, and appropriate transfusion triggers in the postinjury setting. We will also review the role of new technology in patient assessment, therapy and monitoring.

  12. Corrigendum to "Flow cytometric quantitation of platelet phagocytosis by monocytes using a pH-sensitive dye, pHrodo-SE" [Journal of Immunological Methods 447 (2017) 57-64].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Fujihara, Mitsuhiro; Miyazaki, Toru; Matsubayashi, Keiji; Sato, Shinichiro; Azuma, Hiroshi; Kato, Toshiaki; Kino, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hisami; Takamoto, Shigeru; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2018-03-01

    Antibody-mediated phagocytosis of platelets using a flow cytometric monocyte-based phagocytosis assay (FMPA) has been shown to predict the outcome of platelet transfusion. The easy adherence between platelets and monocytes even in the absence of an antibody is regarded as one of limitations of the FMPA. To improve the FMPA for prediction of transfusion outcome, we used the pH-sensitive dye pHrodo succinimidyl ester (pHrodo-SE), which has weak fluorescence at neutral pH and has increased fluorescence intensity in low pH conditions such as in lysomes. Platelets stained with pHrodo-SE were sensitized with an HLA class I monoclonal antibody (w6/32 clone) or anti-HLA class I containing antisera. The platelets were incubated with monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells. Phagocytic activity was assessed by the percentage of monocytes that phagocytosed platelets. Sensitization of platelets with w6/32 significantly increased platelet phagocytosis by monocytes in dose- and time-dependent manners. Anti-HLA class I antibody-containing sera caused platelet phagocytosis in a cognate antigen-antibody-dependent manner. There was a significant correlation (r=0.69, p<0.01) between phagocytic index and titer of HLA class I antibody measured by lymphocyte immunofluorescence test-flow cytometry. In addition, the phagocytic index obtained by FMPA with pHrodo-SE was significantly higher than that obtained by FMPA with the previously used dye, carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, when platelets were sensitized by w6/32 and anti-HLA class I antibody-containing sera. Because of the higher resolution and higher sensitivity than those of the previous method, the pHrodo-SE-based FMPA may be suitable for more precise quantitation of phagocytosis activity, which would enable qualitative evaluation of transfusion effectiveness. Copyright © 2018.

  13. Intrauterine Transfusion in Maternal Rh Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral Antonio Carlos Vieira; Taveira Marcos Roberto; Lopes Ana Paula Brum Miranda; Pereira Alamanda Kfoury; Leite Henrique Vitor

    2001-01-01

    Objetivos: avaliar os resultados do tratamento intra-útero de fetos anêmicos devido a isoimunização materna pelo fator Rh. Pacientes e Métodos: foram acompanhados 61 fetos submetidos a transfusão intra-uterina seja por via intraperitoneal, intravascular ou combinada. Os casos de fetos hidrópicos corresponderam a 19,7% do total, sendo que nestes a via de tratamento sempre foi a intravascular. Foram realizadas em média 2,7 transfusões por feto, com um total de 163 procedimentos. A indicação par...

  14. Quality Control Approach to Anticoagulants and Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Erin

    2016-06-01

    Quality can be defined by processes of care and by the characteristics of the care and its outcomes. In terms of blood loss and transfusion, otolaryngologists should be aware of available guidelines, standards for use of blood products, devices and hemostatic agents, outcomes metrics relevant to patients, and tools for implementing quality improvements. This article reviews the definition of health care quality, and discusses the data regarding anticoagulant medications (particularly new oral anticoagulants) and guidelines for blood product transfusion. A brief outline of quality tools is provided to help otolaryngologists create quality plans for themselves and their institutions/systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of blood transfusion with increased mortality in myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Wetterslev, Jørn; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists.......The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists....

  16. Orthobiologics and platelet rich plasma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Behera, Prateek; Patel, Sandeep; Shetty, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    ... in many chronic musculoskeletal ailments. Investigators have published results of laboratory as well as clinical studies, using orthobiologics like platelet rich plasma, stem cells, autologous conditioned serum etc...

  17. Novel aspects of platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka-Moya Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation is an important process, which is critical for the hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. Recent studies have shown that the platelet aggregation is more complex and dynamic than it was previously thought. There are several mechanisms that can initiate the platelet aggregation and each of them operates under specific conditions in vivo. At the same time, the influence of certain plasma proteins on this process should be considered. This review intends to summarize the recent data concerning the adhesive molecules and their receptors, which provide the platelet aggregation under different conditions.

  18. Isolation of Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aatonen, Maria; Valkonen, Sami; Böing, Anita; Yuana, Yuana; Nieuwland, Rienk; Siljander, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Platelets participate in several physiological functions, including hemostasis, immunity, and development. Additionally, platelets play key roles in arterial thrombosis and cancer progression. Given this plethora of functions, there is a strong interest of the role of platelet-derived

  19. Intraoperative platelet and plasma improves survival in patients operated for a rAAA: a follow-up evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Swiatek, F.; Jorgensen, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Continued haemorrhage remains a significant contributor to mortality in massively transfused patients. We found that early administration of platelets and plasma reduced mortality from 54% to 36% in rAAA patients. The aim of the present evaluation was to evaluate whether reduced...... mortality in rAAA patients related to a pro-active transfusion therapy is maintained. DESIGN: Single-centre observational study. METHODS: Mortality of patients operated for rAAA 2006-07 was compared to that of patients operated 2004-05 (intervention group; n=50) and 2002-04 (control group, n=82). RESULTS......: 64 consecutive patients with rAAA received, similar to the intervention group, more platelets (5 and 4 vs. 0 units, P

  20. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion. PMID:28127478

  1. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen concentration of whole blood influences the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma obtained from centrifugation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Zhengliang; Sheng, Jiagen; Xie, Xuetao; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-09-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which reflects the sedimentation rate of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes in response to centrifugal force, may influence the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) obtained via centrifugation methods. However, no relevant studies have substantiated this. In the present study, blood was collected from 40 healthy volunteers and used to prepare PRP with two plasma-based preparation systems [YinPRP and Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF) systems] and two buffy coat-based systems (RegenPRP and WEGOPRP systems) in a single-donor model. Volumes of PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) that were removed in the preparation process were recorded. Analyses of ESR, haematocrit, C-reaction protein, coagulation, serum glucose and serum lipid of the whole blood used for PRP preparation were performed to evaluate the levels of ESR and the factors known to influence it. Whole blood analysis was performed to evaluate the cellular composition of PRP. Results demonstrated that there were marked positive correlations between the ESR of the whole blood used for PRP preparation and PPP removal efficiencies, platelet concentrations, platelet capture efficiencies and platelet enrichment factors of PRP formulations obtained from plasma-based systems, and PRP yield efficiency of RegenPRP and PPP removal efficiency of WEGOPRP. Furthermore, there were marked negative correlations between ESR and concentrations and enrichment factors of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes of RegenPRP. Fibrinogen concentration of the whole blood, which had a marked positive correlation with ESR, also influenced the cellular composition of PRP. These findings may increase the understanding of PRP preparation and provide substantial evidence for the individualised optimisation of PRP preparation systems used in clinical practice.

  2. Anemia of prematurity : time for a change in transfusion management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodabux, Chantal Muriel

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated clinical effects of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in premature infants, different transfusion volumes in relation to neonatal outcome in premature infants and the use of autologous cord blood (CB) as an alternative for allogeneic transfusions. Despite

  3. Perioperative transfusion threshold and ambulation after hip revision surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kamilla; Johansson, Pär I; Dahl, Benny

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion with red blood cells (RBC) may be needed during hip revision surgery but the appropriate haemoglobin concentration (Hb) threshold for transfusion has not been well established. We hypothesized that a higher transfusion threshold would improve ambulation after hip revision ...

  4. Liberal transfusion strategies still the trend in burn surgery | Allorto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Blood is a limited resource in middle-income countries such as South Africa. Transfusion is associated with complications and expense. We aimed to understand our transfusion practices in burn surgery as well as ascertain the opinion of a broader group of surgeons and anaesthetists regarding transfusion ...

  5. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a change of perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was considered a rare complication of transfusion medicine. Nowadays, TRALI has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality, presumably as a consequence of reaching international agreement on defining TRALI with

  6. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  7. Review of autologous blood transfusion at the Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autologous blood transfusion refers to transfusion of blood and/or blood components that are donated by the intended recipient (1). It is considered as one of the safest methods of blood transfusion (1,2). Different types of autologous blood include: preoperative blood deposit, preoperative haemodilution,intraope.

  8. Blood Transfusion In Surgical Children: The Advantages And Hazards

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing opposition to blood transfusion makes the management of surgical children who require blood very challenging. This retrospective study reviews records of blood transfusion so as to determine the advantages and hazards in surgical children. The advantages and hazards of blood transfusion in surgical ...

  9. Survey of blood transfusion needs in a tertiary Nigerian institute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Inappropriate blood transfusion has been reported from all over the world. Objectives: This survey examined the use of blood and blood products in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital with a view of assessing appropriateness of transfusion, so as to suggest ways of minimizing inappropriate transfusion if they occur ...

  10. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Immunofluorescence as Indicators of Platelet Compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-23

    2.5 ml of 1.2% EDTA in 0.9% NaCl. The platelet- rich plasm (PRP) was isolated by centrifugation at 280 X g for 5 mimmter. The PRP from all the blood...samples was pooled, and the platelets were concentrated by cpntrifugation at 1000 X g for 10 minutes. The platelet- poor plasma (PPP) was removed and the...to -6.4% 2 shrinking 18. TABLE 2 .60A PLATLET _RLUME OF A+ OR 0+ DONOR PLATELETS TREATED WITH EITHER &U,&06OS S O SRUMNFRN AN AOIMMUNIZED TR

  11. Effects of cancer on platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Nick; Sturk, Auguste; Middeldorp, Saskia; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-06-01

    The main function of circulating platelets is to stop bleeding upon vascular injury by the formation of a hemostatic plug. The presence of cancer results in numerical and functional abnormalities of platelets. Thrombocytosis is commonly observed in cancer patients and is associated with decreased survival. Conversely, thrombocytopenia has been shown to have antimetastatic effects in experimental models. Tumor cells also can induce changes in the platelet activation status, both in direct and indirect manners. Direct tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation enables the formation of a cloak of aggregated platelets around circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that shields them from attacks by the immune system and facilitates metastasis to distant sites. Cancer also can induce platelet activation in various indirect ways. Tumor cells shed small extracellular vesicles that expose the transmembrane protein tissue factor (TF)--the initiator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. The abundant presence of TF in the circulation of cancer patients can result in local generation of thrombin, the most potent platelet activator. Another pathway of indirect platelet activation is by increased formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in the presence of tumor-secreted granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Last, tumor cells may regulate the selective secretion of angiogenic proteins from platelet granules, which enables the tumor to stimulate and stabilize the immature neovasculature in the tumor environment. Since there is little doubt that the cancer-induced platelet alterations are beneficial to tumor growth and dissemination, it could be worthwhile to intervene in the underlying mechanisms for anticancer purposes. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents that inhibit platelet activation and thrombin generation can potentially slow cancer progression, although the clinical evidence thus far is not unequivocal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Platelet Rich Plasma in Periodontal Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Sathya Priya Eshwar; Dhayanand John Victor; S Sangeetha; PSG Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Keywords: Growth factors, Platelet concentrates, Platelet Rich Plasma, Regenerative medicine, Tissue engineering Introduction The goal of periodontal therapy is to improve periodontal health and thereby...

  13. For assessment of changes in intraoperative red blood cell transfusion practices over time, the pooled incidence of transfusion correlates highly with total units transfused.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-06-01

    Multiple studies nationwide and at single hospitals have examined changes over time in the incidence of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. However, the cost of RBC transfusions is related to the number of RBC units transfused, not to the incidence. We evaluate whether the readily available incidence of RBC transfusion can be used as a valid surrogate measure. Observational retrospective study. One tertiary, academic hospital. 394,789 cases of 1885 procedures over N=42 quarters of the year. None. Incidence and number of RBC units transfused intraoperatively. The number of RBC units transfused per case did not follow a Poisson distribution, confirming that the number of units and incidence of transfusion are not interchangeable for analyzing decisions by case. However, with all cases of each quarter combined, the Spearman correlation was 0.98±0.01 between each quarter's incidence of RBC transfusion and mean RBC units transfused per case (Punits transfused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome: mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Umur, Asli; Ross, Michael G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) represents a pregnancy complication with a high risk for perinatal mortality and postnatal morbidity. Mathematical models have been utilized to examine the mechanisms of disease and potential treatment modalities. We developed four consecutive models based on

  15. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors of ages between 16 and 65 years. Both first time ...

  16. 1. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ABSTRACT. Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors ofages between 16 and 65 years.

  17. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wiyngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Ross, Michael G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication occurring in monochorionic twins, and untreated, causes high rates of mortality and morbidity. In TTTS, five consecutive stages of increasing severity can be distinguished: first, the oligopolyhydramnios sequence; second, anuria in

  18. Massive transfusion protocols: current best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yen-Michael S Hsu,1 Thorsten Haas,2 Melissa M Cushing1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs are established to provide rapid blood replacement in a setting of severe hemorrhage. Early optimal blood transfusion is essential to sustain organ perfusion and oxygenation. There are many variables to consider when establishing an MTP, and studies have prospectively evaluated different scenarios and patient populations to establish the best practices to attain improved patient outcomes. The establishment and utilization of an optimal MTP is challenging given the ever-changing patient status during resuscitation efforts. Much of the MTP literature comes from the trauma population, due to the fact that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma-related death. As we come to further understand the positive and negative clinical impacts of transfusion-related factors, massive transfusion practice can be further refined. This article will first discuss specific MTPs targeting different patient populations and current relevant international guidelines. Then, we will examine a wide selection of therapeutic products to support MTPs, including newly available products and the most suitable of the traditional products. Lastly, we will discuss the best design for an MTP, including ratio-based MTPs and MTPs based on the use of point-of-care coagulation diagnostic tools. Keywords: hemorrhage, MTP, antifibrinolytics, coagulopathy, trauma, ratio, logistics, guidelines, hemostatic

  19. Transfusion in the age of molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Marion E

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based tests are increasingly being used to predict a blood group phenotype to improve transfusion medicine. This is possible because genes encoding 29 of the 30 blood group systems have been cloned and sequenced, and the molecular bases associated with most antigens have been determined. RBCs carrying a particular antigen, if introduced into the circulation of an individual who lacks that antigen (through transfusion or pregnancy), can elicit an immune response. It is the antibody from such an immune response that causes problems in clinical practice and the reason why antigen-negative blood is required for safe transfusion. The classical method of testing for blood group antigens and antibodies is hemagglutination; however, it has certain limitations, some of which can be overcome by testing DNA. Such testing allows conservation of antibodies for confirmation by hemagglutination of predicted antigen-negativity. High-throughput platforms provide a means to test relatively large numbers of donors, thereby opening the door to change the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients and to prevent immunization. This review summarizes how molecular approaches, in conjunction with conventional hemagglutination, can be applied in transfusion medicine.

  20. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is

  1. TRANSFUSION- TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS IN HAEMOPHILIA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhubi, Bukurije; Mekaj, Ymer; Baruti, Zana; Bunjaku, Ilirijane; Belegu, Mazllum

    2009-01-01

    One of the largest therapeutic problem during the continuous treatment of the patients with Hemophilia A and B, are viral infections as Hepatitis B and C, and HIV, and the other infective diseases, which can be transmitted by the transfusion of blood products.

  2. European strategies against the parasite transfusion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Protozoal infections are endemic in mainly tropical low income countries, affecting millions of people. Malaria, American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma cruzi/Chagas disease) and protozoal tickborne diseases (e.g. Babesia) can be efficiently transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood components. In

  3. editorial emerging alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3. Chan K. Blood Supply: FDA Oversight and Remaining Issues of. Safety. Washington DC, US General Accounting Office, 1997. 4. Steward W.P. Considerations in the use of blood transfusions in anaemic cancerpatients. Monograph of the l 5 International Cancer. Congress, Saturday 18 August 1990, Hamburg, Germany.

  4. PROGRESS IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICES IN KENYA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... guidelines as well as development of haemovigilance manual for hospital use. ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE BLOOD. TRANSFUSION SERVICE. (i) Over the years blood donations from voluntary non-remunerated donors has increased from merely 6,000 units per year in 2002 to 130,000 units in 2007.

  5. Residual infectious risks in blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    Blood transfusion in developed countries is extremely safe. However, a residual risk remains of infectious donations slipping through, because of imperfect donor selection and the diagnostic window period. A myriad of regulations and safety measures is in place to guarantee the high level of safety.

  6. Intraoperative transfusion threshold and tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K; Dahl, B; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) may be needed to maintain oxygen delivery during major surgery, but the appropriate haemoglobin (Hb) concentration threshold has not been well established. We hypothesised that a higher level of Hb would be associated with improved subcutaneous...

  7. Predonated autologous blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of homologous blood carries significant risk of viral infections and immune-mediated reactions. Preoperative autologous blood donation is an attractive alternative to homologous transfusion and has become common in elective orthopaedic surgery. Objective: To present our experience with the use of ...

  8. Preoperative Anaemia and Blood Transfusion Requirements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia prevalence among children in Nigeria is a serious morbidity although it's prevalence in Benin has not been determined in recent times. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of preoperative anaemia, its' associated factors and blood transfusion requirements in children ...

  9. Prevalence of exchange blood transfusion in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exchange blood transfusion (EBT) is carried out for the treatment of conditions presenting with severe hyperbilirubinaemia and anaemia, such as ABO incompatibility, sepsis, prematurity and birth trauma among others. While it is fast being abandoned as treatment modality for severe neonatal jaundice in the ...

  10. Utilization Management in the Blood Transfusion Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter “Sunny”

    2015-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center. PMID:24080431

  11. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs. Platelet concentrates (PC were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL. The PL mixtures (mPL were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS. No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke.

  12. Epidemiology of transfusion-transmitted infections among multi-transfused patients in seven hospitals in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Torres, V A; Pérez-Bao, J; Chauca, G; Sovero, M; Blichtein, D; Chunga, A; Flores, W; Retamal, A; Mendoza, S; Cruz, M; Monge, Z; Lavalle, M; Gutiérrez, J; Málaga, J; Soto, E; Loayza, N; Bolívar, D; Reyna, R; Mendoza, C; Oré, M; González, J; Suárez, M; Montano, S M; Sánchez, J L; Sateren, W; Bautista, C T; Olson, J G; Xueref, S

    2005-12-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) constitute a major health problem worldwide where routine screening of blood or blood products is improperly done, and where non-medical injecting medications and/or drug use are prevalent. Prevalence and risk factors vary by geographic location and by the specific TTI (including HIV-1, HBV, HCV and HTLV-I). To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with TTIs among a sample of multi-transfused adult patients in Peru. A cross-sectional multi-center study was conducted across seven major hospitals in Peru from February 2003 to September 2004. Self-reported behavior information (medical procedures, number of sexual partners, and drug use history) was analyzed, along with a review of exposure history from hospital medical records. Prevalences were calculated by TTI for different exposures, along with unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios for infection risk. Overall, 192 (54.7%) of 351 multi-transfused patients were found infected with one or more TTIs. Number of transfusion units, years of transfusion history (6 or more), and number of treatment facilities (2 or more) were associated with HCV infection. Hemodialysis history was a common risk factor associated with HBV, HCV and HTLV-I infection. HIV infection was associated only with total number of transfusion units received. High prevalences of HBV and HCV infection were found among Peruvian multi-transfused patients and were associated with a past history and number of blood transfusions, as well as with past hemodialysis procedures. TTIs continue to represent a significant public health problem in Peru. Continued vigilant attention to blood safety procedures, including universal screening and health care provider education, is recommended.

  13. The Role of Platelet Factor 4 in Local and Remote Tissue Damage in a Mouse Model of Mesenteric Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchak, Peter H.; Ioannou, Antonis; Rani, Poonam; Lieberman, Linda A.; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Kannan, Lakshmi; Lucca, Jurandir J. Dalle; Kowalska, M. Anna; Tsokos, George C.

    2012-01-01

    The robust inflammatory response that occurs during ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury recruits factors from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. However the contribution of platelets and their products such as Platelet Factor 4 (PF4; CXCL4), during the pathogenesis of IR injury has not been thoroughly investigated. We show that a deficiency in PF4 protects mice from local and remote tissue damage after 30 minutes of mesenteric ischemia and 3 hours of reperfusion in PF4-/- mice compared to control B6 mice. This protection was independent from Ig or complement deposition in the tissues. However, neutrophil and monocyte infiltration were decreased in the lungs of PF4-/- mice compared with B6 control mice. Platelet-depleted B6 mice transfused with platelets from PF4-/- mice displayed reduced tissue damage compared with controls. In contrast, transfusion of B6 platelets into platelet depleted PF4-/- mice reconstituted damage in both intestine and lung tissues. We also show that PF4 may modulate the release of IgA. Interestingly, we show that PF4 expression on intestinal epithelial cells is increased after IR at both the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that may PF4 represent an important mediator of local and remote tissue damage. PMID:22792197

  14. The role of platelet factor 4 in local and remote tissue damage in a mouse model of mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Lapchak

    Full Text Available The robust inflammatory response that occurs during ischemia reperfusion (IR injury recruits factors from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. However the contribution of platelets and their products such as Platelet Factor 4 (PF4; CXCL4, during the pathogenesis of IR injury has not been thoroughly investigated. We show that a deficiency in PF4 protects mice from local and remote tissue damage after 30 minutes of mesenteric ischemia and 3 hours of reperfusion in PF4-/- mice compared to control B6 mice. This protection was independent from Ig or complement deposition in the tissues. However, neutrophil and monocyte infiltration were decreased in the lungs of PF4-/- mice compared with B6 control mice. Platelet-depleted B6 mice transfused with platelets from PF4-/- mice displayed reduced tissue damage compared with controls. In contrast, transfusion of B6 platelets into platelet depleted PF4-/- mice reconstituted damage in both intestine and lung tissues. We also show that PF4 may modulate the release of IgA. Interestingly, we show that PF4 expression on intestinal epithelial cells is increased after IR at both the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that may PF4 represent an important mediator of local and remote tissue damage.

  15. Direct costs of transfusion reactions - an expert judgement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M P; van Tilborgh, A J W; de Vooght, K M K; Bokhorst, A G; Wiersum-Osselton, J C

    2017-11-09

    Despite increasingly meticulous haemovigilance reporting throughout the world, a systematic assessment of the cost of transfusion reactions is still lacking. This is partly caused by the fact that such an assessment requires a subjective expert assessment of the additional costs linked to the adverse reaction. Data on the cost of transfusion reactions could support decision-making regarding blood transfusion safety measures. Thirteen experts from nine hospitals were asked to estimate the additional care required following various types of transfusion reactions. Additional care was quantified as the proportion of reactions requiring care, and the amount of care required (e.g. hospitalization days, additional physician's time). Experts were also asked to provide, per type of transfusion reaction, an estimate of the proportion of transfusion reactions preventable. Structured quantitative expert elicitation methods were applied to obtain and combine expert estimates. The estimated annual in-hospital cost of transfusion reactions in the Netherlands is €933 356 per year (€1.52 per transfusion). Two-thirds (64%) of these are incurred by non-serious transfusion reactions. Circulatory overload, TRALI and anaphylaxis clearly dominate the costs of serious adverse transfusion reactions (66% in total); non-haemolytic transfusion reactions incur 46% of the cost of non-serious transfusion reactions. Additional safety measures targeting circulatory overload and new antibody formation potentially offer the highest cost reduction. In-hospital costs of transfusion reactions are substantial but contribute to less than 1% of the total cost of transfusion in the Netherlands. A considerable part of these costs (24%) might be preventable. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. The diversity of platelet microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boilard, Eric; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Brisson, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Platelet microparticles are small extracellular vesicles abundant in blood. The present review will introduce the mechanisms underlying the generation of microparticles, and will describe the diverse microparticle subtypes identified to date. The most appropriate methodologies used to distinguish microparticle subtypes will be also presented. Both the megakaryocytes and platelets can generate microparticles. Circulating microparticles originating from megakaryocytes are distinguished from those derived from activated platelets by the presence of CD62P, LAMP-1, and immunoreceptor-based activation motif receptors. Close examination of platelet activation has shed light on a novel mechanism leading to microparticle production. Under physiologic flow, microparticles bud off from long membrane strands formed by activated platelets. Furthermore, mounting evidence supports the notion of microparticle heterogeneity. Platelet microparticles are commonly characterized by the expression of surface platelet antigens and phosphatidylserine. In fact, only a fraction of platelet microparticles harbor phosphatidylserine, and a distinct subset contains respiratory-competent mitochondria. During disease, the microparticle surface may undergo posttranslational modifications such as citrullination, further supporting the concept of microparticle diversity. An appreciation of the microparticle heterogeneity will support their development as potential biomarkers and may reveal functions unique to each microparticle subtype in health and disease.

  17. Effects of cancer on platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Nick; Sturk, Auguste; Middeldorp, Saskia; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    The main function of circulating platelets is to stop bleeding upon vascular injury by the formation of a hemostatic plug. The presence of cancer results in numerical and functional abnormalities of platelets. Thrombocytosis is commonly observed in cancer patients and is associated with decreased

  18. The risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections at the Gabonese National Blood Transfusion Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerambiah, Leonard Kounegnigan; Rerambiah, Laurence Essola; Bengone, Calixte; Djoba Siawaya, Joel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood transfusions carry the risk of transmitting blood-borne infections. In contrast to the situation in the developed world, there is a limited number of studies examining this problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to calculate the risks of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from units of blood issued by the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre between 2009 and 2011. Materials and methods All the donations were tested for infectious diseases and the seroconversion incidence rates of HIV, HBV and HCV were calculated. The residual risk of transfusion-associated transmission for each virus was calculated by multiplying the seroconversion rates by the window period expressed in fractions of a year. Results The risks of becoming infected with HIV, HCV, and HBV in subjects receiving units of blood from the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre were 64.7, 207.94 and 534.53 per million donations, respectively. Conclusions This study, which is the first to quantify the true risks of transfusion-transmitted infections in Gabon, reveals and confirms the need to reinforce preventative and screening strategies to improve transfusion safety in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24333085

  19. Role of platelets in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Serkan Yalçın

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, which is extremely useful process for humanbody is the response of living vascular tissues topathological phenomena that removes the pathogens andinitiates the healing procedure. Microorganisms, physicaltrauma, chemical, mechanical, irradiation, or thermal injury,ischemia and immune reactions are most commoncauses of this exceptionally important event for humanbody. Platelets are non-nucleated cells in blood that producedin bone marrow as derived from megakaryocytes.Apart from stop bleeding and achieving hemostasis thereare incredibly important roles of platelets in inflammation.Platelets contain important mediators for inflammationlike neutrophils or macrophages and can alter the courseof mechanism. In this article changing platelet function ininflammation and the effect of these functions to the processof inflammation will be discussed.Key words: Platelet, inflammation, cytokines

  20. First autoclave-sterilized platelet-additive solution containing glucose with a physiological pH for the preparation of plasma-poor platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Shibata, K; Kora, S

    1992-01-01

    The glucose-free platelet-additive solution (termed AR solution), developed by Adams and Rock [Transfusion 1988;28:217-220], was modified by adding glucose as an energy substrate for platelets and maltose to prevent platelet lysis and by replacing sodium gluconate with sodium phosphate for better pH maintenance. The new platelet-additive solution (termed Seto solution) contained 90 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl2, 17 mM tri-sodium citrate, 4.9 mM NaH2PO4, 20.1 mM Na2HPO4, 23 mM sodium acetate, 28.8 mM maltose, and 23.5 mM glucose with a pH of 7.4. The solution was sterilized by autoclaving in plastic bags in nitrogen to prevent glucose caramelization at high pH. Plasma-poor platelet concentrates prepared by adding Seto solution to the pelleted platelet buttons were stored in a LE-2 polyolefin bag at 22 degrees C with constant agitation for 5 days. The platelets suspended in Seto solution maintained oxygen consumption at a rate of 1.1 nmol/min/10(9) platelets after 5-day storage, with glucose consumption and lactate production rates of 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 1.2 +/- 0.2 nmol/min/10(9) platelets, respectively. This resulted in a final mean pH of 7.0. Those suspended in AR solution ceased glycolysis within 3 days because residual plasma glucose had been consumed. This was associated with decreases in percent hypotonic shock response and aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and collagen. Lactate dehydrogenase discharge in AR solution was 5 and 8 times higher at day 3 and day 5, respectively, than that of Seto solution. Morphologically, there were no ballooned platelets after storage in Seto solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Ranitidine prevents postoperative transfusion-induced depression of delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative depression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and the effect of ranitidine on transfusion-induced changes in postoperative CMI were investigated. CMI was assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by skin testing with seven common...... ranitidine therapy, and whole blood transfusion was given to 24 of these patients. Postoperative skin test response was more reduced in transfused vs nontransfused patients (-57% vs -38%, p less than 0.0001). Fourteen of the 24 patients receiving blood transfusion could be exactly matched to 14 patients...

  2. Indications and Effects of Plasma Transfusions in Critically Ill Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Shefler, Alison

    2015-01-01

    (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) values were 1.5 and 48, respectively. After plasma transfusion, the median INR and aPTT changes were -0.2 and -5, respectively. Plasma transfusion significantly improved INR only in patients with a baseline INR greater than 2.5. CONCLUSIONS: One......-third of transfused patients were not bleeding and had no planned procedure. In addition, in most patients, coagulation tests are not sensitive to increases in coagulation factors resulting from plasma transfusion. Studies assessing appropriate plasma transfusion strategies are urgently needed....

  3. Anemia and Blood Transfusions in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Athar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in critically ill patients. As a consequence packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusions are frequent in the critically ill. Over the past two decades a growing body of literature has emerged, linking PRBC transfusion to infections, immunosuppression, organ dysfunction, and a higher mortality rate. However, despite growing evidence that risk of PRBC transfusion outweighs its benefit, significant numbers of critically ill patients still receive PRBC transfusion during their intensive care unit (ICU stay. In this paper, we summarize the current literature concerning the impact of anemia on outcomes in critically ill patients and the potential complications of PRBC transfusions.

  4. [Bleeding due to platelet dysfunction as a presenting symptom of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, D; Zeidman, A; Mittelman, M

    1996-02-15

    A 32-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of fever, blurred vision in the left eye, nasal and gingival bleeding and arthralgia. There was a macular hemorrhage, a tender mass in the left lower abdomen and edema of both legs. She also had anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, platelet function abnormalities, kidney dysfunction, and albuminuria. Serology was positive for antinuclear antibodies and double-stranded DNA; complement level was low, and circulating anticoagulants were present. Kidney biopsy established the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Abdominal sonography demonstrated perisplenic and pelvic bleeding. A pulse therapy of corticosteroids with low-dose oral cyclophosphamide, along with platelet transfusions and infusions of deamino-d-arginine vasopressin resulted in symptomatic and laboratory improvement. Bleeding stopped, platelet function became normal, kidney function tests returned to normal and she became seronegative. It is emphasized that platelet function abnormalities are rare in SLE. The thrombocytopenia was too mild to cause spontaneous bleeding, and lupus anticoagulant is usually associated with thromboembolic complications and not with spontaneous bleeding. It is therefore conceivable that in this case platelet function abnormalities were responsible for the spontaneous bleeding, the presenting sign which led to establishing the diagnosis.

  5. Functional comparison of induced pluripotent stem cell- and blood-derived GPIIbIIIa deficient platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Orban

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs represent a versatile tool to model genetic diseases and are a potential source for cell transfusion therapies. However, it remains elusive to which extent patient-specific hiPSC-derived cells functionally resemble their native counterparts. Here, we generated a hiPSC model of the primary platelet disease Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT, characterized by dysfunction of the integrin receptor GPIIbIIIa, and compared side-by-side healthy and diseased hiPSC-derived platelets with peripheral blood platelets. Both GT-hiPSC-derived platelets and their peripheral blood equivalents showed absence of membrane expression of GPIIbIIIa, a reduction of PAC-1 binding, surface spreading and adherence to fibrinogen. We demonstrated that GT-hiPSC-derived platelets recapitulate molecular and functional aspects of the disease and show comparable behavior to their native counterparts encouraging the further use of hiPSC-based disease models as well as the transition towards a clinical application.

  6. Time-based analysis of the apheresis platelet supply chain in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, R; Cotton, S; Dobbin, J; Chapman, J; Yates, N

    2011-10-01

    During 2009/2010 loss of platelets within NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) due to time expiry was 9.3%. Hospitals remain reluctant to hold stocks of platelets due to the poor shelf life at issue. The purpose of this study was to identify areas for time compression in the apheresis platelet supply chain to extend the shelf life available for hospitals and reduce wastage in NHSBT. This was done within the context of NHSBT reconfiguring their supply chain and moving towards a consolidated and centralised approach. Time based process mapping was applied to identify value and non-value adding time in two manufacturing models. A large amount of the non-value adding time in the apheresis platelet supply chain is due to transportation and waiting for the next process in the manufacturing process to take place. Time based process mapping provides an effective 'lens' for supply chain professionals to identify opportunities for improvement in the platelet supply chain. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  7. The human platelet alloantigen profile in blood donors from Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, C N; Schriefer, A; Albuquerque, S R L; Perdomo, R T; Parente, A F A; Weber, S S

    2016-12-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPAs) are alloantigens derived from polymorphisms in platelet-surface glycoproteins. The occurrence of alloantibodies against HPAs can lead to platelet destruction and subsequent thrombocytopenia. Brazilians have a high rate of racial admixture, and the knowledge of HPA polymorphisms in particular donors from north Brazil, who have a large Amerindian influence, is a relevant strategy to prevent alloimmunisation. Our aim was investigate the HPA allele's frequencies in the Amazonas blood donors. We performed HPA genotyping among 200 Amazonas blood donors by microarray for 11 HPA biallelic systems, including six of the most clinically significant systems (HPA-1 to -5 and -15) and five others (HPA-6 to -9 and -11) that have been also associated with alloimmunisation, amounting to 22 HPA alleles. The obtained allele frequencies were compared with data of 38 populations worldwide to determine the hierarchical relationship and estimated the probability of mismatch platelets. The allele frequencies were 0·862 for HPA-1a, 0·137 for HPA-1b, 0·852 for HPA-2a, 0·147 for HPA-2b, 0·665 for HPA-3a, 0·335 for HPA-3b, 0·995 for HPA-4a, 0·005 for HPA-4b, 0·892 for HPA-5a, 0·107 for HPA-5b, 0·997 for HPA-9a, 0·005 for HPA-9b, 0·502 for HPA-15a and 0·497 for HPA-15b. The incompatibility risks are higher for HPA-15 and HPA-3, followed by HPA-1, -2 and -5. We found differences among populations worldwide, and it is interesting to note the indigenous and European influences in this region, reinforcing the heterogeneity in the ancestry of Brazilians. The results will be helpful in providing information for platelet transfusion to avoid alloimmunisation. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  8. Platelet indices in SGA newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiluk, A; Dabrowska, M; Osada, J; Jasinska, E; Laudanski, T; Redzko, S

    2011-01-01

    The current study objective was to compare blood platelet indices in full-term small-for-gestational-age newborns (SGA) and full-term appropriate-for-gestational-age newborns (AGA). We introduced to our study 61 SGA newborns (31 females and 30 males) and 70 eutrophic infants (32 females and 38 males). The SGA newborns were divided into two groups: those weighing less than the 5th centile: 35 infants (16 females and 19 males) and those between the 5th and 10th centiles: 26 infants (15 females and 11 males). Platelet indices were estimated in blood samples collected from the umbilical artery. SGA demonstrated a decreased count of blood platelets (238×103/μ) as compared with AGA (286×103/μL), p=0.0001. Platelet hematocrit (PTC) also showed differences in both groups (SGA=0.19% vs. AGA=0.22%; p=0.0005). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in SGA (8.25fl) as compared with AGA (7.84fl); p=0.008. Large platelet count (LPLT) was higher in AGA 6.26% vs. SGA=4.75%; p=0.01. Platelet distribution width (PDW) was found to be nearly the same (SGA=47%, AGA=46%). PDW was higher in SGA newborns SGA infants between the 5th and 10th centiles (52%); p=0.008. A decreased blood platelet count, platelet hematocrit and large metabolically active platelet count, which in addition to reduced synthesis and excessive consumption of coagulation factors in states of hiperclotting is characteristic of IUGR, enhances the possibility of bleeding complications and increases the risk of infections. From a clinical point of view, it is important to take into consideration the degree of intrauterine hypotrophy during the evaluation of hemostatic disorders.

  9. Transfusion recipient epidemiology and outcomes research: possibilities for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Christopher D; Blumberg, Neil; Glynn, Simone A; Ness, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) supports major research programs related to the field of transfusion medicine, which encompass blood banking, the practice of transfusion medicine itself, and cellular therapies. Specific programmatic elements have included 1) the Transfusion Medicine/Hemostasis Clinical Trials Network (TMH CTN) charged with conducting clinical trials in transfusion medicine and hemostasis; 2) the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II), which includes domestic and international efforts dedicated to blood donor safety and blood availability issues; 3) the Specialized Centers of Clinically Oriented Research (SCCOR) in Transfusion Biology and Medicine that include two major projects, the Biologic and Immunologic Aspects of Transfusion Medicine Program and the Transfusion and Lung Injury Program, and 4) the Transfusion Therapy Trial for Functional Outcomes in Cardiovascular Patients Undergoing Surgical Hip Fracture Repair (FOCUS), a Phase III clinical trial that has as its major goal to determine whether a more aggressive transfusion strategy in surgery patients with cardiovascular disease (or risk factors) is associated with improved functional recovery and decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes. Notably, none of these programs supports epidemiologic and clinical outcomes research focused on transfusion recipients. Thus, on October 31, 2007, a Working Group on Transfusion Recipient Epidemiology and Outcomes Research was convened by the NHLBI. This group was asked to discuss the current status of the field, identify critical research needs, and make recommendations to the NHLBI program staff.

  10. Prophylactic Platelets in Dengue: Survey Responses Highlight Lack of an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorn, James; Roche, Rosmari Rodriguez; Guzman, Maria G.; Martinez, Eric; Villamil Gomez, Wilmar; Nainggolan, Leonard; Laksono, Ida Safitri; Mishra, Ajay; Lum, Lucy; Faiz, Abul; Sall, Amadou; Dawurung, Joshua; Borges, Alvaro; Leo, Yee-Sin; Blumberg, Lucille; Bausch, Daniel G.; Kroeger, Axel; Horstick, Olaf; Thwaites, Guy; Wertheim, Heiman; Larsson, Mattias; Hien, Tran Tinh; Peeling, Rosanna; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue. PMID:22745847

  11. Prophylactic platelets in dengue: survey responses highlight lack of an evidence base.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Whitehorn

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue.

  12. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseday Z. Tegegn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs. PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA of CPPs. Methods: CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs were characterized by flow cytometry (FC, fluorescence polarization (FP, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thrombin-generation (TG test. Results: SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing–thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a+ PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Conclusions: Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing–thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have

  13. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegegn, Tseday Z; De Paoli, Silvia H; Orecna, Martina; Elhelu, Oumsalama K; Woodle, Samuel A; Tarandovskiy, Ivan D; Ovanesov, Mikhail V; Simak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT) storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs) are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs). PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA) of CPPs. CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs) were characterized by flow cytometry (FC), fluorescence polarization (FP), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thrombin-generation (TG) test. SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing-thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a(+) PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing-thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have significant contribution to PCA of CPPs.

  14. Human Platelet Lysate as a Replacement for Fetal Bovine Serum in Limbal Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Kunal; Gong, Hwee K; Yuan, Ching; Kaufman, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the use of human platelet lysate (HPL) as an alternative supplement for limbal explant culture. Culture media were prepared using either 10% pooled HPL (PHPL), single donor HPL, or fetal bovine serum (FBS). Limbal tissues, obtained from the Minnesota Lions Eye Bank, were cultured in each medium on plastic plates or on denuded amniotic membrane (AM). Immunofluorescence staining was performed for ABCG2, tumor protein p63α, and cytokeratin 3 (K3). Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of ABCG2 and p63. Limbal explants grown in each medium were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to assess the proliferative capacity in each medium. Concentration of growth factors including epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) in HPL and PHPL was compared to that in human serum (HS). Immunofluorescence staining on AM showed prominent expression of ABCG2, p63α but sparse expression of K3 in HPL and PHPL supplemented medium. Real time-PCR showed 1.7 fold higher expression of ABCG2 in PHPL supplemented medium (p = 0.03), and similar expression of p63 in HPL and PHPL supplemented medium compared to FBS medium. The proliferation assay showed that LSCs retained their proliferative potential in HPL supplemented medium. Higher concentration of growth factors were found in HPL, compared to HS. Human platelet lysate has higher concentration of grown factors and is effective in maintaining growth and stem cell phenotype of corneal limbal explant cultures.

  15. Freezing of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates in 6% Dimethyl Sulfoxide: The First Preliminary Study in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Yılmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transfusion of platelet suspensions is an essential part of patient care for certain clinical indications. In this pioneering study in Turkey, we aimed to assess the in vitro hemostatic functions of platelets after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods: Seven units of platelet concentrates were obtained by apheresis. Each apheresis platelet concentrate (APC was divided into 2 equal volumes and frozen with 6% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. The 14 frozen units of APCs were kept at -80 °C for 1 day. APCs were thawed at 37 °C and diluted either with autologous plasma or 0.9% NaCl. The volume and residual numbers of leukocytes and platelets were tested in both before-freezing and post-thawing periods. Aggregation and thrombin generation tests were used to analyze the in vitro hemostatic functions of platelets. Flow-cytometric analysis was used to assess the presence of frozen treated platelets and their viability. Results: The residual number of leukocytes in both dilution groups was <1x106. The mean platelet recovery rate in the plasma-diluted group (88.1±9.5% was higher than that in the 0.9% NaCl-diluted group (63±10%. These results were compatible with the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines quality criteria. Expectedly, there was no aggregation response to platelet aggregation test. The mean thrombin generation potential of postthaw APCs was higher in the plasma-diluted group (2411 nmol/L per minute when compared to both the 0.9% NaCl-diluted group (1913 nmol/L per minute and the before-freezing period (1681 nmol/L per minute. The flowcytometric analysis results for the viability of APCs after cryopreservation were 94.9% and 96.6% in the plasma and 0.9% NaCl groups, respectively. Conclusion: Cryopreservation of platelets with 6% DMSO and storage at -80 °C increases their shelf life from 7 days to 2 years. Besides the increase in hemostatic functions of platelets, the cryopreservation process also does not affect their

  16. Cancer risk among 21st century blood transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T O; Cairns, B J; Reeves, G K; Green, J; Beral, V

    2017-02-01

    Some carcinogenic viruses are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. Intensive viral screening of transfused blood now exists in most countries. In the UK, high-sensitivity nucleic acid amplification tests for hepatitis C virus were introduced in 1999 and it was thought that this would reduce, and possibly eliminate, transfusion-related liver cancer. We aimed to investigate cancer risk in recipients of blood transfusion in 2000 or after. A total of 1.3 million UK women recruited in 1998 on average were followed for hospital records of blood transfusion and for cancer registrations. After excluding women with cancer or precancerous conditions before or at the time of transfusion, Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks of 11 site-specific cancers for women with compared to without prior blood transfusion. During follow up, 11 274 (0.9%) women had a first recorded transfusion in 2000 or after, and 1648 (14.6%) of them were subsequently diagnosed with cancer, a mean 6.8 years after the transfusion. In the first 5 years after transfusion there were significant excesses for most site-specific cancers examined, presumably because some had preclinical cancer. However, 5 or more years (mean 8 years) after blood transfusion, there were significant excess risks only for liver cancer (adjusted relative risk = 2.63, 95%CI 1.45-4.78) and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (adjusted relative risk = 1.74, 1.21-2.51). When analyses were restricted to those undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery, the commonest procedure associated with transfusion, these relative risks were not materially altered. In a large cohort of UK women, transfusions in the 21st century were associated with long-term increased risks of liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some of these malignancies may have been caused by carcinogenic agents that are not currently screened for in transfused blood.

  17. Immunochemical characterization of platelet-specific alloantigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; van Leeuwen, E. F.; Veenboer, G. J.; Tetteroo, P. A.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation was performed with platelet-specific alloantisera (anti-Zwa, -Zwb, -Baka and antiserum Luc) and 125I-labelled platelets of a panel of donors typed for these platelet-specific alloantigens. This was done by sensitization of intact, radiolabelled platelets with the antisera,

  18. Bioresponsive polymers for the detection of bacterial contaminations in platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamerith, Clemens; Heinzle, Andrea; Schneider, Konstantin P; Hulla-Gumbsch, Elisabeth; Gewessler, Ulrike; Ducoroy, Laurent; Gehrer, Michael; Wagner, Thomas; Sigl, Eva; Guebitz, Georg M

    2014-03-25

    Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) can lead to fatal transfusion transmitted diseases and is the most abundant infectious risk in transfusion medicine. The storage conditions of PCs provide a good environment for bacterial growth. The detection of these contaminations at an early stage is therefore important to avoid the transfusion of contaminated samples. In this study, bioresponsive polymer (BRP) systems were used for the detection of microorganisms in PCs. The backbone of the polymer consisted of labelled protein (casein), which was demonstrated to be degraded by pure proteases as models and by extracellular enzymes released by contaminating microorganisms. The concomitant colour change was easily visible to the naked eye. To enhance stability, the protein was cross-linked with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The cross-linked polymer was easier to handle but was less sensitive than the non-cross-linked material. A contamination of a PC with 10CFU/mL S. aureus was detectable after 24 hours. The visible colour reaction was quantified as a ΔE value according to the CIELab concept. A ΔE value of 21.8 was already reached after 24 hours. Hence, this simple but effective system could prevent transfusion of a contaminated PC. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The impact of a massive transfusion protocol (1:1:1) on major hepatic injuries: Does it increase abdominal wall closure rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G.; Dente, Christopher J.; Shaz, Beth; Wyrzykowski, Amy D.; Nicholas, Jeffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Feliciano, David V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) using high plasma and platelet ratios for exsanguinating trauma patients are increasingly popular. Major liver injuries often require massive resuscitations and immediate hemorrhage control. Current published literature describes outcomes among patients with mixed patterns of injury. We sought to identify the effects of an MTP on patients with major liver trauma. Methods Patients with grade 3, 4 or 5 liver injuries who required a massive blood component transfusion were analyzed. We compared patients with high plasma:red blood cell:platelet ratio (1:1:1) transfusions (2007–2009) with patients injured before the creation of an institutional MTP (2005–2007). Results Among 60 patients with major hepatic injuries, 35 (58%) underwent resuscitation after the implementation of an MTP. Patient and injury characteristics were similar between cohorts. Implementation of the MTP significantly improved plasma: red blood cell:platelet ratios and decreased crystalloid fluid resuscitation (p = 0.026). Rapid improvement in early acidosis and coagulopathy was superior with an MTP (p = 0.009). More patients in the MTP group also underwent primary abdominal fascial closure during their hospital stay (p = 0.021). This was most evident with grade 4 injuries (89% vs. 14%). The mean time to fascial closure was 4.2 days. The overall survival rate for all major liver injuries was not affected by an MTP (p = 0.61). Conclusion The implementation of a formal MTP using high plasma and platelet ratios resulted in a substantial increase in abdominal wall approximation. This occurred concurrently to a decrease in the delivered volume of crystalloid fluid. PMID:24067528

  20. Prophylactic platelets in dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage...... of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity...... of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue....

  1. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion increases the risk of infectious complications after major surgery and of cancer recurrence after curative operation. This has been attributed to immunosuppression. Several authors have suggested that filtered whole blood and/or red...... cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...... similar postoperative infectious complications and cancer recurrence and/or survival rates in patients receiving autologous blood donated before operation and those receiving allogeneic blood. Future studies should identify common risk factors associated with blood storage....

  2. [Blood transfusion - safety of the inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Danic, Bruno; Schneider, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Over the years, transfusion medicine has been faced to many different problems, notably those related to transmission of pathogens. Major progresses have been accomplished in terms of security. However, nowadays, the discipline is confronted to the day-to-day variability and availability of blood products. More and more donors are excluded from blood donation due to various reasons, and the donor selection criteria have increased over the years, influencing the number of donors able to give blood. This paradox represents one of the constraints that transfusion medicine should resolve in the future. This paper presents some aspects either common or different between France and Switzerland.