WorldWideScience

Sample records for single-contact pressure solution

  1. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  2. Dependence of osmotic pressure on solution properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure, temperature, salt concentration, and the chemical composition of the salt are parameters affecting solution properties. Pressure and temperature have little effect on osmosis, but osmotic pressure variations due to type of dissolved salt may be significant, especially at high concentrations. For a given salt solution, concentration variations cause large differences in osmotic pressure. A representative difference in concentration across a clay layer in a relatively shallow groundwater system might be 100 to 1,000 ppm. When expressed as ppm NaCl, this difference could cause a head difference of 0.8 to 8 meters of water if one of the rock bodies were closed to fluid escape

  3. Interface Evolution During Transient Pressure Solution Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysthe, D. K.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Renard, F.; Jamtveit, B.; Feder, J.

    When aggregates of small grains are pressed together in the presence of small amounts of solvent the aggregate compacts and the grains tend to stick together. This hap- pens to salt and sugar in humid air, and to sediments when buried in the Earths crust. Stress concentration at the grain contacts cause local dissolution, diffusion of the dissolved material out of the interface and deposition on the less stressed faces of the grains{1}. This process, in geology known as pressure solution, plays a cen- tral role during compaction of sedimentary basins{1,2}, during tectonic deformation of the Earth's crust{3}, and in strengthening of active fault gouges following earth- quakes{4,5}. Experimental data on pressure solution has so far not been sufficiently accurate to understand the transient processes at the grain scale. Here we present ex- perimental evidence that pressure solution creep does not establish a steady state inter- face microstructure as previously thought. Conversely, cumulative creep strain and the characteristic size of interface microstructures grow as the cubic root of time. A sim- ilar transient phenomenon is known in metallurgy (Andrade creep) and is explained here using an analogy with spinodal dewetting. 1 Weyl, P. K., Pressure solution and the force of crystallization - a phenomenological theory. J. Geophys. Res., 64, 2001-2025 (1959). 2 Heald, M. T., Cementation of Simpson and St. Peter Sandstones in parts of Okla- homa, Arkansas and Missouri, J. Geol. Chicago, 14, 16-30 (1956). 3 Schwartz, S., Stöckert, B., Pressure solution in siliciclastic HP-LT metamorphic rocks constraints on the state of stress in deep levels of accretionary complexes. Tectonophysics, 255, 203-209 (1996). 4 Renard, F., Gratier, J.P., Jamtveit, B., Kinetics of crack-sealing, intergranular pres- sure solution, and compaction around active faults. J. Struct. Geol., 22, 1395-1407, (2000). 5 Miller, S. A., BenZion, Y., Burg, J. P.,A three-dimensional fluid-controlled earth

  4. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  5. Pressure solution of minerals in quartz-type buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlstroem, M.

    1986-12-01

    Two samples, pure quartz sand and a sand-bentonite (10%) mixture, were tested under conditions of high pressure (200 bar) and temperature (115 0 C). The experiment was carried out over a period of 70 days. A series of thin slides were prepared on a resin embedded sample at the end of the test period. A microscopical study was performed as to obtain data concerning the effects of pressure and temperature. It showed that no pressure solution had taken place in the pure quartz sand. However, the individual grains had been severely fractured, thus causing significant internal sedimentation. The mixed sample showed that the clay component coated the quartz grains and significantly decreased the effect of stress in the grains by having a cushioning effect. Relative grain movement was facilitated by the clay, by which the grains rotated and slipped into stable positions with large contact areas and low contact stresses. This probably minimized pressure solution. However, a few contact regions indicated the presence of precipitated silica. The investigation shows no definite evidence of pressure solution after an experiment duration of 70 days. Since the effect of solution may be time dependent at the applied temperature, it is recommended that further experiments be conducted at higher effective and porewater pressures but still at 115 0 C. (orig.)

  6. Osmotic pressure of ring polymer solutions : A Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flikkema, Edwin; Brinke, Gerrit ten

    2000-01-01

    Using the wall theorem, the osmotic pressure of ring polymers in solution has been determined using an off-lattice topology conserving Monte Carlo algorithm. The ring polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chains with point-like beads, i.e., under conditions corresponding to θ-conditions for the

  7. Design principles for high-pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Kibies, Patrick; Imoto, Sho; Frach, Roland; Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland; Marx, Dominik; Horinek, Dominik; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-04-14

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures--while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute's response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  8. Salt Effect on Osmotic Pressure of Polyelectrolyte Solutions: Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Michael Y. Carrillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present results of the hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics simulations of the osmotic pressure of salt solutions of polyelectrolytes. In our simulations, we used a coarse-grained representation of polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions. During simulation runs, we alternate Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation steps. Monte Carlo steps were used to perform small ion exchange between simulation box containing salt ions (salt reservoir and simulation box with polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions (polyelectrolyte solution. This allowed us to model Donnan equilibrium and partitioning of salt and counterions across membrane impermeable to polyelectrolyte chains. Our simulations have shown that the main contribution to the system osmotic pressure is due to salt ions and osmotically active counterions. The fraction of the condensed (osmotically inactive counterions first increases with decreases in the solution ionic strength then it saturates. The reduced value of the system osmotic coefficient is a universal function of the ratio of the concentration of osmotically active counterions and salt concentration in salt reservoir. Simulation results are in a very good agreement with osmotic pressure measurements in sodium polystyrene sulfonate, DNA, polyacrylic acid, sodium polyanetholesulfonic acid, polyvinylbenzoic acid, and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride solutions.

  9. Design principles for high–pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Horinek, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.horinek@ur.de [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Kibies, Patrick; Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M., E-mail: stefan.kast@tu-dortmund.de [Physikalische Chemie III, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Imoto, Sho, E-mail: sho.imoto@theochem.rub.de; Marx, Dominik [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland [Physikalische Chemie I, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2016-04-14

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures – while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute’s response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  10. Design principles for high–pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Horinek, Dominik; Kibies, Patrick; Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M.; Imoto, Sho; Marx, Dominik; Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures – while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute’s response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  11. Inhibiting Effect of Additives on Pressure Solution of Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traskine, V.; Skvortsova, Z.; Badun, G.; Chernysheva, M.; Simonov, Ya.; Gazizullin, I.

    2018-05-01

    The task of protection of cultural heritage requires a better understanding of combined effects of mechanical and chemical factors involved in environmental deterioration of monuments. The present paper deals with extending some known physicochemical methods proposed for inhibiting the decay of unstressed materials to their study during water-assisted deformation. The tests have been carried out on natural limestone samples and calcite powders in CaCO3 saturated aqueous solutions under static loads causing measurable pressure solution creep. In the solutions containing 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, the creep rate decreases considerably with increasing concentration of additives. The extent of creep deceleration has been found to be proportional to the independently estimated calcite surface area occupied by adsorbed species. This fact enables us to discriminate the adsorption-induced effect from other variables controlling the pressure solution rate and may be used in screening of compounds able to minimize the environmental impact on marble and limestone objects undergoing mechanical stresses.

  12. Study of vapour pressure of lithium nitrate solutions in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Safarov, Javid [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net; Bich, Eckard [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Hassel, Egon [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Fakultaet Maschinenbau und Schiffstechnik, Universitaet Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 2, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Heintz, Andreas [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Vapour pressure p of (LiNO{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, osmotic, activity coefficients ({phi}, {gamma}) and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in the molality range m = (0.19125 to 2.21552) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empirical description of the experimental vapour pressure results and the (Pitzer + Mayorga) model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of the Archer for the extended Pitzer model was used for the evaluation of activity coefficients.

  13. Stability analysis of a pressure-solution surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Doron; Nur, Amos; Aharonov, Einat

    We present a linear stability analysis of a dissolution surface subjected to non-hydrostatic stress. A sinusoidal perturbation is imposed on an initially flat solid/fluid interface, and the consequent changes in elastic strain energy and surface energy are calculated. Our results demonstrate that if the far-field lateral stresses are either greater, or much smaller than the fluid pressure, the perturbed configuration has a lower strain energy than the initial one. For wavelengths greater than a critical wavelength this energy decrease may be large enough to offset the increased surface energy. Under these conditions, the perturbation grows unstably. If these conditions are not met, the surface becomes flat. The growth rate and wavelength of the maximally unstable mode depend on the mechanism of matter transport. We conclude that the instability discussed in this paper may account for the formation of stylolites and other pressure-solution phenomena, such as roughening of grain contacts.

  14. Evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. The progress of compaction and the evolution of permeability may be followed with time. Specifically, the main minerals of diatomaceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective stresses of 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increase of the dissolution rate constants. Ultimate permeabilities reduce to the order of 90% at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction. (author)

  15. Pressure-induced polyamorphism in lanthanide-solute metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangliang; Li, Renfeng; Liu, Haozhe [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Center for High Pressure Science Technology Advanced Research, Changchun (China); Wang, Luhong [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Qu, Dongdong [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Zhao, Haiyan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The electronic structure inheritance of lanthanide-solvent atoms in lanthanide-based metallic glasses has been proposed. Is a polyamorphism possible in lanthanide-solute metallic glasses? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in metallic glass containing lanthanide have been observed only in lanthanide-solvent metallic glasses. Here, a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous states, accompanied by a 7% volume collapse at ambient pressure, was observed in La{sub 43.4}Pr{sub 18.6}Al{sub 14}Cu{sub 24} metallic glass, with low lanthanide content, by using in situ X-ray total scattering method. The transformation also indicated by changes in short range and medium range order. Thus, it is proposed that the lanthanide-solute metallic glasses also inherit 4f electronic transition from pure lanthanide element in polyamorphic transition. This discovery offers a supplement to research on lanthanide-based metallic glasses, which further provides a new perspective of the polyamorphic transformation in metallic glasses containing lanthanide element. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Weak Frictional Healing as Controlled by Intergranular Pressure Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, C.

    2017-12-01

    Unstable fault slips due to velocity weakening requires a frictional healing effect that is stronger than the instantaneous rate effect. Based on a previous analytical result regarding the healing effect at spherical contacts by intergranular pressure solution (He et al., 2013), we extend the analysis to incorporate the full range of dilatancy angles from π/6 to -π/6, covering uphill and downhill situations of many contacts with different dilatancy angles. Assuming that both healing effect (parameter b) and instantaneous rate effect (parameter a) are controlled by intergranular pressure solution, and averaging over the whole range of dilatancy angle, our analysis derives each of the two effects as a function of temperature. The result shows velocity weakening for friction coefficient>0.274. As hydrothermal conditions are important for deep portion of actual fault zones, the strength of velocity weakening is of interest when the related faulting behavior is concerned. As a measure of the strength of velocity weakening, the derived ratio b/a fully controlled by pressure solution shows an upper bound of 1.22. Data analyses in previous studies on plagioclase (He et al., 2013) and oceanic basalt (Zhang and He, 2017) shows a range of b/a =1.05-1.2, consistent with the analytical result. The valuesrate effect, which reduces b/a to levels below the upper bound. These values are significantly less than in dry experiments on granite by Mitchell et al.(2016), where b/a ranges from 1.54-2.59 as inferred by reanalyzing their stick-slip data at temperatures of 20°C, 500°C and 600°C. Comparison between the two ranges of b/a helps understand the dominant mechanism of frictional healing at contacts, especially under hydrothermal conditions in fault zones. For comparable ratios of system stiffness to the critical value, numerical simulations with a single-degree-of-freedom system show that a smaller b/a significantly reduces the peak slip velocity as a result of reduced period

  17. An affordable cuff-less blood pressure estimation solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Monika; Kumar, Niranjan; Deb, Sujay

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a cuff-less hypertension pre-screening device that non-invasively monitors the Blood Pressure (BP) and Heart Rate (HR) continuously. The proposed device simultaneously records two clinically significant and highly correlated biomedical signals, viz., Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Photoplethysmogram (PPG). The device provides a common data acquisition platform that can interface with PC/laptop, Smart phone/tablet and Raspberry-pi etc. The hardware stores and processes the recorded ECG and PPG in order to extract the real-time BP and HR using kernel regression approach. The BP and HR estimation error is measured in terms of normalized mean square error, Error Standard Deviation (ESD) and Mean Absolute Error (MAE), with respect to a clinically proven digital BP monitor (OMRON HBP1300). The computed error falls under the maximum standard allowable error mentioned by Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation; MAE cost home and clinic bases solution for continuous health monitoring.

  18. Characteristic of the Pressurized Continuous Bunsen Reaction using HIx Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical hydrogen production process (SI process consists of the Bunsen reaction section, the H2SO4 decomposition section and the HI decomposition section. The HIx solution (HI-I2-H2O could be recycled to Bunsen reaction section from the HI decomposition section in the operation of the integrated SI process. The phase separation characteristic of the Bunsen reaction using the HIx solution was similar to that of SO2-I2-H2O system. However, the amount of produced H2SO4 phase was too small. To solve this problem, the study was carried out by the pressurized continuous Bunsen reaction. Bunsen reactions were performed at variation of feed rate of SO2/O2 gas in 3 bar of atmosphere. Also, it was performed to check the effects of the residence time in the reservoir on the characteristics of Bunsen products. As the results, the concentration of H2SO4 and HI in Bunsen products was increased with increasing the amounts of SO2. When the residence time in the reservoir increased, the concentration of H2SO4 and HI in HIx phase was decreased by reverse Bunsen reaction.

  19. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  20. Pressure solution creep of random packs of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Y.; Evans, B.

    2014-05-01

    We performed numerical calculations of compaction in aggregates of spherical grains, using Lehner and Leroy's (2004, hereinafter LL) constitutive model of pressure solution at grain contacts. That model is founded on a local definition of the thermodynamic driving force and leads to a fully coupled formulation of elastic deformation, dissolution, and diffusive transport along the grain boundaries. The initial geometry of the aggregate was generated by random packing of spheres with a small standard deviation of the diameters. During the simulations, isostatic loading was applied. The elastic displacements at the contacts were calculated according to Digby's (1981) nonlinear contact force model, and deformation by dissolution was evaluated using the LL formulation. The aggregate strain and porosity were tracked as a function of time for fixed temperature, applied effective pressure, and grain size. We also monitored values of the average and standard deviation of total load at each contact, the coordination number for packing, and the statistics of the contact dimensions. Because the simulations explicitly exclude processes such as fracturing, plastic flow, and transport owing to surface curvature, they can be used to test the influence of relative changes in the kinetics of dissolution and diffusion processes caused by contact growth and packing rearrangements. We found that the simulated strain data could be empirically fitted by two successive power laws of the form, ɛx ∝ tξ, where ξ was equal to 1 at very early times, but dropped to as low as 0.3 at longer times. The apparent sensitivity of strain rate to stress found in the simulations was much lower than predicted from constitutive laws that assume a single dominant process driven by average macroscopic loads. Likewise, the apparent activation enthalpy obtained from the simulated data was intermediate between that assumed for dissolution and diffusion, and, further, tended to decrease with time. These

  1. The molar enthalpies of solution and vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of some cesium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2006-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cesium chloride, cesium bromide, cesium nitrate, cesium sulfate, cesium formate, and cesium oxalate were determined as a function of temperature. These vapour pressures were used to evaluate the water activities, osmotic coefficients and molar enthalpies of vapourization. Molar enthalpies of solution of cesium chloride, Δ sol H m (T = 295.73 K; m = 0.0622 mol . kg -1 ) = (17.83 ± 0.50) kJ . mol -1 ; cesium bromide, Δ sol H m (T = 293.99 K; m = 0.0238 mol . kg -1 ) = (26.91 ± 0.59) kJ . mol -1 ; cesium nitrate, Δ sol H m (T = 294.68 K; m = 0.0258 mol . kg -1 ) = (37.1 ± 2.3) kJ . mol -1 ; cesium sulfate, Δ sol H m (T = 296.43 K; m = 0.0284 mol . kg -1 ) (16.94 ± 0.43) kJ . mol -1 ; cesium formate, Δ sol H m (T = 295.64 K; m = 0.0283 mol . kg -1 ) = (11.10 ± 0.26) kJ . mol -1 and Δ sol H m (T = 292.64 K; m = 0.0577 mol . kg -1 ) = (11.56 ± 0.56) kJ . mol -1 ; and cesium oxalate, Δ sol H m (T = 291.34 K; m = 0.0143 mol . kg -1 ) = (22.07 ± 0.16) kJ . mol -1 were determined calorimetrically. The purity of the chemicals was generally greater than 0.99 mass fraction, except for HCOOCs and (COOCs) 2 where purities were approximately 0.95 and 0.97 mass fraction, respectively. The uncertainties are one standard deviations

  2. Melting diagram of hydrogen-deuterium solutions for pressures up to 100 atm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznyak, N.G.; Sheinina, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Curves of the onset of melting of hydrogen-deuterium solutions of three different concentrations versus the vapor pressure up to ∼140 atm are measured. The topology of the melting diagram of H 2 --D 2 solutions at elevated pressures is determined. The isotope separation coefficients between the liquid and solid phases are calculated

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimund, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π(1+√w -1 ), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at "maximum power density operating pressure" requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  4. Does the Hertz solution estimate pressures correctly in diamond indentor experiments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, M. S.; Dunn, K. J.

    1986-05-01

    The Hertz solution has been widely used to estimate pressures in a spherical indentor against flat matrix type high pressure experiments. It is usually assumed that the pressure generated when compressing a sample between the indentor and substrate is the same as that generated when compressing an indentor against a flat surface with no sample present. A non-linear finite element analysis of this problem has shown that the situation is far more complex. The actual peak pressure in the sample is highly dependent on plastic deformation and the change in material properties due to hydrostatic pressure. An analysis with two material models is presented and compared with the Hertz solution.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimund, Kevin K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Wilson, Aaron D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  6. Exact solution of unsteady flow generated by sinusoidal pressure gradient in a capillary tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdulhameed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mathematical modeling of unsteady second grade fluid in a capillary tube with sinusoidal pressure gradient is developed with non-homogenous boundary conditions. Exact analytical solutions for the velocity profiles have been obtained in explicit forms. These solutions are written as the sum of the steady and transient solutions for small and large times. For growing times, the starting solution reduces to the well-known periodic solution that coincides with the corresponding solution of a Newtonian fluid. Graphs representing the solutions are discussed.

  7. Analytical solution for dynamic pressurization of viscoelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemabadi, S.H.; Etemad, S.Gh.; Thibault, J.; Golkar Naranji, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    The flow of simplified Phan-Thien-Tanner model fluid between parallel plates is studied analytically for the case where the upper plate moves at constant velocity. Two forms of the stress coefficient, linear and exponential, are used in the constitutive equation. For the linear stress coefficient, the dimensionless pressure gradient, the velocity profile and the product of friction factor and Reynolds number are obtained for a wide range of flow rate, Deborah number and elongational parameter. The results indicate the strong effects of the viscoelastic parameter on the velocity profile, the extremum of the velocity, and the friction factor. A correlation for the maximum pressure rise in single screw extruders is proposed. For the exponential stress coefficient, only velocity profiles were obtained and compared with velocity profiles obtained with the linear stress coefficient

  8. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium acetates, chlorates, and perchlorates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Manzurola, Emanuel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-08-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of sodium acetate, potassium acetate, sodium perchlorate, and potassium perchlorate were determined over the (278 to 318) K temperature range and compared with available in the literature data. The cases of saturated solutions of sodium chlorate and potassium chlorate are also considered. The determined vapour pressures were used to obtain the water activities, the osmotic coefficients, and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in considered systems.

  9. Influence of pressure on acoustic and rheologic parameters in water solutions of laury sodium sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamidov, B. T.; Lezhnev, N. B.

    1995-10-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and density in water solutions of lauril sodium sulphate at frequency 36 MHz, within the range of pressures from 0.1 to 105 MPa at temperature T equals 293 K were measured. According to data of ultrasonic velocity and density under high pressures there was calculated adiabatic compressibility in objects studied from pressure. It was found out that the region of critical concentration of micelle formation has been shifted to the zone of much more low concentrations.

  10. Microstructural Evidences of Intergranular Pressure Solution during Frictional Sliding at Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Yao, S.; He, C.

    2017-12-01

    In the framework of rate- and state-dependent friction, velocity weakening is the result of a healing effect at intergranular contacts that is stronger than the instantaneous rate effect. Intergranular pressure solution has been proposed to be a feasible mechanism for the frictional healing effect (He et al., 2013), but to date no substantial evidences have been reported in related microstructures. In this study we report our reanalyses on samples of plagioclase gouge deformed at hydrothermal conditions with effective normal stresses of 100 MPa, 200 MPa, and 300 MPa, pore pressures of 30 MPa and 100 MPa, and temperatures from 100oC to 600oC. With an Inlens image detector in a scanning electron microscope, our focus is to find the evidences of the pressure solution processes during frictional sliding. As it has been difficult to observe the signatures of pressure solution during frictional sliding at the solution sites due to the short contact time of frequently-switching contact pairs, now we focus on the results of precipitation instead, which is the final process of pressure solution. With high magnification, we find the following evidences of intergranular pressure solution: 1) crystal growth as a result of precipitation is ubiquitously observed in deformed samples at temperatures above 200oC; 2) very fine-grained precipitated particles with flaky morphologies typically appear in intensely sheared regions and between relatively large particles in moderately sheared regions; 3) the precipitated grains are concentrated periodically in zones orientated at 45-50 degrees to the fault strike. These observations indicate that intergranular pressure solution is the dominant process responsible for the frictional healing effect.

  11. The elastic solid solution model for minerals at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, R.

    2018-02-01

    Non-ideality in mineral solid solutions affects their elastic and thermodynamic properties, their thermobaric stability, and the equilibrium phase relations in multiphase assemblages. At a given composition and state of order, non-ideality in minerals is typically modelled via excesses in Gibbs free energy which are either constant or linear with respect to pressure and temperature. This approach has been extremely successful when modelling near-ideal solutions. However, when the lattice parameters of the solution endmembers differ significantly, extrapolations of thermodynamic properties to high pressures using these models may result in significant errors. In this paper, I investigate the effect of parameterising solution models in terms of the Helmholtz free energy, treating volume (or lattice parameters) rather than pressure as an independent variable. This approach has been previously applied to models of order-disorder, but the implications for the thermodynamics and elasticity of solid solutions have not been fully explored. Solid solution models based on the Helmholtz free energy are intuitive at a microscopic level, as they automatically include the energetic contribution from elastic deformation of the endmember lattices. A chemical contribution must also be included in such models, which arises from atomic exchange within the solution. Derivations are provided for the thermodynamic properties of n-endmember solutions. Examples of the use of the elastic model are presented for the alkali halides, pyroxene, garnet, and bridgmanite solid solutions. Elastic theory provides insights into the microscopic origins of non-ideality in a range of solutions, and can make accurate predictions of excess enthalpies, entropies, and volumes as a function of volume and temperature. In solutions where experimental data are sparse or contradictory, the Helmholtz free energy approach can be used to assess the magnitude of excess properties and their variation as a function

  12. Effect of heat/pressure on cyanidin-3-glucoside ethanol model solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, M; Lindauer, R; Butz, P; Tauscher, B

    2008-01-01

    The stability of cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3gl) in 50% ethanol model solutions under heat/pressure treatments was investigated. Cy3gl was rapidly degraded when solutions were subjected to a heat/pressure treatment. The higher the pressure and the temperature used, the higher the degradation. Moreover, the degradation was increased according to increasing holding times. Parallel to the degradation of Cy3gl several hydrolytic products were formed and identified by LC-DAD/ESI-MS. The degradation of Cy3gl was well fitted to a first order reaction (R=0.99). This study pointed out the rate of susceptibility of Cy3gl in model solutions to degrade when exposed to a heat/pressure treatment and the trigger effect of high hydrostatic pressure to hydrolyse Cy3gl. By contrast, the degradation of anthocyanins in a food matrix (red grape extract solutions) was negligible after a heat/pressure process at 600MPa, 70 deg. C during 1h (P >0.05)

  13. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang

    2014-11-01

    An osmosis transport model is presented that combines the standard internal and external concentration polarization equations in the forward osmosis (FO) field with the selective layer transport equations first proposed by Sherwood in 1967. The Sherwood model describes water flux as the sum of a solute-selective, diffusive component driven by the sum of osmotic pressure and hydraulic pressure differences, and a nonselective, convective component driven by hydraulic pressure difference only. This solution-diffusion with defects (SDWD) model and the solution-diffusion (SD) model were compared against data collected using polyamide thin-film-composite (PA-TFC) and integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes, evaluated in various configurations. When tested with pure water on the porous support side and 1.5. M (π=72.7. bar) sodium chloride solution on the selective layer side, applying 1.25. bar of hydraulic pressure to the porous support side increased water flux by an order of magnitude for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water-permeable, nonselective polymer. After coating to block convection through defects, the influence of hydraulic pressure on water flux through this membrane essentially disappeared. Water flux through these defects is low (<1% of total water flux for PA-TFC membranes) and of little consequence in practical FO or reverse osmosis (RO) applications. But in pressure-assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) or pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), convective transport through defects affects the solute concentration difference across the membrane selective layer, increasing or decreasing water flux through defect-free regions. The presence of defects may explain why membrane power density in PRO is lower than that predicted based on

  14. Measurement and prediction of the solubility of acid gases in monoethanolamine solutions at low partial pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, P; Mather, A E

    1977-12-01

    An apparatus for the determination of the solubility of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and their mixtures in ethanolamine solutions at low pressures is described. With this apparatus, the solubility of H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/ and their mixtures in aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine was measured at partial pressures between 0.001 kPa and 9 kPa at temperatures of 80 and 100/sup 0/C. The results for the mixture were compared with two methods of prediction based on a thermodynamic model. 6 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels after swelling in osmotic pressure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Liu, Yuntong; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Xiaoduo

    2016-08-01

    The potential of polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVA/PVP) hydrogels as articular cartilage replacements was in vitro evaluated by using a macromolecule-based solution to mimic the osmotic environment of cartilage tissue. The effects of osmotic pressure solution on the morphology, crystallinity, swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels were investigated by swelling them in non-osmotic and osmotic pressure solutions. The results demonstrated that swelling ratio and equilibrium water content were greatly reduced by swelling in osmotic solution, and the swelling process was found to present pseudo-Fickian diffusion character. The crystallization degree of hydrogels after swelling in osmotic solution increased more significantly when it compared with that in non-osmotic solution. After swelling in osmotic solution for 28days, the compressive tangent modulus and storage modulus of hydrogels were significantly increased, and the low friction coefficient was reduced. However, after swelling in the non-osmotic solution, the compressive tangent modulus and friction coefficient of hydrogels were comparable with those of as-prepared hydrogels. The better material properties of hydrogels in vivo than in vitro evaluation demonstrated their potential application in cartilage replacement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The vapour pressure of water as a function of solute concentration above aqueous solutions of fructose, sucrose, raffinose, erythritol, xylitol, and sorbitol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, S.A.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The vapour pressure of water above an aqueous solution of sucrose at T = 298.06 K has been measured for 9 sucrose mole fractions up to 0.12. Vapour pressure measurements have also been made on aqueous solutions of meso-erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, fructose, and raffinose at T = 317.99 K...

  17. Observed relationships between wood density and solution uptake during pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Halverson; Stan Lebow

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of the relationship between wood properties and solution uptake during pressure treatment could lead to improvements in treatment quality and more efficient use of preservatives. In this study several years of treatment data representing a range of wood species, charge conditions and preservative formulations were analyzed to evaluate the...

  18. Evaluation of permeability and swelling pressure of compacted bentonite using a calcium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Takayoshi; Maeda, Munehiro; Mihara, Morihiro; Tanaka, Masuhiro

    1998-12-01

    Tests to determine the swelling pressure, permeability, compressive strength and elastic modulus of Ca-Na exchanged bentonite, Na-bentonite and Ca-bentonite at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have mainly used distilled water. However, disposal facilities for TRU waste will use cementateous material for packaging, backfill as well as structural support. In this case, a large amount of calcium will dissolve in groundwater flowing through the cementateous material. Therefore, it is important to investigate the mechanical properties of bentonite in calcium-rich water as part of the disposal research program for TRU waste. In order to understand the effect of the chemical composition of water on the basic mechanical properties of bentonite - part of evaluating the disposal concepts for TRU waste disposal - we tested the permeability of compacted bentonite under saturated conditions using a calcium hydroxide solution. The aqueous solution represents water dominated by the calcium component. Na-bentonite, Ca-Na exchanged bentonite and Ca-bentonite were used for swelling pressure measurement tests and permeability testing. Measures of the maximum and equilibrium swelling pressure as well as permeability we obtained. The dry density of bentonite was varied between tests. Results show that swelling pressure and permeability are dependent on dry density. In separate tests using Ca-bentonite, the bentonite-mixing rate was varied as an independent parameter. Results show that there is little change in the swelling pressure and permeability between tests using calcium hydroxide solution and distilled water for all bentonite types. (author)

  19. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure of glycosaminoglycan solutions by membrane osmometry at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2005-09-01

    Articular cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue composed of negatively charged proteoglycans fixed within a collagen matrix. This charge gradient causes the tissue to imbibe water and swell, creating a net osmotic pressure that enhances the tissue's ability to bear load. In this study we designed and utilized an apparatus for directly measuring the osmotic pressure of chondroitin sulfate, the primary glycosaminoglycan found in articular cartilage, in solution with varying bathing ionic strength (0.015 M, 0.15 M, 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M NaCl) at room temperature. The osmotic pressure (pi) was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing chondroitin sulfate concentration and decreasing NaCl ionic bath environment. Above 1 M NaCl, pi changes negligibly with further increases in salt concentration, suggesting that Donnan osmotic pressure is negligible above this threshold, and the resulting pressure is attributed to configurational entropy. Results of the current study were also used to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to the stiffness of cartilage based on theoretical and experimental considerations. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure resulting from configurational entropy is much smaller in cartilage (based on an earlier study on bovine articular cartilage) than in free solution. The rate of change of osmotic pressure with compressive strain is found to contribute approximately one-third of the compressive modulus (H(A)(eff)) of cartilage (Pi approximately H(A)(eff)/3), with the balance contributed by the intrinsic structural modulus of the solid matrix (i.e., H(A) approximately 2H(A)(eff)/3). A strong dependence of this intrinsic modulus on salt concentration was found; therefore, it appears that proteoglycans contribute structurally to the magnitude of H(A), in a manner independent of osmotic pressure.

  20. Required developments towards ultra high pressure and temperature subsea tree system solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queseth, Per-Olaf

    2010-07-01

    For the subsea High Pressure High Temperature oil and gas production systems, the primary challenge is to provide good, reliable solutions for HPHT reservoir exploitation based on an overview of parameters for already discovered potential fields. The paper will present a resume of Aker Solutions' previous development in this area exemplified with experiences from testing and operator observations during production start of HPHT fields in the North Sea. Further improvements are required to comply with the extreme pressures and temperatures sought to overcome. 'The Devil is in the details' is a very relevant proverb. A program to qualify subsea production X-mas trees for Ultra HPHT use will be presented with highlight on sealing systems, feed-through solutions and materials as well as impact on interfacing systems. Preliminary and intermediate analytical and test results will be presented and remaining activities summarised. (Author)

  1. Solution NMR investigation of the response of the lactose repressor core domain dimer to hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Brian; Stetz, Matthew A; Belnavis, Zachary; Wand, A Joshua

    2017-12-01

    Previous investigations of the sensitivity of the lac repressor to high-hydrostatic pressure have led to varying conclusions. Here high-pressure solution NMR spectroscopy is used to provide an atomic level view of the pressure induced structural transition of the lactose repressor regulatory domain (LacI* RD) bound to the ligand IPTG. As the pressure is raised from ambient to 3kbar the native state of the protein is converted to a partially unfolded form. Estimates of rotational correlation times using transverse optimized relaxation indicates that a monomeric state is never reached and that the predominate form of the LacI* RD is dimeric throughout this pressure change. Spectral analysis suggests that the pressure-induced transition is localized and is associated with a volume change of approximately -115mlmol -1 and an average pressure dependent change in compressibility of approximately 30mlmol -1 kbar -1 . In addition, a subset of resonances emerge at high-pressures indicating the presence of a non-native but folded alternate state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of pressure on the solution structure and hydrogen bond properties of aqueous N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups. ► High pressure reduces association propensity causing dispersion of these moieties. ► Orientational polarization of vicinal water molecules near O and H atoms of NMA. ► NMA prefers to be a H-bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water. ► Energy of these hydrogen bonds reduces slightly at high pressure. -- Abstract: Effects of high pressure on hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions are investigated by employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous N-methylacetamide (NMA) solutions. Such systems are of interest mainly because high pressure causes protein denaturation and NMA is a computationally effective model to understand the atomic-level picture of pressure-induced structural transitions of protein. Simulations are performed for five different pressure values ranging from 1 atm to 8000 atm. We find that NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups and high pressure reduces this association propensity, causing dispersion of these moieties. At high pressure, structural void decreases and the packing efficiency of water molecules around NMA molecules increases. Hydrogen bond properties calculations show favorable NMA–NMA hydrogen bonds as compared to those of NMA–water hydrogen bonds and preference of NMA to be a hydrogen bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water.

  3. A thermodynamic study of glucose and related oligomers in aqueous solution: Vapor pressures and enthalpies of mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, S.A.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Vapor pressures above aqueous solutions of glucose and maltose at both 298.06 K and 317.99 K and vapor pressures above aqueous solutions of cellobiose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, and maltopentaose at 317.99 K have been measured. The excess enthalpies have been recorded for all of the above-menti...... in aqueous solution. This so-called transference principle is found to be of interest in furthering the discussion concerning the applicability of lattice-based models for solution theory....

  4. Inactivation of B. Pumilus spores by combination hydrostatic pressure-radiation treatment of parenteral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    Bacterial spores are inactivated by moderate hydrostatic pressures. The radiation dose required to sterilize radiation sensitive pharmaceuticals can be considerably reduced using a combination hydrostatic pressure-radiation treatment. This paper describes a combination pressure-radiation sterilization process using Bacillus pumilus spores suspended in water, 0.9% saline, and 5% dextrose solutions. The optimum temperatures for spore inactivation at 35 MPa and the degree of inactivation at 35, 70 and 105 MPa applied for times up to 100 min have been determined. Inactivation was greatest in saline and least in dextrose. Spores in dextrose were only slightly less radiation resistant than in saline or water. It was calculated that the radiation dose required for sterilization could be halved with appropriate compression treatment. Examples of combinations of pressure-radiation suitable for sterilization are given. One combination is compression at 105 MPa for 18 min for a dose of 1.25 Mrad. (author)

  5. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Miyata, K.

    2010-05-01

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the TH curve for a DMSO solution of R =20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at Pc2=˜200 MPa and at Tc2pressure of SCP, Tc2: temperature of SCP). The presence of two TH peaks for DMSO solutions (R =15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (R ≤15) at high pressures and low temperatures (pressure dependence of the two TH curves for DMSO solutions of R =10 and 12 indicates that the two phase-separated components in the DMSO solution of R =10 have different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  6. Comparison of corneal safety and intraocular pressure-lowering effect of tafluprost ophthalmic solution with other prostaglandin ophthalmic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagami, Takeshi; Wakiyama, Harumi; Kusano, Mao; Kajiyama, Ayano; Miura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masafumi; Yoneda, Ai; Kurihara, Junko; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    The benzalkonium chloride (BAK) content of tafluprost ophthalmic solution (Tapros(®): tafluprost) has been reduced to balance corneal safety and preservative effectiveness (old formulation: 0.01%; new formulation: 0.001%). However, no reports have been published on its clinical effect. Therefore, we conducted a clinical research study to compare the safety of BAK-reduced tafluprost on the ocular surface with other prostaglandin ophthalmic solutions. This clinical study included 28 glaucoma patients (28 eyes) with a treatment history of latanoprost ophthalmic solution (Xalatan(®)) or travoprost ophthalmic solution (Travatan Z(®)), who presented with corneal epithelial disorders. The subjects were switched to BAK-reduced tafluprost, and its effect on the ocular surface was examined after 1 and 2 months of treatment [using fluorescein staining score, hyperemia, tear film breakup time, and intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering]. In all analyzed subjects (N=27), the fluorescein staining score was significantly improved after switching to BAK-reduced tafluprost (P<0.0001). Conversely, the IOP-lowering effect was not notably changed. The subjects switched from latanoprost (n=10) showed significant improvement in fluorescein staining score (P<0.05) as well as in IOP lowering (P<0.01). The subjects switched from travoprost (n=17) also showed significant improvement in fluorescein staining score (P<0.001), but without a significant change in IOP lowering. Tafluprost with reduced BAK has potential as a superior antiglaucoma drug, not only for its IOP-lowering effect, but also for its good corneal safety profile.

  7. Precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution prepared by solidification under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jie, J.C.; Wang, H.W.; Zou, C.M.; Wei, Z.J.; Li, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution containing 21.6 at.% Mg prepared by solidification under 2 GPa was investigated. The results show that the γ-Al 12 Mg 17 phase is formed and the β′ phase cannot be observed in the solid solution during ageing process. The precipitation of γ and β phases takes place in a non-uniform manner during heating process, i.e. the γ and β phases are first formed in the interdendritic region, which is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of Mg atoms in the solid solution solidified under high pressure. Peak splitting of X-ray diffraction patterns of Al(Mg) solid solution appears, and then disappears when the samples are aged at 423 K for different times, due to the non-uniform precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution. The direct transformation from the γ to β phase is observed after ageing at 423 K for 24 h. It is considered that the β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β which needs the diffusion of Mg atoms across the interface of α/γ phases. - Highlights: • The γ phase is formed and the β′ phase is be observed in Al(Mg) solid solution. • Peak splitting of XRD pattern of Al(Mg) solid solution appears during aged at 150 °C. • The β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β

  8. Photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution with algae under high-pressure mercury lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianli; Wu, Feng; Deng, Nansheng

    2004-01-01

    Photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) could be induced in aqueous solution with algae (Nitzschia hantzschiana, etc.) and (or not) Fe3+ under high-pressure mercury lamp with an exposure time of 4 h. *OH was determined by HPLC using benzene as a probe. The photoproduction of *OH increased with increasing algae concentration. Fe3+ could enhance the photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae. The results showed that the photoproduction of *OH in algal solution with Fe3+ was greater than that in algal solution without Fe3+. The light intensity and pH affected the photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae with/without Fe3+. The photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae and Fe3+ under 250 W was greater than that under 125 W HPML. The photoproduction of *OH in algal solution (pH ranged from 4.0 to 7.0) with (or not) Fe3+ at pH 4 was the greatest.

  9. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; Boekel, van Tiny; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were

  10. Plane strain analytical solutions for a functionally graded elastic-plastic pressurized tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eraslan, Ahmet N.; Akis, Tolga

    2006-01-01

    Plane strain analytical solutions to functionally graded elastic and elastic-plastic pressurized tube problems are obtained in the framework of small deformation theory. The modulus of elasticity and the uniaxial yield limit of the tube material are assumed to vary radially according to two parametric parabolic forms. The analytical plastic model is based on Tresca's yield criterion, its associated flow rule and ideally plastic material behaviour. Elastic, partially plastic and fully plastic stress states are investigated. It is shown that the elastoplastic response of the functionally graded pressurized tube is affected significantly by the material nonhomogeneity. Different modes of plasticization may take place unlike the homogeneous case. It is also shown mathematically that the nonhomogeneous elastoplastic solution presented here reduces to that of a homogeneous one by appropriate choice of the material parameters

  11. Modeling the growth and interaction of stylolite networks, using the discrete element method for pressure solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonska, N.; Sparks, D. W.; Aharonov, E.

    2012-12-01

    Pressure solution (also termed chemical compaction) is considered the most important ductile deformation mechanism operating in the Earth's upper crust. This mechanism is a major player in a variety of geological processes, including evolution of sedimentary basins, hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifers, earthquake recurrence cycles, and fault healing. Pressure solution in massive rocks often localizes into solution seams or stylolites. Field observations of stylolites often show elastic/brittle interactions in regions between pressure solution features, including and shear fractures, veins and pull-apart features. To understand these interactions, we use a grain-scale model based on the Discrete Element Method that allows granular dissolution at stressed contacts between grains. The new model captures both the slow chemical compaction process and the more abrupt brittle fracturing and sliding between grains. We simulate a sample of rock as a collection of particles, each representing either a grain or a unit of rock, bonded to each other with breakable cement. We apply external stresses to this sample, and calculate elastic and frictional interactions between the grains. Dissolution is modeled by an irreversible penetration of contacting grains into each other at a rate that depends on the contact stress and an adjustable rate constant. Experiments have shown that dissolution rates at grain contacts are greatly enhanced when there is a mineralogical contrast. Therefore, we dissolution rate constant can be increased to account for an amount of impurities (e.g. clay in a quartz or calcite sandstone) that can accumulate on dissolving contacts. This approach allows large compaction and shear strains within the rock, while allowing examination of local grain-scale heterogeneity. For example, we will describe the effect of pressure solution on the distribution of contact forces magnitudes and orientations. Contact forces in elastic granular packings are inherently

  12. Balancing Osmotic Pressure of Electrolytes for Nanoporous Membrane Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with a Draw Solute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ligen; Li, Dan; Li, Shuaiqiang; Xu, Zhi; Dong, Junhang; Jing, Wenheng; Xing, Weihong

    2016-12-28

    Vanadium redox flow batteries with nanoporous membranes (VRFBNM) have been demonstrated to be good energy storage devices. Yet the capacity decay due to permeation of vanadium and water makes their commercialization very difficult. Inspired by the forward osmosis (FO) mechanism, the VRFBNM battery capacity decrease was alleviated by adding a soluble draw solute (e.g., 2-methylimidazole) into the catholyte, which can counterbalance the osmotic pressure between the positive and negative half-cell. No change of the electrolyte volume has been observed after VRFBNM being operated for 55 h, revealing that the permeation of water and vanadium ions was effectively limited. Consequently, the Coulombic efficiency (CE) of nanoporous TiO 2 vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was enhanced from 93.5% to 95.3%, meanwhile, its capacity decay was significantly suppressed from 60.7% to 27.5% upon the addition of soluble draw solute. Moreover, the energy capacity of the VRFBNM was noticeably improved from 297.0 to 406.4 mAh remarkably. These results indicate balancing the osmotic pressure via the addition of draw solute can restrict pressure-dependent vanadium permeation and it can be established as a promising method for up-scaling VRFBNM application.

  13. Second sound, osmotic pressure, and Fermi-liquid parameters in 3He-4He solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corruccini, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    Second-sound velocities and osmotic pressures are analyzed to obtain the first experimental values for the Landau compressibility parameter F 0 /sup s/ in 3 He- 4 He solutions. Data are presented as a function of pressure and 3 He concentration, and are compared to theoretical predictions. The square of the second-sound velocity at finite temperature is found to be accurately proportional to the internal energy of a perfect Fermi gas. Using inertial effective masses given by the Landau-Pomeranchuk theory, the square of the velocity is found to separate into two parts: a temperature-dependent part characterized completely by ideal Fermi-gas behavior and a temperature-independent part containing all the Fermi-liquid corrections. This is related to a similar separation found in the osmotic pressure

  14. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Sérgio B.; Netto, Theodoro A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3″ diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: ► An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. ► Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. ► The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. ► The burst pressure model’s accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  15. Forward and pressure retarded osmosis: potential solutions for global challenges in energy and water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaysom, Chalida; Cath, Tazhi Y; Depuydt, Tom; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2013-08-21

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMP) have gained renewed interest in recent years and they might become a potential solution for the world's most challenging problems of water and energy scarcity. Though the concept of utilizing osmotic pressure difference between high and low salinity streams across semipermeable membranes has been explored for several decades, lack of optimal membranes and draw solutions hindered competition between forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) with existing water purification and power generation technologies, respectively. Driven by growing global water scarcity and by energy cost and negative environmental impacts, novel membranes and draw solutions are being developed for ODMPs, mass and heat transfer in osmotic process are becoming better understood, and new applications of ODMPs are emerging. Therefore, OMDPs might become promising green technologies to provide clean water and clean energy from abundantly available renewable resources. This review focuses primarily on new insights into osmotic membrane transport mechanisms and on novel membranes and draw solutions that are currently being developed. Furthermore, the effects of operating conditions on the overall performance of osmotic membranes will be highlighted and future perspectives will be presented.

  16. Finite element limit analysis based plastic limit pressure solutions for cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Do Jun; Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Young Jin

    2002-01-01

    Based on detailed FE limit analyses, the present paper provides tractable approximations for plastic limit pressure solutions for axial through-wall cracked pipe; axial (inner) surface cracked pipe; circumferential through-wall cracked pipe; and circumferential (inner) surface cracked pipe. Comparisons with existing analytical and empirical solutions show a large discrepancy in circumferential short through-wall cracks and in surface cracks (both axial and circumferential). Being based on detailed 3-D FE limit analysis, the present solutions are believed to be the most accurate, and thus to be valuable information not only for plastic collapse analysis of pressurised piping but also for estimating non-linear fracture mechanics parameters based on the reference stress approach

  17. Theoretical aspects of pressure and solute denaturation of proteins: A Kirkwood-buff-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2012-12-01

    A new approach to the problem of pressure-denaturation (PD) and solute-denaturation (SD) of proteins is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of Le Chatelier principle, and a solution is sought in terms of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions. It is found that both problems have one factor in common; the excluded volumes of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to the solvent molecules. It is shown that solvent-induced effects operating on hydrophilic groups along the protein are probably the main reason for PD. On the other hand, the SD depends on the preferential solvation of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to solvent and co-solvent molecules.

  18. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  19. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on BCC-lattice parameter in molybdenum, niobium and vanadium with rhenium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smol'yaninova, Eh.A.; Stribuk, E.K.; Tyavlovskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the effect of 1.8GPa hydrostatic pressure on bcc lattice parameters of solid solutions in Mo-Re, Nb-Re, V-re systems are presented. It is shown that after the application hydrostatic pressure a decrease in bcc lattice parameter is observed and the greatest change in the lattice parameter takes place in bcc of solid solutions in the Nb-Re system (DELTA A ∼ 0.0035 nm). Analysis of the experimental data obtained on the basis of calculations made for packing density change in the above-mentioned solid solutions under the pressure is carried out

  20. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Sergio B., E-mail: sbcunha@petrobras.com.br [PETROBRAS/TRANSPETRO, Av. Pres. Vargas 328 - 7th floor, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20091-060 (Brazil); Netto, Theodoro A., E-mail: tanetto@lts.coppe.ufrj.br [COPPE, Federal University ot Rio de Janeiro, Ocean Engineering Department, PO BOX 68508, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3 Double-Prime diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The burst pressure model's accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  1. High-Reynolds-number turbulent-boundary-layer wall-pressure fluctuations with dilute polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian R.; Winkel, Eric S.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R.

    2010-08-01

    Wall-pressure fluctuations were investigated within a high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer (TBL) modified by the addition of dilute friction-drag-reducing polymer solutions. The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9 m long flat-plate test model with the surface hydraulically smooth (k+<0.2) and achieving downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers to 220×106. The polymer (polyethylene oxide) solution was injected into the TBL through a slot in the surface. The primary flow diagnostics were skin-friction drag balances and an array of flush-mounted dynamic pressure transducers 9.8 m from the model leading edge. Parameters varied included the free-stream speed (6.7, 13.4, and 20.2 m s-1) and the injection condition (polymer molecular weight, injection concentration, and volumetric injection flux). The behavior of the pressure spectra, convection velocity, and coherence, regardless of the injection condition, were determined primarily based on the level of drag reduction. Results were divided into two regimes dependent on the level of polymer drag reduction (PDR), nominally separated at a PDR of 40%. The low-PDR regime is characterized by decreasing mean-square pressure fluctuations and increasing convection velocity with increasing drag reduction. This shows that the decrease in the pressure spectra with increasing drag reduction is due in part to the moving of the turbulent structures from the wall. Conversely, with further increases in drag reduction, the high-PDR regime has negligible variation in the mean-squared pressure fluctuations and convection velocity. The convection velocity remains constant at approximately 10% above the baseline-flow convection velocity, which suggests that the turbulent structures no longer move farther from the wall with increasing drag reduction. In light of recent numerical work, the coherence results indicate that in the low-PDR regime, the turbulent structures are being elongated in

  2. The Role of the Pressure in the Partial Regularity Theory for Weak Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Diego; Lemarié-Rieusset, Pierre-Gilles; Mayoufi, Kawther

    2018-04-01

    We study the role of the pressure in the partial regularity theory for weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. By introducing the notion of dissipative solutions, due to D uchon and R obert (Nonlinearity 13:249-255, 2000), we will provide a generalization of the Caffarelli, Kohn and Nirenberg theory. Our approach sheels new light on the role of the pressure in this theory in connection to Serrin's local regularity criterion.

  3. Hydrostatic pressure effect on PNIPAM cononsolvency in water-methanol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Graziano, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    When methanol is added to water at room temperature and 1atm, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), PNIPAM, undergoes a coil-to-globule collapse transition. This intriguing phenomenon is called cononsolvency. Spectroscopic measurements have shown that application of high hydrostatic pressure destroys PNIPAM cononsolvency in water-methanol solutions. We have developed a theoretical approach that identifies the decrease in solvent-excluded volume effect as the driving force of PNIPAM collapse on increasing the temperature. The same approach indicates that cononsolvency, at room temperature and P=1atm, is caused by the inability of PNIPAM to make all the attractive energetic interactions that it could be engaged in, due to competition between water and methanol molecules. The present analysis suggests that high hydrostatic pressure destroys cononsolvency because the coil state becomes more compact, and the quantity measuring PNIPAM-solvent attractions increases in magnitude due to the solution density increase, and the ability of small water molecules to substitute methanol molecules on PNIPAM surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Treatment of Poly-ε-caprolactone Polymer Solutions To Improve Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Silvia; Van Guyse, Joachim; Nikiforov, Anton Y; Onyshchenko, Iuliia; Asadian, Mahtab; Morent, Rino; Hoogenboom, Richard; De Geyter, Nathalie

    2017-09-27

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) specifically designed for liquid treatment has been used in this work to improve the electrospinnability of a 5 w/v % solution of poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) in a mixture of chloroform and N,N-dimethylformamide. Untreated PCL solutions were found to result in nonuniform fibers containing a large number of beads, whereas plasma-treated solutions (exposure time of 2-5 min) enabled the generation of beadless, uniform nanofibers with an average diameter of 450 nm. This enhanced electrospinnability was found to be mainly due to the highly increased conductivity of the plasma-modified PCL solutions. Consequently, more stretching of the polymer jet occurred during electrospinning, leading to the generation of bead-free fibers. Plasma treatment also results in an increased viscosity and decreased pH values. To explain these observed changes, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used to examine the excited species present in the APPJ in contact with the PCL solution. This study revealed that the peaks attributed to H, CH, CH 2 , and C 2 species could be responsible for the degradation of solvent molecules and/or PCL structures during the plasma treatment. Size exclusion chromatography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the molecular weight and the chemical composition of PCL were not significantly affected by the APPJ treatment. Plasma exposure mainly results in the degradation of the solvent molecules instead of modifying the PCL macromolecules, preserving the original polymer as much as possible. A hypothesis for the observed macroscopic changes in viscosity and pH values could be the generation of new chemical species such as HCl and/or HNO 3 . These species are characterized by their high conductivity, low pH values, and strong polarity and could enhance the solvent quality for PCL, leading to the expansion of the polymer coil, which could in turn explain the observed enhanced viscosity after plasma

  6. Oxidative Pressure Leaching of Silver from Flotation Concentrates with Ammonium Thiocyanate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hai; Yang, Jian-Guang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Geng-Tao; Tang, Mo-Tang; Qiu, Guan-Zhou

    2010-02-01

    The thermodynamics and technologies of the selective pressure leaching of silver from flotation concentrates were investigated in an ammonium thiocyanate medium. Thermodynamic analyses, which include silver solubility in NH4SCN solution and Eh-pH diagrams of the Me-MeS-NH4SCN-H2O system at 25 °C, were discussed. The effects of several factors, such as temperature, leaching time, oxidant, pH value, flotation concentrates concentration, surfactant concentration, and so on, on the extraction percentages of silver and zinc were investigated. The following optimal leaching conditions were obtained: NH4SCN concentration 1.5 M, lignin concentration 0.5 g/L, Fe3+ concentration 2 g/L, flotation concentrates addition 200 g/L, and oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa at 130 °C for 3 hours. Under these optimum conditions, the average extraction percentage of silver exceeded 94 pct, whereas the average extraction percentage of zinc was less than 3 pct. Only 7 pct of ammonium thiocyanate was consumed after 4 cycles, which indicated that ammonium thiocyanate hardly was oxidized under these oxidative pressure leaching conditions.

  7. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems

  8. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems.

  9. Importance of Heat and Pressure for Solubilization of Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Justin A; Harris, Thomas I; Oliveira, Paula F; Bell, Brianne E; Alhabib, Abdulrahman; Lewis, Randolph V

    2016-11-23

    The production of recombinant spider silk proteins continues to be a key area of interest for a number of research groups. Several key obstacles exist in their production as well as in their formulation into useable products. The original reported method to solubilize recombinant spider silk proteins (rSSp) in an aqueous solution involved using microwaves to quickly generate heat and pressure inside of a sealed vial containing rSSp and water. Fibers produced from this system are remarkable in their mechanical ability and demonstrate the ability to be stretched and recover 100 times. The microwave method dissolves the rSSPs with dissolution time increasing with higher molecular weight constructs, increasing concentration of rSSPs, protein type, and salt concentration. It has proven successful in solvating a number of different rSSPs including native-like sequences (MaSp1, MaSp2, piriform, and aggregate) as well as chimeric sequences (FlAS) in varied concentrations that have been spun into fibers and formed into films, foams, sponges, gels, coatings, macro and micro spheres and adhesives. The system is effective but inherently unpredictable and difficult to control. Provided that the materials that can be generated from this method of dissolution are impressive, an alternative means of applying heat and pressure that is controllable and predictable has been developed. Results indicate that there are combinations of heat and pressure (135 °C and 140 psi) that result in maximal dissolution without degrading the recombinant MaSp2 protein tested, and that heat and pressure are the key elements to the method of dissolution.

  10. Viscosity of HI-I2-H2O solution at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Songzhe; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Laijun; Xu, Jingming; Gao, Mengxue

    2014-01-01

    Iodine-Sulfur thermochemical cycle (IS-cycle) is one of the most promising massive hydrogen production methods. Basic properties data of the HI-I 2 -H 2 O solution involved in the HI decomposition section of IS-cycle are found to be very important. HI, I 2 , and H 2 O make up a highly non-ideal solution system. Viscosity and its variation with the composition/temperature are very essential for the flowsheet work and HI-H 2 O-I 2 solution’s fluid simulation, especially in the distillation and electro-electrodialysis processes. In this paper, viscosity values of HI-H 2 O-I 2 solutions were measured at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures (from 20 to 125 ºC). As for the composition, the HI/H2O molar ratio of the samples ranged from 1:5.36 to 1:12.00, while the HI/I 2 molar ratio from 1.0 to 1.4.0. Both temperature and composition have dramatic influence on the viscosity. Increasing temperature or H 2 O/HI molar ratio will lead to the reduction of viscosity; while increasing of I 2 /HI molar ratio results in the increase of viscosity. It was also found that I 2 content has a larger and more complex influence on the viscosity of the HI-H 2 O-I 2 solution than H 2 O content does, especially at low temperature (<50 °C). (author)

  11. Atmospheric-pressure electric discharge as an instrument of chemical activation of water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, V. V.; Shutov, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Results of experimental studies and numerical simulations of physicochemical characteristics of plasmas generated in different types of atmospheric-pressure discharges (pulsed streamer corona, gliding electric arc, dielectric barrier discharge, glow-discharge electrolysis, diaphragmatic discharge, and dc glow discharge) used to initiate various chemical processes in water solutions are analyzed. Typical reactor designs are considered. Data on the power supply characteristics, plasma electron parameters, gas temperatures, and densities of active particles in different types of discharges excited in different gases and their dependences on the external parameters of discharges are presented. The chemical composition of active particles formed in water is described. Possible mechanisms of production and loss of plasma particles are discussed.

  12. The study on density change of carbon dioxide seawater solution at high pressure and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.; Chen, B.; Nishio, M.; Akai, M.

    2005-01-01

    It has been widely considered that the global warming, induced by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, is an environmental task affecting the world economic development. In order to mitigate the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere, the sequestration of carbon dioxide into the ocean had been investigated theoretically and experimentally over the last 10 years. In addition to ocean dynamics, ocean geological, and biological information on large space and long time scales, the physical-chemistry properties of seawater-carbon dioxide system at high pressure (P>5.0 MPa) and lower temperature (274.15 K 3 , which is approximately same with that of carbon dioxide freshwater solution, the slope of which is 0.275 g/cm 3

  13. Retention behavior of neutral solutes in pressurized flow-driven capillary electrochromatography using an ODS column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Shinya; Araki, Shuki; Ohtani, Hajime

    2006-02-01

    Several alkyl benzenes are separated by pressurized flow-driven capillary electrochromatography using a temperature-controlled capillary column packed with octadecyl siloxane-modified silica gel, and the effect of applied voltage on the retention is investigated. The van't Hoff plot shows good linearity at the column temperature between 305 and 330 K under applications from -6 to +6 kV. The applied voltage causes a relatively large variation in the enthalpy and the entropy of transfer of the solute from the mobile phase to the stationary phase (> 20%). However, the direction of variation in the enthalpy is almost opposite to that in the entropy, both of which might compensate each other. Therefore, the retention factor is not significantly varied (< 4%) by the application of voltage.

  14. Effects of feed solution chemistry on low pressure reverse osmosis filtration of cesium and strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shiyuan, E-mail: dingshiyuan@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Yang, Yu, E-mail: yangyu@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Haiou, E-mail: huanghaiou@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Hengchen, E-mail: 799599501@qq.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: houlian678@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Xi’an High-Tech Institute, No. 2, Tongxin Street, Baqiao District, Xi’an 710025 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • A low pressure spiral wound RO membrane can reject Cs and Sr efficiently. • The rejection of Cs and Sr is dependent on feed pH and co-existing ions. • Donnan exclusion and electrostatic interaction govern the rejection of Cs and Sr. • The differences of filtration mechanism were influenced by the size of ions. • Sr could strengthen the irreversible membrane fouling resistance with HA. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to identify the removal mechanisms of radionuclides by reverse osmosis (RO) membranes under conditions relevant to full-scale water treatment. For this purpose, the effects of feed solution chemistry on the removal of Cs and Sr by a low pressure RO system was investigated by systematically varying membrane surface charge, ionic composition, and organic matter concentrations. The results showed that the effects of solution chemistry on the filtration of Cs and Sr were related to their hydrated ionic radius, resulting in the predominance of the Donnan’s effect and electrostatic interactions, respectively. Consequently, the rejection of Cs increased more pronouncedly than Sr with the increases of feed concentration. Due to the Donnan’s effect, different anions decreased the rejection of Cs to different extents in accordance to the order of anions’ radii as SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −} > NO{sub 3}{sup −} > F{sup −}. The variations in Sr rejection were influenced by the electrostatic interactions between Sr{sup 2+} and the membrane. In addition, humic acid (HA) lowered the rejection of Cs and caused significant membrane flux decline, but did not change the rejection of Sr. Sr also aggravated HA fouling of the membrane.

  15. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  16. All solution-processed micro-structured flexible electrodes for low-cost light-emitting pressure sensors fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotsu, Rie; Takumi, Takahiro; Vohra, Varun

    2017-07-31

    Recent studies have demonstrated the advantage of developing pressure-sensitive devices with light-emitting properties for direct visualization of pressure distribution, potential application to next generation touch panels and human-machine interfaces. To ensure that this technology is available to everyone, its production cost should be kept as low as possible. Here, simple device concepts, namely, pressure sensitive flexible hybrid electrodes and OLED architecture, are used to produce low-cost resistive or light-emitting pressure sensors. Additionally, integrating solution-processed self-assembled micro-structures into the flexible hybrid electrodes composed of an elastomer and conductive materials results in enhanced device performances either in terms of pressure or spatial distribution sensitivity. For instance, based on the pressure applied, the measured values for the resistances of pressure sensors range from a few MΩ down to 500 Ω. On the other hand, unlike their evaporated equivalents, the combination of solution-processed flexible electrodes with an inverted OLED architectures display bright green emission when a pressure over 200 kPa is applied. At a bias of 3 V, their luminance can be tuned by applying a higher pressure of 500 kPa. Consequently, features such as fingernails and fingertips can be clearly distinguished from one another in these long-lasting low-cost devices.

  17. Apparatus to measure vapor pressure, differential vapor pressure, liquid molar volume, and compressibility of liquids and solutions to the critical point. Vapor pressures, molar volumes, and compressibilities of protiobenzene and deuteriobenzene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooner, Z.S.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure differences between two similar liquids, such as isotopic isomers, or between a solution and its reference solvent at temperatures and pressures extending to the critical point is described. Vapor-phase volume is minimized and pressure is transmitted to the transducer through the liquid, thereby avoiding several experimental difficulties. Liquid can be injected into the heated part of the system by volumetrically calibrated screw injectors, thus permitting measurements of liquid molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity. The addition of a high-pressure circulating pump and injection valve allows the apparatus to be employed as a continuous dilution differential vapor pressure apparatus for determining partial molar free energies of solution. In the second part of the paper data on the vapor pressure, molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity and their isotope effects for C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 from room temperature to near the critical temperature are reported

  18. Pressure Drop and Catalytic Dehydrogenation of NaBH{sub 4} Solution Across Pin Fin Structures in a Microchannel Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Moon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seok Hyun [Key Valve Technologies Ltd., Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee Joon [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Dehydrogenation from the hydrolysis of a sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution has been of interest owing to its high theoretical hydrogen storage capacity (10.8 wt.%) and potentially safe operation. An experimental study has been performed on the catalytic reaction rate and pressure drop of a NaBH4 solution over both a single microchannel with a hydraulic diameter of 300 μm and a staggered array of micro pin fins in the microchannel with hydraulic diameter of 50 μm. The catalytic reaction rates and pressure drops were obtained under Reynolds numbers from 1 to 60 and solution concentrations from 5 to 20 wt.%. Moreover, reacting flows were visualized using a high-speed camera with a macro zoom lens. As a result, both the amount of hydrogenation and pressure drop are 2.45 times and 1.5 times larger in a pin fin microchannel array than in a single microchannel, respectively.

  19. Effect of injection pressure on heat release rate and emissions in CI engine using orange skin powder diesel solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purushothaman, K.; Nagarajan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study the effect of injection pressure on the combustion process and exhaust emissions of a direct injection diesel engine fueled with Orange Skin Powder Diesel Solution (OSPDS). Earlier investigation by the authors revealed that 30% OSPDS was optimum for better performance and emissions. In the present investigation the injection pressure was varied with 30% OSPDS and the combustion, performance and emissions characteristics were compared with those of diesel fuel. The different injection pressures studied were 215 bar, 235 bar and 255 bar. The results showed that the cylinder pressure with 30% OSPDS at 235 bar fuel injection pressure, was higher than that of diesel fuel as well as at other injection pressures. Similarly, the ignition delay was longer and with shorter combustion duration with 30% OSPDS at 235 bar injection pressure. The brake thermal efficiency was better at 235 bar than that of other fuel injection pressures with OSPDS and lower than that of diesel fuel. The NO x emission with 30% OSPDS was higher at 235 bar. The hydrocarbon and CO emissions were lower with 30% OSPDS at 235 bar. The smoke emission with 30% OSPDS was marginally lower at 235 bar and marginally higher at 215 bar than for diesel fuel. The combustion, performance and emission characteristics of the engine operating on the test fuels at 235 bar injection pressure were better than other injection pressures

  20. In Situ Observations of Thermoreversible Gelation and Phase Separation of Agarose and Methylcellulose Solutions under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kometani, Noritsugu; Tanabe, Masahiro; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2015-06-04

    Thermoreversible sol-gel transitions of agarose and methylcellulose (MC) aqueous solutions on isobaric cooling or heating under high pressure up to 400 MPa have been investigated by in situ observations of optical transmittance and falling-ball experiments. For agarose, which undergoes the gelation on cooling, the application of pressure caused a gradual rise in the cloud-point temperature over the whole pressure range examined, which is almost consistent with the pressure dependence of gelling temperature estimated by falling-ball experiments, suggesting that agarose gel is stabilized by compression and that the gelation occurs nearly in parallel with phase separation under ambient and high-pressure conditions. For MC, which undergoes the gelation on heating, the cloud-point temperature showed a slight rise with an initial elevation of pressure up to ∼150 MPa, whereas it showed a marked depression above 200 MPa. In contrast, the gelling temperature of MC, which is nearly identical to the cloud-point temperature at ambient pressure, showed a monotonous rise with increasing pressure up to 350 MPa, which means that MC undergoes phase separation prior to gelation on heating under high pressure above 200 MPa. Similar results were obtained for the melting process of MC gel on cooling. The unique behavior of the sol-gel transition of MC under high pressure has been interpreted in terms of the destruction of hydrophobic hydration by compression.

  1. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 μm) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes 90 Zr and 180 Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer

  2. Compaction creep of quartz sand at 400-600°C: Experimental evidence for dissolution-controlled pressure solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, A.; Spiers, C.J.; Bos, B.

    2002-01-01

    Intergranular pressure solution (IPS) is an important compaction and deformation mechanism in quartzose rocks, but the kinetics and rate-controlling process remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to test microphysical models for compaction creep by IPS against isostatic hot pressing

  3. Compaction creep of simulated anhydrite fault gouge by pressure solution: theory v. experiments and implications for fault sealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluymakers, A. M. H; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The sealing and healing behaviour of faults filled with anhydrite gouge, by processes such as pressure solution, is of interest in relation both to the integrity of faults cutting geological storage systems sealed by anhydrite caprocks and to seismic events that may nucleate in anhydrite-bearing

  4. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2006-01-01

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH and ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a s and osmotic φ coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg -1 and for the ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  5. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages.

  6. On the spurious pressures generated by certain GFEM solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, R.L.; Gresho, P.M.; Lee, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The spurious pressures and acceptable velocities generated when using certain combinations of velocity and pressure approximations in a Galerkin finite element discretization of the primitive variable form of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are analyzed both theoretically and numerically for grids composed of quadrilateral finite elements. Schemes for obtaining usable pressure fields from the spurious numerical results are presented for certain cases

  7. Limit loads for piping branch junctions under internal pressure and in-plane bending-Extended solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun-Jae; Lee, Kuk-Hee; Park, Chi-Yong

    2008-01-01

    The authors have previously proposed plastic limit load solutions for thin-walled branch junctions under internal pressure and in-plane bending, based on finite element (FE) limit loads resulting from three-dimensional (3-D) FE limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials [Kim YJ, Lee KH, Park CY. Limit loads for thin-walled piping branch junctions under internal pressure and in-plane bending. Int J Press Vessels Piping 2006;83:645-53]. The solutions are valid for ratios of the branch-to-run pipe radius and thickness from 0.4 to 1.0, and for the mean radius-to-thickness ratio of the run pipe from 10.0 to 20.0. Moreover, the solutions considered the case of in-plane bending only on the branch pipe. This paper extends the previous solutions in two aspects. Firstly, plastic limit load solutions are given also for in-plane bending on the run pipe. Secondly, the validity of the proposed solutions is extended to ratios of the branch-to-run pipe radius and thickness from 0.0 to 1.0, and the mean radius-to-thickness ratio of the run pipe from 5.0 to 20.0. Comparisons with FE results show good agreement

  8. Experimental Thermodynamics of [Na-Mg-Cl-SO4] Aqueous Solutions at GPa Pressure With Application to Icy Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. M.; Bollengier, O.; Vance, S.

    2017-12-01

    Water competes with silicates as the main constituent of solid bodies in the outer solar system. Ganymede and Titan, the Mercury-sized satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, are made up half of water present as massive hydrospheres where pressure can reach up to 1.5 GPa. Geophysical data and planetary models unequivocally support the existence of global aqueous oceans trapped in these hydrospheres. However, the extent of these oceans and their role in the processes governing the internal structure of these moons remain unresolved. At issue is the poor to non-existent characterization, at the relevant pressures, of the properties of the aqueous fluids of significance to the outer solar system (with notably the Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 salts found in primitive chondrites), forcing current models to rely on pure water only. Our team at the University of Washington has developed an experimental apparatus to acquire the speed of sound of aqueous solutions in the 0 - 0.7 GPa and 250 - 350 K pressure and temperature ranges covering most of the conditions of existence of these extra-terrestrial oceans. Speeds of sound measured over a grid of pressures and temperatures allow calculation of the thermodynamic quantities (G, ρ, μ...) required for planetary science. Early analysis of pure water samples indicates our experimental results are on par with (at lower pressures), or better than, the IAPWS water laboratory standard, with sound speeds determined to 0.02% over our entire pressure range. For the first time at the high pressures of interest for large icy moons, we achieved the exploration of H2O-NaCl, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-Na2SO4 and H2O-MgCl2 solutions, from dilute concentrations to saturation. We are now in the process of acquiring the first data for H2O-NaCl-MgSO4 mixtures. We will briefly present our experimental setup and the underlying sound speed theory, and will then compare our results for the four endmembers, with an emphasis on their different association behavior under pressure as

  9. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2005-01-01

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO 3 + CH 3 OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic φ and activity coefficients γ; and activity of solvent a s have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  10. Photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol in aqueous solution exposed to a high-pressure mercury lamp (250 W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.L.; Wu, F.; Deng, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    The photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE 2 ) induced by high-pressure mercury lamp (λ≥313, 250 W) in aqueous solution of EE 2 was investigated initially. The affecting factors on the photodegradation were studied and described in details, such as EE 2 initial concentration, Fe 3+ , algae, exposure time, and so on. The concentration of EE 2 in distilled water was mainly determined using fluorescence spectrophotometer. The photodegradation of EE 2 in aqueous solution exposed to high-pressure mercury lamp was evident and could be accelerated by Fe 3+ or algae (e.g. Anabaena cylindrica) in general. With the algae concentration increasing, photodegradation rate increased. In this paper, the mechanism of photocatalytic degradation of EE 2 by Fe 3+ or algae is discussed primarily. - Photodegradation increased with increasing concentrations of algae

  11. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  12. Tokamak plasma equilibrium problems with anisotropic pressure and rotation and their numerical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Martynov, A. A.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Poshekhonov, Yu. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    In the MHD tokamak plasma theory, the plasma pressure is usually assumed to be isotropic. However, plasma heating by neutral beam injection and RF heating can lead to a strong anisotropy of plasma parameters and rotation of the plasma. The development of MHD equilibrium theory taking into account the plasma inertia and anisotropic pressure began a long time ago, but until now it has not been consistently applied in computational codes for engineering calculations of the plasma equilibrium and evolution in tokamak. This paper contains a detailed derivation of the axisymmetric plasma equilibrium equation in the most general form (with arbitrary rotation and anisotropic pressure) and description of the specialized version of the SPIDER code. The original method of calculation of the equilibrium with an anisotropic pressure and a prescribed rotational transform profile is proposed. Examples of calculations and discussion of the results are also presented

  13. [Computer modeling the hydrostatic pressure characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of model equation depending the membrane potential deltapsis, on mechanical pressure difference (deltaP), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas), concentration Rayleigh number (RC) and ratio concentration of solutions separated by membrane (Ch/Cl), the characteristics deltapsis = f(deltaP)zetas,RC,Ch/Cl for steady values of zetas, RC and Ch/Cl in single-membrane system were calculated. In this system neutral and isotropic polymeric membrane oriented in horizontal plane, the non-homogeneous binary electrolytic solutions of various concentrations were separated. Nonhomogeneity of solutions is results from creations of the concentration boundary layers on both sides of the membrane. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, RC and zetas.

  14. High pressure liquid chromatographic assay of technetium in solutions of sodium pertechnetate produced at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used for the assay of nanogram quantities of technetium and to determine technetium in decayed pharmaceutical products, derived from three methods of manufacture. These methods of manufacture give comparably low levels of technetium-99, at the time of collection of the solution. However, when the solutions are used to produce ready-to-inject technetium-99m, high levels of technetium-99 are present at the time of calibration, which is the day after the collection date. Where sensitive reagent kits are to be labelled, freshly collected solutions of technetium-99m should be used. The HPLC assay is a valuable technique for the quality control of technetium-based radiopharmaceuticals, and for investigation of methods of manufacture of technetium-99m. Experimental studies confirmed the findings of previous workers

  15. Analytical solution of the thermo-mechanical stresses in a multilayered composite pressure vessel considering the influence of the closed ends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, Z.W.; Tang, C.Y.; Hu, D.P.; Liu, P.Q.; Xia, L.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Limited work has been reported on determining the thermo-mechanical stresses in a multilayered composite pressure vessel when the influence of its closed ends is considered. In this study, an analytical solution was derived for determining the stress distribution of a multilayered composite pressure vessel subjected to an internal fluid pressure and a thermal load, based on thermo-elasticity theory. In the solution, a pseudo extrusion pressure was proposed to emulate the effect of the closed ends of the pressure vessel. To validate the analytical solution, the stress distribution of the pressure vessel was also computed using finite element (FE) method. It was found that the analytical results were in good agreement with the computational ones, and the effect of thermal load on the stress distribution was discussed in detail. The proposed analytical solution provides an exact means to design multilayered composite pressure vessels. Highlights: ► The thermal-mechanical stress was derived for a multilayered pressure vessel. ► A new pseudo extrusion pressure was proposed to emulate the effect of closed ends. ► The analytical results are in good agreement with the computational ones using FEM. ► The solution provides an exact way to design the multilayered pressure vessel.

  16. Comparison of Outcomes for Normal Saline and an Antiseptic Solution for Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Oliver, Noah; Garwood, Caitlin; Evans, Karen K; Steinberg, John S; Lavery, Larry A

    2015-11-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is an adjunctive treatment that uses periodic instillation of a solution and negative pressure for a wide diversity of wounds. A variety of solutions have been reported, with topical antiseptics as the most frequently chosen option. The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of normal saline versus an antiseptic solution for negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation for the adjunctive treatment of infected wounds. This was a prospective, randomized, effectiveness study comparing 0.9% normal saline versus 0.1% polyhexanide plus 0.1% betaine for the adjunctive treatment of infected wounds that required hospital admission and operative débridement. One hundred twenty-three patients were eligible, with 100 patients randomized for the intention-to-treat analysis and 83 patients for the per-protocol analysis. The surrogate outcomes measured were number of operative visits, length of hospital stay, time to final surgical procedure, proportion of closed or covered wounds, and proportion of wounds that remained closed or covered at the 30-day follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences in the demographic profiles in the two cohorts except for a larger proportion of male patients (p = 0.004). There was no statistically significant difference in the surrogate outcomes with the exception of the time to final surgical procedure favoring normal saline (p = 0.038). The authors' results suggest that 0.9% normal saline may be as effective as an antiseptic (0.1% polyhexanide plus 0.1% betaine) for negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation for the adjunctive inpatient management of infected wounds. Therapeutic, II.

  17. A closed solution for the collapse load of pressurized pipelines in free spans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Luciano M. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Murray, David W.; Xuejun Song [University of Alberta (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.

    2005-07-01

    Submarine pipelines for oil exploitation, generally, are under internal pressure and compressive thermal loading. Due to rough see-bottom terrains, these pipelines may be supported only intermittently and span freely. The collapse of such pipelines may produce oil leakage to the environment. A common engineering practice for the determination of the collapse load of such pipelines is the use of finite element modeling. This paper presents an analytical method for the determination of the collapse load of pressurized pipelines extended over free spans. The formulation also takes into account the internal pressure and initial imperfection, generally present in these pipelines. Collapse load is determined from a deduced transcendental equation. Results of the presented formulation are compared with sophisticated finite element analyses. While sophisticated finite element analysis requires hours of computer processing, the present formulation takes practically no time to assess a good approximation for the collapse load of pressurized free span pipelines under compression. The present paper is not intended to substitute the more precise finite element analyses but to provide an easier, faster, and practical way to determine a first approximation of the collapse load of pressurized free span pipelines. (author)

  18. Osmotic power generation by pressure retarded osmosis using seawater brine as the draw solution and wastewater retentate as the feed

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Chunfeng; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a promising technology to produce clean and sustainable osmotic energy from salinity gradient. Fresh water is of scarcity in Singapore; however, alternative sources of feed solutions and draw solutions are well explored. For the first time, seawater brine from the TuaSpring desalination plant and wastewater retentate from the NEWater plant were used in a state-of-the-art TFC-PES hollow fiber membrane PRO process. The highest power densities obtained with 1 M NaCl solution and seawater brine were 27.0 W/m2 and 21.1 W/m2 at 20bar, respectively, when deionized (DI) water was used as the feed solution. However, the highest power density dropped to 4.6W/m2 when wastewater retentate was used as the feed solution. Fouling on the porous substrate induced by the wastewater retentate was identified as the main cause of the reduction in the power densities, while the negative effects of seawater brine on the PRO performances were negligible. Both ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) pretreatment were employed to mitigate fouling from the wastewater retentate, and the power densities were boosted to 6.6W/m2 and 8.9W/m2, respectively, beyond the power density of 5W/m2 proposed by Statkraft for the PRO process to be economical.

  19. Osmotic power generation by pressure retarded osmosis using seawater brine as the draw solution and wastewater retentate as the feed

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Chunfeng

    2015-04-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a promising technology to produce clean and sustainable osmotic energy from salinity gradient. Fresh water is of scarcity in Singapore; however, alternative sources of feed solutions and draw solutions are well explored. For the first time, seawater brine from the TuaSpring desalination plant and wastewater retentate from the NEWater plant were used in a state-of-the-art TFC-PES hollow fiber membrane PRO process. The highest power densities obtained with 1 M NaCl solution and seawater brine were 27.0 W/m2 and 21.1 W/m2 at 20bar, respectively, when deionized (DI) water was used as the feed solution. However, the highest power density dropped to 4.6W/m2 when wastewater retentate was used as the feed solution. Fouling on the porous substrate induced by the wastewater retentate was identified as the main cause of the reduction in the power densities, while the negative effects of seawater brine on the PRO performances were negligible. Both ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) pretreatment were employed to mitigate fouling from the wastewater retentate, and the power densities were boosted to 6.6W/m2 and 8.9W/m2, respectively, beyond the power density of 5W/m2 proposed by Statkraft for the PRO process to be economical.

  20. Relation between the electrolytic solution pressures of the metals and their toxicity to the stickleback (Gasterosteus acelueatus l. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J R.E.

    1939-01-01

    Lethal concentration limits have been determined for the hydrogen ion and the ions of eighteen metals. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus l.) has been employed as test animal. According to their lethal concentration limits on a mg./l. basis their order of increasing toxicity is: Sr, Ca, Na, Ba, Mg, K, Mn, Co, Cr, Ni, Au, Zn, Cd, Pb, Al, Cu, H, Hg, and Ag. On a molar concentration basis the order is as follows: Na, Ca, Sr, Mg, Ba, K, Mn, Co, Cr, Ni, H, Zn, Al, Au, Cd, Pb, Cu, Hg, Ag. All these ions, with the exception of the first six (the metals of the alkalis and alkaline earths), bring about the death of fish by precipitating the gill secretions, thus causing asphyxiation. The alkali and alkaline earth metals appear to enter the body and act as true internal poisons. The position of iron is uncertain. The toxicity of solutions of iron salts appears to be due, mainly if not entirely, to their acidity. On a mg./l. or molar concentration basis there is a marked relationship between the toxicity of the metals and their solution pressures. The metals of very low solution pressure (Ag, Cu, etc.), i.e. those whose ions are most ready to part with their charges and enter into combination with other ions or compounds, are the most toxic as they precipitate the gill secretions and bring about asphyxiation with extreme rapidity. Metals of somewhat higher solution pressure (Zn, Pb, Cd) act in the same way but more slowly. Manganese, which of all the heavy metals has the highest solution pressure, takes effect very slowly and the ions of the alkali and alkaline earth metals, which have a high affinity for their charges, do not precipitate the gill secretions at all. In the case of all ions other than those of the alkali and alkaline earth metals the reactions responsible for the death of the fish take place outside the body. Thus their speed of action does not depend on their penetrating power and the permeability factor does not enter.

  1. Using a Potassium Acetate Solution for Cooling High Pressure Hydrogen in a Prototype Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Abel, M.; Rokni, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    is to be delivered at high pressure a heat exchanger was designed and constructed. The paper presents a detailed study of construction of the heat exchanger which has been tested and compared to theory to predict and verify its performance. The method presented by Nellis and Klein for laminar flow in annulus tubes...

  2. A simple relation for the concentration dependence of osmotic pressure and depletion thickness in polymer solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, G.J.; Skvortsov, A.M.; Tuinier, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose simple expressions II/IIo = 1 + and (omega/omega(ex))(3 alpha-1) and (delta(0)/delta)(2) = 1 + (omega/omega(ex))(2 alpha) for the osmotic pressure II and the depletion thickness 6 as a function of the polymer concentration omega. Here, IIo and delta 0 correspond to the dilute limit, and

  3. Travelling wave solutions for the Richards equation incorporating non-equilibrium effects in the capillarity pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, C. J.; Mitra, K.; Pop, I. S.

    2018-01-01

    The Richards equation is a mathematical model for unsaturated flow through porous media. This paper considers an extension of the Richards equation, where non-equilibrium effects like hysteresis and dynamic capillarity are incorporated in the relationship that relates the water pressure and the

  4. Ultrafiltration of protein solutions; the role of protein association in rejection and osmotic pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G.B.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Smolders, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The monomer-dimer equilibrium of the protein β-lactoglobulin under neutral conditions appears to influence the rejection and the osmotic pressure build-up, both phenomena closely related to ultrafiltration. Rejection measurements indicate different rejections for the β-lactoglobulin monomers and

  5. Solitary traveling wave solutions of pressure equation of bubbly liquids with examination for viscosity and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Mostafa M. A.; Seadawy, Aly R.; Lu, Dianchen

    2018-03-01

    In this research, we investigate one of the most popular model in nature and also industrial which is the pressure equation of bubbly liquids with examination for viscosity and heat transfer which has many application in nature and engineering. Understanding the physical meaning of exact and solitary traveling wave solutions for this equation gives the researchers in this field a great clear vision of the pressure waves in a mixture liquid and gas bubbles taking into consideration the viscosity of liquid and the heat transfer and also dynamics of contrast agents in the blood flow at ultrasonic researches. To achieve our goal, we apply three different methods which are extended tanh-function method, extended simple equation method and a new auxiliary equation method on this equation. We obtained exact and solitary traveling wave solutions and we also discuss the similarity and difference between these three method and make a comparison between results that we obtained with another results that obtained with the different researchers using different methods. All of these results and discussion explained the fact that our new auxiliary equation method is considered to be the most general, powerful and the most result-oriented. These kinds of solutions and discussion allow for the understanding of the phenomenon and its intrinsic properties as well as the ease of way of application and its applicability to other phenomena.

  6. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2006-03-15

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH and ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a {sub s} and osmotic {phi} coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg{sup -1} and for the ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  7. Pressure injection of methyl 2-benzimidazole carbamate hydrochloride solution as a control for Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garold F. Gregory; Thomas W. Jones

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of injecting methyl 2-benzimidazole carbamate hydrochloride solution into elms for prevention or cure of Dutch elm disease is reported. Symptom development was diminished or prevented in elms injected with fungicide before inoculation. Symptom development was arrested in all crown-inoculated diseased trees injected with the...

  8. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.)

  9. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density 37 refs, 15 figs

  10. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.). 14 refs.

  11. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density

  12. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastouret, Alan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Gooijer, Frans [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Overton, Bob [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Jonker, Jan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Curley, Jim [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Constantine, Walter [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Waterman, Kendall Miller [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States)

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  13. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, Huseyn Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2005-12-15

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic {phi} and activity coefficients {gamma}; and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  14. Effects of Pressure on Stability of Biomolecules in Solutions Studied by Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire-; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Gibrat, Gabriel

    Studies of the pressure dependence on protein structure and dynamics contribute not only to the basic knowledge of biological molecules but have also a considerable relevance in full technology, like in food sterilization and pharmacy. Conformational changes induced by pressure as well as the effects on the protein stability have been mostly studied by optical techniques (optical absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence), and by NMR. Most optical techniques used so far give information related to the local nature of the used probe (fluorescent or phosphorescent tryptophan). Small angle neutron scattering and quasi-elastic neutron scattering provide essential complementary information to the optical data, giving quantitative data on change of conformation of soluble globular proteins such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and on the mobility of protons belonging to the protein surface residues.

  15. Numerical solution of the model problem of CCRF-discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheltukhin Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a 1D mathematical model of capacitive coupled RF discharge between symmetrical electrodes in argon at atmospheric pressure in a local approximation. Electrons, atomic and molecular ions, metastable atoms and argon dimmers as well as ground-state atoms are considered. A simplified diagram of argon excited states when two metastable and two resonance states are replaced with the uniform level. Such diagram is frequently used to simulate argon plasma due to efficient mixing of these layers at electron impacts. Velocity factors of electron impact processes were calculated using Boltzmann equation with a glance to electron-electron collisions. This work describes numerical algorithm of mathematical model implementation, which is based on finite-dimensional approximation of the problem using difference schemes together with iteration process. The software was developed to implement iterative processes using MatLab. Characteristics of atmospheric pressure capacitive coupled RF discharge at interelectrod distance 20 mm are calculated.

  16. The European Pressurized Water Reactor. A safe and competitive solution for future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, R.; Gerhard, L.; Goebel, A.

    2004-01-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor - the EPR - is a PWR in the 1600 MW class. Its design is based on experience feedback from several thousand reactors x years of light water reactor operation worldwide, primarily those incorporating the most recent technologies: the French N4 and the German KONVOI reactors. It is an evolutionary design that ensures continuity in the mastery of PWR technology, minimizing the risk for the customer. (author)

  17. Osmotic pressure and virial coefficients of star and comb polymer solutions: dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yu; Fang, Che-Ming; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-03-28

    The effects of macromolecular architecture on the osmotic pressure pi and virial coefficients (B(2) and B(3)) of star and comb polymers in good solvents are studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for both dilute and semiconcentrated regimes. The dependence of the osmotic pressure on polymer concentration is directly calculated by considering two reservoirs separated by a semipermeable, fictitious membrane. Our simulation results show that the ratios A(n+1) identical with B(n+1)/R(g)(3n) are essentially constant and A(2) and A(3) are arm number (f) dependent, where R(g) is zero-density radius of gyration. The value of dimensionless virial ratio g = A(3)/A(2)(2) increases with arm number of stars whereas it is essentially arm number independent for comb polymers. In semiconcentrated regime the scaling relation between osmotic pressure and volume fraction, pi proportional to phi(lambda), still holds for both star and comb polymers. For comb polymers, the exponent lambda is close to lambda(*) (approximately = 2.73 for linear chains) and is independent of the arm number. However, for star polymers, the exponent lambda deviates from lambda(*) and actually grows with increasing the arm number. This may be attributed to the significant ternary interactions near the star core in the many-arm systems.

  18. Alternative welding reconditioning solutions without post welding heat treatment of pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicic, D. T.; Rontescu, C.; Bogatu, A. M.; Dijmărescu, M. C.

    2017-08-01

    In pressure vessels, working on high temperature and high pressure may appear some defects, cracks for example, which may lead to failure in operation. When these nonconformities are identified, after certain examination, testing and result interpretation, the decision taken is to repair or to replace the deteriorate component. In the current legislation it’s stipulated that any repair, alteration or modification to an item of pressurised equipment that was originally post-weld heat treated after welding (PWHT) should be post-weld heat treated again after repair, requirement that cannot always be respected. For that reason, worldwide, there were developed various welding repair techniques without PWHT, among we find the Half Bead Technique (HBT) and Controlled Deposition Technique (CDT). The paper presents the experimental results obtained by applying the welding reconditioning techniques HBT and CDT in order to restore as quickly as possible the pressure vessels made of 13CrMo4-5. The effects of these techniques upon the heat affected zone are analysed, the graphics of the hardness variation are drawn and the resulted structures are compared in the two cases.

  19. Identifying gaps, barriers, and solutions in implementing pressure ulcer prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Irene M; Nadzam, Deborah Morris

    2011-06-01

    Patients continue to suffer from pressure ulcers (PUs), despite implementation of evidence-based pressure ulcer (PU) prevention protocols. In 2009, Joint Commission Resources (JCR) and Hill-Rom created the Nurse Safety Scholar-in-Residence (nurse scholar) program to foster the professional development of expert nurse clinicians to become translators of evidence into practice. The first nurse scholar activity has focused on PU prevention. Four hospitals with established PU programs participated in the PU prevention implementation project. Each hospital's team completed an inventory of PU prevention program components and provided copies of accompanying documentation, along with prevalence and incidence data. Site visits to the four participating hospitals were arranged to provide opportunities for more in-depth analysis and support. Following the initial site visit, the project team at each hospital developed action plans for the top three barriers to PU program implementation. A series of conference calls was held between the site visits. Pressure Ulcer Program Gaps and Recommendations. The four hospitals shared common gaps in terms of limitations in staff education and training; lack of physician involvement; limited involvement of unlicensed nursing staff; lack of plan for communicating at-risk status; and limited quality improvement evaluations of bedside practices. Detailed recommendations were identified for addressing each of these gaps. these Recommendations for eliminating gaps have been implemented by the participating teams to drive improvement and to reduce hospital-acquired PU rates. The nurse scholars will continue to study implementation of best practices for PU prevention.

  20. Leaching of silicon from ferronickel (FeNi) smelting slag with sodium hydroxide solution at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufakhir, F. R.; Mubarok, M. Z.; Ichlas, Z. T.

    2018-01-01

    The present paper reports the leaching behavior of silicon from ferronickel slag under atmospheric pressure using sodium hydroxide solution. The effect of several experimental variables, namely concentration of leaching agent, operating temperature, stirring speed, and slurry density was investigated. The leaching kinetic was also investigated by using shrinking core model. It was determined that leaching of silicon from the slag was controlled by diffusion through product layer, although the activation energy was found to be 85.84 kJ/mol, which was unusually high for such a diffusion-controlled process.

  1. Investigation of hydrophobic substrates for solution residue analysis utilizing an ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge microplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paing, Htoo W; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2018-03-12

    A practical method for preparation of solution residue samples for analysis utilizing the ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (AD-LS-APGD-OES) microplasma is described. Initial efforts involving placement of solution aliquots in wells drilled into copper substrates, proved unsuccessful. A design-of-experiment (DOE) approach was carried out to determine influential factors during sample deposition including solution volume, solute concentration, number of droplets deposited, and the solution matrix. These various aspects are manifested in the mass of analyte deposited as well as the size/shape of the product residue. Statistical analysis demonstrated that only those initial attributes were significant factors towards the emission response of the analyte. Various approaches were investigated to better control the location/uniformity of the deposited sample. Three alternative substrates, a glass slide, a poly(tetrafluoro)ethylene (PTFE) sheet, and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated glass slide, were evaluated towards the microplasma analytical performance. Co-deposition with simple organic dyes provided an accurate means of determining the location of the analyte with only minor influence on emission responses. The PDMS-coated glass provided the best performance by virtue of its providing a uniform spatial distribution of the residue material. This uniformity yielded an improved limits of detection by approximately 22× for 20 μL and 4 x for 2 μL over the other two substrates. While they operate by fundamentally different processes, this choice of substrate is not restricted to the LS-APGD, but may also be applicable to other AD methods such as DESI, DART, or LIBS. Further developments will be directed towards a field-deployable ambient desorption OES source for quantitative analysis of microvolume solution residues of nuclear forensics importance.

  2. Effect of topical ophthalmic dorzolamide(2%)-timolol(0.5%) solution and ointment on intraocular pressure in normal horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofflemire, Kyle L; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Flinn, Allison M; Dufour, Valerie L; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Allbaugh, Rachel A; Griggs, Angela N; Peterson, Chimene S; Whitley, David R

    2015-11-01

    To compare the effect of commercially available solution and compounded ointment formulations of dorzolamide(2%)-timolol(0.5%) on intraocular pressure (IOP) of normal horses. Eighteen clinically normal horses. A randomized, masked prospective design was used with horses divided into two equal groups. One eye of each horse was selected for topical ophthalmic treatment with either 0.2 mL of dorzolamide(2%)-timolol(0.5%) solution or 0.2 g of dorzolamide(2%)-timolol(0.5%) ointment every 12 h for 5 days. The contralateral eye of horses in both groups was untreated. Rebound tonometry was performed every 6 h starting 2 days prior to and ending 2 days after the treatment period. The mean IOP reduction in eyes treated with the solution or ointment formulations was 13%. Untreated eyes in both groups experienced a lesser but still statistically significant reduction in IOP. The IOP values did not return to baseline within 48 h of the last treatment. The commercially available solution and compounded ointment formulations of ophthalmic dorzolamide(2%)-timolol(0.5%) had similar effects on IOP in normal horses. Persistent IOP reduction following cessation of treatment may indicate prolonged drug effect or acclimation of horses to tonometry. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Behavior of neutral solutes in pressurized flow driven electrochromatography using a mixed stationary phase of ODS and anion-exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Shinya; Tsuda, Takao

    2003-05-02

    The behavior of neutral sample solutes in pressurized flow driven electrochromatography using a mixed stationary phase, which consisted of ODS and anion-exchange (ODS-SAX), was studied. Applications of both positive and negative voltage on a column induced increases in retention factors of sample solutes. The direction of an electroosmotic flow under applications of positive and negative voltage were the same, therefore, the sign of the surface charge density under positive and negative voltage was opposite. We proposed a new equation for the relationship between applied voltage and surface charge density, and the practical electroosmotic flow conformed to this equation. Studying the electroosmotic flow using our proposed equation revealed that the applied negative voltage accelerates the protonation of the quaternary ammonium group and dissociation of the silanol group on packing materials. The retention behavior of a neutral solute was affected by the existence of the charged functional groups. We propose that this phenomenon is applicable to the control of the retention behavior of a sample solute using an electric field.

  4. [Measurement of carotenoids by high pressure liquid chromatography: from difficulties to solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steghens, J P; Lyan, B; Le Moel, G; Galabert, C; Fayol, V; Faure, H; Grolier, P; Cheribi, N; Dubois, F; Nabet, F

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of serum carotenoids by HPLC has been largely improved during the last 10 years. However these techniques still require much time and skills, and direct application of published methods is rarely satisfying. We report here the difficulties that we met to transfer some HPLC methods described in the literature to our laboratories. We propose some solution to overcome the problems that we have encountered, our experience will perhaps help out other biologists. We reported also some results obtained in healthy populations.

  5. Electro-osmotic and pressure-driven flow of viscoelastic fluids in microchannels: Analytical and semi-analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrás, L. L.; Afonso, A. M.; Alves, M. A.; Nóbrega, J. M.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a series of solutions for combined electro-osmotic and pressure-driven flows of viscoelastic fluids in microchannels. The solutions are semi-analytical, a feature made possible by the use of the Debye-Hückel approximation for the electrokinetic fields, thus restricted to cases with small electric double-layers, in which the distance between the microfluidic device walls is at least one order of magnitude larger than the electric double-layer thickness. To describe the complex fluid rheology, several viscoelastic differential constitutive models were used, namely, the simplified Phan-Thien-Tanner model with linear, quadratic or exponential kernel for the stress coefficient function, the Johnson-Segalman model, and the Giesekus model. The results obtained illustrate the effects of the Weissenberg number, the Johnson-Segalman slip parameter, the Giesekus mobility parameter, and the relative strengths of the electro-osmotic and pressure gradient-driven forcings on the dynamics of these viscoelastic flows.

  6. Latanoprost ophthalmic solution in the treatment of open angle glaucoma or raised intraocular pressure: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Russo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Russo, Ivano Riva, Teodoro Pizzolante, Federico Noto, Luciano QuarantaCattedra di Malattie dell’Apparato Visivo, Università degli studi di Brescia, USVD “Centro per lo studio del Glaucoma” Spedali Civili di BresciaAbstract: Latanoprost is a prostaglandin F2-alpha isopropyl ester prodrug which is rapidly hydrolyzed by esterases in the cornea to the biologically active latanoprost acid. When latanoprost is topically administered into the eye, the cornea seems to act like as a slow-release depot to the anterior segment. One hour after administration maximum concentration is found in the iris, followed by the anterior chamber and the ciliary body. Despite extensive research, controversy remains about the real mechanism of action of this drug. Immunohistochemical data have shown that the intraocular pressure (IOP reduction with topical prostaglandin F2-alpha is associated with a reduction of collagens within the uveoscleral outflow pathway. Evidence from several experimental and clinical studies suggests that latanoprost is a valuable addition first-line treatment alternatives for glaucoma, ocular hypertension and even angle-closure glaucoma. Strong points are its efficacy, which is demonstrated to be higher than that of brimonidine, dorzolamide and timolol with fewer systemic adverse effects; a convenient administration schedule; and the IOP-controlling pattern, which is relatively flat compared with timolol and dorzolamide, and enables better control in glaucoma progression, since large fluctuations may be associated with the risk of developing glaucoma in untreated ocular hypertensive subjects.Keywords: latanoprost, intraocular pressure, glaucoma, ocular hypertension

  7. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate were determined over the (278 to 322) K temperature range. The determined vapour pressures were used to obtain the water activities, the molar enthalpies of vaporization, and the osmotic coefficients of sodium-D-gluconate

  8. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-05-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate were determined over the (278 to 322) K temperature range. The determined vapour pressures were used to obtain the water activities, the molar enthalpies of vaporization, and the osmotic coefficients of sodium-D-gluconate.

  9. Radiolysis of cesium iodide solutions in conditions prevailing in a pressurized water reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements were made of I/sub 2/ formed when aqueous cesium iodide (CsI) solutions were exposed to two temperatures, 43 and 95 0 C, with irradiation. Iodine partition coefficients were obtained from the experiments. The parameters varied were dose, CsI concentration, and Cs/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ concentration, in the presence of air-carbon dioxide and air-carbon dioxide-hydrogen mixtures, to provide information to calculate the form in which iodine released from fuel as CsI in a reactor accident might reach the environment. In a series of experiments, a two-compartment cell was used to trap the gaseous iodine produced. In this case, it was found that the quantity of gaseous iodine produced increased approximately linearly with the dose (at the dose rate used)

  10. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 in an Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma-Solution System (Gliding Discharge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NI Mingjiang; YANG Huan; CHEN Tong; ZHANG Hao; WU Angjian; DU Changming; LI Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a plasma-solution system was applied to the degradation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7). The effects of initial concentration and type of feed gases (air, oxygen, nitrogen or argon) were studied. As the initial concentration increased from 100 mg/L to 160 mg/L, the discolouration rate of AO7 decreased from 99.3% to 95.9%, whereas the COD removal rate decreased from 37.9% to 22.6%. Air provided the best discolouration and COD removal rates (99.3% and 37.9%, respectively). In the presence of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) catalyst, the AO7 COD removal rate increased to 76.4%. The degradation products were analysed by a GC-MS, revealing that the degradation of the dye molecule was initiated through the cleavage of the -N=N- bond before finally being converted to organic acids. (paper)

  11. Iterative solution to the optimal control of depletion problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the optimal time and spatial dependence of control absorbers in the core of a pressurized water reactor over a single refueling cycle. The reactor is modeled in two dimensions with many regions using two-group diffusion theory. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem with the cycle length fixed and the initial reactor state known. Constraints are placed on the regionwise normalized powers, control absorber concentrations, and the critical soluble boron concentration of the core. The cost functional contains two terms which may be used individually or together. One term maximizes the end-of-cycle (EOC) critical soluble boron concentration, and the other minimizes the norm of the distance between the actual and a target EOC burnup distribution. Results are given for several test problems which are based on a three-region model of the Three Mile Island Unit 1 reactor. The resulting optimal control strategies are bang-bang and lead to EOC states with the power peaking at its maximum and no control absorbers remaining in the core. Throughout the cycle the core soluble boron concentration is zero

  12. Constructing integrable full-pressure full-current free-boundary stellarator magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    For stellarators to be feasible candidates for fusion power stations it is essential that the magnetic field lines lie on nested flux surfaces; however, the lack of a continuous symmetry implies that magnetic islands, caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter currents, diamagnetic currents and resonant coil fields, are guaranteed to exist. The challenge is to design the plasma and coils such that these effects cancel. Magnetic islands in free-boundary full-pressure full-current stellarator magnetohydrodynamic equilibria are suppressed using a procedure based on the PIES code [Comp. Phys. Comm., 43:157, 1986] which iterates the equilibrium equations to obtain the plasma equilibrium. At each iteration, changes to a Fourier representation of the coil geometry are made to cancel resonant fields produced by the plasma. The changes are constrained to lie in the nullspace of certain measures of engineering acceptability and kink stability. As the iterations continue, the coil geometry and the plasma simultaneously converge to an equilibrium in which the island content is negligible. The method is applied to a candidate plasma and coil design for NCSX [Phys. Plas., 7:1911, 2000]. (author)

  13. Constructing Integrable High-pressure Full-current Free-boundary Stellarator Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibrium Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, S.R.; Monticello, D.A.; Reiman, A.H.; Strickler, D.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Ku, L-P; Lazarus, E.; Brooks, A.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Boozer, A.H.; Fu, G-Y.; Neilson, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    For the (non-axisymmetric) stellarator class of plasma confinement devices to be feasible candidates for fusion power stations it is essential that, to a good approximation, the magnetic field lines lie on nested flux surfaces; however, the inherent lack of a continuous symmetry implies that magnetic islands responsible for breaking the smooth topology of the flux surfaces are guaranteed to exist. Thus, the suppression of magnetic islands is a critical issue for stellarator design, particularly for small aspect ratio devices. Pfirsch-Schluter currents, diamagnetic currents, and resonant coil fields contribute to the formation of magnetic islands, and the challenge is to design the plasma and coils such that these effects cancel. Magnetic islands in free-boundary high-pressure full-current stellarator magnetohydrodynamic equilibria are suppressed using a procedure based on the Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver [Reiman and Greenside, Comp. Phys. Comm. 43 (1986) 157] which iterate s the equilibrium equations to obtain the plasma equilibrium. At each iteration, changes to a Fourier representation of the coil geometry are made to cancel resonant fields produced by the plasma. The changes are constrained to preserve certain measures of engineering acceptability and to preserve the stability of ideal kink modes. As the iterations continue, the coil geometry and the plasma simultaneously converge to an equilibrium in which the island content is negligible, the plasma is stable to ideal kink modes, and the coils satisfy engineering constraints. The method is applied to a candidate plasma and coil design for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment [Reiman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8 (May 2001) 2083

  14. Constructing integrable high-pressure full-current free-boundary stellarator magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, S.R.; Monticello, D.A.; Reiman, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    For the (non-axisymmetric) stellarator class of plasma confinement devices to be feasible candidates for fusion power stations it is essential that, to a good approximation, the magnetic field lines lie on nested flux surfaces; however, the inherent lack of a continuous symmetry implies that magnetic islands responsible for breaking the smooth topology of the flux surfaces are guaranteed to exist. Thus, the suppression of magnetic islands is a critical issue for stellarator design, particularly for small aspect ratio devices. Pfirsch-Schlueter currents, diamagnetic currents and resonant coil fields contribute to the formation of magnetic islands, and the challenge is to design the plasma and coils such that these effects cancel. Magnetic islands in free-boundary high-pressure full-current stellarator magnetohydrodynamic equilibria are suppressed using a procedure based on the Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver (Reiman and Greenside 1986 Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 157) which iterates the equilibrium equations to obtain the plasma equilibrium. At each iteration, changes to a Fourier representation of the coil geometry are made to cancel resonant fields produced by the plasma. The changes are constrained to preserve certain measures of engineering acceptability and to preserve the stability of ideal kink modes. As the iterations continue, the coil geometry and the plasma simultaneously converge to an equilibrium in which the island content is negligible, the plasma is stable to ideal kink modes, and the coils satisfy engineering constraints. The method is applied to a candidate plasma and coil design for the National Compact Stellarator eXperiment (Reiman et al 2001 Phys. Plasma 8 2083). (author)

  15. Effects of structural modification via high-pressure annealing on solution-processed InGaO films and thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, You Seung; Choi, Hyung-Wook; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the structural modification of solution-processed nanocrystalline InGaO films via high-pressure annealing and fabricated thin-film transistors. The grain size of InGaO films annealed in the presence of oxygen under high pressure was significantly changed compared the films annealed without high pressure ambient. The O1s XPS peak distribution of InGaO films annealed under high pressure at 350 °C showed a peak similar to that of the non-pressure annealed film at 500 °C. The high-pressure annealing process promoted the elimination of organic residues and dehydroxylation of the metal hydroxide (M–OH) complex. We confirmed the improved device performance of high-pressure annealed InGaO-based thin-film transistors owing to the reduction in charge-trap density. (paper)

  16. Preparation of YBa2Cu3O7 films by low pressure MOCVD using liquid solution sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.; Froehlich, K.; Haase, R.; Labeau, M.; Selbmann, D.; Senateur, J.P.; Thomas, O.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid low pressure MOCVD process is described for reproducible preparation of superconducting thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . The process uses a single solution source of Y, Ba, and Cu β-diketonates dissolved in suitable organic solvents. This liquid precursor is atomized using an ultrasonic aerosol generator and transported as small droplets (∼1μm) into a CVD reactor where solvent and precursor are first evaporated before deposition takes place at low pressure on heated substrates in a cold wall geometry. This process allows, with stable evaporation rates for all three precursors, to grow in-situ superconducting films with constant composition from film to film. Thin and thick films with high critical temperatures and critical currents have been obtained (Tc>80K, Jc>10 4 A/cm 2 at 77K in self field) which are highly c-axis oriented. Experimental details of this new process are described and the effects of different process parameters are studied in order to improve the quality of the deposited layers. (orig.)

  17. A high-temperature high-pressure calorimeter for determining heats of solution up to 623 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamali, Essmaiil; Turner, Peter J; Murray, Richard C; Cobble, James W

    2010-07-01

    A high-temperature high-pressure isoperibol calorimeter for determining the heats of solution and reaction of very dilute substances in water (10(-4) m) at temperatures up to 623 K is described. The energies of vaporization of water at steam saturation pressure were measured as a function of temperature and the results agree with the corresponding values from steam tables to better than 0.08+/-0.18%. The novelties of the present instrument relative to flow type heat capacity calorimeters are that measurements can be made at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and that measurement of heat of reaction involving solids or gases or in the presence of high concentrations of supporting electrolytes, acids, and bases is possible. Furthermore, the advantage of using enthalpy data over heat capacity data for calculations of the standard state Gibbs free energies of electrolytes is that the experimental heat data of this research need only be integrated once to derive higher temperature free energy data from lower temperatures. The derived heat capacities can be used mathematically to obtain free energies by double integration. However, the resulting errors are much smaller than if experimental aqueous heat capacities were used for the integrations.

  18. Atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge: A versatile ion source for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Andrew J. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405 (United States); Williams, Kelsey L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242 (United States); Hieftje, Gary M. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405 (United States); Shelley, Jacob T., E-mail: shellj@rpi.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    An atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge (SCGD) has been evaluated as an ion source for atomic, molecular, and ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The SCGD consists of a direct-current plasma, supported in the ambient air in the absence of gas flows, and sustained upon the surface of a flowing liquid cathode. Analytes introduced in the flowing liquid, as an ambient gas, or as a solid held near the plasma are vaporized and ionized by interactions within or near the discharge. Introduction of acidic solutions containing metal salts produced bare elemental ions as well as H{sub 2}O, OH{sup −} and NO{sub 3}{sup −} adducts. Detection limits for these elemental species ranged from 0.1 to 4 ppb, working curves spanned more than 4 orders of linear dynamic range, and precision varied between 5 and 16% relative standard deviation. Small organic molecules were also efficiently ionized from solution, and both the intact molecular ion and fragments were observed in the resulting SCGD mass spectra. Fragmentation of molecular species was found to be tunable; high discharge currents led to harder ionization, while low discharge currents produced stronger molecular-ion signals. Ambient gases and solids, desorbed by the plasma from a glass probe, were also readily ionized by the SCGD. Indeed, strong analyte signals were obtained from solid samples placed at least 2 cm from the plasma. These findings indicate that the SCGD might be useful also for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Combined with earlier results that showed the SCGD is useful for ionization of labile biomolecules, the results here indicate that the SCGD is a highly versatile ion source capable of providing both elemental and molecular mass-spectral information. - Highlights: • Solution-cathode glow discharge used as an ionization source for mass spectrometry. • SCGD-MS can provide atomic as well as intact molecular mass spectra. • Atomic limits of detection range

  19. Highly Efficient 2D/3D Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells via Low-Pressure Vapor-Assisted Solution Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-Hsiang; Chiang, Yu-Hsien; Jeng, U-Ser; Su, Chun-Jen; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Hsu, Yao-Jane; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Ohigashi, Takuji; Chen, Yu-An; Shen, Po-Shen; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2018-06-08

    The fabrication of multidimensional organometallic halide perovskite via a low-pressure vapor-assisted solution process is demonstrated for the first time. Phenyl ethyl-ammonium iodide (PEAI)-doped lead iodide (PbI 2 ) is first spin-coated onto the substrate and subsequently reacts with methyl-ammonium iodide (MAI) vapor in a low-pressure heating oven. The doping ratio of PEAI in MAI-vapor-treated perovskite has significant impact on the crystalline structure, surface morphology, grain size, UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence spectra, and the resultant device performance. Multiple photoluminescence spectra are observed in the perovskite film starting with high PEAI/PbI 2 ratio, which suggests the coexistence of low-dimensional perovskite (PEA 2 MA n -1 Pb n I 3 n +1 ) with various values of n after vapor reaction. The dimensionality of the as-fabricated perovskite film reveals an evolution from 2D, hybrid 2D/3D to 3D structure when the doping level of PEAI/PbI 2 ratio varies from 2 to 0. Scanning electron microscopy images and Kelvin probe force microscopy mapping show that the PEAI-containing perovskite grain is presumably formed around the MAPbI 3 perovskite grain to benefit MAPbI 3 grain growth. The device employing perovskite with PEAI/PbI 2 = 0.05 achieves a champion power conversion efficiency of 19.10% with an open-circuit voltage of 1.08 V, a current density of 21.91 mA cm -2 , and a remarkable fill factor of 80.36%. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The 4D evolution of porosity during ongoing pressure-solution processes in NaCl using x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macente, Alice; Fusseis, Florian; Butler, Ian; Tudisco, Erika; Hall, Stephen; Andò, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Pressure-solution creep is a common deformation mechanism in the upper crust. It represents a mass transfer via dissolution-reprecipitation that critically affects the hydraulic properties of rocks. Successful management of safe radioactive storage sites in rock-salt deposits critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of salt deposits. Despite numerous lab experiments that have been conducted, many aspects of pressure-solution are still poorly understood. There is little knowledge about the spatio-temporal evolution of porosity and permeability during pressure-solution creep. While rates of pressure-solution creep in silicates and carbonates are slow, which makes laboratory investigations of these materials impractical, compaction experiments have demonstrated that NaCl samples deform sufficiently fast to study pressure-solution creep in a lab environment at room temperature and modest loads. We present results from novel experiments that quantify the 4-dimensional (three spatial dimensions plus time) evolution of pressure-solution processes using in-situ x-ray microtomography. Our experiments are performed in custom made x-ray transparent presses. 5 mm diameter NaCl powder samples with a grain size of 250-300 μm are loaded dry into the press and pre-compacted to produce a starting aggregated material. The sample is then flooded with saturated NaCl solution and loaded uniaxially by means of a pneumatic actuator to a constant uniaxial stress. Different sample mixtures were tested, as well as different uniaxial loads. The resulting deformation of the samples is documented in 3-dimensional microtomographic datasets, acquired at regular time intervals. Image analysis allowed characterization of the microstructural evolution of the NaCl grains and the spatio-temporal distribution of porosity during ongoing mechanical and chemical compaction. The microtomography data have also been analysed with 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC or

  1. Equilibrium solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol as function of concentration, temperature, and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolledo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Rebolledo-Libreros, Maria Esther [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Trejo, Arturo, E-mail: atrejo@imp.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: Gas solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol was measured. Solubility increases as pressure and concentration of 1-amino-2-propanol increase. The Kent-Eisenberg model was used to correlate all the experimental results. Aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification. - Abstract: Using a dynamic method with recirculation of the vapour phase, experimental values for the gas solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol (MIPA) were measured at T = (313.15 and 393.15) K, over the pressure range of (0.2 to 2436.4) kPa. The concentrations of the studied aqueous MIPA solutions were (0.20, 0.30, 0.40, and 0.50) mass fraction. The results of gas solubility are given as the partial pressure of CO{sub 2}, p{sub CO{sub 2}}, against its mole ratio, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}} (mol CO{sub 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1} MIPA), and its mole fraction, x{sub CO{sub 2}}. It is observed that the solubility of CO{sub 2} increases as the concentration of MIPA in solution increases, at a given temperature throughout the pressure range considered; also the solubility values increase, under constant temperature, as the pressure increases in the studied concentration range of MIPA. The physicochemical model of Kent and Eisenberg was used to correlate simultaneously all the experimental results of the solubility of CO{sub 2} in the studied aqueous solutions of MIPA. The model correlates satisfactorily the experimental results. The deviation for pressure was 96.9 kPa using 62 experimental solubility points. The solubility results of carbon dioxide presented in this work are compared with those reported in the literature for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diisopropanolamine (DIPA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and it is possible to conclude that the aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification processes, since the

  2. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E., E-mail: jean-eric.wegrowe@polytechnique.edu; Clochard, M.-C., E-mail: clochard@cea.fr

    2015-12-15

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress–strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (α{sub irrad}) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  3. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress-strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (αirrad) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  4. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress–strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (α irrad ) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  5. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, A.V., E-mail: Alexey.V.Subbotin@gmail.com [Scientific and Production Complex Atomtechnoprom, Moscow 119180 (Russian Federation); Panyukov, S.V., E-mail: panyukov@lpi.ru [PN Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117924 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  6. Reactive extraction of carboxylic acids from apolar hydrocarbons using aqueous solutions of sodium hydrogen carbonate with back-recovery using carbon dioxide under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmanovic, B.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; de Haan, A.B.; Kwant, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    A combination of using an aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate for forward-extraction of carboxylic acids from a dilute apolar organic solvent, and carbon dioxide under pressure for its back-recovery, is studied. Used in combination, these two steps might provide a technique for the

  7. FEM Analyses for T-H-M-M Coupling Processes in Dual-Porosity Rock Mass under Stress Corrosion and Pressure Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The models of stress corrosion and pressure solution established by Yasuhara et al. were introduced into the 2D FEM code of thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory coupling analysis for dual-porosity medium developed by the authors. Aiming at a hypothetical model for geological disposal of nuclear waste in an unsaturated rock mass from which there is a nuclide leak, two computation conditions were designed. Then the corresponding two-dimensional numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory processes were carried out, and the states of temperatures, rates and magnitudes of aperture closure, pore and fracture pressures, flow velocities, nuclide concentrations and stresses in the rock mass were investigated. The results show: the aperture closure rates caused by stress corrosion are almost six orders higher than those caused by pressure solution, and the two kinds of closure rates climb up and then decline, furthermore tend towards stability; when the effects of stress corrosion and pressure solution are considered, the negative fracture pressures in near field rise very highly; the fracture aperture and porosity are decreases in the case 1, so the relative permeability coefficients reduce, therefore the nuclide concentrations in pore and fracture in this case are higher than those in case 2.

  8. Equilibrium Total Pressure and CO2 Solubility in Binary and Ternary Aqueous Solutions of 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(Methylamino)propylamine (MAPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Svendsen, Hallvard Fjøsne; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium total pressures were measured and equilibrium CO2 partial pressures were calculated from the measured total pressure data in binary and ternary aqueous solutions of 2-(diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(methylamino)propylamine (MAPA). The measurements were carried out in a commercially...... available calorimeter used as an equilibrium cell. The examined systems were the binary aqueous solutions of 5 M DEEA, 2 M MAPA, and 1 M MAPA and the ternary aqueous mixtures of 5 M DEEA + 2 M MAPA (5D2M) and 5 M DEEA + 1 M MAPA (5D1M), which gave liquid–liquid phase split upon CO2 absorption. The total...... pressures were measured and the CO2 partial pressures were calculated as a function of CO2 loading at three different temperatures 40 °C, 80 °C, and 120 °C. All experiments were reproduced with good repeatability. The measurements were carried out for 30 mass % MEA solutions to validate the experimental...

  9. (Pressure + volume + temperature) properties for binary oligomeric solutions of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at pressures up to 50 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-J.; Ku, T.-J.; Lin Homu

    2009-01-01

    Densities were measured with a high-pressure densitometer for two binary oligomeric systems of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) (PEGOPE) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at temperatures from 298.15 K to 348.15 K and pressures up to 50 MPa. While the excess volumes are negative in (acetophenone + PEGOPE) over the entire composition range, those are found to change from positive to negative with increasing mole fraction of the solvent in (1-octanol + PEGOPE). The pressure-effect on the liquid densities can be represented accurately by the Tait equation. Moreover, an empirical equation with two characteristic parameters correlates well the PVT data over the entire experimental conditions for each binary system. The experimental specific volumes were also correlated with the Flory-Orwoll-Vrij (FOV) and the Schotte equations of state to within the experimental uncertainty.

  10. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  11. Thermodynamic study of Eu3+/Eu2+ redox reaction in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures and pressures by means of cyclic voltametry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The redox potential of the couple Eu 3+ /E 2+ in aqueous NaCl, NaClO 4 and Na 2 SO 4 solutions of different strength and various pH values has been determined by means of cyclic voltammetry up to 458 K and 1 kbar. In all cases reversible voltammograms were obtained. Compared to the redox potential in ClO 4 - solutions of pH 2, no significant shift was observed in Cl-solutions of the same pH, whereas a drastic shift to more negative potentials in solutions of SO 4 2- and in Cl - solutions of higher pH (pH 3-5) was obtained. This indicates a negligible complexation of Eu 3+ by means of Cl - but a strong one by means of OH - and SO 4 2- . An isothermal pressure increase up to 1 kbar led to a shift of only few mV more negative, indicating a small pressure dependence of the change of the partial molar volume (ΔV el ) accompanying the redox reaction, which results in this case only due to the different degrees of electrostriction. A more drastic shift of the redox potential (in the positive direction) results with increasing temperature. The isobaric temperature dependence of the redox potential is described by a two parameter equation which remains valid up to the saturation pressure at 458 K, due to the small pressure effect. ΔS and ΔH of the redox reaction has been determined. (orig.)

  12. Multi-morphological growth of nano-structured In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} by ambient pressure triethylene glycol based solution syntheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tongfei; Wang, Jian; Lai, Junyun; Zheng, Xuerong; Liu, Weiyan; Ji, Junna [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Hui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Jin, Zhengguo, E-mail: zhgjin@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoparticles, flower-like shaped and sheet-shaped nanocrystals were synthesized by a new, facile, ambient pressure triethylene glycol based solution chemical route using indium(III) chloride and selenium powder as precursors. The growing morphology, crystallization, chemical stoichiometry and light absorption property of the In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} products synthesized were characterized by TEM, HRTEM, FESEM, XRD, EDX and UV–vis–NIR measurements. Multi-morphological growth of the nano-structured In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in triethylene glycol based solution syntheses with changed assisting agents and reaction styles was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Multimorphological growth of In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} was demonstrated based on solution chemistry. • A new, facile, low cost and fast air pressure TEG based solution process was used. • Nanoparticles, flower-like shaped and sheet-shaped nanocrystals were synthesized. • Morphology, crystallization, stoichiometry and light absorption was characterized. • Solution growth of β-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanosheets was firstly reported by this submission.

  13. Variability of computational fluid dynamics solutions for pressure and flow in a giant aneurysm: the ASME 2012 Summer Bioengineering Conference CFD Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, David A; Hoi, Yiemeng; Fahy, Paul; Morris, Liam; Walsh, Michael T; Aristokleous, Nicolas; Anayiotos, Andreas S; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C; Berg, Philipp; Janiga, Gábor; Bols, Joris; Segers, Patrick; Bressloff, Neil W; Cibis, Merih; Gijsen, Frank H; Cito, Salvatore; Pallarés, Jordi; Browne, Leonard D; Costelloe, Jennifer A; Lynch, Adrian G; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Fu, Wenyu; Qiao, Aike; Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F; Kalsi, Hardeep; Long, Quan; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Finol, Ender A; Kono, Kenichi; Malek, Adel M; Lauric, Alexandra; Menon, Prahlad G; Pekkan, Kerem; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Marsden, Alison L; Oshima, Marie; Katagiri, Kengo; Peiffer, Véronique; Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Schaller, Jens; Goubergrits, Leonid; Usera, Gabriel; Mendina, Mariana; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Habets, Damiaan F; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George E; Shaffer, Nicholas; Loth, Francis

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated by a recent controversy regarding pressure drops predicted in a giant aneurysm with a proximal stenosis, the present study sought to assess variability in the prediction of pressures and flow by a wide variety of research groups. In phase I, lumen geometry, flow rates, and fluid properties were specified, leaving each research group to choose their solver, discretization, and solution strategies. Variability was assessed by having each group interpolate their results onto a standardized mesh and centerline. For phase II, a physical model of the geometry was constructed, from which pressure and flow rates were measured. Groups repeated their simulations using a geometry reconstructed from a micro-computed tomography (CT) scan of the physical model with the measured flow rates and fluid properties. Phase I results from 25 groups demonstrated remarkable consistency in the pressure patterns, with the majority predicting peak systolic pressure drops within 8% of each other. Aneurysm sac flow patterns were more variable with only a few groups reporting peak systolic flow instabilities owing to their use of high temporal resolutions. Variability for phase II was comparable, and the median predicted pressure drops were within a few millimeters of mercury of the measured values but only after accounting for submillimeter errors in the reconstruction of the life-sized flow model from micro-CT. In summary, pressure can be predicted with consistency by CFD across a wide range of solvers and solution strategies, but this may not hold true for specific flow patterns or derived quantities. Future challenges are needed and should focus on hemodynamic quantities thought to be of clinical interest.

  14. (p,V{sub m},T,x) measurements for aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions[Density; Concentration; Electrolyte solutions; Equation of state; Lithium nitrate; Saturated density; Saturated pressure; Temperature; Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulagatov, I.M. E-mail: ilmutdin@boulder.nist.govmangur@datacom.ru; Azizov, N.D. E-mail: Nazim_Azizov@yahoo.com

    2004-01-01

    (p,V{sub m},T,x) properties of four aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions (0.181, 0.526, 0.963, and 1.728) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} H{sub 2}O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made for 10 isotherms between (298 and 573) K. The range of pressure was from (2 to 40) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements were estimated to be less than 0.06 %, 0.05 %, 10 mK, and 0.014 %, respectively. The values of saturated density were determined by extrapolating experimental (p,{rho}) data to the vapor-pressure at fixed temperature and composition using an interpolating equation. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method from the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.02 %. Measured values of solution density were compared with values calculated from Pitzer's ion-interaction equation. The agreement is within (0.2 to 0.4) % depending of concentration range.

  15. Investigations of the solid solution in the system SrI2-BaI2 at ambient pressures and at 2.0 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.P.; Holley, C.; Limmer, A.

    1984-01-01

    The P,T,x-diagram of the system SrI 2 -BaI 2 has been investigated at ambient pressures and at 2.0 GPa. The amount of solid solution in the four structure types occuring in this system (SrI 2 - or PbCl 2 -ZrAs 2 -type with SrI 2 and PbCl 2 - or anti-Fe 2 P-type with BaI 2 ) differs considerably. Structural geometries belonging to the same PbCl 2 structure family show marked differences in their toleration to cation substitution. Solid solution is especially pronounced in the BaI 2 -rich phases which incorporate up to 60 mol-% Sr 2+ in the high pressure phase of BaI 2 . (author)

  16. Investigations of the solid solution in the system SrI/sub 2/-BaI/sub 2/ at ambient pressures and at 2. 0 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, H.P.; Holley, C.; Limmer, A. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie)

    1984-09-01

    The P,T,x-diagram of the system SrI/sub 2/-BaI/sub 2/ has been investigated at ambient pressures and at 2.0 GPa. The amount of solid solution in the four structure types occuring in this system (SrI/sub 2/- or PbCl/sub 2/-ZrAs/sub 2/-type with SrI/sub 2/ and PbCl/sub 2/- or anti-Fe/sub 2/P-type with BaI/sub 2/) differs considerably. Structural geometries belonging to the same PbCl/sub 2/ structure family show marked differences in their toleration to cation substitution. Solid solution is especially pronounced in the BaI/sub 2/-rich phases which incorporate up to 60 mol-% Sr/sup 2 +/ in the high pressure phase of BaI/sub 2/.

  17. The counter pressure Pelton turbine as a solution to the energy production in drinking water systems; Die Gegendruck-Peltonturbine als Loesung fuer die Energieproduktion in Trinkwassersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Reto [Haeny AG - Pumpen, Turbinen und Systeme, Jona (Switzerland); Juric, Thomas [A. Abel GmbH, Pumpen und Turbinen, Wundschuh (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    In drinking water slumbers green electricity. Up to now classical Pelton turbines or cheaper standard pumps running in reverse (PAT) were used. Both technologies have disadvantages or limitations regarding their possible applications, therefore, the optimal implementation of the existing potentials are often not entirely possible. The new ''Counter pressure Pelton turbine'' combines the advantages of both technologies and is therefore in many cases the ''most efficient solution''. (orig.)

  18. An advanced analytical solution for pressure build-up during CO2 injection into infinite saline aquifers: The role of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiqing; Bai, Bing; Li, Xiaochun

    2018-02-01

    Existing analytical or approximate solutions that are appropriate for describing the migration mechanics of CO2 and the evolution of fluid pressure in reservoirs do not consider the high compressibility of CO2, which reduces their calculation accuracy and application value. Therefore, this work first derives a new governing equation that represents the movement of complex fluids in reservoirs, based on the equation of continuity and the generalized Darcy's law. A more rigorous definition of the coefficient of compressibility of fluid is then presented, and a power function model (PFM) that characterizes the relationship between the physical properties of CO2 and the pressure is derived. Meanwhile, to avoid the difficulty of determining the saturation of fluids, a method that directly assumes the average relative permeability of each fluid phase in different fluid domains is proposed, based on the theory of gradual change. An advanced analytical solution is obtained that includes both the partial miscibility and the compressibility of CO2 and brine in evaluating the evolution of fluid pressure by integrating within different regions. Finally, two typical sample analyses are used to verify the reliability, improved nature and universality of this new analytical solution. Based on the physical characteristics and the results calculated for the examples, this work elaborates the concept and basis of partitioning for use in further work.

  19. Thermodynamic study of aqueous solutions of polyelectrolytes of low and medium charge density without added salt by direct measurement of osmotic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Miklos, E-mail: miklosnagy@chem.elte.h [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Laboratory for Colloid and Supermolecular Structures, L. Eoetvoes University, P.O. Box 32 H-1518 Budapest 112 (Hungary)

    2010-03-15

    A special block osmometer has been constructed and applied to a systematic study of poly (vinyl alcohol and vinyl sulphate ester) (PVS) sodium salts in dilute and moderately concentrated salt free aqueous solutions. In order to avoid surely ionic contamination all parts of the equipment that can contact with the polyelectrolyte solutions were made of different kinds of plastics and glass. The pressure range spans from (50 to 1.3 . 10{sup 5}) Pa. The measuring system was found to be appropriate for determination of the molar mass of water soluble polymers, too. Above a certain analytical density of dissociable groups (ADDG) an ion size dependent transition was observed on the reduced osmotic pressure vs. concentration curves. The analysis of the osmotic pressure data has clearly revealed that the dependence of the degree of dissociation on ADDG calculated at zero polyelectrolyte concentration contradicts to 'ion condensation' theory. With increasing polyelectrolyte concentration the degree of dissociation decreased rather steeply but at very low concentrations sharp maximums appeared due either to the change in conformation of these charged macromolecules, or formation of dynamic clusters induced by salting out of neutral parts of the macromolecules by the ionized groups. The applicability of the scaling concept as well as the many possible ways of characterization of non-ideality of polyelectrolyte solutions will be discussed in detail.

  20. Theoretical prediction of morphotropic compositions in Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3-based solid solutions from transition pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröting, Melanie; Albe, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present a method based on ab initio calculations to predict compositions at morphotropic phase boundaries in lead-free perovskite solid solutions. This method utilizes the concept of flat free energy surfaces and involves the monitoring of pressure-induced phase transitions as a function of composition. As model systems, solid solutions of Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 with the alkali substituted Li1/2Bi1/2TiO3 and K1/2Bi1/2TiO3 and the alkaline earth substituted CaTiO3 and BaTiO3 are chosen. The morphotropic compositions are identified by determining the composition at which the phase transition pressure equals zero. In addition, we discuss the different effects of hydrostatic pressure (compression and tension) and chemical substitution on the antiphase tilts about the [111] axis (a-a-a-) present in pure Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 and how they develop in the two solid solutions Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3-CaTiO3 and Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3-BaTiO3. Finally, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of this simple computational approach.

  1. Effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quenching kinetics, and electronic and molecular structure of eight and nine-coordinate lanthanide complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupin, C.L.; Riehl, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Applied hydrostatic pressure may be used as a probe of the reaction mechanism for various solution reactions involving lanthanide ions. In this work we report on the use of high pressure to probe the mechanism of enantioselective quenching between racemic luminescent lanthanide complexes containing Dy(III) Tb(III) and Eu(III), and optically active transition metal complexes as quenchers. Diastereomeric rate constants are obtained from a biexponential fit of the luminescence decay. Particular attention will be given to solvation effects on the measured diastereomeric rate constants. The source of chirality is ascribed to a enantioselective rearrangement step within a bimolecular 'encounter' complex yielding a intermolecular geometry in which the energy transfer is efficient. The effect of high pressure on the molecular and electronic structure of these complexes will also be discussed

  2. Densities and apparent molar volumes of aqueous LiI solutions at temperatures from (296 to 600) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulagatov, I.M.; Azizov, N.D.

    2004-01-01

    Densities of five aqueous LiI solutions (0.0906, 0.2832, 0.6621, 1.6046, and 3.0886) mol . kg -1 H 2 O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made along various isotherms between (296.95 and 600.25) K. The range of pressure was (0.1 to 30) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements was estimated to be less than 0.06%, 0.05%, 15 mK, and 0.014%, respectively. To check and confirm the accuracy of the measurements, (p,V m ,T,x) data were taken for pure water at selected temperatures and pressures. Experimental and calculated (IAPWS formulation) densities for pure water show excellent agreement within their experimental uncertainties (average absolute deviation is 0.02%). Values of saturated densities were determined by extrapolating experimental p - ρ data to the vapour pressure at fixed temperature and composition using a linear interpolating equation. Apparent molar volumes were derived using measured values of density for solutions and pure water. The apparent molar volumes were extrapolated to zero concentration (m → 0) to yield partial molar volumes of electrolyte (LiI) at infinite dilution. The temperature, pressure, and concentration dependence of apparent and partial molar volumes was studied. The measured values of density, apparent and partial molar volume were compared with data reported in the literature by other authors. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method using the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.065%

  3. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of N-methyldiethanolamine at high pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Negar; Thomsen, Kaj; Solbraa, Even

    2015-01-01

    A static-analytic method was used to measure the H2S solubility in 50 wt% MDEA and in presence of methane as a makeup gas. The solubility was measured at 7000 kPa total pressure, and at 50 and 70 degrees C, for H2S partial pressures from 31 to 974 kPa. Measurements were also performed at 1500 k...

  4. Mechanical solution of the maximum point of dynamic abutment pressure under deep long-wall working face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, F.; Ma, Q. [Shandong University of Science and Technology, Tai' an (China). College of Resource and Environmental Engineering

    2002-06-01

    The paper studies the dynamic relationship between abutment pressure and overburden collapse precess with advancing of working face. The result shows that the abutment pressure reaches its maximum value when the working face dimension is 1.27 times of the mining depth. This result confirms the statistical result from the strata movement surveys that overburden reaches its full movement stage when extracting dimension reaches 1.2 1.4 times of the mining depth. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential cracks under combined internal pressure, axial force and bending moment − Part II: Finite element validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuebing; Lei, Yuebao; Gao, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential internal/external surface and through-wall defects under combined positive/negative axial force, positive/negative global bending moment and internal pressure have been developed in Part I of this paper. In this Part II, elastic-perfectly plastic 3-D finite element (FE) analyses are performed for selected cases, covering a wide range of geometries and load combinations, to validate the developed limit load solutions. The results show that these limit load solutions can predict the FE data very well for the cases with shallow or deep and short cracks and are conservative. For the cases with very long and deep cracks, the predictions are reasonably accurate and more conservative. -- Highlights: • Elastic-perfectly plastic 3D finite element limiting analyses of cylinders. • Thin/thick-walled cylinders with circumferential surface defects. • Combined loading for pressure, end-force and global bending moment. • Totally 1458 cases analysed and tabulated normalised results provided. • Results used to validate the developed limit load solutions in Part I of this paper

  6. Multisite Ion Model in Concentrated Solutions of Divalent Cations (MgCl2 and CaCl2): Osmotic Pressure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Accurate force field parameters for ions are essential for meaningful simulation studies of proteins and nucleic acids. Currently accepted models of ions, especially for divalent ions, do not necessarily reproduce the right physiological behavior of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. Saxena and Sept (J. Chem. Theor. Comput.2013, 9, 3538–3542) described a model, called the multisite-ion model, where instead of treating the ions as an isolated sphere, the charge was split into multiple sites with partial charge. This model provided accurate inner shell coordination of the ion with biomolecules and predicted better free energies for proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we expand and refine the multisite model to describe the behavior of divalent ions in concentrated MgCl2 and CaCl2 electrolyte solutions, eliminating the unusual ion–ion pairing and clustering of ions which occurred in the original model. We calibrate and improve the parameters of the multisite model by matching the osmotic pressure of concentrated solutions of MgCl2 to the experimental values and then use these parameters to test the behavior of CaCl2 solutions. We find that the concentrated solutions of both divalent ions exhibit the experimentally observed behavior with correct osmotic pressure, the presence of solvent separated ion pairs instead of direct ion pairs, and no aggregation of ions. The improved multisite model for (Mg2+ and Ca2+) can be used in classical simulations of biomolecules at physiologically relevant salt concentrations. PMID:25482831

  7. Preliminary study on the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution with Aldrich humic acid, algae and Fe(III) under high-pressure mercury lamp irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianli; Xu, Dong; Wu, Feng; Liao, Zhenhuan; Liu, Jiantong; Deng, Nansheng

    2004-03-01

    Under a high-pressure mercury lamp (HPML) and using an exposure time of 4 h, the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) could be induced in an aqueous solution containing humic acid (HA). Hydroxyl radicals were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using benzene as a probe. The results showed that *OH photoproduction increased from 1.80 to 2.74 microM by increasing the HA concentration from 10 to 40 mg L(-1) at an exposure time of 4 h (pH 6.5). Hydroxyl radical photoproduction in aqueous solutions of HA containing algae was greater than that in the aqueous solutions of HA without algae. The photoproduction of *OH in the HA solution with Fe(III) was greater than that of the solution without Fe(III) at pH ranging from 4.0 to 8.0. The photoproduction of *OH in HA solution with algae with or without Fe(III) under a 250 W HPML was greater than that under a 125 W HPML. The photoproduction of *OH in irradiated samples was influenced by the pH. The results showed that HPML exposure for 4 h in the 4-8 pH range led to the highest *OH photoproduction at pH 4.0.

  8. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  9. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXIII. Cyclic ketones at T = (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan; Simurka, Lukas; Hnedkovsky, Lubomir; Bolotov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → In this study we examine standard molar volumes of aqueous cyclic ketones. → State parameters of measurements were (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa. → Differences in behavior of monoketones and cyclohexane-1,4-dione were observed. → Group contribution method was designed and examined. - Abstract: Density data for dilute aqueous solutions of four cyclic ketones (cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cycloheptanone, and cyclohexane-1,4-dione) are presented together with standard molar volumes (partial molar volumes at infinite dilution) calculated from the experimental data. The measurements were performed at temperatures from T = 298 K up to T = 573 K. Experimental pressures were close to the saturated vapor pressure of water, and (15 and 30) MPa. The data were obtained using a high-temperature high-pressure flow vibrating-tube densimeter. Experimental standard molar volumes were correlated as a function of temperature and pressure using an empirical polynomial function. Contributions of the molecular structural segments (methylene and carbonyl groups) to the standard molar volume were also evaluated and analyzed.

  10. Phase transition in Smsub(1-x)Gdsub(x)S and Smsub(1-x)Tmsub(x)S solid solutions under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminskij, V.V.; Stepanov, N.N.; Romanova, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted on studying the effect of the n quantity on Psub(pt) (phase transition pressure) for SmS and systems of solid solutions Smsub(1-x)Gdsub(x)S and Smsub(1-x)Tmsub(x)S with conductivity electron concentrations approximately 10 19 -10 21 cm -3 corresponding to the semiconducting phase of these solutions. The investigated monocrystal samples have been prepared by the method of planar crystallization from the melt, have been chipped off over the cleavage planes [100], their characteristic sizes not exceeding 2 mm. Samples of the Smsub(1-x)Tmsub(x)S system were polycrystalline and they had characteristic dimensions of approximately 3mm. Concentration of conductivity electrons has been determined from measurements of the Hall constant. Hydrostatic compression of the samples has been exercised in a piston high-pressure chamber at T=300 K. The observed electric conductivity jump determined by the standard d.c. compensation technique was a criterion of the presence of the phase transition to the metal state. Dependences of Psub(pt) in SmS base solid solutions with approximately 10 19 -10 21 cm -3 concentration of conductivity electrons have similar tendency in behaviour: a certain increase in the phase transition pressure with n growth and then its drop at n approaching concentrations corresponding to compositions close to critical ones for the semiconductor-metal phase transition in any system of solid solutions. If the first mechanism prevails at small as then further on the second mechanism swelling by a power law with a high index plays the main role

  11. In-situ Raman spectroscopic study of aluminate speciation in H2O-KOH solutions at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, M.; Keppler, H.; Manning, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The solubility of corundum in H2O is low even at high pressure and temperatures. Therefore, it is commonly assumed that alumina remains essentially immobile during fluid-rock interaction. However, field and experimental evidence suggests that alumina solubility is strongly enhanced in the presence of silica as well as in alkaline solutions. In order to understand what controls the alumina solubility and how it is enhanced as a function of fluid composition, we conducted Raman-spectroscopic study of Al speciation in aqueous fluids at high pressure and temperature. Experiments were carried out in an externally heated hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell equipped with low-fluorescence diamonds and iridium gaskets. Raman spectra were collected with a Horiba Jobin-Yvon Labram HR spectrometer using the 514 nm line of an argon laser for excitation. In a first series of experiments, the speciation of alumina was studied in a 1 M KOH solution in equilibrium with corundum up to 700 oC and ~1 GPa. The Raman spectra show a prominent band at 618 cm-1 interpreted to arise from Al-O stretching vibrations associated with the tetrahedral [Al(OH)4]1- species. At higher pressure and temperature, an additional vibrational mode appears in the spectra at 374 cm-1 (full width at half maximum ~ 20 cm-1). This feature is tentatively attributed to [(OH)3Al-O-Al(OH)3]2- (Moolenaar et al. 1970, Jour. Phys. Chem., 74, 3629-3636). No evidence for KAl(OH)4 was observed, consistent with piston cylinder experiments at 700 oC and 1 GPa (Wohlers & Manning, 2009, Chem. Geol., 262, 310). Upon cooling from high-pressure and high temperature, slow kinetics of corundum regrowth lead to oversaturation in the solutions, as evidenced by sharp peaks at 930 and 1066 cm-1 observed upon cooling. These features are probably due to colloidal aluminum hydroxide. The results provide the first evidence for aluminate polymerization at high pressure and temperature, and offer insights into the causes for enhancement of

  12. Role of coupled cataclasis-pressure solution deformation in microearthquake activity along the creeping segment of the SAF: Inferences from studies of the SAFOD core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, J.; Gratier, J.; Renard, F.; Mittempregher, S.; di Toro, G.

    2009-12-01

    Rocks encountered in the SAFOD drill hole represent deformation in the southern-most extent of the creeping segment of the SAF north of the Parkfield. At the site and toward the northwest the SAF is characterized by aseismic creep as well as strain release through repeating microearthquakes Mmicroscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, X-ray fluorescence mapping, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The observed microstructural deformation that is apparently relevant to the seismological data includes clear evidence of cyclic deformation events, cataclastic flow, and pressure solution creep with attendant vein sealing and fracture healing fabrics. Friction testing of drill cuttings and modeling by others suggest that the overall creep behavior in shale-siltstone gouge may be due to low bulk friction coefficient of 0.2-0.4 for the fault rock. Furthermore, the low resistivity zone extending to about 5km beneath the SAFOD-Middle Mountain area is believed to consist of a pod of fluid-filled fractured and porous rocks. Our microstructural data indicate that the foliated shale-siltstone cataclasites are, in a highly heterogeneous way, more porous and permeable than the host rock and therefore provide for structurally controlled enhanced fluid-rock interactions. This is consistent with the observed pressure solution deformation and the microstructural indications of transiently high fluid pressures. We hypothesize that while the friction laws defining stable sliding are prevalent in bulk deformation of the creeping segment, there exist the possibility of steady conditions for repetitive healing, dilation, and rupture of populations of stress-oriented patches due to operation of pressure solution creep along the fault zone. The limitation on the total area of the locked patches at any given time would be controlled primarily by the imposed tectonic and near field rates of slip and fluid flux within the local permeability structure. The available geophysical data for the

  13. Osmotic Pressure of Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions via Molecular Simulations of Chemical Potentials: Application to NaCl.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 407, Sl (2016), s. 76-83 ISSN 0378-3812 Grant - others:NSERC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : osmotic pressure * chemical potential * molecular simulation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.473, year: 2016

  14. Intergranular Pressure Solution in Nacl: Grain-To-Grain Contact Experiments under the Optical Microscope Dissolution sous contrainte dans NaCl : expériences de contact grain à grain sous microscope optique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiers C. J.

    2006-12-01

    effective diffusivity varying with contact force and on-going convergence. The results agree broadly with those of previous compaction creep experiments performed using wet halite powder. Discrepancies with other workers results for single-contact dissolution experiments can be explained in terms of differences in experimental configuration and competition between driving forces. La dissolution sous contrainte (IPS - Intergranular Pressure Solution représente un mécanisme de lithification, de compaction et de déformation à l'échelle géologique pour une large gamme de roches. Les études expérimentales d'IPS réalisées sur des agrégats de quartz n'ont pas été couronnées de succès en raison d'un taux faible d'IPS, et les expériences IPS réalisées en utilisant une halite saturée comme analogue de roche (Spiers et Schutjens, 1990 ; Hickman et Evans, 1991 ont laissé des incertitudes quant au détail des mécanismes IPS et à la structure/saturation au contact du grain dans ce matériau. La présente étude fait état de quatre expériences de dissolution de contact réalisées sous microscope optique afin d'étudier le mécanisme et la cinétique de l'IPS pour des contacts simples halite/halite et halite/verre, chargés en eau salée (température ambiante. Des forces normales de contact dans la gamme de 1,0 à 2,6 N ont été appliquées en présence d'eau salée saturée en NaCl, induisant des pressions de 0,8 à 7,4 MPa. Des pertes de masse et des convergences - fonction du temps - ont été observées pour tous les contacts. Dans tous les cas, le fait de charger le contact (ou d'augmenter la charge sur le contact a conduit à la formation immédiate d'une morphologie de contact rugueuse, composée d'un motif d'îles et de canaux, contrôlé par des caractéristiques cristallographiques, à l'échelle de quelques microns. Cette microstructure non équilibrée a évolué dans le temps vers une face de contact optiquement plate. Le processus de convergence

  15. A STUDY OF THE PRESSURE SOLUTION AND DEFORMATION OF QUARTZ CRYSTALS AT HIGH pH AND UNDER HIGH STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNG-HAE CHOI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is generally used as a buffer material in high-level radioactive waste disposal facilities and consists of 50% quartz by weight. Quartz strongly affects the behavior of bentonite over very long periods. For this reason, quartz dissolution experiment was performed under high-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions based on the conditions found in a high-level radioactive waste disposal facility located deep underground. In this study, two quartz dissolution experiments were conducted on 1 quartz beads under low-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions and 2 a single quartz crystal under high-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions. Following the experiments, a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM was used to observe the surfaces of experimental samples. Numerical analyses using the finite element method (FEM were also performed to quantify the deformation of contact area. Quartz dissolution was observed in both experiments. This deformation was due to a concentrated compressive stress field, as indicated by the quartz deformation of the contact area through the FEM analysis. According to the numerical results, a high compressive stress field acted upon the neighboring contact area, which showed a rapid dissolution rate compared to other areas of the sample.

  16. Investigation of the niobium-oxygen system under low pressure and between 550 K and 2350 K: solid solution, surface overlay and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupille, Jacques

    1974-09-01

    This research thesis addresses the behaviour of transition metals when interacting with oxygen, more particularly in the case of phase formation, but also adsorption and desorption which occur in the case of interaction with low pressure oxygen. It focuses on the case of niobium in solid solution. After a description of phases present in the niobium-oxygen system, and a discussion of reactivities of oxygen and water vapour, the author describes the experimental methods (apparatus and installations, samples, measured values), discusses the study of the surface-volume transfer constant of the niobium-oxygen solution, and the niobium-oxygen interaction mechanisms at high (superior to 1700 K) and low (inferior to 1000 K) temperatures: oxide desorption, oxygen reaction kinetics

  17. Generation of InN nanocrystals in organic solution through laser ablation of high pressure chemical vapor deposition-grown InN thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkis, Sabri; Alevli, Mustafa; Burzhuev, Salamat; Vural, Hüseyin Avni; Okyay, Ali Kemal; Ortaç, Bülend

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis of colloidal InN nanocrystals (InN-NCs) in organic solution through nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of high pressure chemical vapor deposition-grown InN thin film on GaN/sapphire template substrate. The size, the structural, the optical, and the chemical characteristics of InN-NCs demonstrate that the colloidal InN crystalline nanostructures in ethanol are synthesized with spherical shape within 5.9–25.3, 5.45–34.8, 3.24–36 nm particle-size distributions, increasing the pulse energy value. The colloidal InN-NCs solutions present strong absorption edge tailoring from NIR region to UV region.

  18. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  19. Microspectroscopic imaging of solution plasma: How do its physical properties and chemical species evolve in atmospheric-pressure water vapor bubbles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Hiroharu; Banno, Motohiro

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we review the development of scientific instruments for obtaining information on the evolution of physical properties and chemical species of solution plasma (SP). When a pulsed high voltage is applied between electrodes immersed in an aqueous solution, SP is formed in water vapor bubbles transiently generated in the solution under atmospheric pressure. To clarify how SP emerges in water vapor bubbles and is sustained in solutions, an instrument with micrometer spatial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution is required. To meet these requirements, a microscopic system with a custom-made optical discharge cell was newly developed, where the working distance between the SP and the microscopic objective lens was minimized. A hollow electrode equipped in the discharge cell also enabled us to control the chemical composition in water vapor bubbles. To study the spatial and temporal evolutions of chemical species in micrometer and nano- to microsecond regions, a streak camera with a spectrometer and a CCD detector with a time-gated electronic device were combined with the microscope system. The developed instrument is expected to contribute to providing a new means of developing new schemes for chemical reactions and material syntheses.

  20. On the Theory of Solitons of Fluid Pressure and Solute Density in Geologic Porous Media, with Applications to Shale, Clay and Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, A.; Kanivetsky, R.; Salusti, E.

    2017-11-01

    We here analyze a new model of transients of pore pressure p and solute density ρ in geologic porous media. This model is rooted in the nonlinear wave theory, its focus is on advection and effect of large pressure jumps on strain. It takes into account nonlinear and also time-dependent versions of the Hooke law about stress, rate and strain. The model solutions strictly relate p and ρ evolving under the effect of a strong external stress. As a result, the presence of quick and sharp transients in low permeability rocks is unveiled, i.e., the nonlinear "Burgers solitons". We, therefore, show that the actual transport process in porous rocks for large signals is not only the linear diffusion, but also a solitons presence could control the process. A test of a presence of solitons is applied to Pierre shale, Bearpaw shale, Boom clay and Oznam-Mugu silt and clay. An application about the presence of solitons for nuclear waste disposal and salt water intrusions is also discussed. Finally, in a kind of "theoretical experiment" we show that solitons could also be present in higher permeability rocks (Jordan and St. Peter sandstones), thus supporting the idea of a possible occurrence of osmosis also in sandstones.

  1. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVIII. Three aliphatic poly(ethylene glycols) at temperatures T = 298 K–573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of three poly(ethylene glycols) in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Data are analyzed and compared with those of similar solutes. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of three poly(ethylene glycols): 3-oxapentane-1,5-diol (diethylene glycol), 3,6-dioxaoctane-1,8-diol (triethylene glycol), and 3,5,9-trioxaundecane-1,11-diol (tetraethylene glycol) measured in the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. Present data complement both the previous measurements performed at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range from (278 to 343) K and the data already available for the first member of the homologous series (ethylene glycol). A comparison with data previously measured for the homologous series of linear aliphatic polyethers (poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers, glymes), diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (3,6-dioxaheptan-1-ol), and selected alkane-α,ω-diols is presented.

  2. Effects of the Oxygen-Carrying Solution OxyVita C on the Cerebral Microcirculation and Systemic Blood Pressures in Healthy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Abutarboush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC as oxygen delivering therapies during hypoxic states has been hindered by vasoconstrictive side effects caused by depletion of nitric oxide (NO. OxyVita C is a promising oxygen-carrying solution that consists of a zero-linked hemoglobin polymer with a high molecular weight (~17 MDa. The large molecular weight is believed to prevent extravasation and limit NO scavenging and vasoconstriction. The aim of this study was to assess vasoactive effects of OxyVita C on systemic blood pressures and cerebral pial arteriole diameters. Anesthetized healthy rats received four intravenous (IV infusions of an increasing dose of OxyVita C (2, 25, 50, 100 mg/kg and hemodynamic parameters and pial arteriolar diameters were measured pre- and post-infusion. Normal saline was used as a volume-matched control. Systemic blood pressures increased (P ≤ 0.05 with increasing doses of OxyVita C, but not with saline. There was no vasoconstriction in small (<50 µm and medium-sized (50–100 µm pial arterioles in the OxyVita C group. In contrast, small and medium-sized pial arterioles vasoconstricted in the control group. Compared to saline, OxyVita C showed no cerebral vasoconstriction after any of the four doses evaluated in this rat model despite increases in blood pressure.

  3. The Effect of Sintering Oxygen Partial Pressure on a SmBiO3 Buffer Layer for Coated Conductors via Chemical Solution Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of high-temperature YBa2Cu3O7−δ (YBCO superconducting material is a considerable prospect for the growing energy shortages. Here, SmBiO3 (SBO films were deposited on (100-orientated yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ simple crystal substrates via the chemical solution deposition (CSD approach for coated conductors, and the effects of sintering oxygen partial pressure on SBO films were studied. The crystalline structures and surface morphologies of SBO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscope (AFM. The optimized growth temperature, the intensity ratios of the SBO (200 peak to the SBO (111 peak, and the crystallinities of SBO films increased with the sintering oxygen partial pressure. The SEM and AFM images displayed a smooth and well-distributed surface in the argon atmosphere. The subsequent YBCO films with superconducting transition temperatures (Tc = 89.5 K, 90.2 K, and 86.2 K and critical current densities (Jc = 0.88 MA/cm2, 1.69 MA/cm2, and 0.09 MA/cm2; 77 K, self-field were deposited to further check the qualities of the SBO layer. These results indicated that sintering oxygen partial pressure had an effect on the epitaxial growth of the SBO buffer layer and YBCO superconducting properties. The experimental results may be a usable reference for the epitaxial growth of YBCO-coated conductors and other oxides.

  4. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVII. Two aliphatic polyethers (triglyme, tetraglyme) at temperatures T = 298–573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of two linear aliphatic polyethers in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Data combined with those obtained previously are analyzed and compared with standard molar volumes of cyclic ethers. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of two linear aliphatic polyethers: 2,5,8,11-tetraoxadodecane (triethylene glycol dimethyl ether, triglyme) and 2,5,8,11,14-pentaoxapentadecane (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether, tetraglyme), measured in the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. The present values complement previous measurements performed for the title polyethers at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range from (278 to 343) K and extend the knowledge to temperature and pressure ranges in which the data on standard molar volumes for lower members of the homologous series (monoglyme, diglyme) are already available.

  5. Direct transformation of calcium sulfite to {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate in a concentrated Ca-Mg-Mn chloride solution under atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baohong Guan; Hailu Fu; Jie Yu; Guangming Jiang; Bao Kong; Zhongbiao Wu [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Department of Environmental Engineering

    2011-01-15

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber sludge have been generated by coal burning power plants. Utilization of the sulfite-rich sludge for preparing {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate ({alpha}-HH), an important kind of cementitious material, is of particular interest to electric utilities and environmental preservation. In the experiment, calcium sulfite hemihydrate was directly transformed to {alpha}-HH without the occurrence of calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH). The transformation was performed in a concentrated CaCl{sub 2} solution containing Mg{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} at 95{sup o}C, atmospheric pressure and low pH. The oxidation of calcium sulfite and the subsequent crystallization of {alpha}-HH constitute the whole conversion, during which the oxidation turns out to be the rate controlling step. Solid solution comprised of calcium sulfite hemihydrate and calcium sulfate was found to coexist with {alpha}-HH in the suspension. Calcium sulfate increases and calcium sulfite decreases spontaneously until the solid solution disappears. Thus, it is a potential alternative to utilize sulfite-rich FGD scrubber sludge for the direct preparation of {alpha}-HH. 36 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Physico-chemical investigation of cement carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a controlled CO2 partial pressure at 25 and 50 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, Laure; Trepy, Nadia; Le Bescop, Patrick; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Monguillon, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of radioactive waste geological disposal, structural concretes have to be adapted to underground chemical conditions. For concrete in water saturated medium, it is believed that carbonation will have a major impact on the interaction between concrete and the geological medium. So, to understand the complex degradation of the cement paste in that context, it is interesting to study a simplified system such as degradation in carbonated water solution. This solution must be at equilibrium with a CO 2 partial pressure 30 times higher than the atmospheric pCO 2 , to reproduce underground natural conditions of Callovo-Oxfordian clayey rock of Bure (France). In this study, the behaviour of a new low pH material (CEM I + silica fume + fly ashes) is compared with a CEM I cement paste, both of them being submitted to carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a pCO 2 equal to 1.32 kPa (1.3 10 -2 atm). Two different temperatures, 25 and 50 C, are considered. To realize these experiments, two different original types of devices were developed

  7. Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems for metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiot, Marie-Noelle

    2013-01-01

    The research works 'Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems' was presented for the graduation: 'Habilitation a diriger des recherches'. The common thread of both themes liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers lies in the improvement of the techniques of radionuclide activity measurement. Metrology of ionization radiation intervenes in numerous domains, in the research, in the industry including the environment and the health, which are subjects of constant concern for the world population these last years. In this big variety of applications answers a large number of radionuclides of diverse disintegration scheme and under varied physical forms. The presented works realized within the National Laboratory Henri Becquerel have for objective to assure detector calibration traceability and to improve the methods of activity measurements within the framework of research projects and development. The improvement of the primary and secondary activity measurement methods consists in perfecting the accuracy of the measurements in particular by a better knowledge of the parameters influencing the detector yield. The works of development dealing with liquid scintillation counting concern mainly the study of the response of liquid scintillators to low energy electrons as well as their linear absorption coefficients using synchrotron radiation. The research works on pressurized ionization chambers consist of the study of their response to photons and electrons by experimental measurements compared to the simulation of the source-detector system using Monte Carlo codes. Besides, the design of a new type of ionization chamber with variable pressure is presented. This new project was developed to guarantee the precision of the amount of activity injected into the patient within the framework of diagnosis examination

  8. Application of Direct Current Atmospheric Pressure Glow Microdischarge Generated in Contact with a Flowing Liquid Solution for Synthesis of Au-Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzimitrowicz, Anna; Jamroz, Piotr; Nyk, Marcin; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-04-06

    A direct current atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (dc-μAPGD) generated between an Ar nozzle microjet and a flowing liquid was applied to produce Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AgCSNPs) in a continuous flow system. Firstly, operating dc-μAPGD with the flowing solution of the Au(III) ions as the cathode, the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) core was produced. Next, to produce the core-shell nanostructures, the collected AuNPs solution was immediately mixed with an AgNO₃ solution and passed through the system with the reversed polarity to fabricate the Ag nanoshell on the AuNPs core. The formation of Au@AgCSNPs was confirmed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Three localized surface plasmon resonance absorption bands with wavelengths centered at 372, 546, and 675 nm were observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of Au@AgCSNPs, confirming the reduction of both the Au(III) and Ag(I) ions. The right configuration of metals in Au@AgCSNPs was evidenced by TEM. The Au core diameter was 10.2 ± 2.0 nm, while the thickness of the Ag nanoshell was 5.8 ± 1.8 nm. The elemental composition of the bimetallic nanoparticles was also confirmed by EDS. It is possible to obtain 90 mL of a solution containing Au@AgCSNPs per hour using the applied microdischarge system.

  9. Cumulates, Dykes and Pressure Solution in the Ice-Salt Mantle of Europa: Geological Consequences of Pressure Dependent Liquid Compositions and Volume Changes During Ice-Salt Melting Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, S.; Asphaug, E.; Bruesch, L.

    2002-12-01

    Water-salt analogue experiments used to investigate cumulate processes in silicate magmas, along with observations of sea ice and ice shelf behaviour, indicate that crystal-melt separation in water-salt systems is a rapid and efficient process even on scales of millimetres and minutes. Squeezing-out of residual melts by matrix compaction is also predicted to be rapid on geological timescales. We predict that the ice-salt mantle of Europa is likely to be strongly stratified, with a layered structure predictable from density and phase relationships between ice polymorphs, aqueous saline solutions and crystalline salts such as hydrated magnesium sulphates (determined experimentally by, inter alia, Hogenboom et al). A surface layer of water ice flotation cumulate will be separated from denser salt cumulates by a cotectic horizon. This cotectic horizon will be both the site of subsequent lowest-temperature melting and a level of neutral buoyancy for the saline melts produced. Initial melting will be in a narrow depth range owing to increasing melting temperature with decreasing pressure: the phase relations argue against direct melt-though to the surface unless vesiculation occurs. Overpressuring of dense melts due to volume expansion on cotectic melting is predicted to lead to lateral dyke emplacement and extension above the dyke tips. Once the liquid leaves the cotectic, melting of water ice will involve negative volume change. Impact-generated melts will drain downwards through the fractured zones beneath crater floors. A feature in the complex crater Mannan'an, with elliptical ring fractures around a conical depression with a central pit, bears a close resemblance to Icelandic glacier collapse cauldrons produced by subglacial eruptions. Other structures resembling Icelandic cauldrons occur along Europan banded structures, while resurgence of ice rubble within collapse structures may produce certain types of chaos region. More general contraction of the ice mantle

  10. Potential of high isostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields for the processing of potato and pea proteins:structural and techno-functional characterization in model solutions and plant tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Baier, Anne Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the potential of high isostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields for the production of high quality plant proteins. Induced changes in protein solutions and plant tissue of potato and pea were analyzed by means of structural and techno-functional characterization as well as by investigation of diffusion and extractions procedures. The application of high isostatic pressure provides a gentle alternative to conventional heat preservation. Especially ...

  11. Standard molar volumes and heat capacities of aqueous solutions of sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate at temperatures up to 573 K and pressures to 28 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourtier, Emilie; Ballerat-Busserolles, Karine; Majer, Vladimir; Šedlbauer, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Original HT/HP data for NaTr(aq) obtained using non-commercial instruments. ► First heat capacity data for NaTr(aq) at conditions remote from ambient. ► Correction for association when calculating stand. therm. properties of Tr(aq) anion. - Abstract: Densities and heat capacities of aqueous solutions of sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate (sodium triflate) of concentrations from 0.025 to 0.3 mol · kg −1 were measured with high temperature, high pressure custom-made instruments at temperatures up to 573 K and at pressures up to 28 MPa. Standard molar volumes and standard molar heat capacities were obtained via extrapolation of the apparent molar properties to infinite dilution. The results for volumetric properties are consistent with earlier literature data, but no previous measurements exist for heat capacities of sodium triflate at superambient conditions. The new data were used for calculating the standard molar volumes and heat capacities for the triflate anion and compared with the results for triflic acid that should be essentially identical within the expected error margins. At temperatures above 473 K an effort was made to refine the processing of literature data for HCl(aq), taking into account its partial association, and subsequently to modify the value for Na + ion calculated from the standard thermodynamic values of NaCl(aq) where its ion pairing was already considered. This approach yields reasonable agreement at high temperatures between the values for triflate ion calculated from its salt and those for triflic acid.

  12. Determination of organophosphorus flame retardants in fish by pressurized liquid extraction using aqueous solutions and solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanqi; Deng, Yuehua; Yuan, Wenting; He, Huan; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng

    2014-10-31

    A novel method was developed for the determination of organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in fish. The method consists of a combination of pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using aqueous solutions and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), followed by gas chromatography-flame photometric detector (GC-FPD). The experimental parameters that influenced extraction efficiency were systematically evaluated. The optimal responses were observed by extracting 1g of fish meat with the solution of water:acetonitrile (90:10, v/v) at 150°C for 5min and acid-washed silica gel used as lipid sorbent. The obtained extract was then analyzed by SPME coupled with GC-FPD without any additional clean-up steps. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed procedure showed a wide linear range (0.90-5000ngg(-1)) obtained by analyzing the spiked fish samples with increasing concentrations of PFRs and correlation coefficient (R) ranged from 0.9900 to 0.9992. The detection limits (S/N=3) were in the range of 0.010-0.208ngg(-1) with standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 2.0% to 9.0%. The intra-day and inter-day variations were less than 9.0% and 7.8%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of PFRs in real fish samples with recoveries varying from 79.8% to 107.3%. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is highly effective for analyzing PFRs in fish samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Autologus normovolemic and hypervolemic hemodilution during surgery using 6% dextran 70 and lactated ringer solution: impact on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, hemoglobin and hematocrite (A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruswan Dachlan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Autologous normovolemic hemodilution (ANH is one of the methods to conserve blood donor (homologous. The decrease in hemoglobin (Hb due to bleeding in major surgery will be minimized and the hematocrite (Hct will be adjusted accordingly by this method. However, due to its impractical clinical application, another simpler hemodilution method is used, i.e. hypervolemic hemodilution (HHD, using 6% dextran 70 and lactated Ringer solutions. The aim of this randomized comparative study was to investigate the impacts of both hemodilution methods (ANH and HHD on mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR, hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrite (Hct in anesthetized patients undergoing major surgery. Fourteen (14 women fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into 2 groups. Seven (7 women received ANH and seven (7 women received HHD method. There were significant statistical differences (P<0.05 between ANH and HHD groups in MAP and Hct after 1 minute (86.3±9.1 vs. 99.1±6.4 on MAP and (27.3±1.7 vs. 31.5±4.4 on Hct and after 20 minutes (87.7±7.3 vs. 98.3±6.8 on MAP and (27.4± 1.7 vs. 3.6±4.8 on Hct post-hemodilution respectively. There was no difference in HR and Hb. No statistical difference between the four parameters tested after 120 minutes post-hemodilution. It may be concluded that both methods worth to be used in clinical setting although further studies are required. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:246-50Keyword: Acute normovolenic hemodilution, acute hypervolemic hemodilution, dextran 70, lactated ringer solution, microsirculation

  14. Pressure (Or No Royal Road)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses how difficult the various problems of pressure, partial pressure, gas laws, and vapor pressure are for students. Outlines the evolution of the concept of pressure, the gas equation for a perfect gas, partial pressures, saturated vapor pressure, Avogadro's hypothesis, Raoult's law, and the vapor pressure of ideal solutions. (JR)

  15. Corrosion Behavior of High Pressure Die Cast Al-Ni and Al-Ni-Ca Alloys in 3.5% NaCl Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthanari, Srinivasan; Jang, Jae Cheol; Shin, Kwang Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this investigation corrosion behavior of newly developed high-pressure die cast Al-Ni (N15) and Al-Ni-Ca (NX1503) alloys was studied in 3.5% NaCl solution. The electrochemical corrosion behavior was evaluated using open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization results validated that NX1503 alloy exhibited lower corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) value (5.969 μA/cm{sup 2}) compared to N15 (7.387 μA/cm{sup 2}). EIS-Bode plots revealed a higher impedance (|Z|) value and maximum phase angle value for NX1503 than N15 alloy. Equivalent circuit curve fitting analysis revealed that surface layer (R{sub 1}) and charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) values of NX1503 alloy was higher compared to N15 alloy. Immersion corrosion studies were also conducted for alloys using fishing line specimen arrangement to simultaneously measure corrosion rates from weight loss (P{sub W}) and hydrogen volume (P{sub H}) after 72 hours and NX1503 alloy had lower corrosion rate compared to N15 alloy. The addition of Ca to N15 alloy significantly reduced the Al{sub 3}Ni intermetallic phase and further grain refinement may be attributed for reduction in the corrosion rate.

  16. The effect of ethanol on the formation and physico-chemical properties of particles generated from budesonide solution-based pressurized metered-dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Traini, Daniela; Chan, Hak-Kim; Young, Paul M

    2013-11-01

    The aerosol performance of budesonide solution-based pressurized metered-dose inhalers (HFA 134a), with various amounts of ethanol (5-30%, w/w) as co-solvents, was evaluated using impaction and laser diffraction techniques. With the increase of ethanol concentration in a formulation, the mass median aerodynamic diameter was increased and the fine particle fraction showed a significant decline. Although data obtained from laser diffraction oversized that of the impaction measurements, good correlations were established between the two sets of data. Particles emitted from all the five formulations in this study were amorphous, with two different types of morphology - the majority had a smooth surface with a solid core and the others were internally porous with coral-like surface morphology. The addition of ethanol in the formulation decreased the percentage of such irregular-shape particles from 52% to 2.5% approximately, when the ethanol concentration was increased from 5% to 30%, respectively. A hypothesis regarding the possible particle formation mechanisms was also established. Due to the difference of droplet composition from the designed formulation during the atomization process, the two types of particle may have gone through distinct drying processes: both droplets will have a very short period of co-evaporation, droplets with less ethanol may be dried during such period; while the droplets containing more ethanol will undergo an extra condensation stage before the final particle formation.

  17. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends.

  18. Viscosity of aqueous Ni(NO3)2 solutions at temperatures from (297 to 475) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa and concentration between (0.050 and 2.246) mol . kg-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulagatov, I.M.; Zeinalova, A.B.; Azizov, N.D.

    2006-01-01

    Viscosity of nine aqueous Ni(NO 3 ) 2 solutions (0.050, 0.153, 0.218, 0.288, 0.608, 0.951, 1.368, 1.824, and 2.246) mol . kg -1 was measured in the temperature range from (297 to 475) K and at pressures (0.1, 10, 20, and 30) MPa. The measurements were carried out with a capillary flow technique. The total experimental uncertainty of viscosity, pressure, temperature, and composition measurements were estimated to be less than 1.6%, 0.05%, 15 mK, and 0.02%, respectively. All experimental and derived results are compared with experimental and calculated values reported in the literature. Extrapolation of the solution viscosity measurements to zero concentration (pure water values) for the given temperature and pressure are in excellent agreement (average absolute deviation, AAD = 0.13%) with the values of pure water viscosity from IAPWS formulation [J. Kestin, J.V. Sengers, B. Kamgar-Parsi, J.M.H. Levelt Sengers, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 13 (1984) 175-189]. The viscosity data for the solutions as a function of concentration have been interpreted in terms of the extended Jones-Dole equation for strong electrolytes. The values of viscosity A-, B-, and D-coefficients of the extended Jones-Dole equation for the relative viscosity (η/η ) of aqueous Ni(NO 3 ) 2 solutions as a function of temperature are studied. The derived values of the viscosity A- and B-coefficients were compared with the results predicted by Falkenhagen-Dole theory (limiting law) of electrolyte solutions and the values calculated with the ionic B-coefficient data. The measured values of viscosity for the solutions were also used to calculate the effective rigid molar volumes in the extended Einstein relation for the relative viscosity (η/η )

  19. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXIV. Selected alkane-α,ω-diols at temperatures T = 298 K to 573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan; Hnědkovský, Lubomír

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of three alkane-α,ω-diols (C 5 , C 8 , C 9 ) in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Dependences on carbon atom number, temperature, and pressure are analysed. -- Abstract: Density data for dilute aqueous solutions of three alkane-α,ω-diols (pentane-1,5-diol, octane-1,8-diol, nonane-1,9-diol) are presented together with standard molar volumes (partial molar volumes at infinite dilution) calculated from the experimental data. The measurements were performed at temperatures from T = 298 K up to T = 573 K. Experimental pressures were slightly above the saturation vapour pressure of water, and (15 and 30) MPa. The data were obtained using a high-temperature high-pressure flow vibrating-tube densimeter. Measured standard molar volumes were combined with data previously published for other members of the homologous series and discussed. Experimental standard molar volumes were correlated as a function of temperature and pressure using an empirical polynomial function. Dependences of standard molar volumes on temperature and pressure were analysed. Contributions of the methylene group to the standard molar volume were also evaluated and discussed

  20. Experimental and first-principles calculation study of the pressure-induced transitions to a metastable phase in GaP O4 and in the solid solution AlP O4-GaP O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angot, E.; Huang, B.; Levelut, C.; Le Parc, R.; Hermet, P.; Pereira, A. S.; Aquilanti, G.; Frapper, G.; Cambon, O.; Haines, J.

    2017-08-01

    α -Quartz-type gallium phosphate and representative compositions in the AlP O4-GaP O4 solid solution were studied by x-ray powder diffraction and absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and by first-principles calculations up to pressures of close to 30 GPa. A phase transition to a metastable orthorhombic high-pressure phase along with some of the stable orthorhombic C m c m CrV O4 -type material is found to occur beginning at 9 GPa at 320 ∘C in GaP O4 . In the case of the AlP O4-GaP O4 solid solution at room temperature, only the metastable orthorhombic phase was obtained above 10 GPa. The possible crystal structures of the high-pressure forms of GaP O4 were predicted from first-principles calculations and the evolutionary algorithm USPEX. A predicted orthorhombic structure with a P m n 21 space group with the gallium in sixfold and phosphorus in fourfold coordination was found to be in the best agreement with the combined experimental data from x-ray diffraction and absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This method is found to very powerful to better understand competition between different phase transition pathways at high pressure.

  1. Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in the aqueous solution of Diethanolamine (DEA) blended with 1-Butyl-1-Methylpyrrolidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate [BmPyrr][OTf] at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, S. N.; Salleh, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    Solubility data of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous Diethanolamine (DEA) blended with 1-Butyl-1-Methylpyrrolidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate [Bmpyrr][OTf] were measured at temperature 313.15K, 323.15K, 333.15K and pressure from 500psi up to 700 psi. The experiments covered over the concentration range of 0-10wt% for [Bmpyrr][OTf] and 30-40wt% for DEA. The solubility of CO2 was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop in high pressure stirred absorption cell reactor. The experimental results showed that CO2 loading in all DEA-[BmPyrr][OTf] mixtures studied increases with increasing of CO2 partial pressure and temperature. It was also found that the CO2 loading capacity increase significantly as the concentration of [Bmpyrr][OTf] increases. Jou and Mather model was used to predict the solubility of CO2 in the mixtures where the experimental data were correlated as a function of temperature and CO2 partial pressure. It was found that the model was successful in predicting the solubility behavior of the aqueous DEA-[Bmpyrr][OTf] systems considered in this study.

  2. Irreversible Conversion of a Water-Ethanol Solution into an Organized Two-Dimensional Network of Alternating Supramolecular Units in a Hydrophobic Zeolite under Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arletti, Rossella; Fois, Ettore; Gigli, Lara; Vezzalini, Giovanna; Quartieri, Simona; Tabacchi, Gloria

    2017-02-13

    Turning disorder into organization is a key issue in science. By making use of X-ray powder diffraction and modeling studies, we show herein that high pressures in combination with the shape and space constraints of the hydrophobic all-silica zeolite ferrierite separate an ethanol-water liquid mixture into ethanol dimer wires and water tetramer squares. The confined supramolecular blocks alternate in a binary two-dimensional (2D) architecture that remains stable upon complete pressure release. These results support the combined use of high pressures and porous networks as a viable strategy for driving the organization of molecules or nano-objects towards complex, pre-defined patterns relevant for the realization of novel functional nanocomposites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  4. A geometric improvement of the velocity-pressure local regularity criterion for a suitable weak solution to the Navier-Stokes equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neustupa, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 4 (2014), s. 685-698 ISSN 0862-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equation * suitable weak solution * regularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://hdl.handle.net/10338.dmlcz/144145

  5. Isosymmetric pressure-induced bonding increase changes compression behavior of clinopyroxenes across jadeite-aegirine solid solution in subduction zones: ISOSYMMETRIC PHASE TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jingui [Key Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth' s Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang China; Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Zhang, Dongzhou [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; Fan, Dawei [Key Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth' s Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang China; Downs, Robert T. [Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson Arizona USA; Hu, Yi [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; Dera, Przemyslaw K. [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA

    2017-01-01

    Pyroxenes are among the most important minerals of Earth's crust and upper mantle and play significant role in controlling subduction at convergent margins. In this study, synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on a natural aegirine [NaFe3+Si2O6] sample at ambient temperature and high pressures to 60 GPa, simulating conditions within the coldest part of a subduction zone consisting of old lithosphere. The diffraction data reveal no obvious sign of structural phase transition in aegirine within this pressure range; however, several relevant structural parameter trends change noticeably at approximately 24 GPa, indicating the presence of the previously predicted isosymmetric bonding change, related to increase of coordination number of Na+ at M2 site. The pressure-volume data, fit with third-order Birch-Murnaghan (BM3) equation of state over the whole pressure range, yields KT0 = 126(2) GPa and K'T0 = 3.3(1), while separate BM3 fits performed for the 0–24.0 GPa and 29.9–60.4 GPa pressure ranges give KT0 = 118(3) GPa, K'T0 = 4.2(3) and KT0 = 133(2) GPa, K'T0 = 3.0(1), suggesting that the structure stiffens as a result of the new bond formation. Aegirine exhibits strong anisotropic compression with unit strain axial ratios ε1:ε2:ε3 = 1.00:2.44:1.64. Structural refinements reveal that NaO8 polyhedron is the most compressible and SiO4 tetrahedron has the lowest compressibility. The consequence of bonding transition is that the compressional behavior of aegirine below ~24 GPa and above that pressure is quite different, with likely consequences for relevant thermodynamic parameters and ion diffusion coefficients.

  6. Crystal Growth and Characterization of (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-BaTiO3 Single Crystals Obtained by a Top-Seeded Solution Growth Method under High-Pressure Oxygen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Hiroaki; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2011-09-01

    A single crystal of ferroelectric 0.88(Bi,Na)TiO3-0.12BaTiO3 (BNT-BT) solid solution with tetragonal P4mm structure was grown by a top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method at a high oxygen pressure (PO2 ) of 0.9 MPa. The crystals exhibited a large remanent polarization (Pr) of 54 µC/cm2, which leads to a spontaneous polarization estimated to be 54 µC/cm2. The large Pr compared with that of crystals grown at PO2 = 0.1 MPa is suggested to originate from a low oxygen vacancy concentration. The high-PO2 TSSG method is demonstrated to be effective for obtaining large-sized, high-quality BNT-BT crystals.

  7. Role of membrane technology to achieve ALARA concept in reprocessing plant: utilization of low pressure reverse osmosis for treatment of delay tank solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabby, Anil K.; Sonawane, J.V.; Rathore, N.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Roy, S.C.; Venugopalan, A.K.; Chagrani, R.D.; Dey, P.K.; Prabhakar, S.; Tiwari, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Reverse osmosis is a well-developed technology. The systems have been used in industrial settings for many years with applications to separation, concentration of product streams and waste water treatment. The technology has been used for removal of the radionuclides from low-level liquid wastes, such as waste streams at nuclear power plants. Because reverse osmosis rejects nearly all contaminants from a solution the high purity product water may be recycled within the power plant, or is usually of such low activity that it is suitable for discharge to the environment. This technology will help in achieving ALARA concept which will be beneficial for the environment. In the present study, the removal of alpha and beta activities from delay tank solution is planned

  8. The relationship between vapour pressure, vaporization enthalpy, and enthalpy of transfer from solution to gas: An extension of the Martin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisaipet, A.; Aryusuk, K.; Lilitchan, S.; Krisnangkura, K.

    2007-01-01

    Martin's equation, Δ sln g G=Δ sln g G o +zδ sln g G, is extended to cover vaporization free energy (Δ l g G). The extended equation is further expanded in terms of enthalpy and entropy and then used to correlate vaporization enthalpy (Δ l g H) and enthalpy of transfer from solution to gas (Δ sln g H). Data available in the literatures are used to validate and support the speculations derived from the proposed equation

  9. An electrokinetic pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Duckjong

    2008-01-01

    A new concept for a micro pressure sensor is demonstrated. The pressure difference between the inlet and the outlet of glass nanochannels is obtained by measuring the electrokinetically generated electric potential. To demonstrate the proposed concept, experimental investigations are performed for 100 nm wide nanochannels with sodium chloride solutions having various concentrations. The proposed pressure sensor is able to measure the pressure difference within a 10% deviation from linearity. The sensitivity of the electrokinetic pressure sensor with 10 −5 M sodium chloride solution is 18.5 µV Pa −1 , which is one order of magnitude higher than that of typical diaphragm-based pressure sensors. A numerical model is presented for investigating the effects of the concentration and the channel width on the sensitivity of the electrokinetic pressure sensor. Numerical results show that the sensitivity increases as the concentration decreases and the channel width increases

  10. A new fabrication process for YBa2Cu4O8 superconducting filaments by the solution spinning method under ambient pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Kojima, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 4 O 8 superconducting filament has successfully been prepared by dry-spinning through a homogeneous aqueous solution containing Y, Ba and Cu acetates, polyvinyl alcohol and other organic acids. After removing volatile components, the 124 filament is obtained by heating at 780deg C for 3 h. A decomposition of the 124 filament is investigated for introducing fine flux-pinning centers into the 123 filament. A high transport J c value of 1900 A/cm 2 at 77 K and at 0 T is attained for the 123 filament through the decomposition of the 124 filament. (orig.)

  11. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB 6 , SrB 6 , BaB 6 and the ternary hexaborides Ca x Sr 1−x B 6 , Ca x Ba 1−x B 6 , Sr x Ba 1−x B 6 (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB 6 (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials

  12. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  14. Determination of Hg(2+) by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng

    2014-10-03

    A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg(2+) was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized l-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg(2+) elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1) and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L(-1) HNO3. The detection limit of FI-SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L(-1), and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg(2+) measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated by determining Hg(2+) in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Pt. 1. Feasibility of closed analytical solutions and simulation of the mixing with CFX-4. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Rohde, U.

    2001-10-01

    The project was aimed at the analytical and numerical simulation of coolant mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWRs. Generally, the coolant mixing is of relevance for two classes of accident scenarios - boron dilution and cold water transients. For the investigation of the relevant mixing phenomena, the Rossendorf test facility ROCOM has been designed. ROCOM is a 1:5 scaled Plexiglas trademark model of the PWR Konvoi allowing velocity measurements by the LDA technique. Design and construction of the ROCOM facility including the measurement equipment were performed in a second part of the project. For the design of the facility, CFD calculations were performed to analyze the scaling of the model. It was found, that the scaling of 1:5 to the prototype meets both: physical and economical demands. A theoretical 2D-model of the downcomer flow was developed based on the potential theory. The coolant inlet is represented by mass sources. Potential vortices were superposed to describe large scale recirculations. However, the method requires an a-priory knowledge of the location and intensity of the vorticity sources. Therefore, the main goal of the project was the numerical simulation of the coolant mixing of different PWRs. The temperature and boron concentration fields established by the coolant mixing during nominal and transient flow conditions in the pressure vessel of the PWR Konvoi and the Russian type WWER-440 were investigated. The calculations were carried out with the CFD-code CFX 4. The results of the CFD calculation are found in the final report. The report is based on the Ph.D. work of T. Hoehne. (orig.) [de

  16. Thermodynamics of self-assembling of mixture of a cationic gemini surfactant and sodium dodecylsulfate in aqueous solution: Calorimetry, conductivity and surface pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Yujie; Ding, Yanhong; Zhuo, Kelei; Wang, Jianji; Bastos, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ITC provided thermodynamic characterization of self-association of oppositely charged gemini/SDS surfactants. • Phase transitions and corresponding enthalpies were obtained by ITC. • The transitions reflect a change in morphology, supported by Cryo-TEM images. • Conductivity and ITC results show very good agreement. • An asymmetric distribution of surfactants in the aggregates is supported by results. - Abstract: The thermodynamics and phase behavior of mixtures of cationic gemini surfactant decanediyl-α,ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-10-12) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were studied in the dilute SDS-rich region. The enthalpy of interaction between both surfactant monomers before the critical micelle concentration for the mixture (cmc_m_i_x) was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). After the cmc_m_i_x, ITC results exhibited a first process associated with a large endothermic enthalpy change followed by a second one with a very small exothermic enthalpy change. In the same regions, the conductivity curves show an increase in slope after the break, followed by a plateau region, respectively for the two processes. The combined results from the various methodologies used lead us to propose that the first process reflects the formation of non-spherical micelles and the second one the vesicle formation. The area per catanionic complex was obtained through surface pressure measurements, leading to an apparent packing parameter ⩾1. The observed behavior may be rationalized on the basis of the hypothesis that both surfactants distribute asymmetrically in the vesicle bilayers and unevenly in the non-spherical micelle. In order to get structural information Cryo-TEM experiments were performed, which provided images that support this interpretation. From all the information gathered a phase diagram was mapped, including three one-phase regions of spherical micelles, non-spherical micelles and vesicles.

  17. Determination of Hg{sup 2+} by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Zhen [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Zheng, E-mail: wangzheng@mail.sic.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • A modified SBA-15 mesoporous silica (SH-SBA-15) was synthesized as a sorbent. • On-line SPE combined with SCGD-AES based on FIA was used to detect Hg{sup 2+} firstly. • A simple, low-cost Hg{sup 2+} analysis in a complex matrix was established. • The sensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} was achieved with a detection limit of 0.75 μg L{sup −1}. - Abstract: A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg{sup 2+} was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized L-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg{sup 2+} elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min{sup −1} and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. The detection limit of FI–SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L{sup −1}, and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg{sup 2+} measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L{sup −1}. The proposed method was validated by determining Hg{sup 2+} in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310)

  18. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVI. 15-Crown-5 and 18-crown-6 ethers at temperatures (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Density data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Standard molar volumes of two crown ethers in water are presented. • Group contribution method was designed to estimate standard molar volumes of cyclic ethers. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of two cyclic ethers, viz. 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6, measured over the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. Present data were combined with those obtained previously for several cyclic ethers and predictions of standard molar volumes based on group contribution approach were tested and analysed

  19. A pressure-based semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin method on staggered unstructured meshes for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations at all Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new arbitrary high order accurate semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for the solution of the two and three dimensional compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured curved meshes. The method is pressure-based and semi-implicit and is able to deal with all Mach number flows. The new DG scheme extends the seminal ideas outlined in [1], where a second order semi-implicit finite volume method for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a general equation of state was introduced on staggered Cartesian grids. Regarding the high order extension we follow [2], where a staggered space-time DG scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was presented. In our scheme, the discrete pressure is defined on the primal grid, while the discrete velocity field and the density are defined on a face-based staggered dual grid. Then, the mass conservation equation, as well as the nonlinear convective terms in the momentum equation and the transport of kinetic energy in the energy equation are discretized explicitly, while the pressure terms appearing in the momentum and energy equation are discretized implicitly. Formal substitution of the discrete momentum equation into the total energy conservation equation yields a linear system for only one unknown, namely the scalar pressure. Here the equation of state is assumed linear with respect to the pressure. The enthalpy and the kinetic energy are taken explicitly and are then updated using a simple Picard procedure. Thanks to the use of a staggered grid, the final pressure system is a very sparse block five-point system for three dimensional problems and it is a block four-point system in the two dimensional case. Furthermore, for high order in space and piecewise constant polynomials in time, the system is observed to be symmetric and positive definite. This allows to use fast linear solvers such as the conjugate gradient (CG) method. In

  20. Raman Line Imaging of Poly(ε-caprolactone)/Carbon Dioxide Solutions at High Pressures: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study for Interpreting Intermolecular Interactions and Free-Volume Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore Carbone, Maria Giovanna; Musto, Pellegrino; Pannico, Marianna; Braeuer, Andreas; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Ernesto

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a Raman line-imaging setup was employed to monitor in situ the CO2 sorption at elevated pressures (from 0.62 to 7.10 MPa) in molten PCL. The method allowed the quantitative measurement of gas concentration in both the time-resolved and the space-resolved modes. The combined experimental and theoretical approach allowed a molecular level characterization of the system. The dissolved CO2 was found to occupy a volume essentially coincident with its van der Waals volume and the estimated partial molar volume of the probe did not change with pressure. Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions with the PCL carbonyls was confirmed to be the main interaction mechanism. The geometry of the supramolecular complex and the preferential interaction site were controlled more by steric than electronic effects. On the basis of the indications emerging from Raman spectroscopy, an equation of state thermodynamic model for the PCL-CO2 system, based upon a compressible lattice fluid theory endowed with specific interactions, has been tailored to account for the interaction types detected spectroscopically. The predictions of the thermodynamic model in terms of molar volume of solution have been compared with available volumetric measurements while predictions for CO2 partial molar volume have been compared with the values estimated on the basis of Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  2. High-pressure tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.

    1976-01-01

    Some solutions to problems of compressing and containing tritium gas to 200 MPa at 700 0 K are discussed. The principal emphasis is on commercial compressors and high-pressure equipment that can be easily modified by the researcher for safe use with tritium. Experience with metal bellows and diaphragm compressors has been favorable. Selection of materials, fittings, and gauges for high-pressure tritium work is also reviewed briefly

  3. Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol at temperatures from 278.15 K to 393.15 K and at the pressure 0.35 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Origlia-Luster, M.L.; Woolley, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes V phi and apparent molar heat capacities C p,phi have been determined for dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol at temperatures from 278.15 K to 393.15 K and at the pressure 0.35 MPa. The molalities investigated ranged from 0.05 mol·kg -1 to 1.0 mol·kg -1 . We used a vibrating tube densimeter (DMA 512P, Anton PAAR, Austria) to determine the densities and volumetric properties. Heat capacities were obtained using a twin fixed-cell, power-compensation, differential-output, temperature-scanning calorimeter (NanoDSC 6100, Calorimetry Sciences Corporation, American Fork, UT, USA). The results were fit by regression to equations that describe the surfaces (V phi ,T,m) and (C p,phi ,T,m). Infinite dilution partial molar volumes V 2 0 and heat capacities C 0 p,2 were obtained over the range of temperatures by extrapolation of these surfaces to m=0 mol·kg -1

  4. In-Situ Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Base 718 Alloy Under Various CO2 Partial Pressures at 150 and 205 °C in NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubi; Zhao, Yongtao; Tang, An; Yang, Wenjie; Li, Enzuo

    2018-03-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques at various partial pressures of CO2 (P_{{{CO}2 }} s) in a 25 wt% NaCl solution at 150 and 205 °C. The passive films composed of FeCO3 exhibit good corrosion resistance with a feature of Warburg impedance, Tafel plots show a complete passivation and the anodic reactions was dominated by a diffusion process at low P_{{{CO}2 }} s (1.8-9.8 MPa) at 150 °C. While numerous dented corrosion areas appeared on the sample surface for the P_{{{CO}2 }} of 11.6 MPa at 205 °C, the Tafel plot with three anodic peaks and the Nyquist diagram with an atrophied impedance arc were present. This dented corrosion attribute to the synergistic effects of stress, temperature, P_{{{CO}2 }} and Cl-, the temperature and stress could play crucial roles on the corrosion of the alloy 718.

  5. Contact nuclei formation in aqueous dextrose solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerreta, Michael K.; Berglund, Kris A.

    1990-06-01

    A laser Raman microprobe was used in situ to observe the growth of alpha dextrose monohydrate on alpha anhydrous dextrose crystals. The Raman spectra indicate growth of the monohydrate below 28.1°C, but the presence of only the anhydrous form above 40.5°C. Contact nucleation experiments with parent anhydrous crystals yielded only monohydrate nuclei below 28.1°C, while contacts in solutions between 34.5 and 41.0°C produced both crystalline forms, and contacts in solutions above 43.5°C produced only anhydrous nuclei. The inability of the monohydrate to grow on anhydrous crystals in the same solution that forms the two crystalline phases with a single contact precludes a simple attrition mechanism of nuclei formation. For the same reason, the hypothetical mechanism involving parent crystal stabilization of pre-crystalline clusters, allowing the clusters to grow into nuclei, is also contradicted. A third, mechanism, which may be a combination of the two, is believed to apply.

  6. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A U; Yangirov, I Z

    1982-01-01

    A clay-powder, cement, and water-base plugging solution is proposed having reduced solution viscosity characteristics while maintaining tensile strength in cement stone. This solution utilizes silver graphite and its ingredients, by mass weight, are as follows: cement 51.2-54.3%; claypowder 6.06-9.1%; silver graphite 0.24-0.33%; with water making up the remainder.

  7. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic coefficient and vapour pressure of N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C4H9, C5H11, C6H13) in the ethanol solution at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Atabay, Maryam; Azamat, Jafar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The osmotic coefficients of the solutions of ionic liquid in ethanol have been measured. ► Measured osmotic coefficients were correlated using Pitzer, e-NRTL and NRF models and polynomial equation. ► Vapour pressures were evaluated from the correlated osmotic coefficients. - Abstract: Osmotic coefficients of the solutions of room temperature ionic liquid N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C 4 H 9 , C 5 H 11 , C 6 H 13 ) in ethanol have been measured at T = 298.15 K by the isopiestic method. The experimental osmotic coefficients have been correlated using the ion interaction model of Pitzer, electrolyte non-random two liquid (e-NRTL) model of Chen, non-random factor (NRF) and a fourth-order polynomial in terms of molality. The vapour pressures of the solutions studied have been evaluated from the osmotic coefficients.

  8. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  9. The 24-hour intraocular pressure control by tafluprost/timolol fixed combination after switching from the concomitant use of tafluprost and timolol gel-forming solution, in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamoto K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Nakamoto,1 Masahiko Takeshi,2 Toshihiko Hiraoka,2,3 Mayuko Eguchi,2,4 Yuichiro Nakano,1,2 Naomi Otsuka,5 Hiroko Hizaki,5 Hiromi Akai,5 Masayo Hashimoto5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Shinanozaka Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 3Hiraoka Eye Clinic, Saitama, Japan; 4Musashiurawa Eye Clinic, Saitama, Japan; 5Japan Medical Affairs, Global R&D, Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP-control effect of the tafluprost/timolol fixed combination (TAF/TIM-FC in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma after they switched from the concomitant use of tafluprost and timolol gel-forming solution. Patients and methods: Twenty patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (12 male and 8 female; mean ± SD age, 57.0±7.1 years were included in this study. The patients were treated for 8 weeks with the concomitant administration of tafluprost and timolol gel-forming solution (evening dosing. At the end of this period, the patients underwent 24-hour IOP monitoring (measured at 21:00, 01:00, 05:00, 09:00, 13:00 and 17:00. IOP was measured with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT and Icare PRO at sitting position at all timepoints and additionally, at supine position with Icare PRO tonometer at 01:00 and 05:00. The patients were then all switched to TAF/TIM-FC treatment (evening dosing. After 8 weeks, the 24-hour IOP monitoring was repeated. Results: Nineteen patients completed the study. The mean 24-hour IOPs in the concomitant and TAF/TIM-FC phases were 13.8±2.7 vs 13.3±2.8 mmHg (P=0.0033 with the GAT in the sitting position and 13.96±2.56 vs 13.48±2.56 mmHg (P=0.0120 with the Icare PRO in habitual positions. In comparison with the concomitant phase, significantly lower IOP was observed for the TAF/TIM-FC phase at 21:00 and 01:00 with the GAT and at 01:00 with the Icare PRO. In addition, the maximum IOP and fluctuations in IOP in

  10. Pressure transient in liquid lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.G.; Wang, X.Q.

    1995-01-01

    The pressure surge that results from a step change of flow in liquid pipelines, commonly known as water hammer, was analyzed by an eigenfunction method. A differential-integral Pressure wave equation and a linearized velocity equation were derived from the equations of mass and momentum conservation. Waveform distortion due to viscous dissipation and pipe-wall elastic expansion is characterized by a dimensionless transmission number K. The pressure surge condition, which is mathematically singular, was used in the solution procedure. The exact solutions from numerical calculation of the differential-integral equation provide a complete Pressure transient in the pipe. The problems are also calculated With the general-purpose computer code COMMIX, which solves the exact mass conservation equation and Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions were compared with published experimental results, and agreement was good. The effect of turbulence on the pressure transient is discussed in the light of COMMIX calculational results

  11. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They commonly ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which are ...

  12. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  13. Pressure Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Monfre, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers, which affect up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease.

  14. Charged Analogues of Henning Knutsen Type Solutions in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y. K.; Kumar, Sachin; Pratibha

    2011-11-01

    In the present article, we have found charged analogues of Henning Knutsen's interior solutions which join smoothly to the Reissner-Nordstrom metric at the pressure free interface. The solutions are singularity free and analyzed numerically with respect to pressure, energy-density and charge-density in details. The solutions so obtained also present the generalization of A.L. Mehra's solutions.

  15. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  16. Effect of ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide and 1-hexyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide on the vapour – Liquid equilibria of the aqueous D-fructose solutions at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure using isopiestic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafarani-Moattar, Mohammed Taghi; Shekaari, Hemayat; Mazaher Haji Agha, Elnaz

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • VLE data for aqueous fructose + [BMIm]Br or [HMIm]Br systems were measured. • Performances of different local composition models were tested in fitting VLE data. • Molal activity coefficients were calculated. • The results were discussed on basis of water, IL and sugar interactions. - Abstract: In this study, water activity measurements have been carried out by the isopiestic method for the systems (D-fructose + 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide + H 2 O) and (D-fructose + 1-hexyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide + H 2 O) at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Vapour pressures and osmotic coefficients of the solutions have been determined from the experimental measured water activity results. The experimental water activity values were satisfactorily correlated with segment-based local composition models of the Wilson, NRTL, modified NRTL, NRF-NRTL and UNIQUAC. Then, using the parameters obtained from these models, the unsymmetrical molal activity coefficients of the D-fructose and ionic liquids in the binary and D-fructose in ternary aqueous solutions have been calculated. Furthermore, the activity coefficients of D-fructose in binary and ternary solutions were used to calculate the Gibbs energy of transfer for D-fructose from water to aqueous ionic liquid solutions. An application of McMillan-Mayer theory of solutions through virial expansion of transfer Gibbs energy was made to get pair and triplet interaction parameters and salting constant values. From the sign and magnitude of these parameters and salting constants and also from the magnitude of activity coefficients some information about solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions are obtained.

  17. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  18. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  19. Preparation of Highly Pure Vanadyl Sulfate from Sulfate Solutions Containing Impurities of Iron and Aluminum by Solvent Extraction Using EHEHPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of highly pure vanadyl sulfate from sulfate solutions containing impurities of iron and aluminumwas investigated by solvent extraction with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (EHEHPA and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP as the phase modifier. The extraction and stripping conditions of vanadium (IV and its separation from iron and aluminum were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the extraction of vanadium (IV and iron were 68% and 53%, respectively, while only 2% aluminum was extracted in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from aluminum. Sulfuric acid solution was used for the stripping. Nearly 100% vanadium (IV and 95% aluminum were stripped, while only 10% iron was stripped under the optimal stripping conditions in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from iron. After five stages of extraction and stripping, highly pure vanadyl sulfate containing 76.5 g/L V (IV with the impurities of 12 mg/L Fe and 10 mg/L Al was obtained, which is suitable for the electrolyte of a vanadium redox flow battery. Organic solution was well regenerated after stripping by oxalic acid solution to remove the remaining iron. The mechanism of vanadium (IV extraction using EHEHPA was also discussed based on the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR analysis.

  20. Conformable Pressurized Structures : Design and Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, F.J.J.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    There are many applications where volume needs to be pressurised within a geometrical space for which conventional pressure vessels do not provide suitable solutions. Applications are for example found in pressure cabins for Blended Wing Body Aircraft and conformable pressure vessels for an

  1. Simulation of low pressure water hammer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himr, D.; Habán, V.

    2010-08-01

    Numerical solution of water hammer is presented in this paper. The contribution is focused on water hammer in the area of low pressure, which is completely different than high pressure case. Little volume of air and influence of the pipe are assumed in water, which cause sound speed change due to pressure alterations. Computation is compared with experimental measurement.

  2. Pressure transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    Strain gauges pressure transducers types are presented. Models, characteristics and calibration procedures were also analysed. Initially, a theoretical study was accomplished to evaluate metallic alloys behavior on sensing elements manufacturing, and diaphragm was used as deflecting elements. Electrical models for potenciometric transducers were proposed at the beginning and subsequently comproved according our experiments. Concerning bridge transducers, existing models confirmed the conditions of linearity and sensitivity related to the electrical signal. All the work done was of help on the calibration field and pressure measurements employing unbounded strain gauge pressure transducers

  3. Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for: Teens Dealing With Bullying Emotional Intelligence Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Coping With Stressful Situations Prom Pressure What Stresses You Out About School? Virginity: A Very Personal Decision Stress & Coping Center ...

  4. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  5. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  6. Circular Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Haas, de W.; Kuikman, P.J.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Sikirica, N.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth part of this report on Circular Solutions is about the circular principle From Waste to Resource. The purpose of this study is to select promising options for the implementation of this circular principle and to elaborate these options further.

  7. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  8. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines an artifact building and evaluation proposal. Design Science Research (DSR) studies usually consider encapsulated artifact that have relationships with other artifacts. The solution prototype as a composed artifact demands for a more comprehensive consideration in its systematic...... environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven......’s research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex...

  9. A change in the electro-physical properties of narrow-band CdHgTe solid solutions acted upon by a volume discharge induced by an avalanche electron beam in the air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a nanosecond volume discharge forming in an inhomogeneous electrical field at atmospheric pressure on the CdHgTe (MCT) epitaxial films of the p-type conduction with the hole concentration 2·1016 cm3 and mobility 500 cm2·V-1·s-1 is studied. The measurement of the electrophysical parameters of the MCT specimens upon irradiation shows that a layer exhibiting the n-type conduction is formed in the near-surface region of the epitaxial films. After 600 pulses and more, the thickness and the parameters of the layer are such that the measured field dependence of the Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of the n-type conduction. Analysis of the preliminary results reveals that the foregoing nanosecond volume discharge in the air at atmospheric pressure is promising for modification of electro-physical MCT properties.

  10. No pressure to make forced solutions for refrigerating agents. New investigation on the eco-efficiency of refrigeration plants in supermarkets; Kaeltemittel-Loesungen nicht uebers Knie brechen. Neue Studie zur Oekoeffizienz von Supermarktkaelteanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-12-15

    Since the commitment of the European Union to reduce greenhouse gases by twenty per cent, the food retailing is extremely under pressure to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide. The refrigeration equipment offers an important approach because generally approximately fifty per cent of the energy consumption in the supermarket is caused by the refrigeration equipment. In a new investigation, the British institute SKM Enviros (London, United Kingdom) analyzed and compared different technologies.

  11. The physics of osmotic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, M. G.

    2017-09-01

    Osmosis drives the development of a pressure difference of many atmospheres between a dilute solution and pure solvent with which it is in contact through a semi-permeable membrane. The educational importance of this paper is that it presents a novel treatment in terms of fluid mechanics that is quantitative and exact. It is also simple and intuitive, showing vividly how osmotic pressures are generated and maintained in equilibrium, driven by differential solvent pressures. The present rigorous analysis using the virial theorem seems unknown and can be easily understood—and taught—at various different levels. It should be valuable to undergraduates, graduate students and indeed to the general physicist.

  12. Volumetric properties for glycine and L-serine in aqueous solutions of 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Emim][HSO4]) at T = (293.15–313.15) K and ambient pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiee, Hamid Reza; Frouzesh, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ternary systems (amino acid + ionic liquid + H 2 O) are considered. • Volumetric properties including density, V φ , ΔV φ 0 and E φ 0 are determined. • Glycine and L-serine were amino acids and [Emim][HSO 4 ] was IL studied. • V φ values for amino acids increased with both concentration of amino acids and temperature. • Both studied amino acids act as structure maker in ternary systems. - Abstract: By using the volumetric properties, the solute–solvent interactions are studied in the ternary (glycine + 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate [Emim][HSO 4 ] + water) and (L-serine + 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate [Emim][HSO 4 ] + water) systems. For this purpose, the apparent molar volumes, V φ , are calculated from the experimental density data. To obtain limiting apparent molar volumes V φ 0 , the apparent molar volume values are fitted to the Redlich-Mayer type equation. Then the limiting apparent molar volumes of transfer, ΔV φ 0 , for studied amino acids from water to aqueous solutions of ionic liquid (IL) are calculated. The results showed that the ΔV φ 0 values are negative for both ternary systems at all temperatures. The limiting apparent molar expansibility E φ 0 values have been obtained from the first derivative of limiting apparent molar volumes with respect to temperature. The values of second derivative of limiting apparent molar volumes respect to temperature show the structure making or breaking ability of glycine and L-serine in studied IL aqueous solutions. The results indicated that glycine and L-serine act as structure maker in studied solutions. McMillan–Mayer theory is used for evaluating the interaction parameters. Also the hydration number, n H , for both amino acids in ternary solutions has been reported.

  13. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Dixon, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR-2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency 3 , KNO 3 , Na 3 PO 4 x12H 2 O, and K 3 PO 4 when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that

  14. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  15. A spherical collapse solution with neutrino outflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, E.N.

    1990-01-01

    A three-parameter family of solutions of Einstein's field equations is given that represents a collapsing perfect fluid with outgoing neutrino flux. Solutions with ''naked'' singularities are exhibited. They can be forbidden by requiring pressure less than or equal to the density as a condition of cosmic censorship

  16. Pressure-driven peristaltic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingalev, S V; Lyubimov, D V; Lyubimova, T P

    2013-01-01

    The peristaltic motion of an incompressible fluid in two-dimensional channel is investigated. Instead of fixing the law of wall's coordinate variation, the law of pressure variation on the wall is fixed and the border's coordinate changes to provide the law of pressure variation on the wall. In case of small amplitude of pressure-variation on the wall A, expansion wave propagates along the length of channel and the wave results in the peristaltic transport of fluid. In the case of large A, the channel divides into two parts. The small pulsating part in the end of the tube creates the flow as a human heart, while the other big part loses this function. The solution of problem for the first peristaltic mode is stable, while the solution for the second 'heart' mode is unstable and depends heavily on boundary conditions.

  17. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure monitors may have some limitations. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... more Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) Elevated blood pressure and stages 1 and 2 high blood pressure ( ...

  18. Solution to the incompatibility between reactor protection logic and turbine shot logic. Scram by high pressure; Solucion a la incompatibilidad entre logica de proteccion de reactor y logica de disparo de turbina. SCRAM por alta presion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Q, R.; Santiago F, C.; Gonzalez P, G., E-mail: ruben.ramos01@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nuclear Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde carried out the Modernization and Increase of Extended Power Project in its two Units (2005-2011). This modernization included to the electro-hydraulic control system of the main turbine, replacing an ana logical system by one digital (Digital Electro-hydraulic Control - DEHC) whose functions are of controlling the reactor pressure in the different operation ways as wells as of controlling the velocity and load of the main turbine. Also, it has protections that are related with diverse plant systems, as the Reactor Protection Systems (RPS). During the tests stage was realized a programmed load rejection, which Reactor Scram should cause when being presented the shot of main turbine. However, the logic of the RPS was inhibited due to the quick response of the new control DEHC, propitiating a condition of non prospective plant and, in consequence, the Reactor Scram happened for another protection of the RPS. (author)

  19. High-pressure differential scanning microcalorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senin, A A; Dzhavadov, L N; Potekhin, S A

    2016-03-01

    A differential scanning microcalorimeter for studying thermotropic conformational transitions of biopolymers at high pressure has been designed. The calorimeter allows taking measurements of partial heat capacity of biopolymer solutions vs. temperature at pressures up to 3000 atm. The principles of operation of the device, methods of its calibration, as well as possible applications are discussed.

  20. Inertia compensated force and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, B.; Engeler, P.; Gossweiler, C. [Kistler Instrumente AG, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Any moving structure is affected by inertial effects. In case of force and pressure sensors, inertial effects cause measurement errors. The paper deals with novel signal conditioning methods and mechanical design features to minimize inertial effects. A novel solution for passive compensation of pressure sensors is presented. (orig.)

  1. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reps, A; Kuzmicka, M; Wisniewska, K [Chair of Food Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury, ul. Heweliusza 1, 10-724 Olsztyn (Poland)], E-mail: arnold.reps@uwm.edu.pl

    2008-07-15

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  2. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  3. Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of EuHN O3 aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to ???900??C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly. ?? 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Low Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  6. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low ... low blood pressure. Medications that can cause low blood pressure Some medications can cause low blood pressure, including: ...

  7. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder ... Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal fluid ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a pressure sore required? play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure ... arrow Why do some pressure sores take so long to heal? play_arrow Can a pressure sore ...

  9. Techniques in high pressure neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the author's practical work from the last 20 years, Techniques in High Pressure Neutron Scattering is one of the first books to gather recent methods that allow neutron scattering well beyond 10 GPa. The author shows how neutron scattering has to be adapted to the pressure range and type of measurement.Suitable for both newcomers and experienced high pressure scientists and engineers, the book describes various solutions spanning two to three orders of magnitude in pressure that have emerged in the past three decades. Many engineering concepts are illustrated through examples of rea

  10. Relative volatility of dilute solutions of Rb-Cs system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, P.B.; Izotov, V.P.; Nisel'son, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Relative volatility of diluted solutions Rb-Cs in the temperature range 650-820 K and pressures 13-200 gPa has been studied. The system Rb-Cs in the range of diluted solutions obeys the Henry law. It is shown, that liquid-vapour equilibrium in diluted solutions of cesium in rubidium is characterized by negative deviation from perfection

  11. Pressure leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksei, Kritskii; Kirill, Karimov; Stanislav, Naboichenko

    2018-05-01

    The results of chalcopyrite concentrate processing using low-temperature and high-temperature sulfuric acid pressure leaching are presented. A material of the following composition was used, 21.5 Cu, 0.1 Zn, 0.05 Pb, 0.04 Ni, 26.59 S, 24.52 Fe, 16.28 SiO2 (in wt.%). The influence of technological parameters on the degree of copper and iron extraction into the leach solution was studied in the wide range of values. The following conditions were suggested as the optimal for the high-temperature pressure leaching: t = 190 °C, PO2 = 0.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 15 g/L, L:S = 6:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract at least 98% Cu from concentrate into the leaching solution during 100 minutes. The following conditions were suggested as optimal for the low-temperature pressure leaching: t = 105 °C, PO2 = 1.3-1.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 90 g/L, L:S = 10:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract up to 83% Cu from the concentrate into the leach solution during 300-360 minutes.

  12. Bifurcations of propellant burning rate at oscillatory pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novozhilov, Boris V. [N. N. Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, 4 Kosygina St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    A new phenomenon, the disparity between pressure and propellant burning rate frequencies, has revealed in numerical studies of propellant burning rate response to oscillatory pressure. As is clear from the linear approximation, under small pressure amplitudes, h, pressure and propellant burning rate oscillations occur with equal period T (T-solution). In the paper, however, it is shown that at a certain critical value of the parameter h the system in hand undergoes a bifurcation so that the T-solution converts to oscillations with period 2T (2T-solution). When the bifurcation parameter h increases, the subsequent behavior of the system becomes complicated. It is obtained a sequence of period doubling to 4T-solution and 8T-solution. Beyond a certain value of the bifurcation parameter h an apparently fully chaotic solution is found. These effects undoubtedly should be taken into account in studies of oscillatory processes in combustion chambers. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  14. A Dual Egalitarian Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.; Tijs, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this note we introduce an egalitarian solution, called the dual egalitarian solution, that is the natural counterpart of the egalitarian solution of Dutta and Ray (1989).We prove, among others, that for a convex game the egalitarian solution coincides with the dual egalitarian solution for its

  15. Osmosis and thermodynamics explained by solute blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2017-01-01

    A solute-blocking model is presented that provides a kinetic explanation of osmosis and ideal solution thermodynamics. It validates a diffusive model of osmosis that is distinct from the traditional convective flow model of osmosis. Osmotic equilibrium occurs when the fraction of water molecules in solution matches the fraction of pure water molecules that have enough energy to overcome the pressure difference. Solute-blocking also provides a kinetic explanation for why Raoult's law and the other colligative properties depend on the mole fraction (but not the size) of the solute particles, resulting in a novel kinetic explanation for the entropy of mixing and chemical potential of ideal solutions. Some of its novel predictions have been confirmed; others can be tested experimentally or by simulation.

  16. Osmosis and thermodynamics explained by solute blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2016-01-01

    A solute-blocking model is presented that provides a kinetic explanation of osmosis and ideal solution thermodynamics. It validates a diffusive model of osmosis that is distinct from the traditional convective flow model of osmosis. Osmotic equilibrium occurs when the fraction of water molecules in solution matches the fraction of pure water molecules that have enough energy to overcome the pressure difference. Solute-blocking also provides a kinetic explanation for why Raoult’s law and the other colligative properties depend on the mole fraction (but not the size) of the solute particles, resulting in a novel kinetic explanation for the entropy of mixing and chemical potential of ideal solutions. Some of its novel predictions have been confirmed, others can be tested experimentally or by simulation. PMID:27225298

  17. Photoconductivity studies of the ferrocyanide ion under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finston, M. I.

    1979-01-01

    The photoaquation of the ferrocyanide ion was studied using a high-pressure photoconductivity apparatus and a steady-state high-pressure mercury lamp. The first-order photocurrent rise-time could be related to the relative quantum efficiency of the photoaquation process, while the dark decay of the photocurrent yielded a relative value of the bimolecular rate-constant for the reverse reaction. Kinetic measurements were carried out on dilute solutions of potassium ferrocyanide in pure water, and in 20% ethanol. The photocurrent yield in aqueous solution was dependent upon secondary chemical equilibria which were sensitive to pressure in a predictable way. In ethanolic solution, the dependence of photocurrent yield on pressure followed the variation of the reciprocal solvent vicosity. In both aqueous and alcoholic solution, the photoaquation quantum efficiency decreased exponentially with pressure, as did the biomolecular rate-constant for the dark reaction in aqueous solution. The pressure dependence of the bimolecular rate-constant in the alcoholic solution indicated a diffusion-limited process. The pressure dependence of the photoaquation quantum yield, and of the bimolecular rate-constant in aqueous solution, was interpreted in terms of an activation volume model. The photoaquation data for both the aqueous and the alcoholic solutions agreed with a hypothetical mechanism whereby ligand-to-metal bond-breaking, and solvent-to-metal bond-formation, are effectively simultaneous. The results for the aqueous dark reaction strongly indicated breaking of the solvent-to-metal bond as the rate-limiting step.

  18. Pressurized thermal shock (PTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Ricardo D.; Ventura, Mirta A.

    2006-01-01

    methodology, offer results, very similar to the obtained ones that are validated against experiences of experimental facilities such like the experimental facility UPTF (Upper Plenum Test Facility). An important observation arises from the analysis of the behavior of the temperature in the fluid contained in the RPV downcomer, below the cold leg level, versus the water injected temperature (T HPI ) by the CAN-I low pressure emergency system (T j system). It is possible to be noticing that when the temperature T HPI increases, the possibility that the conditions occur so that a phenomenon of PTS happens is decreasing. The temperature that is reached in the fuel elements, that is to say, that does not put in risk the structural integrity of the cladding of the fuel element, will fix the maximum limit for the temperature T HPI . We insist on the solution of engineering that would allow modifying the Emergency Core Cooler System (ECCS) behavior, extending the safety margin, what it means, the distance between the K lc of the material and the K l of the process. It is emphasized the excessive conservative hypotheses that have been used in all the previous studies and the necessity to replace them with other more realists that would allow to extend the safety margin. At the moment this safety margin based in these coefficients is about 22 C degrees. (author) [es

  19. Study of accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoma, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-12-01

    It is important for effective safeguarding of nuclear materials to establish a technique for accurate volume measurement of plutonium nitrate solution in accountancy tank. The volume of the solution can be estimated by two differential pressures between three dip-tubes, in which the air is purged by an compressor. One of the differential pressure corresponds to the density of the solution, and another corresponds to the surface level of the solution in the tank. The measurement of the differential pressure contains many uncertain errors, such as precision of pressure transducer, fluctuation of back-pressure, generation of bubbles at the front of the dip-tubes, non-uniformity of temperature and density of the solution, pressure drop in the dip-tube, and so on. The various excess pressures at the volume measurement are discussed and corrected by a reasonable method. High precision-differential pressure measurement system is developed with a quartz oscillation type transducer which converts a differential pressure to a digital signal. The developed system is used for inspection by the government and IAEA. (M. Suetake)

  20. Thermodynamic properties of potassium chloride aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezin, Denis; Driesner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Potassium chloride is a ubiquitous salt in natural fluids, being the second most abundant dissolved salt in many geological aqueous solutions after sodium chloride. It is a simple solute and strong electrolyte easily dissociating in water, however the thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions were never correlated with sufficient accuracy for a wide range of physicochemical conditions. In this communication we propose a set of parameters for a Pitzer-type model which allows calculation of all necessary thermodynamic properties of KCl solution, namely excess Gibbs free energy and derived activity coefficient, apparent molar enthalpy, heat capacity and volume, as well as osmotic coefficient and activity of water in solutions. The system KCl-water is one of the best studied aqueous systems containing electrolytes. Although extensive experimental data were collected for thermodynamic properties of these solutions over the years, the accurate volumetric data became available only recently, thus making possible a complete thermodynamic formulation including a pressure dependence of excess Gibbs free energy and derived properties of the KCl-water liquids. Our proposed model is intended for calculation of major thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions at temperatures ranging from freezing point of a solution to 623 K, pressures ranging from saturated water vapor up to 150 MPa, and concentrations up to the salt saturation. This parameterized model will be further implemented in geochemical software packages and can facilitate the calculation of aqueous equilibrium for reactive transport codes.

  1. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why is it dangerous? play_arrow How common are pressure sores ... likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in ...

  2. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  3. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Top of Page CDC Fact Sheets Related to High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Pulmonary Hypertension Heart Disease Signs ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  5. Kerr generalized solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A Kerr generalized solution for a stationary axially-symmetric gravitational field of rotating self-gravitational objects is given. For solving the problem Einstein equations and their combinations are used. The particular cases: internal and external Schwarzschild solutions are considered. The external solution of the stationary problem is a Kerr solution generalization. 3 refs

  6. Radiochromic liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.; Culp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A radiochromic solution which is sensitive to small dosages of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation is described. It consists of a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent with enough organic acid added to make the solution at least slightly acidic and responds to radiation by permanently changing color. Up to one half of the solution by weight can be replaced by a second solution of an aromatic solvent and an organic fluor. Another modification of the invention is a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent having an aromatic group, an organic fluor, and enough organic acid to make the solution at least slightly acidic. (author)

  7. Liquid scintillation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid scintillation solution described includes a mixture of: a liquid scintillation solvent, a primary scintillation solute, a secondary scintillation solute, a variety of appreciably different surfactants, and a dissolving and transparency agent. The dissolving and transparency agent is tetrahydrofuran, a cyclic ether. The scintillation solvent is toluene. The primary scintillation solute is PPO, and the secondary scintillation solute is dimethyl POPOP. The variety of appreciably different surfactants is composed of isooctylphenol-polyethoxyethanol and sodium dihexyl sulphosuccinate [fr

  8. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  9. Exact relativistic cylindrical solution of disordered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Teixeira, A.F. da; Wolk, I.; Som, M.M.

    1976-05-01

    A source free disordered distribution of electromagnetic radiation is considered in Einstein' theory, and a time independent exact solution with cylindrical symmetry is obtained. The gravitation and pressure effects of the radiation alone are sufficient to give the distribution an equilibrium. A finite maximum concentration is found on the axis of symmetry, and decreases monotonically to zero outwards. Timelike and null geodesics are discussed

  10. Direct measurements of the enthalpy of solution of solid solute in supercritical fluids: study on the CO2-naphthalene system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Han, B; Zhang, J; Li, H; He, J; Yan, H

    2001-10-01

    A setup for a calorimeter for simultaneously measuring the solubility and the solution enthalpy of solid solutes in supercritical fluids (SCFs) has been established. The enthalpy of solution of naphthalene in supercritical CO2 was measured at 308.15 K in the pressure range from 8.0-11.0 MPa. It was found that the enthalpy of solution (deltaH) was negative in the pressure range from 8.0 to 9.5 MPa, and the absolute value decreased with increasing pressure. In this pressure range, the dissolution of the solute was enthalpy driven. However, the deltaH became positive at pressures higher than 9.5 MPa, and the dissolution was entropy driven. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to analyze the local structural environment of the solvated naphthalene molecules in supercritical CO2 under the experimental conditions for the calorimetric measurements. By combining the enthalpy data and the simulation results, it can be deduced that the energy level of CO2 in the high compressible region is higher than that at higher pressures, which results in the large negative enthalpy of solution and the larger degree of solvent-solute clustering in the high compressible region.

  11. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth / For Teens / Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) What's ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  12. Pressure-induced melting of micellar crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.; Schwahn, D.; Janssen, S.

    1993-01-01

    that pressure improves the solvent quality of water, thus resulting in decomposition of the micelles and consequent melting of the micellar crystal. The combined pressure and temperature dependence reveals that in spite of the apparent increase of order on the 100 angstrom length scale upon increasing......Aqueous solutions of triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) aggregate at elevated temperatures into micelles which for polymer concentrations greater-than-or-equal-to 20% make a hard sphere crystallization to a cubic micellar crystal. Structural studies show...... temperature (decreasing pressure) the overall entropy increases through the inverted micellar crystallization characteristic....

  13. Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions with citrate ions. Compressibility studies in aqueous solutions of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures sound velocities were measured in aqueous solutions of citric acid. • Compressibility properties of citric acid solutions are thermodynamically characterized. • Changes in the structure of water when citric acid is dissolved are discussed. -- Abstract: Sound velocities in aqueous solutions of citric acid were measured from 15 °C to 50 °C in 5 °C intervals, within the 0.1 mol · kg −1 to 5.0 mol · kg −1 concentration range. These sound velocities served to evaluate the isentropic and isothermal compressibilities, the apparent molar compressibilities, the isochoric thermal pressure coefficients, changes of the cubic expansion coefficients with pressure at constant temperature, the changes of heat capacities with volume and hydration numbers of citric acid in aqueous solutions

  14. Colliding black hole solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mainuddin

    2005-01-01

    A new solution of Einstein equation in general relativity is found. This solution solves an outstanding problem of thermodynamics and black hole physics. Also this work appears to conclude the interpretation of NUT spacetime. (author)

  15. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process.

  16. Diurnal blood pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Kikuya, Masahiro

    2018-05-23

    The definition of diurnal blood pressure changes varies widely, which can be confusing. Short-term blood pressure variability during a 24-h period and the dipping status of diurnal blood pressure can be captured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and these metrics are reported to have prognostic significance for cardiovascular complications. Morning blood pressure surge also indicates this risk, but its effect may be limited to populations with specific conditions. Meanwhile, the combined use of conventional office blood pressure and out-of-office blood pressure allows us to identify people with white-coat and masked hypertension. Current home devices can measure nocturnal blood pressure during sleep more conveniently than ambulatory monitoring; however, we should pay attention to blood pressure measurement conditions regardless of whether they are in a home, ambulatory, or office setting. The relatively poor reproducibility of diurnal blood pressure changes, including the nocturnal fall of blood pressure, is another underestimated issue to be addressed. Although information on diurnal blood pressure changes is expected to be used more effectively in the future, we should also keep in mind that blood pressure levels have remained central to the primary and secondary prevention of blood pressure-related cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice.

  17. PFP solution stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage

  18. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube

  19. Classical solutions in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaklini, N.S.; Ferrara, S.; Nieuwenhuizen Van, P.

    1977-06-01

    Classical solutions of supergravity are obtained by making finite global supersymmetry rotation on known solutions of the field equations of the bosonic sector. The Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstoem solutions of general relativity are extended to various supergravity systems and the modification to the perihelion precession of planets is discussed

  20. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid scintillation solution is described which includes (1) a scintillation solvent (toluene and xylene), (2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO and Butyl PBD), (3) a secondary scintillation solute (POPOP and Dimethyl POPOP), (4) a plurality of substantially different surfactants and (5) a filter dissolving and/or transparentizing agent. 8 claims

  1. Pressure drops in low pressure local boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, Michel; Schleisiek, Karl

    1969-01-01

    For prediction of flow reduction in nuclear research reactors, it was necessary to establish a correlation giving the pressure drop in subcooled boiling for rectangular channels. Measurements of pressure drop on rectangular channel 60 and 90 cm long and with a coolant gap of 1,8 and 3,6 mm were performed in the following range of parameters. -) 3 < pressure at the outlet < 11 bars abs; -) 25 < inlet temperature < 70 deg. C; -) 200 < heat flux < 700 W/cm 2 . It appeared that the usual parameter, relative length in subcooled boiling, was not sufficient to correlate experimental pressure losses on the subcooled boiling length and that there was a supplementary influence of pressure, heat flux and subcooling. With an a dimensional parameter including these terms a correlation was established with an error band of ±10%. With a computer code it was possible to derive the relation giving the overall pressure drop along the channel and to determine the local gradients of pressure drop. These local gradients were then correlated with the above parameter calculated in local conditions. 95 % of the experimental points were computed with an accuracy of ±10% with this correlation of gradients which can be used for non-uniform heated channels. (authors) [fr

  2. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  3. Classical solutions for a one phase osmosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippoth, F.; Prokert, G.

    2011-01-01

    For a moving boundary problem modelling the motion of a semipermeable membrane by osmotic pressure and surface tension we prove the existence and uniqueness of classical solutions on small time intervals. Moreover, we construct solutions existing on arbitrary long time intervals, provided the

  4. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  6. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart ... kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  7. High blood pressure - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure is found. This is called essential hypertension. High blood pressure that is caused by another medical condition or medicine you are taking is called secondary hypertension. Secondary hypertension may be due to: Chronic ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ...

  11. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  12. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  13. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  14. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  15. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... especially prone to pressure sores? play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop ... play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ...

  17. Proteins in solution: Fractal surfaces in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tscheliessnig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the surface of a protein in solution, as well of the interface between protein and 'bulk solution', is introduced. The experimental technique of small angle X-ray and neutron scattering is introduced and described briefly. Molecular dynamics simulation, as an appropriate computational tool for studying the hydration shell of proteins, is also discussed. The concept of protein surfaces with fractal dimensions is elaborated. We finish by exposing an experimental (using small angle X-ray scattering and a computer simulation case study, which are meant as demonstrations of the possibilities we have at hand for investigating the delicate interfaces that connect (and divide protein molecules and the neighboring electrolyte solution.

  18. High-pressure microbiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michiels, Chris; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Aertsen, Abram

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. High Hydrostatic Pressure Effects in the Biosphere: from Molecules to Microbiology * Filip Meersman and Karel Heremans . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Effects...

  19. Photochemical decomposition of Formaldehyde in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido Z, G.

    1995-01-01

    In this work was studied the effect of ultraviolet radiation produced by a mercury low pressure lamp in solutions of formaldehyde. These solutions were exposed to ultraviolet rays at different times. In some of these series of solutions was added a photosensibilizer in order to obtain a high photodecomposition of formaldehyde. The techniques used for determine the products of the decomposition were the following: 1. In order to measure the residual formaldehyde and glioxal, the Hantzsch and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine methods were used. 2. pH's measurements of the solutions, before and after exposition. 3. Paper's chromatography for determine presence of formed acids. 4. Acid-base tritiations for measure total acidification. We observed that when the time of exposition to UV rays was increased, a high photodecomposition of formaldehyde was formed and, besides, a greater quantity of another products. Of the reagents used like photosensibilizers, with the ruthenium reagent, the best results were obtained. (Author)

  20. Classes of exact Einstein Maxwell solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komathiraj, K.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    We find new classes of exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell system of equations for a charged sphere with a particular choice of the electric field intensity and one of the gravitational potentials. The condition of pressure isotropy is reduced to a linear, second order differential equation which can be solved in general. Consequently we can find exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric gravitational potential in terms of hypergeometric functions. It is possible to find exact solutions which can be written explicitly in terms of elementary functions, namely polynomials and product of polynomials and algebraic functions. Uncharged solutions are regainable with our choice of electric field intensity; in particular we generate the Einstein universe for particular parameter values.

  1. Ionic conductivity measurements of zirconia under pressure using impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takebe, H; Sakamoto, D; Ohtaka, O; Fukui, H; Yoshiasa, A; Yamanaka, T; Ota, K; Kikegawa, T

    2002-01-01

    We have set up an electrical conductivity measurement system under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions with a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus using an AC complex impedance method. With this system, we have successfully measured the electrical conductivity of stabilized ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 solid solution) under pressures up to 5 GPa in the temperature range from 300 to 1200 K. The electrical conductivities obtained under pressure are compatible with those of previous results measured at ambient pressure

  2. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cord injuries? play_arrow Why are pressure sores so serious? play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why ... pressure sores? play_arrow Why is pressure relief so important when sitting in a wheelchair? play_arrow ...

  3. Pressure dependence of conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracewell, B.L.; Hochheimer, H.D.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this work were to attempt the following: (1) Measure the pressure dependence of the electrical conductivity of several quasi-one-dimensional, charge-density-wave solids, including measurements along various crystal directions. (2) Measure photocurrents in selected MX solids at ambient and elevated pressures. (3) Measure the resonance Raman spectra for selected MX solids as a function of pressure

  4. Exchange market pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, H.; Klaassen, F.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Currencies can be under severe pressure in the foreign exchange market, but in a fixed (or managed) exchange rate regime that is not fully visible via the change in the exchange rate. Exchange market pressure (EMP) is a concept developed to nevertheless measure the pressure in such cases. This

  5. High-pressure apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepdael, van L.J.M.; Bartels, P.V.; Berg, van den R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a high-pressure device (1) having a cylindrical high-pressure vessel (3) and prestressing means in order to exert an axial pressure on the vessel. The vessel (3) can have been formed from a number of layers of composite material, such as glass, carbon or aramide fibers which

  6. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  7. Robust and efficient solution procedures for association models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2006-01-01

    Equations of state that incorporate the Wertheim association expression are more difficult to apply than conventional pressure explicit equations, because the association term is implicit and requires solution for an internal set of composition variables. In this work, we analyze the convergence...... behavior of different solution methods and demonstrate how a simple and efficient, yet globally convergent, procedure for the solution of the equation of state can be formulated....

  8. Chronic Tea Consumption Lowers Blood Pressure in Rats: Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic Tea Consumption Lowers Blood Pressure in Rats: Some Associated Mechanisms. ... Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences ... In experiment 5, group 9 (kept on NF and indomethacin solution) also had similar BP as group 10 (kept on ... KEY WORDS: Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), rats, tea.

  9. Ion separation from dilute electrolyte solutions by nanofiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Corazon M.

    2000-03-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a pressure-driven process which is considered potential for the separation of ionic species selectively from solutions containing mixture of electrolyte solutes. The lower operating pressure requirement of NF than reverse osmosis (RO) makes the earlier potentially economical. In the separation of ions, many authors believed that there are membranes with characteristic fixed surface charge and that the mechanism of separation of ions is by the differences in valences of the ions. In this study, experiments involving dilute single-solute and multiple-solute electrolyte solutions were performed using three different NF membranes. Permeate fluxes and ion rejections of the different species of ions in samples of permeate solutions were measured at varied conditions. The mechanism of separation in NF was determined based on the analysis of the trends and behavior of ion rejection relative to the solution temperature, pressure, type of solute, feed concentration and feed solution pH. The results of the experiments show that there is no evidence of the presence of fixed surface charge on the NF membranes. Ion separation was made possible by the combination of sieve effect and ion-hydration effect. Ions having higher hydration numbers showed higher ion rejection than those having lower hydration numbers. A method to determine the effective membrane pore size of NF membranes using hydrodynamic model was proposed. The proposed method is based on the assumptions that the membrane is neutral and that the separation is based on sieving effect. (Author)

  10. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Sound velocity in potassium hydroxide aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapuryan, Kh.D.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Kochetkov, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic velocities in potassium hydroxide aqueous solutions are carried out within the frames of studies on improvement of water chemistry in NPP cooling systems. Method of echo pulses superposition with acoustic path length of 41.447 mm is used for measurements. The measurements are performed at 2.6 MHz frequency. Complex temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is determined. Ultrasonic velocity dependence on pressure is close to linear one. The formula for calculation of thermodynamic properties of the studied solutions on the basis of experimental data obtained is proposed

  12. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a liquid scintillation solution which contains 1) a scintillation solvent (toluol), 2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO), 3) a secondary scintillation solute (dimethyl POPOP), 4) several surfactants (iso-octyl-phenol polyethoxy-ethanol and sodium di-hexyl sulfosuccinate) essentially different from one another and 5) a filter resolution and/or transparent-making agent (cyclic ether, especially tetrahydrofuran). (HP) [de

  13. On the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers used as desorbers in absorption chillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Hernando, N.; Almendros-Ibanez, J.A.; Ruiz, G.; Vega, M. de

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers (PHE) in the boiling temperature of LiBr-H 2 O and NH 3 -H 2 O solutions is studied. For the NH 3 -H 2 O solution, the pressure drop-temperature saturation relationship estates that high pressure drops can be allowed in the solution with negligible changes in the saturation temperature, and in the PHE performance. Besides, in the case of the LiBr-H 2 O solution, as the working pressure is usually very low, the analysis of the pressure drop must be taken as a main limiting parameter for the use of Plate Heat Exchangers as vapour generators. In this case, the pressure drop may considerably change the boiling temperature of the solution entering the heat exchanger and therefore a higher heating fluid temperature may be required. A guideline to design these systems is proposed.

  14. On the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers used as desorbers in absorption chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernando, N.; de Vega, M. [Energy System Engineering (ISE), Departamento de Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Almendros-Ibanez, J.A. [Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Departamento de Mecanica Aplicada e Ingenieria de Proyectos, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Renewable Energy Research Institute, c/de la Investigacion s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz, G. [Energy Efficiency and Renewables Department, Tecnicas Reunidas S.A., C/Arapiles No. 13, 10a, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    The influence of the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers (PHE) in the boiling temperature of LiBr-H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O solutions is studied. For the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O solution, the pressure drop-temperature saturation relationship estates that high pressure drops can be allowed in the solution with negligible changes in the saturation temperature, and in the PHE performance. Besides, in the case of the LiBr-H{sub 2}O solution, as the working pressure is usually very low, the analysis of the pressure drop must be taken as a main limiting parameter for the use of Plate Heat Exchangers as vapour generators. In this case, the pressure drop may considerably change the boiling temperature of the solution entering the heat exchanger and therefore a higher heating fluid temperature may be required. A guideline to design these systems is proposed. (author)

  15. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  16. Pressure locking test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, open-quotes Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.close quotes Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  17. PERVASIVE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocsana Tonis (Bucea-Manea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The utility of BI solutions is accepted all over the world in the modern organizations. However, the BI solutions do not offer a constant feedback in line with the organizational activities. In this context, there have been developed pervasive BI solutions which are present at different levels of the organization, so that employees can observe only what is most relevant to their day-to-day tasks. They are organized in vertical silos, with clearly identified performance and expectations. The paper emphasizes the role of pervasive BI solutions in reaching the key performance indicators of the modern organizations, more important in the context of crisis.

  18. Pressure-driven flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid with pressure-dependent rheological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaseti, Pandelitsa; Damianou, Yiolanda; Georgiou, Georgios C.; Housiadas, Kostas D.

    2018-03-01

    The lubrication flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid in a symmetric long channel of varying width, 2h(x), is modeled extending the approach proposed by Fusi et al. ["Pressure-driven lubrication flow of a Bingham fluid in a channel: A novel approach," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 221, 66-75 (2015)] for a Bingham plastic. Moreover, both the consistency index and the yield stress are assumed to be pressure-dependent. Under the lubrication approximation, the pressure at zero order depends only on x and the semi-width of the unyielded core is found to be given by σ(x) = -(1 + 1/n)h(x) + C, where n is the power-law exponent and the constant C depends on the Bingham number and the consistency-index and yield-stress growth numbers. Hence, in a channel of constant width, the width of the unyielded core is also constant, despite the pressure dependence of the yield stress, and the pressure distribution is not affected by the yield-stress function. With the present model, the pressure is calculated numerically solving an integro-differential equation and then the position of the yield surface and the two velocity components are computed using analytical expressions. Some analytical solutions are also derived for channels of constant and linearly varying widths. The lubrication solutions for other geometries are calculated numerically. The implications of the pressure-dependence of the material parameters and the limitations of the method are discussed.

  19. Volumetric properties of itaconic acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisenbaum, Alexander; Apelblat, Alexander; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions in a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. ► The apparent molar volumes and the cubic expansion coefficients. ► The derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure. ► Changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved. - Abstract: Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions were measured at 5 K intervals from T = (278.15 to 343.15) K. From the determined densities, the apparent molar volumes, the cubic expansion coefficients and the second derivatives of volume with respect to temperature which are interrelated with the derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure were evaluated. These derivatives were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved in it.

  20. Solute-solute interactions in intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Debashis; Murray, Ryan; Collins, Gary S., E-mail: collins@wsu.edu [Washington State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Zacate, Matthew O. [Northern Kentucky University, Department of Physics and Geology (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Experiments were carried out on highly ordered GdAl{sub 2} samples containing extremely dilute mole fractions of{sup 111}In/Cd probe-atom solutes (about 10{sup −11}), intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} having mole fractions of order 0-10{sup −2}, and doped with Ag solutes at mole fractions of order 10{sup −2}. Three types of defect interactions were investigated. (1) Quadrupole interactions caused by Ag-solute atoms neighboring{sup 111}In/Cd solute probe atoms were detected using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays (PAC). Three complexes of pairs of In-probes and Ag-solutes occupying neighboring positions on Gd- and Al-sublattices were identified by comparing site fractions in Gd-poor and Gd-rich GdAl{sub 2}(Ag) samples and from the symmetry of the quadrupole interactions. Interaction enthalpies between solute-atom pairs were determined from temperature dependences of observed site fractions. Repulsive interactions were observed for close-neighbor complexes In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Gd} and In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Al} pairs, whereas a slightly attractive interaction was observed for In{sub Al}+Ag{sub Al}. Interaction enthalpies were all small, in the range ±0.15 eV. (2) Quadrupole interactions caused by intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} neighboring In{sub Gd} probes were also detected and site fractions measured as a function of temperature, as in previous work on samples not doped with Ag-solutes [Temperature- and composition-driven changes in site occupation of solutes in Gd{sub 1+3x}Al{sub 2−3x}, Zacate and Collins (Phys. Rev. B69, 174202 (1))]. However, the effective binding enthalpy between In{sub Gd} probe and Al{sub Gd} antisite was found to change sign from -0.12 eV (attractive interaction) in undoped samples to + 0.24 eV (repulsive) in Ag-doped samples. This may be attributed to an attractive interaction between Al{sub Gd} antisite atoms and Ag-dopants that competes with the attractive interaction between In{sub Gd} and Al{sub Gd

  1. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  2. On Lovelock vacuum solution

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    We show that the asymptotic large $r$ limit of all Lovelock vacuum and electrovac solutions with $\\Lambda$ is always the Einstein solution in $d \\geq 2n+1$ dimensions. It is completely free of the order $n$ of the Lovelock polynomial indicating universal asymptotic behaviour.

  3. Rational Solutions and Lump Solutions of the Potential YTSF Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Qian; Chen, Ai-Hua

    2017-07-01

    By using of the bilinear form, rational solutions and lump solutions of the potential Yu-Toda-Sasa-Fukuyama (YTSF) equation are derived. Dynamics of the fundamental lump solution, n1-order lump solutions, and N-lump solutions are studied for some special cases. We also find some interaction behaviours of solitary waves and one lump of rational solutions.

  4. Pressure vessel failure at high internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1995-01-01

    A RPV failure due to plastic instability was investigated using the ABAQUS finite element code together with a material model of thermal plasticity for large deformations. Not only rotational symmetric temperature distributions were studied, but also 'hot spots'. Calculations show that merely by the depletion of strength of the material - even at internal wall temperatures well below the melting point of the fuel elements of about 2000/2400 C - the critical internal pressure can decrease to values smaller than the operational pressure of 16 Mpa. (orig.)

  5. Bolting multicenter solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, Iosif [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-01-30

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  6. Slideline verification for multilayer pressure vessel and piping analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear finite element method (FEM) computer codes with slideline algorithm implementations should be useful for the analysis of prestressed multilayer pressure vessels and piping. This paper presents closed form solutions useful for validating slideline implementations for this purpose. The solutions describe stresses and displacements of an internally pressurized elastic-plastic sphere initially separated from an elastic outer sphere by a uniform gap. Comparison of closed form and FEM results evaluates the usefulness of the closed form solution and the validity of the slideline implementation used

  7. Measuring fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

  8. Superconductivity at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, N B; Ginzburg, N I

    1969-07-01

    Work published during the last 3 or 4 yrs concerning the effect of pressure on superconductivity is reviewed. Superconducting modifications of Si, Ge, Sb, Te, Se, P and Ce. Change of Fermi surface under pressure for nontransition metals. First experiments on the influence of pressure on the tunneling effect in superconductors provide new information on the nature of the change in phonon and electron energy spectra of metals under hydrostatic compression. 78 references.

  9. Fuel vapor pressure (FVAPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    A subcode (FVAPRS) is described which calculates fuel vapor pressure. This subcode was developed as part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The fuel vapor pressure subcode (FVAPRS), is presented and a discussion of literature data, steady state and transient fuel vapor pressure equations and estimates of the standard error of estimate to be expected with the FVAPRS subcode are included

  10. Investigation of pressure retarded osmosis power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taousanidis Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A major source of energy exists where there is mixing between aqueous solutions of different salinities. This energy source is particularly concentrated where fresh water rivers flow on to the ocean. The power, represented by the osmotic pressure difference between fresh water and salt water, may be called salinity gradient power. In this study the pressure retarded osmosis method for the extraction of salinity gradients’ energy is investigated, main problems and difficulties are pointed out and finally the whole subject is justified with experimental results.

  11. Modification of encapsulation pressure of reverse micelles in liquid ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronald W; Nucci, Nathaniel V; Wand, A Joshua

    2011-09-01

    Encapsulation within reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids offers a potential solution to the slow tumbling problem presented by large soluble macromolecules to solution NMR spectroscopy. The reduction in effective macromolecular tumbling is directly dependent upon the viscosity of the solvent. Liquid ethane is of sufficiently low viscosity at pressures below 5000 psi to offer a significant advantage. Unfortunately, the viscosity of liquid ethane shows appreciable pressure dependence. Reverse micelle encapsulation in liquid ethane often requires significantly higher pressures, which obviates the potential advantages offered by liquid ethane over liquid propane. Addition of co-surfactants or co-solvents can be used to manipulate the minimum pressure required to obtain stable, well-behaved solutions of reverse micelles prepared in liquid ethane. A library of potential additives is examined and several candidates suitable for use with encapsulated proteins are described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yoshikawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Keiji Yoshikawa1, Hiroshi Yamada21Yoshikawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 2Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles.Methods: Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time.Results: With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 ± 0.5 seconds to 4.6 ± 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P < 0.0001. When using the bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa, the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R2 = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R2 = 0.563.Conclusions: Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.Keywords: dispensing time, model eye dropper bottle, model ophthalmic solution, nozzle internal space volume, nozzle inner aperture diameter

  13. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  14. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (orig./PW)

  15. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (DG) [de

  16. Thick brane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Minamitsuji, Masato; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review on thick brane solutions and related topics. Such models have attracted much attention from many aspects since the birth of the brane world scenario. In many works, it has been usually assumed that a brane is an infinitely thin object; however, in more general situations, one can no longer assume this. It is also widely considered that more fundamental theories such as string theory would have a minimal length scale. Many multidimensional field theories coupled to gravitation have exact solutions of gravitating topological defects, which can represent our brane world. The inclusion of brane thickness can realize a variety of possible brane world models. Given our understanding, the known solutions can be classified into topologically non-trivial solutions and trivial ones. The former class contains solutions of a single scalar (domain walls), multi-scalar, gauge-Higgs (vortices), Weyl gravity and so on. As an example of the latter class, we consider solutions of two interacting scalar fields. Approaches to obtain cosmological equations in the thick brane world are reviewed. Solutions with spatially extended branes (S-branes) and those with an extra time-like direction are also discussed.

  17. Professional Hadoop solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lublinsky, Boris; Yakubovich, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    The go-to guidebook for deploying Big Data solutions with Hadoop Today's enterprise architects need to understand how the Hadoop frameworks and APIs fit together, and how they can be integrated to deliver real-world solutions. This book is a practical, detailed guide to building and implementing those solutions, with code-level instruction in the popular Wrox tradition. It covers storing data with HDFS and Hbase, processing data with MapReduce, and automating data processing with Oozie. Hadoop security, running Hadoop with Amazon Web Services, best practices, and automating Hadoop processes i

  18. An Inexpensive High Pressure Optical Absorption Cell for IR-VIS-UV Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, V. E.; Angell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an optical cell, suitable for high-pressure studies between at least -130 and +150 degrees Celsius, which may be assembled for about $50. Discusses experimental demonstration of principles involved when using the apparatus, including effects of pressure on coordination of ions in solution and on reaction rates in solution. (JN)

  19. Semi-analytic solution to planar Helmholtz equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukač M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic solution of interior domains is of great interest. Solving acoustic pressure fields faster with lower computational requirements is demanded. A novel solution technique based on the analytic solution to the Helmholtz equation in rectangular domain is presented. This semi-analytic solution is compared with the finite element method, which is taken as the reference. Results show that presented method is as precise as the finite element method. As the semi-analytic method doesn’t require spatial discretization, it can be used for small and very large acoustic problems with the same computational costs.

  20. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  1. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors, like diabetes, you may need treatment. How does high blood pressure affect pregnant women? A few women will get ... HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health ... High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Women and Diabetes Heart ...

  2. High-pressure crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrusiak, A.

    2008-01-01

    The history and development of high-pressure crystallography are briefly described and examples of structural transformations in compressed compounds are given. The review is focused on the diamond-anvil cell, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the principles of its operation and the impact it has had on high-pressure X-ray diffraction.

  3. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  4. An eHealth System for Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Based on Accelerometer and Pressure Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hayn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are a common skin disease which is associated with pain, reduced autonomy, social isolation, and reduced quality of life. There are several systems for monitoring of pressure ulcer-related risk factors on the market, but up to now no satisfactory solution is available, especially for people with medium pressure ulcer risk. We present a novel pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevention system, which combines the advantages of accelerometer and pressure sensors for monitoring pressure ulcer risk factors. Sensors are used for detection of repositionings of the person lying on the mattress. Sensor data are sent to a tablet where they are analysed and presented graphically. The system was evaluated in a long-term test at the homes of people of the target group. Results indicate that the system is able to detect movements of persons while lying in bed. Weak correlation in between mobility and Braden pressure ulcer risk was found (correlation factor = 0.31. From our data, long-term trends could be visualized as well as 24 h mobility profiles. Such graphical illustrations might be helpful for caregivers in order to optimize care of people with medium to high pressure ulcer risk.

  5. New technology for preparing drilling solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proselkov, Y M; Minenkov, V M

    1981-01-01

    It is indicated that it is possible to provide the necessary indices of structural-mechanical properties of solution with additional dispersion of clay particles in water at the initial stage of preparation of solutions. In the process of dispersion the indices of rheological properties of the solution vary: static SNS and dynamic of shear stress, plastic viscosity. With consideration of the aforementioned a new technology has been developed for preparing solutions from powdery materials. To carry out the technological process we use serial blocks BPR-70 with ejector hydromixer, drilling or centrifuge pump, standard capacity of circulation system, and hydraulic dispersing agent. The technology for preparing the solution is as follow (see figure). Water is poured into tank 4 in an amount equal to half the volume of the prepared portion of solution. In hydraulic disperser 6 packing is installed with a diameter in accordance with the productivity of the drilling pump 5. After this aeration is switched on for 5-7 minutes in the silo 1 of BPR with excess air pressure of 0.2-0.3 kg/cm/sup 2/. Then the drilling pump is switched on and water is pumped through in the following order: tank 4, hydraulic disperser 6, ejector hydromixer 3, tank 4. Pressure at the pump discharge should be 120-150 kg/cm/sup 2/, and the vacuum in the chamber of the electronic hydromixer is at least 0.2 kg/cm/sup 2/. With the aid of a regulating fan 2 we must create a vacuum in the chamber of the hydromixer amounting to 0.08-0.12 kg/cm/sup 2/, and as a consequence of this the fan can regulate the rate and evenness of clay powder feed.

  6. ERP SOLUTIONS FOR SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTUNEA MIHAELA FILOFTEIA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of activities, the business processes as well as their optimization, bring the perspective of profitable growth and create significant and competitive advantages in any company. The adoption of some ERP integrated software solutions, from SMEs’ perspective, must be considered as a very important management decision in medium and long term. ERP solutions, along with the transparent and optimized management of all internal processes, also offer an intra and inter companies collaborative platform, which allows a rapid expansion of activities towards e- business and mobile-business environments. This material introduces ERP solutions for SMEs from commercial offer and open source perspective; the results of comparative analysis of the solutions on the specific market, can be an useful aid to the management of the companies, in making the decision to integrate business processes, using ERP as a support.

  7. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  8. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  9. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  10. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Conductometry of electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Lyubov P.; Kolker, Arkadii M.

    1992-09-01

    A review is given of the theories of the electrical conductance of electrolyte solutions of different ionic strengths and concentrations, and of the models of ion association. An analysis is made of the methods for mathematical processing of experimental conductometric data. An account is provided of various theories describing the dependence of the limiting value of the ionic electrical conductance on the properties of the solute and solvent. The bibliography includes 115 references.

  12. Solutions to horava gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, H; Mei, Jianwei; Pope, C N

    2009-08-28

    Recently Horava proposed a nonrelativistic renormalizable theory of gravitation, which reduces to Einstein's general relativity at large distances, and that may provide a candidate for a UV completion of Einstein's theory. In this Letter, we derive the full set of equations of motion, and then we obtain spherically symmetric solutions and discuss their properties. We also obtain solutions for the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological metric.

  13. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  14. Radiolysis of spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habersbergerova, A.; Janovsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The factors were studied affecting thiosulfate radiolysis in the so-called spray solution for nuclear power plant containments. The reaction mechanism of primary radiolytic reactions leading to thiosulfate decomposition was studied using pulse radiolysis. Also measured was hydrazine loss in the irradiation of the bubbling solution intended for the capture of volatile chemical forms of radioiodine. Pulse radiolysis was used to study the kinetics of hydrazine reaction with elemental iodine. (author)

  15. Optimizing Search Patterns for Multiple Searchers Prosecuting a Single Contact In the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    the target relative to the searcher. The final aspect consists of "force requirements and their economy ." Without a limit on available forces, the...required effect with the greatest economy of forces" [4]. 1.2 Applications and Previous Research The application of SDT extends to multiple scenarios...Applying the math that sank U-boats to today’s intel problems. Defense News. [Online]. Available: http: //www.defensenews.com/article/20130705

  16. A boring solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiuk, M I; Iushkova, N E; Kozubovskii, A I

    1979-10-25

    A boring solution is being patented for boring for oil and gas, which can be used in wells, where the temperature of the circulating liquid reaches 100/sup 0/. Polyvinyl acetate emulsion (PVE) is added for the purpose of decreasing viscosity of the solution at a temperature of agression into the boring solution containing clay, water, carboxymethylcellulose (CBC), a chloride from the number of sodium, potassium, or magnesium chlorides. The solution has the following composition in %: clay, 10 to 20; CBC, 1.5 to 2.0; chloride, 5 to 20; PVE, 0.5 to 2; water, up to 100. In accordance to GOST 1000-62 for the accepted PVE, the compound has the following composition, in %: monomer, 0.8; dry residue, greater than or equal to 50; plasticizer (tributyl phthalate), 5 to 15. The boring solution is processed according to the following method. The original solution, containing clay, water, salts, receives 1.5 to 2% CBC and afterwards it is processed with 0.5 to 2% PVE.

  17. High-Pressure Polymorphism in Orthoamphiboles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, G. J.; Zhang, D.; Shelton, H.; Dera, P.

    2017-12-01

    Amphiboles are double-chain silicate minerals that are the structurally hydrated counterpart to single-chain, anhydrous pyroxenes. They may play an important role in the earth as a carrier for volatiles in subduction zones, as well as a generator for seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Recent work has described previously unrecognized high-pressure polymorphism at low temperatures in a variety of pyroxene minerals, which may be relevant for the structure and dynamics of thick, cold, subducted slabs. However, high-pressure polymorphism in amphiboles above a few GPa in pressure has not been well explored, and if similar polymorphism to pyroxenes exists in this mineral family, it may affect the extent and depth of volatile transport in amphiboles, as well as their rheological properties. At low temperatures and high pressures, orthopyroxenes undergo crystal structure transitions at lower pressures than clinopyroxenes (10-30 GPa vs. > 50 GPa), so for this study we have investigated polymorphism in the anthophyllite-gedrite (Al-free and Al rich) orthoamphibole solid solution series. Using neon gas-loaded diamond anvil cells, we compressed both phases to a maximum pressure of 31 GPa, and observed transitions to new monoclinic structures in both endmembers. In this presentation, we will discuss the details of these transitions and implications for the earth's interior.

  18. The baseline pressure of intracranial pressure (ICP) sensors can be altered by electrostatic discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per K; Bakken, André

    2011-08-22

    The monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has a crucial role in the surveillance of patients with brain injury. During long-term monitoring of ICP, we have seen spontaneous shifts in baseline pressure (ICP sensor zero point), which are of technical and not physiological origin. The aim of the present study was to explore whether or not baseline pressures of ICP sensors can be affected by electrostatics discharges (ESD's), when ESD's are delivered at clinically relevant magnitudes. We performed bench-testing of a set of commercial ICP sensors. In our experimental setup, the ICP sensor was placed in a container with 0.9% NaCl solution. A test person was charged 0.5-10 kV, and then delivered ESD's to the sensor by touching a metal rod that was located in the container. The continuous pressure signals were recorded continuously before/after the ESD's, and the pressure readings were stored digitally using a computerized system A total of 57 sensors were tested, including 25 Codman ICP sensors and 32 Raumedic sensors. When charging the test person in the range 0.5-10 kV, typically ESD's in the range 0.5-5 kV peak pulse were delivered to the ICP sensor. Alterations in baseline pressure ≥ 2 mmHg was seen in 24 of 25 (96%) Codman sensors and in 17 of 32 (53%) Raumedic sensors. Lasting changes in baseline pressure > 10 mmHg that in the clinical setting would affect patient management, were seen frequently for both sensor types. The changes in baseline pressure were either characterized by sudden shifts or gradual drifts in baseline pressure. The baseline pressures of commercial solid ICP sensors can be altered by ESD's at discharge magnitudes that are clinically relevant. Shifts in baseline pressure change the ICP levels visualised to the physician on the monitor screen, and thereby reveal wrong ICP values, which likely represent a severe risk to the patient.

  19. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... or absence of macrovascular disease was assessed by an independent physician. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients had no detectable retinal changes (grade 1), 13 had grade 2 retinopathy, and 18 had more advanced retinopathy (grades 3-6). Compared to patients without retinopathy (grade 1), patients with grades 2......BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...

  20. Antibodies under pressure: A Small-Angle X-ray Scattering study of Immunoglobulin G under high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Nico; Paulus, Michael; Julius, Karin; Schulze, Julian; Voetz, Matthias; Tolan, Metin

    2017-12-01

    In the present work two subclasses of the human antibody Immunoglobulin G (IgG) have been investigated by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering under high hydrostatic pressures up to 5kbar. It is shown that IgG adopts a symmetric T-shape in solution which differs significantly from available crystal structures. Moreover, high-pressure experiments verify the high stability of the IgG molecule. It is not unfolded by hydrostatic pressures of up to 5kbar but a slight increase of the radius of gyration was observed at elevated pressures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Triplets pass their pressure test

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position. The first ones have passed their pressure tests with flying colours. The repaired inner triplet at LHC Point 1, right side (1R). Ranko Ostojic (on the right), who headed the team responsible for repairing the triplets, shows the magnet to Robert Zimmer, President of the University of Chicago and of Fermi Research Alliance, who visited CERN on 20th August.Three cheers for the triplets! All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position in the tunnel. Thanks to the mobilisation of a multidisciplinary team from CERN and Fermilab, assisted by the KEK Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), a solution has been found, tested, validated and applied. At the end of March this year, one of the inner triplets at Point 5 failed to withstand a pressure test. A fault was identified in the supports of two out of the three quadruple magne...

  2. Comparison of pressure between barium reduction and air reduction of the intussusception in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Park, Sang Gyu; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    There are many method of treatment of the intussusception in children, including surgery, barium reduction, air reduction, and saline enema under ultrasonographic monitoring. Among them, barium reduction and air reduction have been used widely as nonsurgical method of treatment in radiologic department. During barium reduction, the bottle filled with barium solution must not be elevated over a 3 feet from the operating table. In air reduction, diagnostic pressure is about 60 mmHg and pressure during reduction usually is maintained between 90 mmHg and 130 mmHg. The authors have studied about pressure difference of barium solution by changing height of the bottle filled with barium solution, and have compared with pressure in air reduction. The results are as follows; 1. Pressure of 20 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 44.4 mmHg, and 69.6 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 2. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 51.4 mmHg, and 80.1 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 3. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 90cm height is much lower than the pressure maintained during air reduction, and this difference in pressure may be one of the causes of low reduction rate in barium reduction then air reduction. 4. The pressure gradient per 10 cm height is about 8.45 mmHg in 20 w/v % barium solution, about 9.21 mmHg in 30 w/v % barium solution, and about 9.72 mmHg 40 w/v % barium solution. 5. Intraluminal pressure difference between the barium reduction and the air reduction is probably of the major causes of rapid diagnosis and high reduction rate in the air reduction.

  3. Comparison of pressure between barium reduction and air reduction of the intussusception in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Park, Sang Gyu; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1989-01-01

    There are many method of treatment of the intussusception in children, including surgery, barium reduction, air reduction, and saline enema under ultrasonographic monitoring. Among them, barium reduction and air reduction have been used widely as nonsurgical method of treatment in radiologic department. During barium reduction, the bottle filled with barium solution must not be elevated over a 3 feet from the operating table. In air reduction, diagnostic pressure is about 60 mmHg and pressure during reduction usually is maintained between 90 mmHg and 130 mmHg. The authors have studied about pressure difference of barium solution by changing height of the bottle filled with barium solution, and have compared with pressure in air reduction. The results are as follows; 1. Pressure of 20 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 44.4 mmHg, and 69.6 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 2. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 51.4 mmHg, and 80.1 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 3. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 90cm height is much lower than the pressure maintained during air reduction, and this difference in pressure may be one of the causes of low reduction rate in barium reduction then air reduction. 4. The pressure gradient per 10 cm height is about 8.45 mmHg in 20 w/v % barium solution, about 9.21 mmHg in 30 w/v % barium solution, and about 9.72 mmHg 40 w/v % barium solution. 5. Intraluminal pressure difference between the barium reduction and the air reduction is probably of the major causes of rapid diagnosis and high reduction rate in the air reduction

  4. Social information solution; Shakai joho solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    An information system for government offices is developed, a system that integrally supports operations inside government offices and the staff service operations by combining Intra Net as the basis of an information system with Internet. The objective of the system is as follows: (1) Information sharing in the place of work and utilization of information resources. (2) Improvement in administrative services and vitalization of an interchange of residents through the preparation of Internet environment. (3) Rationalization of staff operations through groupeware. In addition, by building a network system for the entire region, information communication service is to be provided as a solution between the residents and the administration in the occurrence of a disaster as well as for home care, medical and nursing assistance in the health, medical and welfare fields. (translated by NEDO)

  5. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  6. Pressure suppressing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Makoto.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the pressure in the reactor container from excessively increasing even when vapor leaks from the dry well to a space of the suppression chamber, without passing though the suppression pool at the time of loss of coolant accident. Constitution: When vapor of a high temperature and a high pressure at the time of loss of coolant accident flows from the dry well to the suppression chamber without passing through suppression pool water, vapor dose not condense with pool water, and therefore the pressure within the chamber abnormally increases. For this reason, this abnormal pressure is detected by a pressure detector thereby to start the operations of a blower and a pump. By starting the blower, the pressure in the dry well becomes lower than the pressure in the chamber, and vapor entirely passes through the pool water and entirely condenses with the pool water. By starting the pump, the pool water is sprayed over the space of the chamber, and vapor in the space is condensed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  7. Hydrogen - High pressure production and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauretta, J.R

    2005-01-01

    The development of simple, safe and more and more efficient technologies for the production and the storage of hydrogen is necessary condition for the transition towards the economy of hydrogen.In this work the hydrogen production studies experimentally to high pressure by electrolysis of alkaline solutions without the intervention of compressing systems and its direct storage in safe containers.The made tests show that the process of electrolysis to high pressure is feasible and has better yield than to low pressure, and that is possible to solve the operation problems, with relatively simple technology.The preliminary studies and tests indicate that the system container that studied is immune to the outbreak and can have forms and very different sizes, nevertheless, to reach or to surpass the efficiency of storage of the conventional systems the investments necessary will be due to make to be able to produce aluminum alloy tubes of high resistance

  8. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  9. Compressed-tube pressure cell for optical studies at ocean pressures: Application to glucose mutarotation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, F J

    2016-12-01

    A self-contained compressed-tube pressure cell is tested to 25 MPa. The cell is very simple to construct and offers stable pressure control with optical access to fluid samples. The physical path length of light through the cell is large enough to measure optical activity. The entire system is relatively small and portable, and it is vibration-free, since a compressor is not used. Operation of the cell is demonstrated by measuring the mutarotation rate of aqueous glucose solutions at 25 °C. A logarithmic plot of the rate constant vs. pressure yields an activation volume for mutarotation of -22 cm 3 /mol, approximately twice the value measured previously at higher pressures.

  10. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  12. Evaluation of burst pressure prediction models for line pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xian-Kui; Leis, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of burst pressure plays a central role in engineering design and integrity assessment of oil and gas pipelines. Theoretical and empirical solutions for such prediction are evaluated in this paper relative to a burst pressure database comprising more than 100 tests covering a variety of pipeline steel grades and pipe sizes. Solutions considered include three based on plasticity theory for the end-capped, thin-walled, defect-free line pipe subjected to internal pressure in terms of the Tresca, von Mises, and ZL (or Zhu-Leis) criteria, one based on a cylindrical instability stress (CIS) concept, and a large group of analytical and empirical models previously evaluated by Law and Bowie (International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 84, 2007: 487–492). It is found that these models can be categorized into either a Tresca-family or a von Mises-family of solutions, except for those due to Margetson and Zhu-Leis models. The viability of predictions is measured via statistical analyses in terms of a mean error and its standard deviation. Consistent with an independent parallel evaluation using another large database, the Zhu-Leis solution is found best for predicting burst pressure, including consideration of strain hardening effects, while the Tresca strength solutions including Barlow, Maximum shear stress, Turner, and the ASME boiler code provide reasonably good predictions for the class of line-pipe steels with intermediate strain hardening response. - Highlights: ► This paper evaluates different burst pressure prediction models for line pipes. ► The existing models are categorized into two major groups of Tresca and von Mises solutions. ► Prediction quality of each model is assessed statistically using a large full-scale burst test database. ► The Zhu-Leis solution is identified as the best predictive model.

  13. Evaluation of burst pressure prediction models for line pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xian-Kui, E-mail: zhux@battelle.org [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Leis, Brian N. [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Accurate prediction of burst pressure plays a central role in engineering design and integrity assessment of oil and gas pipelines. Theoretical and empirical solutions for such prediction are evaluated in this paper relative to a burst pressure database comprising more than 100 tests covering a variety of pipeline steel grades and pipe sizes. Solutions considered include three based on plasticity theory for the end-capped, thin-walled, defect-free line pipe subjected to internal pressure in terms of the Tresca, von Mises, and ZL (or Zhu-Leis) criteria, one based on a cylindrical instability stress (CIS) concept, and a large group of analytical and empirical models previously evaluated by Law and Bowie (International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 84, 2007: 487-492). It is found that these models can be categorized into either a Tresca-family or a von Mises-family of solutions, except for those due to Margetson and Zhu-Leis models. The viability of predictions is measured via statistical analyses in terms of a mean error and its standard deviation. Consistent with an independent parallel evaluation using another large database, the Zhu-Leis solution is found best for predicting burst pressure, including consideration of strain hardening effects, while the Tresca strength solutions including Barlow, Maximum shear stress, Turner, and the ASME boiler code provide reasonably good predictions for the class of line-pipe steels with intermediate strain hardening response. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper evaluates different burst pressure prediction models for line pipes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existing models are categorized into two major groups of Tresca and von Mises solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction quality of each model is assessed statistically using a large full-scale burst test database. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Zhu-Leis solution is identified as the best predictive model.

  14. Exact and Numerical Solutions of a Spatially-Distributed Mathematical Model for Fluid and Solute Transport in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model for solute and fluid transport induced by the osmotic pressure of glucose and albumin with the dependence of several parameters on the hydrostatic pressure is described. In particular, the fractional space available for macromolecules (albumin was used as a typical example and fractional fluid void volume were assumed to be different functions of hydrostatic pressure. In order to find non-uniform steady-state solutions analytically, some mathematical restrictions on the model parameters were applied. Exact formulae (involving hypergeometric functions for the density of fluid flux from blood to tissue and the fluid flux across tissues were constructed. In order to justify the applicability of the analytical results obtained, a wide range of numerical simulations were performed. It was found that the analytical formulae can describe with good approximation the fluid and solute transport (especially the rate of ultrafiltration for a wide range of values of the model parameters.

  15. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  16. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  17. Pressure and pressure derivative analysis for injection tests with variable temperature without type-curve matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Martinez, Javier Andres; Montealegre Matilde

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of injection tests under nonisothermic conditions is important for the accurate estimation of the reservoir permeability and the well's skin factor; since previously an isothermical system was assumed without taking into account a moving temperature front which expands with time plus the consequent changes in both viscosity and mobility between the cold and the hot zone of the reservoir which leads to unreliable estimation of the reservoir and well parameters. To construct the solution an analytical approach presented by Boughrara and Peres (2007) was used. That solution was initially introduced for the calculation of the injection pressure in an isothermic system. It was later modified by Boughrara and Reynolds (2007) to consider a system with variable temperature in vertical wells. In this work, the pressure response was obtained by numerical solution of the anisothermical model using the Gauss Quadrature method to solve the integrals, and assuming that both injection and reservoir temperatures were kept constant during the injection process and the water saturation is uniform throughout the reservoir. For interpretation purposes, a technique based upon the unique features of the pressure and pressure derivative curves were used without employing type-curve matching (TDS technique). The formulation was verified by its application to field and synthetic examples. As expected, increasing reservoir temperature causes a decrement in the mobility ratio, then estimation of reservoir permeability is some less accurate from the second radial flow, especially, as the mobility ratio increases

  18. The ideal solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.; Witkamp, G.J.; Hartmann, L.

    2007-01-01

    A smart use of high-pressure carbon dioxide may make a special class of eco-friendly solvents known as ionic liquids much more attractive to the fine chemical industry. Researcher Dr. Maaike Kroon has demonstrated that, on paper at least, the savings can be astronomical.

  19. Degradation of aqueous phenol solutions by coaxial DBD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojcinovic, B. P.; Manojlovic, D.; Roglic, G. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric, J.

    2008-07-01

    Solutions of 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,6-dichlorophenol in bidistilled and water from the river Danube were treated in plasma reactor. In this reactor, based on coaxial dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure, plasma is formed over a thin layer of treated water. After one pass through the reactor, starting chlorophenols concentration of 20 mg/l was diminished up to 95 %. Kinetics of the chlorophenols degradation was monitored by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography method (HPLC).

  20. Pressure Safety Orientation Live #769

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Pressure Safety Orientation (course #769) introduces workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the Laboratory Pressure Safety Program and to pressure-related hazards. This course also affords a hands-on exercise involving the assembly of a simple pressure system. This course is required for all LANL personnel who work on or near pressure systems and are exposed to pressure-related hazards. These personnel include pressure-system engineers, designers, fabricators, installers, operators, inspectors, maintainers, and others who work with pressurized fluids and may be exposed to pressure-related hazards.

  1. Siemens IT solutions for power sector. PROFIT solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunter, P.

    2004-01-01

    The cost reduction, flexibility and revenue increase, potential exploitation, productivity increase, and business opportunities exploitation - that is all what can be required in the races for the promonent positioning on the electricity power market. These requirements can be realized by the sophisticated IT solutions hand-tailored to the special requirements of the electric power producers and tradesmen. This approach makes it possible to achieve greater profit. Our solutions 'PROFIT Solutions', that are symbiosis of the most progressive information technologies and the power plant techniques of the company Siemens, satisfy submitted specifications in substantial measure. The system solutions 'PROFIT Solutions' comprise three solution groups: process, operation a business. The solutions of the group 'IT Process Solutions' increase flexibility and manoeuvrability of equipment, improve the efficiency and contribute to more economical operation of the power generation. Solutions 'IT Process Solutions' simplify and shorten the period of power cycles and conduce to higher labour productivity. Solutions group 'IT Process Solutions' approaches equipment to the market - supports the profit strategies, helps quickly and expertly to determine and predict hazards. The extension PROFIT Cockpit means the nuance to the solutions world 'PROFIT Solutions'. The survey about the whole installation is within reach at the simple touch of a button. It is possible to compile the total system part by part from single solutions 'PROFIT Solutions'. As a matter of fact all single parts can be interconnected with already existing solutions. Routines 'PROFIT Solutions' cooperate with all modern control systems. (author)

  2. Solute segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Okamoto, P.R.; Lam, N.Q.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation at elevated temperature induces redistribution of the elements in alloys on a microstructural level. This phenomenon is caused by differences in the coupling of the various alloy constituents to the radiation-induced defect fluxes. A simple model of the segregation process based on coupled reaction-rate and diffusion equations is discussed. The model gives a good description of the experimentally observed consequences of radiation-induced segregation, including enrichment or depletion of solute elements near defect sinks such as surfaces, voids and dislocations; precipitation of second phases in solid solutions; precipitate redistribution in two-phase alloys; and effects of defect-production rates on void-swelling rates in alloys with minor solute additions

  3. Superstrings fermionic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    1990-06-01

    The solutions proposed by the superstring theory are classified and compared. In order to obtain some of the equivalences, the demonstration is based on the coincidence of the excitation spectrum and the quantum numbers from different states. The fermionic representation of the heterotical strings is discussed. The conformal invariance and the supersymmetric results extended to two dimensions are investigated. Concerning the fermionic strings, the formalism and a phenomenological solution involving three families of quarks, chiral leptons and leptons from the E 6 gauge group are presented. The equivalence between real and complex fermions is discussed. The similarity between some of the solutions of the Wess-Zumino-Witten model and the orbifolds is considered. The formal calculation program developed for reproducing the theory's low energy spectra, in the fermionic string formalism is given [fr

  4. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves the chance of a good recovery. Without treatment, symptoms may worsen and cause death. What research is being done? The NINDS conducts and supports research on neurological disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus. Research on disorders such ...

  5. On Time Performance Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  6. Downhole pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    Sensor remains accurate in spite of varying temperatures. Very accurate, sensitive, and stable downhole pressure measurements are needed for vaiety of reservoir engineering applications, such as deep petroleum reservoirs, especially gas reservoirs, and in areas of high geothermal gradient.

  7. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  8. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney disease, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome Read less Unhealthy lifestyle habits Unhealthy lifestyle habits can increase the risk of high blood pressure. These habits include: Unhealthy eating patterns, such as eating too much sodium ...

  9. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Jun 1,2018 What do your blood ... and Live Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is ... daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important things for someone with a spinal cord ...

  11. Increased intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord) Subdural hematoma (bleeding between the covering of the brain and ... intracranial pressure Patient Instructions Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge Images Subdural hematoma Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References ...

  12. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hours? play_arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the ... for someone with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow Why is ...

  15. Osteomyelitis beneath pressure sores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarman, B.; Hawes, S.; Musher, D.M.; Klima, M.; Young, E.J.; Pircher, F.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight pressure sores were evaluated prospectively. Osteomyelitis was reported histologically in nine of 28 bones and pressure-related changes were reported in 14 bones. Roentgenograms suggested the presence of osteomyelitis in four instances of histologically proved osteomyelitis. Technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans were highly sensitive, showing increased uptake in all cases of osteomyelitis; however, increased uptake also occurred commonly in uninfected bones due to pressure-related changes or other noninfectious causes. Cultures of bone biopsy samples usually disclosed anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacilli, or both. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis must be considered if a pressure sore does not respond to local therapy. If the technetium Tc 99m medronate uptake is increased in the involved area, or roentgenographic findings are abnormal, the diagnosis can only be made with certainty by histologic examination of bone. Antibacterial treatment should be selected based on the results of bone culture

  16. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors Diabetes High blood pressure Family history Obesity Race/ethnicity Full list of causes and risk factors ... give Give monthly Memorials and tributes Donate a car Donate gently used items Stock donation Workplace giving ...

  17. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  18. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  19. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  20. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  1. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  2. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  3. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  4. Krypton oxides under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Łata, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300?GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamical...

  5. Destructive distillation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1932-09-08

    A process of destructive distillation of distillable carbonaceous material under pressure is described, consisting of regulating the temperature by introducing the carbonaceous materials to a point where the reaction of hydrogenation has begun but has not stopped, by placing it in indirect heat-exchange with a cooling agent at a critical temperature below the reaction temperature, the agent being under pressure and introduced in the liquid state. Water is used as the cooling agent.

  6. Deuterium high pressure target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevozchikov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.

    2001-01-01

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm 3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system

  7. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  8. Calculus problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Ideal for self-instruction as well as for classroom use, this text helps students improve their understanding and problem-solving skills in analysis, analytic geometry, and higher algebra. More than 1,200 problems appear in the text, with concise explanations of the basic notions and theorems to be used in their solution. Many are followed by complete answers; solutions for the others appear at the end of the book. Topics include sequences, functions of a single variable, limit of a function, differential calculus for functions of a single variable, fundamental theorems and applications of dif

  9. In Search of Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    when pursuing minor performance improvements in existing technologies. However, reliance on internal knowledge sources carries a risk of organizational inertia related to problem understanding and solution development in the shape of path-dependencies and preferences for exploitation and reapplication...... of existing knowledge. Such inertia may imbue innovation processes related to the development of new technologies with reduced novelty and an inability to recognize alternative and potentially more attractive solutions. As a result, over-reliance on internal knowledge sources is likely to inhibit the ability...

  10. Business Intelligence Integrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristescu Marian Pompiliu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Business Intelligence solution concerns the simple, real-time access to complete information about the business shown in a relevant format of the report, graphic or dashboard type in order help the taking of strategic decisions regarding the direction in which the company goes. Business Intelligence does not produce data, but uses the data produced by the company’s applications. BI solutions extract their data from ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning, CRM (Customer Relationship Management, HCM (Human Capital Management, and Retail, eCommerce or other databases used in the company.

  11. Microsoft big data solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Adam; Welch, John; Clark, Dan; Price, Christopher; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Tap the power of Big Data with Microsoft technologies Big Data is here, and Microsoft's new Big Data platform is a valuable tool to help your company get the very most out of it. This timely book shows you how to use HDInsight along with HortonWorks Data Platform for Windows to store, manage, analyze, and share Big Data throughout the enterprise. Focusing primarily on Microsoft and HortonWorks technologies but also covering open source tools, Microsoft Big Data Solutions explains best practices, covers on-premises and cloud-based solutions, and features valuable case studies. Best of all,

  12. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Osamu; Kumasaka, Katsuyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remove the heat of reactor core using a great amount of moderators at the periphery of the reactor core as coolants. Constitution: Heat of a reactor core is removed by disposing a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling moderators in a moderator tank, without using additional power driven equipments. That is, a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling the moderators in the moderator tank is disposed. Further, the gap between the inner wall of a pressure tube guide pipe disposed through the vertical direction of a moderator tank and the outer wall of a pressure tube inserted through the guide pipe is made smaller than the rupture distortion caused by the thermal expansion upon overheating of the pressure tube and greater than the minimum gap required for heat shiels between the pressure tube and the pressure tube guide pipe during usual operation. In this way, even if such an accident as can not using a coolant cooling device comprising power driven equipment should occur in the pressure tube type reactor, the rise in the temperature of the reactor core can be retarded to obtain a margin with time. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  14. Solubility and physical properties of sugars in pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldaña, Marleny D.A.; Alvarez, Víctor H.; Haldar, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sugar solubility in pressurized water and density at high pressures were measured. ► Glucose solubility was higher than that of lactose as predicted by their σ-profiles. ► Sugar aqueous solubility decreased with an increase in pressure from 15 to 120 bar. ► Aqueous glucose molecular packing shows high sensitivity to pressure. ► The COSMO-SAC model qualitatively predicted the sugar solubility data. - Abstract: In this study, the solubility, density, and refractive index of glucose and lactose in water as a function of temperature were measured. For solubility of sugars in pressurized water, experimental data were obtained at pressures of (15 to 120) bar and temperatures of (373 to 433) K using a dynamic flow high pressure system. Density data for aqueous sugar solutions were obtained at pressures of (1 to 300) bar and temperatures of (298 to 343) K. The refractive index of aqueous sugar solutions was obtained at 293 K and atmospheric pressure. Activity coefficient models, Van Laar and the Conductor-like Screening Model-Segment Activity Coefficient (COSMO-SAC), were used to fit and predict the experimental solubility data, respectively. The results obtained showed that the solubility of both sugars in pressurized water increase with an increase in temperature. However, with the increase of pressure from 15 bar to 120 bar, the solubility of both sugars in pressurized water decreased. The Van Laar model fit the experimental aqueous solubility data with deviations lower than 13 and 53% for glucose and lactose, respectively. The COSMO-SAC model predicted qualitatively the aqueous solubility of these sugars.

  15. Phenomenology of polymer solution dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillies, George D. J

    2011-01-01

    ... solutions, not dilute solutions or polymer melts. From centrifugation and solvent dynamics to viscosity and diffusion, experimental measurements and their quantitative representations are the core of the discussion...

  16. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  17. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with

  18. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  19. Aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of aspects concerning the reorientation of polymer, water and ion hydration complexes have been studied in aqueous solution of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The polymer dynamics are investigated by 1 H-PEO and 13 C-PEO nuclear relaxation experiments. 162 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of transition pressure of δ-stabilized binary plutonium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qinghui

    1992-01-01

    The transformation of δ-stabilized binary plutonium alloys to α-Pu was studies by thermodynamic analysis. A transition pressure-composition equation which can characterize the high pressure transformation from δ to α was derived. Values calculated by the equation and values measured by experiments of published references have the same tendency. the following facts can be explained properly by this equation. (1)The transformation pressure increases linearly with the amount of an alloying element. (2) The slope of the plot of transformation pressure versus composition of δ-Pu alloys is inversely proportional to the minimum amount of solute required to retain δ-phase at room temperature and pressure. (3) Curves showing the relationship between transformation pressure and composition of various δ-stabilized binary alloys interact at the same point of zero solute (transformation pressure axis). In addition, some transformation pressures from δ to α of δ-stabilized alloys are predicted by using the modified theoretical equation

  1. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Taking Care of Pressure Sores [Download this pamphlet: "Taking Care of Pressure Sores" - ( ... may not show up right away. Stages of pressure sores and how to care for them: STAGE ONE ...

  2. Reotemp Pressure Indicator - Local Pressure Indication to Monitor the SCHe Supply Bottle Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    1999-01-01

    These 0-3000 psig range pressure indicators are located in the SCHe helium supply lines at the pressure bottles and upstream of the PRV. These accident monitoring local pressure indicators monitor the SCHe supply bottle pressure. There is one pressure indicator for each SCHe supply (4)

  3. Foundamental characteristics of layered pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Yoshikazu; Fugino, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    Pressure vessels become larger and the working pressure become higher with the remarkable development of petroleum, chemical, thermal power generation and atomic energy industries. Multi-layered pressure vessels can be manufactured cheaply without large installations, and large wall thickness can be made, therefore they are suitable for large pressure vessels. The stress and deformation behaviors of such vessels are very complex because of the effect of frictional force working between layers. In this study, the phenomena arising in multiple layers and the difference as compared with single wall were studied fundamentally as one step for analyzing multi-layered pressure vessels as a whole. Finite element technique was employed as the analyzing method, and the behavior of multiple layers was analyzed, regarding it as multiple contact problem. The behavior of multiple layers seems to appear conspicuously in case of bending load, therefore the basic characteristics regarding bending were examined. The evaluation of interfacial stiffness was carried out by experiment. The computer program for analyzing multiple contact problem was developed. In order to examine the validity of the program, comparison with the analytical solution heretofore and the result of calculation by finite element technique was carried out. Moreover, the experimental proof with multi-layered models was made. The frictional force between layers hardly contributes to the stiffness. (Kako, I.)

  4. Thermal decomposition studies of aqueous and nitric solutions of hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar Kumar; Pranay Kumar Sinha; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyurea and its derivatives are important nonsalt forming reductants in partitioning of uranium and plutonium in the nuclear fuel reprocessing operations. There is no experimental data available in open literature describing pressurization due to the thermal decomposition of aqueous and nitric solutions of hydroxyurea at elevated temperatures. Authors studied thermal decomposition of hydroxyurea-nitric acid system and resultant pressurization at various concentrations of nitric acid in an adiabatic calorimeter in closed-vent conditions. During these experiments, pressurization was observed. In this paper, results of these experiments have been discussed. (author)

  5. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  6. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  7. Pressure Effect on Entrance Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Couch, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts.......The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts....

  8. Performance study of ultrafiltration membrane with bovine serum albumin as feed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahril Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin solutions at different temperature, pH, flow rate and operation pressure have been used as feed solution for studying performance of ultrafiltration membrane. Polysulfone membranes used for this experiment were in form of hollow fibers that have Molecular Weight Cut Off (MWCO) 60 kDa. Observation was focused on flux parameter and rejection coefficient towards protein during the process. Result shows that temperature, pH of BSA feed solution, flow rate and operation pressure can affect the flux and rejection coefficient of membrane. High temperature feed solution tend to decrease the flux but increase rejection coefficient. Rejection coefficient of membrane will increase while flux decreasing at pH of feed solution near to protein isoelectric point. High pressure of feed solution will increase flux but decrease rejection of membrane. Rejection of membrane will decrease and flux will increase when the process operated in slow flow rate. (author)

  9. The calculation of dryout during flow and pressure transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, P.W.; Whalley, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The method for predicting dryout in a round tube by means of an annular flow model (Whalley et al 1974) is extended to cover the case where both inlet mass flux and pressure are time-dependent. The qualitative effects of an inlet pressure transient are assessed by performing a 'numerical experiment' and it is found that the predictions of the model represent reasonable physical trends. The relative merits of wo numerical solution schemes are also discussed

  10. Pressure Drop of Chamfer on Spacer Grid Strap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Euijae; Kim, Kanghoon; Kim, Kyounghong; Nahm, Keeyil [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A swirl flow and cross flow are generated by the spacer grid with mixing vane that enhances the thermal performance and critical heat flux (CHF). The additional pressure drop makes it difficult to meet acceptance criteria for overall pressure drop in fuel assembly depending upon the pump capacity. The chamfer on the end of spacer grid strap is one solution to reduce additional pressure drop without any adverse effect on flow fields. In this research, the pressure drop tests for spacer grid with and without chamfer were carried out at the hydraulic test facility. The result can be applied to develop high performance nuclear fuel assemblies for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. The pressure drop tests for 5x5 spacer grid with and without chamfer as well as 6x6 spacer grid with and without chamfer were carried out at the INFINIT test facility. The Reynolds number ranged about from 16000 to 75000. The sweep-up and sweep-down test showed that the direction of sweep did not affect the pressure drop. The chamfer on spacer grid strap reduced the pressure drop due to the decreased in ratio of inlet area to outlet area. The pressure loss coefficient for spacer grid with chamfer was by up to 13.8 % lower than that for spacer grid without chamfer. Hence, the chamfer on spacer grid strap was one of effective ways to reduce the pressure drop.

  11. Designing high pressure containers for research- principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandkumar, V.

    1997-01-01

    The high pressure scientist looks for a well engineered pressure apparatus for high pressure experiments for 1 kbar (0.1 GPa) and above. Often, a variety of difficulties including the choice of materials, design configuration, optimum utilisation of the strength of materials used in the design, are encountered. This article is intended to help the high pressure scientist to select the design approach for pressure retaining container. The limitations imposed by the strength of available materials and engineering standards in building high pressure containers are discussed. Engineering solutions to overcome these limitations with optimal utilisation of the strength of the materials are also discussed. Novel methods to boost up the pressure retaining capacity like multilayered design and autofrettaging are compared along with their relative advantages and disadvantages. Special methods by which it is possible to attain pressures which are several times the yield strength of the materials of construction are presented. In this aspects such as the basis of the codes and their relevance in the design of high pressure equipment will also be described. Discussions are centered around the methods to tackle situations where experimental constraints dictate requirements of pressures higher than those permitted by design codes. Safety features are also discussed. (author)

  12. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Lee, B. S.

    2002-04-01

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  13. Exploration of polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in forward osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2012-03-01

    The development of the forward osmosis (FO) process has been constrained by the slow development of appropriate draw solutions. Two significant concerns related to draw solutions are the draw solute leakage and intensiveenergy requirement in recycling draw solutes after the FO process. FO would be much attractive if there is no draw solute leakage and the recycle of draw solutes is easy and economic. In this study, polyelectrolytes of a series of polyacrylic acid sodium salts (PAA-Na), were explored as draw solutes in the FO process. The characteristics of high solubility in water and flexibility in structural configuration ensure the suitability of PAA-Na as draw solutes and their relative ease in recycle through pressure-driven membrane processes. The high water flux with insignificant salt leakage in the FO process and the high salt rejection in recycle processes reveal the superiority of PAA-Na to conventional ionic salts, such as NaCl, when comparing their FO performance via the same membranes. The repeatable performance of PAA-Na after recycle indicates the absence of any aggregation problems. The overall performance demonstrates that polyelectrolytes of PAA-Na series are promising as draw solutes, and the new concept of using polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in FO processes is applicable. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Data warehousing as a healthcare business solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheese, R

    1998-02-01

    Because of the trend toward consolidation in the healthcare field, many organizations have massive amounts of data stored in various information systems organizationwide, but access to the data by end users may be difficult. Healthcare organizations are being pressured to provide managers easy access to the data needed for critical decision making. One solution many organizations are turning to is implementing decision-support data warehouses. A data warehouse instantly delivers information directly to end users, freeing healthcare information systems staff for strategic operations. If designed appropriately, data warehouses can be a cost-effective tool for business analysis and decision support.

  15. Properties of concentrated plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Selected properties were measured for solutions containing about 500 and 700 g/l plutonium (IV) in 4--5M nitric acid: density, viscosity, vapor pressure, boiling point, radiolytic gas (H 2 ) evolution rates, and corrosion rate on Ti and 304L stainless steel. Pu solubility was determined to be 550 to 800 g/l in 2.5 to 7M HNO 3 at ambient temperature and 820 to 860 g/l in 3M HNO 3 at 50 0 C

  16. Numerical double layer solutions with ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, D.; Soerensen, J.

    1982-08-01

    Maxwell's equation div D = ro in one dimension is solved numerically, taking ionization into account. Time independent anode sheath and double layer solutions are obtained. By varying voltage, neutral gas pressure, temperature of the trapped ions on the cathode side and density and temperature of the trapped electrones on the anode side, diagrams are constructed that show permissible combinations of these parameters. Results from a recent experiment form a subset. Distribution functions, the Langmuir condition, some scaling laws and a possible application to the lower ionosphere are discussed. (Authors)

  17. Zeolites as alcohol adsorbents from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekova Blagica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential usage of zeolites as adsorbents for the removal of organic molecules from water was investigated in a series of experiments with aqueous solutions of lower alcohols. This could represent a simple solution to the problem of cleaning up industrial wastewater as well as recovering valuable chemicals at relatively low costs. Adsorption isotherms of the Langmuir type were applied, and calculations showed that the amount of propanol adsorbed on silicalite corresponded to approximately 70% of the pore volume. The adsorption process is simple, and recovery of the more concentrated products is easily done by heat treatment and/or at lowered pressures. Adsorption experiments with aqueous acetone showed that silicalite had approximately the same adsorption capacity for acetone as for n-propanol. Heats of adsorption were determined calorimetrically.

  18. Regional myocardial perfusion of cardioplegic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugene, J.; Lyons, K.P.; Ott, R.A.; Gelezunas, V.L.; Chang, C.W.; Kowall, M.G.; Haiduc, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    We compared the regional myocardial perfusion of blood cardioplegic solution (BCP) and crystalloid cardioplegic solution (CCP) in 14 mongrel dogs. Cardiopulmonary bypass was established at 28 degrees C, and a hydraulic occluder was placed around the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. In group 1 (N = 7) collateral coronary arteries were ligated; in group 2 (N = 7) collateral coronary arteries were left in situ. After the aorta was clamped, BCP and CCP were alternately perfused at 200 ml/min. The occluder was inflated to produce moderate, severe, and critical LAD stenosis, and regional perfusion was measured by xenon-133 washout with the Silicon Avalanche Radiation Detector. BCP infusion produced a consistently higher aortic pressure, but CCP flow was better than BCP flow under all conditions, particularly without coronary collaterals. Regional myocardial perfusion of CCP is superior to BCP

  19. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure piping... tests conducted in accordance with this section shall be either hydrostatic tests or pneumatic tests. (1... times the maximum allowable working pressure. (2) When a pneumatic test is conducted on a pressure...

  20. Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2018-01-01

    The theoretical foundation of acoustic radiation pressure in plane wave beams is reexamined. It is shown from finite deformation theory and the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest Adiabatic Principle that the Brillouin stress tensor (BST) is the radiation stress in Lagrangian coordinates (not Eulerian coordinates) and that the terms in the BST are not the momentum flux density and mean excess Eulerian stress but are simply contributions to the variation in the wave oscillation period resulting from changes in path length and true wave velocity, respectively, from virtual variations in the strain. It is shown that the radiation stress in Eulerian coordinates is the mean Cauchy stress (not the momentum flux density, as commonly assumed) and that Langevin's second relation does not yield an assessment of the mean Eulerian pressure, since the enthalpy used in the traditional derivations is a function of the thermodynamic tensions - not the Eulerian pressure. It is shown that the transformation between Lagrangian and Eulerian quantities cannot be obtained from the commonly-used expansion of one of the quantities in terms of the particle displacement, since the expansion provides only the difference between the value of the quantity at two different points in Cartesian space separated by the displacement. The proper transformation is obtained only by employing the transformation coefficients of finite deformation theory, which are defined in terms of the displacement gradients. Finite deformation theory leads to the result that for laterally unconfined, plane waves the Lagrangian and Eulerian radiation pressures are equal with the value (1/4)(2K) along the direction of wave propagation, where (K) is the mean kinetic energy density, and zero in directions normal to the propagation direction. This is contrary to the Langevin result that the Lagrangian radiation pressure in the propagation direction is equal to (2K) and the BST result that the Eulerian radiation pressure in that direction

  1. Weak solutions of magma equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, E.V.

    1999-01-01

    Periodic solutions in terms of Jacobian cosine elliptic functions have been obtained for a set of values of two physical parameters for the magma equation which do not reduce to solitary-wave solutions. It was also obtained solitary-wave solutions for another set of these parameters as an infinite period limit of periodic solutions in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobian elliptic functions

  2. The effects of injected solution temperature on intravenous regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D L; Logan, M R; Wildsmith, J A

    1988-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers received three standard Bier's blocks. Prilocaine 0.5%, 40 ml was injected at a solution temperature of 0 degrees C, 22 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Recordings were made of sensory block, motor block, intravenous pressure, limb temperature and pain on injection. There were no differences between the three treatments in the rate of development or in the quality of block but there was a significant difference in the comfort of injection. Cold solutions caused most, and warm solutions least discomfort.

  3. Exact relativistic solution of disordered radiation with planar symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, A.F. Da F.; Wolk, I.; Som, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations corresponding to and equilibrium distribution of disordered electromagnetic radiation with planar symmetry is obtained. This equilibrium is due solely to the gravitational and pressure effects inherent to the radiation. The distribution of radiation is found to be maximum and finite at the plane of symmetry, and to decrease monotonically in directions normal to this plane. The solution tends asymptotically to the static plane symmetric vacuum solution obtained by Levi-Civita (Atti. Accad. Naz. Lincei Rc.; 27:240 (1918)). Time-like and null geodesics are discussed. (author)

  4. Earnest Rutherford, the solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you did not make it to the Science & Society talk by John Campbell last week and are still wondering about the spelling of "Earnest", here is the solution: Two months after the birth of his fourth child on 30 August 1871 in Spring Grove, New Zealand, James Rutherford registered his son, who was recorded as "Earnest" in the Birth Register. Presumably the Registrar wrote the name down as it sounded and the father failed to notice the mistake when signing the Register.

  5. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  6. The pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear plants with boiling water reactors have a safety containment with a pressure suppression system (PSS). Proceeding on significant self-developments, today the three PSS-lines of General Electric Co. (GE), Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) and ASEA-ATOM are predominant, which are currently represented by the MARK III type, the KWU type 72 and the BWR 75 containment. In addition, there are special developments for the nuclear ship propulsion and for the pressurized water reactors in the Soviet Union. Key design values of the PSS allow a first valuation of its loads during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. (orig.) [de

  7. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  8. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-02-02

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds.

  9. Low pressure lithium condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, R.P.; Oh, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A low pressure experiment to evaluate the laminar film condensation coefficients of lithium was conducted. Some thirty-six different heat transfer tests were made at system pressures ranging from 1.3 to 26 Pa. Boiled lithium was condensed on the inside of a 7.6-cm (ID), 409 stainless-steel pipe. Condensed lithium was allowed to reflux back to the pool boiling region below the condensing section. Fourteen chromel/alumel thermocouples were attached in various regions of the condensing section. The thermocouples were initially calibrated with errors of less than one degree Celsius

  10. Evaluation of automatic vacuum- assisted compaction solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brzeziński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently on the mould-making machines market the companies like: DiSA, KUENKEL WAGNER, HAFLINGER, HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO, HUNTER, SAVELLI AND TECHNICAL play significant role. These companies are the manufacturers of various solutions in machines and instalations applied in foundry engineering. Automatic foundry machines for compaction of green sand have the major role in mechanisation and automation processes of making the mould. The concept of operation of automatic machines is based on the static and dynamic methods of compacting the green sand. The method which gains the importance is the compacting method by using the energy of the air pressure. It's the initial stage or the supporting process of compacting the green sand. However in the automatic mould making machines using this method it's essential to use the additional compaction of the mass in order to receive the final parameters of the form. In the constructional solutions of the machines there is the additional division which concerns the method of putting the sand into the mould box. This division distinquishes the transport of the sand with simultaneous compaction or the putting of the sand without the pre-compaction. As the solutions of the major manufacturers are often the subject for application in various foundries, the authors of the paper would like/have the confidence to present their own evaluation process confirmed by their own researches and independent analysis of the producers' solutions.

  11. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH 3 , hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250 degree C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs 3 or NH 4 NO 3 is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO 3 to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions

  12. New solutions to the Vortex Anisotropic Electron Hydrodynamic equations for a Weibel plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Kovalev, V.F.; Pustovalov, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of the group analysis, new nonlinear solutions to the equations of Vortex Anisotropic Electron Hydrodynamics (VAEH) describing large-scale magnetic structures in a plasm with an anisotropic pressure are obtained. Unlike familiar particular nonlinear solutions to the VAEH equations, new solutions, which are found in the form of an infinite series, are invariant or partially invariant with respect to the permissible Lie and Lie-Baecklund symmetry groups. Examples of finite regular solutions and solutions in the form of magnetic explosion are presented to illustrate the new solutions obtained

  13. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  14. Pressure test method for reactor pressure vessel in construction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Masakado; Ushiroda, Koichi; Miyahara, Ryohei; Takano, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Tadashi; Sato, Keiya.

    1998-01-01

    Plant constitutional parts as targets of both of a primary pressure test and a secondary pressure test are disposed in communication with a reactor pressure vessel, and a pressure of the primary pressure test is applied to the targets of both tests, so that the primary pressure test and the second pressure test are conducted together. Since the number of pressure tests can be reduced to promote construction, and the number of workers can also be reduced. A pressure exceeding the maximum pressure upon use is applied to the pressure vessel after disposing the incore structures, to continuously conduct the primary pressure test and the secondary pressure test joined together and an incore flowing test while closing the upper lid of the pressure vessel as it is in the construction field. The number of opening/closing of the upper lid upon conducting every test can be reduced, and since the pressure resistance test is conducted after arranging circumference conditions for the incore flowing test, the tests can be conducted collectively also in view of time. (N.H.)

  15. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves....... The experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  16. Pressure ulcers: development and psychometric evaluation of the attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention instrument (APuP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeckman, D; Defloor, T; Demarré, L; Van Hecke, A; Vanderwee, K

    2010-11-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a significant problem in hospitals, nursing homes and community care settings. Pressure ulcer incidence is widely accepted as an indicator for the quality of care. Negative attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention may result in suboptimal preventive care. A reliable and valid instrument to assess attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention is lacking. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Attitude towards Pressure ulcer Prevention instrument (APuP). Prospective psychometric instrument validation study. A literature review was performed to design the instrument. Content validity was evaluated by nine European pressure ulcer experts and five experts in psychometric instrument validation in a double Delphi procedure. A convenience sample of 258 nurses and 291 nursing students from Belgium and The Netherlands participated in order to evaluate construct validity and stability reliability of the instrument. The data were collected between February and May 2008. A factor analysis indicated the construct of a 13 item instrument in a five factor solution: (1) attitude towards personal competency to prevent pressure ulcers (three items); (2) attitude towards the priority of pressure ulcer prevention (three items); (3) attitude towards the impact of pressure ulcers (three items); (4) attitude towards personal responsibility in pressure ulcer prevention (two items); and (5) attitude towards confidence in the effectiveness of prevention (two items). This five factor solution accounted for 61.4% of the variance in responses related to attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention. All items demonstrated factor loadings over 0.60. The instrument produced similar results during stability testing [ICC=0.88 (95% CI=0.84-0.91, Ppressure ulcer prevention in patient care, education, and research. In further research, the association between attitude, knowledge and clinical performance should be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. Plasma sheet pressure anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, G.S.; Hones, E.W. Jr; Bame, S.J.; Asbridge, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The ecliptic plane components of the pressure tensors for low-energy ( or =1.2 approximately 25% of the time. Due to the low energy density of the electrons, however, this anisotropy is not itself sufficient to balance the tension of the magnetic field

  18. Pressure vessel integrity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Doney, R.O.; McDonald, M.S.; Jones, D.P.; Wilson, W.K.; Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on nuclear industry applications. The papers were prepared for technical sessions developed under the sponsorship of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Committees for Codes and Standards, Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, and Materials Fabrication. They were presented at the 1991 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference in San Diego, California, June 23-27. The primary objective of the sponsoring organization is to provide a forum for the dissemination and discussion of information on development and application of technology for the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping. This publication includes contributions from authors from Australia, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The papers here are organized in six sections, each with a particular emphasis as indicated in the following section titles: Fracture Technology Status and Application Experience; Crack Initiation, Propagation and Arrest; Ductile Tearing; Constraint, Stress State, and Local-Brittle-Zones Effects; Computational Techniques for Fracture and Corrosion Fatigue; and Codes and Standards for Fatigue, Fracture and Erosion/Corrosion

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_ ...

  20. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  1. Pressurized Thermal Shock, Pts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (Pts) refers to a condition that challenges the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The root cause of this problem is the radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel. This embrittlement leads to an increase in the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RTNDT). RTNDT can increase to the point where the reactor vessel material can loose fracture toughness during overcooling events. The analysis of the risk of having a Pts for a specific plant is a multi-disciplinary problem involving probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), thermal-hydraulic analysis, and ultimately a structural and fracture analysis of the vessel wall. The PRA effort involves the postulation of overcooling events and ultimately leads to an integrated risk analysis. The thermal-hydraulic effort involves the difficult task of predicting the system behavior during a postulated overcooling scenario with a special emphasis on predicting the thermal and mechanic loadings on the reactor pressure vessel wall. The structural and fracture analysis of the reactor vessel wall relies on the thermal-hydraulic conditions as boundary conditions. The US experience has indicated that medium and large diameter primary system breaks dominate the risk of Pts along with scenarios that involve a stuck open valve (and associated system cooldown) that recloses resulting in system re-pressurization while the vessel wall is cool.

  2. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...

  3. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susuki, Akira; Murata, Shigeto; Minato, Akihiko.

    1993-01-01

    In a pressure tube reactor, a reactor core is constituted by arranging more than two units of a minimum unit combination of a moderator sealing pipe containing a calandria tube having moderators there between and a calandria tube and moderators. The upper header and a lower header of the calandria tank containing moderators are communicated by way of the moderator sealing tube. Further, a gravitationally dropping mechanism is disposed for injecting neutron absorbing liquid to a calandria gas injection portion. A ratio between a moderator volume and a fuel volume is defined as a function of the inner diameter of the moderator sealing tube, the outer diameter of the calandria tube and the diameter of fuel pellets, and has no influence to intervals of a pressure tube lattice. The interval of the pressure tube lattice is enlarged without increasing the size of the pressure tube, to improve production efficiency of the reactor and set a coolant void coefficient more negative, thereby enabling to improve self controllability and safety. Further, the reactor scram can be conducted by injecting neutron absorbing liquid. (N.H.)

  4. Putting oysters under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure processing (HPP) is the most commercially important food processing technology in use now and is anticipated to remain of equal or greater importance during the next five to 10 years. This month’s column reviews the theory and current applications of HPP for oysters to improve their sa...

  5. Fascination at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Research at high pressures has developed into an interdisciplinary area which has important implications for and applications in the areas of physics, chemistry, materials sciences, planetary sciences, biology, engineering sciences and technology. The state of-the-art in this field is reviewed and future directions are indicated. (M.G.B.)

  6. ISCHIECTOMY FOR PRESSURE SORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark; Cozen, Lewis; Aldes, John

    1960-01-01

    Ischiectomy with primary closure was carried out in five paraplegic patients with pressure sores. This operation, less extensive than the wide excision with full thickness graft that is now widely advocated, was successful in four of the five cases. In the fifth case none of the several attempts to heal the sores was in the least successful. PMID:18732351

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most important thing to do to prevent pressure sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of ...

  8. Sensing pressure for authentication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henderson, N.J.; White, N.M.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    The use of signals resulting from tapping a rhythm on a pressure sensor is explored for authentication. The features used for authentication can be divided into rhythm and waveform features. This paper studies the use of waveform features. A verification scheme based on prototype waveforms is

  9. Preventing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a prolonged time. This pressure reduces blood supply to that area. Lack of blood supply can cause the skin tissue in this area ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. [Prevention of pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Kenichi

    2009-12-01

    Even though they have not been diagnosed with a recognized disease, many people have or are at risk of contracting debilitating conditions. They can be referred to as being in the "ill-health zone." For example, many bedridden elderly develop pressure ulcers. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers should focus on two main factors: the role of pressure in the development of circulatory disorders; and increased dermal pH. In preventing the development of circulatory disorders resulting in pressure ulcers, using an air or polyurethane mattress is helpful. However, changing the mattress has little effect if the position of the bedridden person is not also changed regularly. To avoid an increase in dermal pH, caregivers should apply moisture-repellent cream and/or oil to the sacral region after careful cleansing. It is important that such preventive measures and treatment be performed daily, and caregivers should be educated on this need and subsequently monitored. Pharmacists have a role in caring for those in the ill-health zone.

  11. Positive airway pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it. After using PAP regularly, you may notice: Better concentration and memory Feeling more alert and less sleepy during the day Improved sleep for your bed partner Being more productive at ... and a better mood Normal sleep patterns Lower blood pressure (in ...

  12. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in a few hours? play_arrow What's ... play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family ...

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cushion? play_arrow What’s important to know about positioning in bed to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  14. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Toyokazu.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a pressure suppression device for a gas cooled reactor wherein the coolant is discharged in a reactor building by a loss-of-coolant accident or the like, the increase in the pressure and temperature is controlled and thermal energy of the discharged coolant of high temperature and high pressure can be absorbed. Constitution: A low heat source unit is provided at the upper part in an inner space of a reactor building provided around the reactor, and at the upper part of the low heat source unit a stirring fan for mixing gas within the building, and a low heat source circulating the low heat source through a pipe is connected to the low heat source unit. The low heat source unit is provided with the pipe arranged in a spiral shape at the upper part of the space of the unit, and a large number of fins are provided at the outer surface of the pipe for increasing the transmission area and improve the heat exchange. When the coolant of high temperature and high pressure has been lost in the building, the thermal energy of the coolant is absorbed by the low heat source unit. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Magnetic measurements under pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zentková, M.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Mihalik, M.; Mihalik, M.; Zentko, A.; Kamarád, Jiří; Mitróová, Z.; Mat`aš, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 57, 8/S (2006), s. 29-32 ISSN 1335-3632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : hydrostatic pressure * Prussian blue analogues * AC susceptibility * intermetallic compound * ferromagnetism * errimagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  16. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  17. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Pressure Print en español Cómo lidiar con la presión de grupo "Come on! ALL of us are cutting ... and they learn from you. It's only human nature to listen to and learn from ... another student in your science class taught you an easy way to remember ...

  18. Optimum position for wells producing at constant wellbore pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Velazquez, R.; Rodriguez de la Garza, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Galindo-Nava, A. [Inst. Mexicanos del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico)]|[Univ. Nacional de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Prats, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the determination of the optimum position of several wells, producing at constant different wellbore pressures from a two-dimensional closed-boundary reservoirs, to maximize the cumulative production or the total flow rate. To achieve this objective they authors use an improved version of the analytical solution recently proposed by Rodriguez and Cinco-Ley and an optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton procedure with line search. At each iteration the algorithm approximates the negative of the objective function by a cuadratic relation derived from a Taylor series. The improvement of rodriguez and Cinco`s solution is attained in four ways. First, an approximation is obtained, which works better at earlier times (before the boundary dominated period starts) than the previous solution. Second, the infinite sums that are present in the solution are expressed in a condensed form, which is relevant for reducing the computer time when the optimization algorithm is used. Third, the solution is modified to take into account the possibility of having wells starting to produce at different times. This point allows them to deal with the problem of getting the optimum position for an infill drilling program. Last, the solution is extended to include the possibility of changing the value of wellbore pressure or being able to stimulate any of the wells at any time. When the wells are producing at different wellbore pressures it is found that the optimum position is a function of time, otherwise the optimum position is fixed.

  19. Hydrogen/deuterium substitution methods: understanding water structure in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium substitution method has been used for different applications, such as the short range order between water molecules in a number of different environments (aqueous solutions of organic molecules), or to study the partial structure factors of water at high pressure and temperature. The absolute accuracy that can be obtained remains uncertain, but important qualitative information can be obtained on the local organization of water in aqueous solution. Some recent results with pure water, methanol and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) solutions are presented. It is shown that the short range water structure is not greatly affected by most solutes except at high concentrations and when the solute species has its own distinctive interaction with water (such as a dissolved small ion). 3 figs., 14 refs

  20. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Pradeep K [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However