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Sample records for single voltage-gated calcium

  1. Voltage-gated calcium channels: Novel targets for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Nam Nhut; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Chien-Fu; Sun, Zhengda; Lai, Ming-Derg; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) comprise five subtypes: The L-type; R-type; N-type; P/Q-type; and T-type, which are encoded by ?1 subunit genes. Calcium ion channels also have confirmed roles in cellular functions, including mitogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis. An association between VGCCs, a reduction in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in prostate cancer cells has also been reported. Therefore, in the present study, the online clinical data...

  2. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  3. Voltage-gated calcium channels: Novel targets for cancer therapy.

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    Phan, Nam Nhut; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Chien-Fu; Sun, Zhengda; Lai, Ming-Derg; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2017-08-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) comprise five subtypes: The L-type; R-type; N-type; P/Q-type; and T-type, which are encoded by α 1 subunit genes. Calcium ion channels also have confirmed roles in cellular functions, including mitogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis. An association between VGCCs, a reduction in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in prostate cancer cells has also been reported. Therefore, in the present study, the online clinical database Oncomine was used to identify the alterations in the mRNA expression level of VGCCs in 19 cancer subtypes. Overall, VGCC family genes exhibited under-expression in numerous types of cancer, including brain, breast, kidney and lung cancers. Notably, the majority of VGCC family members (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1A, CACNA1B, CACNA1E, CACNA1H and CACNA1I) exhibited low expression in brain tumors, with mRNA expression levels in the top 1-9% of downregulated gene rankings. A total of 5 VGCC family members (CACNA1A, CACNA1B, CACNA1E, CACNA1G and CACNA1I) were under-expressed in breast cancer, with a gene ranking in the top 1-10% of the low-expressed genes compared with normal tissue. In kidney and lung cancers, CACNA1S, CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1A and CACNA1H exhibited low expression, with gene rankings in the top 1-8% of downregulated genes. In conclusion, the present findings may contribute to the development of new cancer treatment approaches by identifying target genes involved in specific types of cancer.

  4. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

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    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L

    2011-01-01

    tone. We used microdissected perfused mouse efferent arterioles and found a transient vasoconstriction in response to depolarization with potassium; an effect abolished by removal of extracellular calcium. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists mibefradil and nickel blocked this potassium......Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriolar....... Low concentrations of nickel, an agent that blocks Ca(v)3.2, had a similar effect. Thus, T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are functionally important for depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent dilatation in mouse cortical efferent arterioles.Kidney International advance online...

  5. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels

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    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform o...

  6. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia.

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    Lodh, Sukanya; Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca 2+ entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca 2+ (Ca V ) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca 2+ levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the Ca V channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary Ca V channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three Ca V α1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary Ca V channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of Ca V channel activity do not express any of the three Ca V 1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three Ca V channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the Ca V 1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Glycosylation of voltage-gated calcium channels in health and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lazniewska, Joanna; Weiss, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 5 (2017), s. 662-668 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channels * voltage-gated calcium channels * N-glycosylation * ancillary subunit * trafficking * stability Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  8. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

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    C. Andrew eFrank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response – homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors.There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies – such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other

  9. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response-homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies-such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders.

  10. Structural insights into binding of STAC proteins to voltage-gated calcium channels

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    Wong King Yuen, Siobhan M.; Campiglio, Marta; Tung, Ching-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Excitation–contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle requires functional and mechanical coupling between L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV1.1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). Recently, STAC3 was identified as an essential protein for EC coupling and is part of a group of three proteins that can bind and modulate L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Here, we report crystal structures of tandem-SH3 domains of different STAC isoforms up to 1.2-Å resolution. These form a rigid interaction through a conserved interdomain interface. We identify the linker connecting transmembrane repeats II and III in two different CaV isoforms as a binding site for the SH3 domains and report a crystal structure of the complex with the STAC2 isoform. The interaction site includes the location for a disease variant in STAC3 that has been linked to Native American myopathy (NAM). Introducing the mutation does not cause misfolding of the SH3 domains, but abolishes the interaction. Disruption of the interaction via mutations in the II–III loop perturbs skeletal muscle EC coupling, but preserves the ability of STAC3 to slow down inactivation of CaV1.2. PMID:29078335

  11. Voltage gated sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-12-17

    The inflammatory response is a natural response of the body that occurs immediately following tissue damage, which may be due to injury, infection or disease. The acute inflammatory response is an essential mechanism that promotes healing and a key aspect is the ensuing pain, which warns the subject to protect the site of injury. Thus, it is common to see a zone of primary sensitization as well as consequential central sensitization that generally, is maintained by a peripheral drive from the zone of tissue injury. Inflammation associated with chronic pain states, such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, cancer and migraine etc. is deleterious to health and often debilitating for the patient. Thus there is a large unmet clinical need. The mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic inflammatory pain are extensive and complex, involving a diversity of cell types, receptors and proteins. Among these the contribution of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels on peripheral nociceptors is critical for nociceptive transmission beyond the peripheral transducers and changes in their distribution, accumulation, clustering and functional activities have been linked to both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The latter has been the main area for trials and use of drugs that modulate ion channels such as carbamazepine and gabapentin, but given the large peripheral drive that follows tissue damage, there is a clear rationale for blocking voltage gated sodium and calcium channels in these pain states. It has been hypothesized that pain of inflammatory origin may evolve into a condition that resembles neuropathic pain, but mixed pains such as low back pain and cancer pain often include elements of both pain states. This review considers the therapeutic potential for sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Importance of L- and P/Q-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Human Renal Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Poulsen, Christian B; Walter, Steen

    2011-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers are widely used for treatment of hypertension, because they decrease peripheral vascular resistance through inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Animal studies of renal vasculature have shown expression of several types of calcium channels that are involved......-type subtype (Ca(v) 3.1 and Ca(v) 3.2) voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)s), and quantitative PCR showed highest expression of L-type channels in renal arteries and variable expression between patients of subtypes of calcium channels in intrarenal vessels. Immunohistochemical labeling of kidney sections...... revealed signals for Ca(v) 2.1 and Ca(v) 3.1 associated with smooth muscle cells of preglomerular and postglomerular vessels. In human intrarenal arteries, depolarization with potassium induced a contraction inhibited by the L-type antagonist nifedipine, EC(50) 1.2×10(-8) mol/L. The T-type antagonist...

  13. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis

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    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (−)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (−)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2518–2531, 2014. PMID:24477801

  14. Resveratrol attenuates cortical neuron activity: roles of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium channels.

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    Wang, Ya-Jean; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Linyi; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Hwei-Hisen

    2016-05-21

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in grapes and red wine, exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. However, relatively little is known about whether resveratrol modulates the ion channels in cortical neurons. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) and voltage-gated sodium channels were expressed in cortical neurons and play important roles in regulation of neuronal excitability. The present study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on BKCa currents and voltage-gated sodium currents in cortical neurons. Resveratrol concentration-dependently increased the current amplitude and the opening activity of BKCa channels, but suppressed the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium currents. Similar to the BKCa channel opener NS1619, resveratrol decreased the firing rate of action potentials. In addition, the enhancing effects of BKCa channel blockers tetraethylammonium (TEA) and paxilline on action potential firing were sensitive to resveratrol. Our results indicated that the attenuation of action potential firing rate by resveratrol might be mediated through opening the BKCa channels and closing the voltage-gated sodium channels. As BKCa channels and sodium channels are critical molecular determinants for seizure generation, our findings suggest that regulation of these two channels in cortical neurons probably makes a considerable contribution to the antiseizure activity of resveratrol.

  15. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our ...

  16. Clinical features of neuromuscular disorders in patients with N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies

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    Andreas Totzeck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy.

  17. Small-cell lung cancer with voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: a case report.

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    Kaira, Kyoichi; Okamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Norio; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-04-08

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome and clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction, memory impairment, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is most frequently found in small-cell lung cancer, among various malignancies, and antineuronal antibodies are related to the autoimmune mechanism. We experienced a rare case of a patient with small-cell lung cancer with anti-voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. A 61-year-old Japanese man with a history of smoking cigarettes presented with seizure, confusion and personality change in acute onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted image in his right temporal lobe, suggestive of limbic encephalitis. A mediastinoscopy of the lymph node revealed small-cell lung carcinoma, and he was staged as having limited stage disease. Antibodies against P/Q-type and N-type voltage-gated calcium channel were positive and Hu antibody was negative. He was started on chemotherapy of carboplatin plus etoposide with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Neurological symptoms were gradually improved after systemic chemotherapy. We should be alert to the potential of malignant neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis when we examine a patient with cancer with neurological disorders such as personality change, disorientation, unconsciousness and memory loss. A clinical marker such as voltage-gated calcium channel antibody may help our diagnosis in clinical practice.

  18. Voltage-gated potassium channels regulate calcium-dependent pathways involved in human T lymphocyte activation.

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    Lin, C S; Boltz, R C; Blake, J T; Nguyen, M; Talento, A; Fischer, P A; Springer, M S; Sigal, N H; Slaughter, R S; Garcia, M L

    1993-03-01

    The role that potassium channels play in human T lymphocyte activation has been investigated by using specific potassium channel probes. Charybdotoxin (ChTX), a blocker of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels (PK,Ca) and voltage-gated potassium channels (PK,V) that are present in human T cells, inhibits the activation of these cells. ChTX blocks T cell activation induced by signals (e.g., anti-CD2, anti-CD3, ionomycin) that elicit a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by preventing the elevation of [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. However, ChTX has no effect on the activation pathways (e.g., anti-CD28, interleukin 2 [IL-2]) that are independent of a rise in [Ca2+]i. In the former case, both proliferative response and lymphokine production (IL-2 and interferon gamma) are inhibited by ChTX. The inhibitory effect of ChTX can be demonstrated when added simultaneously, or up to 4 h after the addition of the stimulants. Since ChTX inhibits both PK,Ca and PK,V, we investigated which channel is responsible for these immunosuppressive effects with the use of two other peptides, noxiustoxin (NxTX) and margatoxin (MgTX), which are specific for PK,V. These studies demonstrate that, similar to ChTX, both NxTX and MgTX inhibit lymphokine production and the rise in [Ca2+]i. Taken together, these data provide evidence that blockade of PK,V affects the Ca(2+)-dependent pathways involved in T lymphocyte proliferation and lymphokine production by diminishing the rise in [Ca2+]i that occurs upon T cell activation.

  19. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

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    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  20. Lung adenocarcinoma with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome indicated by voltage-gated calcium channel: a case report

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    Arai Hiromasa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a rare disorder and it is known as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Small cell lung cancer often accompanies this syndrome. Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; there are only a few reported cases worldwide. Case presentation A 75-year-old Japanese man with a past history of chronic rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome by electromyography and serum anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibody level preceding the diagnosis of lung cancer. A chest computed tomography to screen for malignant lesions revealed an abnormal shadow in the lung. Although a histopathological examination by bronchoscopic study could not reveal the malignancy, lung cancer was mostly suspected after the results of a chest computed tomography and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. An intraoperative diagnosis based on the frozen section obtained by tumor biopsy was adenocarcinoma so the patient underwent a lobectomy of the right lower lobe and lymph node dissection with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The permanent pathological examination was the same as the frozen diagnosis (pT2aN1M0: Stage IIa: TNM staging 7th edition. Immunohistochemistry revealed that most of the cancer cells were positive for P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Conclusions Our case is a rare combination of Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome, and to the best of our knowledge it is the first report that indicates the presence of voltage-gated calcium channel in lung adenocarcinoma by immunostaining.

  1. Cholesterol influences voltage-gated calcium channels and BK-type potassium channels in auditory hair cells.

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    Erin K Purcell

    Full Text Available The influence of membrane cholesterol content on a variety of ion channel conductances in numerous cell models has been shown, but studies exploring its role in auditory hair cell physiology are scarce. Recent evidence shows that cholesterol depletion affects outer hair cell electromotility and the voltage-gated potassium currents underlying tall hair cell development, but the effects of cholesterol on the major ionic currents governing auditory hair cell excitability are unknown. We investigated the effects of a cholesterol-depleting agent (methyl beta cyclodextrin, MβCD on ion channels necessary for the early stages of sound processing. Large-conductance BK-type potassium channels underlie temporal processing and open in a voltage- and calcium-dependent manner. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are responsible for calcium-dependent exocytosis and synaptic transmission to the auditory nerve. Our results demonstrate that cholesterol depletion reduced peak steady-state calcium-sensitive (BK-type potassium current by 50% in chick cochlear hair cells. In contrast, MβCD treatment increased peak inward calcium current (~30%, ruling out loss of calcium channel expression or function as a cause of reduced calcium-sensitive outward current. Changes in maximal conductance indicated a direct impact of cholesterol on channel number or unitary conductance. Immunoblotting following sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation revealed BK expression in cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Both direct impacts of cholesterol on channel biophysics, as well as channel localization in the membrane, may contribute to the influence of cholesterol on hair cell physiology. Our results reveal a new role for cholesterol in the regulation of auditory calcium and calcium-activated potassium channels and add to the growing evidence that cholesterol is a key determinant in auditory physiology.

  2. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ¿-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  3. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ω-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  4. Danger: High Voltage—The Role of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Central Nervous System Pathology

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    Andrea Schampel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are widely distributed within the central nervous system (CNS and presumed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of a broad spectrum of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease as well as multiple sclerosis. Several calcium channel blockers have been in clinical practice for many years so that their toxicity and side effects are well studied. However, these drugs are primarily used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and most if not all effects on brain functions are secondary to peripheral effects on blood pressure and circulation. While the use of calcium channel antagonists for the treatment of CNS diseases therefore still heavily depends on the development of novel strategies to specifically target different channels and channel subunits, this review is meant to provide an impulse to further emphasize the importance of future research towards this goal.

  5. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  6. H2O2 augments cytosolic calcium in nucleus tractus solitarii neurons via multiple voltage-gated calcium channels.

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    Ostrowski, Tim D; Dantzler, Heather A; Polo-Parada, Luis; Kline, David D

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a profound role in cardiorespiratory function under normal physiological conditions and disease states. ROS can influence neuronal activity by altering various ion channels and transporters. Within the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), a vital brainstem area for cardiorespiratory control, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induces sustained hyperexcitability following an initial depression of neuronal activity. The mechanism(s) associated with the delayed hyperexcitability are unknown. Here we evaluate the effect(s) of H 2 O 2 on cytosolic Ca 2+ (via fura-2 imaging) and voltage-dependent calcium currents in dissociated rat nTS neurons. H 2 O 2 perfusion (200 µM; 1 min) induced a delayed, slow, and moderate increase (~27%) in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). The H 2 O 2 -mediated increase in [Ca 2+ ] i prevailed during thapsigargin, excluding the endoplasmic reticulum as a Ca 2+ source. The effect, however, was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ or the addition of cadmium to the bath solution, suggesting voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels (VGCCs) as targets for H 2 O 2 modulation. Recording of the total voltage-dependent Ca 2+ current confirmed H 2 O 2 enhanced Ca 2+ entry. Blocking VGCC L, N, and P/Q subtypes decreased the number of cells and their calcium currents that respond to H 2 O 2 The number of responder cells to H 2 O 2 also decreased in the presence of dithiothreitol, suggesting the actions of H 2 O 2 were dependent on sulfhydryl oxidation. In summary, here, we have shown that H 2 O 2 increases [Ca 2+ ] i and its Ca 2+ currents, which is dependent on multiple VGCCs likely by oxidation of sulfhydryl groups. These processes presumably contribute to the previously observed delayed hyperexcitability of nTS neurons in in vitro brainstem slices. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on conduction and concentration of voltage gated calcium channels: A Brownian dynamics study.

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    Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional Brownian Dynamics (BD) in combination with electrostatic calculations is employed to specifically study the effects of radiation of high frequency electromagnetic fields on the conduction and concentration profile of calcium ions inside the voltage-gated calcium channels. The electrostatic calculations are performed using COMSOL Multiphysics by considering dielectric interfaces effectively. The simulations are performed for different frequencies and intensities. The simulation results show the variations of conductance, average number of ions and the concentration profiles of ions inside the channels in response to high frequency radiation. The ionic current inside the channel increases in response to high frequency electromagnetic field radiation, and the concentration profiles show that the residency of ions in the channel decreases accordingly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca [subscript V] 1.2 Mediates Fear Extinction and Modulates Synaptic Tone in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in both the formation and the reduction of fear through Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. Despite the implication of LVGCCs in fear learning and extinction, studies of the individual LVGCC subtypes, Ca[subscript V]1.2 and Ca[subscript V] 1.3, using transgenic mice have…

  9. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels after subchronic and repeated exposure of PC12 cells to different classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, since human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected

  10. Functional and pharmacological consequences of the distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels in the renal blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P B L

    2013-04-01

    Calcium channel blockers are widely used to treat hypertension because they inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels that mediate transmembrane calcium influx in, for example, vascular smooth muscle and cardiomyocytes. The calcium channel family consists of several subfamilies, of which the L-type is usually associated with vascular contractility. However, the L-, T- and P-/Q-types of calcium channels are present in the renal vasculature and are differentially involved in controlling vascular contractility, thereby contributing to regulation of kidney function and blood pressure. In the preglomerular vascular bed, all the three channel families are present. However, the T-type channel is the only channel in cortical efferent arterioles which is in contrast to the juxtamedullary efferent arteriole, and that leads to diverse functional effects of L- and T-type channel inhibition. Furthermore, by different mechanisms, T-type channels may contribute to both constriction and dilation of the arterioles. Finally, P-/Q-type channels are involved in the regulation of human intrarenal arterial contractility. The calcium blockers used in the clinic affect not only L-type but also P-/Q- and T-type channels. Therefore, the distinct effect obtained by inhibiting a given subtype or set of channels under experimental settings should be considered when choosing a calcium blocker for treatment. T-type channels seem to be crucial for regulating the GFR and the filtration fraction. Use of blockers is expected to lead to preferential efferent vasodilation, reduction of glomerular pressure and proteinuria. Therefore, renovascular T-type channels might provide novel therapeutic targets, and may have superior renoprotective effects compared to conventional calcium blockers. Acta Physiologica © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor agonist increases axon outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via voltage-gated calcium ions channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Yao, Yu-Hong; Xiang, Yun; Ma, Xiao-Yun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Hai-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that have been implicated in both neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Accumulating evidence has suggested that Sig-1R plays a role in neuroprotection and axon outgrowth. The underlying mechanisms of Sig-1R-mediated neuroprotection have been well elucidated. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of Sig-1R on axon outgrowth are not fully understood. To clarify this issue, we utilized immunofluorescence to compare the axon lengths of cultured naïve hippocampal neurons before and after the application of the Sig-1R agonist, SA4503. Then, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence were used to examine voltage-gated calcium ion channel (VGCCs) currents in the cell membranes and growth cones. We found that Sig-1R activation dramatically enhanced the axonal length of the naïve hippocampal neurons. Application of the Sig-1R antagonist NE100 and gene knockdown techniques both demonstrated the effects of Sig-1R. The growth-promoting effect of SA4503 was accompanied by the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca 2+ influx and was recapitulated by incubating the neurons with the L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type VGCC blockers, nimodipine, MVIIA and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively. This effect was unrelated to glial cells. The application of SA4503 transformed the growth cone morphologies from complicated to simple, which favored axon outgrowth. Sig-1R activation can enhance axon outgrowth and may have a substantial influence on neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Conotoxins as Tools to Understand the Physiological Function of Voltage-Gated Calcium (CaV Channels

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    David Ramírez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium (CaV channels are widely expressed and are essential for the completion of multiple physiological processes. Close regulation of their activity by specific inhibitors and agonists become fundamental to understand their role in cellular homeostasis as well as in human tissues and organs. CaV channels are divided into two groups depending on the membrane potential required to activate them: High-voltage activated (HVA, CaV1.1–1.4; CaV2.1–2.3 and Low-voltage activated (LVA, CaV3.1–3.3. HVA channels are highly expressed in brain (neurons, heart, and adrenal medulla (chromaffin cells, among others, and are also classified into subtypes which can be distinguished using pharmacological approaches. Cone snails are marine gastropods that capture their prey by injecting venom, “conopeptides”, which cause paralysis in a few seconds. A subset of conopeptides called conotoxins are relatively small polypeptides, rich in disulfide bonds, that target ion channels, transporters and receptors localized at the neuromuscular system of the animal target. In this review, we describe the structure and properties of conotoxins that selectively block HVA calcium channels. We compare their potency on several HVA channel subtypes, emphasizing neuronal calcium channels. Lastly, we analyze recent advances in the therapeutic use of conotoxins for medical treatments.

  13. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  14. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

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    Cecil Antony

    Full Text Available We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2, and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  15. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  16. Stable respiratory activity requires both P/Q-type and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Henner; Zanella, Sebastien; Elsen, Gina E; Smith, Lincoln; Doi, Atsushi; Garcia, Alfredo J; Wei, Aguan D; Xun, Randy; Kirsch, Sarah; Gomez, Christopher M; Hevner, Robert F; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2013-02-20

    P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)2.1) play critical presynaptic and postsynaptic roles throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders. Here we report that mice with a genetic ablation of the Ca(v)2.1 pore-forming α(1A) subunit (α(1A)⁻/⁻) encoded by CACNA1a (Jun et al., 1999) suffer during postnatal development from increasing breathing disturbances that lead ultimately to death. Breathing abnormalities include decreased minute ventilation and a specific loss of sighs, which was associated with lung atelectasis. Similar respiratory alterations were preserved in the isolated in vitro brainstem slice preparation containing the pre-Bötzinger complex. The loss of Ca(v)2.1 was associated with an alteration in the functional dependency on N-type calcium channels (Ca(v)2.2). Blocking N-type calcium channels with conotoxin GVIA had only minor effects on respiratory activity in slices from control (CT) littermates, but abolished respiratory activity in all slices from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice. The amplitude of evoked EPSPs was smaller in inspiratory neurons from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice compared with CTs. Conotoxin GVIA abolished all EPSPs in inspiratory neurons from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice, while the EPSP amplitude was reduced by only 30% in CT mice. Moreover, neuromodulation was significantly altered as muscarine abolished respiratory network activity in α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice but not in CT mice. We conclude that excitatory synaptic transmission dependent on N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels is required for stable breathing and sighing. In the absence of P/Q-type calcium channels, breathing, sighing, and neuromodulation are severely compromised, leading to early mortality.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

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    Chih-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org, a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  18. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  19. Physiology and evolution of voltage-gated calcium channels in early diverging animal phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

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    Adriano Senatore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling, gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling, pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling, regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when many of these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  20. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Ca v ) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca 2+ signals. In animals, Ca v channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca 2+ -sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Ca v channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Ca v channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Ca v channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Ca v channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Ca v channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Ca v channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  1. Synthetic lapachol derivatives relax guinea-pig ileum by blockade of the voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Fabiana de A; Monteiro, Fabio de S; Martins, Italo Rossi R; Barbosa, Ticiano P; Camara, Celso de A; Pinto, Angelo C; Vargas, Maria D; da Silva, Bagnólia A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to further evaluate a possible spasmolytic activity of synthetic lapachol derivatives, norlapachol, alpha-norlapachone, beta-norlapachone and hydro-hydroxy-norlapachol (HH-norlapachol), on guinea-pig ileum. In guinea-pig ileum, except for norlapachol, all naphthoquinones inhibited the phasic contractions induced by carbachol or histamine. Even when the ileum was pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or histamine, all naphthoquinones induced relaxation, suggesting that these naphthoquinones could be acting on the voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)). As the tonic component this contraction is maintained mainly by the opening of the Ca(V), we hypothesized that these naphthoquinones might be acting on these channels. This hypothesis was confirmed by the observation that norlapachol (pD'2 = 4.99), alpha-norlapachone (pD'2 = 4.49), beta-norlapachone (pD'2 = 6.33), and HH-norlapachol (pD'2 = 4.53) antagonized the contractions induced by CaCl2 in depolarizing medium nominally without Ca2+. As beta-norlapachone was the most potent we decided to continue the study of its action mechanism. The fact that this naphthoquinone has inhibited the tonic contractions induced by S-(-)-Bay K8644 [EC50 = (1.6 +/- 0.30) x 10(-5) M] suggests that the Ca2+ channel involved belongs to the type L (Ca(V)1.2). In addition, in the functional level, the spasmolytic effect of beta-norlapachone does not involve participation of free radicals, since its curve of relaxation was unchanged in the presence of glutathione, an antioxidant agent.

  2. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford

  3. Enigma homolog 1 scaffolds protein kinase D1 to regulate the activity of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Wälchli, Sébastien; Iwata, Miki; Ryser, Stephan; Van Lint, Johannes; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2008-06-01

    In cardiomyocytes, protein kinase D1 (PKD1) plays a central role in the response to stress signals. From a yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) as a new binding partner of PKD1. Since in neurons, ENH1, associated with protein kinase Cepsilon, was shown to modulate the activity of N-type calcium channels, and the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel, alpha1C, possesses a potential phosphorylation site for PKD1, we studied here a possible role of ENH1 and PKD1 in the regulation of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel. PKD1-interacting proteins were searched by yeast two-hybrid screening. In vivo protein interactions in cardiomyocytes isolated from heart ventricles of newborn rats were tested by co-immunoprecipitation. Small interfering RNA and a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 were delivered into cardiomyocytes by use of an adenovirus. Calcium currents were measured by the patch-clamp technique. Both ENH1 and PKD1 interact with alpha1C in cardiomyocytes. This interaction is increased upon stimulation. Silencing of ENH1 prevented the binding of PKD1 to alpha1C. Moreover, a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 or the silencing of ENH1 inhibited the alpha-adrenergic-induced increase of L-type calcium currents. We found a new binding partner, ENH1, and a new target, alpha1C, for PKD1 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. We propose a model where ENH1 scaffolds PKD1 to alpha1C in order to form a signalling complex that regulates the activity of cardiac L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  4. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca 2+ with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca 2+ signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca 2+ was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca 2+ -indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca 2+ oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca 2+ level could be induced by applying a high-K + solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca 2+ and voltage-gated Na + channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na + channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca 2+ oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na + channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca 2+ activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca 2+ oscillations are discussed.

  5. GABAA increases calcium in subventricular zone astrocyte-like cells through L- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Z Young

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the adult neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ, the behavior of astrocyte-like cells and some of their functions depend on changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels and tonic GABAA receptor activation. However, it is unknown whether, and if so how, GABAA receptor activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in SVZ astrocytes. To monitor Ca2+ activity selectively in astrocyte-like cells, we used two lines of transgenic mice expressing either GFP fused to a Gq-coupled receptor or DsRed under the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP promoter. GABAA receptor activation induced Ca2+ increases in 40-50% of SVZ astrocytes. GABAA-induced Ca2+ increases were prevented with nifedipine and mibefradil, blockers of L- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC. The L-type Ca2+ channel activator BayK 8644 increased the percentage of GABAA-responding astrocyte-like cells to 75%, suggesting that the majority of SVZ astrocytes express functional VGCCs. SVZ astrocytes also displayed spontaneous Ca2+ activity, the frequency of which was regulated by tonic GABAA receptor activation. These data support a role for ambient GABA in tonically regulating intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through GABAA receptors and VGCC in a subpopulation of astrocyte-like cells in the postnatal SVZ.

  6. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Campiglio, Marta; Jo, Hyunil; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Rumpf, Christine H; Pope, Lianne; Rossen, Nathan D; Flucher, Bernhard E; DeGrado, William F; Minor, Daniel L

    2017-06-21

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein-protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein-protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein-protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca V ) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (Ca V β). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:Ca V β interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to Ca V β. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the Ca V α 1 :Ca V β interaction that modulate Ca V function in an Ca V β isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein-protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based Ca V modulator design.

  7. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  8. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  9. Protein kinase D regulates the human cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel through serine 1884.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Yusuke; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Maturana, Andrés D

    2011-12-15

    Protein kinase D (PKD) regulates the activity of the L-type calcium channel in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, the functional target residues of PKD on the L-type calcium channel remain to be identified. Our aim was to identify the functional phosphorylation sites of PKD on the human L-type calcium channel. The pore subunit of the human CaV1.2 (hCaV1.2) was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. Both the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKD and the mutation of serine 1884 but not serine 1930, putative targets of PKD, strongly reduced L-type calcium currents and single channel activity without affecting the channel's expression at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that serine 1884 is essential for the regulation of hCaV1.2 by PKD. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Restoration of Motor Defects Caused by Loss ofDrosophilaTDP-43 by Expression of the Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel,Cacophony, in Central Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke, Kayly M; Scudder, Charles; Morton, David B

    2017-09-27

    Defects in the RNA-binding protein, TDP-43, are known to cause a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. A variety of experimental systems have shown that neurons are sensitive to TDP-43 expression levels, yet the specific functional defects resulting from TDP-43 dysregulation have not been well described. Using the Drosophila TDP-43 ortholog TBPH, we previously showed that TBPH-null animals display locomotion defects as third instar larvae. Furthermore, loss of TBPH caused a reduction in cacophony , a Type II voltage-gated calcium channel, expression and that genetically restoring cacophony in motor neurons in TBPH mutant animals was sufficient to rescue the locomotion defects. In the present study, we examined the relative contributions of neuromuscular junction physiology and the motor program to the locomotion defects and identified subsets of neurons that require cacophony expression to rescue the defects. At the neuromuscular junction, we showed mEPP amplitudes and frequency require TBPH. Cacophony expression in motor neurons rescued mEPP frequency but not mEPP amplitude. We also showed that TBPH mutants displayed reduced motor neuron bursting and coordination during crawling and restoring cacophony selectively in two pairs of cells located in the brain, the AVM001b/2b neurons, also rescued the locomotion and motor defects, but not the defects in neuromuscular junction physiology. These results suggest that the behavioral defects associated with loss of TBPH throughout the nervous system can be associated with defects in a small number of genes in a limited number of central neurons, rather than peripheral defects. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT TDP-43 dysfunction is a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. Loss- and gain-of-function models have shown that neurons are sensitive to TDP-43

  11. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin;

  12. Deltamethrin affects the expression of voltage-gated calcium channel α1 subunits and the locomotion, egg-laying, foraging behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rune; Yu, Xing; Tan, Xing; Ye, Shan; Ding, Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Deltamethrin belongs to the class of synthetic pyrethroids, which are being widely used as insecticides in agricultural practices. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are the primary targets of these chemicals for toxicity to insects. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) does not have VGSCs but is susceptible to deltamethrin. Recent findings have suggested that pyrethroids can affect voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, it remains elusive whether deltamethrin induces toxicity to C. elegans via modulating the activity of VGCCs. To identify the potential target of deltamethrin, we exposed C. elegans to different concentrations of deltamethrin and Ca 2+ channel blockers for different times, characterized the behavioral toxicity of deltamethrin on C. elegans, and determined the expression of egl-19, unc-2, and cca-1, which encode the α1-subunit of the L-, R/N/P/Q-, and T-type VGCC, respectively. We found that deltamethrin inhibited the locomotion, egg-laying and foraging ability of C. elegans in a concentration dependent manner. We also showed that body length of worms on agar plates containing 200mgL -1 deltamethrin for 12h was not significantly different from controls, whereas the cholinesterase inhibitor carbofuran caused hypercontraction which is a characteristic of organophosphates and carbamates, suggesting that deltamethrin's mode of action is distinct from those nematicides. In addition, unc-2 was significantly up-regulated following 0.05mgL -1 deltamethrin exposure for 24h; while egl-19 and cca-1 were significantly up-regulated following 5 and 50mgL -1 deltamethrin exposure for 24h. Further tests of worms' sensitivity and expression of three α1-subunits of VGCC to Ca 2+ channel blockers indicate that deltamethrin may induce toxic behavior C. elegans via modulation of the expression of the α1-subunits of VGCC. This study provides insights into the linkage between deltamethrin-induced toxic behavior and the regulation of α1-subunits of VGCC in C

  13. Functional and pharmacological consequences of the distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels in the renal blood vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B L

    2013-01-01

    -type is usually associated with vascular contractility. However, the L-, T- and P-/Q-types of calcium channels are present in the renal vasculature and are differentially involved in controlling vascular contractility, thereby contributing to regulation of kidney function and blood pressure. In the preglomerular....... Therefore, the distinct effect obtained by inhibiting a given subtype or set of channels under experimental settings should be considered when choosing a calcium blocker for treatment. T-type channels seem to be crucial for regulating the GFR and the filtration fraction. Use of blockers is expected to lead...

  14. Localization and functional modification of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in equine spermatozoa from fresh and frozen semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrizio, M; Moramarco, A M; Nicassio, M; Micera, E; Zarrilli, A; Lacalandra, G M

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that insemination of cryopreserved semen always results in lower fertility when compared with fresh semen, but there is an increased interest and demand for frozen equine semen by the major breeder associations because of the utility arising from semen already "on hand" at breeding time. In this article, we report that equine sperm cells express L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; their localization is restricted to sperm neck and to the principal piece of the tail in both fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We also studied the causes of cryoinjury at the membrane level focusing on the function of L-type calcium channels. We report that in cryopreserved spermatozoa the mean basal value of [Ca(2+)]i is higher than that of spermatozoa from fresh semen (447.130 vs. 288.3 nM; P antagonist in relation to semen condition (fresh or frozen-thawed). We found that on addition of agonist to the culture medium, the increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) was greater in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 124.59 vs. 16.04 nM; P antagonist the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i was lower in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 32.5 vs. 82.5 nM; P < 0.001). In this article, we also discuss the impact of cryopreservation on sperm physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Korean family of hypokalemic periodic paralysis with mutation in a voltage-gated calcium channel (R1239G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June Bum; Lee, Kyung Yil; Hur, Jae Kyun

    2005-02-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) is a rare disease characterized by reversible attacks of muscle weakness accompanied by episodic hypokalemia. Recent molecular work has revealed that the majority of familial HOPP is due to mutations in a skeletal muscle voltage-dependent calcium-channel: the dihydropyridine receptor. We report a 13-yr old boy with HOPP from a family in which 6 members are affected in three generations. Genetic examination identified a nucleotide 3705 C to G mutation in exon 30 of the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S. This mutation predicts a codon change from arginine to glycine at the amino acid position #1239 (R1239G). Among the three known mutations of the CACNA1S gene, the R1239G mutation was rarely reported. This boy and the other family members who did not respond to acetazolamide, showed a marked improvement of the paralytic symptoms after spironolactone treatment.

  16. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However......, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3...

  17. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  18. Role of voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels in the development of cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Michael E; Hancox, Jules C

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine is a highly active stimulant that alters dopamine metabolism in the central nervous system resulting in a feeling of euphoria that with time can lead to addictive behaviours. Cocaine has numerous deleterious effects in humans including seizures, vasoconstriction, ischaemia, increased heart rate and blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. The cardiotoxic effects of cocaine are indirectly mediated by an increase in sympathomimetic stimulation to the heart and coronary vasculature and by a direct effect on the ion channels responsible for maintaining the electrical excitability of the heart. The direct and indirect effects of cocaine work in tandem to disrupt the co-ordinated electrical activity of the heart and have been associated with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. This review focuses on the direct effects of cocaine on cardiac ion channels, with particular focus on sodium, potassium and calcium channels, and on the contributions of these channels to cocaine-induced arrhythmias. Companion articles in this edition of the journal examine the epidemiology of cocaine use (Wood & Dargan [1]) and the treatment of cocaine-associated arrhythmias (Hoffmann [2]). PMID:20573078

  19. Spasmolytic activity of lapachol and its derivatives, α and β-lapachone, on the guinea-pig ileum involves blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana A. Cavalcante

    Full Text Available Lapachol, α and β-lapachone are naphthoquinones extracted from species of Tabebuia that have shown antiinflammatory, antibacterial, anticancer and trypanosomicidal properties. The aim of this work was to investigate the spasmolytic effect of these naphthoquinones on the guinea-pig ileum, since other naphthoquinones are known to depress the contractile activity of smooth muscles. Lapachol, α and β-lapachone inhibited the phasic contractions induced by both carbachol (IC50 = 1.5 ± 0.2 x 10-4; 7.3 ± 0.9 x 10-5 and 3.2 ± 0.5 x 10-5 M, respectively and histamine (IC50 = 3.6± 0.5; 3.6 ± 0.7 and 3.3 ± 0.6 x 10-5 M, respectively. These compounds also relaxed the ileum pre-contracted with KCl (EC50 = 1.2 ± 0.4; 4.3 ± 0.8 and 2.7 ± 0.2 x 10-5 M, respectively; carbachol (EC50 = 2.6 ± 0.7; 3.5 ± 0.5 and 2.2 ± 0.7 x 10-5 M, respectively or histamine (EC50 = 3.0 ± 0.8; 1.1 ± 0.3 and 3.3 ± 0.6 x 10-5 M, respectively in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect is probably due to inhibition of calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca v. β-lapachone antagonized (pD'2 = 5.73 ± 0.12; slope = 1.51 ± 0.05 CaCl2-induced contractions in depolarizing medium nominally without Ca2+. The finding that β-lapachone inhibited the tonic contractions induced by S-(--Bay K8644 (EC50 = 1.4 ± 0.1 x 10-5 M is suggestive that the L-type CaV is involved. In conclusion, lapachol, α and β-lapachone showed non-selective spasmolytic activity in guinea-pig ileum, and β-lapachone exerts this effect by to blockade of L-type CaV channels.

  20. ¬cAMP promotes the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro via modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eLepski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs remain poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of Ca2+ and cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the differentiation of NPCs extracted from the subventricular zone of E14.5 rat embryos. Patch clamp recordings revealed that increasing cAMP-signaling with Forskolin or IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine significantly facilitated neuronal functional maturation. A continuous application of IBMX to the differentiation medium substantially increased the functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, as well as neuronal firing frequency. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents and in the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic currents. The most prominent acute effect of applying IBMX was an increase in L-type Ca2+currents. Conversely, blocking L-type channels strongly inhibited dendritic outgrowth and synapse formation even in the presence of IBMX, indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ influx plays a major role in neuronal differentiation. Finally, we found that nifedipine completely blocks IBMX-induced CREB phosphorylation (cAMP-response-element-binding protein, indicating that the activity of this important transcription factor equally depends on both enhanced cAMP and voltage-gated Ca2+-signaling. Taken together, these data indicate that the up-regulation of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+-channels and early electrical excitability are critical steps in the cAMP-dependent differentiation of SVZ-derived NPCs into functional neurons. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the acute effects of cAMP on voltage-gated Ca+2channels in NPC-derived developing neurons.

  1. The β4 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel (Cacnb4) regulates the rate of cell proliferation in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Mohamad; Daghsni, Marwa; De Waard, Stephan; Gaborit, Nathalie; Fajloun, Ziad; Ronjat, Michel; Mori, Yasuo; Brusés, Juan L; De Waard, Michel

    2017-08-01

    The β subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (VGCC) are cytosolic proteins that interact with the VGCC pore -forming subunit and participate in the trafficking of the channel to the cell membrane and in ion influx regulation. β subunits also exert functions independently of their binding to VGCC by translocation to the cell nucleus including the control of gene expression. Mutations of the neuronal Cacnb4 (β 4 ) subunit are linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders including epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. It is believed that the pathogenic phenotype induced by these mutations is associated with channel-independent functions of the β 4 subunit. In this report, we investigated the role of β 4 subunit in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and examined whether these functions could be altered by a pathogenic mutation. To this end, stably transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-K1) cells expressing either rat full-length β 4 or the rat C-terminally truncated epileptic mutant variant β 1-481 were generated. The subcellular localization of both proteins differed significantly. Full-length β 4 localizes almost exclusively in the cell nucleus and concentrates into the nucleolar compartment, while the C-terminal-truncated β 1-481 subunit was less concentrated within the nucleus and absent from the nucleoli. Cell proliferation was found to be reduced by the expression of β 4 , while it was unaffected by the epileptic mutant. Also, full-length β 4 interfered with cell cycle progression by presumably preventing cells from entering the S-phase via a mechanism that partially involves endogenous B56δ, a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that binds β 4 but not β 1-481 . Analysis of β 4 subcellular distribution during the cell cycle revealed that the protein is highly expressed in the nucleus at the G1/S transition phase and that it is translocated out of the nucleus during chromatin condensation and cell division. These results

  2. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  3. Pentobarbital inhibition of human recombinant α1A P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels involves slow, open channel block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, A; Sokolova, E; Gingrich, KJ

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pre-synaptic neurotransmitter release is largely dependent on Ca2+ entry through P/Q-type (CaV2.1) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (PQCCs) at most mammalian, central, fast synapses. Barbiturates are clinical depressants and inhibit pre-synaptic Ca2+ entry. PQCC barbiturate pharmacology is generally unclear, specifically in man. The pharmacology of the barbiturate pentobarbital (PB) in human recombinant α1A PQCCs has been characterized. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PB effects on macroscopic Ca2+(ICa) and Ba2+(IBa) currents were studied using whole-cell patch clamp recording in HEK-293 cells heterologously expressing (α1A)human(β2aα2δ-1)rabbit PQCCs. KEY RESULTS PB reversibly depressed peak current (Ipeak) and enhanced apparent inactivation (fractional current at 800 ms, r800) in a concentration-dependent fashion irrespective of charge carrier (50% inhibitory concentration: Ipeak, 656 µM; r800, 104 µM). Rate of mono-exponential IBa decay was linearly dependent on PB concentration. PB reduced channel availability by deepening non-steady-state inactivation curves without altering voltage dependence, slowed recovery from activity-induced unavailable states and produced use-dependent block. PB (100 µM) induced use-dependent block during physiological, high frequency pulse trains and overall depressed PQCC activity by two-fold. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The results support a PB pharmacological mechanism involving a modulated receptor with preferential slow, bimolecular, open channel block (Kd = 15 µM). Clinical PB concentrations (<200 µM) inhibit PQCC during high frequency activation that reduces computed neurotransmitter release by 16-fold and is comparable to the magnitude of Ca2+-dependent facilitation, G-protein modulation and intrinsic inactivation that play critical roles in PQCC modulation underlying synaptic plasticity. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PB inhibition of PQCCs contributes to central nervous system

  4. P/Q-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are involved in the contraction of mammary and brain blood vessels from hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, A D; Lyngsø, K S; Rasmussen, L

    2017-01-01

    : The P/Q-type antagonist ω-agatoxin IVA (10(-8) mol L(-1) ) and the T-type calcium blocker mibefradil (10(-7) mol L(-1) ) inhibited KCl depolarization-induced contraction in mammary arteries from hypertensive patients with no effect on blood vessels from normotensive patients. ω-Agatoxin IVA decreased......AIM: Calcium channel blockers are widely used in cardiovascular diseases. Besides L-type channels, T- and P/Q-type calcium channels are involved in the contraction of human renal blood vessels. It was hypothesized that T- and P/Q-type channels are involved in the contraction of human brain...... contraction in cerebral arterioles from hypertensive patients. L-type blocker nifedipine abolished the contraction in mammary arteries. PCR analysis showed expression of P/Q-type (Cav 2.1), T-type (Cav 3.1 and Cav 3.2) and L-type (Cav 1.2) calcium channels in mammary and cerebral arteries. Immunohistochemical...

  5. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  6. Structural characterization of the voltage sensor domain and voltage-gated K+- channel proteins vectorially-oriented within a single bilayer membrane at the solid/vapor and solid/liquid interfaces via neutron interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Dura, J.A.; Freites, J.A.; Tobias, D.J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) is a modular 4-helix bundle component that confers voltage sensitivity to voltage-gated cation channels in biological membranes. Despite extensive biophysical studies and the recent availability of x-ray crystal structures for a few voltage-gated potassium (Kv-) channels and a voltage-gate sodium (Nav-) channel, a complete understanding of the cooperative mechanism of electromechanical coupling, interconverting the closed-to-open states (i.e. non-conducting to cation conducting) remains undetermined. Moreover, the function of these domains is highly dependent on the physical-chemical properties of the surrounding lipid membrane environment. The basis for this work was provided by a recent structural study of the VSD from a prokaryotic Kv-channel vectorially-oriented within a single phospholipid (POPC; 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) membrane investigated by x-ray interferometry at the solid/moist He (or solid/vapor) and solid/liquid interfaces thus achieving partial to full hydration, respectively (Gupta et. al. Phys. Rev E. 2011, 84). Here, we utilize neutron interferometry to characterize this system in substantially greater structural detail at the sub-molecular level, due to its inherent advantages arising from solvent contrast variation coupled with the deuteration of selected sub-molecular membrane components, especially important for the membrane at the solid/liquid interface. We demonstrate the unique vectorial orientation of the VSD and the retention of its molecular conformation manifest in the asymmetric profile structure of the protein within the profile structure of this single bilayer membrane system. We definitively characterize the asymmetric phospholipid bilayer solvating the lateral surfaces of the VSD protein within the membrane. The profile structures of both the VSD protein and phospholipid bilayer depend upon the hydration state of the membrane. We also determine the distribution of water and

  7. Intracellular calcium elevation during plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is primarily due to calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Sadahiro; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi

    2014-05-01

    We reported previously that plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) can be induced either by synaptic stimulation in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoresis of NMDA in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. To examine whether the plateau potentials are accompanied by an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and to determine the source of Ca2+ elevation, we performed Ca2+ imaging during the plateau potential. Neurons were loaded with Ca2+ indicator fluo-4, and the plateau potentials were generated either synaptically in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoretically applying NMDA. We have found that a transient elevation in intracellular Ca2+ accompanies the plateau potential. The synaptically induced plateau potential and the Ca2+ elevation were blocked by 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7-dCK), an antagonist for the glycine-binding sites of NMDAR. A mixture of Cd2+ and tetrodotoxin did not block NMDA-induced plateau potentials, but completely abolished the accompanying Ca2+ elevation in both the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions in the bathing solution. The NMDA-induced plateau potential was blocked by further adding 5,7-dCK. Our results show that the NMDAR-mediated plateau potential is accompanied by elevation of intracellular Ca2+ that is primarily caused by the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-05-05

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels.

  9. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lazcano-Pérez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7, voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2, the A-type transient outward (IA and delayed rectifier (IDR currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Na; Lu, Min; Echeverri, Fernando; Laita, Bianca; Kalabat, Dalia; Williams, Mark E; Hevezi, Peter; Zlotnik, Albert; Moyer, Bryan D

    2009-03-12

    Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  11. Beta-escin diminishes voltage-gated calcium current rundown in perforated patch-clamp recordings from rat primary afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantopoulos, Constantine; McCallum, J Bruce; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hogan, Quinn

    2004-10-15

    Perforated patch recordings of neuronal calcium currents (I(Ca)) with amphotericin B or nystatin reduce dialysis of intracellular constituents and current rundown, but can be difficult and frequently unsuccessful. We investigated the saponin beta-escin as a putative ionophore for perforated patch I(Ca) recordings in acutely dissociated, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. I(Ca) was recorded in time-course studies after including either beta-escin (50 microM), or amphotericin B (240 microg/ml) as perforating ionophores in the internal pipette solution, in comparison to standard ruptured-patch technique, using suction. Perforated patches were allowed to take place spontaneously. The percentage loss of I(Ca) per min (within the first 20 min) was significantly less after beta-escin (0.0518%) (n = 18), versus either amphotericin (1.82%) (n = 12) or standard patch (4.52%) (n = 7), (P escin (P escin, 7.9 +/- 3.5 MOmega within 44 =/- 14 min after amphotericin B, and 6.8 +/- 1.9 MOmega with standard patch (P escin versus 27% with amphotericin. Leak >10% of peak I(Ca) was present in 25% of cells after beta-escin versus 20% after amphotericin, and 12% after standard technique. Perforated patches using beta-escin were stable for 15-60 min. We conclude that beta-escin may be used as an alternative ionophore for perforated patch-clamp studies in neurons, and results in minimal rundown that can facilitate long-term recordings of I(Ca). Limited rundown may be due to better preservation of cytosolic ATP content.

  12. Cytoplasmic location of α1A voltage-gated calcium channel C-terminal fragment (Cav2.1-CTF aggregate is sufficient to cause cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Takahashi

    Full Text Available The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1 is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6. A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (rCTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range than with Q13 (normal-length. Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei.

  13. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system: news from the world of knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-02-15

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are expressed in blood vessels, the kidney, and the heart. Studies with gene-deficient mice have provided a way to investigate the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels and their role in the cardiovascular system. This review discusses the results from these knockout mice. Evaluation of the literature leads to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly suggested to affect constriction. The Cav3.1 channel is also involved in neointima formation following vascular damage. In the kidney, Cav3.1 regulates plasma flow and Cav3.2 plays a role setting glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are new therapeutic targets in several cardiovascular pathologies, but the use of T-type blockers should be specifically directed to the disease and to the channel subtype. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Mechanism of electromechanical coupling in voltage-gated potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikard eBlunck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt and vertical displacement in order to bring 3-4 e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4-S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the KV channels

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  16. Characterization of voltage-gated Ca(2+ conductances in layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons from rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Almog

    Full Text Available Neuronal voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels are involved in electrical signalling and in converting these signals into cytoplasmic calcium changes. One important function of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels is generating regenerative dendritic Ca(2+ spikes. However, the Ca(2+ dependent mechanisms used to create these spikes are only partially understood. To start investigating this mechanism, we set out to kinetically and pharmacologically identify the sub-types of somatic voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in pyramidal neurons from layer 5 of rat somatosensory cortex, using the nucleated configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The activation kinetics of the total Ba(2+ current revealed conductance activation only at medium and high voltages suggesting that T-type calcium channels were not present in the patches. Steady-state inactivation protocols in combination with pharmacology revealed the expression of R-type channels. Furthermore, pharmacological experiments identified 5 voltage-gated Ca(2+ channel sub-types - L-, N-, R- and P/Q-type. Finally, the activation of the Ca(2+ conductances was examined using physiologically derived voltage-clamp protocols including a calcium spike protocol and a mock back-propagating action potential (mBPAP protocol. These experiments enable us to suggest the possible contribution of the five Ca(2+ channel sub-types to Ca(2+ current flow during activation under physiological conditions.

  17. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-03-06

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H(+) and not OH(-)? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions.

  18. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  19. Excitability Constraints on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Michael; Angelino, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% ide...

  20. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyda R Frolova

    Full Text Available The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav, calcium (ICav, and potassium (IKv currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+ and calcium (Ca2+ currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+ currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential.

  1. [Mechanisms of action of voltage-gated sodium channel ligands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, D B

    2007-05-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channels play a key role in the generation of action potential in excitable cells. Sodium channels are targeted by a number of modulating ligands. Despite numerous studies, the mechanisms of action of many ligands are still unknown. The main cause of the problem is the absence of the channel structure. Sodium channels belong to the superfamily of P-loop channels that also the data abowt includes potassium and calcium channels and the channels of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Crystallization of several potassium channels has opened a possibility to analyze the structure of other members of the superfamily using the homology modeling approach. The present study summarizes the results of several recent modelling studies of such sodium channel ligands as tetrodotoxin, batrachotoxin and local anesthetics. Comparison of available experimental data with X-ray structures of potassium channels has provided a new level of understanding of the mechanisms of action of sodium channel ligands and has allowed proposing several testable hypotheses.

  2. Inhibition of cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels by grape polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, C H R; Baczkó, I; Jones, L; Fercho, M; Light, P E

    2006-11-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of red wine consumption are often attributed to the antioxidant effects of its polyphenolic constituents, including quercetin, catechin and resveratrol. Inhibition of cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) is antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective. As polyphenols may also modulate ion channels, and possess structural similarities to several antiarrhythmic VGSC inhibitors, we hypothesised that VGSC inhibition may contribute to cardioprotection by these polyphenols. The whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record peak and late VGSC currents (INa) from recombinant human heart NaV1.5 channels expressed in tsA201 cells. Right ventricular myocytes from rat heart were isolated and single myocytes were field-stimulated. Either calcium transients or contractility were measured using the calcium-sensitive dye Calcium-Green 1AM or video edge detection, respectively. The red grape polyphenols quercetin, catechin and resveratrol blocked peak INa with IC50s of 19.4 microM, 76.8 microM and 77.3 microM, respectively. In contrast to lidocaine, resveratrol did not exhibit any frequency-dependence of peak INa block. Late INa induced by the VGSC long QT mutant R1623Q was reduced by resveratrol and quercetin. Resveratrol and quercetin also blocked late INa induced by the toxin, ATX II, with IC50s of 26.1 microM and 24.9 microM, respectively. In field-stimulated myocytes, ATXII-induced increases in diastolic calcium were prevented and reversed by resveratrol. ATXII-induced contractile dysfunction was delayed and reduced by resveratrol. Our results indicate that several red grape polyphenols inhibit cardiac VGSCs and that this effect may contribute to the documented cardioprotective efficacy of red grape products.

  3. Lack of direct evidence for a functional role of voltage-operated calcium channels in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, A; Skott, O; Chegini, S

    1990-01-01

    In this study we have examined the role of voltage-gated calcium channels in the regulation of calcium in juxtaglomerular cells. Using a combination of patch-clamp and single-cell calcium measurement we obtained evidence neither for voltage-operated calcium currents nor for changes of the intrace...

  4. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel β1/β1B Subunits Regulate Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Edokobi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocyte contraction is initiated by a set of intricately orchestrated electrical impulses, collectively known as action potentials (APs. Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs are responsible for the upstroke and propagation of APs in excitable cells, including cardiomyocytes. NaVs consist of a single, pore-forming α subunit and two different β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional cell adhesion molecules and channel modulators that have cell type and subcellular domain specific functional effects. Variants in SCN1B, the gene encoding the Nav-β1 and -β1B subunits, are linked to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, e.g., Brugada syndrome, as well as to the early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Dravet syndrome, all of which put patients at risk for sudden death. Evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated that Nav-β1/β1B subunits play critical roles in cardiac myocyte physiology, in which they regulate tetrodotoxin-resistant and -sensitive sodium currents, potassium currents, and calcium handling, and that Nav-β1/β1B subunit dysfunction generates substrates for arrhythmias. This review will highlight the role of Nav-β1/β1B subunits in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  6. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora eSavio Galimberti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa and can also function as cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs. In-vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named channel partners or channel interacting proteins (ChiPs like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin, and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics. Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium channelopathies. This review will outline the structure, function and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field

  7. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit alpha(2)delta-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C. S.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Jefferys, J. G. R.; Dolphin, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 283, Dec (2014), s. 124-137 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14489 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium channel * dorsal root ganglion (DRG) * alpha2delta subunit * epilepsy * neuropathic pain * reactive gliosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.357, year: 2014

  8. Neuronal trafficking of voltage-gated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla S; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability of CNS neurons depends critically on the specific localization of ion channels in the somatodendritic and axonal membranes. Neuronal dendrites receive synaptic inputs at numerous spines and integrate them in time and space. The integration of synaptic potentials...... is regulated by voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, such as Kv4.2, which are specifically localized in the dendritic membrane. The synaptic potentials eventually depolarize the membrane of the axon initial segment, thereby activating voltage-gated sodium channels to generate action potentials. Specific Kv...

  9. Voltage-gated sodium channels: action players with many faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmann, Tamara T.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential and thereby play an important role in propagation of the electrical impulse in excitable tissues like muscle, nerve and the heart. Duplication of the sodium channels encoding genes during evolution generated the

  10. Interactions of local anesthetics with voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, C; Wang, G K

    2004-09-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are dynamic transmembrane proteins responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in excitable membranes. Local anesthetics (LAs) and structurally related antiarrhythmic and anticonvulsant compounds target specific sites in voltage-gated Na+ channels to block Na+ currents, thus reducing excitability in neuronal, cardiac, or central nervous tissue. A high-affinity LA block is produced by binding to open and inactivated states of Na+ channels rather than to resting states and suggests a binding site that converts from a low- to a high-affinity conformation during gating. Recent findings using site-directed mutagenesis suggest that multiple S6 segments together form an LA binding site within the Na+ channel. While the selectivity filter may form the more extracellular-located part of this binding site, the role of the fast inactivation gate in LA binding has not yet been resolved. The receptor of the neurotoxin batrachotoxin (BTX) is adjacent to or even overlaps with the LA binding site. The close proximity of the LA and BTX binding sites to residues critical for inactivation, together with gating transitions through S6 segments, might explain the strong impact of LAs and BTX on inactivation of voltage-gated Na+ channels and might help elucidate the mechanisms underlying voltage- and frequency-dependent LA block.

  11. Structure-based assessment of disease-related mutations in human voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyun Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels are essential for the rapid upstroke of action potentials and the propagation of electrical signals in nerves and muscles. Defects of Nav channels are associated with a variety of channelopathies. More than 1000 disease-related mutations have been identified in Nav channels, with Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 each harboring more than 400 mutations. Nav channels represent major targets for a wide array of neurotoxins and drugs. Atomic structures of Nav channels are required to understand their function and disease mechanisms. The recently determined atomic structure of the rabbit voltage-gated calcium (Cav channel Cav1.1 provides a template for homology-based structural modeling of the evolutionarily related Nav channels. In this Resource article, we summarized all the reported disease-related mutations in human Nav channels, generated a homologous model of human Nav1.7, and structurally mapped disease-associated mutations. Before the determination of structures of human Nav channels, the analysis presented here serves as the base framework for mechanistic investigation of Nav channelopathies and for potential structure-based drug discovery.

  12. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameera X Patel

    Full Text Available Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel, reduced (K+ channels, or produced little effect (h-type channel on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing. For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other

  13. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems.

  14. A voltage-gated H+ channel underlying pH homeostasis in calcifying coccolithophores.

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    Alison R Taylor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine coccolithophorid phytoplankton are major producers of biogenic calcite, playing a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on coccolithophore calcification has received much recent attention and requires improved knowledge of cellular calcification mechanisms. Uniquely amongst calcifying organisms, coccolithophores produce calcified scales (coccoliths in an intracellular compartment and secrete them to the cell surface, requiring large transcellular ionic fluxes to support calcification. In particular, intracellular calcite precipitation using HCO₃⁻ as the substrate generates equimolar quantities of H+ that must be rapidly removed to prevent cytoplasmic acidification. We have used electrophysiological approaches to identify a plasma membrane voltage-gated H+ conductance in Coccolithus pelagicus ssp braarudii with remarkably similar biophysical and functional properties to those found in metazoans. We show that both C. pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi possess homologues of metazoan H(v1 H+ channels, which function as voltage-gated H+ channels when expressed in heterologous systems. Homologues of the coccolithophore H+ channels were also identified in a diversity of eukaryotes, suggesting a wide range of cellular roles for the H(v1 class of proteins. Using single cell imaging, we demonstrate that the coccolithophore H+ conductance mediates rapid H+ efflux and plays an important role in pH homeostasis in calcifying cells. The results demonstrate a novel cellular role for voltage gated H+ channels and provide mechanistic insight into biomineralisation by establishing a direct link between pH homeostasis and calcification. As the coccolithophore H+ conductance is dependent on the trans-membrane H+ electrochemical gradient, this mechanism will be directly impacted by, and may underlie adaptation to, ocean acidification. The presence of this H+ efflux pathway suggests that there is no obligate

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channels: mutations, channelopathies and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andavan, G S B; Lemmens-Gruber, R

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels produce fast depolarization, which is responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in neurons, muscles and heart. These channels are very large membrane proteins and are encoded by ten genes in mammals. Sodium channels are a crucial component of excitable tissues; hence, they are a target for various neurotoxins that are produced by plants and animals for defence and protection, such as tetrodotoxin, scorpion toxins and batrachotoxin. Several mutations in various sodium channel subtypes cause multiple inherited diseases known as channelopathies. When these mutated sodium channel subtypes are expressed in various tissues, channelopathies in brain, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle develop as well as neuropathic pain. In this review, we discuss aspects of voltage-gated sodium channel genes with an emphasis on cardiac muscle sodium channels. In addition, we report novel mutations that underlie a spectrum of diseases, such as Brugada, long QT syndrome and inherited conduction disorders. Furthermore, this review explains commonalities and differences among the channel subtypes, the channelopathies caused by the sodium channel gene mutation and the specificity of toxins and blockers of the channel subtypes.

  16. Excitability constraints on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Angelino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% identical by sequence. This sequence similarity presumably corresponds to similarity of function, consistent with the idea that these properties must be tightly constrained. However, the multiplicity of genes encoding sodium channels raises the question: why are there so many? We demonstrate that the simplest theoretical constraints bounding sodium channel diversity--the requirements of membrane excitability and the uniqueness of the resting potential--act directly on constraining sodium channel properties. We compare the predicted constraints with functional data on mammalian sodium channel properties collected from the literature, including 172 different sets of measurements from 40 publications, wild-type and mutant, under a variety of conditions. The data from all channel types, including mutants, obeys the excitability constraint; on the other hand, channels expressed in muscle tend to obey the constraint of a unique resting potential, while channels expressed in neuronal tissue do not. The excitability properties alone distinguish the nine sodium channels into four different groups that are consistent with phylogenetic analysis. Our calculations suggest interpretations for the functional differences between these groups.

  17. Axonal voltage-gated ion channels as pharmacological targets for pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Romer Rosberg, Mette

    2013-01-01

    . The rationale for considering axonal voltage-gated ion channels as targets for pain treatment comes from the accumulating evidence that chronic pain states are associated with a dysregulation of these channels that could alter their specificity and make them more susceptible to pharmacological modulation...... ultimately depends on the function of voltage-gated ion channels. This review focuses on the pharmacological modulators of voltage-gated ion channels known to be present on axonal membrane which represents by far the largest surface of DRG neurons. Blockers of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, openers of voltage...

  18. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TAURINE REGULATION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CHANNELS IN RETINAL NEURONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew JM; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl−-permeable ionotropic receptors, but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl−-permeable receptors with an inhibitory “cocktail” consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine’s metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K+ channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca2+ channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABAB receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain. PMID:23392926

  20. Voltage-gated sodium channels as targets for pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Linda M; Emyr Davies, T G; O'Reilly, Andrias O; Williamson, Martin S; Wallace, B A

    2017-10-01

    The pyrethroid insecticides are a very successful group of compounds that have been used extensively for the control of arthropod pests of agricultural crops and vectors of animal and human disease. Unfortunately, this has led to the development of resistance to the compounds in many species. The mode of action of pyrethroids is known to be via interactions with the voltage-gated sodium channel. Understanding how binding to the channel is affected by amino acid substitutions that give rise to resistance has helped to elucidate the mode of action of the compounds and the molecular basis of their selectivity for insects vs mammals and between insects and other arthropods. Modelling of the channel/pyrethroid interactions, coupled with the ability to express mutant channels in oocytes and study function, has led to knowledge of both how the channels function and potentially how to design novel insecticides with greater species selectivity.

  1. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability.

  2. NALCN ion channels have alternative selectivity filters resembling calcium channels or sodium channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senatore, A.; Monteil, A.; van Minnen, J.; Smit, A.B.; Spafford, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    NALCN is a member of the family of ion channels with four homologous, repeat domains that include voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. NALCN is a highly conserved gene from simple, extant multicellular organisms without nervous systems such as sponges and placozoans and mostly remains a single

  3. Dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels in cell membranes by the path probability method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özer, Mahmut; Erdem, Rıza

    2004-01-01

    Dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels in the excitable cell membranes is formulated by the path probability method of nonequilibrium statistical physics and approaches of the system toward the steady or equilibrium states are presented. For a single-particle noninteractive two-state model, a first-order rate equation or dynamic equation is derived by introducing the path probability rate coefficients which satisfy the detailed balancing relation. Using known parameters for the batrachotoxin (BTX)-modified sodium channels in giand squid axon as an example, the rate equation is solved and voltage dependence of the time constant ( τ) and its temperature effect are investigated. An increase in voltage caused a shift in τ towards shorter durations while increasing temperature caused a shift in time distribution towards longer durations. Results are compared with the kinetic model for the squid axon BTX-modified sodium channels by the cut-open axon technique and a very good agreement is found.

  4. Thalamic microinfusion of antibody to a voltage-gated potassium channel restores consciousness during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Michael T; Asher, Christopher D; Franciscus, Amanda M; Hahn, Emily L

    2009-04-01

    The Drosophila Shaker mutant fruit-fly, with its malfunctioning voltage-gated potassium channel, exhibits anesthetic requirements that are more than twice normal. Shaker mutants with an abnormal Kv1.2 channel also demonstrate significantly reduced sleep. Given the important role the thalamus plays in both sleep and arousal, the authors investigated whether localized central medial thalamic (CMT) microinfusion of an antibody designed to block the pore of the Kv1.2 channel might awaken anesthetized rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a cannula aimed at the CMT or lateral thalamus. One week later, unconsciousness was induced with either desflurane (3.6 +/- 0.2%; n = 55) or sevoflurane (1.2 +/- 0.1%; n = 51). Arousal effects of a single 0.5-microl infusion of Kv1.2 potassium channel blocking antibody (0.1- 0.2 mg/ml) or a control infusion of Arc-protein antibody (0.2 mg/ml) were then determined. The Kv1.2 antibody, but not the control antibody, temporarily restored consciousness in 17% of all animals and in 75% of those animals where infusions occurred within the CMT (P Consciousness returned on average (+/- SD) 170 +/- 99 s after infusion and lasted a median time of 398 s (interquartile range: 279-510 s). Temporary seizures, without apparent consciousness, predominated in 33% of all animals. These findings support the idea that the CMT plays a role in modulating levels of arousal during anesthesia and further suggest that voltage-gated potassium channels in the CMT may contribute to regulating arousal or may even be relevant targets of anesthetic action.

  5. Antibody-guided photoablation of voltage-gated potassium currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Austin, Daniel C.; Francis, Matthew B.; Trimmer, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A family of 40 mammalian voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels control membrane excitability in electrically excitable cells. The contribution of individual Kv channel types to electrophysiological signaling has been difficult to assign, as few selective inhibitors exist for individual Kv subunits. Guided by the exquisite selectivity of immune system interactions, we find potential for antibody conjugates as selective Kv inhibitors. Here, functionally benign anti-Kv channel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were chemically modified to facilitate photoablation of K currents. Antibodies were conjugated to porphyrin compounds that upon photostimulation inflict localized oxidative damage. Anti-Kv4.2 mAb–porphyrin conjugates facilitated photoablation of Kv4.2 currents. The degree of K current ablation was dependent on photon dose and conjugate concentration. Kv channel photoablation was selective for Kv4.2 over Kv4.3 or Kv2.1, yielding specificity not present in existing neurotoxins or other Kv channel inhibitors. We conclude that antibody–porphyrin conjugates are capable of selective photoablation of Kv currents. These findings demonstrate that subtype-specific mAbs that in themselves do not modulate ion channel function are capable of delivering functional payloads to specific ion channel targets. PMID:23940262

  6. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. French

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10-70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  7. Psychiatric presentation of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    PARTHASARATHI, U. D.; HARROWER, T.; TEMPEST, M.; HODGES, J. R.; WALSH, C.; McKENNA, P. J.; FLETCHER, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody encephalopathy, a rare cause of limbic encephalopathy, typically presents with memory impairment and seizures. Psychiatric symptoms have not been emphasised in the literature. Here we describe a 58-year-old man who presented with panic attacks and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and, later on, developed delusions and hallucinations and then confusion.He was found to have antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.Treatment with immuno-modulatory...

  8. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes Na(V)1.9, Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Touška, Filip; Sattler, S.; Malsch, P.; Lewis, R. J.; Reeh, P. W.; Zimmermann, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 9 (2017), č. článku 269. ISSN 1660-3397 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : voltage-gated calcium channels * calcitonin-gene related peptide * tetrodotoxin * TTX * P-CTX-1 * TRPA1 * TRPC5 * neuropathic pain * neurogenic inflammation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.503, year: 2016

  9. Effects of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel on Cell Proliferation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effects and underlying mechanisms of voltage-gated K+ channels on the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells. Methods. RPMI-8226 MM cell line was used for the experiments. Voltage-gated K+ currents and the resting potential were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RT-PCR detected Kv channel mRNA expression. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. Cell counting system was employed to monitor cell proliferation. DNA contents and cell volume were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results. Currents recorded in RPMI-8226 cells were confirmed to be voltage-gated K+ channels. A high level of Kv1.3 mRNA was detected but no Kv3.1 mRNA was detected in RPMI-8226 cells. Voltage-gated K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP (2 mM depolarized the resting potential from −42 ± 1.7 mV to −31.8 ± 2.8 mV (P0.05. Conclusions. In RPMI-8226, voltage-gated K+ channels are involved in proliferation and cell cycle progression its influence on the resting potential and cell volume may be responsible for this process; the inhibitory effect of the voltage-gated K+ channel blocker on RPMI-8226 cell proliferation is a phase-specific event.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channel expression and action potential generation in differentiated NG108-15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxu; Tu, Huiyin; Zhang, Dongze; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yu-Long

    2012-10-25

    The generation of action potential is required for stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter release in most neurons. Although various voltage-gated ion channels are involved in action potential production, the initiation of the action potential is mainly mediated by voltage-gated Na+ channels. In the present study, differentiation-induced changes of mRNA and protein expression of Na+ channels, Na+ currents, and cell membrane excitability were investigated in NG108-15 cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp results showed that differentiation (9 days) didn't change cell membrane excitability, compared to undifferentiated state. But differentiation (21 days) induced the action potential generation in 45.5% of NG108-15 cells (25/55 cells). In 9-day-differentiated cells, Na+ currents were mildly increased, which was also found in 21-day differentiated cells without action potential. In 21-day differentiated cells with action potential, Na+ currents were significantly enhanced. Western blot data showed that the expression of Na+ channels was increased with differentiated-time dependent manner. Single-cell real-time PCR data demonstrated that the expression of Na+ channel mRNA was increased by 21 days of differentiation in NG108-15 cells. More importantly, the mRNA level of Na+ channels in cells with action potential was higher than that in cells without action potential. Differentiation induces expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels and action potential generation in NG108-15 cells. A high level of the Na+ channel density is required for differentiation-triggered action potential generation.

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields depolarize transmembrane potential via voltage-gated K+, Ca2+ and TRPM8 channels in U87 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ryan C; Bardet, Sylvia M; Carr, Lynn; Romanenko, Sergii; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-10-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have a variety of applications in the biomedical and biotechnology industries. Cancer treatment has been at the forefront of investigations thus far as nsPEFs permeabilize cellular and intracellular membranes leading to apoptosis and necrosis. nsPEFs may also influence ion channel gating and have the potential to modulate cell physiology without poration of the membrane. This phenomenon was explored using live cell imaging and a sensitive fluorescent probe of transmembrane voltage in the human glioblastoma cell line, U87 MG, known to express a number of voltage-gated ion channels. The specific ion channels involved in the nsPEF response were screened using a membrane potential imaging approach and a combination of pharmacological antagonists and ion substitutions. It was found that a single 10ns pulsed electric field of 34kV/cm depolarizes the transmembrane potential of cells by acting on specific voltage-sensitive ion channels; namely the voltage and Ca2 + gated BK potassium channel, L- and T-type calcium channels, and the TRPM8 transient receptor potential channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Odorants suppress voltage-gated currents in retinal horizontal cells in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, F; Miyachi, E

    2000-03-10

    Odorants are known to suppress non-selectively voltage-gated currents in olfactory receptor cells. We found that odorants also suppress voltage-gated currents in neurons of outside of the olfactory system. Under voltage clamp, odorants such as amyl acetate, limonene, and acetophenone suppressed non-selectively voltage-gated currents (a Ca(2+) current, a delayed rectifier K(+) current, a fast transient K(+) current, and an anomalous rectifier K(+) current) in horizontal cells from the goldfish retina. An amyl acetate puff completely and immediately suppressed the Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and the delayed rectifier K(+) current induced by repetitive depolarizations, suggesting that amyl acetate is a closed-channel blocker. Odorants did not change significantly the activation curve of I(Ca), but made the slope of inactivation curve of I(Ca) gentler and shifted its half-inactivation voltage toward a negative voltage. These results are similar to the effects of odorants on voltage-gated currents in olfactory receptor cells. This suggests that odorants may suppress the voltage-gated currents in retinal horizontal cells by the same mechanism described in olfactory receptor cells.

  13. Predictive 3D modelling of the interactions of pyrethroids with the voltage-gated sodium channels of ticks and mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrias O; Williamson, Martin S; González-Cabrera, Joel; Turberg, Andreas; Field, Linda M; Wallace, B A; Davies, T G Emyr

    2014-03-01

    The pyrethroid insecticides are a very successful group of compounds that target invertebrate voltage-gated sodium channels and are widely used in the control of insects, ticks and mites. It is well established that some pyrethroids are good insecticides whereas others are more effective as acaricides. This species specificity is advantageous for controlling particular pest(s) in the presence of another non-target invertebrate, for example controlling the Varroa mite in honeybee colonies. We applied in silico techniques to compare the voltage-gated sodium channels of insects versus ticks and mites and their interactions with a range of pyrethroids and DDT analogues. We identified a single amino acid difference within the pyrethroid binding pocket of ticks/mites that may have significant impact on the effectiveness of pyrethroids as acaricides. Other individual amino acid differences within the binding pocket in distinct tick and mite species may provide a basis for future acaricidal selectivity. Three-dimensional modelling of the pyrethroid/DDT receptor site has led to a new hypothesis to explain the preferential binding of acaricidal pyrethroids to the sodium channels of ticks/mites. This is important for understanding pyrethroid selectivity and the potential effects of mutations that can give rise to resistance to pyrethroids in commercially-important pest species. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Ciguatoxins: Cyclic Polyether Modulators of Voltage-gated Iion Channel Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lewis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins are cyclic polyether toxins, derived from marine dinoflagellates, which are responsible for the symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. Ingestion of tropical and subtropical fin fish contaminated by ciguatoxins results in an illness characterised by neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacology of ciguatoxins is characterised by their ability to cause persistent activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, to increase neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, to impair synaptic vesicle recycling, and to cause cell swelling. It is these effects, in combination with an action to block voltage-gated potassium channels at high doses, which are believed to underlie the complex of symptoms associated with ciguatera. This review examines the sources, structures and pharmacology of ciguatoxins. In particular, attention is placed on their cellular modes of actions to modulate voltage-gated ion channels and other Na+-dependent mechanisms in numerous cell types and to current approaches for detection and treatment of ciguatera.

  15. Ciguatoxins: Cyclic Polyether Modulators of Voltage-gated Iion Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Graham M.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are cyclic polyether toxins, derived from marine dinoflagellates, which are responsible for the symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. Ingestion of tropical and subtropical fin fish contaminated by ciguatoxins results in an illness characterised by neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacology of ciguatoxins is characterised by their ability to cause persistent activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, to increase neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, to impair synaptic vesicle recycling, and to cause cell swelling. It is these effects, in combination with an action to block voltage-gated potassium channels at high doses, which are believed to underlie the complex of symptoms associated with ciguatera. This review examines the sources, structures and pharmacology of ciguatoxins. In particular, attention is placed on their cellular modes of actions to modulate voltage-gated ion channels and other Na+-dependent mechanisms in numerous cell types and to current approaches for detection and treatment of ciguatera.

  16. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eMesirca

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3-/- or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1-/- channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias.

  17. Differential effect of brief electrical stimulation on voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Morven A; Al Abed, Amr; Buskila, Yossi; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H; Morley, John W

    2017-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of neuronal tissue is a promising strategy to treat a variety of neurological disorders. The mechanism of neuronal activation by external electrical stimulation is governed by voltage-gated ion channels. This stimulus, typically brief in nature, leads to membrane potential depolarization, which increases ion flow across the membrane by increasing the open probability of these voltage-gated channels. In spiking neurons, it is activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V channels) that leads to action potential generation. However, several other types of voltage-gated channels are expressed that also respond to electrical stimulation. In this study, we examine the response of voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation by whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and computational modeling. We show that nonspiking amacrine neurons of the retina exhibit a large variety of responses to stimulation, driven by different K V -channel subtypes. Computational modeling reveals substantial differences in the response of specific K V -channel subtypes that is dependent on channel kinetics. This suggests that the expression levels of different K V -channel subtypes in retinal neurons are a crucial predictor of the response that can be obtained. These data expand our knowledge of the mechanisms of neuronal activation and suggest that K V -channel expression is an important determinant of the sensitivity of neurons to electrical stimulation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This paper describes the response of various voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation, such as is applied during prosthetic electrical stimulation. We show that the pattern of response greatly varies between K V channel subtypes depending on activation and inactivation kinetics of each channel. Our data suggest that problems encountered when artificially stimulating neurons such as cessation in firing at high frequencies, or

  18. [Progress in sodium channelopathies and biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Gou, Meng; Xiao, Rong; Li, Qingwei

    2014-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), which are widely distributed in the excitable cells, are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation. They play important roles in the excitative conduction of the neurons and cardiac muscle cells. The abnormalities of the structures and functions of VGSCs can change the excitability of the cells, resulting in a variety of diseases such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy and arrhythmia. At present, some voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are used for treating those diseases. In the recent years, several neurotoxins have been purified from the venom of the animals, which could inhibit the current of the voltage-gated sodium channels. Usually, these neurotoxins are compounds or small peptides that have been further designed and modified for targeted drugs of sodium channelopathies in the clinical treatment. In addition, a novel cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRBGP) has been isolated and purified from the buccal gland of the lampreys (Lampetra japonica), and it could inhibit the Na+ current of the hippocampus and dorsal root neurons for the first time. In the present study, the progress of the sodium channelopathies and the biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are analyzed and summarized.

  19. Hydrogen bonds as molecular timers for slow inactivation in voltage-gated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels enable potassium efflux and membrane repolarization in excitable tissues. Many Kv channels undergo a progressive loss of ion conductance in the presence of a prolonged voltage stimulus, termed slow inactivation, but the atomic determinants that regulate the k...... subunit(s). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01289.001....

  20. The voltage-gated potassium channel subunit, Kv1.3, is expressed in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The Shaker-type voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.3, is believed to be restricted in distribution to lymphocytes and neurons. In lymphocytes, this channel has gained intense attention since it has been proven that inhibition of Kv1.3 channels compromise T lymphocyte activation. To investigate...

  1. SGK3 Sensitivity of Voltage Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5

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    Musaab Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase isoform SGK3 is a powerful regulator of several transporters, ion channels and the Na+/K+ ATPase. Targets of SGK3 include the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which is in turn a known regulator of the voltage gated K+ channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5. The present study thus explored whether SGK3 modifies the activity of the voltage gated K+ channel KCNA5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential, activity of vascular smooth muscle cells, insulin release and tumour cell proliferation. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNA5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SGK3, constitutively active S419DSGK3, inactive K191NSGK3 and/or wild type Nedd4-2. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes was significantly enhanced by wild-type SGK3 and S419DSGK3, but not by K191NSGK3. SGK3 was effective in the presence of ouabain (1 mM and thus did not require Na+/K+ ATPase activity. Coexpression of Nedd4-2 decreased the voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect largely reversed by additional coexpression of SGK3. Conclusion: SGK3 is a positive regulator of KCNA5, which is at least partially effective by abrogating the effect of Nedd4-2.

  2. Antillatoxin is a marine cyanobacterial toxin that potently activates voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W I; Berman, F W; Okino, T; Yokokawa, F; Shioiri, T; Gerwick, W H; Murray, T F

    2001-06-19

    Antillatoxin (ATX) is a lipopeptide derived from the pantropical marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. ATX is neurotoxic in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells, and this neuronal death is prevented by either N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists or tetrodotoxin. To further explore the potential interaction of ATX with voltage-gated sodium channels, we assessed the influence of tetrodotoxin on ATX-induced Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells. The rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ produced by ATX (100 nM) was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by tetrodotoxin. Additional, more direct, evidence for an interaction with voltage-gated sodium channels was derived from the ATX-induced allosteric enhancement of [3H]batrachotoxin binding to neurotoxin site 2 of the alpha subunit of the sodium channel. ATX, moreover, produced a strong synergistic stimulation of [3H]batrachotoxin binding in combination with brevetoxin, which is a ligand for neurotoxin site 5 on the voltage-gated sodium channel. Positive allosteric interactions were not observed between ATX and either alpha-scorpion toxin or the pyrethroid deltamethrin. That ATX interaction with voltage-gated sodium channels produces a gain of function was demonstrated by the concentration-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive stimulation of 22Na+ influx in cerebellar granule cells exposed to ATX. Together these results demonstrate that the lipopeptide ATX is an activator of voltage-gated sodium channels. The neurotoxic actions of ATX therefore resemble those of brevetoxins that produce neural insult through depolarization-evoked Na+ load, glutamate release, relief of Mg2+ block of NMDA receptors, and Ca2+ influx.

  3. Clinical utility of seropositive voltage-gated potassium channel–complex antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammoul, Adham; Shayya, Luay; Mente, Karin; Li, Jianbo; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)–complex are implicated in the pathogenesis of acquired neuromyotonia, limbic encephalitis, faciobrachial dystonic seizure, and Morvan syndrome. Outside these entities, the clinical value of VGKC-complex antibodies remains unclear. Methods: We conducted a single-center review of patients positive for VGKC-complex antibodies over an 8-year period. Results: Among 114 patients positive for VGKC-complex antibody, 11 (9.6%) carrying the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis (n = 9) or neuromyotonia (n = 2) constituted the classic group, and the remaining 103 cases of various neurologic and non-neurologic disorders comprised the nonclassic group. The median titer for the classic group was higher than the nonclassic group (p 0.25 nM) VGKC-complex antibody levels (p < 0.0001). A total of 75.0% of the patients in the high-level group had definite or probable autoimmune basis, while nonautoimmune disorders were seen in 75.6% of patients from the low-level group (p < 0.0001). A total of 26.3% of patients were found with active or remote solid organ or hematologic malignancy, but no antibody titer difference was observed among subgroups of absent, active, or remote malignancy. Compared to age-matched US national census, rates of active cancer in our cohort were higher in patients older than 45 years. Conclusions: High VGKC-complex antibody titers are more likely found in patients with classically associated syndromes and other autoimmune conditions. Low-level VGKC-complex antibodies can be detected in nonspecific and mostly nonautoimmune disorders. The presence of VGKC-complex antibody, rather than its level, may serve as a marker of malignancy. PMID:27847683

  4. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

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    Abel Peter W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were

  5. Distribution and function of voltage-gated sodium channels in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ou, Shao-Wu; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2017-11-02

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are the basic ion channels for neuronal excitability, which are crucial for the resting potential and the generation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. To date, at least nine distinct sodium channel isoforms have been detected in the nervous system. Recent studies have identified that voltage-gated sodium channels not only play an essential role in the normal electrophysiological activities of neurons but also have a close relationship with neurological diseases. In this study, the latest research findings regarding the structure, type, distribution, and function of VGSCs in the nervous system and their relationship to neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, neuropathic pain, brain tumors, neural trauma, and multiple sclerosis, are reviewed in detail.

  6. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-05

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Turkish propolis extracts on expression of voltage-gated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water extracts of Turkish propolis (WEP) on mRNA expression of Nav 1.5 and 1.7 α isoforms of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC) proteins in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Methods: DMSO and WEP (20 μg/mL each) were incubated for 24 h with ...

  8. Lacosamide: A New Approach to Target Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents in Epileptic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe; Perucca, Emilio; Avoli, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of action of several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) rests on their ability to modulate the activity of voltage-gated sodium currents that are responsible for fast action potential generation. Recent data indicate that lacosamide (a compound with analgesic and anticonvulsant effects in animal models) shares a similar mechanism. When compared with other AEDs, lacosamide has the unique ability to interact with sodium channel slow inactivation without affecting fast inactivation. This a...

  9. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  10. Purinergic control of lysenin's transport and voltage-gating properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Carnig, Paul; Kosydar, Samuel; Belzeski, Philip; Hanna, Charles; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Lysenin, a pore-forming protein extracted from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, manifests cytolytic activity by inserting large conductance pores in host membranes containing sphingomyelin. In the present study, we found that adenosine phosphates control the biological activity of lysenin channels inserted into planar lipid membranes with respect to their macroscopic conductance and voltage-induced gating. Addition of ATP, ADP, or AMP decreased the macroscopic conductance of lysenin channels in a concentration-dependent manner, with ATP being the most potent inhibitor and AMP the least. ATP removal from the bulk solutions by buffer exchange quickly reinstated the macroscopic conductance and demonstrated reversibility. Single-channel experiments pointed to an inhibition mechanism that most probably relies on electrostatic binding and partial occlusion of the channel-conducting pathway, rather than ligand gating induced by the highly charged phosphates. The Hill analysis of the changes in macroscopic conduction as a function of the inhibitor concentration suggested cooperative binding as descriptive of the inhibition process. Ionic screening significantly reduced the ATP inhibitory efficacy, in support of the electrostatic binding hypothesis. In addition to conductance modulation, purinergic control over the biological activity of lysenin channels has also been observed to manifest as changes of the voltage-induced gating profile. Our analysis strongly suggests that not only the inhibitor's charge but also its ability to adopt a folded conformation may explain the differences in the observed influence of ATP, ADP, and AMP on lysenin's biological activity.

  11. Expression and distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in ferret sinoatrial node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Morales, Michael J; Campbell, Donald L; Steenbergen, Charles; Strauss, Harold C

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous diastolic depolarization in the sinoatrial (SA) node enables it to serve as pacemaker of the heart. The variable cell morphology within the SA node predicts that ion channel expression would be heterogeneous and different from that in the atrium. To evaluate ion channel heterogeneity within the SA node, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine ion channel expression in the ferret SA node region and atrial appendage. SA nodal cells were distinguished from surrounding cardiac myocytes by expression of the slow (SA node) and cardiac (surrounding tissue) forms of troponin I. Nerve cells in the sections were identified by detection of GAP-43 and cytoskeletal middle neurofilament. Transcript expression was characterized for the 4 hyperpolarization-activated cation channels, 6 voltage-gated Na(+) channels, 3 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, 24 voltage-gated K(+) channel α-subunits, and 3 ancillary subunits. To ensure that transcript expression was representative of protein expression, immunofluorescence was used to verify localization patterns of voltage-dependent K(+) channels. Colocalizations were performed to observe any preferential patterns. Some overlapping and nonoverlapping binding patterns were observed. Measurement of different cation channel transcripts showed heterogeneous expression with many different patterns of expression, attesting to the complexity of electrical activity in the SA node. This study provides insight into the possible role ion channel heterogeneity plays in SA node pacemaker activity.

  12. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessel, Andrew J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2011-01-01

    The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca) channels, small conductance (SK)-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V)2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V)2.3 channel.

  13. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Giessel

    Full Text Available The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca channels, small conductance (SK-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V2.3 channel.

  14. Evidence for functional diversity between the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 and its closest related protein HVRP1.

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    Iris H Kim

    Full Text Available The Hv1 channel and voltage-sensitive phosphatases share with voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels the ability to detect changes in membrane potential through voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. However, they lack the pore domain typical of these other channels. NaV, KV, and CaV proteins can be found in neurons and muscles, where they play important roles in electrical excitability. In contrast, VSD-containing proteins lacking a pore domain are found in non-excitable cells and are not involved in neuronal signaling. Here, we report the identification of HVRP1, a protein related to the Hv1 channel (from which the name Hv1 Related Protein 1 is derived, which we find to be expressed primarily in the central nervous system, and particularly in the cerebellum. Within the cerebellar tissue, HVRP1 is specifically expressed in granule neurons, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Analysis of subcellular distribution via electron microscopy and immunogold labeling reveals that the protein localizes on the post-synaptic side of contacts between glutamatergic mossy fibers and the granule cells. We also find that, despite the similarities in amino acid sequence and structural organization between Hv1 and HVRP1, the two proteins have distinct functional properties. The high conservation of HVRP1 in vertebrates and its cellular and subcellular localizations suggest an important function in the nervous system.

  15. Regulation of Voltage Gated K+ Channel KCNE1/KCNQ1 by the Janus Kinase JAK3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed Warsi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Janus kinase 3 (JAK3, a kinase mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells, has been shown to down-regulate the Na+/K+ ATPase and participate in the regulation of several ion channels and carriers. Channels expressed in thymus and regulating the abundance of T lymphocytes include the voltage gated K+ channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of KCNE1/KCNQ1. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNE1/KCNQ1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568VJAK3, or inactive K851AJAK3. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was measured utilizing two electrode voltage clamp. Results: KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity was significantly increased by wild-type JAK3 and A568VJAK3, but not by K851AJAK3. The difference between oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 alone and oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 with A568VJAK3 was virtually abrogated by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM but not by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D (50 nM. Inhibition of KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 µM resulted in a decline of the voltage gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of A568VJAK3, suggesting that A568VJAK3 did not accelerate KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. Conclusion: JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity, an effect sensitive to JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154.

  16. Regulation of Voltage Gated K+ Channel KCNE1/KCNQ1 by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Jamshed; Abousaab, Abeer; Fezai, Myriam; Elvira, Bernat; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Janus kinase 3 (JAK3), a kinase mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells, has been shown to down-regulate the Na+/K+ ATPase and participate in the regulation of several ion channels and carriers. Channels expressed in thymus and regulating the abundance of T lymphocytes include the voltage gated K+ channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of KCNE1/KCNQ1. cRNA encoding KCNE1/KCNQ1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568VJAK3, or inactive K851AJAK3. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was measured utilizing two electrode voltage clamp. KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity was significantly increased by wild-type JAK3 and A568VJAK3, but not by K851AJAK3. The difference between oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 alone and oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 with A568VJAK3 was virtually abrogated by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM) but not by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D (50 nM). Inhibition of KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 µM) resulted in a decline of the voltage gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of A568VJAK3, suggesting that A568VJAK3 did not accelerate KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity, an effect sensitive to JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

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    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  18. On the multiple roles of the voltage gated sodium channel β1 subunit in genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora eBaroni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are intrinsic plasma membrane proteins that initiate the action potential in electrically excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits. The β1-subunit was the first accessory subunit to be cloned. It can be important for controlling cell excitability and modulating multiple aspects of sodium channel physiology. Mutations of β1 are implicated in a wide variety of inherited pathologies, including epilepsy and cardiac conduction diseases. This review summarizes β1-subunit related channelopathies pointing out the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and their underlying molecular mechanisms.

  19. Gambierol, a toxin produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, is a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Eva; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Kopljar, Ivan; Rainier, Jon D.; Raes, Adam L.; Snyders, Dirk J.; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we pharmacologically characterized gambierol, a marine polycyclic ether toxin which is produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. Besides several other polycyclic ether toxins like ciguatoxins, this scarcely studied toxin is one of the compounds that may be responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Unfortunately, the biological target(s) that underlies CFP is still partly unknown. Today, ciguatoxins are described to specifically activate voltage-gated sodium channels by interacting with their receptor site 5. But some dispute about the role of gambierol in the CFP story shows up: some describe voltage-gated sodium channels as the target, while others pinpoint voltage-gated potassium channels as targets. Since gambierol was never tested on isolated ion channels before, it was subjected in this work to extensive screening on a panel of 17 ion channels: nine cloned voltage-gated ion channels (mammalian Nav1.1–Nav1.8 and insect Para) and eight cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (mammalian Kv1.1–Kv1.6, hERG and insect ShakerIR) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. All tested sodium channel subtypes are insensitive to gambierol concentrations up to 10 μM. In contrast, Kv1.2 is the most sensitive voltage-gated potassium channel subtype with almost full block (>97%) and an half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 34.5 nM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where the selectivity of gambierol is tested on isolated voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, these results lead to a better understanding of gambierol and its possible role in CFP and they may also be useful in the development of more effective treatments. PMID:18313714

  20. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibitory effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated K(+) channels and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Wen; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Chen, Yi-Hung; Gong, Chi-Li; Chen, Yu-Fang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2015-02-01

    Imperatorin is a furocoumarin isolated from Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple neuromodulatory actions such as anticonvulsant effects, anxiolytic effects and anti-nociceptive effects. Although there have been reports demonstrating its effects on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) and transient reversal potential (TRP) V1 channels in neurons, there is hitherto no work showing whether this compound affects voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels and ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels. We investigated the effects of imperatorin on K(+) channels using whole-cell configuration voltage-clamp technique. Imperatorin inhibited Kv channels in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells, and caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. Imperatorin also inhibited heterologously expressed wild type Kv1.2 and Kv2.1 channels, but became much less potent in inhibiting Kv1.2 V370G, a mutant defective in C-type inactivation, implying that drug inhibition depends on C-type inactivation. At a high concentration (100μM), imperatorin also suppressed KATP channels. Our results suggest that imperatorin inhibited both Kv and KATP channels. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels are expressed in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra-Romani, Roberto; Blaustein, Mordecai P; Matteson, Donald R

    2005-07-01

    The presence and properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were studied using whole cell patch-clamp recording. SMCs from mouse and rat mesenteric arteries were enzymatically dissociated using two dissociation protocols with different enzyme combinations. Na+ and Ca2+ channel currents were present in myocytes isolated with collagenase and elastase. In contrast, Na+ currents were not detected, but Ca2+ currents were present in cells isolated with papain and collagenase. Ca2+ currents were blocked by nifedipine. The Na+ current was insensitive to nifedipine, sensitive to changes in the extracellular Na+ concentration, and blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC50 at 4.3 nM. The Na+ conductance was half maximally activated at -16 mV, and steady-state inactivation was half-maximal at -53 mV. These values are similar to those reported in various SMC types. In the presence of 1 microM batrachotoxin, the Na+ conductance-voltage relationship was shifted by 27 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction, inactivation was almost completely eliminated, and the deactivation rate was decreased. The present study indicates that TTX-sensitive, voltage-gated Na+ channels are present in SMCs from the rat and mouse mesenteric artery. The presence of these channels in freshly isolated SMC depends critically on the enzymatic dissociation conditions. This could resolve controversy about the presence of Na+ channels in arterial smooth muscle.

  3. Differential blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels by antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Graham M; Blanche, Tim; Mansfield, Kylie; Tran, Yvonne

    2002-09-27

    The effects of a range of antidepressants were investigated on neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels. With the exception of phenelzine, all antidepressants inhibited batrachotoxin-stimulated 22Na(+) uptake, most likely via negative allosteric inhibition of batrachotoxin binding to neurotoxin receptor site-2 on the Na(+) channel. Imipramine also produced a differential action on macroscopic Na(+) and K(+) channel currents in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Imipramine produced a use-dependent block of Na(+) channels. In addition, there was a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of steady-state Na(+) channel inactivation and slowed repriming kinetics consistent with imipramine having a higher affinity for the inactivated state of the Na(+) channel. At higher concentrations, imipramine also blocked delayed-rectifier and transient outward K(+) currents in the absence of alterations to the voltage-dependence of activation or the kinetics of inactivation. These actions on voltage-gated ion channels may underlie the therapeutic and toxic effects of these drugs. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  5. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human dipeptidyl peptidase 10 (DPPY), a component of voltage-gated potassium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Seitova, Alma; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human dipeptidyl peptidase 10, a component of voltage-gated potassium channels, is described. Dipeptidyl peptidase 10 (DPP10, DPPY) is an inactive peptidase associated with voltage-gated potassium channels, acting as a modulator of their electrophysiological properties, cell-surface expression and subcellular localization. Because potassium channels are important disease targets, biochemical and structural characterization of their interaction partners was sought. DPP10 was cloned and expressed using an insect-cell system and the protein was purified via His-tag affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals obtained by the sitting-drop method were orthorhombic, belonging to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 80.91, b = 143.73, c = 176.25 Å. A single solution with two molecules in the asymmetric unit was found using the structure of DPP6 (also called DPPX) as the search model in a molecular replacement protocol

  7. Functional interaction between S1 and S4 segments in voltage-gated sodium channels revealed by human channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Kasimova, Marina A; Tarek, Mounir; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    The p.I141V mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel is associated with several clinical hyper-excitability phenotypes. To understand the structural bases of the p.I141V biophysical alterations, molecular dynamics simulations were performed. These simulations predicted that the p.I141V substitution induces the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Y168 residue of the S2 segment and the R225 residue of the S4 segment. We generated a p.I141V-Y168F double mutant for both the Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 channels. The double mutants demonstrated the abolition of the functional effects of the p.I141V mutation, consistent with the formation of a specific interaction between Y168-S2 and R225-S4. The single p.Y168F mutation, however, positively shifted the activation curve, suggesting a compensatory role of these residues on the stability of the voltage-sensing domain.

  8. Functional and molecular characterization of voltage gated sodium channel Nav1.8 in bull spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Dharmendra Singh; Swain, Dilip Kumar; Shah, Nadeem; Yadav, Hanuman Prasad; Nakade, Udayraj P; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Nigam, Rajesh; Yadav, Sarvajeet; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The aim of our study was to characterize the voltage gated sodium channel Na v 1.8 in bull spermatozoa. Forty ejaculates were collected from four Hariana bulls and semen samples were pooled in view of the nonsignificant variations between different ejaculates. Functional characterization was undertaken using A-803467, a selective blocker of Na v 1.8, and veratridine as an opener of the voltage gated sodium channels while molecular characterization was done using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assays. In vitro capacitation was induced using heparin, and to study the functional involvement of Na v 1.8 in regulation of capacitation induced hyper sperm motility, A-803467 was used. Selective blocking of Na V 1.8 by A-803467 at 6 and 8 μM concentration significantly (P spermatozoa after 2 h of incubation and it was observed up to 3 h. Treatment of sperm cells with veratridine (6, 8, 10, 15, 20 μM) resulted in concentration- and time-dependent increase in forward progressive sperm motility and it persisted up to 4 h. However, hyperactive motility was induced by veratridine at higher concentrations (10 and 15 μM) after 2 h of incubation. In vitro capacitated spermatozoa treated with A-803467 revealed significant (P spermatozoa showing high mitochondrial transmembrane potential in concentration- and time-dependent manner. High concentrations (10 and 15 μM) of A-803467 and veratridine resulted in bent neck condition in spermatozoa along with significant (P spermatozoa. Strongest IR was observed in the neck and middle piece whereas weak IR was observed in tail and acrosomal region of the spermatozoa. Results of our present study evidently revealed the presence of voltage gated sodium channel Na v 1.8 in bull spermatozoa and its functional involvement in regulation of spermatozoa dynamics in terms of motility, membrane integrity, acrosome integrity, capacitation and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Further studies are warranted to

  9. Differential distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in cortical neurons: implications for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Nicholas D; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2014-03-18

    Neurons contain different functional somatodendritic and axonal domains, each with a characteristic distribution of voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic inputs, and function. The dendritic tree of a cortical pyramidal neuron has 2 distinct domains, the basal and the apical dendrites, both containing dendritic spines; the different domains of the axon are the axonal initial segment (AIS), axon proper (which in myelinated axons includes the node of Ranvier, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes), and the axon terminals. In the cerebral cortex, the dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons receive most of the excitatory synapses; distinct populations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons target specific cellular domains and thus exert different influences on pyramidal neurons. The multiple synaptic inputs reaching the somatodendritic region and generating excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) sum and elicit changes in membrane potential at the AIS, the site of initiation of the action potential.

  10. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na+ channel function in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez Herrero, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na+ channels on motor axons aggravating...... the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice....... With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform...

  11. The voltage-gated proton channel: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties of voltage gated proton channels are described, along with what is known about how the channel protein structure accomplishes these functions. Just as protons are unique among ions, proton channels are unique among ion channels. Their four transmembrane helices sense voltage, the pH gradient, and conduct protons exclusively. Selectivity is achieved by the unique ability of H3O+ to protonate an Asp-Arg salt bridge. Pathognomonic sensitivity of gating to the pH gradient ensures channel opening only when acid extrusion will result, which is crucial to most biological functions. An exception occurs in dinoflagellates in which H+ influx through HV1 triggers the bioluminescent flash. Pharmacological interventions that promise to ameliorate cancer, asthma, brain damage in ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and numerous other conditions, await future progress. PMID:25964989

  12. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eKratzer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean  Standard error of the mean; 231.8  31.2% of control; n=10 while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n=10 nor long-term potentiation (LTP. However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n=8 and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  13. High-throughput electrophysiological assays for voltage gated ion channels using SyncroPatch 768PE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianbo Li

    Full Text Available Ion channels regulate a variety of physiological processes and represent an important class of drug target. Among the many methods of studying ion channel function, patch clamp electrophysiology is considered the gold standard by providing the ultimate precision and flexibility. However, its utility in ion channel drug discovery is impeded by low throughput. Additionally, characterization of endogenous ion channels in primary cells remains technical challenging. In recent years, many automated patch clamp (APC platforms have been developed to overcome these challenges, albeit with varying throughput, data quality and success rate. In this study, we utilized SyncroPatch 768PE, one of the latest generation APC platforms which conducts parallel recording from two-384 modules with giga-seal data quality, to push these 2 boundaries. By optimizing various cell patching parameters and a two-step voltage protocol, we developed a high throughput APC assay for the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. By testing a group of Nav1.7 reference compounds' IC50, this assay was proved to be highly consistent with manual patch clamp (R > 0.9. In a pilot screening of 10,000 compounds, the success rate, defined by > 500 MΩ seal resistance and >500 pA peak current, was 79%. The assay was robust with daily throughput ~ 6,000 data points and Z' factor 0.72. Using the same platform, we also successfully recorded endogenous voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 in primary T cells. Together, our data suggest that SyncroPatch 768PE provides a powerful platform for ion channel research and drug discovery.

  14. Lucifer Yellow slows voltage-gated Na+ current inactivation in a light-dependent manner in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higure, Yoko; Katayama, Yoshimi; Takeuchi, Keita; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2003-01-01

    Lucifer Yellow CH (LY), a membrane-impermeant fluorescent dye, has been used in electrophysiological studies to visualize cell morphology, with little concern about its pharmacological effects. We investigated its effects on TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels in mouse taste bud cells and hippocampal neurons under voltage-clamp conditions. LY applied inside cells irreversibly slowed the inactivation of Na+ currents upon exposure to light of usual intensities. The inactivation time constant of Na+ currents elicited by a depolarization to −15 mV was increased by fourfold after a 5 min exposure to halogen light of 3200 lx at source (3200 lx light), and sevenfold after a 1-min exposure to 12 000 lx light. A fraction of the Na+ current became non-inactivating following the exposure. The non-inactivating current was ≈ 20 % of the peak total Na+ current after a 5 min exposure to 3200 lx light, and ≈ 30 % after a 1 min exposure to 12 000 lx light. Light-exposed LY shifted slightly the current-voltage relationship of the peak Na+ current and of the steady-state inactivation curve, in the depolarizing direction. A similar light-dependent decrease in kinetics occurred in whole-cell Na+ currents of cultured mouse hippocampal neurones. Single-channel recordings showed that exposure to 6500 lx light for 3 min increased the mean open time of Na+ channels from 1.4 ms to 2.4 ms without changing the elementary conductance. The pre-incubation of taste bud cells with 1 mM dithiothreitol, a scavenger of radical species, blocked these LY effects. These results suggest that light-exposed LY yields radical species that modify Na+ channels. PMID:12879866

  15. Parallel evolution of tetrodotoxin resistance in three voltage-gated sodium channel genes in the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Joel W; Chuckalovcak, John P; Janes, Daniel E; Edwards, Scott V; Feldman, Chris R; Brodie, Edmund D; Pfrender, Michael E; Brodie, Edmund D

    2014-11-01

    Members of a gene family expressed in a single species often experience common selection pressures. Consequently, the molecular basis of complex adaptations may be expected to involve parallel evolutionary changes in multiple paralogs. Here, we use bacterial artificial chromosome library scans to investigate the evolution of the voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) family in the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis, a predator of highly toxic Taricha newts. Newts possess tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks Nav's, arresting action potentials in nerves and muscle. Some Thamnophis populations have evolved resistance to extremely high levels of TTX. Previous work has identified amino acid sites in the skeletal muscle sodium channel Nav1.4 that confer resistance to TTX and vary across populations. We identify parallel evolution of TTX resistance in two additional Nav paralogs, Nav1.6 and 1.7, which are known to be expressed in the peripheral nervous system and should thus be exposed to ingested TTX. Each paralog contains at least one TTX-resistant substitution identical to a substitution previously identified in Nav1.4. These sites are fixed across populations, suggesting that the resistant peripheral nerves antedate resistant muscle. In contrast, three sodium channels expressed solely in the central nervous system (Nav1.1-1.3) showed no evidence of TTX resistance, consistent with protection from toxins by the blood-brain barrier. We also report the exon-intron structure of six Nav paralogs, the first such analysis for snake genes. Our results demonstrate that the molecular basis of adaptation may be both repeatable across members of a gene family and predictable based on functional considerations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Nonselective Suppression of Voltage-gated Currents by Odorants in the Newt Olfactory Receptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Fusao; Kurahashi, Takashi; Kaneko, Akimichi

    1997-01-01

    Effects of odorants on voltage-gated ionic channels were investigated in isolated newt olfactory receptor cells by using the whole cell version of the patch–clamp technique. Under voltage clamp, membrane depolarization to voltages between −90 mV and +40 mV from a holding potential (Vh) of −100 mV generated time- and voltage-dependent current responses; a rapidly (amyl acetate, 1 mM acetophenone, and 1 mM limonene) were applied to the recorded cell, the voltage-gated currents were significantly reduced. The dose-suppression relations of amyl acetate for individual current components (Na+ current: INa, T-type Ca2+ current: ICa,T, L-type Ca2+ current: ICa,L, delayed rectifier K+ current: IKv and Ca2+-activated K+ current: IK(Ca)) could be fitted by the Hill equation. Half-blocking concentrations for each current were 0.11 mM (INa), 0.15 mM (ICa,T), 0.14 mM (ICa,L), 1.7 mM (IKv), and 0.17 mM (IK(Ca)), and Hill coefficient was 1.4 (INa), 1.0 (ICa,T), 1.1 (ICa,L), 1.0 (IKv), and 1.1 (IK(Ca)), suggesting that the inward current is affected more strongly than the outward current. The activation curve of INa was not changed significantly by amyl acetate, while the inactivation curve was shifted to negative voltages; half-activation voltages were −53 mV at control, −66 mV at 0.01 mM, and −84 mV at 0.1 mM. These phenomena are similar to the suppressive effects of local anesthetics (lidocaine and benzocaine) on INa in various preparations, suggesting that both types of suppression are caused by the same mechanism. The nonselective blockage of ionic channels observed here is consistent with the previous notion that the suppression of the transduction current by odorants is due to the direst blockage of transduction channels. PMID:9041454

  17. Supratentorial white matter blurring associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex limbic encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Mader, I.; Rauer, S.; Baumgartner, A.; Paus, S.; Wagner, J.; Malter, M.P.; Pruess, H.; Lewerenz, J.; Kassubek, J.; Hegen, H.; Auer, M.; Deisenhammer, F.; Ufer, F.; Bien, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-LE) is frequently non-paraneoplastic and associated with marked improvement following corticosteroid therapy. Mesial temporal lobe abnormalities are present in around 80 % of patients. If associated or preceded by faciobrachial dystonic seizures, basal ganglia signal changes may occur. In some patients, blurring of the supratentorial white matter on T2-weighted images (SWMB) may be seen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of SWMB and whether it is specific for VGKC-LE. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently evaluated signal abnormalities on FLAIR MRI in 79 patients with LE while unaware on the antibody type. SWMB was independently assessed as present in 10 of 36 (28 %) compared to 2 (5 %) of 43 non-VGKC patients (p = 0.009). It was not related to the presence of LGI1 or CASPR2 proteins of VGKC antibodies. MRI showed increased temporomesial FLAIR signal in 22 (61 %) VGKC compared to 14 (33 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.013), and extratemporomesial structures were affected in one VGKC (3 %) compared to 11 (26 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.005). SWMB is a newly described MRI sign rather specific for VGKC-LE. (orig.)

  18. Conotoxins Targeting Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes: Potential Analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. McArthur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  19. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  20. Computational Structural Pharmacology and Toxicology of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are targets for many toxins and medically important drugs. Despite decades of intensive studies in industry and academia, atomic mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. The major cause is a lack of high-resolution structures of eukaryotic channels and their complexes with ligands. In these circumstances a useful approach is homology modeling that employs as templates X-ray structures of potassium channels and prokaryotic sodium channels. On one hand, due to inherent limitations of this approach, results should be treated with caution. In particular, models should be tested against relevant experimental data. On the other hand, docking of drugs and toxins in homology models provides a unique possibility to integrate diverse experimental data provided by mutational analysis, electrophysiology, and studies of structure-activity relations. Here we describe how homology modeling advanced our understanding of mechanisms of several classes of ligands. These include tetrodotoxins and mu-conotoxins that block the outer pore, local anesthetics that block of the inner pore, batrachotoxin that binds in the inner pore but, paradoxically, activates the channel, pyrethroid insecticides that activate the channel by binding at lipid-exposed repeat interfaces, and scorpion alpha and beta-toxins, which bind between the pore and voltage-sensing domains and modify the channel gating. We emphasize importance of experimental data for elaborating the models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural model of the open–closed–inactivated cycle of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnéris, Claire; Naylor, Claire E.; McCusker, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    In excitable cells, the initiation of the action potential results from the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels. These channels undergo a series of conformational changes between open, closed, and inactivated states. Many models have been proposed for the structural transitions that result in these different functional states. Here, we compare the crystal structures of prokaryotic sodium channels captured in the different conformational forms and use them as the basis for examining molecular models for the activation, slow inactivation, and recovery processes. We compare structural similarities and differences in the pore domains, specifically in the transmembrane helices, the constrictions within the pore cavity, the activation gate at the cytoplasmic end of the last transmembrane helix, the C-terminal domain, and the selectivity filter. We discuss the observed differences in the context of previous models for opening, closing, and inactivation, and present a new structure-based model for the functional transitions. Our proposed prokaryotic channel activation mechanism is then compared with the activation transition in eukaryotic sodium channels. PMID:25512599

  2. Regulatory role of voltage-gated sodium channel β subunits in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eChahine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Na+ channels are transmembrane-bound proteins incorporating aqueous conduction pores that are highly selective for Na+. The opening of these channels results in the rapid influx of Na+ ions that depolarize the cell and drive the rapid upstroke of nerve and muscle action potentials. While the concept of a Na+-selective ion channel had been formulated in the 1940s, it was not until the 1980s that the biochemical properties of the 260-kDa and 36-kDa auxiliary β subunits (β1, β2 were first described. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression studies revealed that the  subunit forms the core of the channel and is responsible for both voltage-dependent gating and ionic selectivity. To date, ten isoforms of the Na+ channel α subunit have been identified that vary in their primary structures, tissue distribution, biophysical properties, and sensitivity to neurotoxins. Four β subunits (β1-β4 and two splice variants (β1A, β1B have been identified that modulate the subcellular distribution, cell surface expression, and functional properties of the α subunits. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of β subunit expression and function in peripheral sensory neurons and examine their contributions to neuropathic pain.

  3. Computational Approaches to Studying Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Modulation by General Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianti, Eleonora; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are responsible for the propagation of electrical signals in excitable cells. Small-molecule modulation of VGICs affects transmission of action potentials in neurons and thus can modulate the activity of the central nervous system. For this reason, VGICs are considered key players in the medically induced state of general anesthesia. Consistently, VGICs have been shown to respond to several general anesthetics. However, in spite of extensive electrophysiological characterizations, modulation of VGICs by anesthetics is still only partially understood. Among the challenging aspects are the presence of multiple binding sites and the observation of paradoxical effects, i.e., evidence, for the same channel, of inhibition and potentiation. In this context, molecular simulations emerged in the recent past as the tool of choice to complement electrophysiology studies with a microscopic picture of binding and allosteric regulation. In this chapter, we describe the most effective computational techniques to study VGIC modulation by general anesthetics. We start by reviewing the VGIC conduction cycle, the corresponding set of channel conformations, and the approaches used to model them. We then review the most successful strategies to identify binding sites and estimate binding affinities. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Annotation of functional impact of voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinard, Valérie; Britan, Aurore; Schaeffer, Mathieu; Zahn-Zabal, Monique; Thomet, Urs; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Bairoch, Amos; Abriel, Hugues; Gaudet, Pascale

    2017-05-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are pore-forming transmembrane proteins that selectively allow sodium ions to flow across the plasma membrane according to the electro-chemical gradient thus mediating the rising phase of action potentials in excitable cells and playing key roles in physiological processes such as neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, heart rhythm, and pain sensation. Genetic variations in the nine human genes encoding these channels are known to cause a large range of diseases affecting the nervous and cardiac systems. Understanding the molecular effect of genetic variations is critical for elucidating the pathologic mechanisms of known variations and in predicting the effect of newly discovered ones. To this end, we have created a Web-based tool, the Ion Channels Variants Portal, which compiles all variants characterized functionally in the human sodium channel genes. This portal describes 672 variants each associated with at least one molecular or clinical phenotypic impact, for a total of 4,658 observations extracted from 264 different research articles. These data were captured as structured annotations using standardized vocabularies and ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and the Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology. All these data are available to the scientific community via neXtProt at https://www.nextprot.org/portals/navmut. © 2017 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensing in voltage-gated proton channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Santiago; Perez, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels play an essential role in phagocytic cells by generating a hyperpolarizing proton current that electrically compensates for the depolarizing current generated by the NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst, thereby ensuring a sustained production of reactive oxygen species by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to neutralize engulfed bacteria. Despite the importance of the voltage-dependent Hv current, it is at present unclear which residues in Hv channels are responsible for the voltage activation. Here we show that individual neutralizations of three charged residues in the fourth transmembrane domain, S4, all reduce the voltage dependence of activation. In addition, we show that the middle S4 charged residue moves from a position accessible from the cytosolic solution to a position accessible from the extracellular solution, suggesting that this residue moves across most of the membrane electric field during voltage activation of Hv channels. Our results show for the first time that the charge movement of these three S4 charges accounts for almost all of the measured gating charge in Hv channels. PMID:23401575

  6. RING finger protein 121 facilitates the degradation and membrane localization of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Low, Sean E.; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Zhou, Weibin; Muto, Akira; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y.; Hirata, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Following their synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are transported to the membranes of excitable cells, where they often cluster, such as at the axon initial segment of neurons. Although the mechanisms by which NaV channels form and maintain clusters have been extensively examined, the processes that govern their transport and degradation have received less attention. Our entry into the study of these processes began with the isolation of a new allele of the zebrafish mutant alligator, which we found to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 121 (RNF121), an E3-ubiquitin ligase present in the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Here we demonstrate that RNF121 facilitates two opposing fates of NaV channels: (i) ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and (ii) membrane localization when coexpressed with auxiliary NaVβ subunits. Collectively, these results indicate that RNF121 participates in the quality control of NaV channels during their synthesis and subsequent transport to the membrane. PMID:25691753

  7. Supratentorial white matter blurring associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex limbic encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Mader, I. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rauer, S.; Baumgartner, A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg (Germany); Paus, S. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Malter, M.P. [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Pruess, H. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, J.; Kassubek, J. [Ulm University, Department of Neurology, Ulm (Germany); Hegen, H.; Auer, M.; Deisenhammer, F. [University Innsbruck, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ufer, F. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Bien, C.G. [Epilepsy Centre Bethel, Bielefeld-Bethel (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-LE) is frequently non-paraneoplastic and associated with marked improvement following corticosteroid therapy. Mesial temporal lobe abnormalities are present in around 80 % of patients. If associated or preceded by faciobrachial dystonic seizures, basal ganglia signal changes may occur. In some patients, blurring of the supratentorial white matter on T2-weighted images (SWMB) may be seen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of SWMB and whether it is specific for VGKC-LE. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently evaluated signal abnormalities on FLAIR MRI in 79 patients with LE while unaware on the antibody type. SWMB was independently assessed as present in 10 of 36 (28 %) compared to 2 (5 %) of 43 non-VGKC patients (p = 0.009). It was not related to the presence of LGI1 or CASPR2 proteins of VGKC antibodies. MRI showed increased temporomesial FLAIR signal in 22 (61 %) VGKC compared to 14 (33 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.013), and extratemporomesial structures were affected in one VGKC (3 %) compared to 11 (26 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.005). SWMB is a newly described MRI sign rather specific for VGKC-LE. (orig.)

  8. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (KV channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD, the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins.

  9. Structural characteristics of the redox-sensing coiled coil in the voltage-gated H+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-06-21

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H(+) (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome.

  10. Voltage-gated potassium channel (K(v) 1) autoantibodies in patients with chagasic gut dysmotility and distribution of K(v) 1 channels in human enteric neuromusculature (autoantibodies in GI dysmotility).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubball, A W; Lang, B; Souza, M A N; Curran, O D; Martin, J E; Knowles, C H

    2012-08-01

    Autoantibodies directed against specific neuronal antigens are found in a significant number of patients with gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases (GINMDs) secondary to neoplasia. This study examined the presence of antineuronal antibodies in idiopathic GINMD and GINMD secondary to South American Trypanosomiasis. The GI distribution of voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) was also investigated. Seventy-three patients were included in the study with diagnoses of primary achalasia, enteric dysmotility, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, esophageal or colonic dysmotility secondary to Chagas' disease. Sera were screened for specific antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs; P/Q subtype), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; α3 subtype), and voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs, K(V) 1 subtype) using validated immunoprecipitation assays. The distribution of six VGKC subunits (K(V) 1.1-1.6), including those known to be antigenic targets of anti-VGKC antibodies was immunohistochemically investigated in all main human GI tract regions. Three patients (14%) with chagasic GI dysmotility were found to have positive anti-VGKC antibody titers. No antibodies were detected in patients with idiopathic GINMD. The VGKCs were found in enteric neurons at every level of the gut in unique yet overlapping distributions. The VGKC expression in GI smooth muscle was found to be limited to the esophagus. A small proportion of patients with GI dysfunction secondary to Chagas' disease have antibodies against VGKCs. The presence of these channels in the human enteric nervous system may have pathological relevance to the growing number of GINMDs with which anti-VGKC antibodies have been associated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  12. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amin...... acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches....

  13. Free energy dissipation of the spontaneous gating of a single voltage-gated potassium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Zeng; Wang, Rui-Zhen

    2018-02-01

    Potassium channels mainly contribute to the resting potential and re-polarizations, with the potassium electrochemical gradient being maintained by the pump Na+/K+-ATPase. In this paper, we construct a stochastic model mimicking the kinetics of a potassium channel, which integrates temporal evolving of the membrane voltage and the spontaneous gating of the channel. Its stationary probability density functions (PDFs) are found to be singular at the boundaries, which result from the fact that the evolving rates of voltage are greater than the gating rates of the channel. We apply PDFs to calculate the power dissipations of the potassium current, the leakage, and the gating currents. On a physical perspective, the essential role of the system is the K+-battery charging the leakage (L-)battery. A part of power will inevitably be dissipated among the process. So, the efficiency of energy transference is calculated.

  14. Effect of ciguatoxin 3C on voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents in mouse taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiaroni, Valeria; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Rossini, Gian Paolo; Scalera, Giuseppe; Bigiani, Albertino

    2006-09-01

    The marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus produces highly lipophilic, polycyclic ether toxins that cause a seafood poisoning called ciguatera. Ciguatoxins (CTXs) and gambierol represent the two major causative agents of ciguatera intoxication, which include taste alterations (dysgeusiae). However, information on the mode of action of ciguatera toxins in taste cells is scarce. Here, we have studied the effect of synthetic CTX3C (a CTX congener) on mouse taste cells. By using the patch-clamp technique to monitor membrane ion currents, we found that CTX3C markedly affected the operation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels but was ineffective on voltage-gated K(+) channels. This result was the exact opposite of what we obtained earlier with gambierol, which inhibits K(+) channels but not Na(+) channels. Thus, CTXs and gambierol affect with high potency the operation of separate classes of voltage-gated ion channels in taste cells. Our data suggest that taste disturbances reported in ciguatera poisoning might be due to the ability of ciguatera toxins to interfere with ion channels in taste buds.

  15. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    menon, especially those involved in the gel technique. With an aim of controlling nucleation and improving the size, in the present study, we have grown pure calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals using calcium formate mixed with formic acid as the supernatant solution. The grown crystals have been characterized by ...

  16. PIST (GOPC modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig eHerrmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1,this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1and PIST, which enhances surface levels ofKV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPISTalso showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction betweenKV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners.

  17. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v ) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Na v s in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Na v from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Na v , which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Na v s' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Na v subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Na v homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Na x s and "DEKT" in a fungus Na v suggested that the heterodimeric Na v s may still preserve Na + permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Na v from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Na v s might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric N a v subfamily. This dimeric Na v from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Guanidinium Toxins and Their Interactions with Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. Durán-Riveroll

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Guanidinium toxins, such as saxitoxin (STX, tetrodotoxin (TTX and their analogs, are naturally occurring alkaloids with divergent evolutionary origins and biogeographical distribution, but which share the common chemical feature of guanidinium moieties. These guanidinium groups confer high biological activity with high affinity and ion flux blockage capacity for voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV. Members of the STX group, known collectively as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs, are produced among three genera of marine dinoflagellates and about a dozen genera of primarily freshwater or brackish water cyanobacteria. In contrast, toxins of the TTX group occur mainly in macrozoa, particularly among puffer fish, several species of marine invertebrates and a few terrestrial amphibians. In the case of TTX and analogs, most evidence suggests that symbiotic bacteria are the origin of the toxins, although endogenous biosynthesis independent from bacteria has not been excluded. The evolutionary origin of the biosynthetic genes for STX and analogs in dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria remains elusive. These highly potent molecules have been the subject of intensive research since the latter half of the past century; first to study the mode of action of their toxigenicity, and later as tools to characterize the role and structure of NaV channels, and finally as therapeutics. Their pharmacological activities have provided encouragement for their use as therapeutants for ion channel-related pathologies, such as pain control. The functional role in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems for both groups of toxins is unproven, although plausible mechanisms of ion channel regulation and chemical defense are often invoked. Molecular approaches and the development of improved detection methods will yield deeper understanding of their physiological and ecological roles. This knowledge will facilitate their further biotechnological exploitation and point the way towards

  19. A molecular switch between the outer and the inner vestibules of the voltage-gated Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Touran; Cervenka, Rene; Sandtner, Walter; Lukacs, Peter; Koenig, Xaver; Hilber, Karlheinz; Mille, Markus; Lipkind, Gregory M; Fozzard, Harry A; Todt, Hannes

    2010-12-10

    Voltage-gated ion channels are transmembrane proteins that undergo complex conformational changes during their gating transitions. Both functional and structural data from K(+) channels suggest that extracellular and intracellular parts of the pore communicate with each other via a trajectory of interacting amino acids. No crystal structures are available for voltage-gated Na(+) channels, but functional data suggest a similar intramolecular communication involving the inner and outer vestibules. However, the mechanism of such communication is unknown. Here, we report that amino acid Ile-1575 in the middle of transmembrane segment 6 of domain IV (DIV-S6) in the adult rat skeletal muscle isoform of the voltage-gated sodium channel (rNa(V)1.4) may act as molecular switch allowing for interaction between outer and inner vestibules. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the internal part of DIV-S6 revealed that only mutations at site 1575 rescued the channel from a unique kinetic state ("ultra-slow inactivation," I(US)) produced by the mutation K1237E in the selectivity filter. A similar effect was seen with I1575A. Previously, we reported that conformational changes of both the internal and the external vestibule are involved in the generation of I(US). The fact that mutations at site 1575 modulate I(US) produced by K1237E strongly suggests an interaction between these sites. Our data confirm a previously published molecular model in which Ile-1575 of DIV-S6 is in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the selectivity filter. Furthermore, these functional data define the position of the selectivity filter relative to the adjacent DIV-S6 segment within the ionic permeation pathway.

  20. Interplay between R513 methylation and S516 phosphorylation of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro; Feixas, Ferran; Osuna, Sílvia; Díaz-Hernández, Rubí; Brugada, Ramon; Pagans, Sara

    2015-02-01

    Arginine methylation is a novel post-translational modification within the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily, including the cardiac sodium channel, NaV1.5. We show that NaV1.5 R513 methylation decreases S516 phosphorylation rate by 4 orders of magnitude, the first evidence of protein kinase A inhibition by arginine methylation. Reciprocally, S516 phosphorylation blocks R513 methylation. NaV1.5 p.G514C, associated to cardiac conduction disease, abrogates R513 methylation, while leaving S516 phosphorylation rate unchanged. This is the first report of methylation-phosphorylation cross-talk of a cardiac ion channel.

  1. Interaction of batrachotoxin with the local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 of the voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, N J; Cantrell, A R; Qu, Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1998-11-10

    The voltage-gated sodium channel is the site of action of more than six classes of neurotoxins and drugs that alter its function by interaction with distinct, allosterically coupled receptor sites. Batrachotoxin (BTX) is a steroidal alkaloid that binds to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and causes persistent activation. BTX binding is inhibited allosterically by local anesthetics. We have investigated the interaction of BTX with amino acid residues I1760, F1764, and Y1771, which form part of local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 of type IIA sodium channels. Alanine substitution for F1764 (mutant F1764A) reduces tritiated BTX-A-20-alpha-benzoate binding affinity, causing a 60-fold increase in Kd. Alanine substitution for I1760, which is adjacent to F1764 in the predicted IVS6 transmembrane alpha helix, causes only a 4-fold increase in Kd. In contrast, mutant Y1771A shows no change in BTX binding affinity. For wild-type and mutant Y1771A, BTX shifted the voltage for half-maximal activation approximately 40 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction and increased the percentage of noninactivating sodium current to approximately 60%. In contrast, these BTX effects were eliminated completely for the F1764A mutant and were reduced substantially for mutant I1760A. Our data suggest that the BTX receptor site shares overlapping but nonidentical molecular determinants with the local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 as well as having unique molecular determinants in transmembrane segment IS6, as demonstrated in previous work. Evidently, BTX conforms to a domain-interface allosteric model of ligand binding and action, as previously proposed for calcium agonist and antagonist drugs acting on L-type calcium channels.

  2. Molecular cloning and analysis of zebrafish voltage-gated sodium channel beta subunit genes: implications for the evolution of electrical signaling in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Tao P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action potential generation in excitable cells such as myocytes and neurons critically depends on voltage-gated sodium channels. In mammals, sodium channels exist as macromolecular complexes that include a pore-forming alpha subunit and 1 or more modulatory beta subunits. Although alpha subunit genes have been cloned from diverse metazoans including flies, jellyfish, and humans, beta subunits have not previously been identified in any non-mammalian species. To gain further insight into the evolution of electrical signaling in vertebrates, we investigated beta subunit genes in the teleost Danio rerio (zebrafish. Results We identified and cloned single zebrafish gene homologs for beta1-beta3 (zbeta1-zbeta3 and duplicate genes for beta4 (zbeta4.1, zbeta4.2. Sodium channel beta subunit loci are similarly organized in fish and mammalian genomes. Unlike their mammalian counterparts, zbeta1 and zbeta2 subunit genes display extensive alternative splicing. Zebrafish beta subunit genes and their splice variants are differentially-expressed in excitable tissues, indicating tissue-specific regulation of zbeta1-4 expression and splicing. Co-expression of the genes encoding zbeta1 and the zebrafish sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.5 in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells increased sodium current and altered channel gating, demonstrating functional interactions between zebrafish alpha and beta subunits. Analysis of the synteny and phylogeny of mammalian, teleost, amphibian, and avian beta subunit and related genes indicated that all extant vertebrate beta subunits are orthologous, that beta2/beta4 and beta1/beta3 share common ancestry, and that beta subunits are closely related to other proteins sharing the V-type immunoglobulin domain structure. Vertebrate sodium channel beta subunit genes were not identified in the genomes of invertebrate chordates and are unrelated to known subunits of the para sodium channel in Drosophila. Conclusion The

  3. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    Voltage gated ion channels (VGC) make possible the frequency coding of arterial pressure and the neurotransmission of this information along myelinated and unmyelinated fiber pathways. Although many of the same VGC isoforms are expressed in both fiber types, it is the relative expression of each that defines the unique discharge properties of myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors. For example, the fast inward Na⁺ current is a major determinant of the action potential threshold and the regenerative transmembrane current needed to sustain repetitive discharge. In A-type baroreceptors the TTX-sensitive Na(v)1.7 VGC contributes to the whole cell Na⁺ current. Na(v)1.7 is expressed at a lower density in C-type neurons and in conjunction with TTX-insensitive Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 VGC. As a result, action potentials of A-type neurons have firing thresholds that are 15-20 mV more negative and upstroke velocities that are 5-10 times faster than unmyelinated C-type neurons. A more depolarized threshold in conjunction with a broader complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC subtypes produces C-type action potentials that are 3-4 times longer in duration than A-type neurons and at markedly lower levels of cell excitability. Unmyelinated baroreceptors also express KCa1.1 which provides approximately 25% of the total outward K⁺ current. KCa1.1 plays a critically important role in shaping the action potential profile of C-type neurons and strongly impacts neuronal excitability. A-type neurons do not functionally express the KCa1.1 channel despite having a whole cell Ca(V) current quite similar to that of C-type neurons. As a result, A-type neurons do not have the frequency-dependent braking forces of KCa1.1. Lack of a KCa current and only a limited complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC in addition to a hyperpolarization activated HCN1 current that is nearly 10 times larger than in C-type neurons leads to elevated levels of discharge in A-type neurons, a

  4. The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 is an effector of peripheral inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Wang, Haibin; Costigan, Michael; Allchorne, Andrew J; Hatcher, Jon P; Egerton, Julie; Stean, Tania; Morisset, Valerie; Grose, David; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Chessell, Iain P; Tate, Simon; Green, Paula J; Woolf, Clifford J

    2006-12-13

    We used a mouse with deletion of exons 4, 5, and 6 of the SCN11A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type XI, alpha) gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 to assess its contribution to pain. Na(v)1.9 is present in nociceptor sensory neurons that express TRPV1, bradykinin B2, and purinergic P2X3 receptors. In Na(v)1.9-/- mice, the non-inactivating persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium TTXr-Per current is absent, whereas TTXr-Slow is unchanged. TTXs currents are unaffected by the mutation of Na(v)1.9. Pain hypersensitivity elicited by intraplantar administration of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, interleukin-1beta, capsaicin, and P2X3 and P2Y receptor agonists, but not NGF, is either reduced or absent in Na(v)1.9-/- mice, whereas basal thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity is unchanged. Thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity produced by peripheral inflammation (intraplanatar complete Freund's adjuvant) is substantially diminished in the null allele mutant mice, whereas hypersensitivity in two neuropathic pain models is unchanged in the Na(v)1.9-/- mice. Na(v)1.9 is, we conclude, an effector of the hypersensitivity produced by multiple inflammatory mediators on nociceptor peripheral terminals and therefore plays a key role in mediating peripheral sensitization.

  5. Effect of superoxide derived from lucifer yellow CH on voltage-gated currents of mouse taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Keita; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2008-06-01

    Lucifer yellow CH (LY), a fluorescent membrane-impermeable cell marker dye, has been routinely loaded into cells through recording electrodes to visualize these cells after electrophysiological investigation, without considering its pharmacological effect. Recently, we showed that the exposure of cells loaded with LY to light for microscopy produced unidentified radical species that retarded the inactivation of voltage-gated Na+ currents irreversibly (Higure Y et al. 2003). Here, we show that superoxide dismutase, an enzyme that decomposes superoxide, reverses the retardation effect, which assures that superoxide is the unidentified radical species. The estimated mean lifetime of superoxide in recording electrodes (in the absence of cytoplasm) is approximately 6 min, and hence, the Na+ currents are retarded even in the dark, when LY is exposed to light before being loaded into the cell. Superoxide has no effect on voltage-gated Cl- currents. These results show that superoxide action on ion channels is rather selective. The breakdown of superoxide inside cells and the effect of endogenous superoxide on the superoxide-susceptible channels are discussed.

  6. Excessive blinking and ataxia in a child with occult neuroblastoma and voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Nicholas M

    2012-05-01

    A previously healthy 9-year-old girl presented with a 10-day history of slowly progressive unsteadiness, slurred speech, and behavior change. On examination there was cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, excessive blinking, subtle perioral myoclonus, and labile mood. The finding of oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid prompted paraneoplastic serological evaluation and search for an occult neural crest tumor. Antineuronal nuclear autoantibody type 1 (anti-Hu) and voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies were detected in serum. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scan and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a localized abdominal mass in the region of the porta hepatis. A diagnosis of occult neuroblastoma was made. Resection of the stage 1 neuroblastoma and treatment with pulsed corticosteroids resulted in resolution of all symptoms and signs. Excessive blinking has rarely been described with neuroblastoma, and, when it is not an isolated finding, it may be a useful clue to this paraneoplastic syndrome. Although voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity has not been described previously in the setting of neuroblastoma, it is associated with a spectrum of paraneoplastic neurologic manifestations in adults, including peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorders.

  7. Mechanism of Estradiol-Induced Block of Voltage-Gated K+ Currents in Rat Medial Preoptic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzin, Michael; Malinina, Evgenya; Grimsholm, Ola; Johansson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize possible rapid effects of 17-β-estradiol on voltage-gated K+ channels in preoptic neurons and, in particular, to identify the mechanisms by which 17-β-estradiol affects the K+ channels. Whole-cell currents from dissociated rat preoptic neurons were studied by perforated-patch recording. 17-β-estradiol rapidly (within seconds) and reversibly reduced the K+ currents, showing an EC50 value of 9.7 µM. The effect was slightly voltage dependent, but independent of external Ca2+, and not sensitive to an estrogen-receptor blocker. Although 17-α-estradiol also significantly reduced the K+ currents, membrane-impermeant forms of estradiol did not reduce the K+ currents and other estrogens, testosterone and cholesterol were considerably less effective. The reduction induced by estradiol was overlapping with that of the KV-2-channel blocker r-stromatoxin-1. The time course of K+ current in 17-β-estradiol, with a time-dependent inhibition and a slight dependence on external K+, suggested an open-channel block mechanism. The properties of block were predicted from a computational model where 17-β-estradiol binds to open K+ channels. It was concluded that 17-β-estradiol rapidly reduces voltage-gated K+ currents in a way consistent with an open-channel block mechanism. This suggests a new mechanism for steroid action on ion channels. PMID:21625454

  8. IDENTIFIKASI MUTASI NOKTAH PADA” GEN VOLTAGE GATED SODIUM CHANNEL” Aedes aegypti RESISTEN TERHADAP INSEKTISIDA PYRETHROID DI SEMARANG JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiarti Widiarti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of a point mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene was conducted on the major of dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which occurred to be resistant toward malathion and cypermethrin base on WHO methodology standard (impregnated paper.  The objectives of this studi was to identify the point mutation on the codon 1014  of voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes which was associated  with the vector resistance of pyrethroid group. The detection of a point mutation of  voltage-gated sodium channel was conducted using DNA extraction and semi nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the mosquitoes resistant strain. The susceptibility test (as a screening resistant phenotype showed that few samples of Ae. aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java resistant to malathion 0,8 % ( organophosphate group and cypermethrin 0,25 % (pyrethroid group. The sequencing result showed that there has been a mutation from the leucine (TTA which turned to be phenylalanin (TTT (kdr-w type on the codon 1014 at the voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes from  Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which was associated with the pyrethroid insecticide resistance. There were 78 % mosquitoes which brought  mutation alel kdr-w type on the codon 1014 F. Therefore dengue vector control activities should not use any pyrethroid insecticide group. Key  Words :  Resistance,  Aedes   aegypti,  Voltage   Gated   Sodium  Channel    (VGSC,  Point  Mutation. Abstrak Identifikasi mutasi noktah pada  gen Voltage Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC telah dilakukan pada nyamuk Aedes aegypti dari Kelurahan Simongan Kota Semarang, yang telah resisten terhadap insektisida Malathion dan Cypermethrin pada screening susceptibility test (Standar WHO Impregnated paper. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mendeteksi

  9. A mutation (L1014F) in the voltage-gated sodium channel of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, is associated with resistance to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen P; Paul, Verity L; Slater, Russell; Warren, Anne; Denholm, Ian; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S

    2014-08-01

    The grain aphid, Sitobion avenae Fabricius (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important pest of cereal crops. Pesticides are the main method for control but carry the risk of selecting for resistance. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroid sprays applied to S. avenae, field samples were collected and screened for mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, the primary target site for pyrethroids. Aphid mobility and mortality to lambda-cyhalothrin were measured in coated glass vial bioassays. A single amino acid substitution (L1014F) was identified in the domain IIS6 segment of the sodium channel from the S. avenae samples exhibiting reduced pyrethroid efficacy. Bioassays on aphids heterozygous for the kdr mutation (SR) or homozygous for the wild-type allele (SS) showed that those carrying the mutation had significantly lower susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin. The L1014F (kdr) mutation, known to confer pyrethroid resistance in many insect pests, has been identified for the first time in S. avenae. Clonal lines heterozygous for the mutation showed 35-40-fold resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in laboratory bioassays, consistent with the reported effect of this mutation on pyrethroid sensitivity in other aphid species. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the “carrier” snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th – 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  11. Meet me on the other side: trans-bilayer modulation of a model voltage-gated ion channel activity by membrane electrostatics asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Mereuta

    Full Text Available While it is accepted that biomembrane asymmetry is generated by proteins and phospholipids distribution, little is known about how electric changes manifested in a monolayer influence functional properties of proteins localized on the opposite leaflet. Herein we used single-molecule electrophysiology and investigated how asymmetric changes in the electrostatics of an artificial lipid membrane monolayer, generated oppositely from where alamethicin--a model voltage-gated ion channel--was added, altered peptide activity. We found that phlorizin, a membrane dipole potential lowering amphiphile, augmented alamethicin activity and transport features, whereas the opposite occurred with RH-421, which enhances the monolayer dipole potential. Further, the monolayer surface potential was decreased via adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and demonstrated that vectorial modification of it also affected the alamethicin activity in a predictive manner. A new paradigm is suggested according to which asymmetric changes in the monolayer dipole and surface potential extend their effects spatially by altering the intramembrane potential, whose gradient is sensed by distantly located peptides.

  12. Benchmarking the stability of human detergent-solubilised voltage-gated sodium channels for structural studies using eel as a reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Daria; Henderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    With the ultimate goal of detailed structural analysis of mammalian and particularly human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), we have investigated the relative stability of human and rat VGSCs and compared them with electric eel VGSC. We found that NaV1.3 from rat was the most stable after detergent solubilisation. The order of stability was rNaV1.3 > hNaV1.2 > hNaV1.1 > hNaV1.6 > hNaV1.3 > hNaV1.4. However, a comparison with the VGSC from Electrophorus electricus, which is most similar to NaV1.4, shows that the eel VGSC is considerably more stable in detergent than the human VGSCs examined. We conclude that current methods of structural analysis, such as single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM), may be most usefully targeted to eel VGSC or rNaV1.3, but that structural analysis on the full spectrum of VGSCs, by methods that require greater stability such as crystallisation and X-ray crystallography, will require further stabilisation of the channel. PMID:25838126

  13. Understanding evolutionary paradigm of knockdown resistance in mosquitoes by analyzing DNA sequence polymorphisms in voltage-gated sodium channel in Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Sarkar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Voltage Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC is critical for binding of different insecticides and plays a key role in insecticide resistance. The insect sodium channel consists of four homologous domains (I to IV, each containing six transmembrane segments (S1 to S6. An important mechanism of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids is termed knockdown resistance (kdr, caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism in IIS6 domain of sodium channels. We analyzed the polymorphisms, nucleotide diversity, and phylogenies in VGSC-IIS6 gene in Culex quinquefasciatus from India. We analyzed the neutral model / hypothesis to infer if natural selection is acting upon the analyzed vgsc gene. Tajima’s D, Fu and Li’s D* and F* and Fu’s Fs test were performed to determine whether the distribution of nucleotide variation within the samples was consistent with neutral model. We theorized that the evolutionary pattern of intra-population distribution of variability in vgsc gene is consistent with the neutral expectation.

  14. Built for speed: molecular properties of the voltage sensor domain underlie the rapid activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels compared with Shaker-type K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Many of us were taught in high school biology that the action potential waveform in nerves and other excitable tissues was generated by an initial rapid influx of external Na(+) ions across the plasma membrane, followed by an outward movement of intracellular K(+) ions. The former event, mediated by voltage-gated Na(+) channels, is responsible for the fast depolarizing upstroke of the action potential, while voltage-gated K+ channels are responsible for the subsequent repolarizing phase, which largely controls action potential duration. Although Hodgkin and Huxley described the fundamental importance of this sequential activation process more than 60 y ago, the molecular and structural details underlying the faster activation of voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) vs. K(+) (Kv) channels have yet to be fully resolved.

  15. Calcium signals driven by single channel noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Skupin

    Full Text Available Usually, the occurrence of random cell behavior is appointed to small copy numbers of molecules involved in the stochastic process. Recently, we demonstrated for a variety of cell types that intracellular Ca2+ oscillations are sequences of random spikes despite the involvement of many molecules in spike generation. This randomness arises from the stochastic state transitions of individual Ca2+ release channels and does not average out due to the existence of steep concentration gradients. The system is hierarchical due to the structural levels channel--channel cluster--cell and a corresponding strength of coupling. Concentration gradients introduce microdomains which couple channels of a cluster strongly. But they couple clusters only weakly; too weak to establish deterministic behavior on cell level. Here, we present a multi-scale modelling concept for stochastic hierarchical systems. It simulates active molecules individually as Markov chains and their coupling by deterministic diffusion. Thus, we are able to follow the consequences of random single molecule state changes up to the signal on cell level. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we simulate a variety of experiments. Comparisons of simulated and experimental data of spontaneous oscillations in astrocytes emphasize the role of spatial concentration gradients in Ca2+ signalling. Analysis of extensive simulations indicates that frequency encoding described by the relation between average and standard deviation of interspike intervals is surprisingly robust. This robustness is a property of the random spiking mechanism and not a result of control.

  16. Calcium signals driven by single channel noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupin, Alexander; Kettenmann, Helmut; Falcke, Martin

    2010-08-05

    Usually, the occurrence of random cell behavior is appointed to small copy numbers of molecules involved in the stochastic process. Recently, we demonstrated for a variety of cell types that intracellular Ca2+ oscillations are sequences of random spikes despite the involvement of many molecules in spike generation. This randomness arises from the stochastic state transitions of individual Ca2+ release channels and does not average out due to the existence of steep concentration gradients. The system is hierarchical due to the structural levels channel--channel cluster--cell and a corresponding strength of coupling. Concentration gradients introduce microdomains which couple channels of a cluster strongly. But they couple clusters only weakly; too weak to establish deterministic behavior on cell level. Here, we present a multi-scale modelling concept for stochastic hierarchical systems. It simulates active molecules individually as Markov chains and their coupling by deterministic diffusion. Thus, we are able to follow the consequences of random single molecule state changes up to the signal on cell level. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we simulate a variety of experiments. Comparisons of simulated and experimental data of spontaneous oscillations in astrocytes emphasize the role of spatial concentration gradients in Ca2+ signalling. Analysis of extensive simulations indicates that frequency encoding described by the relation between average and standard deviation of interspike intervals is surprisingly robust. This robustness is a property of the random spiking mechanism and not a result of control.

  17. Finite element model to study calcium distribution in oocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parvaiz Ahmad Naik

    2015-03-20

    Mar 20, 2015 ... lations in astrocytes mediated by voltage gated calcium chan- nels (VGCC). A good number of ... study of calcium distribution in neurons cells, astrocyte cells, but very few attempts are reported in the litera- .... from the constant field which assumes that the electric field in the membrane is constant and thus ...

  18. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na v 1.5 sodium and Ca v 1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a potential

  19. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hilber, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hilber@meduniwien.ac.at [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sandtner, Walter [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on

  20. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Snipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs, which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times.

  1. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  2. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Gao, Ying-Tang [Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Third Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300170 (China); Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K{sup +}-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K{sup +}-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis.

  3. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels are Modulated by Glucose and Involved in Regulating Cellular Insulin Content of INS-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Wang, Songhua; Hu, Qingjuan; Zeng, Lvming; Peng, Hailong; Liu, Chao; Huang, Li-Ping; Song, Hao; Li, Yuping; Yao, Li-Hua; Meng, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Islet beta cells (β-cells) are unique cells that play a critical role in glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin in response to increased glucose levels. Voltage-gated ion channels in β-cells, such as K+ and Ca2+ channels, contribute to insulin secretion. The response of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) in β-cells to the changes in glucose levels remains unknown. This work aims to determine the role of extracellular glucose on the regulation of VGSC. The effect of glucose on VGSC currents (INa) was investigated in insulin-secreting β-cell line (INS-1) cells of rats using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, and the effects of glucose on insulin content and cell viability were determined using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay methods respectively. Our results show that extracellular glucose application can inhibit the peak of INa in a concentration-dependent manner. Glucose concentration of 18 mM reduced the amplitude of INa, suppressed the INa of steady-state activation, shifted the steady-state inactivation curves of INa to negative potentials, and prolonged the time course of INa recovery from inactivation. Glucose also enhanced the activity-dependent attenuation of INa and reduced the fraction of activated channels. Furthermore, 18 mM glucose or low concentration of tetrodotoxin (TTX, a VGSC-specific blocker) partially inhibited the activity of VGSC and also improved insulin synthesis. These results revealed that extracellular glucose application enhances the insulin synthesis in INS-1 cells and the mechanism through the partial inhibition on INa channel is involved. Our results innovatively suggest that VGSC plays a vital role in modulating glucose homeostasis. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Lidocaine reduces the transition to slow inactivation in Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Patrick L; Jarecki, Brian W; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The primary use of local anaesthetics is to prevent or relieve pain by reversibly preventing action potential propagation through the inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Nav1.7, abundantly expressed in pain-sensing neurons, plays a crucial role in perception and transmission of painful stimuli and in inherited chronic pain syndromes. Understanding the interaction of lidocaine with Nav1.7 channels could provide valuable insight into the drug's action in alleviating pain in distinct patient populations. The aim of this study was to determine how lidocaine interacts with multiple inactivated conformations of Nav1.7 channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We investigated the interactions of lidocaine with wild-type Nav1.7 channels and a paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation (I1461T) that destabilizes fast inactivation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to examine the activity of channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. KEY RESULTS Depolarizing pulses that increased slow inactivation of Nav1.7 channels also reduced lidocaine inhibition. Lidocaine enhanced recovery of Nav1.7 channels from prolonged depolarizing pulses by decreasing slow inactivation. A paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation that destabilizes fast inactivation of Nav1.7 channels decreased lidocaine inhibition. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lidocaine decreased the transition of Nav1.7 channels to the slow inactivated state. The fast inactivation gate (domain III–IV linker) is important for potentiating the interaction of lidocaine with the Nav1.7 channel. PMID:21232038

  5. Ryanodine receptors, voltage-gated calcium channels and their relationship with protein kinase A in the myocardium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovič, Miloš; Valeš, Karel; Putnikovič, B.; Djulejič, V.; Mitrovič, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2008), s. 141-149 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/07/0271; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rynodine receptors * kalcium channels Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  6. Autoimmune encephalitis associated with voltage-gated potassium channels-complex and leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 antibodies - a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celicanin, M; Blaabjerg, Morten; Maersk-Moller, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe clinical and paraclinical characteristics of all Danish patients who tested positive for anti-voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC)-complex, anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and anti-contactin-associated protein-2...

  7. Opposite effects of the S4-S5 linker and PIP2 on voltage-gated channel function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and other channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Choveau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6, with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6T in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5L is acting like a ligand binding to S6T to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5L, the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated require PIP2 to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel co-factor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP2 leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP2 and S4-S5L, and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  8. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design: A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results: Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001. There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions: This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance.

  9. Active Dendrites and Differential Distribution of Calcium Channels Enable Functional Compartmentalization of Golgi Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Stephanie; Hull, Court; Regehr, Wade G

    2015-11-25

    Interneurons are essential to controlling excitability, timing, and synaptic integration in neuronal networks. Golgi cells (GoCs) serve these roles at the input layer of the cerebellar cortex by releasing GABA to inhibit granule cells (grcs). GoCs are excited by mossy fibers (MFs) and grcs and provide feedforward and feedback inhibition to grcs. Here we investigate two important aspects of GoC physiology: the properties of GoC dendrites and the role of calcium signaling in regulating GoC spontaneous activity. Although GoC dendrites are extensive, previous studies concluded they are devoid of voltage-gated ion channels. Hence, the current view holds that somatic voltage signals decay passively within GoC dendrites, and grc synapses onto distal dendrites are not amplified and are therefore ineffective at firing GoCs because of strong passive attenuation. Using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging in rat slices, we find that dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels allow somatic action potentials to activate voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) along the entire dendritic length, with R-type and T-type VGCCs preferentially located distally. We show that R- and T-type VGCCs located in the dendrites can boost distal synaptic inputs and promote burst firing. Active dendrites are thus critical to the regulation of GoC activity, and consequently, to the processing of input to the cerebellar cortex. In contrast, we find that N-type channels are preferentially located near the soma, and control the frequency and pattern of spontaneous firing through their close association with calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels. Thus, VGCC types are differentially distributed and serve specialized functions within GoCs. Interneurons are essential to neural processing because they modulate excitability, timing, and synaptic integration within circuits. At the input layer of the cerebellar cortex, a single type of interneuron, the Golgi cell (GoC), carries these functions. The

  10. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Akoum, Nazem; Appadurai, Daniel A.; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Ahmed, Osman; Martinez, Agustin D.; Beyer, Eric C.; Moreno, Alonso P.

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2) is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj) for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge) of the crossing molecules. PMID:28611680

  11. A molecular switch between the outer and the inner vestibule of the voltage-gated Na+ channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrabi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Na+ channels permit rapid transmission of depolarizing impulses throughout cells and cell networks, and are essential to the proper function of skeletal muscle, the heart and the nervous system. The selectivity filter of the channel is considered to be formed by the amino acids D400, E755, K1237, and A1529 ('DEKA' motif) which are located at the innermost turn of the P-loops connecting S5 and S6 segments of each domain. The inner vestibule is believed to be lined by four S6 helices, one from each domain. Comparison of crystal structures of K+ channels in open and closed states as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies suggest that the activation gate of voltage-gated ion channels is located at the inner part of the S6 segments. This may also hold true for voltage-gated Na+ channels because mutations in S6 segments alter activation gating. The gate for fast inactivation of the channel has been mapped to the intracellular linker between domains III and IV. This intracellular loop is currently considered to produce channel inactivation by transiently occluding the intracellular vestibule of the channel. The time constants of entry into and recovery from fast inactivation are on the order of milliseconds. Apart from 'fast inactivation' a number of slower inactivated states have been described. During very long depolarizations, on the order of several minutes, rNaV1.4 channels enter a very stable inactivated state which we refer to as 'ultra-slow' inactivation (IUS). In these channels the likelihood of entry into IUS is substantially increased by a mutation in the selectivity filter, K1237E. IUS can be modulated by molecules binding to the outer vestibule, suggesting that a conformational change of the outer vestibule gives rise to this kinetic state. On the other hand, the local anesthetic drug lidocaine, which binds to the internal part of the channel pore, inhibits entry into IUS by a 'foot-in-the-door' mechanism indicating that a

  12. Distribution of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory endings of mammalian muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Dario I; Vincent, Jacob A; Cope, Timothy C

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling of mechanical stimuli by muscle spindles remains incomplete. In particular, the ionic conductances that sustain tonic firing during static muscle stretch are unknown. We hypothesized that tonic firing by spindle afferents depends on sodium persistent inward current (INaP) and tested for the necessary presence of the appropriate voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels in primary sensory endings. The NaV 1.6 isoform was selected for both its capacity to produce INaP and for its presence in other mechanosensors that fire tonically. The present study shows that NaV 1.6 immunoreactivity (IR) is concentrated in heminodes, presumably where tonic firing is generated, and we were surprised to find NaV 1.6 IR strongly expressed also in the sensory terminals, where mechanotransduction occurs. This spatial pattern of NaV 1.6 IR distribution was consistent for three mammalian species (rat, cat, and mouse), as was tonic firing by primary spindle afferents. These findings meet some of the conditions needed to establish participation of INaP in tonic firing by primary sensory endings. The study was extended to two additional NaV isoforms, selected for their sensitivity to TTX, excluding TTX-resistant NaV channels, which alone are insufficient to support firing by primary spindle endings. Positive immunoreactivity was found for NaV 1.1 , predominantly in sensory terminals together with NaV 1.6 and for NaV 1.7 , mainly in preterminal axons. Differential distribution in primary sensory endings suggests specialized roles for these three NaV isoforms in the process of mechanosensory signaling by muscle spindles. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The molecular mechanisms underlying mechanosensory signaling responsible for proprioceptive functions are not completely elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are expressed in the spindle primary sensory ending, where NaVs are found at every site

  13. Construction and validation of a homology model of the human voltage-gated proton channel hHV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulleperuma, Kethika; Smith, Susan M E; Morgan, Deri; Musset, Boris; Holyoake, John; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Cherny, Vladimir V; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    The topological similarity of voltage-gated proton channels (H(V)1s) to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels raises the central question of whether H(V)1s have a similar structure. We present the construction and validation of a homology model of the human H(V)1 (hH(V)1). Multiple structural alignment was used to construct structural models of the open (proton-conducting) state of hH(V)1 by exploiting the homology of hH(V)1 with VSDs of K(+) and Na(+) channels of known three-dimensional structure. The comparative assessment of structural stability of the homology models and their VSD templates was performed using massively repeated molecular dynamics simulations in which the proteins were allowed to relax from their initial conformation in an explicit membrane mimetic. The analysis of structural deviations from the initial conformation based on up to 125 repeats of 100-ns simulations for each system reveals structural features consistently retained in the homology models and leads to a consensus structural model for hH(V)1 in which well-defined external and internal salt-bridge networks stabilize the open state. The structural and electrostatic properties of this open-state model are compatible with proton translocation and offer an explanation for the reversal of charge selectivity in neutral mutants of Asp(112). Furthermore, these structural properties are consistent with experimental accessibility data, providing a valuable basis for further structural and functional studies of hH(V)1. Each Arg residue in the S4 helix of hH(V)1 was replaced by His to test accessibility using Zn(2+) as a probe. The two outermost Arg residues in S4 were accessible to external solution, whereas the innermost one was accessible only to the internal solution. Both modeling and experimental data indicate that in the open state, Arg(211), the third Arg residue in the S4 helix in hH(V)1, remains accessible to the internal solution and is located near the

  14. Structural models of the transmembrane region of voltage-gated and other K+ channels in open, closed, and inactivated conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, S R; Hao, Y; Guy, H R

    1998-01-01

    A large collaborative, multidisciplinary effort involving many research laboratories continues which uses indirect methods of molecular biology and membrane biophysics to analyze the three-dimensional structures and functional mechanisms of K+ channels. This work also extends to the distant relatives of these channels, including the voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. The role that our group plays in this process is to combine the information gained from experimental studies with molecular modeling techniques to generate atomic-scale structural models of these proteins. The modeling process involves three stages which are summarized as: (I) prediction of the channel sequence transmembrane topology, including the functionality and secondary structure of the segments; (II) prediction of the relative positions of the transmembrane segments, and (III) filling in all atoms of the amino acid residues, with conformations for energetically stabilized interactions. Both physiochemical and evolutionary principles (including sequence homology analysis) are used to guide the development. In addition to testing the steric and energetic feasibilities of different structural hypotheses, the models provide guidance for the design of new experiments. Structural modeling also serves to "fill in the gaps" of experimental data, such as predicting additional residue interactions and conformational changes responsible for functional processes. The modeling process is currently at the stage that experimental studies have definitely confirmed most of our earlier predictions about the transmembrane topology and functionality of different segments. Additionally, this report describes the detailed, three-dimensional models we have developed for the entire transmembrane region and important functional sites of the voltage-gated Shaker K+ channel in the open, closed, and inactivated conformations (including the ion-selective pore and voltage-sensor regions). As part of this effort, we also

  15. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  16. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  17. Effects of WIN55,212-2 on voltage-gated sodium channels in trigeminal ganglion neurons of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Xiao, Jian Min; Cao, Xue Hong; Ming, Zhang Yin; Liu, Lie Ju

    2008-02-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of WIN55,212-2, a potential cannabinoid receptor agonist, on voltage-gated sodium currents I(Na) in cultured trigeminal ganglion neurons of rats, and to investigate whether the anti-nociceptive effects of cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) were produced through its modulation on I(Na). Whole cell patch clamp techniques were used to record I(Na) before and after WIN55,212-2 was perfused in cultured trigeminal ganglion neurons of rats. WIN55,212-2 (0.01 micromol/l) could enhance I(Na) slightly by 11.5 +/- 4.7% (n=7, p0.05). WIN55,212-2 (10 micromol/l) did not affect the active and stable inactive curves of I(Na) (n=7, p>0.05). WIN55,212-2 had bidirectional (two phases) effects on I(Na) in trigeminal ganglion neurons. It might act on different receptors, and the CB1 receptor participated in its modulation on I(Na).

  18. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  19. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Scott P.; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J.; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Thomas M.; Coombes, R. Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer. PMID:24493753

  20. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touska, Filip; Sattler, Simon; Malsch, Philipp; Lewis, Richard J.; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics. PMID:28867800

  1. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Touska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins (CTXs are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1 into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC. Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  2. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  3. Fast voltage gating of Ca2+ release in frog skeletal muscle revealed by supercharging pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A M; Vergara, J L

    1998-09-01

    1. In single frog skeletal muscle fibres, we utilized supercharging voltage clamp command pulses to boost the rate of depolarization in the transverse tubular system (T-system) such that 95 % of steady-state potential is achieved in muscle fibres indicate that peripheral regions of the T-system are not significantly overcompensated under these conditions. 2. We explored the impact of accelerating T-system depolarization on voltage-dependent events of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling by measuring charge movement currents (CMCs) and Ca2+ fluorescence transients in response to both supercharging and conventional step pulses. 3. When compared with CMCs elicited by step pulses, supercharging CMCs are larger, and their kinetics more closely resemble those of gating current records reported for ionic channels. Furthermore, they decay bi-exponentially (tau fast range, 1.3-1.8 ms; tau slow range, 7.3-11.9 ms), whereas step CMCs fall with a single exponential time course (tau range, 12.5-26.7 ms). 4. Similarly, supercharging produces a distinct acceleration in Ca2+ release transients, which show little evidence of the voltage-dependent onset latencies previously encountered using step pulses. 5. The use of this novel methodology in skeletal muscle unveils a previously undetected component of charge movement, the rapid, voltage-dependent recruitment of which may provide the basis for understanding the fast gating of physiological E-C coupling.

  4. Role of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers in the treatment of chronic pain: Potential uses in clinical practice based on available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2018-02-26

    Once patients have failed first line therapy, there is an apparent lack of knowledge on how to proceed with choosing subsequent therapy. To choose amongst alternative agents, an understanding of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and available evidence in targeting various pain conditions is necessary. This article focuses on the use of the carboxamide class of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, eslicarbazepine acetate) for adjunct pain medication management; including research updates in pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and evidence for pain along on this therapeutic group with promising future areas of research. Although evidence for voltage-gated sodium channel blockers in chronic pain management is limited, emerging research has identified this area as promising for additional clinical trials to better guide clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Dysfunction of the Scn8a Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Alters Sleep Architecture, Reduces Diurnal Corticosterone Levels, and Enhances Spatial Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Papale, Ligia Assumpção [UNIFESP; Paul, Ketema N.; Sawyer, Nikki T.; Manns, Joseph R.; Tufik, Sergio [UNIFESP; Escayg, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for the initiation and propagation of transient depolarizing currents and play a critical role in the electrical signaling between neurons. A null mutation in the VGSC gene SCN8A, which encodes the transmembrane protein Na(v)1.6, was identified previously in a human family. Heterozygous mutation carriers displayed a range of phenotypes, including ataxia, cognitive deficits, and emotional instability. A possible role for SCN8A was also prop...

  6. Direct Evidence of Conformational Changes Associated with Voltage Gating in a Voltage Sensor Protein by Time-Resolved X-ray/Neutron Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The voltage sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated cation (e.g., Na+, K+) channels central to neurological signal transmission can function as a distinct module. When linked to an otherwise voltage-insensitive, ion-selective membrane pore, the VSD imparts voltage sensitivity to the channel. Proteins homologous with the VSD have recently been found to function themselves as voltage-gated proton channels or to impart voltage sensitivity to enzymes. Determining the conformational changes associated with voltage gating in the VSD itself in the absence of a pore domain thereby gains importance. We report the direct measurement of changes in the scattering-length density (SLD) profile of the VSD protein, vectorially oriented within a reconstituted phospholipid bilayer membrane, as a function of the transmembrane electric potential by time-resolved X-ray and neutron interferometry. The changes in the experimental SLD profiles for both polarizing and depolarizing potentials with respect to zero potential were found to extend over the entire length of the isolated VSD’s profile structure. The characteristics of the changes observed were in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of a related membrane system, suggesting an initial interpretation of these changes in terms of the VSD’s atomic-level 3-D structure. PMID:24697545

  7. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis: a case illustrating the neuropsychiatric and PET/CT features with clinical and imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, Liesl; Hung, Te-Jui; Al-Ogaili, Zeyad; Moschilla, Girolamo; Knezevic, Wally

    2016-12-01

    To illustrate the neuropsychiatric and imaging findings in a confirmed case of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis. Case report and review of the literature. A 64-year-old man presented with several months' history of obsessive thoughts and compulsions associated with faciobrachial dystonic seizures. He had no significant past medical and psychiatric history. Physical examinations revealed only mildly increased tone in the left upper limb. Bedside cognitive testing was normal. Positron-emission tomography showed intense symmetrical uptake in the corpus striatum. No underlying malignancy was identified on whole body imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, lumbar puncture and electroencephalogram were normal. Serum voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies were strongly positive. The patient had a favourable response to antiepileptic drugs, oral steroids and immunotherapy. Voltage-gated potassium channel limbic encephalitis characteristically presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms and temporal lobe seizures. Positron-emission tomography-computed tomography can be a useful adjunct to the clinical and biochemical work-up. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Pyrethroids differentially alter voltage-gated sodium channels from the honeybee central olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadala, Aklesso; Charreton, Mercedes; Jakob, Ingrid; Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Chahine, Mohamed; Le Conte, Yves; Charnet, Pierre; Collet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central 'antennal lobe neurons' (ALNs) in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1) an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2) a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and processing of

  9. Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C.; Gunning, Simon J.; Lewis, Richard J.; Nicholson, Graham M.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na v ) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na v channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons, P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na v currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na v channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning

  10. Blockade of voltage-gated K+ currents in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells by MK801

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Min Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MK801 (dizocilpine, a phencyclidine (PCP derivative, is a potent noncompetitive antagonist of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr. Another PCP derivative, ketamine, was reported to block voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels, which was independent of NMDAr function. Kv currents are major regulators of the membrane potential (Em and excitability of muscles and neurons. Here, we investigated the effect of MK801 on the Kv channels and Em in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells (RMASMCs. We used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to analyze the effect of MK801 enantiomers on Kv channels and Em. (+MK801 inhibited Kv channels in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 89.1 ± 13.1 μM, Hill coefficient of 1.05 ± 0.08. The inhibition was voltage- and state- independent. (+MK801 didn't influence steady-state activation and inactivation of Kv channels. (+MK801 treatment depolarized Em in a concentration-dependent manner and concomitantly decreased membrane conductance. (−MK801 also similarly inhibited the Kv channels (IC50 of 134.0 ± 17.5 μM, Hill coefficient of 0.87 ± 0.09. These results indicate that MK801 directly inhibits the Kv channel in a state-independent manner in RMASMCs. This MK801-mediated inhibition of Kv channels should be considered when assessing the various pharmacological effects produced by MK801, such as schizophrenia, neuroprotection, and hypertension.

  11. The Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Subfamily KQT Member 4 (KCNQ4) Displays Parallel Evolution in Echolocating Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Han, Naijian; Franchini, Lucía F.; Xu, Huihui; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals that use highly developed laryngeal echolocation, a sensory mechanism based on the ability to emit laryngeal sounds and interpret the returning echoes to identify objects. Although this capability allows bats to orientate and hunt in complete darkness, endowing them with great survival advantages, the genetic bases underlying the evolution of bat echolocation are still largely unknown. Echolocation requires high-frequency hearing that in mammals is largely dependent on somatic electromotility of outer hair cells. Then, understanding the molecular evolution of outer hair cell genes might help to unravel the evolutionary history of echolocation. In this work, we analyzed the molecular evolution of two key outer hair cell genes: the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ4 and CHRNA10, the gene encoding the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. We reconstructed the phylogeny of bats based on KCNQ4 and CHRNA10 protein and nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree built using KCNQ4 amino acid sequences showed that two paraphyletic clades of laryngeal echolocating bats grouped together, with eight shared substitutions among particular lineages. In addition, our analyses indicated that two of these parallel substitutions, M388I and P406S, were probably fixed under positive selection and could have had a strong functional impact on KCNQ4. Moreover, our results indicated that KCNQ4 evolved under positive selection in the ancestral lineage leading to mammals, suggesting that this gene might have been important for the evolution of mammalian hearing. On the other hand, we found that CHRNA10, a gene that evolved adaptively in the mammalian lineage, was under strong purifying selection in bats. Thus, the CHRNA10 amino acid tree did not show echolocating bat monophyly and reproduced the bat species tree. These results suggest that only a subset of hearing genes could underlie the evolution of echolocation. The present work continues to

  12. The batrachotoxin receptor on the voltage-gated sodium channel is guarded by the channel activation gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Ling; Hadid, David; Ragsdale, David S

    2002-04-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX), from South American frogs of the genus Phyllobates, irreversibly activates voltage-gated sodium channels. Previous work demonstrated that a phenylalanine residue approximately halfway through pore-lining transmembrane segment IVS6 is a critical determinant of channel sensitivity to BTX. In this study, we introduced a series of mutations at this site in the Na(v)1.3 sodium channel, expressed wild-type and mutant channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and examined their sensitivity to BTX using voltage clamp recording. We found that substitution of either alanine or isoleucine strongly reduced channel sensitivity to toxin, whereas cysteine, tyrosine, or tryptophan decreased toxin action only modestly. These data suggest an electrostatic ligand-receptor interaction at this site, possibly involving a charged tertiary amine on BTX. We then used a mutant channel (mutant F1710C) with intermediate toxin sensitivity to examine the properties of the toxin-receptor reaction in more detail. In contrast to wild-type channels, which bind BTX almost irreversibly, toxin dissociation from mutant channels was rapid, but only when the channels were open, not when they were closed. These data suggest the closed activation gate trapped bound toxin. Although BTX dissociation required channel activation, it was, paradoxically, slowed by strong membrane depolarization, suggesting additional state-dependent and/or electrostatic influences on the toxin binding reaction. We propose that BTX moves to and from its receptor through the cytoplasmic end of the open ion-conducting pore, in a manner similar to that of quaternary local anesthetics like QX314.

  13. The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily KQT member 4 (KCNQ4) displays parallel evolution in echolocating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Han, Naijian; Franchini, Lucía F; Xu, Huihui; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-05-01

    Bats are the only mammals that use highly developed laryngeal echolocation, a sensory mechanism based on the ability to emit laryngeal sounds and interpret the returning echoes to identify objects. Although this capability allows bats to orientate and hunt in complete darkness, endowing them with great survival advantages, the genetic bases underlying the evolution of bat echolocation are still largely unknown. Echolocation requires high-frequency hearing that in mammals is largely dependent on somatic electromotility of outer hair cells. Then, understanding the molecular evolution of outer hair cell genes might help to unravel the evolutionary history of echolocation. In this work, we analyzed the molecular evolution of two key outer hair cell genes: the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ4 and CHRNA10, the gene encoding the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. We reconstructed the phylogeny of bats based on KCNQ4 and CHRNA10 protein and nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree built using KCNQ4 amino acid sequences showed that two paraphyletic clades of laryngeal echolocating bats grouped together, with eight shared substitutions among particular lineages. In addition, our analyses indicated that two of these parallel substitutions, M388I and P406S, were probably fixed under positive selection and could have had a strong functional impact on KCNQ4. Moreover, our results indicated that KCNQ4 evolved under positive selection in the ancestral lineage leading to mammals, suggesting that this gene might have been important for the evolution of mammalian hearing. On the other hand, we found that CHRNA10, a gene that evolved adaptively in the mammalian lineage, was under strong purifying selection in bats. Thus, the CHRNA10 amino acid tree did not show echolocating bat monophyly and reproduced the bat species tree. These results suggest that only a subset of hearing genes could underlie the evolution of echolocation. The present work continues to

  14. Knockdown resistance (kdr) of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti population in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Penny Humaidah; Prastowo, Joko; Widyasari, Anis; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-06-05

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector of several arthropod-borne viral infections in the tropics profoundly affecting humans, such as dengue fever (DF), West Nile (WN), chikungunya and more recently Zika. Eradication of Aedes still largely depends on insecticides, which is the most cost-effective strategy, and often inefficient due to resistance development in exposed Aedes populations. We here conducted a study of Ae. aegypti resistance towards several insecticides regularly used in the city of Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. Aedes aegypti egg samples were collected with ovitraps and thereafter hatched in the insectary of the Gadjah Mada University. The F0 generation was used for all bioassay-related experiments and knockdown resistance (kdr) assays. Results clearly showed resistance development of Ae. aegypti against tested insecticides. Mortalities of Ae. aegypti were less than 90% with highest resistance observed against 0.75% permethrin. Mosquitoes from the southern parts of Denpasar presented high level of resistance pattern in comparison to those from the western and northern parts of Denpasar. Kdr analysis of voltage-gated sodium channel (Vgsc) gene showed significant association to S989P and V1016G mutations linked to resistance phenotypes against 0.75% permethrin. Conversely, Ae. aegypti F1534C gene mutation did not result in any significant correlation to resistance development. Periodically surveillance of insecticide resistances in Ae. aegypti mosquitoes will help local public health authorities to set better goals and allow proper evaluation of on-going mosquito control strategies. Initial detection of insecticide resistance will contribute to conduct proper actions in delaying mosquito resistance development such as insecticide rotation or combination of compounds in order to prolong chemical efficacy in combating Ae. aegypti vectors in Indonesia.

  15. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Analyses of Nav1.9 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel by Establishing a Heterologous Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi; Xiao, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yunxiao; Tang, Dongfang; Wu, Xinzhou; Tang, Cheng; Chen, Minzhi; Shi, Xiaoliu; Chen, Ping; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Nav1. 9 voltage-gated sodium channel is preferentially expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons. Recent progresses have proved its role in pain sensation, but our understanding of Nav1.9, in general, has lagged behind because of limitations in heterologous expression in mammal cells. In this work, functional expression of human Nav1.9 (hNav1.9) was achieved by fusing GFP to the C-terminal of hNav1.9 in ND7/23 cells, which has been proved to be a reliable method to the electrophysiological and pharmacological studies of hNav1.9. By using the hNav1.9 expression system, we investigated the electrophysiological properties of four mutations of hNav1.9 (K419N, A582T, A842P, and F1689L), whose electrophysiological functions have not been determined yet. The four mutations significantly caused positive shift of the steady-state fast inactivation and therefore increased hNav1.9 activity, consistent with the phenotype of painful peripheral neuropathy. Meanwhile, the effects of inflammatory mediators on hNav1.9 were also investigated. Impressively, histamine was found for the first time to enhance hNav1.9 activity, indicating its vital role in hNav1.9 modulating inflammatory pain. Taken together, our research provided a useful platform for hNav1.9 studies and new insight into mechanism of hNav1.9 linking to pain. PMID:29213238

  17. Molecular insights into the local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels using hydroxylated analogues of mexiletine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eDesaphy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003, suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogues by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block and 10 Hz (use-dependent block stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryl moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug ammine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these results confirm our former hypothesis showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with

  18. Effect of voltage-gated sodium channels blockers on motility and viability of human sperm in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Ahmad Gakhar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test the effect of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs blockers on the motility and viability of human sperm in-vitro and to evaluate the tested compounds as potential contact spermicidal. Methods: Sperm samples were obtained from healthy nonsmoking volunteers of age 25-30 years who had not taken any drug 3 months before and during the course of the study. The effect of VGSCs blockers evaluated from two pharmacological classes including antiarrhythmic (amiodarone, procainamide and disopyramide and antiepileptic (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, and lamotrigine drugs. They were tested on the in-vitro motility and viability of human sperm using Computer Assisted Semen Analyzer. Results: All tested drugs except oxcarbazepine showed dose dependent inhibition of total motility with significant reduction (P<0.05 at the maximum concentration of 200 μM when compared with the control. The concentrations of drugs that reduced total sperm motility to 50% of control (half maximal inhibitory concentration were 2.76, 14.16 and 20.29 μM for phenytoin, lamotrigine and carbamazepine, respectively; and 2.53, 5.32 and 0.37 μM for amiodarone, procainamide and disopyramide, respectively. The anti-motility effects were reversible to various degrees. There was statistically insignificant difference in the inhibition of sperm viability among amiodarone, procainamide and disopyramide. Phenytoin demonstrated the most potent spermicidal action. Conclusions: VGSCs blockers have significant adverse effects on in-vitro motility of human spermatozoa. So in-vivo studies are required to determine their potential toxicological effects on human semen quality, which is an important factor regarding fertility. Moreover, these drugs have the potential to be developed into contact spermicidal.

  19. Intron retention in mRNA encoding ancillary subunit of insect voltage-gated sodium channel modulates channel expression, gating regulation and drug sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline M Bourdin

    Full Text Available Insect voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels are formed by a well-known pore-forming α-subunit encoded by para-like gene and ancillary subunits related to TipE from the mutation "temperature-induced-paralysis locus E." The role of these ancillary subunits in the modulation of biophysical and pharmacological properties of Na(+ currents are not enough documented. The unique neuronal ancillary subunit TipE-homologous protein 1 of Drosophila melanogaster (DmTEH1 strongly enhances the expression of insect Nav channels when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Here we report the cloning and functional expression of two neuronal DmTEH1-homologs of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, PaTEH1A and PaTEH1B, encoded by a single bicistronic gene. In PaTEH1B, the second exon encoding the last 11-amino-acid residues of PaTEH1A is shifted to 3'UTR by the retention of a 96-bp intron-containing coding-message, thus generating a new C-terminal end. We investigated the gating and pharmacological properties of the Drosophila Nav channel variant (DmNav1-1 co-expressed with DmTEH1, PaTEH1A, PaTEH1B or a truncated mutant PaTEH1Δ(270-280 in Xenopus oocytes. PaTEH1B caused a 2.2-fold current density decrease, concomitant with an equivalent α-subunit incorporation decrease in the plasma membrane, compared to PaTEH1A and PaTEH1Δ(270-280. PaTEH1B positively shifted the voltage-dependences of activation and slow inactivation of DmNav1-1 channels to more positive potentials compared to PaTEH1A, suggesting that the C-terminal end of both proteins may influence the function of the voltage-sensor and the pore of Nav channel. Interestingly, our findings showed that the sensitivity of DmNav1-1 channels to lidocaine and to the pyrazoline-type insecticide metabolite DCJW depends on associated TEH1-like subunits. In conclusion, our work demonstrates for the first time that density, gating and pharmacological properties of Nav channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes can be

  20. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  1. Exploring the Structure of the Voltage-gated Na+ Channel by an Engineered Drug Access Pathway to the Receptor Site for Local Anesthetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na+ channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:24947510

  2. Exploring the structure of the voltage-gated Na+ channel by an engineered drug access pathway to the receptor site for local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-08-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na(+) channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channels. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum by selective activators of voltage-gated sodium channels: role of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes de Oliveira, Juliano; Teixeira, Cleber E; Arantes, Eliane C; de Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the capacity of voltage-gated Na(+) channel activators such as batrachotoxin, aconitine, veratridine, Ts1 (formerly Tityus gamma-toxin), and brevetoxin-3 to induce relaxation of rabbit isolated corpus cavernosum (RbCC) and the pharmacologic mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The voltage-gated Na(+) channels of the corpus cavernosum are essential for erectile function. A number of biologic toxins exert their effects by modifying the properties of these channels. Male New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Strips of RbCC were transferred to 10-mL organ baths containing oxygenated and warmed Krebs solution. The RbCC strips were connected to force-displacement transducers, and changes in isometric force were recorded using a PowerLab 400 data acquisition system. Corporeal smooth muscle was precontracted submaximally with phenylephrine (10 micromol/L). The binding site-2 (batrachotoxin, aconitine, and veratridine) and binding site-5 (brevetoxin-3) voltage-gated Na(+) channel activators caused slow-onset RbCC relaxations, and the binding site-4 activator Ts1 produced transitory relaxations followed by a return to baseline. The Na(+)channel blockers tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin (0.1 micromol/L each) abolished the relaxations induced by these agonists. Similarly, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 micromol/L) markedly reduced the relaxations and l-arginine (1 mmol/L) restored the relaxations. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxidiazolo[4,3-alpha] quinoxalin-1-one (10 micromol/L) reduced the relaxations, and the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor sildenafil (100 nmol/L) significantly potentiated the relaxations by all activators. Our results indicate that the relaxations evoked by selective activators of voltage-gated Na(+) channels are mediated by the release of nitric oxide from nitrergic nerves and the activation of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine

  4. Ankyrin-3 is a novel binding partner of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 implicated in renal magnesium handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    San-Cristobal, Pedro; Lainez, Sergio; Dimke, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.1, was recently identified as a causative gene in isolated dominant hypomagnesemia. The channel is situated in the distal convoluted tubule, where it participates in maintaining a favorable electrical gradient for driving magnesium ion into the cell through...... as compared to whole kidney. Electrophysiology studies performed in HEK293 cells expressing Kv1.1 showed that ANK3 significantly inhibited Kv1.1-mediated currents (267 compared to 125 pA/pF) for control and ANK3, respectively. Finally, to evaluate a potential role of ANK3 in magnesium handling, the intrarenal...

  5. Data and calculus on isobolographic analysis to determine the antinociceptive interaction between calcium channel blocker and a TRPV1 blocker in acute pain model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Determining antinociceptive interaction between Phα1β toxin (a voltage gated calcium channel blocker and SB366791 (selective TRPV1 antagonist may have both clinical and mechanistic implications for the pain management. This data in brief article is associated to the research paper “Synergistic antinociceptive effect of a calcium channel blocker and a TRPV1 blocker in an acute pain model in mice”. This material supports the isobolographic analysis performed with the above drugs and shows: data of the dose response curves of the agents given as single drug or combination regimens. Mathematics and statistical processing of dose response curves, proportion of drugs dosage to be used in the combination, calculus of theoretical additive DE20 dose as well as experimentally obtained DE20 are provided. It is also presented details of statistical comparison between theoretical and experimentally obtained DE20.

  6. GABA(A) Increases Calcium in Subventricular Zone Astrocyte-Like Cells Through L- and T-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Stephanie Z; Platel, Jean-Claude; Nielsen, Jakob V

    2010-01-01

    intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in SVZ astrocytes. To monitor Ca(2+) activity selectively in astrocyte-like cells, we used two lines of transgenic mice expressing either GFP fused to a Gq-coupled receptor or DsRed under the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP) promoter. GABA(A) receptor activation......In the adult neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ), the behavior of astrocyte-like cells and some of their functions depend on changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels and tonic GABA(A) receptor activation. However, it is unknown whether, and if so how, GABA(A) receptor activity regulates......-like cells to 75%, suggesting that the majority of SVZ astrocytes express functional VGCCs. SVZ astrocytes also displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) activity, the frequency of which was regulated by tonic GABA(A) receptor activation. These data support a role for ambient GABA in tonically regulating intracellular Ca...

  7. Calcium Domains around Single and Clustered IP3 Receptors and Their Modulation by Buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Rüdiger, S.; Nagaiah, Ch.; Warnecke, G.; Shuai, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    We study Ca2+ release through single and clustered IP3 receptor channels on the ER membrane under presence of buffer proteins. Our computational scheme couples reaction-diffusion equations and a Markovian channel model and allows our investigating the effects of buffer proteins on local calcium concentrations and channel gating. We find transient and stationary elevations of calcium concentrations around active channels and show how they determine release amplitude. Transient calcium domains ...

  8. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours by studying voltage-gated Na + channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na + currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na + channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  9. Binding of the anticonvulsant drug lamotrigine and the neurotoxin batrachotoxin to voltage-gated sodium channels induces conformational changes associated with block and steady-state activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Nora B; O'Reilly, Andrias; Duclohier, Hervé; Wallace, B A

    2003-03-21

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are dynamic membrane proteins characterized by rapid conformational changes that switch the molecule between closed resting, activated, and inactivated states. Sodium channels are specifically blocked by the anticonvulsant drug lamotrigine, which preferentially binds to the channel pore in the inactivated open state. Batrachotoxin is a lipid-soluble alkaloid that causes steady-state activation and binds in the inner pore of the sodium channel with overlapping but distinct molecular determinants from those of lamotrigine. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy on purified voltage-gated sodium channels from Electrophorus electricus, the secondary structures associated with the mixture of states present at equilibrium in the absence of these ligands were compared with specific stabilized states in their presence. As the channel shifts to open states, there appears to be a significant change in secondary structure to a more alpha-helical conformation. The observed changes are consistent with increased order involving the S6 segments that form the pore, the domain III-IV linker, and the P-loops that form the outer pore and selectivity filter. A molecular model has been constructed for the sodium channel based on its homology with the pore-forming regions of bacterial potassium channels, and automated docking of the crystal structure of lamotrigine with this model produces a structure in which the close contacts of the drug are with the residues previously identified by mutational studies as forming the binding site for this drug.

  10. G Protein Regulation of Neuronal Calcium Channels: Back to the Future

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6 (2015), s. 890-906 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : voltage gated calcium channels Cav * G proteins * GPCR Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.931, year: 2015

  11. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... absorb calcium as well. Sufficient calcium intake from food, and supplements if needed, can slow the rate of bone loss. Women of childbearing ... calcium absorption. People who eat a variety of foods don't have to consider ... include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well ...

  12. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60years, functional studies of Na(V)s have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic Na(V)s have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNa(V)s as templates for drug development efforts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Molecular Surface of JZTX-V (β-Theraphotoxin-Cj2a Interacting with Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtype NaV1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Luo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs; NaV1.1–NaV1.9 have been proven to be critical in controlling the function of excitable cells, and human genetic evidence shows that aberrant function of these channels causes channelopathies, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, paralytic myotonia, and pain. The effects of peptide toxins, especially those isolated from spider venom, have shed light on the structure–function relationship of these channels. However, most of these toxins have not been analyzed in detail. In particular, the bioactive faces of these toxins have not been determined. Jingzhaotoxin (JZTX-V (also known as β-theraphotoxin-Cj2a is a 29-amino acid peptide toxin isolated from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao. JZTX-V adopts an inhibitory cysteine knot (ICK motif and has an inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. Previous experiments have shown that JZTX-V has an inhibitory effect on TTX-S and TTX-R sodium currents on rat DRG cells with IC50 values of 27.6 and 30.2 nM, respectively, and is able to shift the activation and inactivation curves to the depolarizing and the hyperpolarizing direction, respectively. Here, we show that JZTX-V has a much stronger inhibitory effect on NaV1.4, the isoform of voltage-gated sodium channels predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle cells, with an IC50 value of 5.12 nM, compared with IC50 values of 61.7–2700 nM for other heterologously expressed NaV1 subtypes. Furthermore, we investigated the bioactive surface of JZTX-V by alanine-scanning the effect of toxin on NaV1.4 and demonstrate that the bioactive face of JZTX-V is composed of three hydrophobic (W5, M6, and W7 and two cationic (R20 and K22 residues. Our results establish that, consistent with previous assumptions, JZTX-V is a Janus-faced toxin which may be a useful tool for the further investigation of the structure and function of sodium channels.

  14. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K......+ channels and Src were analyzed in vivo in mice lacking either or both PTPs. Lack of either PTP increases Kv channel activity and phosphorylation in Schwann cells, indicating these PTPs inhibit Kv current amplitude in vivo. Open probability and unitary conductance of Kv channels are unchanged, suggesting...... an effect on channel number or organization. PTPalpha inhibits Kv channels more strongly than PTPepsilon; this correlates with constitutive association of PTPalpha with Kv2.1, driven by membranal localization of PTPalpha. PTPalpha, but not PTPepsilon, activates Src in sciatic nerve extracts, suggesting Src...

  15. A non-extensive statistical mechanical approach to define the equilibrium value function in the kinetics of voltage-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Rıza

    2007-01-01

    We present a model for the steady-state (or equilibrium) behaviors of the voltage-gated ion channels in cell membranes using the non-extensive or generalized statistical mechanics. The equilibrium value function in the gating kinetics of batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from a squid optic nerve in planar bilayers are calculated for different values of entropic index ( q) which characterizes the degree of non-extensivity of Tsallis’ entropy and the fractal structure of the channels. It is found that in the limit q→1, the results of calculation reduce to the results described by the well-known Boltzmann statistics or the extensive physics. For the non-extensive case ( q≠1), a small deviation with respect to the Boltzmann curve which was observed in a great variety of physical systems occurred.

  16. Modulation of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels by pumiliotoxin 251D: a "joint venture" alkaloid from arthropods and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Thomas; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Maertens, Chantal; Cuypers, Eva; Sudau, Alexander; Nubbemeyer, Udo; Mebs, Dietrich; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Certain amphibians provide themselves with a chemical defense by accumulating lipophilic alkaloids into skin glands from dietary arthropods. Examples of such alkaloids are pumiliotoxins (PTXs). In general, PTXs are known as positive modulators of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Unlike other PTXs, PTX 251D does not share this characteristic. However, mice and insect studies showed that PTX 251D is highly toxic and to date the basis of its toxicity remains unknown. In this work, we searched for the possible target of PTX 251D. The toxin was therefore made synthetically and tested on four VGSCs (mammalian rNa(v)1.2/beta(1), rNa(v)1.4/beta(1), hNa(v)1.5/beta(1) and insect Para/tipE) and five voltage-gated potassium channels (VGPCs) (mammalian rK(v)1.1-1.2, hK(v)1.3, hK(v)11.1 (hERG) and insect Shaker IR) expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. PTX 251D not only inhibited the Na(+) influx through the mammalian VGSCs but also affected the steady-state activation and inactivation. Interestingly, in the insect ortholog, the inactivation process was dramatically affected. Additionally, PTX 251D inhibited the K(+) efflux through all five tested VGPCs and slowed down the deactivation kinetics of the mammalian VGPCs. hK(v)1.3 was the most sensitive channel, with an IC(50) value 10.8+/-0.5 microM. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a PTX affecting VGPCs.

  17. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  18. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  19. Single-molecule folding mechanism of an EF-hand neuronal calcium sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Otazo, Mariela R.; Bellucci, Luca

    2013-01-01

    EF-hand calcium sensors respond structurally to changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, triggering diverse cellular responses and resulting in broad interactomes. Despite impressive advances in decoding their structure-function relationships, the folding mechanism of neuronal calcium sensors...... is still elusive. We used single-molecule optical tweezers to study the folding mechanism of the human neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS1). Two intermediate structures induced by Ca2+ binding to the EF-hands were observed during refolding. The complete folding of the C domain is obligatory for the folding...

  20. Differential effect of T-type voltage-gated calcium channel disruption on renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Anne D; Andersen, Henrik; Cardel, Majken

    2014-01-01

    of two T-type Cav knock-out mice strains. Continuous recordings of blood pressure and heart rate, and para-aminohippurate clearance (renal plasma flow) and inulin clearance (GFR) were performed in conscious, chronically catheterized, wild type and Cav 3.1-/- and Cav 3.2-/- mice. Contractility of afferent...

  1. Distinct modulation of inactivation by a residue in the pore domain of voltage-gated Na+channels: mechanistic insights from recent crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Rene; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2018-01-12

    Inactivation of voltage-gated Na + channels (VGSC) is essential for the regulation of cellular excitability. The molecular rearrangement underlying inactivation is thought to involve the intracellular linker between domains III and IV serving as inactivation lid, the receptor for the lid (domain III S4-S5 linker) and the pore-lining S6 segements. To better understand the role of the domain IV S6 segment in inactivation we performed a cysteine scanning mutagenesis of this region in rNav 1.4 channels and screened the constructs for perturbations in the voltage-dependence of steady state inactivation. This screen was performed in the background of wild-type channels and in channels carrying the mutation K1237E, which profoundly alters both permeation and gating-properties. Of all tested constructs the mutation I1581C was unique in that the mutation-induced gating changes were strongly influenced by the mutational background. This suggests that I1581 is involved in specific short-range interactions during inactivation. In recently published crystal structures VGSCs the respective amino acids homologous to I1581 appear to control a bend of the S6 segment which is critical to the gating process. Furthermore, I1581 may be involved in the transmission of the movement of the DIII voltage-sensor to the domain IV S6 segment.

  2. Channelopathies in Cav1.1, Cav1.3, and Cav1.4 voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striessnig, Jörg; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Koschak, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels couple membrane depolarization to Ca2+-dependent intracellular signaling events. This is achieved by mediating Ca2+ ion influx or by direct conformational coupling to intracellular Ca2+ release channels. The family of Cav1 channels, also termed L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), is uniquely sensitive to organic Ca2+ channel blockers and expressed in many electrically excitable tissues. In this review, we summarize the role of LTCCs for human diseases caused by genetic Ca2+ channel defects (channelopathies). LTCC dysfunction can result from structural aberrations within their pore-forming alpha1 subunits causing hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia sensitivity (Cav1.1 alpha1), incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2; Cav1.4 alpha1), and Timothy syndrome (Cav1.2 alpha1; reviewed separately in this issue). Cav1.3 alpha1 mutations have not been reported yet in humans, but channel loss of function would likely affect sinoatrial node function and hearing. Studies in mice revealed that LTCCs indirectly also contribute to neurological symptoms in Ca2+ channelopathies affecting non-LTCCs, such as Cav2.1 alpha1 in tottering mice. Ca2+ channelopathies provide exciting disease-related molecular detail that led to important novel insight not only into disease pathophysiology but also to mechanisms of channel function.

  3. Species selective resistance of cardiac muscle voltage gated sodium channels: characterization of brevetoxin and ciguatoxin binding sites in rats and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechraoui, Marie-Yasmine Bottein; Wacksman, Jeremy J; Ramsdell, John S

    2006-11-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) and ciguatoxins (CTXs) are two suites of dinoflagellate derived marine polyether neurotoxins that target the voltage gated sodium channel (VGSC). PbTxs are commonly responsible for massive fish kills and unusual mortalities in marine mammals. CTXs, more often noted for human intoxication, are suspected causes of fish and marine mammal intoxication, although this has never been reported in the field. VGSCs, present in the membrane of all excitable cells including those found in skeletal muscle, nervous and heart tissues, are found as isoforms with differential expression within species and tissues. To investigate the tissue and species susceptibility to these biotoxins, we determined the relative affinity of PbTx-2 and -3 and P-CTX-1 to native VGSCs in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of rat and the marine teleost fish Centropristis striata by competitive binding in the presence of [(3)H]PbTx-3. No differences between rat and fish were observed in the binding of PbTxs and CTX to either brain or skeletal muscle. However, [(3)H]PbTx-3 showed substantial lower affinity to rat heart tissue while in the fish it bound with the same affinity to heart than to brain or skeletal muscle. These new insights into PbTxs and CTXs binding in fish and mammalian excitable tissues indicate a species related resistance of heart VGSC in the rat; yet, with comparable sensitivity between the species for brain and skeletal muscle.

  4. Frequency of V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Aedes aegypti in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leslie C; Ponce, Gustavo; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lopez, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2015-06-01

    The V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been associated with resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. A study was carried out to determine the frequency of I1016 and C1534 by real-time PCR in five natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela during 2008, 2010 and 2012, as well as in a strain selected with 0.14 µg of deltamethrin for 15 generations. In natural populations, frequencies of I1016 varied between 0.01 and 0.37, and frequencies of C1534 between 0.35 and 1.0. In the Pampanito strain, the frequency of I1016 increased from 0.02 in F1 up to 0.5 in F15 and from 0.35 up to fixation for C1534 after selection with deltamethrin. The results showed that C1534 frequencies are higher than I1016 frequencies in natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela, and that deltamethrin selected the C1534 more rapidly than I1016. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Voltage-gated ion channels in the axon initial segment of human cortical pyramidal cells and their relationship with chandelier cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria Carmen; DeFelipe, Javier; Muñoz, Alberto

    2006-02-21

    The axon initial segment (AIS) of pyramidal cells is a critical region for the generation of action potentials and for the control of pyramidal cell activity. Here we show that Na+ and K+ voltage-gated channels, together with other molecules involved in the localization of ion channels, are distributed asymmetrically in the AIS of pyramidal cells situated in the human temporal neocortex. There is a high density of Na+ channels distributed along the length of the AIS together with the associated proteins spectrin betaIV and ankyrin G. In contrast, Kv1.2 channels are associated with the adhesion molecule Caspr2, and they are mostly localized to the distal region of the AIS. In general, the distal region of the AIS is targeted by the GABAergic axon terminals of chandelier cells, whereas the proximal region is innervated, mostly by other types of GABAergic interneurons. We suggest that this molecular segregation and the consequent regional specialization of the GABAergic input to the AIS of pyramidal cells may have important functional implications for the control of pyramidal cell activity.

  6. The Venom of the Spider Selenocosmia Jiafu Contains Various Neurotoxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaotun Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenocosmia jiafu is a medium-sized theraphosid spider and an attractive source of venom, because it can be bred in captivity and it produces large amounts of venom. We performed reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS analyses and showed that S. jiafu venom contains hundreds of peptides with a predominant mass of 3000–4500 Da. Patch clamp analyses indicated that the venom could inhibit voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. The venom exhibited inhibitory effects on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R Na+ currents and T-type Ca2+ currents, suggesting the presence of antagonists to both channel types and providing a valuable tool for the investigation of these channels and for drug development. Intra-abdominal injection of the venom had severe toxic effects on cockroaches and caused death at higher concentrations. The LD50 was 84.24 μg/g of body weight in the cockroach. However, no visible symptoms or behavioral changes were detected after intraperitoneal injection of the venom into mice even at doses up to 10 mg/kg body weight. Our results provide a basis for further case-by-case investigations of peptide toxins from this venom.

  7. Thermal melt circular dichroism spectroscopic studies for identifying stabilising amphipathic molecules for the voltage-gated sodium channel NavMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Sam M; Sula, Altin; Wallace, B A

    2017-09-19

    Purified integral membrane proteins require amphipathic molecules to maintain their solubility in aqueous solutions. These complexes, in turn, are used in studies to characterise the protein structures by a variety of biophysical and structural techniques, including spectroscopy, crystallography, and cryo-electron microscopy. Typically the amphilphiles used have been detergent molecules, but more recently they have included amphipols, which are polymers of different sizes and compositions designed to create smaller, more well-defined solubilised forms of the membrane proteins. In this study we used circular dichroism spectroscopy to compare the secondary structures and thermal stabilities of the NavMs voltage-gated sodium channel in different amphipols and detergents as a means of identifying amphipathic environments that maximally maintain the protein structure whilst providing a stabilising environment. These types of characterisations also have potential as means of screening for sample types that may be more suitable for crystallisation and/or cryo-electron microscopy structure determinations. © 2017 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Docking Simulation of the Binding Interactions of Saxitoxin Analogs Produced by the Marine Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum to the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. Durán-Riveroll

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin (STX and its analogs are paralytic alkaloid neurotoxins that block the voltage-gated sodium channel pore (Nav, impeding passage of Na+ ions into the intracellular space, and thereby preventing the action potential in the peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle. The marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum produces an array of such toxins, including the recently discovered benzoyl analogs, for which the mammalian toxicities are essentially unknown. We subjected STX and its analogs to a theoretical docking simulation based upon two alternative tri-dimensional models of the Nav1.4 to find a relationship between the binding properties and the known mammalian toxicity of selected STX analogs. We inferred hypothetical toxicities for the benzoyl analogs from the modeled values. We demonstrate that these toxins exhibit different binding modes with similar free binding energies and that these alternative binding modes are equally probable. We propose that the principal binding that governs ligand recognition is mediated by electrostatic interactions. Our simulation constitutes the first in silico modeling study on benzoyl-type paralytic toxins and provides an approach towards a better understanding of the mode of action of STX and its analogs.

  9. The voltage-gated sodium channel EF-hands form an interaction with the III-IV linker that is disturbed by disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardill, Bernd R; Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Van Petegem, Filip

    2018-03-14

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V ) are responsible for the rapid depolarization of many excitable cells. They readily inactivate, a process where currents diminish after milliseconds of channel opening. They are also targets for a multitude of disease-causing mutations, many of which have been shown to affect inactivation. A cluster of disease mutations, linked to Long-QT and Brugada syndromes, is located in a C-terminal EF-hand like domain of Na V 1.5, the predominant cardiac sodium channel isoform. Previous studies have suggested interactions with the III-IV linker, a cytosolic element directly involved in inactivation. Here we validate and map the interaction interface using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy. We investigated the impact of various disease mutations on the stability of the domain, and found that mutations that cause misfolding of the EF-hand domain result in hyperpolarizing shifts in the steady-state inactivation curve. Conversely, mutations in the III-IV linker that disrupt the interaction with the EF-hand domain also result in large hyperpolarization shifts, supporting the interaction between both elements in intact channels. Disrupting the interaction also causes large late currents, pointing to a dual role of the interaction in reducing the population of channels entering inactivation and in stabilizing the inactivated state.

  10. Functional interactions between voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs): new insights into stimulus-secretion coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, María A; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-03-01

    Stimulus-secretion coupling is a complex set of intracellular reactions initiated by an external stimulus that result in the release of hormones and neurotransmitters. Under physiological conditions this signaling process takes a few milliseconds, and to minimize delays cells have developed a formidable integrated network, in which the relevant molecules are tightly packed on the nanometer scale. Active zones, the sites of release, are composed of several different proteins including voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels. It is well acknowledged that hormone and neurotransmitter release is initiated by the activation of these channels located close to docked vesicles, though the mechanisms that enrich channels at release sites are largely unknown. Interestingly, Rab3 binding proteins (RIMs), a diverse multidomain family of proteins that operate as effectors of the small G protein Rab3 involved in secretory vesicle trafficking, have recently identified as binding partners of Ca(V) channels, placing both proteins in the center of an interaction network in the molecular anatomy of the active zones that influence different aspects of secretion. Here, we review recent evidences providing support for the notion that RIMs directly bind to the pore-forming and auxiliary β subunits of Ca(V) channels and with RIM-binding protein, another interactor of the channels. Through these interactions, RIMs regulate the biophysical properties of the channels and their anchoring relative to active zones, significantly influencing hormone and neurotransmitter release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection and Distribution of V1016Ikdr Mutation in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Gene in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations From Sergipe State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolabella, S S; Santos, R L C; Silva, M C N; Steffler, L M; Ribolla, P E M; Cavalcanti, S C H; Jain, S; Martins, A J

    2016-07-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) resistance to pyrethroids was recorded in Brazil few years after its introduction as the adulticide in the National Dengue Control Program campaigns. Altered susceptibility to pyrethroids had been reported in the state of Sergipe, northeast Brazil, through biological assays, even before its use against Ae. aegypti in the state. Metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms were also revealed in samples from Aracaju, the capital of Sergipe. Herein, we investigated the presence and distribution of the kdr mutation V1016I kdr in Ae. aegypti populations from different municipalities of the state. Aedes aegypti eggs were collected from seven municipalities located in areas showing different climatic types and infestation levels. Approximately 20 Ae. aegypti females from each municipality (total of 135 subjects) were individually submitted to allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) for the 1016 site of the voltage-gated sodium channel (Na V ). The V1016I kdr mutation was found in subjects from all the municipalities under study with a high frequency of heterozygotes in several locations. Homozygous recessive subjects (resistant kdr genotype) were found only in one municipality. The results suggest a wide distribution of the V1016I kdr mutation in the northeast Brazil, which indicates urgent need for monitoring the effectiveness of the pyrethroids currently used for vector control. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effects of (−-Gallocatechin-3-Gallate on Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Min Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The (−-gallocatechin-3-gallate (GCG concentration in some tea beverages can account for as much as 50% of the total catechins. It has been shown that catechins have analgesic properties. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav mediate neuronal action potentials. Tetrodotoxin inhibits all Nav isoforms, but Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are relatively tetrodotoxin-resistant compared to other isoforms and functionally linked to nociception. In this study, the effects of GCG on tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents were investigated in rat primary cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons via the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that 1 μM GCG reduced the amplitudes of peak current density of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents significantly. Furthermore, the inhibition was accompanied by a depolarizing shift of the activation voltage and a hyperpolarizing shift of steady-state inactivation voltage. The percentage block of GCG (1 μM on tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current was 45.1% ± 1.1% in 10 min. In addition, GCG did not produce frequency-dependent block of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents at stimulation frequencies of 1 Hz, 2 Hz and 5 Hz. On the basis of these findings, we propose that GCG may be a potential analgesic agent.

  13. Modulation Effects of Cordycepin on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons in the Presence/Absence of Oxygen

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    Zhi-Bin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study revealed that cordycepin features important neuroprotective effects against hypoxic insult by improvement of neuronal electrophysiological function. Modulation on voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC in CA1 neurons is the initial event during hypoxia/ischemia. However, no study comprehensively investigated cordycepin on VGSC. Hence, this study investigated modulation effects of cordycepin on VGSC not only in oxygen physiological conditions but also in acute oxygen deprivation injury conditions. Results revealed that cordycepin (80 μM reduced the amplitude of VGSC currents (INa (77.6% of control, p<0.01 within 1 min of drug exposure coupled with a negative shift in steady-state inactivation and prolonged recovery time course from inactivation. Additionally, this mild reduction on the peak of INa induced by the pretreatment with cordycepin can attenuate and delay the following hypoxia causing rapid dramatic decrease in INa with no additive change in the voltage dependence of inactivation. As modulation on VGSC in CA1 neurons represents the initial event during ischemia, we propose that suppression effect of cordycepin on VGSC is an important neuronal protective mechanism that may enhance neuronal tolerance to acute oxygen deprivation and delay hypoxia-induced neuronal injuries.

  14. Docking Simulation of the Binding Interactions of Saxitoxin Analogs Produced by the Marine Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum to the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.4.

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    Durán-Riveroll, Lorena M; Cembella, Allan D; Band-Schmidt, Christine J; Bustillos-Guzmán, José J; Correa-Basurto, José

    2016-05-06

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its analogs are paralytic alkaloid neurotoxins that block the voltage-gated sodium channel pore (Nav), impeding passage of Na⁺ ions into the intracellular space, and thereby preventing the action potential in the peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle. The marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum produces an array of such toxins, including the recently discovered benzoyl analogs, for which the mammalian toxicities are essentially unknown. We subjected STX and its analogs to a theoretical docking simulation based upon two alternative tri-dimensional models of the Nav1.4 to find a relationship between the binding properties and the known mammalian toxicity of selected STX analogs. We inferred hypothetical toxicities for the benzoyl analogs from the modeled values. We demonstrate that these toxins exhibit different binding modes with similar free binding energies and that these alternative binding modes are equally probable. We propose that the principal binding that governs ligand recognition is mediated by electrostatic interactions. Our simulation constitutes the first in silico modeling study on benzoyl-type paralytic toxins and provides an approach towards a better understanding of the mode of action of STX and its analogs.

  15. Epidermal growth factor potentiates in vitro metastatic behaviour of human prostate cancer PC-3M cells: involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel

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    Uysal-Onganer Pinar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a high level of functional voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC expression has been found in strongly metastatic human and rat prostate cancer (PCa cells, the mechanism(s responsible for the upregulation is unknown. The concentration of epidermal growth factor (EGF, a modulator of ion channels, in the body is highest in prostatic fluid. Thus, EGF could be involved in the VGSC upregulation in PCa. The effects of EGF on VGSC expression in the highly metastatic human PCa PC-3M cell line, which was shown previously to express both functional VGSCs and EGF receptors, were investigated. A quantitative approach, from gene level to cell behaviour, was used. mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Protein expression was studied by Western blots and immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Functional assays involved measurements of transverse migration, endocytic membrane activity and Matrigel invasion. Results Exogenous EGF enhanced the cells' in vitro metastatic behaviours (migration, endocytosis and invasion. Endogenous EGF had a similar involvement. EGF increased VGSC Nav1.7 (predominant isoform in PCa mRNA and protein expressions. Co-application of the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX suppressed the effect of EGF on all three metastatic cell behaviours studied. Conclusion 1 EGF has a major involvement in the upregulation of functional VGSC expression in human PCa PC-3M cells. (2 VGSC activity has a significant intermediary role in potentiating effect of EGF in human PCa.

  16. Sensory renal innervation: a kidney-specific firing activity due to a unique expression pattern of voltage-gated sodium channels?

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    Freisinger, Wolfgang; Schatz, Johannes; Ditting, Tilmann; Lampert, Angelika; Heinlein, Sonja; Lale, Nena; Schmieder, Roland; Veelken, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Sensory neurons with afferent axons from the kidney are extraordinary in their response to electrical stimulation. More than 50% exhibit a tonic firing pattern, i.e., sustained action potential firing throughout depolarizing, pointing to an increased excitability, whereas nonrenal neurons show mainly a phasic response, i.e., less than five action potentials. Here we investigated whether these peculiar firing characteristics of renal afferent neurons are due to differences in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs). Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats (Th11-L2) were recorded by the current-clamp technique and distinguished as "tonic" or "phasic." In voltage-clamp recordings, Navs were characterized by their tetrodotoxoxin (TTX) sensitivity, and their molecular identity was revealed by RT-PCR. The firing pattern of 66 DRG neurons (41 renal and 25 nonrenal) was investigated. Renal neurons exhibited more often a tonic firing pattern (56.1 vs. 12%). Tonic neurons showed a more positive threshold (-21.75 ± 1.43 vs.-29.33 ± 1.63 mV; P sodium currents. Interestingly, mRNA expression of TTX-resistant sodium channels was significantly increased in renal, predominantly tonic, DRG neurons. Hence, under physiological conditions, renal sensory neurons exhibit predominantly a firing pattern associated with higher excitability. Our findings support that this is due to an increased expression and activation of TTX-resistant Navs.

  17. Point mutations in segment I-S6 render voltage-gated Na+ channels resistant to batrachotoxin.

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    Wang, S Y; Wang, G K

    1998-03-03

    Batrachotoxin (BTX) is a steroidal alkaloid that causes Na+ channels to open persistently. This toxin has been used widely as a tool for studying Na+ channel gating processes and for estimating Na+ channel density. In this report we used point mutations to identify critical residues involved in BTX binding and to examine if such mutations affect channel gating. We show that a single asparagine --> lysine substitution of the rat muscle Na+ channel alpha-subunit, mu1-N434K, renders the channel completely insensitive to 5 microM BTX when expressed in mammalian cells. This mutant channel nonetheless displays normal current kinetics with minimal changes in gating properties. Another substitution, mu1-N434A, yields a partial BTX-sensitive mutant. Unlike wild-type currents, the BTX-modified mu1-N434A currents continue to undergo fast and slow inactivation as if the inactivation processes remain functional. This finding implies that the mu1-N434 residue upon binding with BTX is critical for subsequent changes on gating; alanine at the mu1-434 position apparently diminishes the efficacy of BTX on eliminating Na+ channel inactivation. Mutants of two adjacent residues, mu1-I433K and mu1-L437K, also were found to exhibit the identical BTX-resistant phenotype. We propose that the mu1-I433, mu1-N434, and mu1-L437 residues in transmembrane segment I-S6 probably form a part of the BTX receptor.

  18. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl− Channel CLH-1

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    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3− buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3− uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3− uptake involves Na+/HCO3− cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl− channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3− and mediates HCO3− uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl− channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl− concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3− flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3− is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3− flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. PMID:26674864

  20. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl- Channel CLH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina; Bianchi, Laura

    2015-12-16

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3 (-) buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3 (-) uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3 (-) uptake involves Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl(-) channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3 (-) and mediates HCO3 (-) uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl(-) channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl(-) concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3 (-) flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3 (-) is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3 (-) flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516377-21$15.00/0.

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease-Like Periodic Sharp Wave Complexes in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel-Complex Antibodies Encephalitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Martin; Irani, Sarosh R; Guillemette, Annie; Gosselin-Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Geschwind, Michael; Jansen, Gerard H; Gould, Peter V; Laforce, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-cAbs) encephalitis, a treatable autoantibody encephalopathy, has been previously reported to clinically mimic sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Among available clinical clues to distinguish them, periodic sharp wave complexes, a typical finding in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, have never been reported in association with VGKC-cAbs encephalitis. A 76-year-old man was transferred to a tertiary neurology center with a clinical history of 6-month weight loss, cognitive disturbance, and nonspecific generalized weakness. He had two seizures the month before transfer and then evolved to severe encephalopathy, requiring mechanical ventilation. Periodic sharp wave complexes every 1 to 2 seconds over slowed background were found on EEG, and MRI showed cerebellar and bifrontal cortical T2/FLAIR/DWI hypersignal without restricted diffusion on ADC mapping. Pancorporal positron emission tomography scan was negative. An immunotherapy trial did not improve the patient condition. Therefore, he died after life support withdrawal. Brain autopsy revealed mononuclear neocortex infiltrate without significant spongiosis, and the anti-VGKC test showed a seropositivity of 336 pmol/L (normal, 0-31), 3 month after the patient deceased. This is the first reported case of VGKC-cAbs encephalitis associated with periodic sharp wave complexes on EEG, which further confuse the differential diagnosis with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the cortical DWI hypersignal without restriction seems to remain a way to discriminate these two entities appropriately, when present. These clues are of paramount importance because VGKC-cAbs encephalitis is a treatable disease.

  2. A comparison of 15 Hz sine on-line and off-line magnetic stimulation affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

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    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Dou, Jun-Rong; Li, Ze-yan

    2016-10-01

    Combined with the use of patch-clamp techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has proven to be a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons after extensive research. The studies generally focused on the method: the neurons are first stimulated in an external standard magnetic exposure device, and then moved to the patch-clamp to record electrophysiological characteristics (off-line magnetic exposure). Despite its universality, real-time observation of the effects of magnetic stimulation on the neurons is more effective (on-line magnetic stimulation). In this study, we selected a standard exposure device for magnetic fields acting on mouse prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons, and described a new method that a patch-clamp setup was modified to allow on-line magnetic stimulation. By comparing the off-line exposure and on-line stimulation of the same magnetic field intensity and frequency affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents, we succeeded in proving the feasibility of the new on-line stimulation device. We also demonstrated that the sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons increased significantly under the 15 Hz sine 1 mT, and 2 mT off-line magnetic field exposure and under the 1 mT and 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation, and the rate of acceleration was most significant on 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation. This study described the development of a new on-line magnetic stimulator and successfully demonstrated its practicability for scientific stimulation of neurons.

  3. Clinical presentation of anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies in children: A series of 24 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuskan, Bahadir; Yildirim, Mirac; Topaloglu, Haluk; Erol, Ilknur; Oztoprak, Ulkuhan; Tan, Huseyin; Gocmen, Rahsan; Anlar, Banu

    2018-01-01

    The symptomatology and paraclinical findings of antibody-mediated encephalitis, a relatively novel disorder, are still being characterized in adults and children. A high index of suspicion is needed in order to identify these cases among children presenting with various neurological symptoms. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical, demographic and laboratory findings and outcome of children with anti-NMDAR and anti-VGKC encephalitis for any typical or distinctive features. Cases diagnosed with anti-N-Methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and anti-voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody-mediated encephalopathy in four major child neurology centers are described. In four years, 16 children with NMDAR and 8 children with VGKC antibody-associated disease were identified in the participating centers. The most frequent initial manifestation consisted of generalized seizures and cognitive symptoms in both groups. Movement abnormalities were frequent in anti-NMDAR patients and autonomic symptoms, in anti-VGKC patients. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein, cell count and IgG index were normal in 9/15 anti-NMDAR and 5/8 anti-VGKC patients tested. EEG and MRI findings were usually nonspecific and non-contributory. The rate and time of recovery was not related to age, sex, acute or subacute onset, antibody type, MRI, EEG or CSF results. Treatment within 3 months of onset was associated with normal neurological outcome. Our results suggest anti-NMDAR and VGKC encephalopathies mostly present with non-focal neurological symptoms longer than 3 weeks. In contrast with adult cases, routine CSF testing, MRI and EEG did not contribute to the diagnosis in this series. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impaired Fear Extinction Due to a Deficit in Ca2+ Influx Through L-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in Mice Deficient for Tenascin-C

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    Fabio Morellini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mice deficient in the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TNC−/− express a deficit in specific forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which involve the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs. The mechanisms underlying this deficit and its functional implications for learning and memory have not been investigated. In line with previous findings, we report on impairment in theta-burst stimulation (TBS-induced long-term potentiation (LTP in TNC−/− mice in the CA1 hippocampal region and its rescue by the L-VGCC activator Bay K-8644. We further found that the overall pattern of L-VGCC expression in the hippocampus in TNC−/− mice was normal, but Western blot analysis results uncovered upregulated expression of the Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 α-subunits of L-VGCCs. However, these L-VGCCs were not fully functional in TNC−/− mice, as demonstrated by Ca2+ imaging, which revealed a reduction of nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons. TNC−/− mice showed normal learning and memory in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm but impaired extinction of conditioned fear responses. Systemic injection of the L-VGCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem into wild-type mice mimicked the impairment of fear extinction observed in TNC−/− mice. The deficiency in TNC−/− mice substantially occluded the effects of these drugs. Our results suggest that TNC-mediated modulation of L-VGCC activity is essential for fear extinction.

  5. Sodium Channel Voltage-Gated Beta 2 Plays a Vital Role in Brain Aging Associated with Synaptic Plasticity and Expression of COX5A and FGF-2.

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    XiYang, Yan-Bin; Wang, You-Cui; Zhao, Ya; Ru, Jin; Lu, Bing-Tuan; Zhang, Yue-Ning; Wang, Nai-Chao; Hu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Hao, Chun-Guang; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dong, Wei; Quan, Xiong-Zhi; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The role of sodium channel voltage-gated beta 2 (SCN2B) in brain aging is largely unknown. The present study was therefore designed to determine the role of SCN2B in brain aging by using the senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8), a brain senescence-accelerated animal model, together with the SCN2B transgenic mice. The results showed that SAMP8 exhibited impaired learning and memory functions, assessed by the Morris water maze test, as early as 8 months of age. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of SCN2B were also upregulated in the prefrontal cortex at this age. Treatment with traditional Chinese anti-aging medicine Xueshuangtong (Panax notoginseng saponins, PNS) significantly reversed the SCN2B expressions in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in improved learning and memory. Moreover, SCN2B knockdown transgenic mice were generated and bred to determine the roles of SCN2B in brain senescence. A reduction in the SCN2B level by 60.68% resulted in improvement in the hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition memory and long-term potential (LTP) slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), followed by an upregulation of COX5A mRNA levels and downregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA expression. Together, the present findings indicated that SCN2B could play an important role in the aging-related cognitive deterioration, which is associated with the regulations of COX5A and FGF-2. These findings could provide the potential strategy of candidate target to develop antisenescence drugs for the treatment of brain aging.

  6. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

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    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H + channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H + channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na + and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na + -dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg 2+ , bafilomycin A 1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H + channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H + channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H + channels may help ROS production.

  7. Ablation of Ca(V2.1 voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels in mouse forebrain generates multiple cognitive impairments.

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    Robert Theodor Mallmann

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca(V2.1 (P/Q-type Ca²⁺ channels located at the presynaptic membrane are known to control a multitude of Ca²⁺-dependent cellular processes such as neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Our knowledge about their contributions to complex cognitive functions, however, is restricted by the limited adequacy of existing transgenic Ca(V2.1 mouse models. Global Ca(V2.1 knock-out mice lacking the α1 subunit Cacna1a gene product exhibit early postnatal lethality which makes them unsuitable to analyse the relevance of Ca(V2.1 Ca²⁺ channels for complex behaviour in adult mice. Consequently we established a forebrain specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out model by crossing mice with a floxed Cacna1a gene with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the NEX promoter. This novel mouse model enabled us to investigate the contribution of Ca(V2.1 to complex cognitive functions, particularly learning and memory. Electrophysiological analysis allowed us to test the specificity of our conditional knock-out model and revealed an impaired synaptic transmission at hippocampal glutamatergic synapses. At the behavioural level, the forebrain-specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out resulted in deficits in spatial learning and reference memory, reduced recognition memory, increased exploratory behaviour and a strong attenuation of circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we present a novel conditional Ca(V2.1 knock-out model that is most suitable for analysing the in vivo functions of Ca(V2.1 in the adult murine forebrain.

  8. Stimulatory Action of Telmisartan, an Antagonist of Angiotensin II Receptor, on Voltage-Gated Na⁺ Current: Experimental and Theoretical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Tung; Yang, Chia-Jung; Lee, Yu-Chi; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2018-02-28

    Telmisartan (Tel) is recognized as a non-peptide blocker of AT1R. Whether this agent has any direct effects on ion currents remains unexplored. In whole-cell current recordings, addition of Tel increased the peak amplitude of voltage-gated Na⁺ (NaV) current (INa) accompanied by the increased time constant of INa inactivation in differentiated NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells. Tel-stimulated INa in these cells is unlinked to either blockade of AT1R or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). In order to explore how this compound affects the amplitude and kinetics of INa in neurons, a Hodgkin-Huxley-based (HH-based) model designed to mimic effect of Tel on the functional activities of neurons was computationally created in this study. In this framework, the parameter for h inactivation gating variable, which was changed in a stepwise fashion, was implemented to predict changes in membrane potentials (V) as a function of maximal Na⁺ (GNa), K⁺ conductance (GK), or both. As inactivation time course of INa was increased, the bifurcation point of V versus GNa became lower, and the range between subcritical and supercritical values at the bifurcation of V versus GK correspondingly became larger. During a slowing in INa inactivation, the critical boundary between GNa and GK was shifted towards the left. Simulation studies demonstrated that progressive slowing in the inactivation time course of INa resulted in unanticipated increase of neuronal excitability by mimicking the effect of Tel in neuronal cells. Collectively, Tel can directly interact with the NaV channel to increase peak INa as well as to slow INa inactivation. It is thus highly likely that the effects of Tel or its structurally similar drugs could be another intriguing mechanism underlying their pharmacological actions in neurons or neuroendocrine cells occurring in vivo.

  9. Comparative study of the distribution of the alpha-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels in normal and axotomized rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Obata, Koichi; Dai, Yi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2008-09-10

    We compared the distribution of the alpha-subunit mRNAs of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.1-1.3 and Nav1.6-1.9 and a related channel, Nax, in histochemically identified neuronal subpopulations of the rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In the naïve DRG, the expression of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 was restricted to A-fiber neurons, and they were preferentially expressed by TrkC neurons, suggesting that proprioceptive neurons possess these channels. Nav1.7, -1.8, and -1.9 mRNAs were more abundant in C-fiber neurons compared with A-fiber ones. Nax was evenly expressed in both populations. Although Nav1.8 and -1.9 were preferentially expressed by TrkA neurons, other alpha-subunits were expressed independently of TrkA expression. Actually, all IB4(+) neurons expressed both Nav1.8 and -1.9, and relatively limited subpopulations of IB4(+) neurons (3% and 12%, respectively) expressed Nav1.1 and/or Nav1.6. These findings provide useful information in interpreting the electrophysiological characteristics of some neuronal subpopulations of naïve DRG. After L5 spinal nerve ligation, Nav1.3 mRNA was up-regulated mainly in A-fiber neurons in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Although previous studies demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reversed this up-regulation, the Nav1.3 induction was independent of either TrkA or GFRalpha1 expression, suggesting that the induction of Nav1.3 may be one of the common responses of axotomized DRG neurons without a direct relationship to NGF/GDNF supply. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Effect of angiotensin II on voltage-gated sodium currents in aortic baroreceptor neurons and arterial baroreflex sensitivity in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Liu, Jinxu; Zheng, Hong; Tu, Huiyin; Muelleman, Robert L; Li, Yu-Long

    2015-07-01

    Impairment of arterial baroreflex sensitivity is associated with mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Elevation of plasma angiotension II (Ang II) contributes to arterial baroreflex dysfunction in CHF. A reduced number of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels in aortic baroreceptor neurons are involved in CHF-blunted arterial baroreflex. In this study, we investigated acute effect of Ang II on Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neuron and on arterial baroreflex in sham and coronary artery ligation-induced CHF rats. Using Ang II I radioimmunoassay, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot, we found that Ang II levels, and mRNA and protein expression of angiotension II type 1 receptor in nodose ganglia from CHF rats were higher than that from sham rats. Local microinjection of Ang II (0.2  nmol) into the nodose ganglia decreased the arterial baroreflex sensitivity in sham rats, whereas losartan (1  nmol, an angiotension II type 1 receptor antagonist) improved the arterial baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Data from patch-clamp recording showed that Ang II (100  nmol/l) acutely inhibited Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neurons from sham and CHF rats. In particular, inhibitory effect of Ang II on Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neurons was larger in CHF rats than that in sham rats. Losartan (1  μmol/l) totally abolished the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Nav currents in sham and CHF aortic baroreceptor neurons. These results suggest that elevation of endogenous Ang II in the nodose ganglia contributes to impairment of the arterial baroreflex function in CHF rats through inhibiting Nav channels.

  11. Effect of angiotension II on voltage-gated sodium currents in aortic baroreceptor neurons and arterial baroreflex sensitivity in heart failure rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Liu, Jinxu; Zheng, Hong; Tu, Huiyin; Muelleman, Robert L.; Li, Yu-Long

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of arterial baroreflex sensitivity is associated with mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Elevation of plasma angiotension II (Ang II) contributes to arterial baroreflex dysfunction in CHF. A reduced number of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels in aortic baroreceptor neurons are involved in CHF-blunted arterial baroreflex. In this study, we investigated acute effect of Ang II on Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neuron and on arterial baroreflex in sham and coronary artery ligation-induced CHF rats. Using Ang II 125I radioimmunoassay, real-time RT-PCR and western blot, we found that Ang II levels, and mRNA and protein expression of angiotension II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in nodose ganglia (NG) from CHF rats were higher than that from sham rats. Local microinjection of Ang II (0.2 nmol) into the NG decreased the arterial baroreflex sensitivity in sham rats, whereas losartan (1 nmol, an AT1R antagonist) improved the arterial baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Data from patch-clamp recording showed that Ang II (100 nM) acutely inhibited Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neurons from sham and CHF rats. In particular, inhibitory effect of Ang II on Nav currents in the aortic baroreceptor neurons was larger in CHF rats than that in sham rats. Losartan (1 μM) totally abolished the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Nav currents in sham and CHF aortic baroreceptor neurons. These results suggest that elevation of endogenous Ang II in the NG contributes to impairment of the arterial baroreflex function in CHF rats through inhibiting Nav channels. PMID:25827427

  12. Calcium Domains around Single and Clustered IP3 Receptors and Their Modulation by Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, S.; Nagaiah, Ch.; Warnecke, G.; Shuai, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We study Ca2+ release through single and clustered IP3 receptor channels on the ER membrane under presence of buffer proteins. Our computational scheme couples reaction-diffusion equations and a Markovian channel model and allows our investigating the effects of buffer proteins on local calcium concentrations and channel gating. We find transient and stationary elevations of calcium concentrations around active channels and show how they determine release amplitude. Transient calcium domains occur after closing of isolated channels and constitute an important part of the channel's feedback. They cause repeated openings (bursts) and mediate increased release due to Ca2+ buffering by immobile proteins. Stationary domains occur during prolonged activity of clustered channels, where the spatial proximity of IP3Rs produces a distinct [Ca2+] scale (0.5–10 μM), which is smaller than channel pore concentrations (>100 μM) but larger than transient levels. While immobile buffer affects transient levels only, mobile buffers in general reduce both transient and stationary domains, giving rise to Ca2+ evacuation and biphasic modulation of release amplitude. Our findings explain recent experiments in oocytes and provide a general framework for the understanding of calcium signals. PMID:20655827

  13. Calcium domains around single and clustered IP3 receptors and their modulation by buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, S; Nagaiah, Ch; Warnecke, G; Shuai, J W

    2010-07-07

    We study Ca(2+) release through single and clustered IP(3) receptor channels on the ER membrane under presence of buffer proteins. Our computational scheme couples reaction-diffusion equations and a Markovian channel model and allows our investigating the effects of buffer proteins on local calcium concentrations and channel gating. We find transient and stationary elevations of calcium concentrations around active channels and show how they determine release amplitude. Transient calcium domains occur after closing of isolated channels and constitute an important part of the channel's feedback. They cause repeated openings (bursts) and mediate increased release due to Ca(2+) buffering by immobile proteins. Stationary domains occur during prolonged activity of clustered channels, where the spatial proximity of IP(3)Rs produces a distinct [Ca(2+)] scale (0.5-10 microM), which is smaller than channel pore concentrations (>100 microM) but larger than transient levels. While immobile buffer affects transient levels only, mobile buffers in general reduce both transient and stationary domains, giving rise to Ca(2+) evacuation and biphasic modulation of release amplitude. Our findings explain recent experiments in oocytes and provide a general framework for the understanding of calcium signals. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Loss-of-function of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 (channelopathies) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyder, Arthur; Mazzone, Amelia; Strege, Peter R; Tester, David J; Saito, Yuri A; Bernard, Cheryl E; Enders, Felicity T; Ek, Weronica E; Schmidt, Peter T; Dlugosz, Aldona; Lindberg, Greger; Karling, Pontus; Ohlsson, Bodil; Gazouli, Maria; Nardone, Gerardo; Cuomo, Rosario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; Galeazzi, Francesca; Neri, Matteo; Portincasa, Piero; Bellini, Massimo; Barbara, Giovanni; Camilleri, Michael; Locke, G Richard; Talley, Nicholas J; D'Amato, Mauro; Ackerman, Michael J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2014-06-01

    SCN5A encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. Many patients with cardiac arrhythmias caused by mutations in SCN5A also have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether patients with IBS have SCN5A variants that affect the function of NaV1.5. We performed genotype analysis of SCN5A in 584 persons with IBS and 1380 without IBS (controls). Mutant forms of SCN5A were expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells, and functions were assessed by voltage clamp analysis. A genome-wide association study was analyzed for an association signal for the SCN5A gene, and replicated in 1745 patients in 4 independent cohorts of IBS patients and controls. Missense mutations were found in SCN5A in 13 of 584 patients (2.2%, probands). Diarrhea-predominant IBS was the most prevalent form of IBS in the overall study population (25%). However, a greater percentage of individuals with SCN5A mutations had constipation-predominant IBS (31%) than diarrhea-predominant IBS (10%; P < .05). Electrophysiologic analysis showed that 10 of 13 detected mutations disrupted NaV1.5 function (9 loss-of-function and 1 gain-of-function function). The p. A997T-NaV1.5 had the greatest effect in reducing NaV1.5 function. Incubation of cells that expressed this variant with mexiletine restored their sodium current and administration of mexiletine to 1 carrier of this mutation (who had constipation-predominant IBS) normalized their bowel habits. In the genome-wide association study and 4 replicated studies, the SCN5A locus was strongly associated with IBS. About 2% of patients with IBS carry mutations in SCN5A. Most of these are loss-of-function mutations that disrupt NaV1.5 channel function. These findings provide a new pathogenic mechanism for IBS and possible treatment options. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Muhammad M. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sonsalla, Patricia K. [Department of Neurology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R., E-mail: jricha3@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na{sup +}){sub i}] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na{sup +} influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} observed at 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression of gp91{sup phox}, an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX + cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • LPS causes immediate increase in sodium through VGSC and subsequently through the NHE-1. • Inhibition of VGSC reduces increases in NHE-1 and gp91{sup phox}. • Inhibition of VGSC and NHE-1 reduces NADPH oxidase-mediated Tnf-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. • NHE-1 and Na{sub v}1.6 may be viable targets for therapeutic interventions to reduce neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease.

  16. MiR-30b Attenuates Neuropathic Pain by Regulating Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.3 in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songxue Su

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nav1.3 is a tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoform among voltage-gated sodium channels that are closely associated with neuropathic pain. It can be up-regulated following nerve injury, but its biological function remains uncertain. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous non-coding RNAs that can regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding with their target mRNAs. Using Target Scan software, we discovered that SCN3A is the major target of miR-30b, and we then determined whether miR-30b regulated the expression of Nav1.3 by transfecting miR-30b agomir through the stimulation of TNF-α or by transfecting miR-30b antagomir in primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. The spinal nerve ligation (SNL model was used to determine the contribution of miR-30b to neuropathic pain, to evaluate changes in Nav1.3 mRNA and protein expression, and to understand the sensitivity of rats to mechanical and thermal stimuli. Our results showed that miR-30b agomir transfection down-regulated Nav1.3 mRNA stimulated with TNF-α in primary DRG neurons. Moreover, miR-30b overexpression significantly attenuated neuropathic pain induced by SNL, with decreases in the expression of Nav1.3 mRNA and protein both in DRG neurons and spinal cord. Activation of Nav1.3 caused by miR-30b antagomir was identified. These data suggest that miR-30b is involved in the development of neuropathic pain, probably by regulating the expression of Nav1.3, and might be a novel therapeutic target for neuropathic pain.Perspective: This study is the first to explore the important role of miR-30b and Nav1.3 in spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain, and our evidence may provide new insight for improving therapeutic approaches to pain.

  17. A single-pill combination of amlodipine besylate and atorvastatin calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Roy

    2006-03-01

    This review describes the clinical profile and rationale for the development of a single-pill formulation of the calcium channel blocker amlodipine besylate, a blood pressure-lowering agent with pleiotropic effects, and atorvastatin calcium, a statin with lipid-lowering as well as pleiotropic anti-atherosclerotic properties. Amlodipine and atorvastatin have been demonstrated in numerous clinical trials to be highly effective in lowering blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Furthermore, both amlodipine and atorvastatin have been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular events in a broad range of patients. The amlodipine/atorvastatin single pill has been shown to improve patients' achievement of national guideline-recommended blood pressure and lipid target levels and exhibits a safety profile consistent with its parent compounds. The combination pill is available in formulations appropriate for administration across therapeutic dose ranges targeted to a wide variety of hypertensive patients with additional risk factors and differing degrees of cardiovascular risk, or with manifest cardiovascular disease. Single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin has the potential to improve the management of hypertensive patients with additional cardiovascular risk factors, especially dyslipidemia, by reducing pill burden and prescription costs. This potential has important implications because hypertensive patients with additional risk factors represent a large proportion of those at risk for cardiovascular events. Copyright 2006 Prous Science.

  18. A single-pill combination of amlodipine besylate and atorvastatin calcium (update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Roy; Hobbs, F D Richard; Zamorano, Jose; Girerd, Xavier

    2007-03-01

    This review describes the clinical profile and rationale for the development of a single-pill formulation of the calcium channel blocker amlodipine besylate, a blood-pressure--lowering agent, and atorvastatin calcium, a statin with lipid-lowering antiatherosclerotic properties. Amlodipine and atorvastatin have been demonstrated in numerous clinical trials to be highly effective in lowering blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Furthermore, both amlodipine and atorvastatin have been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular events in a broad range of patients' in hypertensive patients with three concomitant cardiovascular risk factors but normal to mildly elevated cholesterol levels, amlodipine combined with atorvastatin demonstrated a reduction in cardiovascular events. The amlodipine/atorvastatin single pill has been shown to improve patients; achievement of national-guideline-recommended blood pressure and lipid target levels and exhibits a safety profile consistent with its parent compounds. The combination pill is now available in parts of Europe in formulations containing either 5 or 10 mg amlodipine and 10 mg atorvastatin. Amlodipine combined with atorvastatin has been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk, and the single-pill formulation has the potential to improve adherence and decrease prescription costs. These potential benefits are associated with important implications because hypertensive patients with additional risk factors represent a large proportion of those at risk for cardiovascular events. (c) 2007 Prous Science.

  19. L-type calcium channels refine the neural population code of sound level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Calum Alex; Green, David Brian

    2016-01-01

    The coding of sound level by ensembles of neurons improves the accuracy with which listeners identify how loud a sound is. In the auditory system, the rate at which neurons fire in response to changes in sound level is shaped by local networks. Voltage-gated conductances alter local output by regulating neuronal firing, but their role in modulating responses to sound level is unclear. We tested the effects of L-type calcium channels (CaL: CaV1.1–1.4) on sound-level coding in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) in the auditory midbrain. We characterized the contribution of CaL to the total calcium current in brain slices and then examined its effects on rate-level functions (RLFs) in vivo using single-unit recordings in awake mice. CaL is a high-threshold current and comprises ∼50% of the total calcium current in ICC neurons. In vivo, CaL activates at sound levels that evoke high firing rates. In RLFs that increase monotonically with sound level, CaL boosts spike rates at high sound levels and increases the maximum firing rate achieved. In different populations of RLFs that change nonmonotonically with sound level, CaL either suppresses or enhances firing at sound levels that evoke maximum firing. CaL multiplies the gain of monotonic RLFs with dynamic range and divides the gain of nonmonotonic RLFs with the width of the RLF. These results suggest that a single broad class of calcium channels activates enhancing and suppressing local circuits to regulate the sensitivity of neuronal populations to sound level. PMID:27605536

  20. Coevolution of the Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 Mutations in the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Z Vera-Maloof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L. is the principal urban vector of dengue viruses. Currently 2.5 billion people are at risk for infection and reduction of Ae. aegypti populations is the most effective means to reduce the risk of transmission. Pyrethroids are used extensively for adult mosquito control, especially during dengue outbreaks. Pyrethroids promote activation and prolong the activation of the voltage gated sodium channel protein (VGSC by interacting with two distinct pyrethroid receptor sites [1], formed by the interfaces of the transmembrane helix subunit 6 (S6 of domains II and III. Mutations of S6 in domains II and III synergize so that double mutants have higher pyrethroid resistance than mutants in either domain alone. Computer models predict an allosteric interaction between mutations in the two domains. In Ae. aegypti, a Ile1,016 mutation in the S6 of domain II was discovered in 2006 and found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance in field populations in Mexico. In 2010 a second mutation, Cys1,534 in the S6 of domain III was discovered and also found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance and correlated with the frequency of Ile1,016.A linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed on Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 in Ae. aegypti collected in Mexico from 2000-2012 to test for statistical associations between S6 in domains II and III in natural populations. We estimated the frequency of the four dilocus haplotypes in 1,016 and 1,534: Val1,016/Phe1,534 (susceptible, Val1,016/Cys1,534, Ile1,016/Phe1,534, and Ile1,016/Cys1,534 (resistant. The susceptible Val1,016/Phe1,534 haplotype went from near fixation to extinction and the resistant Ile1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections from a frequency close to zero to frequencies ranging from 0.5-0.9. The Val1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections until 2008 after which it began to decline as Ile1,016/Cys1,534 increased. However, the Ile1,016/Phe1

  1. Numerical Simulations of Calcium Ions Spiral Wave in Single Cardiac Myocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Xing

    2010-04-01

    The calcium ions (Ca2+) spark is an elementary Ca2+ release event in cardiac myocytes. It is believed to buildup cell-wide Ca2+ signals, such as Ca2+ transient and Ca2+ wave, through a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) mechanism. Here the excitability of the Ca2+ wave in a single cardiac myocyte is simulated by employing the fire-diffuse-fire model. By modulating the dynamic parameters of Ca2+ release and re-uptake channels, we find three Ca2+ signaling states in a single cardiac myocyte: no wave, plane wave, and spiral wave. The period of a spiral wave is variable in the different regimes. This study indicates that the spiral wave or the excitability of the system can be controlled through micro-modulation in a living excitable medium.

  2. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  3. Presence of two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, and a novel mutation, V1010L, in the voltage gated Na+ channel of Anopheles culicifacies from Orissa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Rajendra M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance in insects resulting from mutation(s in the voltage gated Na+ channel (VGSC is one of the mechanisms of resistance against DDT and pyrethroids. Recently a point mutation leading to Leu-to-Phe substitution in the VGSC at residue 1014, a most common kdr mutation in insects, was reported in Anopheles culicifacies-a major malaria vector in the Indian subcontinent. This study reports the presence of two additional amino acid substitutions in the VGSC of an An. culicifacies population from Malkangiri district of Orissa, India. Methods Anopheles culicifacies sensu lato (s.l. samples, collected from a population of Malkangiri district of Orissa (India, were sequenced for part of the second transmembrane segment of VGSC and analyzed for the presence of non-synonymous mutations. A new primer introduced restriction analysis-PCR (PIRA-PCR was developed for the detection of the new mutation L1014S. The An. culicifacies population was genotyped for the presence of L1014F substitution by an amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS and for L1014S substitutions by using a new PIRA-PCR developed in this study. The results were validated through DNA sequencing. Results DNA sequencing of An. culicifacies individuals collected from district Malkangiri revealed the presence of three amino acid substitutions in the IIS6 transmembrane segments of VGSC, each one resulting from a single point mutation. Two alternative point mutations, 3042A>T transversion or 3041T>C transition, were found at residue L1014 leading to Leu (TTA-to-Phe (TTT or -Ser (TCA changes, respectively. A third and novel substitution, Val (GTG-to-Leu (TTG or CTG, was identified at residue V1010 resulting from either of the two transversions–3028G>T or 3028G>C. The L1014S substitution co-existed with V1010L in all the samples analyzed irrespective of the type of point mutation associated with the latter. The PIRA-PCR strategy developed for the

  4. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Excitation-calcium release uncoupling in aged single human skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbono, O; O'Rourke, K S; Ettinger, W H

    1995-12-01

    The biological mechanisms underlying decline in muscle power and fatigue with age are not completely understood. The contribution of alterations in the excitation-calcium release coupling in single muscle fibers was explored in this work. Single muscle fibers were voltage-clamped using the double Vaseline gap technique. The samples were obtained by needle biopsy of the vastus lateralis (quadriceps) from 9 young (25-35 years; 25.9 +/- 9.1; 5 female and 4 male) and 11 old subjects (65-75 years; 70.5 +/- 2.3; 6 f, 5 m). Data were obtained from 36 and 39 fibers from young and old subjects, respectively. Subjects included in this study had similar physical activity. Denervated and slow-twitch muscle fibers were excluded from this study. A significant reduction of maximum charge movement (Qmax) and DHP-sensitive Ca current were recorded in muscle fibers from the 65-75 group. Qmax values were 7.6 +/- 0.9 and 3.2 +/- 0.3 nC/muF for young and old muscle fibers, respectively (P charge inactivation or interconversion (charge 1 to charge 2) were found. The peak Ca current was (-)4.7 +/- 0.08 and (-)2.15 +/- 0.11 muA/muF for young and old fibers, respectively (P muscle fibers, respectively. Caffeine (0.5 mM) induced potentiation of the peak calcium transient in both groups. The decrease in the voltage-/Ca-dependent Ca release ratio in old fibers (0.18 +/- 0.02) compared to young fibers (0.47 +/- 0.03) (P skeletal muscle and, the reduction of Ca release is due to DHPR-ryanodine receptor uncoupling in fast-twitch fibers. These alterations can account, at least partially for the skeletal muscle function impairment associated with aging.

  6. Growth Rate and Morphology of a Single Calcium Carbonate Crystal on Polysulfone Film Measured with Time Lapse Raman Micro Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The growth of single, self- nucleated calcium carbonate crystals on a polysulfone (PSU) film was investigated with high resolution, time lapse Raman imaging. The Raman images were acquired on the interface of the polymer with the crystal. The growth of crystals could thus be followed in time. PSU is

  7. ¹H, ¹³C, and ¹⁵N backbone resonance assignments of the 37 kDa voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channel β4 subunit core SH3-GK domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingfu; Horne, William A

    2014-04-01

    The β subunit of the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (α1, α2δ, and β subunits) is a member of the MAGUK family of proteins and plays an essential role in regulating Ca(2+) channel trafficking and gating. It also serves as a central interaction partner for various Ca(2+) channel regulatory proteins. We report here the nearly complete (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 37 kDa core SH3-GK domains of the β4 subunit. This is the first report of solution assignments for β subunits, and as such will lay the foundation for future investigations of interaction site mapping, functional dynamics, and protein complex structure determination.

  8. Mechanisms of calcium sequestration by isolated Malpighian tubules of the house cricket Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Austin; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Hemolymph calcium homeostasis in insects is achieved by the Malpighian tubules, primarily by sequestering excess Ca 2+ within internal calcium stores (Ca-rich granules) most often located within type I (principal) tubule cells. Using both the scanning ion-selective electrode technique and the Ramsay secretion assay this study provides the first measurements of basolateral and transepithelial Ca 2+ fluxes across the Malpighian tubules of an Orthopteran insect, the house cricket Acheta domesticus. Ca 2+ transport was specific to midtubule segments, where 97% of the Ca 2+ entering the tubule is sequestered within intracellular calcium stores and the remaining 3% is secreted into the lumen. Antagonists of voltage-gated (L-type) calcium channels decreased Ca 2+ influx ≥fivefold in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-stimulated tubules, suggesting basolateral Ca 2+ influx is facilitated by voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. Increasing fluid secretion through manipulation of intracellular levels of cAMP or Ca 2+ had opposite effects on tubule Ca 2+ transport. The adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway promotes Ca 2+ sequestration whereas both 5-hydroxytryptamine and thapsigargin inhibited sequestration. Our results suggest that the midtubules of Acheta domesticus are dynamic calcium stores, which maintain hemolymph calcium concentration by manipulating rates of Ca 2+ sequestration through stimulatory (cAMP) and inhibitory (Ca 2+ ) regulatory pathways. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reporting sodium channel activity using calcium flux: pharmacological promiscuity of cardiac Nav1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Du, Fang; Xu, Kaiping; Li, Min

    2015-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential for membrane excitability and represent therapeutic targets for treating human diseases. Recent reports suggest that these channels, e.g., Nav1.3 and Nav1.5, are inhibited by multiple structurally distinctive small molecule drugs. These studies give reason to wonder whether these drugs collectively target a single site or multiple sites in manifesting such pharmacological promiscuity. We thus investigate the pharmacological profile of Nav1.5 through systemic analysis of its sensitivity to diverse compound collections. Here, we report a dual-color fluorescent method that exploits a customized Nav1.5 [calcium permeable Nav channel, subtype 5 (SoCal5)] with engineered-enhanced calcium permeability. SoCal5 retains wild-type (WT) Nav1.5 pharmacological profiles. WT SoCal5 and SoCal5 with the local anesthetics binding site mutated (F1760A) could be expressed in separate cells, each with a different-colored genetically encoded calcium sensor, which allows a simultaneous report of compound activity and site dependence. The pharmacological profile of SoCal5 reveals a hit rate (>50% inhibition) of around 13% at 10 μM, comparable to that of hERG. The channel activity is susceptible to blockage by known drugs and structurally diverse compounds. The broad inhibition profile is highly dependent on the F1760 residue in the inner cavity, which is a residue conserved among all nine subtypes of Nav channels. Both promiscuity and dependence on F1760 seen in Nav1.5 were replicated in Nav1.4. Our evidence of a broad inhibition profile of Nav channels suggests a need to consider off-target effects on Nav channels. The site-dependent promiscuity forms a foundation to better understand Nav channels and compound interactions. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. NALCN ion channels have alternative selectivity filters resembling calcium channels or sodium channels.

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    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available NALCN is a member of the family of ion channels with four homologous, repeat domains that include voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. NALCN is a highly conserved gene from simple, extant multicellular organisms without nervous systems such as sponges and placozoans and mostly remains a single gene compared to the calcium and sodium channels which diversified into twenty genes in humans. The single NALCN gene has alternatively-spliced exons at exons 15 or exon 31 that splices in novel selectivity filter residues that resemble calcium channels (EEEE or sodium channels (EKEE or EEKE. NALCN channels with alternative calcium, (EEEE and sodium, (EKEE or EEKE -selective pores are conserved in simple bilaterally symmetrical animals like flatworms to non-chordate deuterostomes. The single NALCN gene is limited as a sodium channel with a lysine (K-containing pore in vertebrates, but originally NALCN was a calcium-like channel, and evolved to operate as both a calcium channel and sodium channel for different roles in many invertebrates. Expression patterns of NALCN-EKEE in pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis suggest roles for NALCN in secretion, with an abundant expression in brain, and an up-regulation in secretory organs of sexually-mature adults such as albumen gland and prostate. NALCN-EEEE is equally abundant as NALCN-EKEE in snails, but is greater expressed in heart and other muscle tissue, and 50% less expressed in the brain than NALCN-EKEE. Transfected snail NALCN-EEEE and NALCN-EKEE channel isoforms express in HEK-293T cells. We were not able to distinguish potential NALCN currents from background, non-selective leak conductances in HEK293T cells. Native leak currents without expressing NALCN genes in HEK-293T cells are NMDG(+ impermeant and blockable with 10 µM Gd(3+ ions and are indistinguishable from the hallmark currents ascribed to mammalian NALCN currents expressed in vitro by Lu et al. in Cell. 2007 Apr 20;129(2:371-83.

  11. Electron spin resonance of X-irradiated single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkmaz, M.

    1977-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectra of an irradiated single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate grown from silica gel have been investigated. Only one species of free radical was observed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The free radical was found to be the result of the splitting of a C-H bond adjacent to both the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. For some orientations of the crystal in the external magnetic field two unresolved doublets, due to two noequivalent protons, was observed. The g factor was found to be almost isotropic, with a value of 2.0032 +- 0.0005. Couplings with two H nuclei are believed to be the result of the proton of the hydroxyl group attached directly to the unsaturated asymmetric carbon atom and of the proton attached directly to the other asymmetric carbon atom of the molecule. The principal elements of the nuclear coupling of these protons are 5.8, 7.9, 3.7 and 6.8, 7.0, 17.3 G respectively. The radical was found to be very stable, the ESR pattern being undiminished for more than half a year after the irradiation. (author)

  12. Modification of single Na+ channels by batrachotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Quandt, F N; Narahashi, T

    1982-01-01

    The modifications in the properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels caused by batrachotoxin were studied by using the patch clamp method for measuring single channel currents from excised membranes of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. The toxin-modified open state of the Na+ channel has a decreased conductance in comparison to that of normal Na+ channels. The lifetime of the modified open state is drastically prolonged, and channels now continue to open during a maintained depolarization so that the...

  13. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Expression of Renal Outer Medullary K+Channel and Voltage-gated K+Channel 7.1 in Bladder Urothelium of Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane-Dar; Lee, Ming-Huei; Yang, Wen-Kai; Wang, Kuan-Lin; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the changes including expression and localization of 2 potassium channels, renal outer medullary K + channel (ROMK) and voltage-gated K + channel 7.1 (KCNQ1), after increased urinary potassium leakage in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). The study group included 24 patients with IC/PBS and a control group consisting of 12 volunteers without any IC/PBS symptoms. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the protein expression and distribution of potassium channels using immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescent staining under confocal laser microscopy. The results revealed that ROMK was predominantly expressed in apical cells of the bladder urothelium at significantly higher levels (3.3-fold) in the study group than in the control group. In contrast, KCNQ1 was expressed in the basolateral membrane according to confocal microscopy results and did not significantly differ between groups. Our data showed that the abundance of ROMK protein in apical cells was increased in the IC/PBS group, whereas KCNQ1, which was distributed in the basolateral membrane of the bladder urothelium, showed similar abundance between groups. These results suggest that upregulation of the ROMK channel in apical cells might permit avid potassium flux into the bladder lumen to maintain intracellular K + homeostasis in the dysfunctional urothelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrophysiological Features of Single Store-Operated Calcium Channels in HEK S4 Cell Line with Stable STIM1 Protein Knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygin, A V; Vigont, V A; Glushankova, L N; Zimina, O A; Kolesnikov, D O; Skopin, A Yu; Kaznacheeva, E V

    2017-07-01

    An important role in intracellular calcium signaling is played by store-operated channels activated by STIM proteins, calcium sensors of the endoplasmic reticulum. In stable STIM1 knockdown HEK S4 cells, single channels activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores were detected by cell-attached patch-clamp technique and their electrophysiological parameters were described. Comparison of the properties of single channels in HEK293 and HEK S4 cells revealed no significant differences in their current-voltage curves, while regulation of store-operated calcium channels in these cell lines depended on the level of STIM1 expression. We can conclude that electrophysiological peculiarities of store-regulated calcium entry observed in different cells can be explained by differences in STIM1 expression.

  16. Presence of two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, and a novel mutation, V1010L, in the voltage gated Na+ channel of Anopheles culicifacies from Orissa, India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt Rajendra M; Pradhan Sabyasachi; Das Manoj K; Dykes Cherry L; Singh Om P; Agrawal Om P; Adak Tridibes

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Knockdown resistance in insects resulting from mutation(s) in the voltage gated Na+ channel (VGSC) is one of the mechanisms of resistance against DDT and pyrethroids. Recently a point mutation leading to Leu-to-Phe substitution in the VGSC at residue 1014, a most common kdr mutation in insects, was reported in Anopheles culicifacies-a major malaria vector in the Indian subcontinent. This study reports the presence of two additional amino acid substitutions in the VGSC of a...

  17. Calcium channelopathies in inherited neurological disorders: relevance to drug screening for acquired channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Mutations located in the human genes encoding voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for a variety of diseases referred to as calcium channelopathies, including familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, childhood absence epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder, all of which are rare inherited forms of common neurological disorders. The genetic basis of these calcium channelopathies provides a unique opportunity to investigate their underlying mechanisms from the molecular to whole-organism levels. Studies of channelopathies provide insight on the relationships between channel structure and function, and reveal diverse and unexpected physiological roles for the channels. Importantly, these studies may also lead to the identification of drugs for the treatment of genetically acquired channel disorders, as well as to novel therapeutic practices. In this feature review, recent findings regarding neurological calcium channelopathies are discussed.

  18. Genetic variants of potassium voltage-gated channel genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, and KCNE1) affected the risk of atrial fibrillation in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Shen, Chao; Yao, Zhaohui; Liang, Jinjun; Huang, Congxin

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common type of cardiac arrhythmia and is a major healthcare burden. Around 20% of patients show no obvious clinical manifestations; this can lead to a delay of AF diagnosis and prevention. Genetic mutations are one of the important risk factors for AF. This study aimed to assess the associations between polymorphisms on KCNE1, KCNQ1, and KCNH2 with the risk of AF in a Chinese population. A case-control study comprised of 438 AF patients and 450 controls. The tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were retrieved in the International HapMap database and Haploview software was used to capture all the polymorphisms on KCNE1, KCNQ1, and KCNH2. DNA was extracted from blood and polymerase chain reaction-based assays were used to genotype polymorphisms of the KCNE1, KCNQ1, and KCNH2 genes. Chi-square test and student t-tests were used to evaluate the differences in the clinical characteristics between AF cases and controls. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the association between genetic variants of KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, and AF risk. Among the nine tag SNPs, three were significantly associated with the risk of AF: the rs1805127*G allele on KCNE1, and the rs2283228*C and rs1057128*A alleles on KCNQ1. In contrast, rs1805120*T variant was correlated with lower risk of AF. However, the other five genetic variants (rs2237892, rs2237895, rs2237897, rs2070357, and rs2070356) showed no significant association with AF risk (all p>0.05). Our study suggested that the rs1805127*G allele of KCNE1, and the rs2283228*C and rs1057128*A alleles on KCNQ1 are risk factors for AF, while the rs1805120*T allele on KCNH2 may serve as a protective factor for AF.

  19. Evolutionary analyses of KCNQ1 and HERG voltage-gated potassium channel sequences reveal location-specific susceptibility and augmented chemical severities of arrhythmogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accili Eric A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in HERG and KCNQ1 potassium channels have been associated with Long QT syndrome and atrial fibrillation, and more recently with sudden infant death syndrome and sudden unexplained death. In other proteins, disease-associated amino acid mutations have been analyzed according to the chemical severity of the changes and the locations of the altered amino acids according to their conservation over metazoan evolution. Here, we present the first such analysis of arrhythmia-associated mutations (AAMs in the HERG and KCNQ1 potassium channels. Results Using evolutionary analyses, AAMs in HERG and KCNQ1 were preferentially found at evolutionarily conserved sites and unevenly distributed among functionally conserved domains. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs are under-represented at evolutionarily conserved sites in HERG, but distribute randomly in KCNQ1. AAMs are chemically more severe, according to Grantham's Scale, than changes observed in evolution and their severity correlates with the expected chemical severity of the involved codon. Expected chemical severity of a given amino acid also correlates with its relative contribution to arrhythmias. At evolutionarily variable sites, the chemical severity of the changes is also correlated with the expected chemical severity of the involved codon. Conclusion Unlike nsSNPs, AAMs preferentially locate to evolutionarily conserved, and functionally important, sites and regions within HERG and KCNQ1, and are chemically more severe than changes which occur in evolution. Expected chemical severity may contribute to the overrepresentation of certain residues in AAMs, as well as to evolutionary change.

  20. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  1. PKA Controls Calcium Influx into Motor Neurons during a Rhythmic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine) rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels. PMID:24086161

  2. Effects of Nitric Oxide on Voltage-Gated K⁺ Currents in Human Cardiac Fibroblasts through the Protein Kinase G and Protein Kinase A Pathways but Not through S-Nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyemi; Choi, Jeongyoon; Kim, Young-Won; Lee, Donghee; Kim, Jung-Ha; Ko, Jae-Hong; Bang, Hyoweon; Kim, Taeho; Lim, Inja

    2018-03-12

    This study investigated the expression of voltage-gated K⁺ (K V ) channels in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the K V currents, and the underlying phosphorylation mechanisms. In reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, two types of K V channels were detected in HCFs: delayed rectifier K⁺ channel and transient outward K⁺ channel. In whole-cell patch-clamp technique, delayed rectifier K⁺ current (I K ) exhibited fast activation and slow inactivation, while transient outward K⁺ current (I to ) showed fast activation and inactivation kinetics. Both currents were blocked by 4-aminopyridine. An NO donor, S -nitroso- N -acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), increased the amplitude of I K in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC 50 value of 26.4 µM, but did not affect I to . The stimulating effect of SNAP on I K was blocked by pretreatment with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) or by KT5823. 8-bromo-cyclic GMP stimulated the I K . The stimulating effect of SNAP on I K was also blocked by pretreatment with KT5720 or by SQ22536. Forskolin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP each stimulated I K . On the other hand, the stimulating effect of SNAP on I K was not blocked by pretreatment of N -ethylmaleimide or by DL-dithiothreitol. Our data suggest that NO enhances I K , but not I to , among K V currents of HCFs, and the stimulating effect of NO on I K is through the PKG and PKA pathways, not through S -nitrosylation.

  3. The metal-ion-dependent adhesion site in the Von Willebrand factor-A domain of α2δ subunits is key to trafficking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantí, C.; Nieto-Rostro, M.; Foucault, I.; Heblich, F.; Wratten, J.; Richards, M. W.; Hendrich, J.; Douglas, L.; Page, K. M.; Davies, A.; Dolphin, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    All auxiliary α2δ subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels contain an extracellular Von Willebrand factor-A (VWA) domain that, in α2δ-1 and -2, has a perfect metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). Modeling of the α2δ-2 VWA domain shows it to be highly likely to bind a divalent cation. Mutating the three key MIDAS residues responsible for divalent cation binding resulted in a MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 subunit that was still processed and trafficked normally when it was expressed alone. However, unlike WT α2δ-2, the MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 subunit did not enhance and, in some cases, further diminished CaV1.2, -2.1, and -2.2 currents coexpressed with β1b by using either Ba2+ or Na+ as a permeant ion. Furthermore, expression of the MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 reduced surface expression and strongly increased the perinuclear retention of CaVα1 subunits at the earliest time at which expression was observed in both Cos-7 and NG108–15 cells. Despite the presence of endogenous α2δ subunits, heterologous expression of α2δ-2 in differentiated NG108–15 cells further enhanced the endogenous high-threshold Ca2+ currents, whereas this enhancement was prevented by the MIDAS mutations. Our results indicate that α2δ subunits normally interact with the CaVα1 subunit early in their maturation, before the appearance of functional plasma membrane channels, and an intact MIDAS motif in the α2δ subunit is required to promote trafficking of the α1 subunit to the plasma membrane by an integrin-like switch. This finding provides evidence for a primary role of a VWA domain in intracellular trafficking of a multimeric complex, in contrast to the more usual roles in binding extracellular ligands in other exofacial VWA domains. PMID:16061813

  4. Different aspects of sartan + calcium antagonist association compared to the single therapy on inflammation and metabolic parameters in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Carbone, Anna; Querci, Fabrizio; Fogari, Elena; D'Angelo, Angela; Maffioli, Pamela

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker combination on blood pressure control, lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation markers. We randomized 276 hypertensive patients to olmesartan 20 mg, amlodipine 10 mg, or a single pill containing an olmesartan/amlodipine combination 20/5 mg for 12 months. We evaluated the following: body weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin (FPI), M value, lipid profile, adiponectin (ADN), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor-1β (MIP-1β). Olmesartan/amlodipine combination better reduced blood pressure, FPI, homeostasis model assessment index, and increased M value and ADN compared to olmesartan and amlodipine monotherapies. Olmesartan/amlodipine significantly decreased Hs-CRP, MCP-1, and MIP-1β. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, clinical study, ARB/calcium antagonist combination resulted to be more effective than single monotherapies in reducing blood pressure, in improving insulin sensitivity, and in reducing inflammation parameters in patients with stage I essential hypertension.

  5. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  6. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times...

  7. First direct electron microscopic visualization of a tight spatial coupling between GABAA-receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1992-01-01

    Using cerebellar granule neurons in culture it was demonstrated that exposure of the cells to the GABAA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) leads to an increase in the number of voltage-gated calcium channels as revealed by quantitative preembedding indirect imm...... of THIP-treated cultures. This suggests that primarily low affinity GABAA-receptors are closely associated with Ca2+ channels and this may be important for the ability of these receptors to mediate an inhibitory action on transmitter release even under extreme depolarizing conditions....

  8. Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Insecticide-Induced Stimulation of Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated calcium channels. Therefore, the present study compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroids to evoke Ca2+ influx in primary cultures of mouse neocortical neurons. Nine pyrethroids (tefluthrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin, β-cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, S-bioallethrin, fenpropathrin, cypermethrin, and bifenthrin) produced concentration-dependent elevations in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neocortical neurons. Permethrin and resmethrin were without effect on [Ca2+]i. These pyrethroids displayed a range of efficacies on Ca2+ influx; however, the EC50 values for active pyrethroids all were within one order of magnitude. Tetrodotoxin blocked increases in [Ca2+]i caused by all nine active pyrethroids, indicating that the effects depended on VGSC activation. The pathways for deltamethrin- and tefluthrin-induced Ca2+ influx include N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors, L-type Ca2+ channels, and reverse mode of operation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inasmuch as antagonists of these sites blocked deltamethrin-induced Ca2+ influx. These data demonstrate that pyrethroids stimulate Ca2+ entry into neurons subsequent to their actions on VGSCs. PMID:20881019

  9. MiR-223-3p as a Novel MicroRNA Regulator of Expression of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Kv4.2 in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is a devastating cardiovascular disease with a high rate of morbidity and mortality, partly due to enhanced arrhythmogenicity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to participate in the regulation of cardiac ion channels and the associated arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that miR-223-3p contributes to the electrical disorders in AMI via modulating KCND2, the gene encoding voltage-gated channel Kv4.2 that carries transient outward K+ current Ito. Methods: AMI model was established in male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats by left anterior descending artery (LAD ligation. Evans blue and TTC staining was used to measure infarct area. Ito was recorded in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes or cultured neonatal rat ventricular cells (NRVCs by whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the protein level of Kv4.2 and real-time RT-PCR to determine the transcript level of miR-223-3p. Luciferase assay was used to examine the interaction between miR-223-3p and KCND2 in cultured NRVCs. Results: Expression of miR-223-3p was remarkably upregulated in AMI relative to sham control rats. On the contrary, the protein level of Kv4.2 and Ito density were significantly decreased in AMI. Consistently, transfection of miR-223-3p mimic markedly reduced Kv4.2 protein level and Ito current in cultured NRVCs. Co-transfection of AMO-223-3p (an antisense inhibitor of miR-223-3p reversed the repressive effect of miR-223-3p. Luciferase assay showed that miR-223-3p, but not the negative control, substantially suppressed the luciferase activity, confirming the direct binding of miR-223-3p to the seed site within the KCND2 sequence. Finally, direct intramuscular injection of AMO-223-3p into the ischemic myocardium to knockdown endogenous miR-223-3p decreased the propensity of ischemic arrhythmias. Conclusions: Upregulation of miR-223-3p in AMI repressed the expression of

  10. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (rs4236480 in TRPV5 Calcium Channel Gene Is Associated with Stone Multiplicity in Calcium Nephrolithiasis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Khaleel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis is characterized by calcification of stones in the kidneys from an unknown cause. Animal models demonstrated the functional roles of the transient receptor potential vanilloid member 5 (TRPV5 gene in calcium renal reabsorption and hypercalciuria. Therefore, TRPV5 was suggested to be involved in calcium homeostasis. However, whether genetic polymorphisms of TRPV5 are associated with kidney stone multiplicity or recurrence is unclear. In this study, 365 Taiwanese kidney-stone patients were recruited. Both biochemical data and DNA samples were collected. Genotyping was performed by a TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. We found that a TRPV5 polymorphism (rs4236480 was observed to be associated with stone multiplicity of calcium nephrolithiasis, as the risk of stone multiplicity was higher in patients with the TT+CT genotype than in patients with the CC genotype (p=0.0271. In summary, despite the complexity of nephrolithiasis and the potential association of numerous calcium homeostatic absorption/reabsorption factors, TRPV5 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of calcium nephrolithiasis.

  11. Trimethyloxonium modification of single batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels in planar bilayers. Changes in unit conductance and in block by saxitoxin and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley JF; French, RJ; Krueger, BK

    1986-01-01

    Single batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels from rat brain were modified by trimethyloxonium (TMO) after incorporation in planar lipid bilayers. TMO modification eliminated saxitoxin (STX) sensitivity, reduced the single channel conductance by 37%, and reduced calcium block of inward sodium currents. These effects always occurred concomitantly, in an all-or-none fashion. Calcium and STX protected sodium channels from TMO modification with potencies similar to their affinities for block. Calcium inhibited STX binding to rat brain membrane vesicles and relieved toxin block of channels in bilayers, apparently by competing with STX for the toxin binding site. These results suggest that toxins, permeant cations, and blocking cations can interact with a common site on the sodium channel near the extracellular surface. It is likely that permeant cations transiently bind to this superficial site, as the first of several steps in passing inward through the channel. PMID:2419487

  12. Action potential-evoked calcium release is impaired in single skeletal muscle fibers from heart failure patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino DiFranco

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+ release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers.Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms was markedly (2.6-fold and significantly (p<0.05 smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms. This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers.These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients.

  13. Monitoring single-synapse glutamate release and presynaptic calcium concentration in organised brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas P; Zheng, Kaiyu; Tyurikova, Olga; Reynolds, James P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-06-01

    Brain function relies in large part on Ca 2+ -dependent release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from neuronal axons. Establishing the causal relationship between presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and probabilistic glutamate release is therefore a fundamental quest across neurosciences. Its progress, however, has hitherto depended primarily on the exploration of either cultured nerve cells or giant central synapses accessible to direct experimental probing in situ. Here we show that combining patch-clamp with time-resolved imaging of Ca 2+ -sensitive fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (Tornado-FLIM) enables readout of single spike-evoked presynaptic Ca 2+ concentration dynamics, with nanomolar sensitivity, in individual neuronal axons in acute brain slices. In parallel, intensity Tornado imaging of a locally expressed extracellular optical glutamate sensor iGluSnFr provides direct monitoring of single-quantum, single-synapse glutamate releases in situ. These two methods pave the way for simultaneous registration of presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and transmitter release in an intact brain at the level of individual synapses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A single and rapid calcium wave at egg activation in Drosophila

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    Anna H. York-Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation is an essential process that accompanies fertilisation in all animals and heralds major cellular changes, most notably, resumption of the cell cycle. While activation involves wave-like oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in mammals, ascidians and polychaete worms and a single Ca2+ peak in fish and frogs, in insects, such as Drosophila, to date, it has not been shown what changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels occur. Here, we utilise ratiometric imaging of Ca2+ indicator dyes and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator proteins to identify and characterise a single, rapid, transient wave of Ca2+ in the Drosophila egg at activation. Using genetic tools, physical manipulation and pharmacological treatments we demonstrate that the propagation of the Ca2+ wave requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ can be uncoupled from egg swelling, but not from progression of the cell cycle. We further show that mechanical pressure alone is not sufficient to initiate a Ca2+ wave. We also find that processing bodies, sites of mRNA decay and translational regulation, become dispersed following the Ca2+ transient. Based on this data we propose the following model for egg activation in Drosophila: exposure to lateral oviduct fluid initiates an increase in intracellular Ca2+ at the egg posterior via osmotic swelling, possibly through mechano-sensitive Ca2+ channels; a single Ca2+ wave then propagates in an actin dependent manner; this Ca2+ wave co-ordinates key developmental events including resumption of the cell cycle and initiation of translation of mRNAs such as bicoid.

  15. Restricting calcium currents is required for correct fiber type specification in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Nasreen; Dienes, Beatrix; Benedetti, Ariane; Tuluc, Petronel; Szentesi, Peter; Sztretye, Monika; Rainer, Johannes; Hess, Michael W; Schwarzer, Christoph; Obermair, Gerald J; Csernoch, Laszlo; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling is independent of calcium influx. In fact, alternative splicing of the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV1.1 actively suppresses calcium currents in mature muscle. Whether this is necessary for normal development and function of muscle is not known. However, splicing defects that cause aberrant expression of the calcium-conducting developmental CaV1.1e splice variant correlate with muscle weakness in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we deleted CaV1.1 (Cacna1s) exon 29 in mice. These mice displayed normal overall motor performance, although grip force and voluntary running were reduced. Continued expression of the developmental CaV1.1e splice variant in adult mice caused increased calcium influx during EC coupling, altered calcium homeostasis, and spontaneous calcium sparklets in isolated muscle fibers. Contractile force was reduced and endurance enhanced. Key regulators of fiber type specification were dysregulated and the fiber type composition was shifted toward slower fibers. However, oxidative enzyme activity and mitochondrial content declined. These findings indicate that limiting calcium influx during skeletal muscle EC coupling is important for the secondary function of the calcium signal in the activity-dependent regulation of fiber type composition and to prevent muscle disease. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Microscopic heat pulse-induced calcium dynamics in single WI-38 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hideki; Oyama, Kotaro; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive Ca(2+) dynamics occur primarily through transient receptor potential channels, but also by means of Ca(2+) channels and pumps on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. As such, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) is re-equilibrated by changes in ambient temperature. The present study investigated the effects of heat pulses (heating duration: 2 s or 150 s) on [Ca(2+)]cyt in single WI-38 fibroblasts, which are considered as normal cells. We found that Ca(2+) burst occurred immediately after short (2 s) heat pulse, which is similar to our previous report on HeLa cells, but with less thermosensitivity. The heat pulses originated from a focused 1455-nm infrared laser light were applied in the vicinity of cells under the optical microscope. Ca(2+) bursts induced by the heat pulse were suppressed by treating cells with inhibitors for sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) or inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Long (150 s) heat pulses also induced Ca(2+) bursts after the onset of heating and immediately after re-cooling. Cells were more thermosensitive at physiological (37°C) than at room (25°C) temperature; however, at 37°C, cells were responsive at a higher temperature (ambient temperature+heat pulse). These results strongly suggest that the heat pulse-induced Ca(2+) burst is caused by a transient imbalance in Ca(2+) flow between SERCA and IP3R, and offer a potential new method for thermally controlling Ca(2+)-regulated cellular functions.

  17. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

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    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  18. Potentiation of Opioid-Induced Analgesia by L-Type Calcium Channel Blockers: Need for Clinical Trial in Cancer Pain

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    S Basu Ray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports indicate that the analgesic effect of opioids is due to both closure of specific voltage-gated calcium channels (N- and P/Q-types and opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs in neurons concerned with transmission of pain. However, administration of opioids leads to unacceptable levels of side effects, particularly at high doses. Thus, current research is directed towards simultaneously targeting other voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs like the L-type VGCCs or even other cell signaling mechanisms, which would aug-ment opioid-mediated analgesic effect without a concurrent increase in the side effects. Unfortunately, the results of these studies are often conflicting considering the different experimental paradigms (variable drug selection and their doses and also the specific pain test used for studying analgesia adopted by researchers. The present review focuses on some of the interesting findings regarding the analgesic effect of Opioids + L-VGCC blockers and suggests that time has come for a clinical trial of this combination of drugs in the treatment of cancer pain.

  19. TRPM8 and Nav1.8 sodium channels are required for transthyretin-induced calcium influx in growth cones of small-diameter TrkA-positive sensory neurons

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    Vincent Adele J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP is a peripheral neuropathy caused by the extracellular accumulation and deposition of insoluble transthyretin (TTR aggregates. However the molecular mechanism that underlies TTR toxicity in peripheral nerves is unclear. Previous studies have suggested that amyloidogenic proteins can aggregate into oligomers which disrupt intracellular calcium homeostasis by increasing the permeability of the plasma membrane to extracellular calcium. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of TTR on calcium influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Results Levels of intracellular cytosolic calcium were monitored in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons isolated from embryonic rats using the calcium-sensitive fluorescent indicator Fluo4. An amyloidogenic mutant form of TTR, L55P, induced calcium influx into the growth cones of DRG neurons, whereas wild-type TTR had no significant effect. Atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies confirmed that the L55P TTR contained oligomeric species of TTR. The effect of L55P TTR was decreased by blockers of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, as well as by blockers of Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channels and transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8 channels. siRNA knockdown of TRPM8 channels using three different TRPM8 siRNAs strongly inhibited calcium influx in DRG growth cones. Conclusions These data suggest that activation of TRPM8 channels triggers the activation of Nav1.8 channels which leads to calcium influx through VGCC. We suggest that TTR-induced calcium influx into DRG neurons may contribute to the pathophysiology of FAP. Furthermore, we speculate that similar mechanisms may mediate the toxic effects of other amyloidogenic proteins such as the β-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. The calcium channel β2 (CACNB2 subunit repertoire in teleosts

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    Mueller Rachel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyocyte contraction is initiated by influx of extracellular calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels. These oligomeric channels utilize auxiliary β subunits to chaperone the pore-forming α subunit to the plasma membrane, and to modulate channel electrophysiology 1. Several β subunit family members are detected by RT-PCR in the embryonic heart. Null mutations in mouse β2, but not in the other three β family members, are embryonic lethal at E10.5 due to defects in cardiac contractility 2. However, a drawback of the mouse model is that embryonic heart rhythm is difficult to study in live embryos due to their intra-uterine development. Moreover, phenotypes may be obscured by secondary effects of hypoxia. As a first step towards developing a model for contributions of β subunits to the onset of embryonic heart rhythm, we characterized the structure and expression of β2 subunits in zebrafish and other teleosts. Results Cloning of two zebrafish β2 subunit genes (β2.1 and β2.2 indicated they are membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK-family genes. Zebrafish β2 genes show high conservation with mammals within the SH3 and guanylate kinase domains that comprise the "core" of MAGUK proteins, but β2.2 is much more divergent in sequence than β2.1. Alternative splicing occurs at the N-terminus and within the internal HOOK domain. In both β2 genes, alternative short ATG-containing first exons are separated by some of the largest introns in the genome, suggesting that individual transcript variants could be subject to independent cis-regulatory control. In the Tetraodon nigrovidis and Fugu rubripes genomes, we identified single β2 subunit gene loci. Comparative analysis of the teleost and human β2 loci indicates that the short 5' exon sequences are highly conserved. A subset of 5' exons appear to be unique to teleost genomes, while others are shared with mammals. Alternative splicing is temporally and

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Non-surgical Sterilization of Male Cats with Single Intra-testicular Injection of Calcium Chloride

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    Samanta Prabhat K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium chloride solution is an established injectable sterilant in dogs and other mammals. With cat populations a continuing problem, we sought to explore its first use in cats. Six cats per group were injected with 5%, 10% or 20% calcium chloride dihydrate in saline solution with lignocaine hydrochloride, a local anaesthetic. Results At the 60th day post-injection, cat testes were collected and showed complete testicular necrosis and replacement by fibrous tissue; very low sperm counts; and reduction of serum testosterone by at least 70% in 20% dose. Androgenic enzyme activities and their expressions were also reduced in all the treated groups along with intra-testicular testosterone concentration was also low. Increased testicular lipid peroxidation, with reduced antioxidants and mitochondrial membrane potential, were evident following calcium chloride treatments. However, there were no apparent changes in serum concentrations of cortisol, fasting blood sugar level, blood urea nitrogen, packed cell volume, or total serum protein following calcium chloride injection, suggesting that this method of sterilization is not associated with any general stress response. Conclusion Calcium chloride solution demonstrates potential for androgenesis-eliminating nonsurgical sterilization of male cats in addition to its proven efficacy in dogs and other mammals.

  2. Anestésicos locais: interação com membranas biológicas e com o canal de sódio voltagem-dependente Local anesthetics: interaction with biological membranes and with the voltage-gated sodium channel

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    Daniele Ribeiro de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA are described in the literature. Two types of theories can be distinguished: those that focus on the direct effects of LA on their target protein in the axon membranes, i.e. the voltage-gated sodium channel and the ones that take into account the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase for the reversible nerve blockage. Since there is a direct correlation between LA hydrophobicity and potency, it is crucial to take this physico-chemical property into account to understand the mechanism of action of LA, be it on the sodium channel protein, lipid(s, or on the whole membrane phase.

  3. In vitro–in vivo studies of the quantitative effect of calcium, multivitamins and milk on single dose ciprofloxacin bioavailability

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    Baishakhi Dey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin, commonly used in India as an anti-microbial for prolonged use in chronic and non-specific indications, may affect the bioavailability of the drug. The drug prescribed is commonly taken with multivitamins, calcium and milk. A simple and reliable analytical methodology obtaining a correlation with in vivo urinary excretion studies using UV and HPLC and in vitro dissolution studies (IVIVC has shown a significant increase in elimination rate of ciprofloxacin co-administered with multivitamins, calcium and milk. Appreciable IVIVC results proved that dissolution studies could serve as an alternative to in vivo bioavailability and also support bio-waivers.

  4. Molecular and functional identification of cyclic AMP-sensitive BKCa potassium channels (ZERO variant) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in single rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jørgensen, Finn; Andreasen, Ditte

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the type and functional significance of potassium channels and voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(v)) in single rat JG cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Single JG cells displayed outward rectification at positive membrane potentials and limited net currents......, respectively. Double immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of BKCa and renin in the same cell. cAMP increased the outward current by 1.6-fold, and this was inhibited by 74% with iberiotoxin. Expression of the cAMP-sensitive splice variant (ZERO) of BKCa was confirmed in single-sampled JG cells by RT...... no effect. We conclude that JG cells express functional cAMP-sensitive BKCa channels (the ZERO splice variant) and voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels....

  5. κ-Opioid Receptor Inhibition of Calcium Oscillations in Spinal Cord Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelamangalath, Lakshmi; Dravid, Shashank M.; George, Joju; Aldrich, Jane V.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse embryonic spinal cord neurons in culture exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations from day in vitro (DIV) 6 through DIV 10. Such spontaneous activity in developing spinal cord contributes to maturation of synapses and development of pattern-generating circuits. Here we demonstrate that these calcium oscillations are regulated by κ opioid receptors (KORs). The κ opioid agonist dynorphin (Dyn)-A (1–13) suppressed calcium oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner, and both the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone and the κ-selective blocker norbinaltorphimine eliminated this effect. The KOR-selective agonist (+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69593) mimicked the effect of Dyn-A (1–13) on calcium oscillations. A κ-specific peptide antagonist, zyklophin, was also able to prevent the suppression of calcium oscillations caused by Dyn-A (1–13). These spontaneous calcium oscillations were blocked by 1 μM tetrodotoxin, indicating that they are action potential-dependent. Although the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker nifedipine did not suppress calcium oscillations, the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin inhibited this spontaneous response. Blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline and dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), also suppressed calcium oscillations, revealing a dependence on glutamate-mediated signaling. Finally, we have demonstrated expression of KORs in glutamatergic spinal neurons and localization in a presynaptic compartment, consistent with previous reports of KOR-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. The KOR-mediated inhibition of spontaneous calcium oscillations may therefore be a consequence of presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. PMID:21422300

  6. BDNF-Induced Potentiation of Spontaneous Twitching in Innervated Myocytes Requires Calcium Release From Intracellular Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLEIMAN, ROBIN J.; TIAN, NING; KRIZAJ, DAVID; HWANG, THOMAS N.; COPENHAGEN, DAVID R.; REICHARDT, LOUIS F.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can potentiate synaptic release at newly developed frog neuromuscular junctions. Although this potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+ and reflects changes in acetylcholine release, little is known about the intracellular transduction or calcium signaling pathways. We have developed a video assay for neurotrophin-induced potentiation of myocyte twitching as a measure of potentiation of synaptic activity. We use this assay to show that BDNF-induced synaptic potentiation is not blocked by cadmium, indicating that Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is not required. TrkB autophosphorylation is not blocked in Ca2+-free conditions, indicating that TrkB activity is not Ca2+ dependent. Additionally, an inhibitor of phospholipase C interferes with BDNF-induced potentiation. These results suggest that activation of the TrkB receptor activates phospholipase C to initiate intracellular Ca2+ release from stores which subsequently potentiates transmitter release. PMID:10899220

  7. Altering calcium influx for selective destruction of breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han-Gang; McLaughlin, Sarah; Newman, Mackenzie; Brundage, Kathleen; Ammer, Amanda; Martin, Karen; Coad, James

    2017-03-04

    Human triple-negative breast cancer has limited therapeutic choices. Breast tumor cells have depolarized plasma membrane potential. Using this unique electrical property, we aim to develop an effective selective killing of triple-negative breast cancer. We used an engineered L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cec), activated by membrane depolarization without inactivation, to induce excessive calcium influx in breast tumor cells. Patch clamp and flow cytometry were used in testing the killing selectivity and efficiency of human breast tumor cells in vitro. Bioluminescence and ultrasound imaging were used in studies of human triple-negative breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 xenograft in mice. Histological staining, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate mechanism that mediates Cec-induced cell death. Activating Cec channels expressed in human breast cancer MCF7 cells produced enormous calcium influx at depolarized membrane. Activating the wild-type Cav1.2 channels expressed in MCF7 cells also produced a large calcium influx at depolarized membrane, but this calcium influx was diminished at the sustained membrane depolarization due to channel inactivation. MCF7 cells expressing Cec died when the membrane potential was held at -10 mV for 1 hr, while non-Cec-expressing MCF7 cells were alive. MCF7 cell death was 8-fold higher in Cec-expressing cells than in non-Cec-expressing cells. Direct injection of lentivirus containing Cec into MDA-MB-231 xenograft in mice inhibited tumor growth. Activated caspase-3 protein was detected only in MDA-MB-231 cells expressing Cec, along with a significantly increased expression of activated caspase-3 in xenograft tumor treated with Cec. We demonstrated a novel strategy to induce constant calcium influx that selectively kills human triple-negative breast tumor cells.

  8. Quantitative imaging of chemical composition in single cells by secondary ion mass spectrometry: cisplatin affects calcium stores in renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for quantitative single cell mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) analysis is described in this chapter with examples of the treatment of cells with anticancer drug, cisplatin. Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum ii (CDDP), is widely used for the treatment of many malignancies, including testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, head and neck, and small cell and non-small cell lung cancers. The possibility of renal injury by cisplatin treatment is a major dose-limiting factor in this cancer therapy. At present, the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal cytotoxicity are poorly understood. In this work, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used for investigating cisplatin-induced alterations in intracellular chemical composition in a well-established model (LLC-PK(1) cell line) for studying renal injury. The cells were cryogenically prepared by the sandwich freeze-fracture method for subcellular imaging analysis of chemical composition (total concentrations of K(+), Na(+), and Ca(2+)) in individual cells. The single cell analysis of these diffusible ions necessitates the use of reliable cryogenic sample preparations for SIMS. The sandwich freeze-fracture method offers a simple approach for cryogenically preserving diffusible ions and molecules inside the cells for SIMS analysis. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing chemical images of single cells with 500-nm spatial resolution was used in the study. In cisplatin-treated cells, SIMS imaging showed the presence of detectable amount of platinum at mass 195, as (195)Pt(+) secondary ions in individual cells. SIMS observations also revealed that individual cells differed in their response to cisplatin. While the chemical composition of some cells was unaffected by cisplatin, others showed a reduction in cytoplasmic calcium stores that was not associated with changes in their intracellular K or Na concentrations. Another population of cells displayed an increase in

  9. Single-molecule folding mechanisms of the apo- and Mg2+-bound states of human neuronal calcium sensor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqvi, Mohsin M; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Otazo, Mariela R

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is the primordial member of a family of proteins responsible primarily for sensing changes in neuronal Ca(2+) concentration. NCS-1 is a multispecific protein interacting with a number of binding partners in both calcium-dependent and independent manners, and acting...... in a variety of cellular processes in which it has been linked to a number of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite extensive studies on the Ca(2+)-activated state of NCS proteins, little is known about the conformational dynamics of the Mg(2+)-bound and apo states, both of which are populated...... by populating one intermediate state consisting of a folded C-domain and an unfolded N-domain. The interconversion at equilibrium between the different molecular states populated by NCS-1 was monitored in real time through constant-force measurements and the energy landscapes underlying the observed transitions...

  10. A NLTE line formation for neutral and singly-ionised calcium in model atmospheres of B-F stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation calculations for Ca I and Ca II in B-F stars. The sign and the magnitude of NLTE abundance corrections depend on line and stellar parameters. We determine calcium abundances for nine stars with reliable stellar parameters. For all stars, where the lines of both species could be measured, the NLTE abundances are found to be consistent within the error bars. We obtain consistent NLTE abundances from Ca II lines in the visible and near infra-red (IR, 8912-27, 9890 Å) spectrum range, in contrast with LTE, where the discrepancy between the two groups of lines ranges from -0.5 dex to 0.6 dex for different stars. Our NLTE method reproduces the Ca II 8912-27, 9890 Å lines observed in emission in the late B-type star HD 160762 with the classical plane-parallel and LTE model atmosphere. NLTE abundance corrections for lines of Ca I and Ca II were calculated in a grid of model atmospheres with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 13000 K, 3.2 ≤ log g ≤ 5.0, -0.5 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤0.5, ξt= 2.0 km s-1. Our NLTE results can be applied for calcium NLTE abundance determination from Gaia spectra, given that accurate continuum normalisation and proper treatment of the hydrogen Paschen lines are provided. The NLTE method can be useful to refine calcium underabundances in Am stars and to provide accurate observational constraints on the models of diffusion.

  11. Single organelle fret-based analysis of intracellular calcium: different effects of presinilis carrying Familial Alzheimer's Disease mutations

    OpenAIRE

    wong, andrea kuan cie

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is one of the major intracellular messengers that impacts nearly every aspect of cell life. In particular, it plays essential roles in neuronal development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, as well as in the regulation of metabolic pathways and cell fate decisions. The first goal of my work was to study more in details the Golgi apparatus (GA), as an intracellular Ca2+ store. The Golgi complex may store up to 5% of the total cellular Ca2+ at higher concentrations an...

  12. Calcium-permeable ion channels in the kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions (Ca2+) are crucial for a variety of cellular functions. The extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations are thus tightly regulated to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis. The kidney, one of the major organs of the excretory system, regulates Ca2+ homeostasis by filtration and reabsorption. Approximately 60% of the Ca2+ in plasma is filtered, and 99% of that is reabsorbed by the kidney tubules. Ca2+ is also a critical signaling molecule in kidney development, in all kidney cellular functions, and in the emergence of kidney diseases. Recently, studies using genetic and molecular biological approaches have identified several Ca2+-permeable ion channel families as important regulators of Ca2+ homeostasis in kidney. These ion channel families include transient receptor potential channels (TRP), voltage-gated calcium channels, and others. In this review, we provide a brief and systematic summary of the expression, function, and pathological contribution for each of these Ca2+-permeable ion channels. Moreover, we discuss their potential as future therapeutic targets. PMID:27029425

  13. Glucose stimulates neurotensin secretion from the rat small intestine by mechanisms involving SGLT1 and GLUT2 leading to cell depolarization and calcium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Bechmann, Louise Ellegaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neurohormone produced in the central nervous system and in the gut epithelium by the enteroendocrine N cell. NT may play a role in appetite regulation and may have potential in obesity treatment. Glucose ingestion stimulates NT secretion in healthy young humans......, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Here, we show that rats express NT in the gut and that glucose gavage stimulates secretion similarly to oral glucose in humans. Therefore, we conducted experiments on isolated perfused rat small intestine with a view to characterize the cellular pathways...... of secretion. Luminal glucose (20% wt/vol) stimulated secretion but vascular glucose (5, 10, or 15 mmol/l) was without effect. The underlying mechanisms depend on membrane depolarization and calcium influx, since the voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine and the KATP channel opener diazoxide...

  14. Calcium-Enhanced Twitching Motility in Xylella fastidiosa Is Linked to a Single PilY1 Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F; Parker, Jennifer K; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is restricted to the xylem vessel environment, where mineral nutrients are transported through the plant host; therefore, changes in the concentrations of these elements likely impact the growth and virulence of this bacterium. Twitching motility, dependent on type IV pili (TFP), is required for movement against the transpiration stream that results in basipetal colonization. We previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca) increases the motility of X. fastidiosa, although the mechanism was unknown. PilY1 is a TFP structural protein recently shown to bind Ca and to regulate twitching and adhesion in bacterial pathogens of humans. Sequence analysis identified three pilY1 homologs in X. fastidiosa (PD0023, PD0502, and PD1611), one of which (PD1611) contains a Ca-binding motif. Separate deletions of PD0023 and PD1611 resulted in mutants that still showed twitching motility and were not impaired in attachment or biofilm formation. However, the response of increased twitching at higher Ca concentrations was lost in the pilY1-1611 mutant. Ca does not modulate the expression of any of the X. fastidiosa PilY1 homologs, although it increases the expression of the retraction ATPase pilT during active movement. The evidence presented here suggests functional differences between the PilY1 homologs, which may provide X. fastidiosa with an adaptive advantage in environments with high Ca concentrations, such as xylem sap. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Calcium triggers reversal of calmodulin on nested anti-parallel sites in the IQ motif of the neuronal voltage-dependent sodium channel NaV1.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Liam; Fowler, C Andrew; Mahling, Ryan; Lin, Zesen; Miller, Mark Stephen; Marx, Dagan C; Yoder, Jesse B; Kim, Elaine H; Tefft, Kristin M; Waite, Brett C; Feldkamp, Michael D; Yu, Liping; Shea, Madeline A

    2017-05-01

    Several members of the voltage-gated sodium channel family are regulated by calmodulin (CaM) and ionic calcium. The neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel Na V 1.2 contains binding sites for both apo (calcium-depleted) and calcium-saturated CaM. We have determined equilibrium dissociation constants for rat Na V 1.2 IQ motif [IQRAYRRYLLK] binding to apo CaM (~3nM) and (Ca 2+ ) 4 -CaM (~85nM), showing that apo CaM binding is favored by 30-fold. For both apo and (Ca 2+ ) 4 -CaM, NMR demonstrated that Na V 1.2 IQ motif peptide (Na V 1.2 IQp ) exclusively made contacts with C-domain residues of CaM (CaM C ). To understand how calcium triggers conformational change at the CaM-IQ interface, we determined a solution structure (2M5E.pdb) of (Ca 2+ ) 2 -CaM C bound to Na V 1.2 IQp . The polarity of (Ca 2+ ) 2 -CaM C relative to the IQ motif was opposite to that seen in apo CaM C -Na v 1.2 IQp (2KXW), revealing that CaM C recognizes nested, anti-parallel sites in Na v 1.2 IQp . Reversal of CaM may require transient release from the IQ motif during calcium binding, and facilitate a re-orientation of CaM N allowing interactions with non-IQ Na V 1.2 residues or auxiliary regulatory proteins interacting in the vicinity of the IQ motif. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of single-cell responses in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish with dextran-coupled calcium dyes delivered via local electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kassing

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio has become one of the major animal models for in vivo examination of sensory and neuronal computation. Similar to Xenopus tadpoles neural activity in the optic tectum, the major region controlling visually guided behavior, can be examined in zebrafish larvae by optical imaging. Prerequisites of these approaches are usually the transparency of larvae up to a certain age and the use of two-photon microscopy. This principle of fluorescence excitation was necessary to suppress crosstalk between signals from individual neurons, which is a critical issue when using membrane-permeant dyes. This makes the equipment to study neuronal processing costly and limits the approach to the study of larvae. Thus there is lack of knowledge about the properties of neurons in the optic tectum of adult animals. We established a procedure to circumvent these problems, enabling in vivo calcium imaging in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish. Following local application of dextran-coupled dyes single-neuron activity of adult zebrafish can be monitored with conventional widefield microscopy, because dye labeling remains restricted to tens of neurons or less. Among the neurons characterized with our technique we found neurons that were selective for a certain pattern orientation as well as neurons that responded in a direction-selective way to visual motion. These findings are consistent with previous studies and indicate that the functional integrity of neuronal circuits in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish is preserved with our staining technique. Overall, our protocol for in vivo calcium imaging provides a useful approach to monitor visual responses of individual neurons in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish even when only widefield microscopy is available. This approach will help to obtain valuable insight into the principles of visual computation in adult vertebrates and thus complement previous work on developing visual circuits.

  17. Calcium aluminate silicate Ca2Al2SiO7 single crystal applicable to piezoelectric sensors at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Hagiwara, Manabu; Noguchi, Hiroaki; Hoshina, Takuya; Takahashi, Tomoko; Kodama, Nobuhiro; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    Ca2Al2SiO7 (CAS) bulk single crystals were grown by the Czochralski method. Material constants of the crystal were determined over the driving temperature range of a typical combustion pressure sensor. The electrical resistivity at 800 °C was found to be of the order of 108 Ωcm. We constructed a measurement system for the direct piezoelectric effect at high temperature, and characterized the crystals in a simulated engine cylinder combustion environment. Output charge signal against applied stress was detected at 700 °C. These observations suggest that CAS crystals are superior candidate materials for high temperature for stress sensing.

  18. High resolution imaging of calcium dynamics in single spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Rossella

    2001-08-01

    Whole-cell recordings and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to investigate the properties of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells in acute slices. We first measured the properties of Ca2+ entry during AP firing of a cell and synaptic stimulation. The back-propagation of a single AP into the dendrites caused [Ca2+]; to rise in dendrites and spines simultaneously and it invaded the whole dendritic tree. The measured synaptically evoked Ca2+ signals in individual spines were different depending on the intracellular solution. In K +-based solution, synaptic stimulation evoked a Ca2+ signal that was restricted to single spines (dendritic spread 4 microns). This suggests an important role for K+ channels in regulating dendritic Ca2+ signals. I also describe a result which gave us the first view of synaptic function at a single connection. In one experiment the recorded electrical responses was demonstrated to arise from a single optically identified synapse. The surprisingly high coefficient of variation of the recorded signals suggests that either vesicles have different neurotransmitter concentration or the synapse generates responses to multiple released vesicles. We then investigated the role of Ca2+ entry during the pairing protocol for UP induction. We found that the post-synaptic depolarization required for LTP induction leads to a large maintained elevation of [Ca 2+]; in all spines due to VDCC activation; the [Ca2+]; elevation was greatly reduced by intracellular application of D890, a VDCC blocker. D890 almost completely blocked LTP, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through VDCC could be essential for LTP induction. The effect of D890 is not due to L-type Ca2+ channels, since a specific blocker of these channels did not affect LTP. When tested by Tom Soderling, high concentrations of D890 (IC-50 = 1mM) inhibited CaMKII, an enzyme whose activity is required for LTP induction. These results leave the role of VDCC in LTP induction

  19. Maturation of calcium-dependent GABA, glycine, and glutamate release in the glycinergic MNTB-LSO pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alamilla

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a key nucleus in high-fidelity temporal processing that underlies sound localization in the auditory brainstem. While the glycinergic principal cells of the MNTB project to all primary nuclei of the superior olive, during development the projection from MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is of interest because this immature inhibitory projection is known to undergo tonotopic refinement during an early postnatal period, and because during this period individual MNTB terminals in the LSO transiently release glycine GABA and glutamate. Developmental changes in calcium-dependent release are understood to be required to allow various auditory nuclei to follow high frequency activity; however, little is known about maturation of calcium-dependent release in the MNTB-LSO pathway, which has been presumed to have less stringent requirements for high-fidelity temporal following. In acute brainstem slices of rats age postnatal day 1 to 15 we recorded whole-cell responses in LSO principal neurons to electrical stimulation in the MNTB in order to measure sensitivity to external calcium, the contribution of different voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes to vesicular release, and the maturation of these measures for both GABA/glycine and glutamate transmission. Our results establish that release of glutamate at MNTB-LSO synapses is calcium-dependent. Whereas no significant developmental changes were evident for glutamate release, GABA/glycine release underwent substantial changes over the first two postnatal weeks: soon after birth L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs together mediated release, but after hearing onset P/Q-type VGCCs predominated. Blockade of P/Q-type VGCCs reduced the estimated quantal number for GABA/gly and glutamate transmission at P5-8 and the frequency of evoked miniature glycinergic events at P12-15, without apparent effects on spontaneous release of

  20. Modification of single Na+ channels by batrachotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, F N; Narahashi, T

    1982-11-01

    The modifications in the properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels caused by batrachotoxin were studied by using the patch clamp method for measuring single channel currents from excised membranes of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. The toxin-modified open state of the Na+ channel has a decreased conductance in comparison to that of normal Na+ channels. The lifetime of the modified open state is drastically prolonged, and channels now continue to open during a maintained depolarization so that the probability of a channel being open becomes constant. Modified and normal open states of Na+ channels coexist in batrachotoxin-exposed membrane patches. Unlike the normal condition, Na+ channels exposed to batrachotoxin open spontaneously at large negative potentials. These spontaneous openings apparently cause the toxin-induced increase in Na+ permeability which, in turn, causes membrane depolarization.

  1. Calcium current homeostasis and synaptic deficits in hippocampal neurons from Kelch-like 1 knockout mice

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    Paula Patricia Perissinotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1 is a neuronal actin-binding protein that modulates voltage-gated CaV2.1 (P/Q-type and CaV3.2 (α1H T-type calcium channels; KLHL1 knockdown experiments (KD cause down-regulation of both channel types and altered synaptic properties in cultured rat hippocampal neurons (Perissinotti et al., 2014. Here, we studied the effect of ablation of KLHL1 on calcium channel function and synaptic properties in cultured hippocampal neurons from KLHL1 knockout (KO mice. Western blot data showed the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was less abundant in KO hippocampus compared to wildtype (WT; and PQ-type calcium currents were smaller in KO neurons than WT during early days in vitro, although this decrease was compensated for at late stages by increases in L-type calcium current. In contrast, T-type currents did not change in culture. However, biophysical properties and western blot analysis revealed a differential contribution of T-type channel isoforms in the KO, with CaV3.2 α1H subunit being down-regulated and CaV3.1 α1G up-regulated. Synapsin I levels were reduced in the KO hippocampus; cultured neurons displayed a concomitant reduction in synapsin I puncta and decreased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC frequency. In summary, genetic ablation of the calcium channel modulator resulted in compensatory mechanisms to maintain calcium current homeostasis in hippocampal KO neurons; however, synaptic alterations resulted in a reduction of excitatory synapse number, causing an imbalance of the excitatory-inhibitory synaptic input ratio favoring inhibition.

  2. Gene analysis of the calcium channel 1 subunit and clinical studies for two patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, K; Terui, K; Tsutaya, S; Matsuda, E; Shoji, M; Sakihara, S; Nigawara, T; Takayasu, S; Moriyama, T; Yasujima, M; Suda, T

    2006-11-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a skeletal muscle disorder in which episodic attacks of muscle weakness occur; they are associated with decreased serum potassium (K+) levels. Recent molecular approaches have clarified that the condition is caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated calcium channel 1 subunit (CACNA1S). We describe two unrelated patients with HypoPP, followed by their relevant clinical studies and gene analysis. Clinical studies included an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), food-loading and insulin tolerance tests (ITT). For Case 1, serum K+ levels were extremely decreased following insulin tolerance testing compared with levels for controls. These results support the hypothesis that no efflux of K+ ion occurs in patients because of low activity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) channels. Mutational analysis of the CACNA1S gene showed a duplicate insertion of 14 base pairs (bp) from 52 to 65 in intron 26, present in the heterozygous state in both patients. No other mutations were detected in the CACNA1S gene, the muscle sodium channel gene (SCN4A) or the voltage-gated K+ channel gene (KCN3) of either patient. Further analysis showed that this duplicate insertion of 14 bp in intron 26 of the CACNA1S gene was found in 23.7% of healthy subjects. K+ dynamics studies are useful for confirming this syndrome, while further gene analysis for various ion channels using amplification and direct sequencing are required to evaluate the molecular basis of the disorder in the individual patient.

  3. Effect of insecticidal fusion proteins containing spider toxins targeting sodium and calcium ion channels on pyrethroid-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Fitches, Elaine; Pyati, Prashant; Gatehouse, John A

    2015-07-01

    The recombinant fusion proteins Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA contain the spider venom peptides δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a or ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a respectively, linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA). Pl1a targets receptor site 4 of insect voltage-gated sodium channels (NaCh), while Hv1a targets voltage-gated calcium channels. Insecticide-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae) contain mutations in NaCh. The pyrethroid-resistant kdr (794J) and super-kdr (UKO) strains contain mutations at residues L1014 and M918 in the channel α-subunit respectively, while the kdr + super-kdr strain (4824J), insensitive to pyrethroids, contains mutations at both L1014 and M918. Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA fusion proteins have estimated LC50 values of 0.35 and 0.19 mg mL(-1) when fed to wild-type M. persicae. For insecticide-resistant aphids, LC50 for the Pl1a/GNA fusion protein increased by 2-6-fold, correlating with pyrethroid resistance (wild type < kdr < super-kdr < kdr + super-kdr strains). In contrast, LC50 for the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein showed limited correlation with pyrethroid resistance. Mutations in the sodium channel in pyrethroid-resistant aphids also protect against a fusion protein containing a sodium-channel-specific toxin, in spite of differences in ligand-channel interactions, but do not confer resistance to a fusion protein targeting calcium channels. The use of fusion proteins with differing targets could play a role in managing pesticide resistance. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Hallmarks of the channelopathies associated with L-type calcium channels: a focus on the Timothy mutations in Ca(v)1.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Within the voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav channels) family, there are four genes coding for the L-type Cav channels (Cav1). The Cav1 channels underly many important physiological functions like excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, neuronal excitability and gene transcription. Mutations found in the genes encoding the Cav channels define a wide variety of diseases called calcium channelopathies and all four genes coding the Cav1 channels are carrying such mutations. L-type calcium channelopathies include muscular, neurological, cardiac and vision syndromes. Among them, the Timothy syndrome (TS) is linked to missense mutations in CACNA1C, the gene that encodes the Ca(v)1.2 subunit. Here we review the important features of the Cav1 channelopathies. We also report on the specific properties of TS-Ca(v)1.2 channels, which display non-inactivating calcium current as well as higher plasma membrane expression. Overall, we conclude that both electrophysiological and surface expression properties must be investigated to better account for the functional consequences of mutations linked to calcium channelopathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The involvement of the Mid1/Cch1/Yvc1 calcium channels in Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Alves de Castro

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is a major opportunistic pathogen and allergen of mammals. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes and also influences A. fumigatus pathogenicity. The presented study characterized the function of the A. fumigatus homologues of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae calcium channels, voltage-gated Cch1, stretch-activated Mid1 and vacuolar Yvc1. The A. fumigatus calcium channels cchA, midA and yvcA were regulated at transcriptional level by increased calcium levels. The YvcA::GFP fusion protein localized to the vacuoles. Both ΔcchA and ΔmidA mutant strains showed reduced radial growth rate in nutrient-poor minimal media. Interestingly, this growth defect in the ΔcchA strain was rescued by the exogenous addition of CaCl2. The ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔcchA ΔmidA strains were also sensitive to the oxidative stress inducer, paraquat. Restriction of external Ca(2+ through the addition of the Ca(2+-chelator EGTA impacted upon the growth of the ΔcchA and ΔmidA strains. All the A. fumigatus ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔyvcA strains demonstrated attenuated virulence in a neutropenic murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Infection with the parental strain resulted in a 100% mortality rate at 15 days post-infection, while the mortality rate of the ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔyvcA strains after 15 days post-infection was only 25%. Collectively, this investigation strongly indicates that CchA, MidA, and YvcA play a role in A. fumigatus calcium homeostasis and virulence.

  6. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    ), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p...-malignant as well as normal. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate......BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...

  7. Pannexin1 channel proteins in the zebrafish retina have shared and unique properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina,

  8. Local calcium elevation and cell elongation initiate guided motility in electrically stimulated osteoblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Ozkucur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigation of the mechanisms of guided cell migration can contribute to our understanding of many crucial biological processes, such as development and regeneration. Endogenous and exogenous direct current electric fields (dcEF are known to induce directional cell migration, however the initial cellular responses to electrical stimulation are poorly understood. Ion fluxes, besides regulating intracellular homeostasis, have been implicated in many biological events, including regeneration. Therefore understanding intracellular ion kinetics during EF-directed cell migration can provide useful information for development and regeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the initial events during migration of two osteogenic cell types, rat calvarial and human SaOS-2 cells, exposed to strong (10-15 V/cm and weak (< or = 5 V/cm dcEFs. Cell elongation and perpendicular orientation to the EF vector occurred in a time- and voltage-dependent manner. Calvarial osteoblasts migrated to the cathode as they formed new filopodia or lamellipodia and reorganized their cytoskeleton on the cathodal side. SaOS-2 cells showed similar responses except towards the anode. Strong dcEFs triggered a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels, whereas a steady state level of intracellular calcium was observed in weaker fields. Interestingly, we found that dcEF-induced intracellular calcium elevation was initiated with a local rise on opposite sides in calvarial and SaOS-2 cells, which may explain their preferred directionality. In calcium-free conditions, dcEFs induced neither intracellular calcium elevation nor directed migration, indicating an important role for calcium ions. Blocking studies using cadmium chloride revealed that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are involved in dcEF-induced intracellular calcium elevation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these data form a time scale of the morphological and physiological

  9. Estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists stimulate calcium oscillations in human and mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERalpha and ERbeta on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERbeta, but not ERalpha. The non-selective ER agonist 17beta-estradiol (E(2 rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERalpha agonist 4,4',4''-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyltrisphenol (PPT. In contrast, the selective ERbeta agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl-propionitrile (DPN, MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041 stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E(2. The ERbeta agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERbeta activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERbeta signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds.

  10. A calcium-dependent plasticity rule for HCN channels maintains activity homeostasis and stable synaptic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  11. A calcium-dependent plasticity rule for HCN channels maintains activity homeostasis and stable synaptic learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Honnuraiah

    Full Text Available Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific

  12. A Calcium-Dependent Plasticity Rule for HCN Channels Maintains Activity Homeostasis and Stable Synaptic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  13. Effects of calcium, inorganic phosphate, and pH on isometric force in single skinned cardiomyocytes from donor and failing human hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, J.; Klein, L. J.; Zaremba, R.; Boontje, N. M.; Huybregts, M. A.; Stooker, W.; Eijsman, L.; de Jong, J. W.; Visser, C. A.; Visser, F. C.; Stienen, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    During ischemia, the intracellular calcium and inorganic phosphate (P(i)) concentrations rise and pH falls. We investigated the effects of these changes on force development in donor and failing human hearts to determine if altered contractile protein composition during heart failure changes the

  14. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and over: 1,200 mg/day The body needs vitamin D to help absorb calcium. You can get ... from your diet. Ask your provider whether you need to take a vitamin D supplement. SIDE EFFECTS AND SAFETY DO NOT ...

  15. Impact of human D398N single nucleotide polymorphism on intracellular calcium response mediated by α3β4α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimäki, Anne; Herder, Penelope; Li, Ping; Esch, Caroline; Laughlin, James R.; Akk, Gustav; Stitzel, Jerry A.

    2013-01-01

    The human CHRNA5 D398N polymorphism (rs16969968) causes an aspartic acid to asparagine change in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α5 subunit gene. The N398 variant of CHRNA5 is linked to increased risk for nicotine dependence. In this study, we explored the effect of the CHRNA5 D398N polymorphism on the properties of human α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Addition of either D398 or N398 variant of α5 subunit in the α3β4* receptor did not affect total [125I]-epibatidine binding or surface expression of the receptor. However, addition of α5D398 into α3β4* receptor decreased the maximal response to agonist without significantly affecting EC50 in aequorin intracellular calcium assay. α3β4α5N398 nAChRs showed further decreased maximal response. The differences in agonist efficacy between the receptor subtypes were found to be dependent upon the concentration of external calcium but independent of external sodium. Moreover, activation of α3β4α5 nAChRs led to significantly greater intracellular calcium release from IP3 stores relative to α3β4 nAChRs although no effect of the α5 polymorphism was observed. Finally, inclusion of the α5 variant caused a small shift to the left in IC50 for some of the antagonists tested, depending upon α5 variant but did not affect sensitivity of α3β4* receptors to desensitization in response to incubation with nicotine. In conclusion, addition of either variant of a5 into an α3β4α5 receptor similarly effects receptor pharmacology and function. However, the N398 variant exhibits a reduced response to agonists when extracellular calcium is high and it may lead to distinct downstream cellular signaling. PMID:22820273

  16. Fragile X mental retardation protein controls synaptic vesicle exocytosis by modulating N-type calcium channel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Cassidy, John S.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable form of mental retardation, is characterized by synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic transmission depends critically on presynaptic calcium entry via voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Here we show that the functional expression of neuronal N-type CaV channels (CaV2.2) is regulated by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). We find that FMRP knockdown in dorsal root ganglion neurons increases CaV channel density in somata and in presynaptic terminals. We then show that FMRP controls CaV2.2 surface expression by targeting the channels to the proteasome for degradation. The interaction between FMRP and CaV2.2 occurs between the carboxy-terminal domain of FMRP and domains of CaV2.2 known to interact with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Finally, we show that FMRP controls synaptic exocytosis via CaV2.2 channels. Our data indicate that FMRP is a potent regulator of presynaptic activity, and its loss is likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunction in FXS.

  17. Huwentoxin-XVI, an analgesic, highly reversible mammalian N-type calcium channel antagonist from Chinese tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meichun; Luo, Xuan; Xiao, Yucheng; Sun, Zhenghua; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Zhonghua; Zeng, Xiongzhi; Chen, Hanchun; Tang, Jianhua; Zeng, Weimin; Songping Liang

    2014-04-01

    N-type calcium channels play important roles in the control of neurotransmission release and transmission of pain signals to the central nervous system. Their selective inhibitors are believed to be potential drugs for treating chronic pain. In this study, a novel neurotoxin named Huwentoxin-XVI (HWTX-XVI) specific for N-type calcium channels was purified and characterized from the venom of Chinese tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena. HWTX-XVI is composed of 39 amino acid residues including six cysteines that constitute three disulfide bridges. HWTX-XVI could almost completely block the twitch response of rat vas deferens to low-frequency electrical stimulation. Electrophysiological assay indicated that HWTX-XVI specifically inhibited N-type calcium channels in rat dorsal root ganglion cells (IC50 ∼60 nM). The inhibitory effect of HWTX-XVI on N-type calcium channel currents was dose-dependent and similar to that of CTx-GVIA and CTx-MVIIA. However, the three peptides exhibited markedly different degrees of reversibility after block. The toxin had no effect on voltage-gated T-type calcium channels, potassium channels or sodium channels. Intraperitoneal injection of the toxin HWTX-XVI to rats elicited significant analgesic responses to formalin-induced inflammation pain. Toxin treatment also changed withdrawal latency in hot plate tests. Intriguingly, we found that intramuscular injection of the toxin reduced mechanical allodynia induced by incisional injury in Von Frey test. Thus, our findings suggest that the analgesic potency of HWTX-XVI and its greater reversibility could contribute to the design of a novel potential analgesic agent with high potency and low side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. P/Q- and N-type calcium-channel antibodies: Oncological, neurological, and serological accompaniments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Nicholas L; Lennon, Vanda A; Lachance, Daniel H; Klein, Christopher J; Pittock, Sean J; Mckeon, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Voltage-gated calcium-channel autoimmunity (VGCC-P/Q and VGCC-N types) occurs beyond Lambert-Eaton syndrome and lung cancer. We reviewed records for 236 Mayo Clinic patients with VGCC antibodies found in evaluation for paraneoplastic neurological autoimmunity (generally without myasthenic syndromes). VGCC autoantibodies were detected in 3.4% of neurological patients, 1.7% of healthy controls, and 4% of neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer controls. Fifty neurological patients (21%) had ≥ 1 neoplasm, historically (46) or detected prospectively [small-cell lung carcinoma (2), breast adenocarcinoma (2), lymphoma (1), and suspected tonsillar carcinoma (1)]. Autoimmune neurological diagnosis frequencies (encephalopathy, ataxia, myelopathy, neuropathy, neuromuscular junction disorder, and myopathy) among patients with medium values (24%; 0.10-0.99 nmol/L) or low values (19%; 0.03-0.10 nmol/L) were fewer than among patients with antibody values exceeding 1.00 nmol/L (71%; P = 0.02 and 0.004, respectively). Among neuronal VGCC-autoantibody-seropositive patients, autoimmune neurological phenotypes and cancer types are diverse. Cautious interpretation of results (particularly medium and low values) is advised. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: 220-227, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Clare, Jeffrey J. [Eaton Pharma Consulting, Eaton Socon, Cambridgeshire PE19 8EF (United Kingdom); Debanne, Dominique [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Alcaraz, Gisele, E-mail: gisele.alcaraz@univmed.fr [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  20. Low voltage-activated calcium channels gate transmitter release at the dorsal root ganglion sandwich synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Gabriela M; Nath, Arup R; Adams, Michael E; Stanley, Elise F

    2013-11-15

    A subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are intimately attached in pairs and separated solely by thin satellite glial cell membrane septa. Stimulation of one neuron leads to transglial activation of its pair by a bi-, purinergic/glutamatergic synaptic pathway, a transmission mechanism that we term sandwich synapse (SS) transmission. Release of ATP from the stimulated neuron can be attributed to a classical mechanism involving Ca(2+) entry via voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV) but via an unknown channel type. Specific blockers and toxins ruled out CaV1, 2.1 and 2.2. Transmission was, however, blocked by a moderate depolarization (-50 mV) or low-concentration Ni(2+) (0.1 mM). Transmission persisted using a voltage pulse to -40 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV, confirming the involvement of a low voltage-activated channel type and limiting the candidate channel type to either CaV3.2 or a subpopulation of inactivation- and Ni(2+)-sensitive CaV2.3 channels. Resistance of the neuron calcium current and SS transmission to SNX482 argue against the latter. Hence, we conclude that inter-somatic transmission at the DRG SS is gated by CaV3.2 type calcium channels. The use of CaV3 family channels to gate transmission has important implications for the biological function of the DRG SS as information transfer would be predicted to occur not only in response to action potentials but also to sub-threshold membrane voltage oscillations. Thus, the SS synapse may serve as a homeostatic signalling mechanism between select neurons in the DRG and could play a role in abnormal sensation such as neuropathic pain.

  1. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  2. An evaluation of the importance of gastric acid secretion in the absorption of dietary calcium.

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Linn, G W; Davis, G R; Buddrus, D J; Morawski, S G; Santa Ana, C; Fordtran, J S

    1984-01-01

    Since calcium solubility is a prerequisite to calcium absorption, and since solubility of calcium is highly pH-dependent, it has been generally assumed that gastric acid secretion and gastric acidity play an important role in the intestinal absorption of calcium from ingested food or calcium salts such as CaCO3. To evaluate this hypothesis, we developed a method wherein net gastrointestinal absorption of calcium can be measured after ingestion of a single meal. A large dose of cimetidine, whi...

  3. Bioavailability of vitamin D₂ and calcium from fortified milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ravinder; Sachdeva, Bhawana; Arora, Sumit; Kapila, Suman; Wadhwa, Balbir Kaur

    2014-03-15

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine bioavailability of calcium and vitamin D₂ from milk fortified with either calcium or vitamin D₂ alone or when both were used for preparation of multiple micronutrient fortified milk and also to study its interaction with iron and zinc bioavailability. 32 weanling male rats (aged 21-28 days) were assigned into four groups and were fed milk and milk fortified with calcium, vitamin D₂ and calcium+vitamin D₂. Vitamin D₂ increased calcium bioavailability. In multiple micronutrient fortified milk, the bioavailability of both calcium+vitamin D₂ increased in comparison to single fortification. Calcium fortification decreased, whereas vitamin D₂ increased the absorption of iron and zinc. However, calcium and vitamin D₂ when fortified in combination, the iron and zinc bioavailability was similar to control group. There was positive association between bioavailability of calcium and vitamin D₂. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    -saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation......Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc...

  6. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekhoff, T., E-mail: torsten.diekhoff@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, K.G. [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Pumberger, M. [Department of Spine Surgery, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Putzier, M.; Fuchs, M. [Department of Spine Surgery, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Objectives: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Materials and methods: Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5 T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen’s kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Results: Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75–1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81–1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ = 0.63–0.89) compared to MRI (κ = 0.9–1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r = 0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2 +/− 0.2 in VNC and 16.7 +/− 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2 +/− 0.3 and 7.1 +/− 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Conclusions: Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity

  7. Absorption of levothyroxine when coadministered with various calcium formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfirescu, Isabelle; Carlson, Harold E

    2011-05-01

    Calcium carbonate is a commonly used dietary supplement and has been shown to interfere with levothyroxine absorption. However, calcium citrate, which is also used for supplementation purposes, has not been studied previously and calcium acetate, which is used to treat hyperphosphatemia in renal failure, has been reported to show little or no interference with levothyroxine absorption in a retrospective pharmacoepidemiologic study. We aimed to compare the effect of these three calcium formulations on levothyroxine absorption. The study was conducted in eight healthy, euthyroid adults. We performed single-dose pharmacokinetic studies in which we measured levothyroxine absorption when given alone or when coadministered with calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, or calcium acetate in doses containing 500 mg elemental calcium. Serum thyroxine was measured at intervals over a 6-hour period after ingestion of the study drugs. Coadministration of each of the three calcium preparations significantly reduced levothyroxine absorption by about 20%-25% compared with levothyroxine given alone. Contrary to a prior report, our data suggest that calcium acetate interferes with levothyroxine absorption in a manner similar to that seen with calcium carbonate and calcium citrate. Although the effect of calcium is modest compared with some other medications previously studied, hypothyroid patients should be cautioned to take their levothyroxine well-separated from all of these calcium formulations.

  8. [Distribution diversity of integrins and calcium channels on major human and mouse host cells of Leptospira species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-xue; Zhao, Xin; Qian, Jing; Yan, Jie

    2012-07-01

    To determine the distribution of integrins and calcium channels on major human and mouse host cells of Leptospira species. The expression of β1, β2 and β3 integrins was detected with immunofluorescence assay on the surface of human monocyte line THP-1, mouse mononuclear-macrophage-like cell line J774A.1, human vascular endothelial cell line HUVEC, mouse vascular endothelial cell EOMA, human hepatocyte line L-02, mouse hepatocyte line Hepa1-6, human renal tubular epithelial cell line HEK-293, mouse glomerular membrane epithelial cell line SV40-MES13, mouse collagen blast line NIH/3T3, human and mouse platelets. The distribution of voltage gate control calcium channels Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3 and Cav2.3, and receptor gate calcium channels P(2)X(1), P(2)2X(2), P(2)X(3), P(2)X(4), P(2)X(5), P(2)X(6) and P(2)X(7) were determined with Western blot assay. β1 integrin proteins were positively expressed on the membrane surface of J774A.1, THP-1, HUVEC, EOMA, L-02, Hepa1-6 and HEK-239 cells as well as human and mouse platelets. β2 integrin proteins were expressed on the membrane surface of J774A.1, THP-1, HUVEC, EOMA, and NIH/3T3 cells. β3 integrin proteins were expressed on the membrane surface of J774A.1, THP-1, HUVEC, EOMA, Hepa1-6, HEK-239 and NIH/3T3 cells as well as human and mouse platelets. P(2)X(1) receptor gate calcium channel was expressed on the membrane surface of human and mouse platelets, while P(2)X(5) receptor gate calcium channel was expressed on the membrane surface of J774A.1, THP-1, L-02, Hepa1-6, HEK-239 and HUVEC cells. However, the other calcium channels were not detected on the tested cell lines or platelets. There is a large distribution diversity of integrins and calcium channel proteins on the major human and mouse host cells of Leptospira species, which may be associated with the differences of leptospira-induced injury in different host cells.

  9. Beat-to-Beat Variation in Periodicity of Local Calcium Releases Contributes to Intrinsic Variations of Spontaneous Cycle Length in Isolated Single Sinoatrial Node Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Monfredi

    Full Text Available Spontaneous, submembrane local Ca(2+ releases (LCRs generated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in sinoatrial nodal cells, the cells of the primary cardiac pacemaker, activate inward Na(+/Ca(2+-exchange current to accelerate the diastolic depolarization rate, and therefore to impact on cycle length. Since LCRs are generated by Ca(2+ release channel (i.e. ryanodine receptor openings, they exhibit a degree of stochastic behavior, manifested as notable cycle-to-cycle variations in the time of their occurrence.The present study tested whether variation in LCR periodicity contributes to intrinsic (beat-to-beat cycle length variability in single sinoatrial nodal cells.We imaged single rabbit sinoatrial nodal cells using a 2D-camera to capture LCRs over the entire cell, and, in selected cells, simultaneously measured action potentials by perforated patch clamp.LCRs begin to occur on the descending part of the action potential-induced whole-cell Ca(2+ transient, at about the time of the maximum diastolic potential. Shortly after the maximum diastolic potential (mean 54±7.7 ms, n = 14, the ensemble of waxing LCR activity converts the decay of the global Ca(2+ transient into a rise, resulting in a late, whole-cell diastolic Ca(2+ elevation, accompanied by a notable acceleration in diastolic depolarization rate. On average, cells (n = 9 generate 13.2±3.7 LCRs per cycle (mean±SEM, varying in size (7.1±4.2 µm and duration (44.2±27.1 ms, with both size and duration being greater for later-occurring LCRs. While the timing of each LCR occurrence also varies, the LCR period (i.e. the time from the preceding Ca(2+ transient peak to an LCR's subsequent occurrence averaged for all LCRs in a given cycle closely predicts the time of occurrence of the next action potential, i.e. the cycle length.Intrinsic cycle length variability in single sinoatrial nodal cells is linked to beat-to-beat variations in the average period of individual LCRs each cycle.

  10. Aberrant Splicing Induced by Dysregulated Rbfox2 Produces Enhanced Function of CaV1.2 Calcium Channel and Vascular Myogenic Tone in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Fan, Jia; Zhu, Huayuan; Ji, Li; Fan, Wenyong; Kapoor, Isha; Wang, Yue; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Guoqing; Wang, Juejin

    2017-12-01

    Calcium influx from activated voltage-gated calcium channel Ca V 1.2 in vascular smooth muscle cells is indispensable for maintaining myogenic tone and blood pressure. The function of Ca V 1.2 channel can be optimized by alternative splicing, one of post-transcriptional modification mechanisms. The splicing factor Rbfox2 is known to regulate the Ca V 1.2 pre-mRNA alternative splicing events during neuronal development. However, Rbfox2's roles in modulating the key function of vascular Ca V 1.2 channel and in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain elusive. Here, we report that the proportion of Ca V 1.2 channels with alternative exon 9* is increased by 10.3%, whereas that with alternative exon 33 is decreased by 10.5% in hypertensive arteries. Surprisingly, the expression level of Rbfox2 is increased ≈3-folds, presumably because of the upregulation of a dominant-negative isoform of Rbfox2. In vascular smooth muscle cells, we find that knockdown of Rbfox2 dynamically increases alternative exon 9*, whereas decreases exon 33 inclusion of Ca V 1.2 channels. By patch-clamp studies, we show that diminished Rbfox2-induced alternative splicing shifts the steady-state activation and inactivation curves of vascular Ca V 1.2 calcium channel to hyperpolarization, which makes the window current potential to more negative. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rbfox2 increases the pressure-induced vascular myogenic tone of rat mesenteric artery. Taken together, our data indicate that Rbfox2 modulates the functions of vascular Ca V 1.2 calcium channel by dynamically regulating the expressions of alternative exons 9* and 33, which in turn affects the vascular myogenic tone. Therefore, our work suggests a key role for Rbfox2 in hypertension, which provides a rational basis for designing antihypertensive therapies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions, such as Raynaud's disease For people of African heritage and older people, calcium channel blockers might ... high-blood-pressure/in-depth/calcium-channel-blockers/ART-20047605 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  13. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  14. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in

  15. Calcium, An Overview-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercinski, Floyd J

    1989-06-01

    An overview of calcium is presented including introduction, pre-history, chronology of the research recorded in the literature, discussion, summary, recent references, literature cited, acknowledgments, and appendix. Elemental calcium began with the Earth's formation. Calcium was used for utilitarian purposes in B.C. times. In the 12th and 13th centuries A.D., calcium oxide was formed by roasting limestone to form calcium carbonate. A test for calcium was found in the 17th century, and "stones" were observed in humans (see appendix). In the 19th century, calcium was isolated and chemically identified by electrolysis, and later in that century calcium was found to be needed in a physiological solution similar to the ionic content of blood. In the 20th century it was found that, in the absence of calcium, living cells pulled away from one another. Anesthesia was produced by massive injection of magnesium salts into a mammal-conciousness could be restored by the addition of calcium, which neutralized the magnesium. Finally, calcium out of control in necrosis has an invasive action. Calcium antagonists and their mode of action were described in 1986.

  16. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor exon IV transcription through calcium responsive elements in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zheng

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been studied as an important model to elucidate the mechanisms underlying numerous aspects of neuroplasticity. It has been extensively emphasized that Ca(2+ influx through different routes may have significantly different effects on BDNF transcription. Here, we examined the regulatory property of the major calcium responsive elements (CaRE in BDNF promoter IV in cultured rat cortical neurons. BDNF promoter IV, as well as CaRE1 and CaRE3, was significantly activated by Ca(2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC or NMDA receptor (NMDAR. However, the L-VGCC- and NMDAR-mediated activation of CaRE was differentially regulated by different Ca(2+-stimulated protein kinases. Specifically, PKA, CaMKI, and CaMKIV activity were required for L-VGCC-, but not NMDAR-mediated CaRE1 activation. CaMKI activity was required for NMDAR- but not L-VGCC-mediated CaRE3 activation. Surprisingly, the activation of CaRF, a previously identified transcription factor for CaRE1, was stimulated via L-VGCC but not NMDAR, and required MEK, PI3K and CaMKII activity. These results suggest a new working model that activity-dependent BDNF IV up-regulation may be coordinately mediated by CaRE1 and CaRE3 activity, which show different responses to Ca(2+-stimulated kinases. Our data also explain how the individual cis-element in BDNF promoter is distinctively coupled to different Ca(2+ routes.

  17. RNAi silencing of P/Q-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons of adult mouse leads to episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Julie; Bertaso, Federica; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Metz, Alexandra; Lemmers, Céline; Ango, Fabrice; Fagni, Laurent; Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a dominantly inherited human neurological disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the CaV2.1 subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It remains however unknown whether the deficit of cerebellar CaV2.1 in adult is in direct link with the disease. To address this issue, we have used lentiviral based-vector RNA interference (RNAi) to knock-down CaV2.1 expression in the cerebellum of adult mice. We show that suppression of the P/Q-type channels in Purkinje neurons induced motor abnormalities, such as imbalance and ataxic gait. Interestingly, moderate channel suppression caused no basal ataxia, while β-adrenergic activation and exercise mimicked stress induced motor disorders. Moreover, stress-induced ataxia was stable, non-progressive and totally abolished by acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat EA2. Altogether, these data reveal that P/Q-type channel suppression in adult mice supports the episodic status of EA2 disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of radiogallium-labeled DTPA-amlodipine complex for possible L-type calcium channel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firuzyar, Tahereh; Shafiee-Ardestani, Mehdi; Khalaj, Ali [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Pharmacy; Jalilian, Amir R.; Fazaeli, Yousef; Aboudzadeh, Mohammad Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiopharmacy Research Group

    2014-07-01

    A DTPA-conjugated amlodipine analog (DTPA-AMLO) 3, was prepared for possible voltage gated calcium channel imaging after radiolabeling with Ga-67. [{sup 67}Ga]-DTPA-AMLO complex was prepared starting [{sup 67}Ga]gallium chloride and DTPA-AMLO in 60-90 min at 50-60 C in phosphate buffer. The partition co-efficient and stability of the tracer was determined in final solution (25 C) and presence of human serum (37 C) up to 24 h. The biodistribution of the labeled compound in wild-type rats were determined up to 72 h using organ counting and SPECT. The radiolabled complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (>96%, RTLC and >98% HPLC) and significant specific activity (7-10 GBq/mmol). The log P for the complex was calculated as -0.594, consistent with a water soluble complex. The tracer is mostly washed out through kidneys which were in full compliance with the amlodipine metabolism and imaging studies demonstrated the same behavior. The tracer uptake in organs with smooth muscles was observed in stomach, colon as well as intestine.

  20. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  1. Single step purification and characterization of a thermostable and calcium independent α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquifaciens TSWK1-1 isolated from Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir, Gujarat (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2011-05-01

    A thermophilic bacteria, identified and designated as Bacillus amyloliquifaciens TSWK1-1 (16S rRNA gene sequence, GenBank: GQ121033), was isolated from a hot water reservoir located at Tulsi Shyam, Gujarat, India. The optimum temperature and pH for amylase production were 50 °C and 7.0, respectively. The crude enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by dialysis. However, single step purification was achieved on Phenyl Sepharose 6FF affinity column with 45.71% yield, 8000 U/mg specific activity and 13.33 fold purification. The molecular weight of the purified α-amylase was 43 kD. The optimal temperature and pH for amylase activity were 70 °C and 7.0, respectively; however, the purified amylase was stable at broad temperature and pH range. The purified amylase did not require Ca(++) and K(+); however, it was moderately affected by Mg(++) and Cu(++) and significantly inhibited by Na(+) and Fe(++). The amylase was highly thermostable and remained active for 24h at 60 °C, for 12h at 70 °C and up to 3h even at 90 °C. Other unique features of the enzyme were calcium independent nature and resistance against chemical denaturation by Urea and Guanidine-HCl. The data on the enzymatic stability at different levels of purity would add significantly to the knowledge of amylases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  3. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  4. Association of admission serum calcium levels and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute ST-elevated myocardial infarction: an eight-year, single-center study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between admission serum calcium levels and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI has not been well definitively explored. The objective was to assess the predictive value of serum calcium levels on in-hospital mortality in STEMI patients. METHODS: From 2003 to 2010, 1431 consecutive STEMI patients admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University were enrolled in the present study. Patients were stratified according to quartiles of serum calcium from the blood samples collected in the emergency room after admission. Between the aforementioned groups,the baseline characteristics, in-hospital management, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. The association of serum calcium level with in-hospital mortality was calculated by a multivariable Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 1431 included patients, 79% were male and the median age was 65 years (range, 55-74. Patients in the lower quartiles of serum calcium, as compared to the upper quartiles of serum calcium, were older, had more cardiovascular risk factors, lower rate of emergency revascularization,and higher in-hospital mortality. According to univariate Cox proportional analysis, patients with lower serum calcium level (hazard ratio 0.267, 95% confidence interval 0.164-0.433, p<0.001 was associated with higher in-hospital mortality. The result of multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analyses showed that the Killip's class≥3 (HR = 2.192, p = 0.026, aspartate aminotransferase (HR = 1.001, p<0.001, neutrophil count (HR = 1.123, p<0.001, serum calcium level (HR = 0.255, p = 0.001, and emergency revascularization (HR = 0.122, p<0.001 were significantly and independently associated with in-hospital mortality in STEMI patients. CONCLUSIONS: Serum calcium was an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI. This widely

  5. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence evaluation of two different atorvastatin calcium 10-mg tablets: A single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, two-period crossover study in healthy fasted Chinese adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Pu, Hua-Hua; Liu, Gang-Yi; Jia, Jing-Ying; Weng, Li-Ping; Xu, Rong-Jing; Li, Guo-Xiu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Meng-Qi; Lu, Chuan; Yu, Chen

    2010-07-01

    Atorvastatin calcium is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor indicated for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Information on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin in a Chinese population is lacking, and regulatory requirements necessitate a bioequivalence study for the marketing of a generic product in China. The aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of a test and branded reference formulation of atorvastatin calcium 10-mg tablets in healthy fasted Chinese male volunteers. This was a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study with a 2-week washout period between doses. Healthy Chinese males were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg of either the test or reference formulation, and 13 blood samples were obtained over a 48-hour interval. Plasma concentrations of parent atorvastatin and ortho-hydroxy-atorvastatin (primary active metabolite) were simultaneously determined using a validated liquid chromatography-isotopic dilution mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including C(max), T(max), t((1/2)), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity)), were calculated. The 2 formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if 90% CIs for the log transformed ratios of AUC and C(max) of atorvastatin were within the predetermined bioequivalence range (0.80-1.25 for AUC and 0.70-1.43 for C(max)) as established by the State Food and Drug Administration of China. Tolerability was evaluated throughout the study by vital signs monitoring, physical examinations, 12-lead ECGs, and subject interviews on adverse events (AEs). A total of 66 subjects were assessed for inclusion; 20 were excluded prior to study initiation. Of the 46 healthy subjects (mean [SD] age, 24.1 [2.5] years; height, 170.8 [5.1] cm; weight, 64.6 [6.4] kg; body mass index (BMI), 22.1 [1.7] kg/m(2)) who completed the study, 45 subjects (mean [SD] age, 24.1 [2.5] years; height, 171.1 [4

  6. Calcium current activation kinetics in isolated pyramidal neurones of the Ca1 region of the mature guinea-pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, A R; Wong, R K

    1987-11-01

    1. Neurones were isolated from the CA1 region of the guinea-pig hippocampus and subjected to the whole-cell mode of voltage clamping, to determine the kinetics of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel activation. 2. Isolated neurones had an abbreviated morphology, having lost most of the distal dendritic tree during the isolation procedure. The electrical compactness of the cells facilitates voltage clamp analysis. 3. Block of sodium and potassium currents revealed a persistent current activated on depolarization above -40 mV, which inactivated slowly when the intracellular medium contained EGTA. The current was blocked by Co2+ and Cd2+, augmented by increases in Ca2+ and could be carried by Ba2+, suggesting that the current is borne by Ca2+. 4. Steady-state activation of the Ca2+ current was found to be well described by the Boltzman equation raised to the second power. 5. The open channel's current-voltage (I-V) relationship rectified in the inward direction and was consistent with the constant-field equation. 6. The kinetics of Ca2+ current onset followed m2 kinetics throughout the range of its activation. Tail current kinetics were in accord with this model. A detailed Hodgkin-Huxley model was derived, defining the activation of this current. 7. The kinetics of the currents observed in this regionally and morphologically defined class of neurones were consistent with the existence of a single kinetic class of channels.

  7. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  8. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and degenerative dementias the calcium-channel blocker nimodipine, compared with placebo, slightly improved the. MMSE scores." Thus, an additional or alternative explanation, albeit still unproven, could involve specific neuroprotection conferred by calcium-channel blockade.~Indeed, the ageing brain loses its ability to ...

  9. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this ... vary. However, the main ingredient is called a calcium-channel antagonist. It helps decrease the heart's pumping strength, which ...

  10. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  11. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  12. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Modularization is a process by which we can break a network into small units for better analysis of the original network. The idea is used here to break human calcium signalling pathway into simple entities known as modules. Since there is no single definition of a module, we have followed certain criteria to create them.

  13. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca v ) β 1a subunit (Ca v β 1a ) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Ca v β 1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Ca v β 1a NH 2 -terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Ca v β 1a /YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Ca v β 1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Ca v β 1a is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Ca v β 1a . • We mapped TnT3 and Ca v β 1a interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Ca v β 1a nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation

  14. Molecular level model for the agonist/antagonist selectivity of the 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, David A.; Kwon, Yong Wha; Strong, Phyllis D.; Triggle, David J.

    1991-04-01

    Crystal structures of the 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) calcium channel activators Bay K 8643 [methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-pyridine-5-carboxylate], Bay O 8495 [methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyridine-5-carboxylate], and Bay O 9507 [methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(4-nitrophenyl)-pyridine-5-carboxylate] were determined. The conformations of the 1,4-DHP rings of these activator analogues of Bay K 8644 [methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyridine-5- carboxylate] do not suggest that their activator properties are as strongly correlated with the degree of 1,4-DHP ring flattening as was indicated for members of the corresponding antagonist series. The solid state hydrogen bonding of the N(1)-H groups of the activators is not, unlike that of their antagonist counterparts, to acceptors that are directly in line with the donor. Rather, acceptor groups are positioned within ± 60 degrees of the N(1)-H bond in the vertical plane of the 1,4-DHP ring. Previously determined structure-activity relationships have indicated the importance of this N(1)-H group to the activity of the 1,4-DHP antagonists. Based on these observations, a model is advanced to describe the 1,4-DHP binding site of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and its ability to accommodate both antagonist and activator ligands.

  15. Characterisation of the interaction of the C-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor with neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Yun Lian

    Full Text Available NCS-1 is a member of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS family of EF-hand Ca(2+ binding proteins which has been implicated in several physiological functions including regulation of neurotransmitter release, membrane traffic, voltage gated Ca(2+ channels, neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and learning. NCS-1 binds to the dopamine D2 receptor, potentially affecting its internalisation and controlling dopamine D2 receptor surface expression. The D2 receptor binds NCS-1 via a short 16-residue cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. We have used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterise the interactions between the NCS-1/Ca(2+ and D2 peptide. The data show that NCS-1 binds D2 peptide with a K(d of ∼14.3 µM and stoichiometry of peptide binding to NCS-1 of 2:1. NMR chemical shift mapping confirms that D2 peptide binds to the large, solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove, on one face of the NCS-1 molecule, with residues affected by the presence of the peptide spanning both the N and C-terminal portions of the protein. The NMR and mutagenesis data further show that movement of the C-terminal helix 11 of NCS-1 to fully expose the hydrophobic groove is important for D2 peptide binding. Molecular docking using restraints derived from the NMR chemical shift data, together with the experimentally-derived stoichiometry, produced a model of the complex between NCS-1 and the dopamine receptor, in which two molecules of the receptor are able to simultaneously bind to the NCS-1 monomer.

  16. "Slow" Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of CaV2.2 Calcium Channels Is Modulated by the PKC Activator Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate (PMA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    Full Text Available CaV2.2 (N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca2+ channels play key roles in neurons and neuroendocrine cells including the control of cellular excitability, neurotransmitter / hormone secretion, and gene expression. Calcium entry is precisely controlled by channel gating properties including multiple forms of inactivation. "Fast" voltage-dependent inactivation is relatively well-characterized and occurs over the tens-to- hundreds of milliseconds timeframe. Superimposed on this is the molecularly distinct, but poorly understood process of "slow" voltage-dependent inactivation, which develops / recovers over seconds-to-minutes. Protein kinases can modulate "slow" inactivation of sodium channels, but little is known about if/how second messengers control "slow" inactivation of Ca2+ channels. We investigated this using recombinant CaV2.2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells and native CaV2 channels endogenously expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA dramatically prolonged recovery from "slow" inactivation, but an inactive control (4α-PMA had no effect. This effect of PMA was prevented by calphostin C, which targets the C1-domain on PKC, but only partially reduced by inhibitors that target the catalytic domain of PKC. The subtype of the channel β-subunit altered the kinetics of inactivation but not the magnitude of slowing produced by PMA. Intracellular GDP-β-S reduced the effect of PMA suggesting a role for G proteins in modulating "slow" inactivation. We postulate that the kinetics of recovery from "slow" inactivation could provide a molecular memory of recent cellular activity and help control CaV2 channel availability, electrical excitability, and neurotransmission in the seconds-to-minutes timeframe.

  17. Anti-tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (Infliximab) Attenuates Apoptosis, Oxidative Stress, and Calcium Ion Entry Through Modulation of Cation Channels in Neutrophils of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugan, Yunus; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şahin, Mehmet; Aykur, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is known to be associated with increased neutrophil activation and oxidative stress, however, the mechanism of neutrophil activation is still unclear. We have hypothesized that the antioxidant and anti-tumor necrosis factor properties of infliximab may affect intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in the neutrophils of AS patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of infliximab on calcium signaling, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in neutrophils of AS patients. Neutrophils collected from ten patients with AS and ten healthy controls were used in the study. In a cell viability test, the ideal non-toxic dose and incubation time of infliximab were found as 100 μM and 1 h, respectively. In some experiments, the neutrophils were incubated with the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers verapamil + diltiazem (V + D) and the TRPM2 channel blocker 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB). Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis, caspase 3, and caspase 9 values were high in neutrophils of AS patients and were reduced with infliximab treatment. Reduced glutathione level and glutathione peroxidase activity were low in the patients and increased with infliximab treatment. The intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations were low in 2-APB and V + D groups. In conclusion, the current study suggests that infliximab is useful against apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress in neutrophils of patients with AS, which seem to be dependent on increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of TRPM2 and VGCC.

  18. Effects of Calcium Ion, Calpains, and Calcium Channel Blockers on Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Nakazawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular genetic studies have revealed many of the causative genes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP. These achievements have provided clues to the mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in RP. Apoptosis is known to be a final common pathway in RP and, therefore, a possible therapeutic target for photoreceptor rescue. However, apoptosis is not a single molecular cascade, but consists of many different reactions such as caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways commonly leading to DNA fractionation and cell death. The intracellular concentration of calcium ions is also known to increase in apoptosis. These findings suggest that calpains, one of the calcium-dependent proteinases, play some roles in the process of photoreceptor apoptosis and that calcium channel antagonists may potentially inhibit photoreceptor apoptosis. Herein, the effects of calpains and calcium channel antagonists on photoreceptor degeneration are reviewed.

  19. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by supporting muscles needed to avoid falls. Children need vitamin D to build strong bones, and adults need ... be taken at one time. While your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium, you do not need ...

  20. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, ...

  1. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement thickening products, and many others) Many hair relaxers and straighteners Slaked lime This list may not include all sources of ...

  2. Enhanced analgesic effect of morphine-nimodipine combination ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    . Introduction. Calcium plays an important role in the transmission of pain signals in the central nervous system. At the pre- synaptic nerve terminal, voltage-gated calcium channels. (VGCCs) open in response to action potentials to allow.

  3. The importance of occupancy rather than affinity of CaVβ subunits for the calcium channel I–II linker in relation to calcium channel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Leroy, Jérôme; Richards, Mark W; Pratt, Wendy S; Dolphin, Annette C

    2006-01-01

    The CaVβ subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the trafficking and biophysical properties of these channels. We have taken advantage of mutations in the tyrosine residue within the alpha interaction domain (AID) in the I–II linker of CaV2.2 which reduce, but do not abolish, the binding of β1b to the AID of CaV2.2. We have found that the mutation Y388S decreased the affinity of CaVβ1b binding to the CaV2.2 I–II linker from 14 to 329 nm. However, the Y388S mutation had no effect on current density and cell surface expression of CaV2.2/α2δ-2/β1b channels expressed in human embryonic kidney tsA-201 cells, when equivalent proportions of cDNA were used. Furthermore, despite the 24-fold reduced affinity of CaVβ1b for the Y388S I–II linker of CaV2.2, all the key features of modulation as well as trafficking by CaVβ subunits remained intact. This is in contrast to the much more marked effect of the W391A mutation, which abolished interaction with the CaV2.2 I–II linker, and very markedly affected the trafficking of the channels. However, using the Xenopus oocyte expression system, where expression levels can be accurately titrated, when CaVβ1b cDNA was diluted 50-fold, all evidence of interaction with CaV2.2 Y388S was lost, although wild-type CaV2.2 was still normally modulated by the reduced concentration of β1b. These results indicate that high affinity interaction with the α1 subunit is not necessary for any of the modulatory effects of CaVβ subunits, but occupancy of the interaction site is important, and this will occur, despite the reduced affinity, if the CaVβ subunit is present in sufficient excess. PMID:16627564

  4. The importance of occupancy rather than affinity of CaV(beta) subunits for the calcium channel I-II linker in relation to calcium channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Leroy, Jérôme; Richards, Mark W; Pratt, Wendy S; Dolphin, Annette C

    2006-07-15

    The Ca(V)beta subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the trafficking and biophysical properties of these channels. We have taken advantage of mutations in the tyrosine residue within the alpha interaction domain (AID) in the I-II linker of Ca(V)2.2 which reduce, but do not abolish, the binding of beta1b to the AID of Ca(V)2.2. We have found that the mutation Y388S decreased the affinity of Ca(V)beta1b binding to the Ca(V)2.2 I-II linker from 14 to 329 nm. However, the Y388S mutation had no effect on current density and cell surface expression of Ca(V)2.2/alpha2delta-2/beta1b channels expressed in human embryonic kidney tsA-201 cells, when equivalent proportions of cDNA were used. Furthermore, despite the 24-fold reduced affinity of Ca(V)beta1b for the Y388S I-II linker of Ca(V)2.2, all the key features of modulation as well as trafficking by Ca(V)beta subunits remained intact. This is in contrast to the much more marked effect of the W391A mutation, which abolished interaction with the Ca(V)2.2 I-II linker, and very markedly affected the trafficking of the channels. However, using the Xenopus oocyte expression system, where expression levels can be accurately titrated, when Ca(V)beta1b cDNA was diluted 50-fold, all evidence of interaction with Ca(V)2.2 Y388S was lost, although wild-type Ca(V)2.2 was still normally modulated by the reduced concentration of beta1b. These results indicate that high affinity interaction with the alpha1 subunit is not necessary for any of the modulatory effects of Ca(V)beta subunits, but occupancy of the interaction site is important, and this will occur, despite the reduced affinity, if the Ca(V)beta subunit is present in sufficient excess.

  5. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  6. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  7. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  8. Profiling neuronal ion channelopathies with non-invasive brain imaging and dynamic causal models: Case studies of single gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jessica R; Symmonds, Mkael; Hanna, Michael G; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J; Moran, Rosalyn J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessments of brain function rely upon visual inspection of electroencephalographic waveform abnormalities in tandem with functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, no current technology proffers in vivo assessments of activity at synapses, receptors and ion-channels, the basis of neuronal communication. Using dynamic causal modeling we compared electrophysiological responses from two patients with distinct monogenic ion channelopathies and a large cohort of healthy controls to demonstrate the feasibility of assaying synaptic-level channel communication non-invasively. Synaptic channel abnormality was identified in both patients (100% sensitivity) with assay specificity above 89%, furnishing estimates of neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion throughput of sodium, calcium, chloride and potassium. This performance indicates a potential novel application as an adjunct for clinical assessments in neurological and psychiatric settings. More broadly, these findings indicate that biophysical models of synaptic channels can be estimated non-invasively, having important implications for advancing human neuroimaging to the level of non-invasive ion channel assays. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin. These findings identify an unanticipated role for ciguatoxin in the regulation of homeostatic plasticity in central neurons involving NaV channels and raise the possibility that some of the neurological symptoms of ciguatera might be explained by these compensatory mechanisms.

  11. Epilepsy: The Role of the Super Family of Voltage Gated Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    newborns  with  APGAR  scores  of  nine  or  above  at  five   minutes.    The...repolarization  of  cardiac  action  potentials  and   is  altered  in  the   arrhythmia  Long  QT  syndrome  caused  by  a...mutated  in   an  inherited  epilepsy  of   newborns .  Nat  Genet.  18:25-­‐9.   91     Singh,  N.A.,

  12. Enhanced annealing, high Curie temperature and low-voltage gating in (Ga,Mn)As

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejník, Kamil; Owen, M.H.S.; Novák, Vít; Mašek, Jan; Irvine, A.C.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 5 (2008), 054403/1-054403/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002; GA ČR GEFON/06/E001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductor * Curie temperature * field-effect transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  13. Voltage-gated sodium channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells of mormyrid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. de Ruiter (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar Purkinje cells of mormyrid fish differ in some morphological as well as physiological parameters from their counterparts in mammals. Morphologically, Purkinje cells of mormyrids have larger dendrites that are characterized by a lower degree of branching in the molecular layer.

  14. Effect of Turkish propolis extracts on expression of voltage-gated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Turkish propolis was previously carried out in our laboratory. According to HPLC analysis, the main flavonoids of DMSO extracts of propolis were found to be galangin, naringenin, chrysin, kaempferol, quercetin and cinnamic acid derivatives, while caffeic and caffeoyl quinic acids were present in the water extracts [11].

  15. Involvement of batrachotoxin binding sites in ginsenoside-mediated voltage-gated Na+ channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Yoon, In-Soo; Shin, Tae-Joon; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2008-04-08

    Recently, we showed that the 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), an active ingredient of Panax ginseng, inhibits rat brain NaV1.2 channel peak currents (INa). Batrachotoxin (BTX) is a steroidal alkaloid neurotoxin and activates NaV channels through interacting with transmembrane domain-I-segment 6 (IS6) of channels. Recent report shows that ginsenoside inhibits BTX binding in rat brain membrane fractions. However, it needs to be confirmed whether biochemical mechanism is relevant physiologically and which residues of the BTX binding sites are important for ginsenoside regulations. Here, we demonstrate that mutations of BTX binding sites such as N418K and L421K of rat brain NaV1.2 and L437K of mouse skeletal muscle NaV1.4 channel reduce or abolish Rg3 inhibition of I(Na) and attenuate Rg3-mediated depolarizing shift of the activation voltage and use-dependent inhibition. These results indicate that BTX binding sites play an important role in modifying Rg3-mediated Na+ channel properties.

  16. Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 antibodies in myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romi, F.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, N.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Plant, G.T.; Gilhus, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by skeletal muscle weakness mainly caused by acetylcholine receptor antibodies. MG can be divided into generalized and ocular, and into early-onset (<50 years of age) and late-onset (≥50 years of age). Anti-Kv1.4 antibodies targeting

  17. Voltage Gating of a Biomimetic Nanopore: Electrowetting of a Hydrophobic Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Jemma L; Song, Chen; Wallace, E Jayne; Sansom, Mark S P

    2017-02-28

    It is desirable that nanopores that are components of biosensors are gated, i.e., capable of controllable switching between closed (impermeable) and open (permeable) states. A central hydrophobic barrier within a nanopore may act as a voltage-dependent gate via electrowetting, i.e., changes in nanopore surface wettability by application of an electric field. We use "computational electrophysiology" simulations to demonstrate and characterize electrowetting of a biomimetic nanopore containing a hydrophobic gate. We show that a hydrophobic gate in a model β-barrel nanopore can be functionally opened by electrowetting at voltages that do not electroporate lipid bilayers. During the process of electrowetting, voltage-induced alignment of water dipoles occurs within the hydrophobic gate region of the nanopore, with water entry preceding permeation of ions through the opened nanopore. When the ionic imbalance that generates a transbilayer potential is dissipated, water is expelled from the hydrophobic gate and the nanopore recloses. The open nanopore formed by electrowetting of a "featureless" β-barrel is anionic selective due to the transmembrane dipole potential resulting from binding of Na + ions to the headgroup regions of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Thus, hydrophobic barriers can provide voltage-dependent gates in designed biomimetic nanopores. This extends our understanding of hydrophobic gating in synthetic and biological nanopores, providing a framework for the design of functional nanopores with tailored gating functionality.

  18. Differential expression of the Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channel family in the rat nephron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Salvador, Carolina; Diaz-Bello, Beatriz; Escobar, Laura I

    2014-10-01

    Several potassium (K(+)) channels contribute to maintaining the resting membrane potential of renal epithelial cells. Apart from buffering the cell membrane potential and cell volume, K(+) channels allow sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule (PT), K(+) recycling and K(+) reabsorption in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and K(+) secretion and K(+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), connecting tubule (CNT) and collecting duct. Previously, we identified Kv.1.1, Kv1.3 and Kv1.6 channels in collecting ducts of the rat inner medulla. We also detected intracellular Kv1.3 channel in the acid secretory intercalated cells, which is trafficked to the apical membrane in response to dietary K(+) to function as a secretory K(+) channel. In this work we sought to characterize the expression of all members of the Kv1 family in the rat nephron. mRNA and protein expression were detected for all Kv1 channels. Immunoblots identified differential expression of each Kv1 in the cortex, outer and inner medulla. Immunofluorescence labeling detected Kv1.5 in Bowman´s capsule and endothelial cells and Kv1.7 in podocytes, endothelial cells and macula densa in glomeruli; Kv1.4, Kv1.5 and Kv1.7 in PT; Kv1.2, Kv1.4 and Kv1.6 in TAL; Kv1.1, Kv1.4 and Kv1.6 in DCT and CNT and Kv1.3 in DCT, and all the Kv1 family in the cortical and medullary collecting ducts. Recently, some hereditary renal syndromes have been attributed to mutations in K(+) channels. Our results expand the repertoire of K(+) channels that contribute to K(+) homeostasis to include the Kv1 family.

  19. The shaping of two distinct dendritic spikes by A-type voltage-gated K+ channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchil eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic ion channels have been a subject of intense research in neuroscience because active ion channels in dendrites shape input signals. Ca2+-permeable channels including NMDA receptors (NMDARs have been implicated in supralinear dendritic integration, and the IA conductance in sublinear integration. Despite their essential roles in dendritic integration, it has remained uncertain whether these conductances coordinate with, or counteract, each other in the process of dendritic integration. To address this question, experiments were designed in hippocampal CA1 neurons with a recent 3D digital holography system that has shown excellent performance for spatial photoactivation. The results demonstrated a role of IA as a key contributor to two distinct dendritic spikes, low- and high-threshold Ca2+ spikes, through a preferential action of IA on Ca2+-permeable channel-mediated currents, over fast AMPAR-mediated currents. It is likely that the rapid kinetics of IA provides feed-forward inhibition to counteract the delayed Ca2+ channel-mediated dendritic excitability. This research reveals one dynamic ionic mechanism of dendritic integration, and may contribute to a new understanding of neuronal hyperexcitability embedded in several neural diseases such as epilepsy, fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  1. Calcium wave propagation in networks of endothelial cells: model-based theoretical and experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juexuan Long

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a combined theoretical and experimental study of the propagation of calcium signals in multicellular structures composed of human endothelial cells. We consider multicellular structures composed of a single chain of cells as well as a chain of cells with a side branch, namely a "T" structure. In the experiments, we investigate the result of applying mechano-stimulation to induce signaling in the form of calcium waves along the chain and the effect of single and dual stimulation of the multicellular structure. The experimental results provide evidence of an effect of architecture on the propagation of calcium waves. Simulations based on a model of calcium-induced calcium release and cell-to-cell diffusion through gap junctions shows that the propagation of calcium waves is dependent upon the competition between intracellular calcium regulation and architecture-dependent intercellular diffusion.

  2. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  3. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens......Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens...... to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m...

  4. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  5. Calcium in aardappel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velvis, H.

    2001-01-01

    Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de literatuur m.b.t. het element calcium in aardappel. Daarbij wordt gekeken naar de functie in de plant, de opname en het interne transport, en de gevolgen van tekorten voor de opbrengst en de vatbaarheid voor pathogenen

  6. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling...

  7. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone...... in the renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  8. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  9. Nerve injury-induced calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein dysregulation leads to increased pre-synaptic excitatory input into deep dorsal horn neurons and neuropathic allodynia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyi; Luo, Z. David

    2015-01-01

    Background Upregulation of voltage-gated-calcium-channel α2δ1 subunit post spinal nerve ligation injury (SNL) or in α2δ1-overexpressing transgenic (Tg) mice correlates with tactile allodynia, a pain state mediated mainly by Aβ sensory fibers forming synaptic connections with deep dorsal horn neurons. It is not clear however whether dysregulated α2δ1 alters deep dorsal horn synaptic neurotransmission that underlies tactile allodynia development post nerve injury. Methods Tactile allodynia was tested in the SNL and α2δ1 Tg models. Miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents were recorded in deep dorsal horn (DDH) neurons from these animal models using whole cell patch clamp slice recording techniques.. Results There was a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) in DDH neurons that correlated with tactile allodynia in SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. Gabapentin, an α2δ1 ligand that is known to block tactile allodynia in these models, also normalized mEPSC frequency dose-dependently in DDH neurons from SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. In contrast, neither frequency nor amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was altered in DDH neurons from SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that α2δ1 dysregulation is highly likely contributing to tactile allodynia through a pre-synaptic mechanism involving facilitation of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in deep dorsal horn of spinal cord. PMID:25691360

  10. Retrieval of context-associated memory is dependent on the Ca(v)3.2 T-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Shen, Jhe-Wei; Chung, Ni-Chun; Min, Ming-Yuan; Cheng, Sin-Jong; Liu, Ingrid Y

    2012-01-01

    Among all voltage-gated calcium channels, the T-type Ca²⁺ channels encoded by the Ca(v)3.2 genes are highly expressed in the hippocampus, which is associated with contextual, temporal and spatial learning and memory. However, the specific involvement of the Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel in these hippocampus-dependent types of learning and memory remains unclear. To investigate the functional role of this channel in learning and memory, we subjected Ca(v)3.2 homozygous and heterozygous knockout mice and their wild-type littermates to hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks, including trace fear conditioning, the Morris water-maze and passive avoidance. The Ca(v)3.2 ⁻/⁻ mice performed normally in the Morris water-maze and auditory trace fear conditioning tasks but were impaired in the context-cued trace fear conditioning, step-down and step-through passive avoidance tasks. Furthermore, long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced for 180 minutes in hippocampal slices of WTs and Ca(v)3.2 ⁺/⁻ mice, whereas LTP persisted for only 120 minutes in Ca(v)3.2 ⁻/⁻ mice. To determine whether the hippocampal formation is responsible for the impaired behavioral phenotypes, we next performed experiments to knock down local function of the Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel in the hippocampus. Wild-type mice infused with mibefradil, a T-type channel blocker, exhibited similar behaviors as homozygous knockouts. Taken together, our results demonstrate that retrieval of context-associated memory is dependent on the Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel.

  11. Retrieval of context-associated memory is dependent on the Ca(v3.2 T-type calcium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Chen

    Full Text Available Among all voltage-gated calcium channels, the T-type Ca²⁺ channels encoded by the Ca(v3.2 genes are highly expressed in the hippocampus, which is associated with contextual, temporal and spatial learning and memory. However, the specific involvement of the Ca(v3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel in these hippocampus-dependent types of learning and memory remains unclear. To investigate the functional role of this channel in learning and memory, we subjected Ca(v3.2 homozygous and heterozygous knockout mice and their wild-type littermates to hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks, including trace fear conditioning, the Morris water-maze and passive avoidance. The Ca(v3.2 ⁻/⁻ mice performed normally in the Morris water-maze and auditory trace fear conditioning tasks but were impaired in the context-cued trace fear conditioning, step-down and step-through passive avoidance tasks. Furthermore, long-term potentiation (LTP could be induced for 180 minutes in hippocampal slices of WTs and Ca(v3.2 ⁺/⁻ mice, whereas LTP persisted for only 120 minutes in Ca(v3.2 ⁻/⁻ mice. To determine whether the hippocampal formation is responsible for the impaired behavioral phenotypes, we next performed experiments to knock down local function of the Ca(v3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel in the hippocampus. Wild-type mice infused with mibefradil, a T-type channel blocker, exhibited similar behaviors as homozygous knockouts. Taken together, our results demonstrate that retrieval of context-associated memory is dependent on the Ca(v3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channel.

  12. Antidepressants Rescue Stress-Induced Disruption of Synaptic Plasticity via Serotonin Transporter-Independent Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, Claus; Frase, Sibylle; Haug, Verena; von Wolff, Gregor; Clark, Kristin; Münzer, Patrick; Dorner, Alexandra; Scholliers, Jonas; Horn, Max; Vo Van, Tanja; Seifert, Gabriel; Serchov, Tsvetan; Biber, Knut; Nissen, Christoph; Klugbauer, Norbert; Bischofberger, Josef

    2017-10-19

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a basic ability of the brain to dynamically adapt to external stimuli and regulate synaptic strength and ultimately network function. It is dysregulated by behavioral stress in animal models of depression and in humans with major depressive disorder. Antidepressants have been shown to restore disrupted synaptic plasticity in both animal models and humans; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We examined modulation of synaptic plasticity by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in hippocampal brain slices from wild-type rats and serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice. Recombinant voltage-gated calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels in heterologous expression systems were used to determine the modulation of Ca 2+ channels by SSRIs. We tested the behavioral effects of SSRIs in the chronic behavioral despair model of depression both in the presence and in the absence of SERT. SSRIs selectively inhibited hippocampal long-term depression. The inhibition of long-term depression by SSRIs was mediated by a direct block of voltage-activated L-type Ca 2+ channels and was independent of SERT. Furthermore, SSRIs protected both wild-type and SERT knockout mice from behavioral despair induced by chronic stress. Finally, long-term depression was facilitated in animals subjected to the behavioral despair model, which was prevented by SSRI treatment. These results showed that antidepressants protected synaptic plasticity and neuronal circuitry from the effects of stress via a modulation of Ca 2+ channels and synaptic plasticity independent of SERT. Thus, L-type Ca 2+ channels might constitute an important signaling hub for stress response and for pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  14. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  15. Lead content of calcium supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E A; Szabo, N J; Tebbett, I R

    2000-09-20

    Substantial quantities of lead have been reported in some over-the-counter calcium supplement preparations, including not only bone-meal and dolomite, but also over-the-counter natural and refined calcium carbonate formulations. Examination of this issue is warranted given recent increases in physician recommendations for calcium supplements for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. To determine the lead content of calcium supplements and to quantify the lead exposure from popular brands of calcium in dosages used for childhood recommended daily allowance, osteoporosis, and phosphate binding in dialysis patients. Analysis of lead content in 21 formulations of nonprescription calcium carbonate (including 7 natural [ie, oyster shell] and 14 refined), 1 brand of prescription-only calcium acetate, and 1 noncalcium synthetic phosphate binder conducted in March 2000. Lead content, assayed using electrothermal atomic absorption, expressed as micrograms of lead per 800 mg/d of elemental calcium, per 1500 mg/d of calcium, and for a range of dosages for patients with renal failure. Six microg/d of lead was considered the absolute dietary limit, with no more than 1 microg/d being the goal for supplements. Four of 7 natural products had measurable lead content, amounting to approximately 1 microg/d for 800 mg/d of calcium, between 1 and 2 microg/d for 1500 mg/d of calcium, and up to 10 microg/d for renal dosages. Four of the 14 refined products had similar lead content, including up to 3 microg/d of lead in osteoporosis calcium dosages and up to 20 microg/d in high renal dosages. No lead was detected in the calcium acetate or polymer products. Lead was present even in some brand name products from major pharmaceutical companies not of natural oyster shell derivation. Despite increasingly stringent limits of lead exposure, many calcium supplement formulations contain lead and thereby may pose an easily avoidable public health concern. JAMA. 2000;284:1425-1429.

  16. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  17. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  18. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  19. Ca4As3 – a new binary calcium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andrea V.; Hlukhyy, Viktor; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the binary compound tetra­calcium triarsenide, Ca4As3, was investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Ca4As3 crystallizes in the Ba4P3 structure type and is thus a homologue of isotypic Sr4As3. The unit cell contains 32 Ca2+ cations, 16 As3− isolated anions and four centrosymmetric [As2]4– dumbbells. The As atoms in each of the dumbbells are connected by a single bond, thus this calcium arsenide is a Zintl phase. PMID:26870427

  20. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  1. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of bone turnover is a complex and finely tuned process. Many factors regulate bone remodeling, including hormones, growth factors, cytokines etc. However, little is known about the signals coupling bone formation to bone resorption, and how mechanical forces are translated...... into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...

  2. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet.

  3. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  4. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  5. PERMETHRIN BUT NOT DELTAMETHRIN INCREASES SPONTANEOUS GLUTAMATE RELEASE FROM HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS IN CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript provides important information relevant to the cumulative risk assessment of pyrethroid insecticides. Others have proposed that pyrethroid effects on voltage-gated calcium channels contribute the neurotoxicity and must be considered in cumulative risk assessments ...

  6. Localization of Cacna1s to ON Bipolar Dendritic Tips Requires mGluR6-Related Cascade Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Tummala, Shanti R.; Neinstein, Adam; Fina, Marie E.; Dhingra, Anuradha; Vardi, Noga

    2014-01-01

    The pore forming subunit of a L-type voltage gated calcium channel colocalizes with the components of the ON bipolar cell signaling cascade and its localization is dependent on the normal expression of these components.

  7. The effect of a supersaturated calcium phosphate mouth rinse on the development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation: a single-center, randomized, prospective study of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse + standard of care versus standard of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Mercier, Carole; Geussens, Yasmyne; Nuyts, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Mucosal damage is an important and debilitating side effect when treating head and neck cancer patients with (chemo-)radiation. The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to investigate whether the addition of a neutral, supersaturated, calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse benefits the severity and duration of acute mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation. A total of 60 patients with malignant neoplasms of the head and neck receiving (chemo)radiation were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients were randomized into two treatment arms: a control group receiving standard of care (n = 31) and a study group receiving standard of care + daily CP mouth rinses (n = 27) starting on the first day of (chemo-)radiation. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were assessed twice a week using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria scale version 3, oral pain was scored with a visual analogue scale. No significant difference in grade III mucositis (59 vs. 71 %; p = 0.25) and dysphagia (33 vs. 42 %, p = 0.39) was observed between the study group compared to the control group. Also no significant difference in time until development of peak mucositis (28.6 vs. 28.7 days; p = 0.48), duration of peak mucositis (22.7 vs. 24.6 days; p = 0.31), recuperation of peak dysphagia (20.5 vs 24.2 days; p = 0.13) and occurrence of severe pain (56 vs. 52 %, p = 0.5). In this randomized study, the addition of CP mouth rinse to standard of care did not improve the frequency, duration or severity of the most common acute toxicities during and early after (chemo)radiation. There is currently no evidence supporting its standard use in daily practice.

  8. Regional specificity of exercise and calcium during skeletal growth in girls : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iuliano-Burns, S; Saxon, L; Naughton, G; Gibbons, K; Bass, SL

    Combining exercise with calcium supplementation may produce additive or multiplicative effects at loaded sites; thus, we conducted a single blind, prospective, randomized controlled study in pre- and early-pubertal girls to test the following hypotheses. (1) At the loaded sites, exercise and calcium

  9. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  10. Calcium kinetics in parathyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymling, J.F.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reports a study of calcium kinetics in twelve cases of parathyroid disease. The data suggest that hyperparathyroidism usually causes increased bone turnover. The study of calcium kinetics may be a valuable tool in the differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and in evaluating treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The bone turnover in one case of hypoparathyroidism was extremely low. 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a ... tion and development of tissues (bone and calcareous skeleton) (Ringer and Sainsbury 1894), conduction of nerve impulse to muscle, cell ...

  12. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. ... healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal bone ...

  13. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  14. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  15. Action potential propagation recorded from single axonal arbors using multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R; Bridges, Daniel C; Wu, Bian; Randall, Connor; Audouard, Morgane; Jang, Jiwon; Hansma, Paul K; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2018-04-11

    We report the presence of co-occurring extracellular action potentials (eAPs) from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons among groups of planar electrodes on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The invariant sequences of eAPs among co-active electrode groups, repeated co-occurrences and short inter-electrode latencies are consistent with action potential propagation in unmyelinated axons. Repeated eAP co-detection by multiple electrodes was widespread in all our data records. Co-detection of eAPs confirms they result from the same neuron and allows these eAPs to be isolated from all other spikes independently of spike sorting algorithms. We averaged co-occurring events and revealed additional electrodes with eAPs that would otherwise be below detection threshold. We used these eAP cohorts to explore the temperature sensitivity of action potential propagation and the relationship between voltage-gated sodium channel density and propagation velocity. The sequence of eAPs among co-active electrodes 'fingerprints' neurons giving rise to these events and identifies them within neuronal ensembles. We used this property and the non-invasive nature of extracellular recording to monitor changes in excitability at multiple points in single axonal arbors simultaneously over several hours, demonstrating independence of axonal segments. Over several weeks, we recorded changes in inter-electrode propagation latencies and ongoing changes in excitability in different regions of single axonal arbors. Our work illustrates how repeated eAP co-occurrences can be used to extract physiological data from single axons with low electrode density MEAs. However, repeated eAP co-occurrences leads to over-sampling spikes from single neurons and thus can confound traditional spike-train analysis.

  16. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-01-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with 45 Ca 2 + and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with 45 Ca 2 + . These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4 Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with 45 Ca 2 + prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was wekly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelt-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of 45 Ca 2 + . (orig.)

  17. Hcl extractable minerals (Iron ,Zinc ,Calcium, Lead,Aluminum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Georgette Koduah

    come from a single source, Anfoega, a town in the Volta Region of Ghana popular for mining the clay soil as a major commercial activity. The clay soil lumps from each market were ..... Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, 2000. 40. Walton JR Aluminium disruption of calcium homeostasis and signal transduction resembles ...

  18. Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus in the intensive care unit: Do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus are important electrolytes involved in the regulation of homeostasis. However the utility in monitoring them in critically ill patients is still unclear. We therefore undertook a prospective, non-interventional, single center study in the intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in ...

  19. Crystal growth and characterization of calcium metaborate scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fujimoto, Y.; Yanagida, T.; Kawaguchi, N.; Fukuda, K.; Totsuka, D.; Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Chani, V.; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 703, MAR (2013), s. 7-10 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Czochralski method * single crystal * scintillator * calcium metaborate * luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2013

  20. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  1. Topological specificity and hierarchical network of the circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Ono, Daisuke; Hasan, Mazahir T; Ueda, Tetsuo; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-26

    The circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a hierarchical multioscillator system in which neuronal networks play crucial roles in expressing coherent rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, our understanding of the neuronal network is still incomplete. Intracellular calcium mediates the input signals, such as phase-resetting stimuli, to the core molecular loop involving clock genes for circadian rhythm generation and the output signals from the loop to various cellular functions, including changes in neurotransmitter release. Using a unique large-scale calcium imaging method with genetically encoded calcium sensors, we visualized intracellular calcium from the entire surface of SCN slice in culture including the regions where autonomous clock gene expression was undetectable. We found circadian calcium rhythms at a single-cell level in the SCN, which were topologically specific with a larger amplitude and more delayed phase in the ventral region than the dorsal. The robustness of the rhythm was reduced but persisted even after blocking the neuronal firing with tetrodotoxin (TTX). Notably, TTX dissociated the circadian calcium rhythms between the dorsal and ventral SCN. In contrast, a blocker of gap junctions, carbenoxolone, had only a minor effect on the calcium rhythms at both the single-cell and network levels. These results reveal the topological specificity of the circadian calcium rhythm in the SCN and the presence of coupled regional pacemakers in the dorsal and ventral regions. Neuronal firings are not necessary for the persistence of the calcium rhythms but indispensable for the hierarchical organization of rhythmicity in the SCN.

  2. A microstructural study of the degradation and calcium release from hydroxyapatite-calcium oxide ceramics made by infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghao; Schmelzer, Eva; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite pellets, partially densified in a low-temperature heat treatment, were infiltrated with calcium nitrate solution followed by in-situ precipitation of Ca(OH) 2 and CaCO 3 . The infiltrated bodies were then densified to high relative density and the calcium carbonate transformed to calcium oxide during sintering and resulted in biphasic hydroxyapatite-CaO ceramics. This work investigated the influence of the infiltration on surface morphology, weight change, and microstructural-level degradation caused by exposure to saline at pH=7.4 and a temperature of 20°C. The CaO rendered the materials more susceptible to degradation, and released calcium into the saline faster than single phase, calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) that were used as a control. In consequence, these ceramics could be used to release calcium into the culture microenvironments of bone tissue or bone marrow cells next to a scaffold surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein upregulation in dorsal spinal cord mediates spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Zeng, Jun; Sharp, Kelli; Kim, Donghyun; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2011-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can dramatically impair the quality of life for SCI patients. SCI-induced neuropathic pain can be manifested as both tactile allodynia (a painful sensation to a non-noxious stimulus) and hyperalgesia (an enhanced sensation to a painful stimulus). The mechanisms underlying these pain states are poorly understood. Clinical studies have shown that gabapentin, a drug that binds to the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Ca(v)α2δ-1) proteins is effective in the management of SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Accordingly, we hypothesized that tactile allodynia post SCI is mediated by an upregulation of Ca(v)α2δ-1 in dorsal spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether SCI-induced dysregulation of spinal Ca(v)α2δ-1 plays a contributory role in below-level allodynia development in a rat spinal T9 contusion injury model. We found that Ca(v)α2δ-1 expression levels were significantly increased in L4-6 dorsal, but not ventral, spinal cord of SCI rats that correlated with tactile allodynia development in the hind paw plantar surface. Furthermore, both intrathecal gabapentin treatment and blocking SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 protein upregulation by intrathecal Ca(v)α2δ-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could reverse tactile allodynia in SCI rats. These findings support that SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 upregulation in spinal dorsal horn is a key component in mediating below-level neuropathic pain states, and selectively targeting this pathway may provide effective pain relief for SCI patients. Spinal cord contusion injury caused increased calcium channel Ca(v)α2δ-1 subunit expression in dorsal spinal cord that contributes to neuropathic pain states. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.