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Sample records for single volcanic province

  1. Payenia volcanic province, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Pleistocene to Holocene Payenia volcanic province is a backarc region of 60,000 km2 in Mendoza, Argentina, which is dominated by transitional to alkaline basalts and trachybasalts. We present major and trace element compositions of 139 rocks from this area of which the majority are basaltic r...

  2. Supervolcanoes Within an Ancient Volcanic Province in Arabia Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Joseph. R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2014-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars represent a new type of highland volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae display a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism, and explosive eruptions. Extruded lavas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulfur and erupted fine-grained pyroclastics from these calderas likely fed the formation of altered, layered sedimentary rocks and fretted terrain found throughout the equatorial region. Discovery of a new type of volcanic construct in the Arabia volcanic province fundamentally changes the picture of ancient volcanism and climate evolution on Mars. Other eroded topographic basins in the ancient Martian highlands that have been dismissed as degraded impact craters should be reconsidered as possible volcanic constructs formed in an early phase of widespread, disseminated magmatism on Mars.

  3. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...... are isotopically similar to the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone arc rocks and their mantle source possibly resembled the source of South Atlantic N-MORB prior to addition of fluids and melts from the subduction channel. However, it must have been more enriched than the estimates of depleted upper mantle from...

  4. Constructing the volcanic architecture of Kalkarindji, an ancient flood basalt province, using a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P.; Widdowson, M.; Kelley, S. P.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Murphy, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Kalkarindji Continental Flood Basalt Province (CFBP) is the oldest igneous province in the Phanerozoic. Erupted in the mid-Cambrian (505-510 Ma) [1], it is estimated volumes of lava up to 1.5 x 105 km3could have been erupted, making this similar in size to the better known Columbia River Basalts, USA. Relatively little is known about the province, due in part to its remote location, though large swathes remain well preserved (c. 50,000 km2). This study, based on rigorous field investigations, utilises 4 different analytical techniques to construct a volcanic architecture for the Kalkarindji basalts, drawing together these complimentary datasets to generate a series of detailed stratigraphies from around the province. Mineralogy and petrography form the basis while geochemical data aides in defining lava flow stratigraphies and distinguishing individual flow packages in disparate locations around the province. 40Ar/39Ar dating of key stratigraphic marker horizons support stratigraphical correlation across the province whilst the use of palaeomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy has allowed for correlation on a broader scale. Indications from this study point towards an unusual eruption among CFBPs in the Phanerozoic; a lack of tumescence, immediate subsidence of the lava pile following cessation of eruption; and, in the main sub-province, we map a simple volcanic structure thinning to the east from a single source. 1. L. M. Glass, D. Phillips, (2006). Geology. 34, 461-464.

  5. Petrologic Modeling of Magmatic Evolution in The Elysium Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, D.; Karunatillake, S.; Hood, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Elysium Volcanic Province (EVP) on Mars is a massive expanse of land made up of many hundreds of lava flows of various ages1. The variable surface ages within this volcanic province have distinct elemental compositions based on the derived values from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) suite2. Without seismic data or ophiolite sequences on Mars, the compositions of lavas on the surface provide some of the only information to study the properties of the interior of the planet. The Amazonian surface age and isolated nature of the EVP in the northern lowlands of Mars make it ideal for analyzing the mantle beneath Elysium during the most recent geologic era on Mars. The MELTS algorithm is one of the most commonly used programs for simulating compositions and mineral phases of basaltic melt crystallization3. It has been used extensively for both terrestrial applications4 and for other planetary bodies3,5. The pMELTS calibration of the algorithm allows for higher pressure (10-30 kbars) regimes, and is more appropriate for modeling melt compositions and equilibrium conditions for a source within the martian mantle. We use the pMELTS program to model how partial melting of the martian mantle could evolve magmas into the surface compositions derived from the GRS instrument, and how the mantle beneath Elysium has changed over time. We attribute changes to lithospheric loading by long term, episodic volcanism within the EVP throughout its history. 1. Vaucher, J. et al. The volcanic history of central Elysium Planitia: Implications for martian magmatism. Icarus 204, 418-442 (2009). 2. Susko, D. et al. A record of igneous evolution in Elysium, a major martian volcanic province. Scientific Reports 7, 43177 (2017). 3. El Maarry, M. R. et al. Gamma-ray constraints on the chemical composition of the martian surface in the Tharsis region: A signature of partial melting of the mantle? Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 185, 116-122 (2009). 4. Ding, S. & Dasgupta, R. The

  6. The Tyrrhena-Malea Volcanic Province, Mars: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Greeley, R.; Ferguson, R.; Kuzmin, R.; McCord, T.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J.; Xiao, L.; Manfredi, L.; Poulet, F.; Pinet, P.; Baratoux, D.; Plaut, J. J.; Raitala, J.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    Building on previous studies of volcanoes around the Hellas basin with new studies of imaging (HRSC, THEMIS, MOC, HiRISE, CTX), multispectral (HRSC, OMEGA), topographic (MOLA) and gravity data, we define a new Martian volcanic province as the Tyrrhena-Malea Volcanic Province (T-MVP). With an area of >2.1 million sq. km, it contains the six oldest central vent volcanoes on Mars, which formed after the Hellas impact basin, between 4.0 to 3.6 Ga. These volcanoes mark a transition from the flood volcanism that formed Malea Planum ~3.8 Ga, to localized point source eruptions. The T-MVP volcanoes have two general morphologies: 1) shieldlike edifices (Tyrrhena, Hadriaca, and Amphitrites Paterae), and 2) caldera-like depressions surrounded by ridged plains (Peneus, Malea, and Pityusa Paterae). Positive gravity anomalies are found at Tyrrhena, Hadriaca, and Amphitrites, perhaps indicative of dense magma bodies below the surface. The lack of shield-like edifices and weak gravity anomalies at Peneus, Malea, and Pityusa suggest a fundamental difference in their formation, styles of eruption, and/or compositions. The northernmost volcanoes, the ~3.7- 3.9 Ga Tyrrhena and Hadriaca Paterae, have low slopes, well-channeled flanks, and smooth caldera floors (at tens of meters/pixel scale), indicative of ash shields formed from poorly-consolidated pyroclastic deposits that have been modified by fluvial and aeolian erosion and deposition. The ~3.6 Ga Amphitrites Patera also has a well-channeled flank, but it and the ~3.8 Ga Peneus Patera are dominated by scalloped and pitted terrain, pedestal and ejecta flow craters, and a general `softened' appearance. This morphology is indicative not only of surface materials subjected to periglacial processes involving water ice, but also of a surface composed of easily eroded materials such as ash and dust. The southernmost volcanoes, the ~3.8 Ga Malea and Pityusa Paterae, have no channeled flanks, no scalloped and pitted terrain, and lack the

  7. The Snake River Plain Volcanic Province: Insights from Project Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, J. W.; Potter, K. E.; Hanan, B. B.; Jean, M. M.; Duncan, R. A.; Champion, D. E.; Vetter, S.; Glen, J. M. G.; Christiansen, E. H.; Miggins, D. P.; Nielson, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) Volcanic Province is the best modern example of a time-transgressive hotspot track beneath continental crust. The SRP began 17 Ma with massive eruptions of Columbia River basalt and rhyolite. After 12 Ma volcanism progressed towards Yellowstone, with early rhyolite overlain by basalts that may exceed 2 km thick. The early rhyolites are anorogenic with dry phenocryst assemblages and eruption temperatures up to 950C. Tholeiitic basalts have major and trace element compositions similar to ocean island basalts (OIB). Project Hotspot cored three deep holes in the central and western Snake River Plain: Kimama (mostly basalt), Kimberly (mostly rhyolite), and Mountain Home (lake sediments and basaslt). The Kimberly core documents rhyolite ash flows up to 700 m thick, possibly filling a caldera or sag. Chemical stratigraphy in Kimama and other basalt cores document fractional crystallization in relatively shallow magma chambers with episodic magma recharge. Age-depth relations in the Kimama core suggest accumulation rates of roughly 305 m/Ma. Surface and subsurface basalt flows show systematic variations in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes with distance from Yellowstone interpreted to reflect changes in the proportion of plume source and the underlying heterogeneous cratonic lithosphere, which varies in age, composition, and thickness from west to east. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes suggest <5% lithospheric input into a system dominated by OIB-like plume-derived basalts. A major flare-up of basaltic volcanism occurred 75-780 ka throughout the entire SRP, from Yellowstone in the east to Boise in the west. The youngest western SRP basalts are transitional alkali basalts that range in age from circa 900 ka to 2 ka, with trace element and isotopic compositions similar to the plume component of Hawaiian basalts. These observations suggest that ancient SCLM was replaced by plume mantle after the North America passed over the hotspot in the western SRP, which triggered renewed

  8. Late Neogene Volcanic Stratigraphy in the Southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province of Baja California: Time Constraints and Vent Source Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carrillo, P.; Martin, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Cañon, E.

    2007-05-01

    Late Neogene syn-rift explosive volcanism occurred in the Puertecitos Volcanic Province along the western margin of the Gulf of California. This volcanic episode is possibly related to extension during opening of the lower Delfin basin in mid-late Pliocene time. The volcanic stratigraphy in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province comprises three main groups: group 1 is a mid-Miocene, arc-related volcanic and sedimentary apron. Groups 2 and 3 are syn-rift volcanic units interstratified within alluvial conglomerate. Group 2 includes a non-welded, crystal-rich pyroclastic flow deposit, and a dark glassy dacite lava flow. Distinctive mineralogy of the crystal tuff is augite, sanidine-microcline and quartz. Two 39Ar/40Ar laser step-heating experiments on sanidine grains yielded an 6.18 ± 0.03 Ma isochron age, consistent with a 6.1 ± 0.4 Ma plateau age obtained in the dacite lava. Thickness of the crystal tuff varies from 35 m in the northeast to 10 m in the southwest along 5 km of distance. Group 3 is characterized by the lack of quartz and potassic feldspar phenocrysts. Three laser step heating experiments on groundmass samples constrain this pulse of explosive volcanism between 2.9 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.03 Ma. Thicknesses of individual units increase to the northeast and collectively reach up to 150 m. Isopath maps for distinctive flow-units indicate consistent dispersion direction to the SW (average azimuth 210° ± 15°). This inferred flow direction is similar to the orientation of magnetic susceptibility axes measured in 20 oriented samples that yield a mean azimuth of 214°± 24°. In group 3 flow-units eutaxitic foliation is concordant and dips 8-20° to the ENE. Tilting of the volcanic sequence is produced by a series of NNW-trending, west-dipping, high-angle normal faults with less than 40 m of throw. Balanced cross- sections in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province indicates that post-2.8 Ma extension is less than 15% suggesting that major deformation

  9. Interactions between climatic forcing of lake level change, tectonics and volcanism in the Rungwe Volcanic Province, SW Highlands of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, D.; Williamson, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Rungwe Volcanic Province extends between the Rukwa and Nyasa (Malawi) rift lakes, which both experimented marked water level fluctuations (several hundred meters in altitude) during the last 40 ka. The infilling of water reservoirs whether artificial or natural, is known to be able to trigger earthquakes and volcanism (Ambraseys and Sarma, 1968). In the Southwestern Highlands of Tanzania and most especially in the Rungwe Volcanic Province where the western and eastern branches of the East African Rift System meet, a similar link is likely highlighted. Compilation of available data supplemented by new observations allows investigating the time relations between (1) climatically induced, rapid water level fluctuations in the surrounding rift lakes, (2) tectonic activation of the fault systems that extend from the lacustrine depressions to the volcanic area, and (3) deposition of tephra layers in soils and sediments. The latter are considered to reflect the frequency and/or magnitude of explosive eruptions in the Rungwe massif. According to these data, a connexion is suggested between the great lakes level change, tectonics, and volcanic activity for the last glacial - interglacial transition (14 - 11.5 cal. ka BP), and possibly also during the Holocene.

  10. Mantle xenoliths from South Auckland Volcanic Provinces (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccini, B.; Bonadiman, C.; Coltorti, M.; Briggs, R.

    2012-04-01

    Two suites of mantle xenoliths have been collected from the basaltic outcrops of Ngatutura and Okete Beaches. These alkaline volcanics are located in the western part of the North Island (New Zealand) and belong to the South Auckland Volcanic Province. They are situated in an intraplate tectonic setting behind the currently active Taupo Volcanic Zone, and 300 km above the subducting slab. The host lavas show restricted compositions, ranging from hawaiites to nepheline hawaiites, and are enriched in LIL, LRE, and HFS elements. The Ngatutura samples (NG) are equigranular and protogranular dunites; only NG1 have modally detectable amount of opx and cpx. Dunite NG6 is crosscut by a network of orthopyroxenite veins and NG4 is the sole composite lherzolite/dunite sample. In dunites olivine (ol) can be found as medium/coarse grained (average 2.5 mm) crystals; kink-banding is visible in some cases. Orthopyroxene (opx), is smaller (up to 1 mm) and interstitial. Spinel (sp) is very small, black, euhedral and often enclosed within olivine. The majority of Alexandra samples (OK) is constituted by protogranular and porphyroclastic cpx-poor lherzolites, with minor porphyroclastic harzburgites and rare dunites. Cumulitic clinopyroxenites have also been found. Ol in lherzolites and harzburgites is coarse grained (up to 9 mm), with the characteristic kink-banding. Opx can be found as medium-coarse grained (up to 5.5 mm in porphyroclastic samples), and shows exsolution lamellae. Cpx is small (up to 1.5 mm) and exhibits spongy textures. In clinopyroxenites ol is characterized by a medium grained (up to 2 mm) kink-banded crystals. Cpx is arranged in big individuals (up to 3.5 mm across) with exsolution lamellae. Sp can be found both as primary, bigger crystals (sometimes with reaction rims) or as secondary idiomorphic and smaller crystals. Amphibole occurs only in the OK8 ol-websterite. Both xenolith suites have sp as the only aluminum phase. Metasomatic reactions occur in both mantle

  11. The Teles Pires volcanic province: A paleogeoproterozoic silicic-dominated large igneous province in southwest Amazon craton and tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Jayme Alfredo Dexheimer; Saes, Gerson Souza; Macambira, Moacir Jose Buenano

    2001-01-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are important features of the Earth history especially recognized during Paleo to Mezosoic times when they are related to the break up of supercontinents (Coffin and Eldhom, 1994). These provinces occur in several different tectonic settings such as volcanic passive margins, submarine ridges and continental and oceanic plateaux. Mafic-dominanted provinces are the most well known among the LIPs and the best examples are the Karoo, Kerguelem and Ontong-Java. LIPs including an important silicic component have been described in some basaltic provinces of southern Africa (Milner et al. 1992). More recently, silicic-dominated LIPs have been recognized in eastern Australia (Bryan et al., 2000), in southern South America (Pankhurst et al. 1998) and in Antartica Penninsula (Riley and Leat, 1999). The common characteristics of this kind of LIP include: 1) large volume of silicic rocks with dominance of ignimbrites, 2) active over 40 to 50 m.y.; and 3) spatially and temporally associated with plate break up. In this paper we present the main geologic and geochronologic characteristics of the Teles Pires volcanic province from southwest Amazon Craton, which allow its classification as a Paleoprotorozoic silicic-dominated LIP. Geologic implications of this suggestion includes the existence of a large cratonic plate as old as 1.81Ga for the Amazon Craton, therefore the proposed 1.85-1.55 Ga magmatic arc of Rio Negro-Juruena Province should be reviewed (au)

  12. New 40Ar / 39Ar age and geochemical data from seamounts in the Canary and Madeira volcanic provinces: Support for the mantle plume hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K.; Bogaard, P. v. d.; Duggen, S.; Werner, R.

    2005-08-01

    The role of mantle plumes in the formation of intraplate volcanic islands and seamount chains is being increasingly questioned. Particular examples are the abundant and somewhat irregularly distributed island and seamount volcanoes off the coast of northwest Africa. New 40Ar / 39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of volcanic rocks from seamounts northeast of the Madeira Islands (Seine and Unicorn) and northeast of the Canary Islands (Dacia and Anika), however, provide support for the plume hypothesis. The oldest ages of shield stage volcanism from Canary and Madeira volcanic provinces confirm progressions of increasing age to the northeast. Average volcanic age progression of ∼1.2 cm/a is consistent with rotation of the African plate at an angular velocity of ∼0.20° ± 0.05 /Ma around a common Euler pole at approximately 56° N, 45° W computed for the period of 0-35 Ma. A Euler pole at 35° N, 45° W is calculated for the time interval of 35-64 Ma. The isotope geochemistry further confirms that the Madeira and Canary provinces are derived from different sources, consistent with distinct plumes having formed each volcanic group. Conventional hotspot models, however, cannot easily explain the up to 40 m.y. long volcanic history at single volcanic centers, long gaps in volcanic activity, and the irregular distribution of islands and seamounts in the Canary province. A possible explanation could involve interaction of the Canary mantle plume with small-scale upper mantle processes such as edge-driven convection. Juxtaposition of plume and non-plume volcanism could also account for observed inconsistencies of the classical hotspot concept in other volcanic areas.

  13. Platinum-group elements in the Eastern Deccan volcanic province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Platinum group elements; geochemistry; Deccan volcanism; India. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 122, No. 4, August 2013, pp. 1035–1044 c Indian Academy of Sciences. 1035 ... cal Survey of India has identified 16 flows form- ing four formations in the Umaria .... core and iron enrichment in the rims. Olivine is rarely present.

  14. Migration of Widespread Long-Lived Volcanism across the Galápagos Volcanic Province: Evidence for a broad hotspot melting Anomaly?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O Connor, J.M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Worthington, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The well-studied Galápagos Archipelago is a small part of the much larger Galápagos Volcanic Province (GVP) consisting of the Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and related seamount provinces. Although these aseismic ridges and seamounts dominate the morphology of the region, little

  15. Timing and duration of volcanism in the North Atlantic Igneous Province

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Michael; Duncan, Robert A.; Tegner, Christian

    2007-01-01

    We combine new and published 40Ar/39Ar age determinations from incremental heating experiments on whole rocks and mineral separates to assess the timing, duration and distribution of volcanic activity during construction of the North Atlantic Igneous Province. We use these ages together with volume...... estimates of erupted magmas and their cumulates to calculate melt production rates for the early Tertiary flood basalts of East Greenland and the Faeroes Islands. The lavas lie at opposite ends of the Greenland-Iceland-Faeroes Ridge, the postulated Iceland hotspot track, and record volcanic activity leading...

  16. Linking Volcanism and Gas Release from the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province to the PETM: Challenges and Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, H.; Jones, M. T.; Jerram, D. A.; Planke, S.; Kjoberg, S.; Schmid, D. W.; Iyer, K.; Tegner, C.

    2016-12-01

    The main phase of the development of the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province took place about 56 Ma and coincides with the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The volcanic activity was characterized by voluminous flood basalts, large plutonic complexes, sub-marine eruptions, widespread tephra deposition, and emplacement of sills and dikes along the continental margins of Norway, Greenland, Ireland, and the UK. Here we review the style and tempo of volcanism during this important period of Earth's history and discuss the sources and volumes of the carbon gases emitted to the ocean and atmosphere. Moreover, we present new data and models from 1) West Greenland showing the impact on sill intrusions on gas generation from heated Cretaceous mudstones, 2) a 3D seismic survey of gas release structures offshore Norway, and 3) Paleocene-Eocene tephra layers from Svalbard and Denmark. Gas migrated out of the contact aureoles by either explosive venting or by slower seepage towards the seafloor as demonstrated by 3D seismic data. Some of the gas was permanently trapped (dry gas and CO2-rich gas) in the source rocks and aureoles. Combined with high-precision zircon ages and a time model for the PETM, our approach may give robust fluxes that can explain both the onset and the body of the PETM.

  17. Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopic constraints on mantle sources and crustal contaminants in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Thirlwall, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    The presented Sr, Nd, Hf and double-spike Pb-isotopic analyses of Quaternary basalts from the Payenia volcanic province in southern Mendoza, Argentina, confirm the presence of two distinct mantle types feeding the Payenia volcanism. The southern Payenia mantle source feeding the intraplate-type Río...

  18. Neogene seismites and seismic volcanic rocks in the Linqu area, Shandong Province, E China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian H.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Yishu Fault Zone runs through the centre of Shandong Province (E China; it is a deep-seated large fault system that still is active. Two volcanic faulted basins (the Shanwang and Linqu Basins in the Linqu area, west of the fault zone, are exposed to rifting, which process is accompanied by a series of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes with a magnitude of 5-8. Lacustrine sediments in the basins were affected by these earthquakes so that seismites with a variety of soft-sediment deformation structures originated. The seismites form part of the Shanwang Formation of the Linqu Group. Semi-consolidated fluvial conglomerates became deformed in a brittle way; these seismites are present at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. Intense earthquakes triggered by volcanic activity left their traces in the form of seismic volcanic rocks associated with liquefied-sand veins in the basalt/sand intercalations at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. These palaeo-earthquake records are dated around 14-10 Ma; they are responses to the intense tectonic extension and the basin rifting in this area and even the activity of the Yishu Fault Zone in the Himalayan tectonic cycle.

  19. A geochronological study of mafic and acidic lavas from Veneto Volcanic province (North-East Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, Valentina; Webb, Laura; Bonadiman, Costanza; Marzoli, Andrea; Coltorti, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the North-East of Italy represents one of the most important magmatic province of the Adria Plate. VVP magmatism occurred in a period ranging from late Paleocene to late Oligocene (De Vecchi et al., 1976). Five main volcanic districts can be defined from north-west to south-east: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Lessini Hills, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, ranging in compostion from mela-nephelinites to quartz-normative tholeiites (Beccaluva et al., 2007). By contrast in the Euganean Hills volcanic and subvolcanic rocks range from subordinate basalts to prevalently acidic types, mostly quartz-trachytes and rhyolites (Milani et al., 1999). Despite of the deep petrological knowledge about this province, the radioisotopic ages of the related volcanic activities for each district are still poorly defined or even totally missing. 40Ar/39Ar ages on 9 samples have been obtained to determine the age range for the VVP. 40Ar/39Ar whole rock step heating analyses yielded ages ranging from 40.7 ± 0.2 Ma to 23.3 ± 1.5 Ma for basanites of Val d'Adige and Marosticano area, respectively. For the Lessinean district, 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses for two basanites, one trachybasalt and one alkali basalt close to 40 Ma, while a tholeiite from the same area yielded the youngest age for this district (i.e. 32.9 ± 1.8 Ma). This young age is comparable to 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained for the Euganean Hills intermediate-acidic rocks (Jourdan, pers. comm., 2016), suggesting a time-related shift from more alkaline to Si-saturated magmatism in the whole province. References Barbieri G., Medizza F. (1969). Contributo alla conoscenza geologica della regione di Bolca (Monti Lessini). Memorie dell'Istituto di Geologia e Mineralogia dell'Università di Padova, 27, 1-36. Beccaluva L., Bianchini G., Bonadiman C., Coltorti M., Milani L., Salvini L., Siena F., Tassinari R. (2007). Intraplate

  20. A new look at the collision-related volcanism in Eastern Anatolia, Turkey: Volcanic history of the Northern-Van neovolcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mehmet; Lebedev, Vladimir; Sharkov, Evgenii; Oyan, Vural; Ünal, Esin

    2010-05-01

    The region including the Eastern Anatolian - Northern Iranian High Plateau and Greater and Lesser Caucasus mountain ranges is one of the best examples of an active continental collision zone in the world, which is thought to have been formed by the closure of the northern branch of the Neotethyan Ocean. It comprises one of the high plateaus of the Alpine-Himalaya mountain belt (i.e. the Eastern Anatolia High Plateau) with an average elevation of ~2 km above the sea level. The volcanic activity initiated immediately after the block uplift of the region (at around 15 Ma as our new isotope-geochronological database indicates) and produced great volumes of volcanic material in a number of countries including Turkey, Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Iran. At present, the volcanic province extends from Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) into Caucasus of Southern Russia, spanning a distance of some 1000 km. Perhaps the most striking aspect of the Eastern Anatolian - N Iranian High Plateau and Caucasus is the volume and compositional variability of collision-related volcanic products erupted in a time interval from Neogene to Quaternary. Only in E Turkey, the collision-related volcanic units cover over half of the region (i.e.˜43,000 km2). In order to better understand the spatial and temporal compositional variations in volcanic rocks and their implications on magma genesis and geodynamic evolution of the region, we conducted joint research on this spectacular volcanic province. One of the largest Cenozoic volcanic areas on the EAHP is located in the north of Lake Van as we named "the Northern-Van neovolcanic province". It covers an area of about 6000 km2 starting from the northern cost of Lake Van. It is composed of a series of volcanic edifices (e.g. Girekol, Meydandag and Etrusk volcanoes). Remarkably, these volcanoes sit almost on the culmination of a regional domal structure called "Lake Van dome" in the vertex of the eastern Turkish high plateau. We intentionally

  1. Permo-triassic volcanism in the San Rafael Block (Mendoza province) and its uraniferous potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiman, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Permo-triassic volcanism in the San Rafael Block, Mendoza, Argentina, which forms part of the Choiyoi province and it represents by large volumes of intermediate to silicic ignimbrites with minor sub volcanic bodies of rhyolites, andesites and basandesites. Three different suites can be distinguished: the first one (Lower Section) of Early Permian age, is composed of dacites and rhyolites (SiO 2 up to 71 %) with minor andesites, the second one (Upper Section) of Late Permian-Early Triassic age is made up of rhyolites (SiO 2 up to 77 %) with some basandesites and andesites, and the third one, of Triassic age is composed of rhyolites (SiO 2 > 75 %) and basandecites. These suites are easily distinguished by means of trace element data and are believed to represent the transition between a subduction-related magmatic arc and an extensional tectonic regime. This tectonic setting is similar to the prevalent during the Cenozoic in the Sierra Occidental of Mexico and is favourable for the development of long-lived hydrothermal systems which lead to economic U concentrations (i.e. Sierra de Pena Blanca). In the San Rafael Block, the Dr. Baulies-Los Reyunos U deposit, which is hosted in volcanic sediments, is associated to the first suite (Lower Section). Although minor U concentrations are known, up to date, to be related to the second and third suites, these rocks are fertile and seen to be potential source for the formation of uranium deposits within a volcanic caldera environment. (Author)

  2. New Age and Geochemical Data From Seamounts in the Canary and Madeira Volcanic Provinces: A Contribution to the "Great Plume Debate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K.; van den Bogaard, P.; Duggen, S.; Werner, R.

    2004-12-01

    The role of hotspots (mantle plumes) in the formation of intraplate volcanic island and seamount groups is being increasingly questioned, in particular concerning the abundant and somewhat irregularly distributed island and seamount volcanoes off the coast of northwest Africa. However, new 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of volcanic rocks from two seamounts northeast of the Canary Islands and two northeast of the Madeira Islands provide new support for the plume hypothesis. The oldest ages of shield stage volcanism from seamounts and islands northeast of the Canary and Madeira Islands confirm progressions of increasing age to the northeast for both island/seamount chains consistent with northeast directed plate motion. Calculated angular velocities for the average movement of the African plate in both regions gave similar values of about 0.45\\deg plus/minus 0.05\\deg/Ma around a rotation pole located north of the Azores Islands. Furthermore, the curvature of the chains clearly deviates from the E-W orientation of fracture zones in the East Atlantic. A local control of surface volcanism by lithospheric zones of weakness, however, is likely for some E-W elongated seamounts and islands. The isotope geochemistry additionally confirms that the two volcanic provinces are derived from distinct sources, consistent with distinct mantle plumes having formed both volcanic groups. Conventional hotspot models, however, cannot easily explain the wide distribution of seamounts in the Canary region and the long history of volcanic activity at single volcanic centers (e.g. Dacia seamount, 47-4 Ma; Selvagen Islands, 30-3 Ma). A possible explanation could involve interaction of a Canary mantle plume with small-scale upper mantle processes such as edge driven convection at the edge of the NW African craton (e.g. King and Ritsema, 2000, Science 290, 1137-1140).

  3. Paralavas in the Cretaceous Paraná volcanic province, Brazil - A genetic interpretation of the volcanic rocks containing phenocrysts and glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Sérgio B; Hartmann, Léo A; Bello, Rosa M S

    2016-01-01

    The occurrences of glassy rocks containing long and curved phenocrysts in the Paraná volcanic province, South America, are here interpreted as paralavas. The large number of thin (0.1-0.5 m) dikes and sills of glassy volcanic rocks with hopper, hollow or curved, large crystals of clinopyroxene (up to 10 cm), plagioclase (up to 1 cm), magnetite and apatite are contained in the core of thick (>70 m) pahoehoe flows. They are strongly concentrated in the state of Paraná, coincident with the presence of the large number of dikes in the Ponta Grossa arch. These rocks were previously defined as pegmatites, although other names have also been used. A paralava is here interpreted as the product of melting of basaltic rocks following varied, successive processes of sill emplacement in high-kerogen bituminous shale and ascent of the resultant methane. As the gas reached the lower portion of the most recent lava flow of the volcanic pile, the methane reacted with the silicate and oxide minerals of the host volcanic rock (1,000 ºC) and thus elevated the local temperature to 1,600 ºC. The affected area of host rock remelted (possibly 75 wt.%) and injected buoyantly the central and upper portion of the core. This methane-related mechanism explains the evidence found in the paralavas from this volcanic province, one of the largest in the continents.

  4. Stratigraphical framework of basaltic lavas in Torres Syncline main valley, southern Parana-Etendeka Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Lucas M.; Lima, Evandro F.; Waichel, Breno L.; Scherer, Claiton M.; Barreto, Carla J.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province records the volcanism of the Early Cretaceous that precedes the fragmentation of the South-Gondwana supercontinent. Traditionally, investigations of these rocks prioritized the acquisition of geochemical and isotopic data, considering the volcanic stack as a monotonous succession of tabular flows. Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil and where the Parana-Etendeka basalts are well preserved. This work provides a detailed analysis of lithofacies and facies architecture, integrated to petrographic and geochemical data. We identified seven distinct lithofacies grouped into four facies associations related to different flow morphologies. The basaltic lava flows in the area can be divided into two contrasting units: Unit I - pahoehoe flow fields; and Unit II - simple rubbly flows. The first unit is build up by innumerous pahoehoe lava flows that cover the sandstones of Botucatu Formation. These flows occur as sheet pahoehoe, compound pahoehoe, and ponded lavas morphologies. Compound lavas are olivine-phyric basalts with intergranular pyroxenes. In ponded lavas and cores of sheet flows coarse plagioclase-phyric basalts are common. The first pahoehoe lavas are more primitive with higher contents of MgO. The emplacement of compound pahoehoe flows is related to low volume eruptions, while sheet lavas were emplaced during sustained eruptions. In contrast, Unit II is formed by thick simple rubbly lavas, characterized by a massive core and a brecciated/rubbly top. Petrographically these flows are characterized by plagioclase-phyric to aphyric basalts with high density of plagioclase crystals in the matrix. Chemically they are more differentiated lavas, and the emplacement is related to sustained high effusion rate eruptions. Both units are low TiO2 and have geochemical characteristics of Gramado magma type. The Torres Syncline main valley has a similar evolution when compared to other Large Igneous Provinces

  5. Rhyolitic ignimbrites in the Rogerson Graben, southern Snake River Plain volcanic province: volcanic stratigraphy, eruption history and basin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Graham D. M.; Branney, Michael J.; Bonnichsen, Bill; McCurry, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The 80 km long NNE-trending Rogerson Graben on the southern margin of the central Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA, hosts a rhyolitic pyroclastic succession, 200 m thick, that records a period of successive, late-Miocene, large-volume explosive eruptions from the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain volcanic province, and contemporaneous extension. The succession, here termed the Rogerson Formation, comprises seven members (defined herein) and records at least eight large explosive eruptions with numerous repose periods. Five high-grade and extremely high-grade ignimbrites are intercalated with three non-welded ignimbrites and two volcaniclastic deposits, with numerous repose periods (palaeosols) throughout. Two of the ignimbrites are dominantly rheomorphic and lava-like but contain subordinate non-welded pyroclastic layers. The ignimbrites are typical Snake River Plain high-silica rhyolites, with anhydrous crystal assemblages and high inferred magmatic temperatures (≤ 1,025°C). We tentatively infer that the Jackpot and Rabbit Springs Members may have been emplaced from the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive centre on the basis of: (1) flow lineation trends, (2) crystal assemblage, and (3) radiometric age. We infer that the overlying Brown’s View, Grey’s Landing, and Sand Springs Members may have been emplaced from the Twin Falls eruptive centre on the basis of: (1) kinematic indicators (from the east), and (2) crystal assemblage. Furthermore, we have established the contemporaneous evolution of the Rogerson Graben from the emplacement of the Jackpot Member onwards, and infer that it is similar to younger half-graben along the southern margin of the Snake River Plain, formed by local reactivation of Basin and Range structures by the northeastwardly migration of the Yellowstone hot-spot.

  6. Mercury as a proxy for Large Igneous Province volcanism: A comparison of Mesozoic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Lawrence; Jenkyns, Hugh; Mather, Tamsin; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ruhl, Micha; Whiteside, Jessica; Dickson, Alexander; Jarvis, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Mass extinction events and other episodes of palaeoceanographic and palaeoclimatic upheaval, such as Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs), have punctuated global climate throughout the Phanerozoic Aeon. Many of these events from the last 300 million years have been causally linked with Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), which represent the geologically abrupt emplacement of millions of cubic kilometres of (chiefly) basaltic material. Evidence for such a relationship comes both from a coincidence in radiometrically determined ages of many LIPs with the apparent age of an extinction/climate perturbation, and also from the sedimentary record, where stratigraphic horizons recording palaeoclimatic events commonly also record perturbations in sedimentary proxies for volcanism. Numerous recent studies have highlighted Hg/TOC (mercury/total organic carbon) excursions in both terrestrial and marine sedimentary archives recording mass extinctions. Because the main natural source of mercury to the modern environment is volcanic outgassing, such Hg/TOC excursions have been used to support a precise temporal link between many major environmental perturbations and the formation of LIPs. Here, we present new Hg/TOC data from the end-Triassic extinction and Late Cretaceous OAE 2, and compare it to previously published data from records of the end-Permian, end-Triassic, Early Toarcian OAE, Early Aptian OAE 1a, Cenomanian-Turonian OAE 2, and end-Cretaceous events. Comparing the mercury records of multiple events is crucial to further understanding of the controls on Hg/TOC as a volcanic proxy, as well as the processes governing relationships between different environmental perturbations and LIPs. Of particular interest is the influence of LIP location (e.g. subaerial vs subaqeous; low- vs high-latitude), and the potential generation of additional thermogenic volatiles during LIP emplacement.

  7. Did volcanic activity of the Emeishan large igneous province expand in Wuchiapingian times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherpour, Borhan; Bucher, Hugo; Yuan, Dong-Xun; Shen, Shu-zhong; Leu, Marc; Zhang, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Emplacement of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in the Capitanian (Middle Permian) is associated with several environmental changes (e.g. facies change, carbon cycle perturbation and temperature rise) across the Guadalupian-Lopingian (G-L) interval in South China. However, most of the reported changes are within the Capitanian stage or close to the G-L boundary. Here, we report an episode of drastic environmental changes from the Pingtang syncline (S. Guizhou) that is similar with the previously known ones but which is significantly younger. The studied section represents a protracted and stepwise facies change from a benthos rich, thick-bedded and light grey shallow water limestone (Unit A) to a 30 m-thick unit with thin-bedded dark (OM-rich) radiolarian-spiculitic facies (Unit B). The latter is overlain by an 8 m-thick unit of volcaniclastic sandstone and silts defining a succession of decimetric, cyclic and thinning upward layers (Unit C). The base of the overlying medium-bedded limestone unit (Unit D) contain radiolarian and sponge spicules whose abundance progressively decrease up section with a progressive replacement by abundant benthic faunas concomitant with the transition to thick bedded limestone. A total of five conodont index species (assigned to Clarkina) of early Wuchiapingian age were recognized from Unit A and Unit B. The observed facies transition from Unit A to Unit B indicates a drastic drowning event. Unit C represents a distal turbiditic succession and the overlying Unit D shows an upward shallowing trend back to the initial shallow marine condition. Compilation of sedimentary records across G-L in South China reveals that such drowning events tend to cluster within three discrete time intervals. The drowning events may or may not end with deposition of either volcanics or volcaniclastics. Two first clusters display drowning events overlain by ELIP volcanic rocks or volcaniclastics of ELIP origin and are of Capitanian age. Only the

  8. A 150-ka-long record for the volcano-tectonic deformation of Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Tonguç Uysal, I.; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Mutlu, Halim; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-04-01

    The Anatolian Block represents one of the most outstanding examples of intra-plate deformation related to continental collision. Deformation related to the convergence of the Afro-Arabian continent toward north gives rise to widespread and intense arc volcanism in the Central Anatolia. All the usual studies on dating the volcano-tectonic deformation of the region are performed entirely on volcanic events of the geological record resulted in eruptions. However, without volcanic eruption, magma migration and related fluid pressurization also generate crustal deformation. In the current study has been funded by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey with the project no. 115Y497, we focused on fracture systems and their carbonate veins around the Ihlara Valley (Cappadocia) surrounded by well-known volcanic centers with latest activities of the southern Central Anatolian Volcanic Province. We dated 37 samples using the Uranium-series technique and analyzed their isotope systematics from fissure veins, which are thought to be controlled by the young volcanism in the region. Our detailed fracture analyses in the field show that there is a regional dilatation as a result of a NW-SE striking extension which is consistent with the results of recent GPS studies. The Uranium-series results indicate that fracture development and associated carbonate vein deposition occurred in the last 150 ka. Carbon and oxygen isotope systematics have almost remained unchanged in the studied time interval. Although veins in the region were precipitated from fluids primarily of meteoric origin, fluids originating from water-rock interaction also contribute for the deposition of carbonate veins. The age distribution indicates that the crustal deformation intensified during 7 different period at about 4.7, 34, 44, 52, 83, 91, 149 ka BP. Four of these periods (4.7, 34, 91, 149 ka BP) correspond to the volcanic activities suggested in the previous studies. The three crustal

  9. Landsat 5 TM images and DEM in lithologic mapping of Payen Volcanic Field (Mendoza Province, Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaciai, A.; Bisson, M.; Mazzarini, F.; Del Carlo, P.; Pasquare, G.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite image such as Landsat 5 TM scene provides excellent representation of Earth and synoptic view of large geographic areas in different band combination. Landsat TM images allow automatic and semi-automatic classification of land cover, nevertheless the software frequently may some difficulties in distinguishing between similar radiometric surfaces. In this case, the use of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) can be an important tool to identify different surface covers. In this study, several False Color Composite (FCC) of Landsat 5 TM Image, DEM and the respective draped image of them, were used to delineate lithological boundaries and tectonic features of regional significance of the Paven Volcanic Field (PVF). PFV is a Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the black-arc extensional areas of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina) characterized by many composite basaltic lava flow fields. The necessity to identify different lava flows with the same composition, and then with same spectral features, allows to highlight the improvement of synergic use of TM images and shaded DEM in the visual interpretation. Information obtained from Satellite data and DEM have been compared with previous geological maps and transferred into a topographical base map. Based on these data a new lithological map at 1:100.000 scale has been presented [it

  10. Evaluating earthquake disaster risk management in schools in Rungwe Volcanic Province in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaristo Haulle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article establishes existing knowledge on earthquakes and coping mechanisms employed in reducing the severity of adverse impacts caused by an earthquake disaster in a specific locality. The purpose of the study was to recommend useful measures for disaster risk management. It also more particularly aimed at assessing mechanisms employed in reducing the disaster risk and integrating knowledge of disasters and hazards in primary and secondary school curricula. The study was carried out in Rungwe Volcanic Province in Rungwe District, Tanzania, and included recording people’s attitudes towards earthquake disaster and locations of schools. It employed focus group discussions, public hearings and interviews in order to capture the actual situation relating to risk and vulnerability assessments by the community. The study revealed high levels of risk and vulnerability to the impact of earthquakes on the part of the community, who accepted earthquakes as a normal phenomenon and therefore did not employ special measures to reduce the impact. The study showed that the community’s coping mechanisms and the extent to which disaster management knowledge has been integrated in school curricula are inadequate in addressing earthquake disasters. It is thus recommended that traditional and modern technologies be integrated in curricula and later in sustainable practices; such technologies include the belief in ‘Nyifwila’, traditional housing style and wooden housing, and non-structural planning for disaster risk management.

  11. Studies of crustal structure, seismic precursors to volcanic eruptions and earthquake hazard in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mavonga, T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, civil wars in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo have caused massive social disruptions, which have been exacerbated by volcanic and earthquake disasters. Seismic data were gathered and analysed as part...

  12. Records of Triassic volcanism in Pangean Great Lakes, and implications for reconstructing the distal effects of Large Igneous Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, J. H.; Percival, L.; Kinney, S.; Olsen, P. E.; Mather, T. A.; Philpotts, A.

    2017-12-01

    Documentation of the precise timing of volcanic eruptions in sedimentary records is key for linking volcanic activity to both historical and geological episodes of environmental change. Deposition of tuffs in sediments, and sedimentary enrichment of trace metals linked to igneous processes, are both commonly used for such correlations. In particular, sedimentary mercury (Hg) enrichments have been used as a marker for volcanic activity from Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) to support their link to episodes of major climate change and mass extinction in the geological record. However, linking such enrichments to a specific eruption or eruption products is often challenging or impossible. In this study, the mercury records from two exactly contemporaneous latest Triassic-earliest Jurassic rift lakes are presented. Both sedimentary records feature igneous units proposed to be related to the later (Early Jurassic) stages of volcanism of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). These CAMP units include a small tuff unit identified by thin-section petrology and identified at 10 localities over a distance of over 200 km, and a major CAMP basalt flow overlying this tuff (and dated at 200.916±0.064 Ma) which is also known across multiple sedimentary basins in both North America and Morocco and is thought to have been emplaced about 120 kyr after the tuff. A potential stratigraphic correlation between Hg enrichments and the igneous units is considered, and compared to the established records of mercury enrichments from the latest Triassic that are thought to be coeval with the earlier stages of CAMP volcanism. Investigating the Hg records of sedimentary successions containing tuffs and basalt units is an important step for demonstrating whether the mercury emissions from specific individual volcanic eruptions in the deep past can be identified in the geological record, and are thus important tools for interpreting the causes of associated past geological events, such as

  13. Crustal velocity structure of the Deccan Volcanic Province, Indian Peninsula, from observed surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through inversion of fundamental mode group velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves, we study the crustal and subcrustal structure across the central Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP, which is one of the world’s largest terrestrial flood basalts. Our analysis is based on broadband seismograms recorded at seismological station Bhopal (BHPL in the central India from earthquakes located near west coast of India, with an average epicentral distance about 768 km. The recording station and epicentral zone are situated respectively on the northern and southern edges of DVP with wave paths across central DVP. The period of group velocity data ranges from 5 to 60 s for Rayleigh waves and 5 to 45 s for Love waves. Using the genetic algorithm, the observed data have been inverted to obtain the crust and subcrustal velocity structure along the wavepaths. Using this procedure, a similar velocity structure was also obtained earlier for the northwestern DVP, which is in the west of the present study region. Comparison of results show that the crustal thickness decreases westward from central DVP (39.6 km to northwestern DVP (37.8 km along with the decrease of thickness of upper crust; while the thickness of lower crust remains nearly same. From east to west S-wave velocity in the upper crust decreases by 2 to 3 per cent, while P-wave velocity in the whole crust and subcrust decreases by 3 to 6 per cent. The P- and S-wave velocities are positively correlated with crustal thickness and negatively correlated with earth’s heat flow. It appears that the elevated crustal and subcrustal temperature in the western side is the main factor for low velocities on this side.

  14. The genesis of a lava cave in the Deccan Volcanic Province (Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R. Pawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lava tubes and channels forming lava distributaries have been recognized from different parts of western Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP. Openings of smaller dimension have been documented from the pāhoehoe flows around Pune, in the western DVP. A small lava cave is exposed in Ghoradeshwar hill, near Pune. Detailed field studies of the physical characteristics, structure and morphology of the flows hosting the lava tube has been carried out. This is the first detailed documentation of a lava cave from the DVP. The lava cave occurs in a compound pāhoehoe flow of Karla Formation, characterized by the presence of lobes, toes and small scale features like squeeze-ups. Field observations and measurements reveal that the dimensions of the cave are small, with low roof and a maximum width of 108 cm. The cave morphology along the 20 m passage varies from circular to semi-circular, with a twilight zone to the north. The gentle micro-topography at Ghoradeshwar controlled the advancement of pāhoehoe lobes and toes within the sheet lobe. The pre-flow gradients towards the north led to the progression of flow from the east, where the cave opening is presently seen. Dimensions and related morphology of the lava cave suggest that it can be best described as a small sub-crustal cave formed by draining of an inflated of pāhoehoe lava lobe. At Ghoradeshwar, besides the natural lava cave, Buddhist caves carved in pāhoehoe lava flows are also observed, indicating that early man took advantage of the existing openings in pāhoehoe flows and sculpted the caves to suit their requirements.

  15. From "Volcanic Field" to "Volcanic Province": A Continuum of Spatial-Clustered Structures With Geological Significance or a Matter of Academic Snobbism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2017-12-01

    "Volcanic Field" is a term commonly used to describe a group of small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic volcanoes, but that often includes groups of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices. Besides ambiguities on the type of edifice that should be considered to form a VF, there is a lack of agreement concerning the number of volcanoes required to define a VF (ranging from five to over 1000), it is uncertain if the area covered by the volcanoes forming a VF must have a minimum number of volcanoes/unit area, or if the distance between adjacent structures needs to have a specific length. Furthermore, in many cases it is uncertain whether some area is occupied by two adjacent fields or if it is occupied by two subgroups belonging to a unique field. On the other hand, in analogy with the official definition of a geologic province, a "Volcanic Province" can be defined as a large region or area characterized by similar volcanic features, or by a history differing significantly from that of adjacent areas. Because neither the dimensions of the region nor the characteristics of the features to be used as reference are specified, there is an inherent ambiguity in this definition, which in some cases might become the source of unnecessary confusion. This work presents a review of the various ambiguities that remain unaddressed on the definition of a VF, and that bear some connection with the definition of VPs in general, with special interest in intraplate settings. It is shown that questions such as a) how many volcanoes are required to form a VF and b) when two "neighbor" volcanoes should not be considered to be part of the same field, can be adequately addressed by adopting the techniques of cluster analysis. Other parameters might not be as easy to address including aspects related to total volume of magma erupted, overall composition of the erupted products and age spans of activity and intermediate gaps. Based on the evidence presented, it is shown that there is a

  16. Various origins of clinopyroxene megacrysts from basanites from the eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, Danuta; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Kukuła, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxene megacrysts up to few centimetres in size occur in Cenozoic alkaline lavas forming the north-eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province in Lower Silesia (SW Poland). The megacrysts occur, among other, in the Miocene basanite from Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka (bulk rock mg# 0.65-0.66) and in that from Lutynia (Pliocene, K-Ar age: 4.56 +/- 0.2 Ma; Birkenmajer et al. 2002; bulk rock mg# 0.64). The megacrysts typically consist of homogeneous core surrounded by patchy and spongy mantle, which is covered by a thin outermost rim of composition similar to that of the groundmass clinopyroxene occurring in the host basanite. The mantles of the megacrysts have been affected by melting, whereas the cores preserve their primary composition. We compare the core parts of megacrysts in the following. The Ostrzyca clinopyroxene megacrysts contain euhedral apatite intergrowths. The clinopyroxene has the composition of Fe-rich diopside (mg# = 0.61 - 0.70), contain significant sodium (to 0.12 a pfu) and are calcium rich (0.89-0.92 a pfu). The Lutynia megacrysts have the composition of augite and diopside (mg# 0.80-0.83). The sodium content is also high (to 0.12 a pfu), but calcium varies from 0.68 to 0.77 a pfu. The REE concentrations for Lutynia (1-10 x PM) are lower relative to Ostrzyca, enriched 10-100 times relative to PM. In both sites the megacrysts are strongly enriched in LREE relative to HREE and TE are characterized by positive Th, La and Ce anomalies, slight negative Sr and Y anomalies and strong Pb anomaly in the PM normalised patterns. The megacrysts from Ostrzyca reveal slight negative Ti and strong positive Zr and Hf anomalies, whereas those Lutynia have negative Zr anomaly and Ti anomaly is absent. Major and trace element composition shows that the megacrysts from Ostrzyca formed as coarse-grained cumulate at significant depth (lower crust?) from the LREE enriched alkaline melt. That melt was very rich in phosphorous which enabled its saturation in

  17. Origin of native copper in the Paraná volcanic province, Brazil, integrating Cu stable isotopes in a multi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Sérgio Benjamin; Hartmann, Léo Afraneo; Lazarov, Marina; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Opitz, Joachim; Theye, Thomas; Viefhaus, Tillmann

    2018-03-01

    Different hypotheses exist on the origin of native copper mineralization in the Paraná volcanic province that invoke magmatic, late magmatic, or hydrothermal events. The average copper content in the host basalts is 200 ppm. Native copper occurs as dendrites in cooling joints, fractures, and cavities within amygdaloidal crusts. Cuprite, tenorite, chrysocolla, malachite, and azurite occur in breccias at the top of the lava flows. Chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrometry, electron microprobe analyses, LA-ICP-MS, and Cu isotope analyses were used to evaluate the origin of native copper in the volcanic province. Copper contents in magnetite of the host basalt are close to 1 wt.%, whereas clinopyroxene contains up to 0.04 wt.% Cu. Cretaceous hydrothermal alteration of magnetite and clinopyroxene released copper to generate hydrothermal copper mineralization. The isotopic composition of the native copper in the Paraná volcanic province varies from -0.9‰ in the southeastern portion (Rio Grande do Sul state) to 1.9‰ in the central portion (Paraná state) of the province. This study supports a hydrothermal origin followed by supergene enrichment for native copper in the Paraná volcanic province.

  18. U-Th age evidence from carbonate veins for episodic crustal deformation of Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Mutlu, Halim; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-12-01

    Central Anatolia represents one of the most outstanding examples of intraplate deformation related to both continental collision and back-arc extension generating non-uniformly distributed stress fields. In this study, we provide direct field evidence of various stress directions and investigate carbonate-filled fracture systems in the Central Anatolian Volcanic Province using U/Th geochronology and isotope geochemistry for evaluating the episodes of latest volcanic activity under regional stress. Field data reveal two independent fracture systems in the region. Successive fracture development has been controlled by two different volcanic eruption centers (Hasandağ Composite Volcano and Acıgöl Caldera). Trace element, and stable (C and O) and radiogenic (Sr) isotope compositions of carbonate veins indicate different fluid migration pathways for two different fracture systems. The U/Th age data for carbonate veins of two independent fracture systems indicate that the crustal deformation intensified during 7 episodic periods in the last 150 ka. The NNE-trending first fracture system was formed as a result of strain cycles in a period from 149 ± 2.5, through 91 ± 1.5 to 83 ± 2.5 ka BP. Subsequent deformation events represented by the ENE-trending second fracture zone have been triggered during the period of 53 ± 3.5, 44 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1 ka BP before the first fracture zone resumed the activity at about 4.7 ± 0.15 ka BP. Although further studies are needed to evaluate statistical significance of age correlations, the periods of carbonate precipitation inferred from U-Th age distributions in this study are comparable with the previous dating results of surrounding volcanic eruption events.

  19. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    scenarios may hence not be pragmatic. If this is the case, then it has important implications for emplacement of planetary lava flows and for mass extinctions. The link between CFB provinces and mass extinctions hinges on catastrophic effects of volatile release during individual CFB eruptions. (Courtillot and Renne 2003).

  20. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  1. Jarosite occurrence in the Deccan Volcanic Province of Kachchh, western India: Spectroscopic studies on a Martian analog locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Satadru; Mitra, Souvik; Gupta, Saibal; Jain, Nirmala; Chauhan, Prakash; Parthasarathy, G.; Ajai

    2016-03-01

    The sulfate mineral jarosite is considered a key indicator of hydrous, acidic, and oxidizing conditions on the surface of early Mars. Here we report an analog terrestrial locality hosting jarosite from Matanumadh, Kachchh, western India, using detailed spectroscopic studies on weathered basalts of the Deccan Volcanic Province and overlying tuffaceous shales and sandstones of the Matanumadh Formation. Hyperspectral data in the visible/near-infrared (350-2500 nm) to midinfrared (4000-400 cm-1) region of the electromagnetic spectrum and X-ray diffraction patterns have been acquired on samples collected from the field to detect and characterize the hydrous sulfate and phyllosilicate phases present at the studied site. Hydrous sulfates occur in association with Al-rich phyllosilicates (kaolinite) that overlie a zone of Fe/Mg smectites in altered basalts. Jarosite is found within both saprolitic clay horizons altered from the basalt and within variegated sandstone and shale/clay units overlying the saprolite; it mostly occurs as secondary veins with or without gypsum. Jarosite is also seen as coatings on kaolinite clasts of varying shapes and sizes within the tuffaceous variegated sandstone unit. We argue that the overall geological setting of the Matanumadh area, with this unusual mineral assemblage developing within altered basalts and in the overlying sedimentary sequence, mimics the geological environment of many of the identified jarosite localities on Mars and can be considered as a Martian analog from this perspective.

  2. Mineral chemistry, Thermo-barometry and Crystal Size Distribution of volcanic rocks from Shirinak: Implication for genesis of volcanic rocks in the southeast of Urumieh-Dokhtar (Kerman province

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    Fatemeh Sepidbar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Shirinak volcanic rocks, known as Dahaj-Sarduieh belt in Kerman province, are exposed southeast of Urumieh-Dokhtar volcanic belt. Petrographically, the volcanic rocks are basalts and andesite, which consist mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine as well as calcite, quartz and chlorite as the secondary minerals.  All of these minerals set in fine grain matrix with porphyric and glomeroporphyric textures. Based on mineral chemistry data, plagioclases range from labradorite to bytownite and have been undergone compositional and thermal mixing. They mostly show sieve texture.  CSD (crystal size distribution study shows that the shape of plagioclase microlites is tablet with aspect ratio of 1:7:10 for short:intermediate:long axes, respectively. Moreover, three-dimensional shape of plagioclase crystals, nucleation and growth time were estimated 40.27 years, which is completely consistent with the nature of basalt. Based on dip of CSD diagram, magma mixing process has been clearly involved in the magma genesis. The pyroxenes studied are augite in composition that were physically crystalized in moderate to high pressure and temperature of 550-1110 ̊ C. They crystallized from a magma likely with about 10% fluid and in variable fO2 condition. On the base of pyroxene chemistry, the basic rocks from Shirinak belong to tholeiitic to calcalkaline series in volcanic arc setting (Neo-Tethys subduction.

  3. Plate flexure and volcanism: Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni alkalic province, New Ireland Basin, Papua New Guinea

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    Lindley, I. D.

    2016-05-01

    Late Cenozoic Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) alkaline volcanism, New Ireland Basin, PNG, is associated with extensional cracks along the crests of flexed ridges developed on the New Ireland Microplate (New name). The tectonic alignment of the TLTF volcanic arc is essentially perpendicular to the flexed ridges, suggesting that fractures parallel to the direction of maximum horizontal compression facilitated the rapid ascent of alkaline magmas from the mantle region, perhaps 60-70 km depth. The mainly Pliocene to Pleistocene volcanoes were localized at the intersection of ridge-parallel Kabang structures and arc-parallel Niffin structures, suggesting that the Kabang-Niffin structural intersections underlying each of the TLTF island groups provided a well developed, clustered network of open conduits which tapped the mantle source region. Periodic post-Miocene locking and unlocking along the strike-slip Kilinailau Fault (New name) are thought to have functioned as a valve, turning on (Pliocene) and then turning off (Pleistocene) volcanic activity, respectively. Partial locking of the Kilinailau Fault during the Pliocene resulted in the accumulation of intraplate stresses within the New Ireland Microplate, and caused plate flexure and ridge development, plate-cracking along ridge crests and the development of arc-parallel regional fractures parallel to the direction of maximum compression. Unlocking of the Kilinailau Fault in the Pleistocene resulted in the release of intraplate stresses in the New Ireland Microplate and a cessation of volcanic activity across most of the TLTF arc. The style and scale of plate flexure and cracking, accompanied by within-plate alkaline volcanism from equally spaced ridge-top eruptive centers confined to a narrow, linear volcanic arc are unknown from any other tectonic province.

  4. Identification of the volcanic quartz origins from dune sand using a single-grain RTL measurement

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    Yawata, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2004-05-01

    In an earlier study, we found that quartz grains extracted from Niigata dune sand all contained red thermoluminescence (RTL) phenomena. This RTL could subsequently be attributed to the volcanic origin of the material. The Agano River is assumed to be the main source of the Niigata dune material. Using the single aliquot regenerative method, which involves the measurement of several hundreds of grains, the measured equivalent doses from the RTL-quartz grains were larger than expected. Consequently, a single-grain method combined with RTL-measurement was developed to determine the equivalent doses from each quartz grain. Placing a biotite plate with a central hole for the sample grain on the sample disk made a significant contribution to keeping background levels as low as possible. The histogram of the equivalent doses evaluated from 72 quartz grains revealed that the Niigata dune originates from at least four different volcanic sources around Agano River. One of them is the Numazawa volcano, because the minimum equivalent dose values from the single grain method are equal to those of quartz grains from the Numazawa pumice.

  5. The Triassic-Liassic volcanic sequence and rift evolution in the Saharan Atlas basins (Algeria). Eastward vanishing of the Central Atlantic magmatic province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meddah, A.; Bertrand, H.; Seddiki, A.; Tabeliouna, M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the Triassic-Liassic sequence in ten diapirs from the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Based on detailed mapping, two episodes are identified. The first one consists of a volcano-sedimentary sequence in which three volcanic units were identified (lower, intermediate and upper units). They are interlayered and sometimes imbricated with siliciclastic to evaporitic levels which record syn-sedimentary tectonics. This sequence was deposited in a lagoonal-continental environment and is assigned to the Triassic magmatic rifting stage. The second episode, lacking lava flows (post magmatic rifting stage), consists of carbonate levels deposited in a lagoonal to marine environment during the Rhaetian-Hettangian. The volcanic units consist of several thin basaltic flows, each 0.5 to 1m thick, with a total thickness of 10–15m. The basalts are low-Ti continental tholeiites, displaying enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements [(La/Yb)n= 2.5-6] with a negative Nb anomaly. Upwards decrease of light-rare-earth-elements enrichment (e.g. La/Yb) is modelled through increasing melting rate of a spinel-bearing lherzolite source from the lower (6–10wt.%) to the upper (15–20wt.%) unit. The lava flows from the Saharan Atlas share the same geochemical characteristics and evolution as those from the Moroccan Atlas assigned to the Central Atlantic magmatic province. They represent the easternmost witness of this large igneous province so far known.

  6. The Triassic-Liassic volcanic sequence and rift evolution in the Saharan Atlas basins (Algeria). Eastward vanishing of the Central Atlantic magmatic province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meddah, A.; Bertrand, H.; Seddiki, A.; Tabeliouna, M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the Triassic-Liassic sequence in ten diapirs from the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Based on detailed mapping, two episodes are identified. The first one consists of a volcano-sedimentary sequence in which three volcanic units were identified (lower, intermediate and upper units). They are interlayered and sometimes imbricated with siliciclastic to evaporitic levels which record syn-sedimentary tectonics. This sequence was deposited in a lagoonal-continental environment and is assigned to the Triassic magmatic rifting stage. The second episode, lacking lava flows (post magmatic rifting stage), consists of carbonate levels deposited in a lagoonal to marine environment during the Rhaetian-Hettangian. The volcanic units consist of several thin basaltic flows, each 0.5 to 1m thick, with a total thickness of 10–15m. The basalts are low-Ti continental tholeiites, displaying enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements [(La/Yb)n= 2.5-6] with a negative Nb anomaly. Upwards decrease of light-rare-earth-elements enrichment (e.g. La/Yb) is modelled through increasing melting rate of a spinel-bearing lherzolite source from the lower (6–10wt.%) to the upper (15–20wt.%) unit. The lava flows from the Saharan Atlas share the same geochemical characteristics and evolution as those from the Moroccan Atlas assigned to the Central Atlantic magmatic province. They represent the easternmost witness of this large igneous province so far known.

  7. Stratigraphy of amethyst geode-bearing lavas and fault-block structures of the Entre Rios mining district, Paraná volcanic province, southern Brazil

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    LÉO A. HARTMANN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Entre Rios mining district produces a large volume of amethyst geodes in underground mines and is part of the world class deposits in the Paraná volcanic province of South America. Two producing basalt flows are numbered 4 and 5 in the lava stratigraphy. A total of seven basalt flows and one rhyodacite flow are present in the district. At the base of the stratigraphy, beginning at the Chapecó river bed, two basalt flows are Esmeralda, low-Ti type. The third flow in the sequence is a rhyodacite, Chapecó type, Guarapuava subtype. Above the rhyodacite flow, four basalt flows are Pitanga, high-Ti type including the two mineralized flows; only the topmost basalt in the stratigraphy is a Paranapanema, intermediate-Ti type. Each individual flow is uniquely identified from its geochemical and gamma-spectrometric properties. The study of several sections in the district allowed for the identification of a fault-block structure. Blocks are elongated NW and the block on the west side of the fault was downthrown. This important structural characterization of the mining district will have significant consequences in the search for new amethyst geode deposits and in the understanding of the evolution of the Paraná volcanic province.

  8. Petrology, geochemistry, and geochronology of Paleoproterozoic volcanic and granitic rocks (1.89-1.88 Ga) of the Pitinga Province, Amazonian Craton, Brazil

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    Ferron, J. Maximino T. M.; Bastos Neto, Artur C.; Lima, Evandro F.; Nardi, Lauro V. S.; Costi, Hilton T.; Pierosan, Ronaldo; Prado, Maurício

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents geochemical, petrographic, and geochronological data on the Uatumã magmatism in the Pitinga Province, where it is represented by volcanic rocks from the Iricoumé Group and granitic rocks from the Mapuera Suite. The Iricoumé Group (1.89-1.88 Ga) is constituted of the Divisor Formation (intermediate volcanic rocks), Ouro Preto Formation (acid effusive rocks), and Paraiso Formation (acid crystal-rich ignimbrites, surge deposits, and basic rocks). The volcanic sequence is intruded by granitoids from the Mapuera Suite (1.88 Ga), mainly represented by monzogranites and syenogranites. Structural and field relations suggest that caldera complex collapse controlled the emplacement of volcanics and granitoids of the Mapuera Suite. Subsequent structure reactivations allowed the younger Madeira Suite (1.82-1.81 Ga) to be emplaced in the central portion of the caldera complex. The felsic Iricoumé magmatism is mainly composed of rhyolites, trachydacites and latites, with SiO 2 contents between 64 wt% and 80 wt%. The plutonic rocks from the Mapuera Suite present SiO 2 between 65 wt% and 77 wt%. Volcanic and granitic rocks present identical geochemical characteristics and that is attributed to their co-magmatic character. The felsic volcanic rocks and granites are metaluminous to slightly peraluminous and show affinity with silica-saturated alkaline series or with A-type magmas. They have Na 2O + K 2O between 6.6% and 10.4%, FeO t/(FeO t + MgO) varying between 0.76 and 0.99, Ga/Al ratios between 1.5 and 4.9, like typical A-type rocks; and plot in the within-plate or post-collisional fields in the (Nb + Y) vs. Rb diagram. The Nb/Y ratios indicate that these rocks are comparable to A2-type granites. This magmatism can be related to the (i) potassic alkaline series, with low Sr content in the felsic rocks explained by plagioclase fractionation at low pressure and high temperature or, alternatively, (ii) a bimodal association where magma had high crustal

  9. The peculiar case of Marosticano xenoliths: a cratonic mantle fragment affected by carbonatite metasomatism in the Veneto Volcanic Province (Northern Italy)

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    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo; Florencia Fahnestock, M.; Bryce, Julia G.; Marzoli, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the Northern Italy, represents one of the most important volcanic provinces of the Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic districts: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, from nephelinites to tholeiites in composition. Commonly VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths. This study presents a petrological characterization of the new xenolith occurrence of Marosticano and comparison with previously studied VVP xenolith populations (i.e. from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas), which represent off-craton lithospheric mantle fragment affected by Na-alkaline silicate metasomatism (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001; Gasperini et al., 2006). Marosticano (MA) peridotites are anhydrous spinel-bearing lherzolites and harzburgites, which are geochemically well distinguishible from the other VVP mantle xenoliths. Primary minerals record the "most restitic" composition of the VVP sampled mantle, even calling the geochemical features of a sub-cratonic mantle. Olivines in both lherzolites and harzburgites show high Ni contents compared with the Fo values (Ni→ lherzolite: 2600-3620 ppm; harzburgite: 2600-3540 ppm; Fo → lh: 91-92; hz: 90-93) that follow the trend of olivine from a cratonic area (Kelemen, 1998). Orthopyroxenes have mg# values with 1:1 ratio with coexisting olivines and Al2O3 contents always 0.5 wt%) contents are also the chemical characteristics of the clinopyroxenes. On the whole both MA pyroxenes show major element contents that recall the characteristics of those from cratonic (sp-bearing) peridotites (e.g. from Greenland, South Africa and Tanzania; Downes et al., 2004). In addition, the relationship between the high Fo content of olivine and the high chromium contents (cr#=(Cr/(Cr+Al)X100); lh: 30-53; hz: 38-67) in coexisting spinel, out of

  10. Stable isotope and mineralogical investigation of the genesis of amethyst geodes in the Los Catalanes gemological district, Uruguay, southernmost Paraná volcanic province

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    Duarte, Lauren C.; Hartmann, Leo A.; Ronchi, Luiz H.; Berner, Zsolt; Theye, Thomas; Massonne, Hans J.

    2011-03-01

    Stable isotopes (C, O, S) and mineralogical studies of the world-class amethyst-geode deposits of the Los Catalanes gemological district, Uruguay, constrain processes operative during mineral deposition. The mineralized basaltic andesites from the Cretaceous Paraná volcanic province are intensely altered to zeolites (clinoptilolite) and clay minerals. Variations in the δ18O values of silica minerals in geodes (chalcedony, quartz, and amethyst) are much larger and the values generally somewhat lower (21.2-31.5‰) in the Uruguayan deposits than in the Ametista do Sul area of southern Brazil. The range of δ34S values (-15.0 to -0.3‰) of altered basaltic rocks requires (in addition to sulfur of magmatic origin) the involvement of 34S-depleted sedimentary sulfur from bacterial sulfate reduction. The results delimit the mineralizing processes to a post-eruption environment characterized by low temperature and strong interaction of the lava flows with meteoric water.

  11. Zircon ages delimit the provenance of a sand extrudite from the Botucatu Formation in the Paraná volcanic province, Iraí, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Viter M; Hartmann, Léo A; Santos, João O S; McNaughton, Neal J

    2015-09-01

    Ion microprobe age determinations of 102 detrital zircon crystals from a sand extrudite, Cretaceous Paraná volcanic province, set limits on the origin of the numerous sand layers present in this major flood basalt province. The zircon U-Pb ages reflect four main orogenic cycles: Mesoproterozoic (1155-962 Ma), latest Proterozoic-early Cambrian (808-500 Ma) and two Palaeozoic (Ordovician- 480 to 450 Ma, and Permian to Lower Triassic- 296 to 250 Ma). Two additional small concentrations are present in the Neoarchean (2.8 to 2.6 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.0 to 1.7 Ga). Zircon age peaks closely match the several pulses of igneous activity in the Precambrian Brazilian Shield and active orogeny in Argentina. A main delimitation of the origin of the sand is the absence of zircon ages from the underlying Cretaceous basalts, thus supporting an injectite origin of the sand as an extrudite that emanated from the paleoerg that constitutes the Botucatu Formation.

  12. Late Pleistocene to Holocene soil development and environments in the Long Gang Volcanic Field area, Jilin Province, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniela; Zhang, Xinrong; Knöbel, Jette; Maerker, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Late Pleistocene to Holocene shifts of climate and vegetation in the Long Gang Volcanic Field in NE China have been reconstructed, e. g. by Steblich et al. (2009), based on Maar lake sediment cores. In this study, we investigated soil development during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene and linked it to the climate and vegetation reported in the literature. Three pedons were described and analyzed on a crater wall surrounding a maar. The lower part of the slope is covered by basic pyroclastics that are obviously younger than the maar itself. Pedon 1 is located on the upper slope, where the younger pyroclastics are not present; thus it developed over the entire Holocene and part of the Late Pleistocene. Pedon 2 is on the toe slope and developed from the young basic pyroclastics. Vegetation remains, charred by fire that was caused by the volcanic ash fall, were found in the lowermost part of the pyroclastics layer, on top of a paleosol. Charcoal fragments were dated to 18950-18830 cal BP (using INTCAL 09). Thus, pedon 2 developed since around 18.9 ka BP, whereas the development of the paleosol that was buried under the pyroclastics (pedon 3), was stopped at this time. Pedons 1 and 2 are Vitric Andosols, developed mainly from basic pyroclastics, as evidenced by the composition of rock fragments in the soils, comprising 78 / 81 mass % lapilli and 22 / 19 mass % gneiss fragments, respectively. Pedon 3 is a Cutanic Luvisol (Chromic) that developed entirely from gneiss fragments produced by the maar explosion. Lab data suggest increasing intensity of pedogenesis in the direction: Pedon 3 (paleosol) Global and Planetary Change, 65, 56-70.

  13. Emplacement history and inflation evidence of a long basaltic lava flow located in Southern Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro I.; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Jalowitzki, Tiago L. R.; Orihashi, Yuji; Ponce, Alexis D.

    2015-02-01

    The El Corcovo lava flow, from the Huanul shield volcano in the southern Mendoza province (central-western Argentina) traveled a distance of 70 km and covered a minimum area of ~ 415 km2. The flow emplacement was controlled both by extrinsic (e.g., topography) and intrinsic (e.g., lava supply rate, lava physicochemical characteristics) factors. The distal portion of the lava flow reached the Colorado River Valley, in La Pampa Province, where it spread and then was confined by earlier river channels. Cross-sections through the flow surveyed at several localities show two vesicular layers surrounding a dense central section, where vesicles are absent or clustered in sheet-shaped and cylindrical-shaped structures. Lavas of the El Corcovo flow are alkaline basalts with low values of viscosity. The morphological and structural characteristics of the flow and the presence of landforms associated with lava accumulation are the evidence of inflation. This process involved the formation of a tabular sheet flow up to 4 m of thick with a large areal extent in the proximal sectors, while at terminal sectors frontal lobes reached inflation values up to 10 m. The numerous swelling structures present at these portions of the flow suggest the movement of lava in lava tubes. We propose that this aspect and the low viscosity of the lava allowed the flow travel to a great distance on a gentle slope relief.

  14. Structure Of Conduits Of The Acidic Volcanism And Related Deposits In The Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province, São Marcos Region, South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, L. F.; De Campos, C. P.; Lima, E. F. D.; Janasi, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Voluminous acidic volcanics from the Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province crop out in the southern part of Brazil. The conduits responsible for the feeding of this intermediate/acid volcanism are preserved and well exposed in the São Marcos region (Lima et al. 2012; Geologia USP 12:49-64). Conduits are aligned along a NW-SE trend and have thicknesses up to 1 km. These structures are often characterized by mixing between dacitic and rhyodacitic magmas, with intercalation between two major zones: 1) reddish or grayish vitrophiricdacite/rhyodacite, sub-divided in massive or vesiculated; 2) reddish or grayish vitrophiric fragmented dacite/rhyodacite composed of bubble-rich angular to rounded blocks. Such fragments commonly deform coeval to the flow. A third zone dominated by filaments depicts a chaotic stretching-and-folding process from the mixture of the acid magmas. We used classical field measurements of flow structures and recognized main flow directions in these feeder-dikes. They follow two preferential directions: NW, ranging from N272° to N 355°, and NE, varying from N20° to N85°. These directions are indicative of a transtensive fissural system, which seems to be related to conjugated fractures. Evidence of an important fragmentation process in the conduits point towards the presence of related products in this region, thus rheomorphic deposits such as those observed elsewhere (e.g. Uruguay and Namibia) are expected to occur. Possible vestiges of these deposits could be represented by restricted outcrops of lens-shaped and banded hipohyaline, occasionally bubble-rich, dacites. The presence of continuous pseudotachylitic levels, tightly folded bands with horizontal axial planes together with local deformed bubble-rich pumice-like lens could be indicative of remelting and rheomorphism of previous vulcanoclastic material. Coulees and compound (lobed) dacitic lava flows, reaching up to 5-8 meters length, occur as the uppermost deposits and correspond to the

  15. Investigating the Formation and Subsurface Structure of a Large Water-Filled Basaltic Maar Volcano Using Constrained Potential Field Modelling, Lake Purrumbete Maar, Newer Volcanics Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, J. C.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Purrumbete Maar of the Newer Volcanics Province, south-eastern Australia is one of the largest maar volcanoes in the world with a near circular crater up to 2800 m in diameter and hosting a 45 m deep crater lake. Surrounding tephra ring deposits are comprised of cross-bedded fine ash and lapilli-ash deposits typical of efficient subsurface phreatomagmatic eruptive activity. Erupted accessory lithics suggest subsurface phreatomagmatic activity occurred to a depth no greater than 250 m, whilst irregular clast shapes and peperitic textures observed in marl lithics suggest the host rock was poorly consolidated during eruptive activity. To further understand factors controlling Lake Purrumbete Maars immense size, high resolution lake and land-based gravity and magnetic data were collected for use in forward modelling of the subsurface architecture associated with the maar. Collection of gravity data presented a unique challenge due to the nature of measuring small changes in gravitational forces (structure, consistent with maars hosted within poorly consolidated sediments. 2.5-D forward models were used to produce a 3-D reference model for property and geometry inversions, to test and optimise the modelled features. Inversions suggest the major vents likely occur to a greater depth than 240 m as suggested in the initial reference model.

  16. Geology and metallogeny of the volcanic complex of Rio Blanco Ullum. Province of San Juan. Republica Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, N.; Weidmann, N.; Puigdomenech, H.; Weidmann, R.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary results of a research carried out at the Complejo Rio Blanco de Ullum, San Juan. Argentina are summarized in the present paper. These studies are focused on geological and metallogenic features o f this unit. The study area is located 20 km. WNW of San Juan city with geographic coordinates of 31grades 30' South latitude and 68 grades 52' West longitude. The older rocks aotcroping in the area correspond to limestones of Ordovician San Juan Formation, the chronologic succession continues with sales and siltstones of Silurian Tambolar Formation, pelites and subgraywackes of Devonian Punta Negra Formation and finally a 1500 m thick package of piroclastics and sediments of Albarracin Formation of Tertiary age. Albarracin Formation is composed pf a Basal Member (sandstones and stilstones), a Tuffaceous Member (tuffs, tuffites and oligomictic breccia s with conglomerate interbed dings in the upper part) and a Conglomeratic Member (polimictic para conglomerates). According to piroclastics facies, relationships and spreading area of piroclastics deposits a c olapsed dome and avalanche model is proposed to be the main process for the piroclastics package outcropping in the area.Sedimentary and piroclastics rocks are intruded by five sub volcanic units as noted by Leveratto (1968) which are composed by different lithologies such as: Altered Da cite - Rhyolite, Ullum Da cite, Cerro Blanco de Zonda Andesite, Ullum Andesite and Hybrid Andesite.Detailed work on alteration assemblages and metallogenic features in the southwestern sector of the Complejo resulted in the identification of three alteration zones with characteric features of potassic, argillic and propyllitic signature. (author)

  17. Source contamination and mantle heterogeneity in the genesis of Italian potassic and ultrapotassic volcanic rocks: Sr-Nb-Pb isotope data from Roman Province and Southern Tuscany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conticelli, S.; D'Antonio, M.; Pinarelli, L.; Civetta, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Tyrrhenian border of the Italian peninsula has been the site of intense magmatism from Pliocene to recent times. Although calc-alkaline, potassic and ultrapotassic volcanism overlaps in space and time, a decrease of alkaline character in time and space (southward) is observed. Alkaline ultrapotassic and potassic volcanic rocks are characterized by variable enrichment in K and incompatible elements, coupled with consistently high LILE/IFSE values, similar to those of calc-alkaline volcanic rocks from the nearby Aeolian arc. On the basis of mineralogy and major and trace element chemistry two different arrays can be recognized among primitive rocks; a silica saturated trend, which resulted in formation of leucite-free mafic rocks, and a silica under saturated trend, characterized by leucite-bearing rocks. Initial 87 Sr/ 87 Sr and 143 Nd/ 144 Nd values of Italian ultrapotassic and potassic mafic rocks range from 0.70506 to 0.71672 and from 0.51173 to 0.51273, respectively. 207 Pb/ 204 Pb values range between 18.50 and 19.15, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb values range between 15.63 and 15.70, and 208 Pb/ 204 Pb values range between 38.35 and 39.20. The general ε Sr vs. ε Nd array, along with crustal lead isotopic values, clearly indicates that a continental crustal component has played an important role in the genesis of those magmas. The main question is where this continental crustal component has been acquired by the magmas. Volcanological and petrologic data indicate continental crustal contamination to be a leading process along with fractional crystallization and magma mixing. Considering, however, only the samples thought to represent primary magmas, which have been in equilibrium with their mantle source, a clearer picture emerges. A large variation of ε Sr vs. ε Nd is still observed, with ε Sr from -2 to +180 and ε Nd from +2 to -12. A bifurcation of this array is observed in the samples that plot in the lower right quadrant, with mafic leucite-bearing Roman

  18. Exsolution lamellae in volcanic pyroxene; Single phenocryst thermometry for long-lived magmatic reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    I Made, R.; Herrin, J. S.; Tay, Y. Y.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the relevant timescales of thermal and chemical evolution of magma below the active volcanoes can help us to better anticipate volcanic eruptions and their likely precursor signals. In recent years, several lines of thermochronological inquiry have converged on a realization that, within many volcanic systems, magmas experience prolonged periods of relatively low-temperature storage prior to eruption during short duration transient events. This prolonged storage at low magmatic temperatures can result in series of solid state phase transformations within minerals, producing a petrologic record of their thermal history. In this example, we observed pigeonite exsolution lamellae in augite phenocrysts from the 2011 eruption of Cordon Caulle volcano, Chile. The small size of these features ( 70nm width and bear exsolution textures and apply this knowledge to understanding the thermal conditions of magma storage in long-lived volcanic reservoirs.

  19. Mapping the sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments in the western part of Narmada-Tapti region of Deccan Volcanic Province, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, A. S. N.; Sarkar, Dipankar; Sen, Mrinal K.; Sridher, V.; Prasad, A. S. S. S. R. S.

    2014-10-01

    Deccan Traps spread over large parts of south, west and central India, possibly hiding underneath sediments with hydrocarbon potential. Here, we present the results of seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiments along three profiles, and analyze them together the results from all other refraction profiles executed earlier in the western part of Narmada-Tapti region of the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP). We employ travel time modelling to derive the granitic basement configuration, including the overlying Trap and sub-trappean sediment thickness, if any. Travel time skips and amplitude decay in the first arrival refraction data are indicative of the presence of low velocity sediments (Mesozoic), which are the low velocity zones (LVZ) underneath the Traps. Reflection data from the top of LVZ and basement along with the basement refraction data have been used to derive the Mesozoic sediment thickness. In the middle and eastern parts of the study region between Narmada and Tapti, the Mesozoic sediment thickness varies between 0.5 and 2.0 km and reaches more than 2.5 km south of Sendhwa between Narmada and Tapti Rivers. Thick Mesozoic sediments in the eastern parts are also accompanied by thick Traps. The Mesozoic sediments along the present three profiles may not be much prospective in terms of its thickness, except inside the Cambay basin, where the subtrappean sediment thickness is about 1000-1500 m. In the eastern part of the study area, the deepest section (>4 km) has thick (∼2 km) Mesozoic sediments, but with almost equally thick Deccan Trap cover. Results of the present study provide important inputs for future planning for hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  20. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jesus; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Hermida, Nuria; Amblas, David; Arrese, Beatriz; Martín-Sosa, Pablo; Acosta, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP), an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA) to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25-30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (processes in the past and recent to subrecent oceanographic conditions and associated active processes determined the current physiography, morphology and sedimentary patterns of Concepcion Bank, including the development and decline of CWC mounds The setting of the seamount in the regional crustal structure is also discussed.

  1. Sedimentary Mercury Enrichments as a Marker for Submarine Large Igneous Province Volcanism? Evidence From the Mid-Cenomanian Event and Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (Late Cretaceous)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, J. D.; Ruhl, M.; Dickson, A. J.; Mather, T. A.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Percival, L. M. E.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Cartwright, J.; Eldrett, J. S.; Bergman, S. C.; Minisini, D.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2), during the Cenomanian-Turonian transition (˜94 Ma), was the largest perturbation of the global carbon cycle in the mid-Cretaceous and can be recognized by a positive carbon-isotope excursion in sedimentary strata. Although OAE 2 has been linked to large-scale volcanism, several large igneous provinces (LIPs) were active at this time (e.g., Caribbean, High Arctic, Madagascan, Ontong-Java) and little clear evidence links OAE 2 to a specific LIP. The Mid-Cenomanian Event (MCE, ˜96 Ma), identified by a small, 1‰ positive carbon-isotope excursion, is often referred to as a prelude to OAE 2. However, no underlying cause has yet been demonstrated and its relationship to OAE 2 is poorly constrained. Here we report sedimentary mercury (Hg) concentration data from four sites, three from the southern margin of the Western Interior Seaway and one from Demerara Rise, in the equatorial proto-North Atlantic Ocean. We find that, in both areas, increases in mercury concentrations and Hg/TOC ratios coincide with the MCE and the OAE 2. However, the increases found in these sites are of a lower magnitude than those found in records of many other Mesozoic events, possibly characteristic of a marine rather than atmospheric dispersal of mercury for both events. Combined, the new mercury data presented here are consistent with an initial magmatic pulse at the time of the MCE, with a second, greater pulse at the onset of OAE 2, possibly related to the emplacement of LIPs in the Pacific Ocean and/or the High Arctic.

  2. Magmatism and Eurekan deformation in the High Arctic Large Igneous Province: 40Ar–39Ar age of Kap Washington Group volcanics, North Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegner, Christian; Storey, Michael; Holm, Paul Martin

    2011-01-01

    of alkaline volcanics from Kap Kane, part of the Kap Washington Group volcanics at the northern tip of Greenland, provides an emplacement age of 71.2±0.5 Ma obtained from amphibole in lapilli tuffs, and a thermal resetting age of 49–47 Ma obtained in feldspar and whole-rocks from trachyte flows. Patch...

  3. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Rivera

    Full Text Available Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP, an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25-30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (<400 m, flatter (<0.5° eastern half. Subsidence associated to the crustal cooling that followed the emplacement phase further contributed the current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3° western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount's summit

  4. The relationship between carbonate facies, volcanic rocks and plant remains in a late Palaeozoic lacustrine system (San Ignacio Fm, Frontal Cordillera, San Juan province, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, P.; Méndez-Bedia, I.; Gallastegui, G.; Colombo, F.; Cardó, R.; Limarino, O.; Heredia, N.; Césari, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    The San Ignacio Fm, a late Palaeozoic foreland basin succession that crops out in the Frontal Cordillera (Argentinean Andes), contains lacustrine microbial carbonates and volcanic rocks. Modification by extensive pedogenic processes contributed to the massive aspect of the calcareous beds. Most of the volcanic deposits in the San Ignacio Fm consist of pyroclastic rocks and resedimented volcaniclastic deposits. Less frequent lava flows produced during effusive eruptions led to the generation of tabular layers of fine-grained, greenish or grey andesites, trachytes and dacites. Pyroclastic flow deposits correspond mainly to welded ignimbrites made up of former glassy pyroclasts devitrified to microcrystalline groundmass, scarce crystals of euhedral plagioclase, quartz and K-feldspar, opaque minerals, aggregates of fine-grained phyllosilicates and fiammes defining a bedding-parallel foliation generated by welding or diagenetic compaction. Widespread silicified and silica-permineralized plant remains and carbonate mud clasts are found, usually embedded within the ignimbrites. The carbonate sequences are underlain and overlain by volcanic rocks. The carbonate sequence bottoms are mostly gradational, while their tops are usually sharp. The lower part of the carbonate sequences is made up of mud which appear progressively, filling interstices in the top of the underlying volcanic rocks. They gradually become more abundant until they form the whole of the rock fabric. Carbonate on volcanic sandstones and pyroclastic deposits occur, with the nucleation of micritic carbonate and associated production of pyrite. Cyanobacteria, which formed the locus of mineral precipitation, were related with this nucleation. The growth of some of the algal mounds was halted by the progressive accumulation of volcanic ash particles, but in most cases the upper boundary is sharp and suddenly truncated by pyroclastic flows or volcanic avalanches. These pyroclastic flows partially destroyed the

  5. Osmium isotope variations accompanying the eruption of a single lava flow field in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Gannoun, A.; Barry, T. L.; Self, S.; Burton, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical interpretations of continental flood basalts usually assume that individual lava flows represent compositionally homogenous and rapidly erupted products of large well-mixed magma reservoirs. However, inflated pāhoehoe lavas may develop over considerable periods of time and preserve chemical variations that can be temporally linked through flow formation to eruption sequence thus providing an understanding of magma evolution over the timescale of a single eruption. This study presents comprehensive major, trace element and Re-Os isotope data for a single eruption that formed the 2660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field in the Columbia River Basalt Province, USA. Major and trace element variations accompanying flow emplacement (e.g. MgO 3.09-4.55 wt%, Ni 17.5-25.6 ppm) are consistent with fractional crystallisation, but other petrogenetic processes or variable sources cannot be distinguished. However, there is a systematic shift in the initial 187Os/188Os isotope composition of the magma (age corrected to 15.27 Ma), from 0.174 (lava core) to 1.444 (lava crust) within a single 35 m thick sheet lobe. Lava crust values are more radiogenic than any known mantle source, consistent with previous data indicating that neither an enriched reservoir nor the sub-continental lithospheric mantle are likely to have sourced these basalts. Rather, these data indicate that lavas emplaced during the earliest stages of eruption have higher degrees of crustal contamination. These results highlight the limitations of applying chemostratigraphic correlation across continental flood basalt provinces, the use of single data points to define melt sources and magmatic processes, and the dangers of using conventional isochron techniques in such basalt sequences for absolute chronology.

  6. Young volcanism in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil, shows no evidence for a trace of the Fernando de Noronha plume on the continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knesel, Kurt M.; Souza, Zorano S.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Cohen, Benjamin E.; Silveira, Francisco V.

    2011-02-01

    We present 40Ar/39Ar ages for four volcanic bodies from a group of volumetrically minor alkaline plugs, necks, and dikes in northeastern Brazil, previously ascribed to passage over the purported Fernando de Noronha plume. The rocks are relatively primitive (9.5-14.7 wt.% MgO), typically nepheline-normative basanites with ocean island basalt (OIB)-like trace-element compositions similar to alkalic basalts from the Fernando de Noronha archipelago. Highly fractionated REE coupled with relative depletions of K and Rb indicates that the silica undersaturated magmas were generated by small degrees of melting in the presence of residual garnet and a hydrous metasomatic phase. Three of the four units (Caracarazinho, Cabugizinho da Arara and Serra Preta de Bodó) were heretofore undated. The fourth body (Cabelo de Negro) was included to facilitate comparison with published K-Ar dates. 40Ar/39Ar age determinations by the laser incremental-heating method on duplicate grains of groundmass reveal the youngest continental volcanism in Brazil, with emplacement ages between 8.9 ± 0.5 and 7.1 ± 0.3 Ma. Our age for Cabelo de Negro (7.9 ± 0.3 Ma) is roughly 20 Ma younger than the published K-Ar date for this plug. The reproducibility of our duplicate analyses and the consistency of the plateau, ideogram and isochron ages for this sample attest to the reliability of the new 40Ar/39Ar results. Our geochronological results show that volcanic activity on the continent did not shut down prior to the onset of volcanism on the island of Fernando de Noronha. Both areas were active contemporaneously for at least 5 Ma. We argue that the extended duration, small volume and lack of a clear age progression suggest that this example of alkaline intraplate volcanism is more likely the surface manifestation of the upwelling flow seen in an edge-driven convection mode, rather than tracking passage over a deep-seated mantle plume. This hypothesis is supported by xenolith thermobarometery, heat

  7. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D.; Dade, B.; Jupp, T.

    2003-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  8. Age of origin of the polymetamorphosed Copperton Formation, Namaqua-Natal Province, determined by single grain zircon Pb-Pb dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.H.; Griffin, G.; Kroener, A.; Humphreys, H.

    1990-01-01

    The Copperton Formation of the Areachap Group in the Northern Cape Province is a strongly metamorphosed, predominantly metavolcanic unit which contains several massive sulphide deposits. Previous work on this unit has established a complex metamorphic history, the four main phases of which are fairly well dated by a combination of methods; however, the age of origin is still poorly constrained. Zircons extracted from the Smouspan Gneiss Member of the Copperton formation are euhedral and show a crystal habit which indicates an igneous and probably volcanic origin, with no discernable metamorphic component. Whole-grain thermal evaporation on four such zircon grains yielded a precise set of 207 Pb/ 206 Pb data which establishes a 1 285 ± 14 Ma age for the origin of the Smouspan Gneiss and Copperton Formation. Indications of a ∼1 600 Ma age from other parts of the Areachap Group should be treated with caution until more reliable data are obtained. 9 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs

  9. Assessment of the uranium potential of the Jurassic volcanism (Bahía Laura and El Quemado Complexes), Province of Santa Cruz, using ground-borne gamma-ray spectrometry and rock geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, L.E.; Maloberti, A.L.; Gayone, M.R.; Kaufmann, C.; Sruoga, P.

    2013-01-01

    Radiometric surveys are a rapid tool to measure uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K) concentrations in rocks and are very useful in the exploration for radioactive minerals. The distribution of uranium in Jurassic volcanic rocks of the province of Santa Cruz is evaluated in this work using ground gamma-ray spectrometry and rock geochemistry in order to assess its potential to form uranium deposits. Five areas were selected, which had some previous data of high radiometric values and detailed geological information. Measurements were carried out with a portable gamma-ray spectrometer (Exploranium-GR 320®) in andesites, ignimbrites, rhyolites, silicified areas, ash-fall tuffs and lacustrine sediments corresponding to the Bahía Laura and to El Quemado complexes. The results were similar in the five surveyed areas: radiometric concentrations show good positive correlations with chemical composition of the studied rocks for both K and Th, and a relatively poorer correlation for U. Different processes such as magmatic differentiation, vapor phase crystallization, hydrothermal alteration and supergene alteration are reflected in the distribution of these elements. U concentrations increase in the more glassy rocks, in areas with hydrothermal silicification, and in fracture zones, features that should be considered in future surveys. The calkalkaline composition and arc-signatures of the Jurassic magmatism are not the most favorable for uranium enrichment and for concentration of significant mineralizations. However, the extensional tectonic setting; the occurrence of calderas with facies slightly enriched in U and Th, in addition to hydrothermal activity are positive factors for U exploration. (authors) [es

  10. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    the lithosphere is thinnest and possibly in areas of elevated mantle temperatures. The pyroxenite melts formed at deeper levels react with the surrounding peridotite and thereby changes composition leading to eruption of melts which experienced variable degrees of melt-peridotite interaction. This can presumably...... explain the existence of two elementally distinct magma types with the exact same isotopic composition....

  11. Nested Architecture of Pyroclastic Bedforms Generated by a Single Flow Event: Outcrop Examples from the Izu Volcanic Islands, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2009-12-01

    We claim that compound bedforms, where small bedforms (e.g., dunes and antidunes) occur within and around the larger bedforms, are common in pyroclastic-flow deposits, using Quaternary-Holocene outcrop examples from the modern Izu volcanic island chain some 100-150 km SSW of Tokyo. The nested occurrence of bedforms have been well documented for siliciclastic deposits, as exemplified by compound dunes where small dunes (c. cm- dm thick) occur between the avalanche surfaces within larger dunes, indicating that these dunes of different sizes were produced simultaneously. However, compound dunes have rarely been reported from pyroclastic deposits. In contrast, we have discovered that compound dunes are common in pyroclastic flow deposits in the late Pleistocene & Holocene outcrops in Niijima and Oshima of the Izu volcanic island chain. Moreover, these outcrops contain abundant compound antidunes, which have been reported from neither siliciclastic or pyroclastic deposits. This is probably because flume studies, where most of published antidune studies are based, focus on small (c. cm-dm high) antidunes. In Niijima Island, we examined pyroclastic-flow deposits shed from Mt. Miyatsuka (14 ka) and Mt. Mukai (886 A.D.). Both groups of deposits contain abundant antidune stratifications, which commonly form nested structures in a two- or three-fold hierarchy, with subordinate crossbeddings originated from dune migrations. Each class of antidunes is characterized by multiple scour surfaces and vertical aggradations around mounds of lag deposits above erosion surfaces, and typically has both upstream and downstream accretion components with different proportions. The late Pleistocene pyroclastic outcrops of the nearby Oshima Island exhibit similar patterns. The geometry of the accretion surfaces vary significantly in the outcrops of both Niijima and Oshima. Whereas the antidunes dominated by upstream accretion are characterized by (1) gently inclined accretion surface and (2

  12. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity

  13. The age and provenance of metasedimentary rocks in the Quetico Subprovince, Ontario, from single zircon analyses: Implications for Archean sedimentation and tectonics in the Superior Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.W.; Pezzutto, F.; Ojakangas, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses been performed on single detrital zircon grains from greywacke samples collected along the northern boundary of the Quetico Subprovince in northwest Ontario. Secondary lead loss was virtually eliminated by choosing crack-free grains and removing the outer surface using air abrasion. Thus, the 207 Pb/ 206 Pb age can be considered a good approximation to the age crystallization of each grain. Zircons in the Quetico metasediments show a range of ages from 2698 ± 3 Ma to 3009 ± 4 Ma. Deposition and metamorphism of the metasediments is bracketed within a 10 ± 5 Ma time span between crystallization of the youngest detritial zircon grain and a late-tectonic intrusion, the Blalock pluton, which cuts the sediments and has a zircon age of 2688 ± 4 Ma. The most easterly metasediment sample contains zircons with ages which cluster around 3007 ± 6 Ma which is within error of the age of a batholith dated in the adjacent Marmion Lake area of the Wabigoon Subprovince. This, along with the fact that most detrital zircons were only slightly abraded by sedimentary transport, suggests that the source of many zircons may have been proximal from the north. There is also a significant cluster of young zircon ages in a the range 2709-2698 Ma. Surprisingly, only a few ages correspond to the time of most intense arc-type felsic volcanism (2745-2710 Ma) in the main greenstone belt of the western Wabigoon Subprovince. Sedimentary deposition occurred at a time of extensive deformation in the adjacent Wabigoon Subprovince. The pattern of detrital grain ages indicates that this involved uplift of a complex older sialic landmass. Petrographic evidence for the presence of substantial felsic volcanic detritus as well as the fact that many of the zircons only slightly pre-date deposition indicates that much of the sediment was probably derived from erosion of active volcanic centers. (orig./WL)

  14. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  15. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  16. Volcanic features of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Degassing-induced crystallization in silicate melt inclusion: evaluating the role of post-entrapment changes in melt inclusion from the SW volcanic flows of Deccan Large Igneous Province (Deccan LIP) lava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Choudhary, Babita

    2017-04-01

    Melt inclusions represent sampling of magma during their growth in magma chambers and during ascent to the surface. Several studies of melt inclusions in Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) in different parts of the world have been documented in the literature (Sobolev et al. 2011; Kamenetsky et al. 2012). Melt inclusions study from Deccan LIP can provide new insights into the physio-chemical conditions and evolution of this important LIP. The Deccan LIP was fissure eruption mainly emplaced over a very short duration at 66 Ma (Schoene et al. 2015). To better characterize and explain the diversity in geochemical composition, petrogenesis and volatile degassing, melt inclusions studies have been carried out in clinopyroxene and plagioclase feldspar from a suite of samples in the Western Ghats section. Samples were obtained from the upper three formations (the Wai subgroup). The inclusions are primary and range in shape and size varies from a few microns, up to 100 microns. The inclusions are crystalline, and contain daughter phases. Some are glassy, with or without a shrinkage bubble. The melt inclusions show substantial variations in major element composition. Inclusions are significantly enriched in TiO2 (3.68 to 0.08 wt%) and FeO (18.3 to 2.63 wt%). SiO2 ranges from 43.4-66.8 wt% and classification diagrams of total alkali (Na2O+K2O) Vs. silica melt inclusions show that most inclusions are of sub-alkaline to mildly alkaline composition. Al2O3 ranges from 9.7- 22.4wt % and MgO 18.3-1.6. EPMA measurements demonstrated the presence of daughter crystals, such as magnetite and titanomagnetite, and high FeO, TiO2 and CaO within melt inclusions among the silicate daughter crystal clusters. Volatiles are determined have wide range in composition in both plagioclase- and pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions by using FTIR technique, values up to 2wt% H2Ototal and 1808 ppm CO2. Moreover the variability in composition and volatiles the melt from the samples in a single flow suggests

  18. Young Rhyolitic and Alkaline Volcanism of the Ecuadorian Arc - A Result of the Carnegie Ridge Subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M. L.; Mothes, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The subduction of aseismic submarine ridges under continental arcs generally results in the cessation of volcanic activity (Wilson, 1989). The rapidly-subducting (6 cm/yr) Carnegie Ridge under Ecuador, however, is associated with increased and diverse volcanism. The Northern Volcanic Zone in Colombia is a single row of volcanoes, but in Ecuador it is characterized by a high density of Pleistocene and active centers distributed in four parallel bands perpendicular to the convergence axis. Here the NVZ is higher in elevation (3-6 km high) and wider (ca. 140 km) than elsewhere. Ecuador’s volcanic arc has its volcanic front in the western cordillera where it is characterized by on-going dacitic, Si-rich andesitic, and adakitic-like volcanism. Eastwards, in the InterAndean Depression the volcanoes are older and andesitic. In the adjacent eastern cordillera the active volcanoes are normal 2-pyroxene andesites. However, co-existing with this andesite chain is a province of young rhyolitic volcanism (Hall & Mothes, 2001) which ranges in age from 2.7 Ma to historic times. In addition, immediately east of the rhyolitic province in a back-arc setting occurs a small group of alkaline volcanoes with feldspathoid-bearing basanites and tephrites. The rhyolite province extends 130 km southwards from the 50 km-long Chacana caldera complex (800 km3 of flow deposits) to early Holocene pumice flows recently identified at Pisayambo. Between these extremes are found the 20 km-wide Chalupas caldera and associated Late Pleistocene silicic centers and domes. The discovery of young rhyolitic centers at the eastern foot of the Andes (Aliso) extends the province 40 km eastwards. A flare-up of rhyolitic activity began at 200 ka with the 100 km3 Chalupas pumice flow, the coeval rhyolite flows from Chacana caldera, and a 11 km3 andesitic lava flow from nearby Antisana volcano. At 170-180 ka the northern sector of Chacana witnessed rhyolitic lava flows and extensive pumice lapilli falls whose

  19. Ages of plains volcanism on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Ernst; Jagert, Felix; Broz, Petr

    2010-05-01

    Plain-style volcanism [1] is widespread in the Tharsis and Elysium volcanic provinces on Mars, [2,3]. Detailed images and topographic data reveal the morphology and topography of clusters of low shields and associated lava flows. The landforms of plains volcanism on Mars have all well-known terrestrial analogues in basaltic volcanic regions, such as Hawaii, Iceland, and in particular the Snake River Plains [4]. The very gentle flank slopes (J. (1981) Icarus, 45, 586-601. [3] Hodges C.A. and Moore H.J. (1994) Atlas of volcanic features on Mars: USGS Prof. Paper 1534, 194 p. [4] Hauber E. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 69-95. [5] Wilson L. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 28-46. [6] Vaucher, J. et al. (2009) Icarus 204, 418-442. [7] Baratoux D. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 47-68. [8] Bleacher J.E. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 96-102. [9] Ivanov B.A. (2001) Space Sci. Rev. 96, 87-104. [10] Hartmann W.H. and Neukum G. (2001) Space Sci. Rev. 96, 165-194 [11] Kneissl T. et al. (2010) LPS XVI, submitted. [12] Michael, G.G. and Neukum G. (2010) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., in press. . [13] Malin M.C. et al. (2007) JGR 112, E05S04, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002808.

  20. Volcanic stratigraphy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joan; Groppelli, Gianluca; Brum da Silveira, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Volcanic stratigraphy is a fundamental component of geological mapping in volcanic areas as it yields the basic criteria and essential data for identifying the spatial and temporal relationships between volcanic products and intra/inter-eruptive processes (earth-surface, tectonic and climatic), which in turn provides greater understanding of the geological evolution of a region. Establishing precise stratigraphic relationships in volcanic successions is not only essential for understanding the past behaviour of volcanoes and for predicting how they might behave in the future, but is also critical for establishing guidelines for exploring economic and energy resources associated with volcanic systems or for reconstructing the evolution of sedimentary basins in which volcanism has played a significant role. Like classical stratigraphy, volcanic stratigraphy should also be defined using a systematic methodology that can provide an organised and comprehensive description of the temporal and spatial evolution of volcanic terrain. This review explores different methods employed in studies of volcanic stratigraphy, examines four case studies that use differing stratigraphic approaches, and recommends methods for using systematic volcanic stratigraphy based on the application of the concepts of traditional stratigraphy but adapted to the needs of volcanological environment.

  1. The Volcanism Ontology (VO): a model of the volcanic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, J.; Babaie, H. A.

    2017-12-01

    We have modeled a part of the complex material and process entities and properties of the volcanic system in the Volcanism Ontology (VO) applying several top-level ontologies such as Basic Formal Ontology (BFO), SWEET, and Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB) within a single framework. The continuant concepts in BFO describe features with instances that persist as wholes through time and have qualities (attributes) that may change (e.g., state, composition, and location). In VO, the continuants include lava, volcanic rock, and volcano. The occurrent concepts in BFO include processes, their temporal boundaries, and the spatio-temporal regions within which they occur. In VO, these include eruption (process), the onset of pyroclastic flow (temporal boundary), and the space and time span of the crystallization of lava in a lava tube (spatio-temporal region). These processes can be of physical (e.g., debris flow, crystallization, injection), atmospheric (e.g., vapor emission, ash particles blocking solar radiation), hydrological (e.g., diffusion of water vapor, hot spring), thermal (e.g., cooling of lava) and other types. The properties (predicates) relate continuants to other continuants, occurrents to continuants, and occurrents to occurrents. The ontology also models other concepts such as laboratory and field procedures by volcanologists, sampling by sensors, and the type of instruments applied in monitoring volcanic activity. When deployed on the web, VO will be used to explicitly and formally annotate data and information collected by volcanologists based on domain knowledge. This will enable the integration of global volcanic data and improve the interoperability of software that deal with such data.

  2. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N 2 –CO 2 –H 2 O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO 2 outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H 2 can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N 2 –CO 2 –H 2 O–H 2 ) can be sustained as long as volcanic H 2 output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H 2 warming is reduced in dense H 2 O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H 2 atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  3. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa, E-mail: rmr277@cornell.edu [Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N{sub 2}–CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO{sub 2} outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H{sub 2} can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N{sub 2}–CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O–H{sub 2}) can be sustained as long as volcanic H{sub 2} output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H{sub 2} warming is reduced in dense H{sub 2}O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H{sub 2} atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  4. Structural mapping of Chikotra River basin in the Deccan Volcanic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ground magnetic data collected over Chikotra River in the peripheral region of Deccan Volcanic Province. (DVP) of Maharashtra located in Kolhapur district was analysed to throw light on the structural pat- tern and distribution of magnetic sources within the basin. In order to isolate the magnetic anomalies showing varying ...

  5. Silicate volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  6. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic, alkalic volcanic lineages at Mount Morning, West Antarctica and their entrained lithospheric mantle xenoliths: Lithospheric versus asthenospheric mantle sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam P.; Cooper, Alan F.; Price, Richard C.

    2013-12-01

    Two volcanic lineages are identified at Mount Morning, a Cenozoic to recent, eruptive centre in the Ross Sea, West Antarctica, which is part of the McMurdo Volcanic Group. Both the older (at least 18.7-11.4 Ma), mildly alkalic, nepheline- or quartz-normative Mason Spur Lineage, and the younger (at least 6-0.02 Ma), nepheline normative, strongly alkalic Riviera Ridge Lineage evolved by fractional crystallization from nominally anhydrous (Zealandia and eastern Australia share common chemical and isotopic source characteristics and they have been argued to collectively constitute a single diffuse alkaline magmatic province (DAMP). Source characteristic similarities suggest DAMP volcanic rocks inherit at least some of their trace element and isotopic characteristics from the lithospheric mantle. Super-chondritic Nb/Ta values measured in some SCLM xenoliths and volcanic rocks at Mount Morning, and in volcanic rocks across the DAMP, can be explained by addition of ⩽5 wt% carbonatite to the source. The DAMP SCLM is a significant Nb reservoir that offers an explanation for the Nb paradox.

  7. MEVTV Workshop on Early Tectonic and Volcanic Evolution of Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, H.

    1988-01-01

    Although not ignored, the problems of the early tectonic and volcanic evolution of Mars have generally received less attention than those later in the evolution of the planet. Specifically, much attention was devoted to the evolution of the Tharsis region of Mars and to the planet itself at the time following the establishment of this major tectonic and volcanic province. By contrast, little attention was directed at fundamental questions, such as the conditions that led to the development of Tharsis and the cause of the basic fundamental dichotomy of the Martian crust. It was to address these and related questions of the earliest evolution of Mars that a workshop was organized under the auspices of the Mars: Evolution of Volcanism, Tectonism, and Volatiles (MEVTV) Program. Four sessions were held: crustal dichotomy; crustal differentiation/volcanism; Tharsis, Elysium, and Valles Marineris; and ridges and fault tectonics

  8. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  9. Ice Nuclei Production in Volcanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper [Durant et al., 2008] includes a review of research on ice nucleation in explosive volcanic clouds in addition to reporting their own research on laboratory measurements focused on single-particle ice nucleation. Their research as well as the research they reviewed were concerned with the freezing of supercooled water drops (250 to 260 K) by volcanic ash particles acting as ice freezing nuclei. Among their conclusions are: Fine volcanic ash particles are very efficient ice freezing nuclei. Volcanic clouds likely contain fine ash concentrations 104 to 105 times greater than found in meteorological clouds. This overabundance of ice nuclei will produce a cloud with many small ice crystals that will not grow larger as they do in meteorological clouds because the cloud water content is widely distributed among the numerous small ice crystals. The small ice crystals have a small fall velocity, thus volcanic clouds are very stable. The small ice crystals are easily lofted into the stratosphere transporting water and adsorbed trace gasses. In this paper we examine the mechanism for the production of the small ice nuclei and develop a simple model for calculating the size of the ice nuclei based upon the distribution of magma around imbedded bubbles. We also have acquired a volcanic bomb that exhibits bubble remnants on its entire surface. The naturally occurring fragments from the volcanic bomb reveal a size distribution consistent with that predicted by the simple model. Durant, A. J., R. A. Shaw, W. I. Rose, Y. Mi, and G. G. J. Ernst (2008), Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D09206, doi:10.1029/2007JD009064.

  10. Timing and composition of continental volcanism at Harrat Hutaymah, western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert A.; Kent, Adam J R; Thornber, Carl; Schliedler, Tyler D; Al-Amri, Abdullah M

    2016-01-01

    Harrat Hutaymah is an alkali basalt volcanic field in north-central Saudi Arabia, at the eastern margin of a large Neogene continental, intraplate magmatic province. Lava flow, tephra and spatter cone compositions in the field include alkali olivine basalts and basanites. These compositions contrast with the predominantly tholeiitic, fissure-fed basalts found along the eastern margin of the Red Sea. The Hutaymah lava flows were erupted through Proterozoic arc-associated plutonic and meta-sedimentary rocks of the Arabian shield, and commonly contain a range of sub-continental lithospheric xenoliths, although the lavas themselves show little indication of crustal contamination. Previous radiometric dating of this volcanic field (a single published K–Ar age; 1.8 Ma) is suspiciously old given the field measurement of normal magnetic polarity only (i.e. Brunhes interval, ≤ 780 Ka). We report new age determinations on 14 lava flows by the 40Ar–39Ar laser step heating method, all younger than ~ 850 Ka, to better constrain the time frame of volcanism, and major, trace and rare earth element compositions to describe the chemical variation of volcanic activity at Harrat Hutaymah. Crystal fractionation was dominated by olivine ± clinopyroxene at a range of upper mantle and crustal pressures. Rapid ascent and eruption of magma is indicated by the array of lower crustal and lithospheric xenoliths observed in lava flows and tephra. Modeling suggests 1–7% melting of an enriched asthenospheric mantle source occurred beneath Harrat Hutaymah under a relatively thick lithospheric cap (60–80 km).

  11. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  12. Martian volcanism: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Martian volcanism is reviewed. It is emphasized that lava plains constitute the major type of effusive flow, and can be differentiated by morphologic characteristics. Shield volcanoes, domes, and patera constitute the major constructional landforms, and recent work has suggested that explosive activity and resulting pyroclastic deposits may have been involved with formation of some of the small shields. Analysis of morphology, presumed composition, and spectroscopic data all indicate that Martian volcanism was dominantly basaltic in composition

  13. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  14. Evidences for a volcanic province in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Sudhakar, M.

    in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). In addition to the rocks studied, the occurrence of many morpho-tectonic features such as seamounts, abyssal hills and major fracture zones at 73 degrees E, 75 degrees 45'E and 79 degrees E, have helped in correlating...

  15. Inca Volcanic Stone Provenance in the Cuzco Province, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick N. Hunt

    1990-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of andesite and basalt as architectual ashlars by Inca stonemasons has been widely discussed throughout the literature. Most of these archaeological or architectural studies are in agreement that that primary Inca quarrying centers in the Cuzco area are in the Rio Huatanay valley at Rumiqolqa and Huaccoto, both to the southeast of Cuzco.

  16. How `Monogenetic' is the Auckland Volcanic Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spargo, S. R.; Smith, I. E.; Wilson, C. J.

    2007-05-01

    The Auckland Field is the youngest basaltic intraplate volcanic field in New Zealand; it is located about 350-400 km behind the present day active convergent plate boundary. The field contains about 50 recognised late Pleistocene to Holocene eruptive centres generated by the rise and eruption of very small volume (mainly less than 0.35 km3) batches of magma. The field covers approximately 100 km2 of the Auckland urban area and has been termed monogenetic, implying that individual centres erupt single magma batches during brief eruptive periods. Detailed studies of individual centres reveal significant compositional diversity. The following trends are recognised: 1). Single trends from early evolved to later less evolved compositions representing deep near source fractionation of a single magma batch generated in the garnet peridotite stability field (e.g. Crater Hill about 29 ka, 0.1 km3), this is demonstrably monogenetic behaviour. 2). Multiple compositional trends in magmas from a single eruption event signifying the sequential rise and fractionation of magma batches generated from different sources (3-8 percent melt of a garnet peridotite source at depths of about 80-50 km and 5-12 percent melt of spinel peridotite at depths about 50- 22km), for example Pupuke (about 250 ka, 0.1 km3) this is polygenetic behaviour. 3). Multiple compositional trends in temporarily discrete eruption events from the same centre (Rangitoto, 8 to 700 a, 2.3 km3) this is also polygenetic behaviour. The chemical diversity observed within these three volcanic centres, representing the life span of the Auckland Volcanic Field, questions how well we actually understand this very common type of global volcanism. The range of compositions observed in individual centres of the Auckland Volcanic Field reflects the interplay of melting and fractionation processes at different depths in the mantle and calls into question the use of the term monogenetic to describe them.

  17. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  18. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B. G.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2004-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity during the last three hundred years reveals that volcanic eruptions exhibit seasonality to a statistically significant degree. This remarkable pattern is observed primarily along the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and locally at some individual volcanoes. Globally, seasonal fluctuations amount to 18% of the historical average monthly eruption rate. In some regions, seasonal fluctuations amount to as much as 50% of the average eruption rate. Seasonality principally reflects the temporal distribution of the smaller, dated eruptions (volcanic explosivity index of 0-2) that dominate the eruption catalog. We suggest that the pattern of seasonality correlates with the annual Earth surface deformation that accompanies the movement of surface water mass during the annual hydrological cycle and illustrate this with respect to global models of surface deformation and regional measurements of annual sea level change. For example, seasonal peaks in the eruption rate of volcanoes in Central America, the Alaskan Peninsula, and Kamchatka coincide with periods of falling regional sea level. In Melanesia, in contrast, peak numbers of volcanic eruptions occur during months of maximal regional sea level and falling regional atmospheric pressure. We suggest that the well-documented slow deformation of Earth's surface that accompanies the annual movements of water mass from oceans to continents acts to impose a fluctuating boundary condition on volcanoes, such that volcanic eruptions tend to be concentrated during periods of local or regional surface change rather than simply being distributed randomly throughout the year. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment and volcanoclimate feedback mechanisms.

  19. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption

  20. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen Region of California, southern Cascade Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Clynne, Michael A.; Smith, James G.; Muffler, L. J. P.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    1990-11-01

    Hundreds of short-lived, small- to moderate-volume, mostly mafic volcanoes occur throughout the Lassen region of NE California and surround five longer-lived, large-volume, intermediate to silicic volcanic centers younger than 3 Ma. Volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma are scarce in the Lassen region. We identify 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma, and we classify these into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO2 content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. By 2 Ma, the eastern limit of voicanism had contracted westward toward the late Quaternary arc. Late Quaternary volcanism is concentrated around and north of the silicic Lassen volcanic center. The belt of most recent volcanism (25-0 ka) has been active since at least 2 Ma. Most mafic volcanism is cakalkaline basalt and basaltic andésite. However, lesser volume of low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT), a geochemically distinctive basalt type found in the northern Basin and Range province, also has erupted throughout the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc since the Pliocene. Thus models of the mantle source and tectonic control of LKOT magmatism should be applicable both within and behind the subduction-related arc. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW alignments of these features indicate NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress (ENE extension), which is similar to the stress regime in the adjacent northwestern Basin and Range and northern Sierra Nevada provinces. The large, long-lived volcanic centers developed just west of a zone of closely spaced NNW trending normal faults. Within that zone of faulting, pervasive ENE extension has precluded growth of large, long-lived crustal magma systems. We interpret the western limit of the zone of NNW trending normal faults as the western boundary of the Basin and Range province where it overlaps

  1. Volcanic activity and climatic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, R A; Goodman, B M

    1980-03-07

    Radiocarbon dates of volcanic activity suggest variations that appear to be related to climatic changes. Historical eruption records also show variations on the scale of years to centuries. These records can be combined with simple climatic models to estimate the impact of various volcanic activity levels. From this analysis it appears that climatic prediction in the range of 2 years to many decades requires broad-scale volcanic activity prediction. Statistical analysis of the volcanic record suggests that some predictability is possible.

  2. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  3. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  4. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen region of California, Southern Cascade Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guffanti, M. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Clynne, M.A.; Smith, J.G.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Bullen, T.D. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The authors identify 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma, and they classify these into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO{sub 2} content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. Most mafic volcanism is calcalkaline basalt and basaltic andesite. However, lesser volume of low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT), a geochemically distinctive basalt type found in the northern Basin and Range province, also has erupted throughout the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc since the Pliocene. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW alignments of these features indicate NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress (ENE extension), which is similar to the stress regime in the adjacent northwestern Basin and Range and northern Sierra Nevada provinces. They interpret the western limit of the zone of NNW trending normal faults as the western boundary of the Basin and Range province where it overlaps the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc. The Lassen volcanic region occurs above the subducting Gorda North plate but also lies within a broad zone of distributed extension that occurs in the North American lithosphere east and southeast of the present Cascadia subduction zone. The scarcity of volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma suggests that a more compressive lithospheric stress regime prior to the late Miocene extensional episode may have suppressed volcanism, even though subduction probably was occurring beneath the Lassen region.

  5. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, A. J.; Shaw, R. A.; Rose, W. I.; Mi, Y.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2008-05-01

    Water is the dominant component of volcanic gas emissions, and water phase transformations, including the formation of ice, can be significant in the dynamics of volcanic clouds. The effectiveness of volcanic ash particles as ice-forming nuclei (IN) is poorly understood and the sparse data that exist for volcanic ash IN have been interpreted in the context of meteorological, rather than volcanic clouds. In this study, single-particle freezing experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of ash particle composition and surface area on water drop freezing temperature. Measured freezing temperatures show only weak correlations with ash IN composition and surface area. Our measurements, together with a review of previous volcanic ash IN measurements, suggest that fine-ash particles (equivalent diameters between approximately 1 and 1000 μm) from the majority of volcanoes will exhibit an onset of freezing between ˜250-260 K. In the context of explosive eruptions where super-micron particles are plentiful, this result implies that volcanic clouds are IN-rich relative to meteorological clouds, which typically are IN-limited, and therefore should exhibit distinct microphysics. We can expect that such "overseeded" volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal size, relative to dynamically similar meteorological clouds, and that glaciation will tend to occur over a relatively narrow altitude range.

  6. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  7. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A.; Wells, S.; Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K.; Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report

  8. Serial K-Ar dating of volcanic section in Shanxi Zuoyun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Daming; Li Qi

    2003-01-01

    The area of Zuoyun volcanic rocks located on the boundary between Inner Mongolia and Shanxi provinces is over 1500 km 2 , but had no any isotopic age up to now. A serial volcanic rock section in this area had been dated by K-Ar method in this paper. The age of the section top is 15.13 ± 0.08 Ma, and the age of the section base is 23.90 ± 0.33 Ma. According to the results of K-Ar dating and petrography research published the volcanic rocks in Zouyun area are belong to the Miocene 'General Hannuoba basalt'. (authors)

  9. Volcanic Successions of the Jebal Remah Volcano, Northeast Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD AL-MALABEH

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jebal Remah volcano is one of huge but very poorly known tephra cones exposed on the basalt province of Harra El-Jabban. Detailed investigations indicate that this volcano is topographically distinct and structurally well-developed. It consists of voluminous air-fall scoria, arranged in three distinct horizons; namely lower black lapilli horizon, middle banded yellow horizon and upper brown blocky horizon. Each horizon consists of friable, loose and well bedded ejecta. Agglutination and lithification are limited to the upper horizon. A comparison among the volcanic successions of three horizons show different volcanic features that nevertheless retain a comparable overall character from one horizon to another. In spite of some similarity in the type of ejecta, actually these differ in total thickness, number of beds and internal stratification. This dissimilarity within volcanic successions of the volcano support the overall increase in fluidity, temperature and decrease in volatile content of the magma with the time. Thus, volcano shows a complete range of thermal facies. The studied volcano appears to have resulted from one prolonged eruptive phase. Its volcanic activity consisted of a series of discrete explosion intervals, separated by quiet periods. Field criteria indicate that the volcano is of strombolian type of volcanicity and resulted in a magmatic fragmentation mode.

  10. Volcanic eruptions on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, R. G.; Schneider, N. M.; Terrile, R. J.; Cook, A. F.; Hansen, C.

    1981-09-01

    Nine eruption plumes which were observed during the Voyager 1 encounter with Io are discussed. During the Voyager 2 encounter, four months later, eight of the eruptions were still active although the largest became inactive sometime between the two encounters. Plumes range in height from 60 to over 300 km with corresponding ejection velocities of 0.5 to 1.0 km/s and plume sources are located on several plains and consist of fissures or calderas. The shape and brightness distribution together with the pattern of the surface deposition on a plume 3 is simulated by a ballistic model with a constant ejection velocity of 0.5 km/s and ejection angles which vary from 0-55 deg. The distribution of active and recent eruptions is concentrated in the equatorial regions and indicates that volcanic activity is more frequent and intense in the equatorial regions than in the polar regions. Due to the geologic setting of certain plume sources and large reservoirs of volatiles required for the active eruptions, it is concluded that sulfur volcanism rather than silicate volcanism is the most likely driving mechanism for the eruption plumes.

  11. The Auckland Volcanic Field - a basaltic field showing random behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corvec, N.; Rowland, J. V.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Basaltic monogenetic volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon typically producing fields of volcanic centers that increase in number with time. The process of field growth is not constant but punctuated by single eruptions, flare-ups and hiatuses. The development of a volcanic field involves physical processes that occur in the mantle, where batches of basaltic magma originate, and within the intervening lithosphere through which magma is transferred to the surface. The spatial and temporal distribution of volcanic centers within such volcanic fields results from, and thus may provide insights to, these physical processes (e.g., magma production, tectonic controls), thereby aiding in our understanding of a volcanic field's future development. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), which lies in the most populated area of New Zealand, comprises 50 volcanic centers and produced its last eruption ~600 years ago. A recent study has provided a relative chronology of the entire sequence of eruptions, which is here used together with the spatial distribution of volcanic centers to investigate the evolution of the field in time and space. Two methods were used: 1) the Poisson Nearest Neighbor (PNN) analysis which evaluates the spatial distribution of a natural population over the spatial distribution of a statistical random model, the Poisson model; and 2) the Voronoi analysis which evaluates the spatial characteristics of each volcanic center by dividing a region (i.e., the volcanic field) into a set of polygons. The results of the PNN analysis show that the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers within the AVF follows the Poisson model, therefore they cannot be used to extrapolate the future evolution of the volcanic field. The preliminary results of the Voronoi analysis show in combination with the geochemical signatures from some volcanic centers a possible zonation within the source region, and/or the magmas may be variably affected on their way

  12. Investigation of the Effects of rs137852599 Single-nucleotide Polymorphism Existence in Drug Resistance against Treatment with Enzalutamide in Individuals Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer in Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Kaviani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of rs137852599 single-nucleotide polymorphism in the androgen receptor coding gene on drug resistance against treatment with Enzalutamide in individuals diagnosed with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the ARMS-PCR analysis was conducted on androgen receptor coding gene in 50 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer with drug resistance and on 50 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer without drug resistance. The statistical analyses were performed using the GeNePop server and then the results were investigated by the SISA server. Results: The allele frequencies of A and C alleles in rs137852599 were 0.78 and 0.22 for drug resistant and 0.94 and 0.06 for non-drug resistance groups. The results indicated that there is a meaningful relationship between drug resistance and rs137852599 single-nucleotide polymorphism (p = 0.020. Conclusion: The existence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms may result in drug resistance in individuals diagnosed with prostate cancer. Therefore, investigation of the existence of such polymorphisms can be effective in prescription of suitable drugs for these patients.

  13. Paleocene and Early Eocene volcanic ash layers in the Schlieren Flysch, Switzerland: U-Pb dating and Hf-isotopes of zircons, pumice geochemistry and origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Simone; Winkler, Wilfried; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Ulmer, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Thin mm to cm thick bentonite layers of Paleocene to Early Eocene age in the Tonsteinschichten of the Schlieren Flysch represent volcanic ash layers. Heavy mineral analysis of the layers indicates basic to acidic volcanic sources. U/Pb dating of single zircon crystals of a Paleocene layer (WW1948) by LA-ICP-MS points to an eruption at 59.87 ± 0.41 Ma, whereas ID-TIMS shows an eruption age of 60.96 ± 0.07 Ma. Taking into account the external precision of LA-ICP-MS analyses of 1-2% both ages are overlapping and indicate an apparent minimal durations of zircon crystallization of 350 ka. Hf-isotope analysis of the same zircon crystals reveals the hybrid character of the source magma. The geochemical composition of the pumice grains of all bentonite layers is strongly affected by alteration. Nevertheless, the original character of the volcanic source can be evaluated. The Paleocene ashes (Lower Tonsteinschichten, LT) show a more fractionated multi-element pattern than the ashes of Early Eocene (Upper Tonsteinschichten, UT). The LT ash series are of rhyodacite to dacite character whereas the UT ashes fall in the field of alkali basalts. Both ash series seem to originate from a within-plate volcanic setting according to their trace element concentrations. Geochemical and temporary counterparts can be found in ash layers from Anthering (Austria) and the Danish Basin. As proposed for those ashes, volcanism connected to the opening of the North Atlantic might be the source as well for the ashes in the Schlieren Flysch. By comparison of the composition of rocks from the British Paleogene Igneous Province BPIP and the Schlieren Flysch ashes many correlations can be drawn which supports the suggestion of a North Atlantic origin of the Alpine ashes.

  14. Field-trip guides to selected volcanoes and volcanic landscapes of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-06-23

    The North American Cordillera is home to a greater diversity of volcanic provinces than any comparably sized region in the world. The interplay between changing plate-margin interactions, tectonic complexity, intra-crustal magma differentiation, and mantle melting have resulted in a wealth of volcanic landscapes.  Field trips in this guide book collection (published as USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2017–5022) visit many of these landscapes, including (1) active subduction-related arc volcanoes in the Cascade Range; (2) flood basalts of the Columbia Plateau; (3) bimodal volcanism of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone volcanic system; (4) some of the world’s largest known ignimbrites from southern Utah, central Colorado, and northern Nevada; (5) extension-related volcanism in the Rio Grande Rift and Basin and Range Province; and (6) the eastern Sierra Nevada featuring Long Valley Caldera and the iconic Bishop Tuff.  Some of the field trips focus on volcanic eruptive and emplacement processes, calling attention to the fact that the western United States provides opportunities to examine a wide range of volcanological phenomena at many scales.The 2017 Scientific Assembly of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) in Portland, Oregon, was the impetus to update field guides for many of the volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, as well as publish new guides for numerous volcanic provinces and features of the North American Cordillera. This collection of guidebooks summarizes decades of advances in understanding of magmatic and tectonic processes of volcanic western North America. These field guides are intended for future generations of scientists and the general public as introductions to these fascinating areas; the hope is that the general public will be enticed toward further exploration and that scientists will pursue further field-based research.

  15. Mantle updrafts and mechanisms of oceanic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.; Natland, James H.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an isolated planet is characterized by narrow downwellings and broad updrafts-consequences of Archimedes' principle, the cooling required by the second law of thermodynamics, and the effect of compression on material properties. A mature cooling planet with a conductive low-viscosity core develops a thick insulating surface boundary layer with a thermal maximum, a subadiabatic interior, and a cooling highly conductive but thin boundary layer above the core. Parts of the surface layer sink into the interior, displacing older, colder material, which is entrained by spreading ridges. Magma characteristics of intraplate volcanoes are derived from within the upper boundary layer. Upper mantle features revealed by seismic tomography and that are apparently related to surface volcanoes are intrinsically broad and are not due to unresolved narrow jets. Their morphology, aspect ratio, inferred ascent rate, and temperature show that they are passively responding to downward fluxes, as appropriate for a cooling planet that is losing more heat through its surface than is being provided from its core or from radioactive heating. Response to doward flux is the inverse of the heat-pipe/mantle-plume mode of planetary cooling. Shear-driven melt extraction from the surface boundary layer explains volcanic provinces such as Yellowstone, Hawaii, and Samoa. Passive upwellings from deeper in the upper mantle feed ridges and near-ridge hotspots, and others interact with the sheared and metasomatized surface layer. Normal plate tectonic processes are responsible both for plate boundary and intraplate swells and volcanism.

  16. Mantle updrafts and mechanisms of oceanic volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L; Natland, James H

    2014-10-14

    Convection in an isolated planet is characterized by narrow downwellings and broad updrafts--consequences of Archimedes' principle, the cooling required by the second law of thermodynamics, and the effect of compression on material properties. A mature cooling planet with a conductive low-viscosity core develops a thick insulating surface boundary layer with a thermal maximum, a subadiabatic interior, and a cooling highly conductive but thin boundary layer above the core. Parts of the surface layer sink into the interior, displacing older, colder material, which is entrained by spreading ridges. Magma characteristics of intraplate volcanoes are derived from within the upper boundary layer. Upper mantle features revealed by seismic tomography and that are apparently related to surface volcanoes are intrinsically broad and are not due to unresolved narrow jets. Their morphology, aspect ratio, inferred ascent rate, and temperature show that they are passively responding to downward fluxes, as appropriate for a cooling planet that is losing more heat through its surface than is being provided from its core or from radioactive heating. Response to doward flux is the inverse of the heat-pipe/mantle-plume mode of planetary cooling. Shear-driven melt extraction from the surface boundary layer explains volcanic provinces such as Yellowstone, Hawaii, and Samoa. Passive upwellings from deeper in the upper mantle feed ridges and near-ridge hotspots, and others interact with the sheared and metasomatized surface layer. Normal plate tectonic processes are responsible both for plate boundary and intraplate swells and volcanism.

  17. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.77-94Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and

  18. Io - Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of a volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io (dark fountain-like feature near the limb) was taken March 4, 1979, about 12 hours before Voyager 1's closest approach to Jupiter. This and the accompanying photo present the evidence for the first active volcanic eruption ever observed on another body in the solar system. This photo taken from a distance of 310,000 miles (499,000 kilometers), shows a plume-like structure rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface, a cloud of material being produced by an active eruption. At least four eruptions have been identified on Voyager 1 pictures and many more may yet be discovered on closer analysis. On a nearly airless body like Io, particulate material thrown out of a volcano follows a ballistic trajectory, accounting for the dome-like shape of the top of the cloud, formed as particles reach the top of their flight path and begin to fall back. Spherical expansion of outflowing gas forms an even larger cloud surrounding the dust. Several regions have been identified by the infrared instrument on Voyager 1 as being several hundred degrees Fahrenheit warmer than surrounding terrain, and correlated with the eruptions. The fact that several eruptions appear to be going on simultaneously makes Io the most active surface in the solar system and suggests to scientists that Io is undergoing continuous volcanism, revising downward the age of Io's surface once again. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  19. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and vicinity encompasses 1,905 km2 at the south end of the Cascade Range in Shasta, Lassen, Tehama, and Plumas Counties, northeastern California (fig. 1, sheet 3). The park includes 430 km2 of scenic volcanic features, glacially sculpted terrain, and the most spectacular array of thermal features in the Cascade Range. Interest in preserving the scenic wonders of the Lassen area as a national park arose in the early 1900s to protect it from commercial development and led to the establishment in 1907 of two small national monuments centered on Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone. The eruptions of Lassen Peak in 1914-15 were the first in the Cascade Range since widespread settling of the West in the late 1800s. Through the printed media, the eruptions aroused considerable public interest and inspired renewed efforts, which had languished since 1907, to establish a national park. In 1916, Lassen Volcanic National Park was established by combining the areas of the previously established national monuments and adjacent lands. The southernmost Cascade Range is bounded on the west by the Sacramento Valley and the Klamath Mountains, on the south by the Sierra Nevada, and on the east by the Basin and Range geologic provinces. Most of the map area is underlain by middle to late Pleistocene volcanic rocks; Holocene, early Pleistocene, and late Pliocene volcanic rocks (Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks are inferred to underlie the volcanic deposits (Jachens and Saltus, 1983), but the nearest exposures of pre-Tertiary rocks are 15 km to the south, 9 km to the southwest, and 12 km to the west. Diller (1895) recognized the young volcanic geology and produced the first geologic map of the Lassen area. The map (sheet 1) builds on and extends geologic mapping by Williams (1932), Macdonald (1963, 1964, 1965), and Wilson (1961). The Lassen Peak area mapped by Christiansen and others (2002) and published in greater detail (1:24,000) was

  20. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  1. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  2. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  3. Use of Single- versus Multiple-Fraction Palliative Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases: Population-Based Analysis of 16,898 Courses in a Canadian Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Robert A.; Tiwana, Manpreet S.; Barnes, Mark; Kiraly, Andrew; Beecham, Kwamena; Miller, Stacy; Hoegler, David; Olivotto, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is abundant evidence that a single fraction (SF) of palliative radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases is equivalent to more protracted and costly multiple fraction courses. Despite this, there is low utilization of SFRT internationally. We sought to determine the utilization of SFRT in a population-based, publicly funded health care system. Methods and Materials: All consecutive patients with bone metastases treated with RT during 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia (BC) were identified. Associations between utilization of SFRT and patient and provider characteristics were investigated. Results: A total of 16,898 courses of RT were delivered to 8601 patients. SFRT was prescribed 49% of the time. There were positive relationships among SFRT utilization and primary tumor group (P<.001; most commonly in prostate cancer), worse prognosis (P<.001), increasing physician experience (P<.001), site of metastases (P<.001; least for spine metastases), and area of training (P<.001; most commonly for oncologists trained in the United Kingdom). There was wide variation in the prescription of SFRT across 5 regional cancer centers, ranging from 25.5% to 73.4%, which persisted after controlling for other, potentially confounding factors (P<.001). Conclusions: The large variability in SFRT utilization across BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) cancer centers suggests there is a strong cultural effect, where physicians' use of SFRT is influenced by their colleagues' practice. SFRT use in BC was similar to that in other Canadian and western European reports but strikingly higher than in the United States. Further work is needed to standardize SFRT prescribing practices internationally for this common indication for RT, with the potential for huge health system cost savings and substantial improvements in patients' quality of life

  4. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  5. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  6. Natural radioactivity in volcanic ash from Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, E.B.; De Vera, C.M.; Garcia, T.Y.; Dela Cruz, F.M.; Esguerra, L.V.; Castaneda, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Last June 15, 1991, a major pyroclastic eruption occurred from Mt. Pinatubo volcano located in Zambales, Central Luzon. The radiological impact of this eruption was assessed based on the concentrations of the principal naturally occurring radionuclides observed in volcanic ash. The volcanic ash samples were collected from locations which are within 50-km radius of Mt. Pinatubo at various times after the eruption. The mean activity concentrations in Bq/kg wet weight of the natural radionuclides in volcanic ash were as follows: 12.6 for 238 U, 14.0 for 232 Th and 330 for 40 K. These values are significantly higher than the mean activity concentrations of these radionuclides observed in topsoil in the same provinces before the eruption. This suggests that with the deposition of large quantities of volcanic ash and lahar in Central Luzon and concomitant topographic changes, the distribution and quantities of radionuclides which gave rise to terrestrial radiation may have also changed. Outdoor radon concentrations measured three days and later after the eruption were within normal background values. (auth.). 4 refs.; 5 tabs.; 1 fig

  7. Flexurally-resisted uplift of the Tharsis Province, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.; Sleep, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    The tectonic style of Mars is dominated by vertical motion, perhaps more than any of the terrestrial planets. The imprint of this tectonic activity has left a surface widely faulted even though younger volcanism has masked the expression of tectonism in many places. Geological activity associated with the Tharsis and, to a lesser extent, Elysium provinces is responsible for a significant portion of this faulting, while the origins of the remaining features are enigmatic in many cases. The origin and evolution of the Tharsis and Elysium provinces, in terms of their great elevation, volcanic activity, and tectonic style, has sparked intense debate over the last fifteen years. Central to these discussions are the relative roles of structural uplift and volcanic construction in the creation of immense topographic relief. For example, it is argued that the presence of very old and cratered terrain high on the Tharsis rise, in the vicinity of Claritas Fossae, points to structural uplift of an ancient crust. Others have pointed out, however, that there is no reason that this terrain could not be of volcanic origin and thus part of the constructional mechanism

  8. Ciclos tectónicos, volcánicos y sedimentarios del Cenozoico del sur de Mendoza-Argentina (35°-37°S y 69°30'W Cenozoic tectonic, volcanic and sedimentary cycles in southern Mendoza Province, Argentina (35°-37°S y 69°30'W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Combina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la estratigrafía sedimentaria y volcánica asociada a los procesos de deformación de las unidades con edades del Cretácico Tardío al Plioceno Tardío aflorantes en el sur de Mendoza, Argentina, entre los ríos Atuel y Barrancas en el ámbito de la Cordillera Principal. Se proponen tres ciclos tectovolcano-sedimentarios, limitados por discordancias regionales generadas por la acción de las Fases Incaica, Quechua, Pehuenche y Diaguita. El primer ciclo comprende las unidades volcánicas y sedimentarias del Cretácico Superior hasta el Oligoceno Superior (Formaciones Roca y Pircala-Coihueco y el Ciclo Eruptivo Molle. El segundo abarca desde el Oligoceno Tardío al Mioceno Tardío (Formación Agua de la Piedra y las Andesitas Huincán. Por último, el tercer ciclo comprende desde el Mioceno Tardío al Plioceno (Formaciones Butaló, Pincheiras, Loma Fiera, Río Diamante y las Andesitas La Brea.This article describes the volcanic and sedimentary stratigraphy and their associated proces-ses with the Andean deformation during the Late Cretaceous to Late Pliocene. The studied área is located between the Atuel and Barrancas rivers and the Main Cordillera, in southern Mendoza, Argentina. Three tectovolcano-sedimentary cycles limited by regional discordances (Inca, Quechua, Pehuenche and Diaguita are proposed. The first comprises Upper Oligocene to Upper Miocene volcanic and sedimentary units (Roca and Pircala-Coihueco formations and the Volcanic Cycle Molle. The second extends from the Late Oligocene to Late Miocene (Agua de la Piedra Formation and the Huincán Andesites volcanic cycle. Finally, the third cycle ranges from the Late Miocene to Pliocene (Butaló, Pincheiras, Loma Fiera and Rio Diamante formations and La Brea Andesites.

  9. Closer look at lunar volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.; Taylor, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Although the American Apollo and Soviet Luna missions concentrated on mare basalt samples, major questions remain about lunar volcanism. Lunar field work will be indispensable for resolving the scientific questions about ages, compositions, and eruption processes of lunar volcanism. From a utilitarian standpoint, a better knowledge of lunar volcanism will also yield profitable returns in lunar base construction (e.g., exploitation of rille or lava-tube structures) and in access to materials such as volatile elements, pure glass, or ilmenite for lunar industry

  10. Correlations between silicic volcanic rocks of the St Mary's Islands (southwestern India) and eastern Madagascar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melluso, Leone; Sheth, Hetu C.; Mahoney, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The St Mary's, Islands (southwestern India) expose silicic volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks (rhyolites and granophyric dacites) emplaced contemporaneously with the Cretaceous igneous province of Madagascar, roughly 88-90 Ma ago. I he St Mary's Islands rocks have phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopy......The St Mary's, Islands (southwestern India) expose silicic volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks (rhyolites and granophyric dacites) emplaced contemporaneously with the Cretaceous igneous province of Madagascar, roughly 88-90 Ma ago. I he St Mary's Islands rocks have phenocrysts of plagioclase...... and isotopic Compositions very close to those of rhyolites exposed between Vatomandry Ilaka and Mananjary in eastern Madagascar, and are distinctly different from rhyolites front other sectors of the Madagascan province. We therefore postulate that the St Mary's and the Vatomandry-Ilaka Mananjary silicic rock...... outcrops were adjacent before the Late Cretaceous rifting that split Madagascar from India, If so, they provide a valuable tool to check and aid traditional Cretaceous India Madagascar reconstructions based on palaeomagnetism, matching Precambrian geological features, and geometric fitting of continental...

  11. A Mesoproterozoic continental flood rhyolite province, the Gawler Ranges, Australia: the end member example of the Large Igneous Province clan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Pankhurst

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhyolite and dacite lavas of the Mesoproterozoic upper Gawler Range Volcanics (GRV (>30 000 km3 preserved, South Australia, represent the remnants of one of the most voluminous felsic magmatic events preserved on Earth. Geophysical interpretation suggests eruption from a central cluster of feeder vents which supplied large-scale lobate flows >100 km in length. Pigeonite inversion thermometers indicate eruption temperatures of 950–1100 °C. The lavas are A-type in composition (e.g. high Ga/Al ratios and characterised by elevated primary halogen concentrations (~1600 ppm fluorine, ~400 ppm chlorine. These depolymerised the magma such that temperature-composition-volatile non-Arrhenian melt viscosity modelling suggests they had viscosities of <3.5 log η (Pa s. These physicochemical properties have led to the emplacement of a Large Rhyolite Province, which has affinities in emplacement style to Large Basaltic Provinces. The low viscosity of these felsic magmas has produced a unique igneous system on a scale which is either not present or poorly preserved elsewhere on the planet. The Gawler Range Volcanic Province represents the erupted portion of the felsic end member of the family of voluminous, rapidly emplaced terrestrial magmatic provinces.

  12. Volcanology: Volcanic bipolar disorder explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Eruptions come in a range of magnitudes. Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments show that rare, giant super-eruptions and smaller, more frequent events reflect a transition in the essential driving forces for volcanism.

  13. Monogenetic volcanic hazards and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Connor, L. J.; Richardson, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many of the Earth's major cities are build on the products of monogenetic volcanic eruptions and within geologically active basaltic volcanic fields. These cities include Mexico City (Mexico), Auckland (New Zealand), Melbourne (Australia), and Portland (USA) to name a few. Volcanic hazards in these areas are complex, and involve the potential formation of new volcanic vents and associated hazards, such as lava flows, tephra fallout, and ballistic hazards. Hazard assessment is complicated by the low recurrence rate of volcanism in most volcanic fields. We have developed a two-stage process for probabilistic modeling monogenetic volcanic hazards. The first step is an estimation of the possible locations of future eruptive vents based on kernel density estimation and recurrence rate of volcanism using Monte Carlo simulation and accounting for uncertainties in age determinations. The second step is convolution of this spatial density / recurrence rate model with hazard codes for modeling lava inundation, tephra fallout, and ballistic impacts. A methodology is presented using this two-stage approach to estimate lava flow hazard in several monogenetic volcanic fields, including at a nuclear power plant site near the Shamiram Plateau, a Quaternary volcanic field in Armenia. The location of possible future vents is determined by estimating spatial density from a distribution of 18 mapped vents using a 2-D elliptical Gaussian kernel function. The SAMSE method, a modified asymptotic mean squared error approach, uses the distribution of known eruptive vents to optimally determine a smoothing bandwidth for the Gaussian kernel function. The result is a probability map of vent density. A large random sample (N=10000) of vent locations is drawn from this probability map. For each randomly sampled vent location, a lava flow inundation model is executed. Lava flow input parameters (volume and average thickness) are determined from distributions fit to field observations of the low

  14. Volcanic crisis in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mgs. Víctor Manuel Pérez Martínez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is the result of an investigation which is focussed on some deontological aspects of the scientificjournalism. In the first place it gives a theoretical vision about science, journalism, internet and including some reflectionsabout the deontological principles in handling the information about science and technology. This focus is useful as it formsthe base of an investigation where we deal with the information about a possible ”volcanic crisis” in El Teide during the years2004-2005 done by the digital newspaper” El Dïa” a canarian newspaper from Tenerife. The work required the revision of theinformation which was published and a followed analysis of its context. It was used the digital version with the purpose ofvisualizing the news which was published. It was also compared with a printed version, with local cover but divulged theinformation to the public who was most affected by this particular news. The results give rise to some questions regardinghow the information is given to a topic which is of local interest as well as national and international interest due to therepercussions in the social, economical and tourist field (the tourist field is the main industrial sector in Tenerife by receivingthis type of news.

  15. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  16. Characterization of seismicity at Volcan Baru, Panama: May 2013 through April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Chet J.

    Volcan Baru, in the western province of Chiriqui, is Panama's youngest and most active volcano. Although Baru has experienced no historic eruptions there have been four eruptive episodes in the last 1600 years, the most recent occurring 400-500 years ago (Sherrod et al., 2007). In addition, there have been four reported earthquake swarms in the last 100 years. The most recent swarm occurred in May of 2006, prompting a USGS hazard assessment (Sherrod et al., 2007). In order to characterize local seismicity and provide a reference for future monitoring efforts, we established a seismic network that operated from May 2013 through April 2014. The network consisted of eight temporary single-component, short-period sensors loaned by OSOP Panama, and three permanent stations distributed over a 35 by 15 km area. During operation of the network a catalog of 91 local events were detected, located and then used to calculate a minimum 1-D velocity model for Baru. Of particular interest were a cluster of events west of the town of Boquete. A template matching detection technique was used to identify another 47 smaller magnitude events in the area of this cluster. Spectrograms for the largest events in the cluster show a broad band of frequencies up to ˜20 Hz suggesting a predominantly tectonic source while eight focal mechanisms were calculated which suggest strike-slip and reverse faulting may be the predominant source processes. Further study is encouraged to better constrain the source processes and investigate how volcanic processes might affect local tectonics. 1. 1The material contained in this thesis is intended for submission to the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research .

  17. Petrogenesis of the Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rock series of the České Středohoří Complex (Bohemian Massif), Czech Republic: A case for two lineages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostal, J.; Schellnutt, J. G.; Ulrych, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 317, June (2017), s. 677-706 ISSN 0002-9599 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Central European volcanic province * continental alcaline volcanism * fractional crystallization * magmatic fluids Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2016

  18. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  19. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  20. Geochronologic evidence of a large magmatic province in northern Patagonia encompassing the Permian-Triassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppo, Tomás; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Fanning, Christopher M.

    2018-03-01

    The Los Menucos Complex (northern Patagonia) consists of ∼6 km thick succession of acidic and intermediate volcanic and pyroclastic products, which has been traditionally assigned to the Middle/Late Triassic. New U/Pb (SHRIMP) zircon crystallization ages of 257 ± 2 Ma at the base, 252 ± 2 Ma at an intermediate level and 248 ± 2 Ma near the top of the sequence, indicate that this volcanic event took place in about 10 Ma around the Permian-Triassic boundary. This volcanism can now be considered as the effusive terms of the neighboring and coeval La Esperanza Plutono-Volcanic Complex. This indicates that the climax of activity of a large magmatic province in northern Patagonia was coetaneous with the end-Permian mass extinctions. Likely correlation of La Esperanza- Los Menucos magmatic province with similar volcanic and plutonic rocks across other areas of northern Patagonia suggest a much larger extension than previously envisaged for this event. Its age, large volume and explosive nature suggest that the previously ignored potential role that this volcanism might have played in climatic deterioration around the Permian-Triassic boundary should be investigated.

  1. Observations And Implications Of Spatial Complexity In Hotspot Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundargi, Rohan Kiran

    One of the defining characteristics of hotspot volcanism is the presence of a long-lived, linear chain of age-progressive volcanoes created by the movement of the lithosphere over a stationary melting anomaly. However, the spatial distribution of volcanism at hotspots is often complex and highly variable suggesting that the relationship between magma generation and magma transport at hotspots is poorly understood. Here, I present the results of the first systematic quantitative characterization of the spatial distribution of volcanism at oceanic hotspots. In the first study I develop a novel methodology to characterize the across-strike distribution of volcanism at hotspots and apply it to a catalog of 40 oceanic hotspots. I find that only 25% (10/40) of hotspots exhibit the simple single-peak profile predicted by geodynamic models of melt generation in mantle plumes. The remaining 75% (30/40) of hotspots exhibit a dual- or multi-peak pattern. In the second study, I focus on the across-strike distribution of volcanism at the oceanic hotspots that are sourced by a deep-rooted mantle plume. 14 out of the 15 consensus plume-fed hotspots exhibit a dual-peaked across-strike profile. The spacing between these peaks display a strong negative correlation with lithospheric age, in direct contrast to models of inter-volcanic spacing controlled by elastic plate thickness. This relation suggests a different mechanism controls volcanic spacing at plume-fed hotspots. In the third chapter, I investigate variations in the average topographic profiles over time along the two longest and best-constrained oceanic hotspot tracks: Hawaii and Louisville. I find that the dual-peak across-strike profile of volcanism is a persistent feature at the Louisville hotspot over the entire length of the track examined (spanning a period of more than 65 Myr). In contrast, the dual-peak profile of volcanism at Hawaii is only evident along the most recent portion of the track (i.e., over the last 5

  2. Rate of volcanism on Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegley, B. Jr.; Prinn, R.G.

    1988-07-01

    The maintenance of the global H 2 SO 4 clouds on Venus requires volcanism to replenish the atmospheric SO 2 which is continually being removed from the atmosphere by reaction with calcium minerals on the surface of Venus. The first laboratory measurements of the rate of one such reaction, between SO 2 and calcite (CaCO 3 ) to form anhydrite (CaSO 4 ), are reported. If the rate of this reaction is representative of the SO 2 reaction rate at the Venus surface, then we estimate that all SO 2 in the Venus atmosphere (and thus the H 2 SO 4 clouds) will be removed in 1.9 million years unless the lost SO 2 is replenished by volcanism. The required rate of volcanism ranges from about 0.4 to about 11 cu km of magma erupted per year, depending on the assumed sulfur content of the erupted material. If this material has the same composition as the Venus surface at the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 landing sites, then the required rate of volcanism is about 1 cu km per year. This independent geochemically estimated rate can be used to determine if either (or neither) of the two discordant (2 cu km/year vs. 200 to 300 cu km/year) geophysically estimated rates is correct. The geochemically estimated rate also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth

  3. Martian mud volcanism: Terrestrial analogs and implications for formational scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J.A.; Mazzini, A.

    2009-01-01

    The geology of Mars and the stratigraphic characteristics of its uppermost crust (mega-regolith) suggest that some of the pervasively-occurring pitted cones, mounds, and flows may have formed through processes akin to terrestrial mud volcanism. A comparison of terrestrial mud volcanism suggests that equivalent Martian processes likely required discrete sedimentary depocenters, volatile-enriched strata, buried rheological instabilities, and a mechanism of destabilization to initiate subsurface flow. We outline five formational scenarios whereby Martian mud volcanism might have occurred: (A) rapid deposition of sediments, (B) volcano-induced destabilization, (C) tectonic shortening, (D) long-term, load-induced subsidence, and (E) seismic shaking. We describe locations within and around the Martian northern plains that broadly fit the geological context of these scenarios and which contain mud volcano-like landforms. We compare terrestrial and Martian satellite images and examine the geological settings of mud volcano provinces on Earth in order to describe potential target areas for piercement structures on Mars. Our comparisons help to evaluate not only the role of water as a functional component of geological processes on Mars but also how Martian mud volcanoes could provide samples of otherwise inaccessible strata, some of which could contain astrobiological evidence.

  4. Alkaline volcanic rocks from the Columbia Hills, Gusev crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSween, H.Y.; Ruff, S.W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F.; Herkenhoff, K.; Gellert, Ralf; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Squyres, S. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; McCoy, T.J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Irvine, Backstay, and Wishstone are the type specimens for three classes of fine-grained or fragmental, relatively unaltered rocks with distinctive thermal emission spectra, found as float on the flanks of the Columbia Hills. Chemical analyses indicate that these rocks are mildly alkaline basalt, trachybasalt, and tephrite, respectively. Their mineralogy consists of Na- and K-rich feldspar(s), low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, ferroan olivine, Fe-Ti (and possibly Cr) oxides, phosphate, and possibly glass. The texture of Wishstone is consistent with a pyroclastic origin, whereas Irvine and Backstay are lavas or possibly dike rocks. Chemical compositions of these rocks plot on or near liquid lines of descent for most elements calculated for Adirondack class rocks (olivine-rich basalts from the Gusev plains) at various pressures from 0.1 to 1.0 GPa. We infer that Wishstone-, Backstay-, and Irvine-class magmas may have formed by fractionation of primitive, oxidized basaltic magma similar to Adirondack-class rocks. The compositions of all these rocks reveal that the Gusev magmatic province is alkaline, distinct from the subalkaline volcanic rocks thought to dominate most of the planet's surface. The fact that differentiated volcanic rocks were not encountered on the plains prior to ascending Husband Hill may suggest a local magma source for volcanism beneath Gusev crater. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Rhyolite thermobarometry and the shallowing of the magma reservoir, Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, C.R.; Bacon, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The compositionally bimodal Pleistocene Coso volcanic field is located at the western margin of the Basin and Range province ~ 60 km north of the Garlock fault. Thirty-nine nearly aphyric high-silica rhyolite domes were emplaced in the past million years: one at 1 Ma from a transient magma reservoir, one at ~ 0.6 Ma, and the rest since ~ 0.3 Ma. Over the past 0.6 My, the depth from which the rhyolites erupted has decreased and their temperatures have become slightly higher. Pre-eruptive conditions of the rhyolite magmas, calculated from phenocryst compositions using the two-oxide thermometer and the Al-in-hornblende barometer, ranged from 740??C and 270 MPa (2.7 kbar; ~ 10 km depth) for the ~ 0.6 Ma magma, to 770??C and 140 MPa (1.4 kbar; ~ 5.5 km) for the youngest (~ 0.04 Ma) magma. Results are consistent with either a single rhyolitic reservoir moving upward through the crust, or a series of successively shallower reservoirs. As the reservoir has become closer to the surface, eruptions have become both more frequent and more voluminous.

  6. Etnean and Hyblean volcanism shifted away from the Malta Escarpment by crustal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Maccaferri, Francesco; Acocella, Valerio; Cirrincione, Rosolino

    2018-03-01

    A fraction of the volcanic activity occurs intraplate, challenging our models of melting and magma transfer to the Earth's surface. A prominent example is Mt. Etna, eastern Sicily, offset from the asthenospheric tear below the Malta Escarpment proposed as its melt source. The nearby Hyblean volcanism, to the south, and the overall northward migration of the eastern Sicilian volcanism are also unexplained. Here we simulate crustal magma pathways beneath eastern Sicily, accounting for regional stresses and decompression due to the increase in the depth of the Malta Escarpment. We find non-vertical magma pathways, with the competition of tectonic and loading stresses controlling the trajectories' curvature and its change in time, causing the observed migration of volcanism. This suggests that the Hyblean and Etnean volcanism have been fed laterally from a melt pooling region below the Malta Escarpment. The case of eastern Sicily shows how the reconstruction of the evolution of magmatic provinces may require not only an assessment of the paleostresses, but also of the contribution of surface loads and their variations; at times, the latter may even prevail. Accounting for these competing stresses may help shed light on the distribution and wandering of intraplate volcanism

  7. Tectonics and metallogenic provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Various theories have been advanced to explain the well-known uneven distribution of metals and ore-deposit types in space and time. Primordial differences in the mantle, preferential concentration of elements in the crust, the prevalence of ore-forming processes at certain times and (or) places, and combinations of one or several of these factors have all been called upon to account for the "metallogenic provinces," which can be defined loosely as regions containing similar deposits of one or a group of metals or minerals. Because many, perhaps most, provinces have complex, multistage origins, the relative importance of inheritance vs. process is still controversial. In recent years the geographic relationship of many geologically young provinces to present-day plate-tectonic positions (accreting or consuming margins, intraplate structures, etc.) has been widely recognized, and the presumption is strong that older provinces had similar relationships to former plates. As most ore deposits resulted from a favorable conjunction of geological processes that are no longer operative, elucidation of their genesis requires reconstruction of the geologic history of the province, with particular emphasis on events coeval with mineralization. Tectonic analysis is an important aspect of this reconstruction; data from orbiting satellites have contributed greatly to this analysis, as the voluminous literature of the past decade testifies. Both the synoptic view of large areas and the ability to emphasize faint contrasts have revealed linear, curvilinear, and circular features not previously recognized from field studies. Some of these undoubtedly reflect basement structures that have contributed to the development, or limit the extent, of metallogenic provinces. Their recognition and delineation will be increasingly valuable to the assessment of resources available and as guides to exploration for the ores needed by future generations. ?? 1983.

  8. Carboniferous-Permian volcanic evolution in Central Europe—U/Pb ages of volcanic rocks in Saxony (Germany) and northern Bohemia (Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Uwe; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Breiter, Karel; Sergeev, Sergey; Stanek, Klaus; Tichomirowa, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Nine SHRIMP U/Pb ages on zircon and two Pb/Pb single zircon ages have been determined from Late Paleozoic volcanic rocks from Saxony and northern Bohemia. Samples came from the Teplice-Altenberg Volcanic Complex, the Meissen Volcanic Complex, the Chemnitz Basin, the Döhlen Basin, the Brandov-Olbernhau Basin, and the North Saxon Volcanic Complex. The Teplice-Altenberg Volcanic Complex is subdivided into an early Namurian phase (Mikulov Ignimbrite, 326.8 ± 4.3 Ma), thus older than assumed by previous studies, and a late caldera-forming phase (Teplice Ignimbrite, 308.8 ± 4.9 Ma). The age of the latter, however, is not well constrained due to a large population of inherited zircon and possible hydrothermal overprint. The Leutewitz Ignimbrite, product of an early explosive volcanic episode of the Meissen Volcanic Complex yielded an age of 302.9 ± 2.5 Ma (Stephanian A). Volcanic rocks intercalated in the Brandov-Olbernhau Basin (BOB, 302 ± 2.8 Ma), Chemnitz Basin (CB, 296.6 ± 3.0 Ma), Döhlen Basin (DB, 296 ± 3.0 Ma), and the North Saxon Volcanic Complex (NSVC, c. 300-290 Ma) yielded well-constrained Stephanian to Sakmarian ages. The largest Late Paleozoic ignimbrite-forming eruption in Central Europe, the Rochlitz Ignimbrite, has a well-defined middle Asselian age of 294.4 ± 1.8 Ma. Ages of palingenic zircon revealed that the Namurian-Westphalian magmatism assimilated larger amounts of crystalline basement that formed during previous Paleozoic geodynamic phases. The Precambrian inherited ages support the chronostratigraphic structure assumed for the Saxo-Thuringian Zone of the Variscan Orogen. The present results help to improve the chronostratigraphic allocation of the Late Paleozoic volcanic zones in Central Europe. At the same time, the radiometric ages have implications for the interbasinal correlation and for the geodynamic evolution of the Variscan Orogeny.

  9. Candidate constructional volcanic edifices on Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J.; Rothery, D. A.; Balme, M. R.; Conway, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    [Introduction] Studies using MESSENGER data suggest that Mercury’s crust is predominantly a product of effusive volcanism that occurred in the first billion years following the planet’s formation. Despite this planet-wide effusive volcanism, no constructional volcanic edifices, characterized by a topographic rise, have hitherto been robustly identified on Mercury, whereas constructional volcanoes are common on other planetary bodies in the solar system with volcanic histories. Here, we descri...

  10. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    Three basic topics are addressed for the disruptive event analysis: first, the range of disruptive consequences of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity; second, the possible reduction of the risk of disruption by volcanic activity through selective siting of a repository; and third, the quantification of the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity

  11. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and

  12. Potential volcanic impacts on future climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Ingo; Outten, Stephen; Otterå, Odd Helge; Hawkins, Ed; Wagner, Sebastian; Sigl, Michael; Thorne, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Volcanic activity plays a strong role in modulating climate variability. Most model projections of the twenty-first century, however, under-sample future volcanic effects by not representing the range of plausible eruption scenarios. Here, we explore how sixty possible volcanic futures, consistent with ice-core records, impact climate variability projections of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) under RCP4.5 (ref. ). The inclusion of volcanic forcing enhances climate variability on annual-to-decadal timescales. Although decades with negative global temperature trends become ~50% more commonplace with volcanic activity, these are unlikely to be able to mitigate long-term anthropogenic warming. Volcanic activity also impacts probabilistic projections of global radiation, sea level, ocean circulation, and sea-ice variability, the local-scale effects of which are detectable when quantifying the time of emergence. These results highlight the importance and feasibility of representing volcanic uncertainty in future climate assessments.

  13. Local to global: a collaborative approach to volcanic risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Eliza; Loughlin, Sue; Barsotti, Sara; Bonadonna, Costanza; Jenkins, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic risk assessments at all scales present challenges related to the multitude of volcanic hazards, data gaps (hazards and vulnerability in particular), model representation and resources. Volcanic hazards include lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows, tephra fall, ballistics, gas dispersal and also earthquakes, debris avalanches, tsunamis and more ... they can occur in different combinations and interact in different ways throughout the unrest, eruption and post-eruption period. Volcanoes and volcanic hazards also interact with other natural hazards (e.g. intense rainfall). Currently many hazards assessments consider the hazards from a single volcano but at national to regional scales the potential impacts of multiple volcanoes over time become important. The hazards that have the greatest tendency to affect large areas up to global scale are those transported in the atmosphere: volcanic particles and gases. Volcanic ash dispersal has the greatest potential to directly or indirectly affect the largest number of people worldwide, it is currently the only volcanic hazard for which a global assessment exists. The quantitative framework used (primarily at a regional scale) considers the hazard at a given location from any volcano. Flow hazards such as lahars and floods can have devastating impacts tens of kilometres from a source volcano and lahars can be devastating decades after an eruption has ended. Quantitative assessment of impacts is increasingly undertaken after eruptions to identify thresholds for damage and reduced functionality. Some hazards such as lava flows could be considered binary (totally destructive) but others (e.g. ash fall) have varying degrees of impact. Such assessments are needed to enhance available impact and vulnerability data. Currently, most studies focus on physical vulnerability but there is a growing emphasis on social vulnerability showing that it is highly variable and dynamic with pre-eruption socio

  14. Venus volcanism and El Chichon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Reinterpretations of telemetry data returned to earth from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter suggest that the surface of Venus may be characterized by violent immense volcanic activity. L.W. Esposito has made an interactive analysis of Pioneer ultraviolet spectral data and similar data from the earth's atmosphere [Science, 223, 1072-1074, 1984]. Spacecraft analysis of sulfur dioxide in the earth's upper atmosphere, apparently released by El Chich[acu]on, Mexico, in March 1982 (EOS, June 14, 1983, p. 411, and August 16, 1983, p. 506) prompted reanalysis of accumulated Pioneer ultraviolet data. Massive injections of sulfur dioxide into the Venus atmosphere could be the result of volcanic eruptions about the size of the Krakatoa explosive eruption that took place between Java and Summatra in 1883.

  15. Source mechanisms of volcanic tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël

    2015-10-28

    Volcanic tsunamis are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including volcano-tectonic earthquakes, slope instabilities, pyroclastic flows, underwater explosions, shock waves and caldera collapse. In this review, we focus on the lessons that can be learnt from past events and address the influence of parameters such as volume flux of mass flows, explosion energy or duration of caldera collapse on tsunami generation. The diversity of waves in terms of amplitude, period, form, dispersion, etc. poses difficulties for integration and harmonization of sources to be used for numerical models and probabilistic tsunami hazard maps. In many cases, monitoring and warning of volcanic tsunamis remain challenging (further technical and scientific developments being necessary) and must be coupled with policies of population preparedness. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Uranium deposits in volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-eight papers were presented at the meeting and two additional papers were provided. Three panels were organized to consider the specific aspects of the genesis of uranium deposits in volcanic rocks, recognition criteria for the characterization of such deposits, and approaches to exploration. The papers presented and the findings of the panels are included in the Proceedings. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these papers

  17. Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the respiratory toxicity of volcanic ash in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David E.; Ayris, Paul M.; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Human exposure to inhalable volcanic ash particles following an eruption is a health concern, as respirable-sized particles can potentially contribute towards adverse respiratory health effects, such as the onset or exacerbation of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Although there is substantial information on the mineralogical properties of volcanic ash that may influence its biological reactivity, knowledge as to how external factors, such as air pollution, contribute to and augment the potential reactivity is limited. To determine the respiratory effects of volcanic particle interactions with anthropogenic pollution and volcanic gases we will experimentally assess: (i) physicochemical characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to respiratory toxicity; (ii) the effects of simultaneously inhaling anthropogenic pollution (i.e. diesel exhaust particles (DEP)) and volcanic ash (of different origins); (iii) alteration of volcanic ash toxicity following interaction with volcanic gases. In order to gain a first understanding of the biological impact of the respirable fraction of volcanic ash when inhaled with DEP in vitro, we used a sophisticated 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier. The multi-cellular system was exposed to DEP [0.02 mg/mL] and then exposed to either a single or repeated dose of well-characterised respirable volcanic ash (0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 hours using a pseudo-air liquid interface approach. Cultures were subsequently assessed for adverse biological endpoints including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and (pro)-inflammatory responses. Results indicated that the combination of DEP and respirable volcanic ash at sub-lethal concentrations incited a significant release of pro-inflammatory markers that was greater than the response for either DEP or volcanic ash, independently. Further work is planned, to determine if

  18. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  19. Late Palaeozoic magmatism in the northern New England Orogen - evidence from U-Pb SHRIMP dating in the Yarrol and Connors provinces, central Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withnall, I.W.; Hutton, L.J.; Hayward, M.A.; Blake, P.; Fanning, C.M.; Burch, G.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The northern part of the New England Orogen in central Queensland has been divided into three provinces, which are from east to west, the Wandilla, Yarrol and Connors Provinces. Previous workers suggested that the provinces are elements in an Early Carboniferous west-dipping subduction system with the Wandilla Province representing the accretionary wedge, the Yarrol Province a forearc basin and the Connors Province the volcanic arc. Farther west, a fourth province, the Drummond Basin, is interpreted as a back-arc basin. The Connors Province crops out in two areas, the Auburn Arch in the south and Connors Arch in the north. Prior to the present study, some workers recognised two superimposed volcanic arcs, one in the Late Devonian and a second in the Early Permian. Other workers have challenged this model suggesting that the rocks in the Connors Province were mainly Late Carboniferous to Early Permian and that they recorded a period of continental extension. U-Pb SHRIMP dating in the Connors Province has confirmed the existence of at least episodic Early Carboniferous magmatism from the Tournaisian to Namurian in both the Auburn and Connors Arches. We suggest that the Tournaisian rocks are vestiges of the Early Carboniferous volcanic arc suggested by earlier workers. Ages of ∼350Ma and ∼349Ma in the Connors Province are similar to ages for volcanics in Cycle 1 in the Drummond Basin and to volcanics in the lower part of the Rockhampton Group in the Yarrol Province. Magmatism in the Drummond Basin and Yarrol Province continued into the Visean although no early Visean rocks have yet been recognised in the Connors Province. The mid-Carboniferous (late Visean) may represent an important change in the evolution of the region. East of the Auburn Arch, in the Yarrol Province, this time corresponds to the boundary between the Rockhampton Group and Lorray Formation, and is marked by a sudden increase in regional radiometric response. It represents the start of

  20. Optimal likelihood-based matching of volcanic sources and deposits in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Emily; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In monogenetic volcanic fields, where each eruption forms a new volcano, focusing and migration of activity over time is a very real possibility. In order for hazard estimates to reflect future, rather than past, behavior, it is vital to assemble as much reliable age data as possible on past eruptions. Multiple swamp/lake records have been extracted from the Auckland Volcanic Field, underlying the 1.4 million-population city of Auckland. We examine here the problem of matching these dated deposits to the volcanoes that produced them. The simplest issue is separation in time, which is handled by simulating prior volcano age sequences from direct dates where known, thinned via ordering constraints between the volcanoes. The subproblem of varying deposition thicknesses (which may be zero) at five locations of known distance and azimuth is quantified using a statistical attenuation model for the volcanic ash thickness. These elements are combined with other constraints, from widespread fingerprinted ash layers that separate eruptions and time-censoring of the records, into a likelihood that was optimized via linear programming. A second linear program was used to optimize over the Monte-Carlo simulated set of prior age profiles to determine the best overall match and consequent volcano age assignments. Considering all 20 matches, and the multiple factors of age, direction, and size/distance simultaneously, results in some non-intuitive assignments which would not be produced by single factor analyses. Compared with earlier work, the results provide better age control on a number of smaller centers such as Little Rangitoto, Otuataua, Taylors Hill, Wiri Mountain, Green Hill, Otara Hill, Hampton Park and Mt Cambria. Spatio-temporal hazard estimates are updated on the basis of the new ordering, which suggest that the scale of the 'flare-up' around 30 ka, while still highly significant, was less than previously thought.

  1. Paleoproterozoic volcanism in the southern Amazon Craton (Brazil): insight into its origin and deposit textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Amazon craton hosts a primitive volcanic activity that took place in a region completely stable since 1.87 Ga. The current geotectonic context is very different from what caused the huge volcanism that we are presenting in this work. Volcanic rocks in several portions of the Amazon craton were grouped in the proterozoic Uatumã supergroup, a well-preserved magmatic region that covers an area with more than 1,200,000 km2. In this work one specific region is considered, the southwestern Tapajos Gold province (TGP) that is part of the Tapajós-Parina tectonic province (Tassinari and Macambri, 1999). TGP consists of metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary sequences resulted from a ca. 2.10-1.87 Ga ocean-continent orogeny. High-K andesites to felsic volcanic sequences and plutonic bodies, andesitic/rhyolitic epiclastic volcanic rocks and A-type granitic intrusions form part of this volcanism/plutonism. In this work we focus particularly our attention on welded, reomorphic and lava-like rhyolitic ignimbrites and co-ignimbrite brecchas. Fiamme texture of different welding intensity, stretched obsidian fragments, "glassy folds", relict pumices, lithics, rotated crystals of feldspars, bipiramidal quarz, and devetrification spherulites are the common features represented by our samples. Microscopical images are provided to characterize the deposits analyzed during this preliminary research. The lack of continuum outcrops in the field made more difficult the stratigraphic reconstruction, but the superb preservation of the deposits, apparently without any metamorphic evidences (not even low-grade), permits a clearly description of the textures and a differentiation between deposits. A detailed exploration of this ancient andesitic and rhyolitic volcanic activity could contribute greatly to the knowledge of the Amazon territory and in particular for the recognition of the various units that form the supergroup Uatumã, especially in relation to different eruptive

  2. Global CO2 Emission from Volcanic Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Padron, E.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Kusukabe, M.; Mori, T.; Nolasco, D.

    2009-12-01

    During the last two decades, scientists have paid attention to CO2 volcanic emissions and its contribution to the global C budget. Excluding MORBs as a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere, the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanism has been estimated about 300 Mt y-1 and this rate accounts for both visible (plume & fumaroles) and non-visible (diffuse) volcanic gas emanations (Mörner & Etíope, 2002). However, CO2 emissions from volcanic lakes have not been considered to estimate the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanoes. In order to improve this global CO2 emission rate and estimate the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, an extensive research on CO2 emission of volcanic lakes from Phillipines, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Mexico, Indonesia, Germany, France, Cameroon, Costa Rica, El Salvador and Ecuador had been recently carried out. In-situ measurements of CO2 efflux from the surface environment of volcanic lakes were performed by means of a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total CO2 emission from each volcanic lake, CO2 efflux maps were constructed using sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs). CO2 emission rates were normalized by the lake area (km2), and volcanic lakes were grouped following classification in acid, alkaline and neutral lakes. The observed average normalized CO2 emission rate values increase from alkaline (5.5 t km-2 d-1), neutral (210.0 t km-2 d-1), to acid (676.8 t km-2 d-1) volcanic lakes. Taking into account (i) these normalized CO2 emission rates from 31 volcanic lakes, (ii) the number of volcanic lakes in the world (~ 1100), (iii) the fraction of the investigated alkaline (45%), neutral (39%), and acid (16%) volcanic lakes, and (iv) the average areas of the investigated alkaline (36,8 km2), neutral (3,7 km2), and acid (0,5 km2) volcanic lakes; the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes is about ~ 182 Mt year-1. This estimated value is about ~ 50% of the actual estimated global CO2

  3. Professional conduct of scientists during volcanic crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    IAVCEI SubcommitteeCrisis Protocols; Newhall, Chris; Aramaki, Shigeo; Barberi, Franco; Blong, Russell; Calvache, Marta; Cheminee, Jean-Louis; Punongbayan, Raymundo; Siebe, Claus; Simkin, Tom; Sparks, Stephen; Tjetjep, Barry; Newhall, Chris

    Stress during volcanic crises is high, and any friction between scientists can distract seriously from both humanitarian and scientific effort. Friction can arise, for example, if team members do not share all of their data, if differences in scientific interpretation erupt into public controversy, or if one scientist begins work on a prime research topic while a colleague with longer-standing investment is still busy with public safety work. Some problems arise within existing scientific teams; others are brought on by visiting scientists. Friction can also arise between volcanologists and public officials. Two general measures may avert or reduce friction: (a) National volcanologic surveys and other scientific groups that advise civil authorities in times of volcanic crisis should prepare, in advance of crises, a written plan that details crisis team policies, procedures, leadership and other roles of team members, and other matters pertinent to crisis conduct. A copy of this plan should be given to all current and prospective team members. (b) Each participant in a crisis team should examine his or her own actions and contribution to the crisis effort. A personal checklist is provided to aid this examination. Questions fall generally in two categories: Are my presence and actions for the public good? Are my words and actions collegial, i.e., courteous, respectful, and fair? Numerous specific solutions to common crisis problems are also offered. Among these suggestions are: (a) choose scientific team leaders primarily for their leadership skills; (b) speak publicly with a single scientific voice, especially when forecasts, warnings, or scientific disagreements are involved; (c) if you are a would-be visitor, inquire from the primary scientific team whether your help would be welcomed, and, in general, proceed only if the reply is genuinely positive; (d) in publications, personnel evaluations, and funding, reward rather than discourage teamwork. Models are

  4. Development of the Central-Afar volcanic margin, mantle upwelling and break-up processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pik, Raphaël; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie; Stab, Martin; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2017-04-01

    Whereas the present day mantle dynamics is now well imaged by geophysical investigations, the long-term expression of mantle dynamics below rifted lithosphere is not directly recorded at the surface of the earth. Such information must therefore be extracted from non-direct manifestations of mantle upwelling, which are principally (i) the uplift of the upperlying lithosphere and (ii) the melts produced when the solidus of mantle mineral assemblages is crossed. These first order and unique evidences should therefore represent corner stones output of any geodynamic models used to deduce the interplay between mantle dynamics and surface deformations. For magmatism produced during extension of lithosphere, the dynamics of mantle upwelling can be recognized in the volumes of magmas and also in their geochremistry, which allow tracking the various types of mantle sources and the various types of mantle melting regime (P, T and intensity of partial melting). Volcanism has been closely associated with extension in the East African rift system. It is yet (and logically) heterogeneously distributed along the western, eastern and northern volcanic provinces. We have concentrated the efforts of a multidisciplinary team these last years in the northern Ethiopian volcanic province where the most important volumes of volcanism have been emplaced since 30 Ma, from Continental Flood Basalts episode to active extension along the Central Afar magmatic segment. These structural and geochemical data point out new constraints on the interplay between the upwelling of the Afar mantle plume and the style and mechanisms of extension, and imply to update and revise our understanding of the development of this volcanic margin.

  5. How a wet tropical rainforest copes with repeated volcanic destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Leigh C. F.; Boyd, William E.

    2005-11-01

    The Holocene Period for the province of West New Britain, Papua New Guinea, is characterised by periodic catastrophic volcanism. The region is mantled in dense wet tropical rainforest, and has been occupied by people since the Pleistocene. Analyses of peat from two nearby sites within a lowland rainforest environment provide us with a macro-level landscape account of the periodic destruction and recovery of the coastal forests during seven periods of volcanic activity in the latter part (˜2900 yr ago to present) of the Holocene. Radiocarbon dating shows the very close correlation of the peat and tephra layers at both sites, yet the pollen analysis reveals different vegetation communities. These initial results allow us to begin identifying the processes of recovery, and to recognise different ecological pressures placed on vegetation at these neighbouring sites. Evidence of hydrological changes are observed beginning with a marine incursion recorded at Garu Site 3 ˜1360 14C yr B.P. The distinct differences in the vegetation re-establishment and community regeneration rates suggest the greater level of disturbance at Garu Site 1 could be related to the depth of the ashfall, although the proximity of a known human settlement may also be a contributing factor. Of note, palynologically, we found that the fern spore flora is particularly rich and believe it will be useful for ecological interpretation.

  6. The East Greenland rifted volcanic margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kent Brooks

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Palaeogene North Atlantic Igneous Province is among the largest igneous provinces in the world and this review of the East Greenland sector includes large amounts of information amassed since previous reviews around 1990.The main area of igneous rocks extends from Kangerlussuaq (c. 67°N to Scoresby Sund (c. 70°N, where basalts extend over c. 65 000 km2, with a second area from Hold with Hope (c. 73°N to Shannon (c. 75°N. In addition, the Ocean Drilling Project penetrated basalt at five sites off South-East Greenland. Up to 7 km thickness of basaltic lavas have been stratigraphically and chemically described and their ages determined. A wide spectrum of intrusions are clustered around Kangerlussuaq, Kialeeq (c. 66°N and Mesters Vig (c. 72°N. Layered gabbros are numerous (e.g. the Skaergaard and Kap Edvard Holm intrusions, as are under- and oversaturated syenites, besides small amounts of nephelinite-derived products, such as the Gardiner complex (c. 69°N with carbonatites and silicate rocks rich in melilite, perovskite etc. Felsic extrusive rocks are sparse. A single, sanidine-bearing tuff found over an extensive area of the North Atlantic is thought to be sourced from the Gardiner complex.The province is famous for its coast-parallel dyke swarm, analogous to the sheeted dyke swarm of ophiolites, its associated coastal flexure, and many other dyke swarms, commonly related to central intrusive complexes as in Iceland. The dyke swarms provide time markers, tracers of magmatic evolution and evidence of extensional events. A set of dykes with harzburgite nodules gives unique insight into the Archaean subcontinental lithosphere.Radiometric dating indicates extrusion of huge volumes of basalt over a short time interval, but the overall life of the province was prolonged, beginning with basaltic magmas at c. 60 Ma and continuing to the quartz porphyry stock at Malmbjerg (c. 72°N at c. 26 Ma. Indeed, activity was renewed in the Miocene with

  7. Recent progress in volcanism studies: Site characterization activities for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.; Valentine, G.; Morley, R.; Perry, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Significant progress has been made on volcanism studies over the past calendar year. There are a number of major highlights from this work. Geochronology data have been obtained for the Lathrop Wells center using a range of isotopic, radiogenic, and age-calibrated methods. Initial work is encouraging but still insufficient to resolve the age of the center with confidence. Geologic mapping of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers was completed and a report issued on the geology and chronology data. Twenty shallow trenches have been constructed in volcanic units of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Results of detailed studies of the trenches support a polycyclic eruptive history. New soil data from the trenches continue to support a late Pleistocene or Holocene age for many of the volcanic units at the center. Geochemical data (trace element and isotopic analysis) show that the volcanic units of the Lathrop Wells center cannot be related to one another by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, supporting a polycyclic model of volcanism. Structural models using existing data are used to evaluate the probability of magmatic disruption of a potential repository. Several permissive models have been developed but none lead to significant differences in calculating the disruption ratio. Work was initiated on the eruptive and subsurface effects of magmatic activity on a repository. (author)

  8. Nanoparticles of volcanic ash as a carrier for toxic elements on the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolin, Mikhail S; Fedotov, Petr S; Malik, Natalia A; Karandashev, Vasily K

    2018-06-01

    At present, there is concern about engineered nanoparticles in the environment, whereas natural nanoparticles (NPs) and their impact are often neglected. In our paper, we demonstrate the important role of nanoparticles of volcanic ash in transport of toxic elements on a global scale. A single volcanic eruption can eject millions of tons of ash. NPs of volcanic ash reach the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and may "travel" around the world for years affecting human health, environment, and even climate. So far, there is a gap in exposure assessment of volcanic ash NPs since their chemical composition remains largely unknown. Here we show for the first time that volcanic ash NPs can serve as an important carrier for potentially toxic elements. The concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, Ag, Sn, Se, Te, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi in volcanic ash NPs (volcanoes from different regions of the world (Kamchatka, Far East of Russia and Andes, Chile). The work opens a new door into studies on biogeochemical impact of volcanic ash. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Holocene volcanism of the upper McKenzie River catchment, central Oregon Cascades, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligne, Natalia I.; Conrey, Richard M.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Champion, Duane E.; Amidon, William H.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the complexity of eruptive activity within mafic volcanic fields, we present a detailed geologic investigation of Holocene volcanism in the upper McKenzie River catchment in the central Oregon Cascades, United States. We focus on the Sand Mountain volcanic field, which covers 76 km2 and consists of 23 vents, associated tephra deposits, and lava fields. We find that the Sand Mountain volcanic field was active for a few decades around 3 ka and involved at least 13 eruptive units. Despite the small total volume erupted (∼1 km3 dense rock equivalent [DRE]), Sand Mountain volcanic field lava geochemistry indicates that erupted magmas were derived from at least two, and likely three, different magma sources. Single units erupted from one or more vents, and field data provide evidence of both vent migration and reoccupation. Overall, our study shows that mafic volcanism was clustered in space and time, involved both explosive and effusive behavior, and tapped several magma sources. These observations provide important insights on possible future hazards from mafic volcanism in the central Oregon Cascades.

  10. Some effects. Guangdong province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y; Wang, J

    1994-03-01

    Shenzhen City in Guangdong Province grew from 310,000 residents when it was established in 1979 to 1.66 million people in 1990. 1.02 million inhabitants are considered floating people, non-natives. Wang Jinxia, a 26-year-old mother, is like other women comprising 46.05% of the floating population who came from across the country to earn money then return to their native homes. Wang had an IUD inserted after giving birth to her daughter, even though it is common to bear many children in her native home in Anhui province. Understanding that the floating population is the main engine of rapid economic growth in the city, the Family Planning Committee of Shenzhen provides services to both native and nonnative residents. The committee has worked particularly hard to promote family planning counseling and services to nonnatives of childbearing age to prevent unplanned pregnancy before and after marriage. Health care services are also provided to adolescents. Acknowledging that most nonnatives have not registered their households with the community, however, some enterprises have integrated family planning services into their total health and welfare program for employees.

  11. Felsic volcanism in a basic shield (El Hierro, Canary Islands). Implications in terms of volcanic hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Becerril Carretero, Laura; Martí Molist, Joan; Meletlidis, Stavros; Galindo Jiménez, Inés

    2014-05-01

    El Hierro, the southwesternmost and smallest island of the Canary Archipelago, is a complex basaltic shield volcano characterized by mainly effusive volcanism with both Strombolian and Hawaiian activity. Explosive felsic volcanism is not a common feature of the archipelago and, so far, it has only been reported on the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, where it has been responsible for the formation of large central volcanic complexes. The presence of felsic rocks on the other islands of the archipelago and specifically on El Hierro is mostly restricted to subvolcanic intrusions and a few lava flows, generally associated with the oldest parts of the islands. We hereby report the presence of a trachytic pumice deposit on the island of El Hierro, referred to here as the Malpaso Member. A detailed stratigraphic, lithological, and sedimentological study was carried out on the deposits of this explosive episode of felsic composition, which is the only one found on the Canary Islands apart from those of Gran Canaria and Tenerife. Four different subunits were identified on the basis of their lithological and granulometrical characteristics. The products of the eruption correspond to a single eruptive event and cover an area of about 13 km2. This deposit originated from a base-surge-type explosive eruption with a subsequent radial emplacement of dilute PDC currents, was emplaced from the vent that would have been located in a similar position to the volcano of Tanganasoga. The low vesicularity of juvenile fragments and the morphological characteristics of the fine particles, as well as the high proportion of lithic fragments and the ash-rich nature of the deposit, suggest that magma/water interaction controlled the dynamics of the eruption. This study demonstrates that magmas from El Hierro could have the potential for producing an explosive eruption, in an environment in which the majority of the eruptions are basaltic and effusive in nature. Bearing in mind

  12. Felsic Volcanics on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Stopar, J.; Braden, S.; Hawke, B. R.; Robinson, M. S.; Glotch, T. D.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Seddio, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) imaging and thermal data provide new morphologic and compositional evidence for features that appear to be expressions of nonmare silicic volcanism. Examples reflecting a range of sizes and volcanic styles include the Gruithuisen and Mairan Domes, and the Hansteen Alpha (H-A) and Compton-Belkovich (C-B) volcanic complexes. In this work we combine new observations with existing compositional remote sensing and Apollo sample data to assess possible origins. Images and digital topographic data at 100 m scale (Wide Angle Camera) and ~0.5 to 2 m (Narrow Angle Camera) reveal (1) slopes on volcanic constructs of ~12° to 27°, (2) potential endogenic summit depressions, (3) small domical features with dense boulder populations, and (4) irregular collapse features. Morphologies in plan view range from the circular to elliptical Gruithuisen γ and δ domes (~340 km2 each), to smaller cumulodomes such as Mairan T and C-B α (~30 km2, each), to the H-A (~375 km2) and C-B (~680 km2) volcanic complexes. Heights range from ~800-1800 m, and most domes are relatively flat-topped or have a central depression. Positions of the Christiansen Feature in LRO Diviner data reflect silicic compositions [1]. Clementine UVVIS-derived FeO varies from ~5 to 10 wt%. Lunar Prospector Th data indicate model values of 20-55 ppm [2,3], which are consistent with compositions ranging from KREEP basalt to lunar granite. The Apollo collection contains small rocks and breccia clasts of felsic/granitic lithologies. Apollo 12 samples include small, pristine and brecciated granitic rock fragments and a large, polymict breccia (12013) consisting of felsic material (quartz & K-feldspar-rich) and mafic phases (similar to KREEP basalt). Many of the evolved lunar rocks have geochemically complementary compositions. The lithologic associations and the lack of samples with intermediate composition suggest a form of magmatic differentiation that produced mafic and felsic

  13. Volcanic deposits in Antarctic snow and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Robert J.; Legrand, Michel; Aristarain, Alberto J.; Zanolini, FrançOise

    1985-12-01

    Major volcanic eruptions are able to spread large amounts of sulfuric acid all over the world. Acid layers of volcanic origin were detected for the first time a few years ago by Hammer in Greenland ice. The present paper deals with volcanic deposits in the Antarctic. The different methods that can be used to find volcanic acid deposits in snow and ice cores are compared: electrical conductivity, sulfate, and acidity measurements. Numerous snow and ice samples collected at several Antarctic locations were analyzed. The results reveal that the two major volcanic events recorded by H2SO4, fallout in Antarctic ice over the last century are the eruptions of Krakatoa (1883) and Agung (1963), both located at equatorial latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The volcanic signals are found to be particularly well defined at central Antarctic locations apparently in relation to the low snow accumulation rates in these areas. It is demonstrated that volcanic sulfuric acid in snow is not even partially neutralized by ammonia. The possible influence of Antarctic volcanic activity on snow chemistry is also discussed, using the three recent eruptions of the Deception Island volcano as examples. Only one of them seems to have had a significant effect on the chemistry of snow at a location 200 km from this volcano. It is concluded that Antarctic volcanic ice records are less complicated than Greenland records because of the limited number of volcanos in the southern hemisphere and the apparently higher signal to background ratio for acidity in Antarctica than in Greenland.

  14. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  15. Nephelometric Dropsonde for Volcanic Ash, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes could enable unprecedented observations of...

  16. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  17. Zircon U-Pb geochronology links the end-Triassic extinction with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Terrence J; Olsen, Paul E; Bowring, Samuel A; McLean, Noah M; Kent, Dennis V; Puffer, John; McHone, Greg; Rasbury, E Troy; Et-Touhami, Mohammed

    2013-05-24

    The end-Triassic extinction is characterized by major losses in both terrestrial and marine diversity, setting the stage for dinosaurs to dominate Earth for the next 136 million years. Despite the approximate coincidence between this extinction and flood basalt volcanism, existing geochronologic dates have insufficient resolution to confirm eruptive rates required to induce major climate perturbations. Here, we present new zircon uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologic constraints on the age and duration of flood basalt volcanism within the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. This chronology demonstrates synchroneity between the earliest volcanism and extinction, tests and corroborates the existing astrochronologic time scale, and shows that the release of magma and associated atmospheric flux occurred in four pulses over about 600,000 years, indicating expansive volcanism even as the biologic recovery was under way.

  18. A Larger Volcanic Field About Yucca Mountain: New Geochemical Data From the Death Valley Volcanic Field, Inyo County California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, A. K.; Smith, E. I.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanism is an important issue for the characterization of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Due to recent legal decisions that now require DOE to evaluate hazards over both 10,000 year and 1,000,000 year compliance periods, the definition of the area of interest for calculation of disruption probability and a knowledge of the volcanic process have become more important. New geochemical data for the Death Valley volcanic field in the Greenwater Range in Inyo County, California indicate that the Death Valley field and the volcanoes about Yucca Mountain are parts of the same volcanic field. The Death Valley field is just 35 km south of Yucca Mountain and only 20 km south of buried volcanoes in the Amargosa Valley. Trace elements for both areas show a negative Nb anomaly, but differ in that Death Valley basalt has lower La (70 vs. 130 ppm). Isotopic ratios are remarkably similar and strongly support a link between the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas. The isotope ranges for Death Valley are -11.88 to -3.26, 0.706322 to 0.707600, 17.725 to 18.509, 15.512 to 15.587, and 38.237 to 38.854 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Crater Flat isotope ranges are -13.17 to -5.48, 0.706221 to 0.707851, 18.066 to 18.706, 15.488 to 15.564, and 38.143 to 38.709 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Depth of melting calculated using the Fe-Na geobarometer indicates that basalt magma was generated at depths of 135-138 km beneath Death Valley and 115-133 km for Crater Flat indicating asthenospheric melting for both areas. Combining the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas into a single volcanic field increases the area of interest for probability calculations by over 1/3 and increases the number of volcanic events by 23. The increased size of the volcanic field and number of volcanoes may result in an increase in the probability of disruption of the

  19. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    distributions of volcanic ash from Sakurajima volcano have basically characteristics of unimodal and gaussian. Mode of distributions are 150 - 200 micron at 5 km and 70-80 micron at 20 km respectively from the Showa crater. Mode and deviation of the grain size distribution are function of distance from the source. Fine volcanic ash less than 1 micron in diameter is few and exists in every samples. Component of volcanic ash samples are dark-colored dense glass shard (ca. 50%), light-colored dense glass shard (10%), variously colored and vesiculated glass shard (10%), free crystal (20%), lithic fragment (10%), and altered fragment (less than 5%) which are mostly having similar ratio in every location suggesting single source process of the eruption. We also found fine volcanic ash samples less than 10 micron are frequently aggregated. The present study includes the result of "Research and Development of Margin Assessment Methodology of Decay Heat Removal Function against External Hazards" entrusted to Japan Atomic Energy Agency by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT).

  20. Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Mineral Mountain and Teapot Mountain quadrangles, Pinal County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, William J.; Theodore, Ted G.

    1979-01-01

    The widespread distribution of Tertiary volcanic rocks in south-central Arizona is controlled in part by prevolcanic structures along which volcanic vents were localized. Volcanic rocks in the Mineral Mountain and Teapot Mountain quadrangles mark the site of a major northwest-trending structural hingeline. This hingeline divides an older Precambrian X terrane on the west from intensely deformed sequences of rock as young as Pennsylvanian on the east, suggesting increased westerly uplift. The volcanic rocks consist of a pile of complexly interlayered rhyolite, andesite, dacite, flows and intrusive rocks, water-laid tuffs, and very minor olivine basalt. Although the rocks erupted from several different vents, time relations, space relations, and chemistry each give strong evidence of a single source for all the rocks. Available data (by the K-Ar dating method) on hornblende and biotite separates from the volcanic rocks range from 14 to 19 m.y. and establish the pre-middle Miocene age of major dislocations along the structural hingeline. Most of the volcanic rocks contain glass, either at the base of the flows or as an envelope around the intrusive phases. One of the intrusive rhyolites, however, seems to represent one of the final eruptions. Intense vesiculation of the intrusive rhyolite suggests a large content of volatiles at the time of its eruption. Mineralization is associated with the more silicic of these middle Miocene volcanic rocks; specifically, extensive fissure quartz veins contain locally significant amounts of silver, lead, and zinc and minor amounts of gold. Many of the most productive deposits are hosted by the volcanic rocks, although others occur in the Precambrian rocks. Magnetic data correspond roughly to the geology in outlining the overall extent of the volcanic rocks as a magnetic low.

  1. Geochemical features of the Cretaceous alkaline volcanics in the area of Morado hill, Jachal town, San Juan, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the alkaline volcanic rocks that crop out at the Morado hill located in the southern end of the Mogna ranges, which are part of the Eastern border of the pre mountain in the San Juan province, Argentina.The petrography and geochemistry study of the alkaline volcanics has allowed to classify them as tephrite basanite or basanite nephelinite, with strong alkaline chemical affinity, showing a characteristic composition of within plate geochemistry environment. The radimetric analysis, K-Ar data, has shown an average 90 ∓ 8 m.y. age for this rocks, (Cingolani et al. 1984) pointing out the Upper Cretaceous (lower section) stratigraphical position for the suite. The discussion of the results makes conspicuous the relationships of these alkaline rocks with others of the central and northwestern regions of the country that allowed to establish an alkaline petrographic province

  2. Cenozoic intraplate volcanism on New Zealand: Upwelling induced by lithospheric removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoernle, K.; White, J. D. L.; van den Bogaard, P.; Hauff, F.; Coombs, D. S.; Werner, R.; Timm, C.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Reay, A.; Cooper, A. F.

    2006-08-01

    reach the surface in their pure form due to the swamping effect of larger-degree melts formed at shallower depths. Different volcanic styles in part reflect the mode of removal, and size and shape of detached parts of the lithospheric keel. Removal of continental lithospheric mantle could be an important process for explaining the origin of diffuse igneous provinces on continental lithosphere.

  3. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  4. Geomorphological Approach for Regional Zoning In The Merapi Volcanic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Wahyu Santosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphologial approach can be used as the basic for identifying and analyzing the natural resources potentials, especially in volcanic landscape. Based on its geomorphology, Merapi volcanic landscape can be divided into 5 morphological units, i.e.: volcanic cone, volcanic slope, volcanic foot, volcanic foot plain, and fluvio-volcanic plain. Each of these morphological units has specific characteristic and natural resources potential. Based on the condition of geomorphology, the regional zoning can be compiled to support the land use planning and to maintain the conservation of environmental function in the Merapi Volcanic area.

  5. Volcanic Ash on Slopes of Karymsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A volcanic eruption can produce gases, lava, bombs of rock, volcanic ash, or any combination of these elements. Of the volcanic products that linger on the land, most of us think of hardened lava flows, but volcanic ash can also persist on the landscape. One example of that persistence appeared on Siberia's Kamchatka Peninsula in spring 2007. On March 25, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around the Karymsky Volcano. In this image, volcanic ash from earlier eruptions has settled onto the snowy landscape, leaving dark gray swaths. The ash stains are confined to the south of the volcano's summit, one large stain fanning out toward the southwest, and another toward the east. At first glance, the ash stain toward the east appears to form a semicircle north of the volcano and sweep back east. Only part of this dark shape, however, is actually volcanic ash. Near the coast, the darker color may result from thicker vegetation. Similar darker coloring appears to the south. Volcanic ash is not really ash at all, but tiny, jagged bits of rock and glass. These jagged particles pose serious health risks to humans and animals who might inhale them. Likewise, the ash poses hazards to animals eating plants that have been coated with ash. Because wind can carry volcanic ash thousands of kilometers, it poses a more far-reaching hazard than other volcanic ejecta. Substantial amounts of ash can even affect climate by blocking sunlight. Karymsky is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. It is one of many active volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, which is part of the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific Rim. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  6. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  7. The origin of the Line Islands: plate or plume controlled volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, L. P.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical compositions of melts produced in the Earth's mantle provide key data for our understanding of the Earth's internal structure. Particularly, the range in compositions for oceanic intraplate volcanism has fueled the ongoing debate on the dynamic origin of hotspots. Traditionally, hotspots have been interpreted to originate from narrow, upwelling plumes of hot mantle material that reach the bottom of the tectonic plates. Progressively younger volcanoes, as seen at, for example, Hawaii, are then derived from plume melts. However, such a plume may originate from the core-mantle boundary, the top of seismically defined superplumes, or the origin may not lie in a buoyantly upwelling plume at all. The presence of an age progressive volcanic chain and a large igneous province, a high buoyancy flux, the geochemical composition of the erupted lavas, and seismically slow velocities have been used to distinguish different hotspot origins. Volcanic chains that lack most of these features may originate from the eruption of shallow melts along lithospherically controlled cracks. A unique area to study this type of volcanism is the Line Islands. These islands define a complex chain of volcanoes south of Hawaii that morphologically define multiple sub-groups. Moreover, recent age dating has revealed a complex geochronology. Combined geochronological and geochemical data from the Line Islands allude to the presence of shallow mantle melts that feed eruptions where there are weaknesses in the plates due to fractures or fissures. The Line Islands consist of elongated ridges, seamounts, atolls and islands that form the northern segment of the Line-Tuamotu chain of volcanoes. The volcanic chain is divided into three morphologically distinct regions; the northern, central and southern provinces. Long en echelon ridges of the Line Islands Cross Trend intersect the northern province at 14-16°N, which consists of the section between the Molokai and Clarion fracture zones. The

  8. The role of a mantle plume in the formation of Yellowstone volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Tiffany; Liu, Lijun

    2016-02-01

    The origin of the Yellowstone volcanic province remains debated. Proposed hypotheses involve either a mantle plume or not. Recent tomographic images allow a quantitative evaluation of the plume hypothesis and its interaction with the Farallon slabs. Using 4-D geodynamic models with data assimilation, we find that the slab is always in the way of the initially rising plume and that the plume could reach the surface only through the broken slab hinge at ~15 Ma. For most of the time, the sinking slabs dominate the mantle flow and prohibit upwelling. We find that a plume that satisfies the present mantle image beneath Yellowstone fails to predict both voluminous hot materials at shallow depths beneath the western U.S. and the age migration of the hot spot tracks. We suggest that a plume is likely to have much less influence on the Yellowstone volcanism than previously thought.

  9. Climatic Impact of Volcanic Eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Zielinski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions have the potential to force global climate, provided they are explosive enough to emit at least 1–5 megaton of sulfur gases into the stratosphere. The sulfuric acid produced during oxidation of these gases will both absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation, thus warming the stratosphere and cooling the Earth’s surface. Maximum global cooling on the order of 0.2–0.3°C, using instrumental temperature records, occurs in the first 2 years after the eruption, with lesser cooling possibly up to the 4th year. Equatorial eruptions are able to affect global climate, whereas mid- to high-latitude events will impact the hemisphere of origin. However, regional responses may differ, including the possibility of winter warming following certain eruptions. Also, El Niño warming may override the cooling induced by volcanic activity. Evaluation of different style eruptions as well as of multiple eruptions closely spaced in time beyond the instrumental record is attained through the analysis of ice-core, tree-ring, and geologic records. Using these data in conjunction with climate proxy data indicates that multiple eruptions may force climate on decadal time scales, as appears to have occurred during the Little Ice Age (i.e., roughly AD 1400s–1800s. The Toba mega-eruption of ~75,000 years ago may have injected extremely large amounts of material into the stratosphere that remained aloft for up to about 7 years. This scenario could lead to the initiation of feedback mechanisms within the climate system, such as cooling of sea-surface temperatures. These interacting mechanisms following a mega-eruption may cool climate on centennial time scales.

  10. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  11. Seismic equivalents of volcanic jet scaling laws and multipoles in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matthew M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Aldridge, David F.

    2018-04-01

    We establish analogies between equivalent source theory in seismology (moment-tensor and single-force sources) and acoustics (monopoles, dipoles and quadrupoles) in the context of volcanic eruption signals. Although infrasound (acoustic waves seismic sources. By considering the radiated power of a harmonic force source at the surface of an elastic half-space, we show that a volcanic jet or plume modelled as a seismic force has similar scaling with respect to eruption parameters (e.g. exit velocity and vent area) as an acoustic dipole. We support this by demonstrating, from first principles, a fundamental relationship that ties together explosion, torque and force sources in seismology and highlights the underlying dipole nature of seismic forces. This forges a connection between the multipole expansion of equivalent sources in acoustics and the use of forces and moments as equivalent sources in seismology. We further show that volcanic infrasound monopole and quadrupole sources exhibit scalings similar to seismicity radiated by volume injection and moment sources, respectively. We describe a scaling theory for seismic tremor during volcanic eruptions that agrees with observations showing a linear relation between radiated power of tremor and eruption rate. Volcanic tremor over the first 17 hr of the 2016 eruption at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, obeyed the linear relation. Subsequent tremor during the main phase of the eruption did not obey the linear relation and demonstrates that volcanic eruption tremor can exhibit other scalings even during the same eruption.

  12. Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA v1.0: an idealized forcing generator for climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from volcanic eruptions have a significant impact on the Earth's climate. To include the effects of volcanic eruptions in climate model simulations, the Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA forcing generator provides stratospheric aerosol optical properties as a function of time, latitude, height, and wavelength for a given input list of volcanic eruption attributes. EVA is based on a parameterized three-box model of stratospheric transport and simple scaling relationships used to derive mid-visible (550 nm aerosol optical depth and aerosol effective radius from stratospheric sulfate mass. Precalculated look-up tables computed from Mie theory are used to produce wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction, single scattering albedo, and scattering asymmetry factor values. The structural form of EVA and the tuning of its parameters are chosen to produce best agreement with the satellite-based reconstruction of stratospheric aerosol properties following the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, and with prior millennial-timescale forcing reconstructions, including the 1815 eruption of Tambora. EVA can be used to produce volcanic forcing for climate models which is based on recent observations and physical understanding but internally self-consistent over any timescale of choice. In addition, EVA is constructed so as to allow for easy modification of different aspects of aerosol properties, in order to be used in model experiments to help advance understanding of what aspects of the volcanic aerosol are important for the climate system.

  13. Late Cenozoic Samtskhe-Javakheti Volcanic Highland, Georgia:The Result of Mantle Plumes Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okrostsvaridze, Avtandil

    2017-04-01

    intraplate volcanic ridge. Based on our studies, we assume that the Samtskhe-Javakheti volcanic highland is a result of full cycle mantle plume activity and not of by adiabatic decompression melting of the asthenosphere, as it is considered at present (Keskin, 2007). Therefore, we assume that this volcanic highland is a Northern marginal manifestation of the Eastern Africa-Red Sea -Anatolia mantle plume flow. If we accept this idea, then the Pliocene-Pleistocene Samtskhe-Javakheti volcanic highland is the youngest continental mantle plume formation of the Earth. REFERENCES Keskin M., 2007. Eastern Anatolia: a hotspot in a collision zone without a mantle plume. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 430, pp. 693 - 722. Okrostsavridze A., Popkhadze A., Kirkitadze G., 2016. Megavolcano in the Late Cenozoic Samtckhe-Javakheti Volcanic Province? In procceding of 6th workshop on Collapse Caldera, Hokkaido, Japan. p. 42-43.

  14. The Basin and Range Province in Utah, Nevada, and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Thomas B.

    1943-01-01

    Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks are known only in the central and eastern part of the province. They locally attain considerable thicknesses, however, as the combined thickness of the two series in western Utah approaches 24,000 feet. The geanticline appears to have been eroded by Permian time, as Permian strata have been recognized in most parts of the province except the southern, where another geanticline, which persisted into the Mesozoic era, began to rise coincidentally with the disappearance of the older one. Igneous activity was at a minimum throughout the Paleozoic era. Some volcanism appears to have occurred locally in the Carboniferous period, but the lavas and sills cannot yet be accurately dated and may be somewhat younger. The second geanticline, which began to form in Permian time, was greatly extended during the Mesozoic era and eventually caused the disappearance of the geosynclinal seas that had persisted throughout most of Paleozoic time. Its axis lay east of the earlier geanticline, and its gradual emergence resulted in the development of two depositional troughs within the province. The western trough was filled with more than 30,000 feet of sediments and interbedded volcanic deposits, which range in age from basal Lower Triassic through the Lower Jurassic. Deposition in this trough was terminated by a period of intense orogeny near the end of Lower Jurassic time. The deposits of the eastern trough are found only along the eastern border of the province; they consist largely of nonmarine sedimentary beds ranging in age from Triassic to Upper Cretaceous. Marine Lower Triassic, possible Middle Triassic, and Upper Jurassic sedimentary rocks have been found in a few places, and some pyroclastic rocks occur in Lower Triassic and Upper Cretaceous beds. The eastern seaway appears to have been closed to the south, for lagoonal deposits, such as salines, characterize the southern and southeastern extensions of the marine formations. In addition to the sur

  15. Modern analogues for Miocene to Pleistocene alkali basaltic phreatomagmatic fields in the Pannonian Basin: "soft-substrate" to "combined" aquifer controlled phreatomagmatism in intraplate volcanic fields Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane; Haller, Miguel; Brenna, Marco; Csillag, Gabor

    2010-09-01

    The Pannonian Basin (Central Europe) hosts numerous alkali basaltic volcanic fields in an area similar to 200 000 km2. These volcanic fields were formed in an approximate time span of 8 million years producing smallvolume volcanoes typically considered to be monogenetic. Polycyclic monogenetic volcanic complexes are also common in each field however. The original morphology of volcanic landforms, especially phreatomagmatic volcanoes, is commonly modified. by erosion, commonly aided by tectonic uplift. The phreatomagmatic volcanoes eroded to the level of their sub-surface architecture expose crater to conduit filling as well as diatreme facies of pyroclastic rock assemblages. Uncertainties due to the strong erosion influenced by tectonic uplifts, fast and broad climatic changes, vegetation cover variations, and rapidly changing fluvio-lacustrine events in the past 8 million years in the Pannonian Basin have created a need to reconstruct and visualise the paleoenvironment into which the monogenetic volcanoes erupted. Here phreatomagmatic volcanic fields of the Miocene to Pleistocene western Hungarian alkali basaltic province have been selected and compared with modern phreatomagmatic fields. It has been concluded that the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) in New Zealand could be viewed as a prime modern analogue for the western Hungarian phreatomagmatic fields by sharing similarities in their pyroclastic successions textures such as pyroclast morphology, type, juvenile particle ratio to accidental lithics. Beside the AVF two other, morphologically more modified volcanic fields (Pali Aike, Argentina and Jeju, Korea) show similar features to the western Hungarian examples, highlighting issues such as preservation potential of pyroclastic successions of phreatomagmatic volcanoes.

  16. Solar PV Industry in Jiangsu Province [China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    Jiangsu Province is a leading province in China both in terms of Solar PV application as well as its implementation. The Netherlands Business Support Office in Nanjing reports on the photovoltaic solar cell industry in Jiangsu Province with details on opportunities for foreign investors; applications of solar energy in the province; Chinese government; relevant organizations; and key Chinese players in this sector.

  17. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http

  18. New evidence of the Monchique - Madeira hot spot volcanism at the Coral Patch seamount, Central Eastern Atlantic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oriano, F.; Angeletti, L.; Laurenzi, M. A.; Trua, T.; Capotondi, L.; Taviani, M.; Torelli, L.; Zitellini, N.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed swath bathymetry, high resolution seismic profiles and bottom sampling, collected during the SWIM 2005 and SWIM 2005 cruises, provide new data to constrain the emplacement mechanism of the Monchique-Madeira hotspot in the Central - Eastern Atlantic Sea. During last decades, although this volcanic province has been the object of several investigations, the location of hotspot track and the alignments of the volcanic centers, such as Ormonde, Ampere and Coral Patch seamounts, are still matter of debate. Several alkaline volcanic centers are recognized at Coral Patch and volcanic rocks obtained from the top of the seamount provides a radiometric (40Ar-39Ar) age of 31.4±1.98 Ma. Our data suggest that volcanism was emplaced on the top of a preexistent seamount and was strongly affected by the regional tectonic compressive regime, active on this sector of the Africa Eurasia plate boundary since Oligocene. The compression formed lithospheric scale structures acting as a reserved lane for the upwelling of mantle material during the transit of the hotspot. Lithified pelagic carbonates, infilling fissures in lava blocks and hosting planktic foraminifers, permit to date at the Chattian (24-28 Ma) the first documentation of Coral Patch acting as an offshore terrigenous-starved deep seamount. This situation protracts to recent times as shown by the occurrence of veneers of foraminifer-pteropod oozes and deep-sea mollusc-coral hash and pelagic limestones as the sole sediment types recovered from Coral Patch.

  19. Review of the Cambrian volcanic activity in Morocco: geochemical fingerprints and geotectonic implications for the rifting of West Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouclet, André; El Hadi, Hassan; Álvaro, J. Javier; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Benharref, Mohammed; Fekkak, Abdelilah

    2018-03-01

    Volcanic activities related to the opening of a Cambrian rift in Morocco were widespread from the Fortunian to the Cambrian Epoch 3. Numerous data are available from northwestern volcanic sites, particularly in the western High Atlas, but they are scarce from the southeastern sites. New data are documented here from the volcanic formations exposed in the Jbel Tazoult n'Ouzina of the Tafilalt Province, eastern Anti-Atlas and dated to Cambrian Epoch 2-3. The Cambrian volcanic activities recorded in the High Atlas, Anti-Atlas, and Coastal Meseta are synthesized to refine their stratigraphic setting and to characterize their magmatic affinities and fingerprints. Six volcanic pulses are determined as tholeiitic, transitional, and alkaline suites. The tholeiitic and transitional magmas originated from primitive mantle and E-MORB-type sources with a spinel- and garnet-bearing lherzolite composition. Some of them were modified by assimilation-fractional crystallisation processes during crust-mantle interactions. The alkaline magmas fit with an OIB-type and a garnet-bearing lherzolite source. The palaeogeographic distribution of the magmatic suites was controlled by the lithospheric thinning of the Cambrian Atlas Rift and lithospheric constraints of the Pan-African metacraton and West African craton.

  20. Mercury enrichment indicates volcanic triggering of the Valanginian environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Guillaume; Morales, Chloé; Duchamp-Alphonse, Stéphanie; Westermann, Stéphane; Adatte, Thierry; Föllmi, Karl

    2017-04-01

    The Valanginian stage (Early Cretaceous, ˜137-132 Ma) recorded an episode of pronounced palaeoenvironmental change, which is marked by a globally recorded positive δ13C excursion of 1.5 to 2‰ amplitude, also known as the "Weissert event or episode". Its onset near the early/late Valanginian boundary (B. campylotoxus-S. verrucosum ammonite Zones) coincides with a phase of warmer climate conditions associated with enhanced humidity, major changes in the evolution of marine plankton, and the drowning of tropical and subtropical marine shallow-water carbonate ecosystems. The globally recorded excursion indicates important transformations in the carbon cycle, which have tentatively been associated with Paraná-Etendeka large igneous province (LIP) volcanic activity. Incertainties in existing age models preclude, however, its positive identification as a trigger of Valanginian environmental change. Since very recently, mercury (Hg) chemostratigraphy offers the possibly to evaluate the role of LIP activity during major palaeoenvironmental perturbations. In this study we investigate the distribution of Hg contents in four Valanginian reference sections located in pelagic and hemipelagic environments in the Central Tethyan Realm (Lombardian Basin, Breggia section), the northern Tethyan margin (Vocontian Basin, Orpierre and Angles sections), and the narrow seaway connecting the Tethyan and Boreal Oceans (Polish Basin, Wawal core). All records show an enrichment in Hg concentrations at or near the onset of the Weissert Episode, with maximal values of 70.5 ppb at Angles, 59.5 ppb at Orpierre, 69.9 ppb at Wawal, and 17.0 ppb at Breggia. The persistence of the Hg anomaly in Hg/TOC and Hg/phyllosilicate ratios shows that organic-matter scavenging and/or adsorbtion onto clay minerals only played a limited role.We propose that volcanic outgassing was the primary source of the Hg enrichment and conclude that an important magmatic pulse triggered the Valanginian environmental

  1. Palaeoclimate: Volcanism caused ancient global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Katrin J.; Bralower, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    A study confirms that volcanism set off one of Earth's fastest global-warming events. But the release of greenhouse gases was slow enough for negative feedbacks to mitigate impacts such as ocean acidification. See Letter p.573

  2. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  3. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  4. Shape measurements of volcanic particles by CAMSIZER

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Castro, Maria Deborah; Andronico, Daniele; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro; Torrisi, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    The shape of volcanic particles is an important parameter holding information related to physical and geochemical processes. The study of particle shape may help improving knowledge on the main eruptive processes (fragmentation, transport and sedimentation) during explosive activity. In general, volcanic ash is formed by different components, namely juvenile, lithic and crystal particles, each one characterized by peculiar morphology. Moreover, quantifying the shape of pyroclasts is needed by...

  5. Imaging volcanic CO2 and SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, A.; Wright, R.; Lucey, P. G.; Porter, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting and quantifying volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions is of relevance to volcanologists. Changes in the amount and composition of gases that volcanoes emit are related to subsurface magma movements and the probability of eruptions. Volcanic gases and related acidic aerosols are also an important atmospheric pollution source that create environmental health hazards for people, animals, plants, and infrastructures. For these reasons, it is important to measure emissions from volcanic plumes during both day and night. We present image measurements of the volcanic plume at Kīlauea volcano, HI, and flux derivation, using a newly developed 8-14 um hyperspectral imaging spectrometer, the Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI). THI is capable of acquiring images of the scene it views from which spectra can be derived from each pixel. Each spectrum contains 50 wavelength samples between 8 and 14 um where CO2 and SO2 volcanic gases have diagnostic absorption/emission features respectively at 8.6 and 14 um. Plume radiance measurements were carried out both during the day and the night by using both the lava lake in the Halema'uma'u crater as a hot source and the sky as a cold background to detect respectively the spectral signatures of volcanic CO2 and SO2 gases. CO2 and SO2 path-concentrations were then obtained from the spectral radiance measurements using a new Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR)-based inversion algorithm, which was developed as part of this project. Volcanic emission fluxes were determined by combining the path measurements with wind observations, derived directly from the images. Several hours long time-series of volcanic emission fluxes will be presented and the SO2 conversion rates into aerosols will be discussed. The new imaging and inversion technique, discussed here, are novel allowing for continuous CO2 and SO2 plume mapping during both day and night.

  6. Medical effects of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Peter J.

    1990-09-01

    Excluding famine and tsunamis, most deaths in volcanic eruptions have been from pyroclastic flows and surges (nuées ardentes) and wet debris flows (lahars). Information on the causes of death and injury in eruptions is sparse but the available literature is summarised for the benefit of volcanologists and emergency planners. In nuées, thermal injury may be at least as important as asphyxia in causing immediate deaths. The high temperature of the gases and entrained particles readily causes severe burns to the skin and the air passages and the presence of both types of injury in an individual may combine to increase the delayed mortality risk from respiratory complications or from infection of burns. Trauma from missiles or body displacement is also common, but the role of asphyxiant or irritant gases, and steam, remains unclear. The ratio of dead: injured is much higher than in other natural disasters. At the periphery of a nuée being protected inside buildings which remain intact appears to greatly increase the chances of survival. In lahars, infected wounds and crush injury are the main delayed causes of death, and the scope for preventive measures, other than evacuation, is small. The evidence from Mount St. Helens, 1980, and other major eruptions indicates that, although mortality is high within the main zone of devastation and in the open, emergency planning should concentrate on the periphery of a nuée where preventive measures are feasible and could save many lives in densely populated areas.

  7. Lava and Life: New investigations into the Carson Volcanics, lower Kimberley Basin, north Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Karin; Phillips, Chris; Hollis, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The Carson Volcanics are the only volcanic unit in the Paleoproterozoic Kimberley Basin and are part of a poorly studied Large Igneous Province (LIP) that was active at 1790 Ma. New work focussing on this LIP in 2012 and 2013 involved helicopter-supported traverses and sampling of the Carson Volcanics in remote areas near Kalumburu in far north Western Australia's Kimberley region. The succession is widespread and flat lying to gently dipping. It consists of three to six basalt units with intercalated sandstone and siltstone. The basalts are 20-40 m thick, but can be traced up to 60 km along strike. The basalt can be massive or amygdaloidal and commonly display polygonal to subhorizontal and rare vertical columnar jointing. Features of the basalt include ropy lava tops and basal pipe vesicles consistent with pahoehoe lavas. The intercalated cross-bedded quartzofeldspathic sandstone and siltstone vary in thickness up to 40 m and can be traced up to 40 km along strike. Peperite is common and indicates interaction between wet, unconsolidated sediment and hot lava. Stromatolitic chert at the top of the formation represents the oldest life found within the Kimberley region. Mud cracks evident in the sedimentary rocks, and stromatolites suggest an emergent broad tidal flat environment. The volcanics were extruded onto a wide marginal margin setting subject to frequent flooding events. Thickening of the volcanic succession south and the palaeocurrents in the underlying King Leopold Sandstone and the overlying Warton Sandstone suggest that this shelf sloped to the south. The type of basalt and the basalt morphology indicate a low slope gradient of about 1°.

  8. The role of Deccan volcanism during the K-T mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Gertsch, B.

    2012-12-01

    The potential role of major volcanic provinces has long been neglected as potential cause for major mass extinctions in Earth's history. This is despite the fact that volcanic activity is implicated in four of the five Phanerozoic mass extinctions, whereas a large asteroid impact is only associated with the K-T mass extinction. After 28 years of nearly unchallenged perception that a large impact (Chicxulub) on Yucatan caused the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, this theory is facing its most serious challenge from Deccan volcanism in India. Recent advances in Deccan volcanic studies show that Deccan Trap volcanism began with a relatively minor eruption phase (~6% of total volume) during the late Maastrichtian magnetic polarity C30n. The main eruption phase (~80%) occurred over a short period in C29r just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) and the last Deccan phase (~14%) erupted in the early Danian C29n. Multiproxy studies from sections in Meghalaya (NE India), Jhilmili in central India (Madhya Pradesh), 6 quarry outcrops from Rajahmundry (SE India), 10 deep wells from the Krishna-Godavari Basin (K-G) (Andhra Pradesh) place the KTB mass extinction near the end of the main Deccan phase coincident with the mass extinction. These studies show that the second and third phase of eruptions each produced the world's largest and longest lava megaflows ~1500 km across India through the K-G Basin into the Bay of Bengal. These megaflows are separated by sand, silt and shale which record the mass extinction across an interval that spans zones CF1-CF2 and most of the nannofossil Micula prinsii zone and is correlative with the rapid global warming and subsequent cooling near the end of the Maastrichtian. The mass extinction began preceding the first of the four mega-flows in C29r. Planktic foraminifera suffered a 50% drop in species richness. Survivors suffered another 50% drop after the first mega-flow, leaving just 7 to 8 survivor species. No recovery occurred between

  9. What are volcanic passive margins? A discussion based on seismic and field examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalan, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic or magma-rich passive margins are continental margins whose underlying rift basins, developed during the stretching and thinning phases that affected the continental crust before breakup, are totally or predominantly filled by volcanic and volcanic-derived rocks. The type of magma is usually fissural tholeiitic basalts, eventually bi-modal basaltic-rhyolitic. This is in strong contrast with the definition of sedimentary or magma-poor passive margins, whose rift basins are predominantly filled with sedimentary rocks. As the name states, magma-poor margins may display a certain amount of magmatism, but which is clearly secondary with respect to the dominant sedimentary nature of the syn-rift filling. These are two end-members in the classification of passive margins, and as such, transitional members represented by passive margins displaying characteristics of both extremes are recognizable. The significant difference in the nature of the syn-rift strata gives rise to strikingly different seismic facies in seismic sections that cross the entire width of passive margins, allowing a relatively easy visual distinction between the end-members, as well as of the transitional members. Typical growth volcanic strata dip seawards and fill grabens controlled by landward dipping listric faults, giving rise to the well known laterally accreted wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR). The amount of magmatism in volcanic margins is so high that it impacts a large area surrounding the continental margin, thus, also easing the recognition of this end-member through the analysis of the neighboring surface geology. Volcanic margins are characterized by Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) that present pre-rift (lava deltas, tabular lava flows, trap-stage), syn-rift (seaward-dipping growth strata, extrusive centers, SDR-stage) and post-rift (volcanos, punctual lava flows) magmatism. Breakup of the continental crust takes place at the climax of the SDR-stage. Volcanism is

  10. Local and remote infrasound from explosive volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.; LE Pichon, A.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can inject large volumes of ash into heavily travelled air corridors and thus pose a significant societal and economic hazard. In remote volcanic regions, satellite data are sometimes the only technology available to observe volcanic eruptions and constrain ash-release parameters for aviation safety. Infrasound (acoustic waves ~0.01-20 Hz) data fill this critical observational gap, providing ground-based data for remote volcanic eruptions. Explosive volcanic eruptions are among the most powerful sources of infrasound observed on earth, with recordings routinely made at ranges of hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Advances in infrasound technology and the efficient propagation of infrasound in the atmosphere therefore greatly enhance our ability to monitor volcanoes in remote regions such as the North Pacific Ocean. Infrasound data can be exploited to detect, locate, and provide detailed chronologies of the timing of explosive volcanic eruptions for use in ash transport and dispersal models. We highlight results from case studies of multiple eruptions recorded by the International Monitoring System and dedicated regional infrasound networks (2008 Kasatochi, Alaska, USA; 2008 Okmok, Alaska, USA; 2009 Sarychev Peak, Kuriles, Russian Federation; 2010 Eyjafjallajökull, Icleand) and show how infrasound is currently used in volcano monitoring. We also present progress towards characterizing and modeling the variability in source mechanisms of infrasound from explosive eruptions using dedicated local infrasound field deployments at volcanoes Karymsky, Russian Federation and Sakurajima, Japan.

  11. Examples of transport of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursik, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Examination of the transport of volcanic aerosol clouds can be implemented by utilizing models for introduction and early stage spread of eruption plumes, and long-range transport. As a plume rises into the atmosphere, it is subject to the atmospheric circulation. Average wind patterns in the troposphere and stratosphere are useful in determining general features of volcanic cloud transport, but daily, seasonal and year to year variance must be taken into account in any one particular case. Tropospheric circulation plays a small role relative to stratospheric circulation, although the effects of the tropospheric portion of eruptions can be significant to catastrophic, as was the case with the April, 2010, eruption of Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland. Stratospheric circulation plays an important role in the long-term influence of volcanic aerosol, since residence time is great, due to limited mixing and vertical motion. The eruptions of Eyjafjallajokull and Laki, Iceland; Hudson, Chile; El Chichon, Mexico, and Pinatubo, Phillipines, provide examples of how volcanic clouds interact with the atmospheric circulation. Eruption clouds from low latitudes spread across both hemispheres, while eruption clouds from high latitudes remain in the hemisphere of the eruption. Cloud form and dispersal pattern are determined by season; the shape of a volcanic cloud is altitude dependent. The size of a volcanic cloud in relation to atmospheric eddies is important in determining how it is dispersed.

  12. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  13. Provenance and drainage system of the Early Cretaceous volcanic detritus in the Himalaya as constrained by detrital zircon geochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Mian Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The age range of the major intra-plate volcanic event that affected the northern Indian margin in the Early Cretaceous is here defined precisely by detrital zircon geochronology. U–Pb ages of Early Cretaceous detrital zircons found in the Cretaceous to the Paleocene sandstones cluster mainly between 142 Ma and 123 Ma in the northern Tethys Himalayan unit, and between 140 Ma and 116 Ma in the southern Tethys Himalayan unit. The youngest and oldest detrital zircons within this group indicate that volcanism in the source areas started in the latest Jurassic and ended by the early Albian. Stratigraphic data indicate that volcaniclastic sedimentation began significantly earlier in southern Tibet (Tithonian than in Nepal (Valanginian, and considerably later in Spiti and Zanskar (Aptian/Albian to the west. This apparent westward migration of magmatism was explained with progressive westward propagation of extensional/transtensional tectonic activity and development of fractures cutting deeply across the Indian continental margin crust. However, detrital zircon geochronology provides no indication of heterochroneity in magmatic activity in the source areas from east to west, and thus lends little support to such a scenario. Westward migration of volcaniclastic sedimentation may thus reflect instead the westward progradation of major drainage systems supplying volcanic detritus sourced from the same volcanic centers in the east. Development of multiple radial drainage away from the domal surface uplift associated with magmatic upwelling, as observed for most large igneous provinces around the world, may also explain why U–Pb ages of detrital zircons tend to cluster around 133–132 Ma (the age of the Comei igneous province in Tethys Himalayan units, but around 118–117 Ma (the age of the Rajmahal igneous province in Lesser Himalayan units.

  14. Field-trip guide to Columbia River flood basalts, associated rhyolites, and diverse post-plume volcanism in eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Mark L.; Streck, Martin J.; McClaughry, Jason D.

    2017-08-09

    The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late Cenozoic. This compositionally diverse suite of volcanic rocks are considered part of the La Grande-Owyhee eruptive axis (LOEA), an approximately 300-kilometer-long (185 mile), north-northwest-trending, middle Miocene to Pliocene volcanic belt located along the eastern margin of the Columbia River flood basalt province. Volcanic rocks erupted from and preserved within the LOEA form an important regional stratigraphic link between the (1) flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau on the north, (2) bimodal basalt-rhyolite vent complexes of the Owyhee Plateau on the south, (3) bimodal basalt-rhyolite and time-transgressive rhyolitic volcanic fields of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Plateau, and (4) the High Lava Plains of central Oregon.This field-trip guide describes a 4-day geologic excursion that will explore the stratigraphic and geochemical relationships among mafic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and coeval and compositionally diverse volcanic rocks associated with the early “Yellowstone track” and High Lava Plains in eastern Oregon. Beginning in Portland, the Day 1 log traverses the Columbia River gorge eastward to Baker City, focusing on prominent outcrops that reveal a distal succession of laterally extensive, large-volume tholeiitic flood lavas of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Basalt formations of the CRBG. These “great flows” are typical of the well-studied flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau, where interbedded silicic and calc-alkaline lavas are conspicuously absent. The latter part of Day 1 will highlight exposures of middle to late Miocene silicic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite domes, and

  15. Heavy metals in the volcanic environment and thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneri, R; Malandrino, P; Gianì, F; Russo, M; Vigneri, P

    2017-12-05

    In the last two decades thyroid cancer incidence has increased worldwide more than any other cancer. Overdiagnosis of subclinical microcarcinomas has certainly contributed to this increase but many evidences indicate that a true increase, possibly due to environmental factors, has also occurred. Thyroid cancer incidence is markedly increased in volcanic areas. Thus, the volcanic environment is a good model to investigate the possible factors favoring thyroid cancer. In the volcanic area of Mt. Etna in Sicily, as well as in other volcanic areas, a non-anthropogenic pollution with heavy metals has been documented, a consequence of gas, ash and lava emission. Soil, water and atmosphere contamination, via the food chain, biocontaminate the residents as documented by high levels in the urines and the scalp hair compared to individuals living in adjacent non-volcanic areas. Trace amounts of metals are essential nutrients but, at higher concentrations, can be toxic for living cells. Metals can behave both as endocrine disruptors, perturbing the hormonal system, and as carcinogens, promoting malignant transformation. Similarly to other carcinogens, the transforming effect of heavy metals is higher in developing organisms as the fetus (contaminated via the mother) and individuals in early childhood. In the last decades environment metal pollution has greatly increased in industrialized countries. Although still within the "normal" limits for each single metal the hormesis effect (heavy metal activity at very low concentration because of biphasic, non linear cell response) and the possible potentiation effect resulting from the mixture of different metals acting synergistically can explain cell damage at very low concentrations. The effect of metals on the human thyroid is poorly studied: for some heavy metals no data are available. The scarce studies that have been performed mainly focus on metal effect as thyroid endocrine disruptors. The metal concentration in tissues has

  16. Petrological Features and evolution of Post-Collision Volcanism of the Central Part of the Caucasus Segment (within Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutberidze, Bezhan

    2013-04-01

    The study area is located in the central part of the Caucasus - Asia Minor segment of the Alpine folded belt. The subduction geodynamic situation in the Caucasus segment changed to a collision 11 Ma ago in conditions of convergence of the Africa -Arabian and Eurasian continental lithospheric plates, followed by the closure of the Mesezoic ocean Thetys with its oceanic type crust. The first powerful paroxysm of collision subareal volcanism in the central part of the Caucasus segment occured in the volcanic area of South Georgia at the end of the Miocene. The initial stage of its volcanic activity begins with the eruption of pyroclastic material and ends with the eruptions of lava material. The products range in composition from basalts to ryolite. Andesites and dacites are predominant. The second cycle of volcanic paroxysm begins in the Late Pliocene, starting with the eruption of thick areal doleritebasaltic lavas on the Javakheti Plateau - the volcanic area of South Georgia ends with the eruption of lavas of andesitic composition and their pyroclasts. The volcanic processes in the South Georgian volcanic area end in the Middle Pleistocene by the formation of dolerite-basaltic and andesitic lava flows. Volcanic activity in the folded system of the Lesser Caucasus started in the Late Pliocene with the eruption of basalts, andesitebasalts, andesites and their pyroclastic equivalents. Andesites are predominant. Late Miocene volcanism is manifested mainly in the Transcaucasian intermontane area. All volcanic products of the cited area correspond to subalkaline (rarely alkaline) basalts, being represented by short lava flows and their pyroclastic equivalents. The subalkaline basalts of the Transcaucasian intermontane area are close to continental lithospheric intraplate basalts. Volcanism in the folded system of the Greater Caucasus is confined to two enormous regions including the Kazbegi and Keli plateau provinces. The magmatism occurred in 5 episodes at: Late

  17. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature and style of emplacement of Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) lava flows has been a atter of great interest as well as considerable controversy in the recent past. However, even a cursory review of published literature reveals that the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and Hawaiian volcanoes provide most of ...

  18. GIS methodology for geothermal play fairway analysis: Example from the Snake River Plain volcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Jacob; Shervais, John W.; Glen, Jonathan; Nielson, Dennis L.; Garg, Sabodh; Dobson, Patrick; Gasperikova, Erika; Sonnenthal, Eric; Visser, Charles; Liberty, Lee M.; Siler, Drew; Evans, James P.; Santellanes, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Play fairway analysis in geothermal exploration derives from a systematic methodology originally developed within the petroleum industry and is based on a geologic and hydrologic framework of identified geothermal systems. We are tailoring this methodology to study the geothermal resource potential of the Snake River Plain and surrounding region. This project has contributed to the success of this approach by cataloging the critical elements controlling exploitable hydrothermal systems, establishing risk matrices that evaluate these elements in terms of both probability of success and level of knowledge, and building automated tools to process results. ArcGIS was used to compile a range of different data types, which we refer to as ‘elements’ (e.g., faults, vents, heatflow…), with distinct characteristics and confidence values. Raw data for each element were transformed into data layers with a common format. Because different data types have different uncertainties, each evidence layer had an accompanying confidence layer, which reflects spatial variations in these uncertainties. Risk maps represent the product of evidence and confidence layers, and are the basic building blocks used to construct Common Risk Segment (CRS) maps for heat, permeability, and seal. CRS maps quantify the variable risk associated with each of these critical components. In a final step, the three CRS maps were combined into a Composite Common Risk Segment (CCRS) map for analysis that reveals favorable areas for geothermal exploration. Python scripts were developed to automate data processing and to enhance the flexibility of the data analysis. Python scripting provided the structure that makes a custom workflow possible. Nearly every tool available in the ArcGIS ArcToolbox can be executed using commands in the Python programming language. This enabled the construction of a group of tools that could automate most of the processing for the project. Currently, our tools are repeatable, scalable, modifiable, and transferrable, allowing us to automate the task of data analysis and the production of CRS and CCRS maps. Our ultimate goal is to produce a toolkit that can be imported into ArcGIS and applied to any geothermal play type, with fully tunable parameters that will allow for the production of multiple versions of the CRS and CCRS maps in order to better test for sensitivity and to validate results.

  19. WITHDRAWN: The Palaeocene Cerro Munro tonalite intrusion (Chubut Province, Argentina): A plutonic remnant of explosive volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, C.; Aragón, E.; Castro, A.; Pedreira, R.; Sánchez-Navas, A.; Díaz-Alvarado, J.; D´Eramo, F.; Pinotti, L.; Aguilera, Y.; Cavarozzi, C.; Demartis, M.; Hernando, I. R.; Fuentes, T.

    2017-10-01

    The publisher regrets that an error occurred which led to the premature publication of this paper. This error bears no reflection on the article or its authors. The publisher apologizes to the authors and the readers for this unfortunate error in Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 78C (2017) 30 - 60, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2017.06.002. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal

  20. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    effects of cooling. The possibility of an insulating mode of transport was not considered. Such a mode of transport, however, was well characterised for young lava flows, especially in Hawaii. The growth of pahoehoe lava flows by endogenous growth or inflation, and thermally efficient transport through lava tubes had been ...

  1. Active fault systems of the Kivu rift and Virunga volcanic province, and implications for geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zal, H. J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Wood, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; d'Oreye, N.; Carn, S. A.; Rutagarama, U.

    2013-12-01

    H Zal, C Ebinger, D. Wood, C. Scholz, N. d'Oreye, S. Carn, U. Rutagarama The weakly magmatic Western rift system, East Africa, is marked by fault-bounded basins filled by freshwater lakes that record tectonic and climatic signals. One of the smallest of the African Great Lakes, Lake Kivu, represents a unique geohazard owing to the warm, saline bottom waters that are saturated in methane, as well as two of the most active volcanoes in Africa that effectively dam the northern end of the lake. Yet, the dynamics of the basin system and the role of magmatism were only loosely constrained prior to new field and laboratory studies in Rwanda. In this work, we curated, merged, and analyzed historical and digital data sets, including spectral analyses of merged Shuttle Radar Topography Mission topography and high resolution CHIRP bathymetry calibrated by previously mapped fault locations along the margins and beneath the lake. We quantitatively compare these fault maps with the time-space distribution of earthquakes located using data from a temporary array along the northern sector of Lake Kivu, as well as space-based geodetic data. During 2012, seismicity rates were highest beneath Nyiragongo volcano, where a range of low frequency (1-3 s peak frequency) to tectonic earthquakes were located. Swarms of low-frequency earthquakes correspond to periods of elevated gas emissions, as detected by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Earthquake swarms also occur beneath Karisimbi and Nyamuragira volcanoes. A migrating swarm of earthquakes in May 2012 suggests a sill intrusion at the DR Congo-Rwanda border. We delineate two fault sets: SW-NE, and sub-N-S. Excluding the volcano-tectonic earthquakes, most of the earthquakes are located along subsurface projections of steep border faults, and intrabasinal faults calibrated by seismic reflection data. Small magnitude earthquakes also occur beneath the uplifted rift flanks. Time-space variations in seismicity patterns provide a baseline for hazard assessment, and guide future studies in the Kivu rift, and document the role of magmatism in rifting processes.

  2. Volcanism on differentiated asteroids (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.

    2013-12-01

    after passing through optically dense fire fountains. At low eruption rates and high volatile contents many clasts cooled to form spatter or cinder deposits, but at high eruption rates and low volatile contents most clasts landed hot and coalesced into lava ponds to feed lava flows. Lava flow thickness varies with surface slope, acceleration due to gravity, and lava yield strength induced by cooling. Low gravity on asteroids caused flows to be relatively thick which reduced the effects of cooling, and many flows probably attained lengths of tens of km and stopped as a result of cessation of magma supply from the reservoir rather than cooling. On most asteroids larger than 100 km radius experiencing more than ~30% mantle melting, the erupted volcanic deposits will have buried the original chondritic surface layers of the asteroid to such great depths that they were melted, or at least heavily thermally metamorphosed, leaving no present-day meteoritical evidence of their prior existence. Tidal stresses from close encounters between asteroids and proto-planets may have very briefly increased melting and melt migration speeds in asteroid interiors but only gross structural disruption would have greatly have changed volcanic histories.

  3. Modeling Io volcanism: Maximum volcanic temperatures, depths of melting and magma composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Interim results of thermal and structural modeling of volcanism on Io were presented. The final results of the modeling are summarized. The basic analysis is an evaluation of the magma trigger mechanism for initiating and maintaining eruptions. Secondary aspects include models of the mechanical mode of magma emplacement, interactions with a sulphur-rich upper crust, and more speculative implications for Io's volcanism.

  4. A new radiative model implemented into an AOGCM: Simulations of recent and historical volcanic eruptions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodri, M.; Fluteau, F.

    2009-12-01

    radius, single-scatter albedo, etc) are accounted for. The climatic impact will depend on the monthly mean optical thickness reconstructed by Amman et al 2003 and Gao et al 2008. Sets of numerical experiments have been performed in order to investigate the climatic effect of recent volcanic eruptions (Pinatubo, El Chichon). We will compare these simulations with various observations as well as those previously obtained with other models. Then we will present climatic simulations of historical volcanic eruptions (Tambora, 1815; Krakatoa, 1883; and others). These results will be compared with various sets of data.

  5. [The relationships between the single nueleotide polymorphisms of CACNA1S gene 11 exon and thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in the people of Han Nationality in Sichuan Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhu; Li, Li; Li, Sheyu; Yao, Yu; Liu, Yuping; Tian, Haoming

    2011-06-01

    The present research was aimed to investigate the relationships between the single nueleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CACNA1S gene 11 exon and thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP)in the people of Han Nationality in Sichuan China. 100 male subjects were divided into four groups in this study, i.e., 22 patients with THPP, 23 patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP), 33 patients with thyrotoxicosis but without hypokalemic periodic paralysis (NTHPP), and 22 healthy (control group) subjects. The sequences of the CACNA1S gene exon 11 polymorphisms, for the four groups respectively, were analysed by the SNPs method with polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA direct sequencing. A meta-analysis of three additional studies was also performed. Three SNPs of exon 11 of the CACNA1S gene (C1491T, T1551C, C1564T) were present in all the four groups. The polymorphisms C1491T and T1551C were present in both homozygotes and heterozygotes, while the C1564T polymorphism was present only in heterozygotes. The genotype frequencies of variants at C1491T and T1551C were not significantly associated with TPP (dominant model: P=0.530 and P=0.568; allele frequency model: P=0.563 and P=0.568). A Meta-analysis yielded combined odds ratio (OR) for TPP of 2. 12 (95% CI: 0.80-5.60) at C1491T, 2.90 (95% CI: 0.71-11.78) at T1551C, and 1.61 (95% CI: 0.36-7.26) at C1564T with the dominant model. These results suggested that three SNPs of CACNA1S gene exon 11 definitely could exist but could not be associated with TPP people of Han Nationality in Sichuan.

  6. Volcanic Supersites as cross-disciplinary laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzale, Antonello; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Giamberini, Mariasilvia; Pennisi, Maddalena; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic Supersites, defined in the frame of the GEO-GSNL Initiative, are usually considered mainly for their geohazard and geological characteristics. However, volcanoes are extremely challenging areas from many other points of view, including environmental and climatic properties, ecosystems, hydrology, soil properties and biogeochemical cycling. Possibly, volcanoes are closer to early Earth conditions than most other types of environment. During FP7, EC effectively fostered the implementation of the European volcano Supersites (Mt. Etna, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Iceland) through the MED-SUV and FUTUREVOLC projects. Currently, the large H2020 project ECOPOTENTIAL (2015-2019, 47 partners, http://www.ecopotential-project.eu/) contributes to GEO/GEOSS and to the GEO ECO Initiative, and it is devoted to making best use of remote sensing and in situ data to improve future ecosystem benefits, focusing on a network of Protected Areas of international relevance. In ECOPOTENTIAL, remote sensing and in situ data are collected, processed and used for a better understanding of the ecosystem dynamics, analysing and modelling the effects of global changes on ecosystem functions and services, over an array of different ecosystem types, including mountain, marine, coastal, arid and semi-arid ecosystems, and also areas of volcanic origin such as the Canary and La Reunion Islands. Here, we propose to extend the network of the ECOPOTENTIAL project to include active Volcanic Supersites, such as Mount Etna and other volcanic Protected Areas, and we discuss how they can be included in the framework of the ECOPOTENTIAL workflow. A coordinated and cross-disciplinary set of studies at these sites should include geological, biological, ecological, biogeochemical, climatic and biogeographical aspects, as well as their relationship with the antropogenic impact on the environment, and aim at the global analysis of the volcanic Earth Critical Zone - namely, the upper layer of the Earth

  7. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  8. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  9. The Province of the South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Papastergiadis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of contemporary art nothing could be worse than to be described as provincial. In a sphere where novelty, mobility and connectedness are the most highly valued signs, the image of the province is loaded with a curse that is saturated with the melancholic rut of repetition, stagnation and isolation. The dreaded load of the province is to be stuck when everyone else is on the move. This curse is nowhere more heavily felt than in the former colonial spaces of the South. And yet, in and from the South the idea of provincialism has been radically redefined.

  10. The 40Ar/39Ar age record and geodynamic significance of Indo-Madagascar and Deccan flood basalt volcanism in the Sarnu-Dandali alkaline complex, Rajasthan, northwestern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Anjali; Pande, Kanchan; Sheth, Hetu; Kant Sharma, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    The Sarnu-Dandali alkaline complex in Rajasthan, northwestern India, is considered to represent early, pre-tholeiite magmatism in the Deccan Traps continental flood basalt (CFB) province, based on a single 40Ar/39Ar age of 68.57 Ma. Rhyolites found in the complex are considered to be 750 Ma Malani basement. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages of 88.9-86.8 Ma (for syenites, nephelinite, phonolite and rhyolite) and 66.3 ± 0.4 Ma (2σ, melanephelinite) provide clear evidence that whereas the Sarnu-Dandali complex has Deccan-age components, it is dominantly an older (by ˜20 million years) alkaline complex, with rhyolites included. Sarnu-Dandali is thus an alkaline igneous center active at least twice in the Late Cretaceous, and also much before as suggested by a basalt flow underlying the Early Cretaceous Sarnu Sandstone. The 89-86 Ma 40Ar/39Ar ages fully overlap with those for the Indo-Madagascar CFB province formed during continental break-up between India (plus Seychelles) and Madagascar. Recent 40Ar/39Ar work has shown polychronous emplacement (over ≥ 45 million years) of the Mundwara alkaline complex in Rajasthan, 100 km from Sarnu-Dandali, and 84-80 Ma ages obtained from Mundwara also arguably represent late stages of the Indo-Madagascar CFB volcanism. Remnants of the Indo-Madagascar CFB province are known from several localities in southern India but hitherto unknown from northwestern India 2000 km away. Additional equivalents buried under the vast Deccan Traps are highly likely. We relate the Sarnu-Dandali and Mundwara complexes to decompression melting of ancient, subduction-fluxed, enriched mantle lithosphere due to periodic lithospheric extension during much of the Cretaceous, and hundreds of kilometers inland from the India-Madagascar and India-Seychelles rifted margins.

  11. Geochemical study on hot-spring water in West New Britain Province, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahan, M. M.; Verave, R. T.; Irarue, P. Y.

    2015-10-01

    West New Britain Province, which occupies the western part of New Britain Island in Papua New Guinea, is ideally located within an active tectonic region that influences volcanism creating an environment favourable for geothermal activity. Geothermal mapping of surface manifestations reveals high temperature geothermal prospects along the northern coastline of West New Britain Province that are further confirmed by geochemical analysis. The occurrence of geothermal features is confined to the Quaternary Kimbe Volcanics and alluvium in the lowland areas. The features in Talasea appear to be controlled by deep-seated northerly trending faults while structures in Hoskins also appear to be deep seated but have not been identified. The geothermal systems in West New Britain Province have not been drilled, but preliminary reconnaissance geothermal mapping and geochemical analysis reveals four high temperature geothermal prospects suitable for further investigation and development of geothermal energy. These are the Pangalu (Rabili) and Talasea Station geothermal prospects in Talasea and Kasiloli (Magouru) and Silanga (Bakama and Sakalu) geothermal prospects in Hoskins. The calculated reservoir temperatures for these fields are in the range of 245-310 °C. Recommendations are made for further follow-up exploratory investigations.

  12. Sm-Nd study of Precambrian crustal development in the Prieska-Copperton region, Cape Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.H.; Hawkesworth, C.J.; Van Calsteren, P.; Scott, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    Samples representing the major lithological units between Copperton and Prieskapoort in the Cape Province have been analysed for Sm and Nd concentrations and Nd isotopic compositions. The ∼ 3000 Ma Marydale Group is shown to extend without major chronostratigraphic breaks from slightly metamorphosed basalt and arkose west of the Doornberg Fault at Prieskapoort to highly metamorphosed gneisses east of the Brakbos Fault at Copperton. Evidence is found of plutonic alkaline igneous activity, and possibly volcanism, which occurred during the ∼ 1 900 Ma Kheis tectogenesis. Early Proterozoic material apparently dominates the lower crustal region of the eastern Namaqua Province sampled by kimberlites. Sm-Nd data for the Copperton Formation of the Namaqua Province places an upper limit of ∼ 1 514 Ma and lower limit of ∼ 1 350 Ma on its origin. Omission of basaltic samples from the isochron regression yields the younger age, which is more easily reconciled with Pb isotope data. Volcanism is envisaged from a mantle source with a history of light rare-earth depletion relative to the chondritic earth model. By analogy with modern tectonic environments, the Copperton Formation probably formed in an active continental margin or island arc environment

  13. Volcano-sedimentary processes operating on a marginal continental arc: the Archean Raquette Lake Formation, Slave Province, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, W. U.; Corcoran, P. L.

    2001-06-01

    The 200-m thick, volcano-sedimentary Raquette Lake Formation, located in the south-central Archean Slave Province, represents a remnant arc segment floored by continental crust. The formation overlies the gneissic Sleepy Dragon Complex unconformably, is laterally interstratified with subaqueous mafic basalts of the Cameron River volcanic belt, and is considered the proximal equivalent of the turbidite-dominated Burwash Formation. A continuum of events associated with volcanism and sedimentation, and controlled by extensional tectonics, is advocated. A complex stratigraphy with three volcanic and three sedimentary lithofacies constitute the volcano-sedimentary succession. The volcanic lithofacies include: (1) a mafic volcanic lithofacies composed of subaqueous pillow-pillow breccia, and subaerial massive to blocky flows, (2) a felsic volcanic lithofacies representing felsic flows that were deposited in a subaerial environment, and (3) a felsic volcanic sandstone lithofacies interpreted as shallow-water, wave- and storm-reworked pyroclastic debris derived from explosive eruptions. The sedimentary lithofacies are represented by: (1) a conglomerate-sandstone lithofacies consistent with unconfined debris flow, hyperconcentrated flood flow and talus scree deposits, as well as minor high-energy stream flow conglomerates that formed coalescing, steep-sloped, coarse-clastic fan deltas, (2) a sandstone lithofacies, interpreted as hyperconcentrated flood flow deposits that accumulated at the subaerial-subaqueous interface, and (3) a mudstone lithofacies consistent with suspension sedimentation in a small restricted lagoon-type setting. The Raquette Lake Formation is interpreted as a fringing continental arc that displays both high-energy clastic sedimentation and contemporaneous effusive and explosive mafic and felsic volcanism. Modern analogues that develop along active plate margins in which continental crust plays a significant role include Japan and the Baja California

  14. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    highveld to the south. The large round feature near the north-west corner indicates an ancient volcanic crater in the Pilanesberg National Park. Many bright, buff-colored rectangular patches around Johannesburg are associated with mining activities, and at least two of these areas (situated 40 kilometers southeast of the city) hold large amounts of water. The Sterkfontein Caves (now included within the recently created 'Cradle of Humankind' World Heritage Site) are located about 35 kilometers northwest of Johannesburg. In the southern portion of the images, a section of the Vredefort Hills are apparent to the west, and to the east the Vaal River and a large water body contained by the Vaal Dam delineate the border between the Gauteng and Free State provinces.The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 13266, and covers an area of about 190 kilometers x 221 kilometers. It utilizes data from blocks 111 to 112 within World Reference System-2 path 170.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  15. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  16. Deuterium values from volcanic glass: A paleoelevation proxy for Oregon's Cascade Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, T. B.; Bershaw, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrated volcanic glass has been used as a proxy to constrain Cenozoic paleoclimate across many of the world's mountain ranges. However, there are concerns that volcanic glass may not preserve the isotopic composition of syndepositional meteoric water. The Cascades are an excellent location to study the validity of hydrated volcanic glass as a paleoenvironmental proxy for several reasons. Moisture is derived from a single oceanic source and falls as orographic precipitation in the Cascades, leading to a characteristic altitude effect, or inverse relationship between elevation and the isotopic composition of meteoric water (δD). In addition, past studies have inferred uplift of the Cascades and an increase in the rain shadow effect since the Eocene through independent methods such as changing fossil assemblages, and other isotopic proxies including carbonates and fossil teeth. In this study, δD values of two hydrated tuff samples are compared: one prior to ( 29 Ma) and one following ( 5 Ma) the onset of High Cascade volcanism. The isotopic composition of these samples are interpreted in the context of modern water across the range to understand the potential of volcanic glass as a proxy for paleoelevation in the Pacific Northwest.

  17. Volcanic eruptions and seismicity of Mt. Baekdu (Changbai) occurred in the historical time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, T.; Baag, C.; Chu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, it was reported that the Mt. Baekdu had large volcanic eruptions at least two times in the geological and historical times and the lake Cheonji (Tianchi in Chinese) had formed by collapse of the summit part of the mountain. The last one of the four eruptions occurred in the historical time. Geologists tried to measure the date of eruptions using carbon isotope, but the results show diversity ranging approximately form AD 8 to 14 centuries corresponding to the dates of two dynasties of Balhae (Bohai in Chinese) and Goryeo. Unfortunately, there is no distinct record of the eruptions in this period in historical literatures. In the current study, we could infer that the last great volcanic eruption occurred in the winter time with strong northwestern seasonal wind, considering the distribution of pumice on the satellite images and the thickness of the pumice layers measured at sites in relationship with the climatic environment. On the other hand, some researchers interpreted five events appearing in historical documents written in the Joseon dynasty to be related to volcanic eruptions of Mt. Baekdu. These events occurred in the years 1413, 1597, 1668, 1702, and 1903. Their interpretations have been widely cited in journals and books, However based on critical reviews of historical literature including Joseon Wangjo Sillok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty), we find that three events of the five were not related to volcanic eruptions of the Mt. Baekdu. Events in the years 1413 and 1668 were phenomena of Asian dust. The event in 1903 recorded in a Chinese literature is found to be a shower type of rain drop with hail accompanied by thunder and lightning. Only the two events in 1597 and 1702 are confirmed to be related to volcanic activities of Mt. Baekdu. According to Joseon Wangjo Sillok, a large earthquake of maximum intensity 9 (Modified Mercalli Intensity, MMI) and its aftershocks occurred at the border region of Samsu county in Hamgyeongdo Province in the

  18. 1. The Province of Philosophers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 4. Mapmakers - The Province of Philosophers. Harini Nagendra. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 4 April 1999 pp 6-11. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/04/0006-0011 ...

  19. 1. The Province of Philosophers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 4. Mapmakers - The Province of Philosophers. Harini Nagendra. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 4 April 1999 pp 6-11. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/04/0006-0011 ...

  20. Paraben degradation using catalytic ozonation over volcanic rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, João F; Quinta-Ferreira, Maria Emília; Costa, Raquel; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M; Martins, Rui C

    2018-03-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial and preservatives in pharmaceutical and personal care products and are continuously reaching the water streams. Conventional wastewater treatments are proven inefficient on the removal of this kind of contaminants from wastewater. Therefore, catalytic ozonation appears as a suitable option, due to the oxidant power of ozone and its high capacity of hydroxyl radical generation in the presence of a suitable catalyst. The main drawback of catalytic ozonation is related with the choice of stable and active catalysts at low cost. On this way, two volcanic rocks were tested to enhance the removal of a mixture of parabens by ozonation, improving their degradation. Indeed, catalytic ozonation with volcanic rock allowed total paraben degradation using a transferred ozone dose (TOD) of 55 mg/L which corresponds to a reduction of about threefold the amount of TOD comparatively with single ozonation (170 mg/L of TOD). Due to the presence of semiconductors on volcanic rock composition, the effect of UVA irradiation on paraben degradation was analyzed. The neutral and basic conditions enhanced catalytic ozonation comparatively to acid conditions. Higher pH values allowed a total methylparaben degradation with 35 mg O 3 /L, whereas for low pH values, 55 mg O 3 /L was required. The use of a radical scavenger proven that hydroxyl radicals are the main responsible for paraben degradation with catalytic ozonation. This was confirmed through the analysis of the by-products, where 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-diHBA), 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and hydroquinone were quantified.

  1. Arsenic determination in water supplies for human consumption of the province of Cartago, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero-Campos, Virginia; Quesada-Kimsey, Jaime; Ledezma-Espinoza, Aura; Sandoval-Mora, Jose A.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific knowledge about hydroarsenicism must be disclosed in Latin America. The presence of arsenic has been detected in waters of Costa Rica that have been used for human consumption, in areas of risk; specifically in the province of Cartago, in the cantons of Oreamuno, Central, Paraiso and Alvarado. A quantification of reduced form trivalent arsenic was performed with the methodology of the 7062 Environmental Protection Agency of the United States, through volatile metal hydride generation by flame atomic absorption. The analyzed samples have determined that maintaining the maximum extent permitted by current legislation Costa Rican, 10μg/L. Research areas have corresponded to areas of high risk for its volcanic nature. The vast water supply of the cantons under study, with areas of relative protection circling recharge areas of springs, has caused the population to consume water source underground, but surface direct influence, less influence of volcanic rocks that are found at greater depths. (author) [es

  2. Tropical Volcanic Soils From Flores Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmatullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils that are developed intropical region with volcanic parent materials have many unique properties, and high potential for agricultural use.The purpose of this study is to characterize the soils developed on volcanic materials from Flores Island, Indonesia,and to examine if the soils meet the requirements for andic soil properties. Selected five soils profiles developed fromandesitic volcanic materials from Flores Island were studied to determine their properties. They were compared intheir physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics according to their parent material, and climatic characteristicdifferent. The soils were developed under humid tropical climate with ustic to udic soil moisture regimes withdifferent annual rainfall. The soils developed from volcanic ash parent materials in Flores Island showed differentproperties compared to the soils derived from volcanic tuff, even though they were developed from the sameintermediary volcanic materials. The silica contents, clay mineralogy and sand fractions, were shown as the differences.The different in climatic conditions developed similar properties such as deep solum, dark color, medium texture, andvery friable soil consistency. The soils have high organic materials, slightly acid to acid, low to medium cationexchange capacity (CEC. The soils in western region have higher clay content and showing more developed than ofthe eastern region. All the profiles meet the requirements for andic soil properties, and classified as Andisols order.The composition of sand mineral was dominated by hornblende, augite, and hypersthenes with high weatherablemineral reserves, while the clay fraction was dominated by disordered kaolinite, and hydrated halloysite. The soilswere classified into subgroup as Thaptic Hapludands, Typic Hapludands, and Dystric Haplustands

  3. Constraining the age and origin of the seamount province in the Northeast Indian Ocean using geophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Rajat; O'Neill, Craig

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of western margin of Australia from Greater India started around 155 Ma and progressed southwards. After the separation, the interceding intraplate region experienced large volumes of submarine volcanism, extending over 100 Myrs. The Christmas Island Seamount Province (CHRISP, as it has been dubbed) lies south of the Java-Sunda Trench, and contains numerous submerged volcanic seamounts, and two sub-aerially exposed island groups—Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Christmas Island. While recent geochronological investigations have shed light on the diverse eruption ages of the volcanics of this region, some islands/seamounts have demonstrated protracted volcanic histories, and it is not clear how the volcanic loading, tectonic subsidence, and subsequent emergence history of the islands relates to these discrete volcanic episodes. This study utilises a number of geophysical techniques to determine the crustal structure, loading and subsidence history, and last sub-aerial exposure age for the CHRISP. The study shows that flexural and subsidence modelling are reliable techniques in constraining the age of the seamounts when geochronological techniques are not possible. Utilising regional gravity signatures, we model the crustal structure underneath the Cocos (Keeling) Island, and constrain the thickness of the limestone cover between 900 and 2,100 m. Using age-depth subsidence curves for oceanic lithosphere the time since these seamounts were exposed above sea-level was determined, and a trend in exposure ages that youngs towards the west is observed. Two episodes of volcanism have been recorded at Christmas Island and they are of different origin. The younger phase in the Pliocene is a manifestation of flexure induced cracks produced in the lithosphere as it rides the subduction fore-bulge, whereas a low velocity seismic zone rising from the lower mantle, and tectonic reorganization, may be associated with the older Eocene volcanic phase, as well as much of

  4. Volcanic air pollution hazards in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff

    2017-04-20

    Noxious sulfur dioxide gas and other air pollutants emitted from Kīlauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i react with oxygen, atmospheric moisture, and sunlight to produce volcanic smog (vog) and acid rain. Vog can negatively affect human health and agriculture, and acid rain can contaminate household water supplies by leaching metals from building and plumbing materials in rooftop rainwater-catchment systems. U.S. Geological Survey scientists, along with health professionals and local government officials are working together to better understand volcanic air pollution and to enhance public awareness of this hazard.

  5. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  6. Beginning and end of lunar mare volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, P.H.; Spudis, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    Having presented the inferred distribution and style of the early phases of mare volcanism, based on current evidence, it is suggested that certain regions of the Moon underwent two distinct pulses of igneous activity. Crater statistics for the post-Lichtenberg mare unit and other selected units are examined and it is concluded that mare volcanism extended to a time comparable with that of the Copernicus impact, or approximately 1 Myr BP. These reassessments of the oldest and youngest maria provide new constraints on geophysical models of the internal thermal history of the Moon. (U.K.)

  7. Geochemical Signatures of Potassic to Sodic Adang Volcanics, Western Sulawesi: Implications for Their Tectonic Setting and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godang Shaban

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.3.195-214The Adang Volcanics represent a series of (ultra potassic to sodic lavas and tuffaceous rocks of predominantly trachytic composition, which forms the part of a sequence of Late Cenozoic high-K volcanic and associated intrusive rocks occurring extensively throughout Western Sulawesi. The tectonic setting and origin of these high-K rocks have been the subject of considerable debates. The Adang Volcanics have mafic to mafitic-intermediate characteristics (SiO2: 46 - 56 wt% and a wide range of high alkaline contents (K2O: 0.80 - 9.08 %; Na2O: 0.90 - 7.21 % with the Total Alkali of 6.67 - 12.60 %. Al2O3 values are relatively low (10.63 - 13.21 % and TiO2 values relatively high (1.27 - 1.91 %. Zr and REE concentrations are also relatively high (Zr: 1154 - 2340 ppm; Total REE (TREY = TRE: 899.20 - 1256.50 ppm; TRExOy: 1079.76 - 1507.97 ppm, with an average Zr/TRE ratio of ~ 1.39. The major rock forming minerals are leucite/pseudoleucite, diopside/aegirine, and high temperature phlogopite. Geochemical plots (major oxides and trace elements using various diagrams suggest the Adang Volcanics formed in a postsubduction, within-plate continental extension/initial rift tectonic setting. It is further suggested magma was generated by minor (< 0.1 % partial melting of depleted MORB mantle material (garnet-lherzolite with the silicate melt having undergone strong metasomatism. Melt enrichment is reflected in the alkaline nature of the rocks and geochemical signatures such as Nb/Zr > 0.0627 and (Hf/SmPM > 1.23. A comparison with the Vulsini ultrapotassic volcanics from the Roman Province in Italy shows both similarities (spidergram pattern indicating affinity with Group III ultrapotassics volcanics and differences (nature of mantle metasomatism.

  8. Volcanic instability: the effects of internal pressurisation and consideration of rock mass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Petford, N.; Bromhead, E. N.

    2003-04-01

    ) system, which considers the strength of the intact rock, the spacing of discontinuities, the condition of the discontinuities and the groundwater conditions. When using this system to assess the strength of a field scale basalt it's strength can be up to 80 % weaker than an intact laboratory sample, and a typical rhyolite from the Snowdonia volcanic province (North Wales) has it's rock mass strength reduced to 12.61 MPa compared to an intact sample strength taken to be 175 MPa. When it is also considered that a volcanic edifice is not entirely made of dense lava flows, but may be made up of the likes of tuffs and pyroclastic deposits, ash deposits, hyaloclastics, and splatter material, all of which are intrinsically weaker than solid volcanic rocks, it can be seen that a volcanic edifice has the potential to be very weak indeed.

  9. Environmental implication of subaqueous lava flows from a continental Large Igneous Province: Examples from the Moroccan Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghilani, S.; Youbi, N.; Madeira, J.; Chellai, E. H.; López-Galindo, A.; Martins, L.; Mata, J.

    2017-03-01

    The Late Triassic-Early Jurassic volcanic sequence of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) of Morocco is classically subdivided into four stratigraphic units: the Lower, Middle, Upper and Recurrent Formations separated by intercalated sediments deposited during short hiatuses in volcanic activity. Although corresponding to a Large Igneous Province formed in continental environment, it contains subaqueous lava flows, including dominant pillowed flows but also occasional sheet flows. We present a study of the morphology, structure and morphometry of subaqueous lava flows from three sections located at the Marrakech High-Atlas (regions of Aït-Ourir, Jbel Imzar and Oued Lhar-Herissane), as well as an analysis of the sediments, in order to characterize them and to understand their environmental meaning. The analysis of clays by the diffraction method X-ray revealed the presence of illite, mica, phengite, céladonite, talc and small amounts of quartz, hematite, calcite and feldspar, as well as two pairs of interbedded irregular (chlorite Smectite/chlorite-Mica). Fibrous minerals such as sepiolite and palygorskite were not detected. The peperite of Herissane region (Central High Atlas) provided an excellent overview on the factors favoring the magma-sediment interaction. These are the products of a mixture of unconsolidated or poorly consolidated sediments, low permeability with a low viscosity magma. The attempt of dating palynology proved unfortunately without results.

  10. Electronprobe microanalysis of volcanic glass at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, S.; Steen, N.; Erlund, E.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of volcanic glass is of particular importance to volcanologists and petrologists. However, for many volcanic systems, the production of good quantitative analyses is problematic due to the interstitial nature of the glass and the instability of the sample under the impact of a high energy electron beam on the surface. Previous studies have established that alkali ions, especially sodium and potassium migrate away from the point of beam impact during routine EPMA of glasses yielding erroneous results. An initial study here has investigated the effects both at normal ambient temperature (298 K) and cryogenic temperature (83 K) by means of a liquid-nitrogen cooled cryo-stage across a broad range of volcanic glass compositions. The glasses studied have between 48 and 76 wt% SiO_2 and varying concentrations of sodium and potassium and other non-volatile components. The water content of each glass was independently determined by FTIR spectroscopy. All analyses were performed on a Cameca Camebax Micro operating under SAMX automation software. Under "normal" wavelength dispersive EPMA operating conditions, a typical analysis might take between two and four minutes depending on the number of spectrometers available, the number of elements analysed and the required precision and detection limits for the elements concerned. Results show that there is a strong relationship between initial temperature and stability of the alkali species during the course of a single analysis. Under cryogenic analytical conditions the glass is seen to be immune to the heating effects of the electron beam and alkali ions will remain stable in the sample. Consequently it is possible to analyse these materials with higher beam currents, smaller spot sizes and longer dwell times than is possible under ambient temperature conditions. Analysis performed using the cryo-stage can yield a marked improvement in the precision and detection limits of both major and minor elements compared with

  11. Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene melilitic volcanic rocks of the Bohemian Massif: petrology and mineral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skála Roman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene volcanic rocks of the Bohemian Massif represent the easternmost part of the Central European Volcanic Province. These alkaline volcanic series include rare melilitic rocks occurring as dykes, sills, scoria cones and flows. They occur in three volcanic periods: (i the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene period (80–59 Ma in northern Bohemia including adjacent territories of Saxony and Lusatia, (ii the Mid Eocene to Late Miocene (32.3–5.9 Ma period disseminated in the Ohře Rift, the Cheb–Domažlice Graben, Vogtland, and Silesia and (iii the Early to Late Pleistocene period (1.0–0.26 Ma in western Bohemia. Melilitic magmas of the Eocene to Miocene and Pleistocene periods show a primitive mantle source [(143Nd/144Ndt=0.51280–0.51287; (87Sr/86Srt=0.7034–0.7038] while those of the Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene period display a broad scatter of Sr–Nd ratios. The (143Nd/144Ndt ratios (0.51272–0.51282 of the Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene rocks suggest a partly heterogeneous mantle source, and their (87Sr/86Srt ratios (0.7033–0.7049 point to an additional late- to post-magmatic hydrothermal contribution. Major rock-forming minerals include forsterite, diopside, melilite, nepheline, sodalite group minerals, phlogopite, Cr- and Ti-bearing spinels. Crystallization pressures and temperatures of clinopyroxene vary widely between ~1 to 2 GPa and between 1000 to 1200 °C, respectively. Nepheline crystallized at about 500 to 770 °C. Geochemical and isotopic similarities of these rocks occurring from the Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene suggest that they had similar mantle sources and similar processes of magma development by partial melting of a heterogeneous carbonatized mantle source.

  12. Electrical charging of ash in Icelandic volcanic plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Aplin, Karen L; Houghton, Isobel M P; Nicoll, Keri A

    2014-01-01

    The existence of volcanic lightning and alteration of the atmospheric potential gradient in the vicinity of near-vent volcanic plumes provides strong evidence for the charging of volcanic ash. More subtle electrical effects are also visible in balloon soundings of distal volcanic plumes. Near the vent, some proposed charging mechanisms are fractoemission, triboelectrification, and the so-called "dirty thunderstorm" mechanism, which is where ash and convective clouds interact electrically to e...

  13. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of basaltic rocks from the Develidağ volcanic complex, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürkcüoglu, Biltan

    2010-01-01

    The Develidağ volcanic zone (DVZ) is a part of the Middle Miocene-Quaternary Cappadocian Volcanic Province (CVP) in central Anatolia. The DVZ is located at the eastern side of the Plio-Quaternary Sultansazlığı pull-apart basin, that opened along the Ecemiş left-lateral strike-slip fault. Towards the south, the volcanic rocks of the DVZ overlie the Paleozoic metamorphic rocks of the Taurus range. Regional stratigraphic studies indicate that volcanic rocks of the DVZ crop out in a ˜N-S trending rectangular-shaped exposure in the middle of which Middle Miocene andesitic rocks are found surrounded by Upper Miocene basaltic rocks. The purpose of this paper is to present basic geochemical data for the DVZ rocks and discuss possible processes of magma generation. The Develidağ basalts are characterized by low LILE (Rb, K, Ba, Th) and high HFSE (Nb,Zr,Hf,Y) contents, whereas the andesites generally have high LILE and HFSE values except for Nb and Zr. Variable abundances of Pb (3.11-12.09 ppm) and U (0.36-2.64 ppm) are associated with high Ba content within the rock suites. Although low Nb/La (0.6-0.7) and relatively high Ba/Nb ratios indicate crustal involvement for the basalts, high Zr/Ba (0.5), Zr/Hf (42-47) and Th/U (3.13-4.69) values imply contributions from an asthenospheric source component. Furthermore, the high Zr/Hf values (>36) are the diagnostic feature of metasomatized mantle (Dupuy et al., 1992; Rudnick et al., 1993). Moreover, multi-element patterns show that Develidağ basalts have similar trace element signatures to those of the US Cascades tholeiites. The ratios of Zr/Hf, Zr/Ba, Nb/Th and Sr/Ce indicate that basaltic rocks are derived from a MORB-like mantle, and calculated melting model reflects generation from a spinel peridotite source (3-4% melting), but the combined effects of melting and assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) processes seem to be partially responsible for the relatively evolved rocks. Typical tholeiitic

  14. Magmatic evolution of Panama Canal volcanic rocks: A record of arc processes and tectonic change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Farris

    Full Text Available Volcanic rocks along the Panama Canal present a world-class opportunity to examine the relationship between arc magmatism, tectonic forcing, wet and dry magmas, and volcanic structures. Major and trace element geochemistry of Canal volcanic rocks indicate a significant petrologic transition at 21-25 Ma. Oligocene Bas Obispo Fm. rocks have large negative Nb-Ta anomalies, low HREE, fluid mobile element enrichments, a THI of 0.88, and a H2Ocalc of >3 wt. %. In contrast, the Miocene Pedro Miguel and Late Basalt Fm. exhibit reduced Nb-Ta anomalies, flattened REE curves, depleted fluid mobile elements, a THI of 1.45, a H2Ocalc of <1 wt. %, and plot in mid-ocean ridge/back-arc basin fields. Geochemical modeling of Miocene rocks indicates 0.5-0.1 kbar crystallization depths of hot (1100-1190°C magmas in which most compositional diversity can be explained by fractional crystallization (F = 0.5. However, the most silicic lavas (Las Cascadas Fm. require an additional mechanism, and assimilation-fractional-crystallization can reproduce observed compositions at reasonable melt fractions. The Canal volcanic rocks, therefore, change from hydrous basaltic pyroclastic deposits typical of mantle-wedge-derived magmas, to hot, dry bi-modal magmatism at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. We suggest the primary reason for the change is onset of arc perpendicular extension localized to central Panama. High-resolution mapping along the Panama Canal has revealed a sequence of inward dipping maar-diatreme pyroclastic pipes, large basaltic sills, and bedded silicic ignimbrites and tuff deposits. These volcanic bodies intrude into the sedimentary Canal Basin and are cut by normal and subsequently strike-slip faults. Such pyroclastic pipes and basaltic sills are most common in extensional arc and large igneous province environments. Overall, the change in volcanic edifice form and geochemistry are related to onset of arc perpendicular extension, and are consistent with the

  15. On the climatic implications of volcanic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard S.; Giannitsis, Constantine

    1998-03-01

    A simple energy balance model is used to investigate the response to a volcanic-type radiative forcing under different assumptions about the climatic sensitivity of the system. Volcanic eruptions are used as control experiments to investigate the role of the ocean-atmosphere coupling and of diffusive heat uptake by the thermocline. The effect of varying equilibrium climate sensitivity by varying the coupling of the atmosphere and ocean is examined, high sensitivity being associated with weak coupling. A model representing a coupled land-ocean system, with a reasonably realistic representation of the large-scale physics is used. It is found that systems with large equilibrium sensitivities not only respond somewhat more strongly to radiative perturbations but also return to equilibrium with much longer timescales. Based on this behavior pattern, we examine the model response to a series of volcanic eruptions following Krakatoa in 1883. Comparison between the model results and past temperature records seems to suggest that use of small sensitivity parameters is more appropriate. Despite the uncertainties associated with both the physics and the quantitative characteristics of the radiative forcing and the temperature anomalies produced by volcanic eruptions, the present study constitutes a possible test of different assumptions about the sensitivity of the climate system.

  16. Volcanic sunset-glow stratum: origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, A B; Meinel, M P

    1967-01-13

    Reexamination of the phenomenon of volcanic-dust sunsets, as typified by the Krakatoa event, supports a theory that the scattering layer is produced by the interaction of ozone and sulfur dioxide in much the same manner as is the normal "Junge"aerosol layer at 20 kilometers.

  17. A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are ...

  18. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  19. Monogenetic volcanism: personal views and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.

    2015-11-01

    Monogenetic volcanism produces small-volume volcanoes with a wide range of eruptive styles, lithological features and geomorphic architectures. They are classified as spatter cones, scoria (or cinder) cones, tuff rings, maars (maar-diatremes) and tuff cones based on the magma/water ratio, dominant eruption styles and their typical surface morphotypes. The common interplay between internal, such as the physical-chemical characteristics of magma, and external parameters, such as groundwater flow, substrate characteristics or topography, plays an important role in creating small-volume volcanoes with diverse architectures, which can give the impression of complexity and of similarities to large-volume polygenetic volcanoes. In spite of this volcanic facies complexity, we defend the term "monogenetic volcano" and highlight the term's value, especially to express volcano morphotypes. This study defines a monogenetic volcano, a volcanic edifice with a small cumulative volume (typically ≤1 km3) that has been built up by one continuous, or many discontinuous, small eruptions fed from one or multiple magma batches. This definition provides a reasonable explanation of the recently recognized chemical diversities of this type of volcanism.

  20. The Elusive Evidence of Volcanic Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K; Gharghabi, P; Gafford, J; Mazzola, M

    2017-11-14

    Lightning strikes are known to morphologically alter and chemically reduce geologic formations and deposits, forming fulgurites. A similar process occurs as the result of volcanic lightning discharge, when airborne volcanic ash is transformed into lightning-induced volcanic spherules (LIVS). Here, we adapt the calculations used in previous studies of lightning-induced damage to infrastructure materials to determine the effects on pseudo-ash samples of simplified composition. Using laboratory high-current impulse experiments, this research shows that within the lightning discharge channel there is an ideal melting zone that represents roughly 10% or less of the total channel radius at which temperatures are sufficient to melt the ash, regardless of peak current. The melted ash is simultaneously expelled from the channel by the heated, expanding air, permitting particles to cool during atmospheric transport before coming to rest in ash fall deposits. The limited size of this ideal melting zone explains the low number of LIVS typically observed in volcanic ash despite the frequent occurrence of lightning during explosive eruptions.

  1. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of anorogenic basic volcanic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    anorogenic setting for the basic rocks of Kundal area is suggested, which is in conformity with the similar setting for Malani Igneous Suite. 1. Introduction. The Malani magmatism is characterized by sub- volcanic setting, volcano-plutonic ring structures, anorogenic (A-type), high heat producing magma- tism and controlled by ...

  2. Amazonian volcanism inside Valles Marineris on Mars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, Petr; Hauber, E.; Wray, J. J.; Michael, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 473, September (2017), s. 122-130 ISSN 0012-821X Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Mars * Valles Marineris * volcanism * scoria cone * hydrothermal activity Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: Volcanology Impact factor: 4.409, year: 2016

  3. Book review: Large igneous provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive compilation of all aspects of large igneous provinces (LIPs). Published in 2014, the book is now the definitive source of information on the petrogenesis of this type of globally important, voluminous magmatic activity. In the first few pages, LIPs are characterized as magmatic provinces with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 that are dominated by mafic magmas emplaced or erupted in intraplate settings during relatively short (1–5 m.y.) time intervals. Given these parameters, particularly areal extent, LIPs clearly represent significant contributions to global geologic evolution through time. This point is underscored, also in the introductory chapter, by a series of figures that aptly characterize the global time-space distribution of LIPs; an accompanying, particularly useful table identifies individual LIPs, quantifies their basic characteristics, and enumerates pertinent references. Accordingly, this compilation is a welcome addition to the geologic literature.

  4. Neotectonics in the maritime provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.L.

    1988-03-01

    Seismic risk assessment in the Maritime Provinces requires input from not just historical, but also geological sources. A detailed search through published and unpublished geological literature reveals many examples - some probable, some possible -of neotectonic movement in the area. Examples range in tectonic significance from those that reflect exaggerated local imbalance to those that signify deep-seated stress. Evidence for neotectonism in the Maritimes is multidisciplined. It includes deformation in bedrock and quaternary deposits, and regional warping. Recent movement also is indicated by changes in relative sea level, in situ stress fields and geodetic fluctuations. Finally, and most unequivocally, neotectonism in the Maritime Provinces is manifested as the seismic events that have sporadically affected the area throughout its recent geological history, and continue up to the present day. 288 refs

  5. Age and petrogenetic constraints on the Lower Glassy Ignimbrite of the Mount Somers Volcanic Group, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Quinten; Waight, Tod Earle; Whitehouse, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Mount Somers Volcanic Group (MSVG) forms a large (~18000 km2) calc-alkaline volcanic complex on New Zealand’s Eastern Province. U-Pb SIMS spot ages on zircon from the lower glassy ignimbrite in Rakaia Gorge reveal a bimodal distribution of 99.0 ± 0.5 and 96.3 ± 0.5 Ma (2σ). These ages...... are within error of previous (unpublished) zircon SHRIMP ages but have a precision that enables identification of two distinct episodes of zircon crystallisation, indicating magmatic activity over a period of at least 2.5 Ma. The younger age is interpreted to represent the emplacement age of the ignimbrite....... The older age may originate from the assimilation of underlying ignimbrites or prolonged magma chamber processes. Combined O and Hf isotopes in zircon indicate that melt compositions for the ~99 Ma and ~96 Ma magmatic episodes were very similar and intermediate between the local upper crust and mantle...

  6. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment. DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at ...

  7. Compositional Differences between Felsic Volcanic rocks from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pliocene felsic rift margin and Quaternary rift center volcanic rocks from the northern Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) exhibit contrasts in major and trace element contents and Sr-Nd isotopic ratios. Quaternary rift center felsic volcanic rocks are mainly peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, whereas Pliocene felsic rift margin volcanic ...

  8. Microphysical Properties of Alaskan Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthukkudy, A.; Espinosa, R.; Rocha Lima, A.; Remer, L.; Colarco, P. R.; Whelley, P.; Krotkov, N. A.; Young, K.; Dubovik, O.; Wallace, K.; Martins, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic ash has the potential to cause a variety of severe problems for human health and the environment. Therefore, effective monitoring of the dispersion and fallout from volcanic ash clouds and characterization of the aerosol particle properties are essential. One way to acquire information from volcanic clouds is through satellite remote sensing: such images have greater coverage than ground-based observations and can present a "big picture" perspective. A challenge of remote sensing is that assumptions of certain properties of the target are often a pre-requisite for making accurate and quantitative retrievals. For example, detailed information about size distribution, sphericity, and optical properties of the constituent matter is needed or must be assumed. The same kind of information is also needed for atmospheric transport models to properly simulate the dispersion and fallout of volcanic ash. Presented here is a laboratory method to determine the microphysical and optical properties of volcanic ash samples collected from two Alaskan volcanoes with markedly different compositions. Our method uses a Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) and a system that re-suspends the particles in an air flow. The PI-Neph measures angular light scattering and polarization of the re-suspended particles from 3o to 175o in scattering angle, with an angular resolution of 1o . Primary measurements include phase function and polarized phase function at three wavelengths (445nm, 532nm, and 661nm). Size distribution, sphericity, and complex refractive index are retrieved indirectly from the PI-Neph measurements using the GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) inversion algorithm. We report the results of this method applied to samples from the Mt. Okmok (2008) and Mt. Katmai (1912) volcanic eruptions. To our knowledge, this is the first time direct measurements of phase matrix elements of ash from Mt. Okmok and Mt. Katmai have been reported. Retrieved

  9. Sources of Quaternary volcanism in the Itasy and Ankaratra volcanic fields, Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoazanamparany, C.; Widom, E.; Kuentz, D. C.; Raharimahefa, T.; Rakotondrazafy, F. M. A.; Rakotondravelo, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present new major and trace element and Sr, Nd, Pb and Os isotope data for Quaternary basaltic lavas and tephra from the Itasy and Ankaratra volcanic fields, representing the most recent volcanism in Madagascar. Mafic magmas from Itasy and Ankaratra exhibit significant inter- and intra-volcanic field geochemical heterogeneity. The Itasy eruptive products range in composition from foidite to phonotephrite whereas Ankaratra lavas range from basanite to trachybasalts. Trace element signatures of samples from both volcanic fields are very similar to those of ocean island basalts (OIB), with significant enrichment in Nb and Ta, depletion in Rb, Cs, and K, and relatively high Nb/U and Ce/Pb. However, the Itasy volcanic rocks show enrichment relative to those of Ankaratra in most incompatible elements, indicative of a more enriched source and/or lower degrees of partial melting. Significant inter- and intra-volcanic field heterogeneity is also observed in Sr, Nd, Pb and Os isotope signatures. The Itasy volcanic rocks generally have less radiogenic Sr and Nd isotopic ratios but more radiogenic Pb isotopic signatures than the Ankaratra volcanic field. Together, the Itasy and Ankaratra volcanic rocks form a well-defined negative correlation in Sr vs. Pb isotopes that could be attributed to lithospheric contamination or variable degrees of mixing between distinct mantle sources. However, the lack of correlation between isotopes and indices of crustal contamination (e.g. MgO and Nb/U) are inconsistent with shallow lithospheric contamination, and instead suggest mixing between compositionally distinct mantle sources. Furthermore, although Sr-Pb isotope systematics are apparently consistent with mixing between two different sources, distinct trends in Sr vs. Nd isotopes displayed by samples from Itasy and Ankaratra, respectively, argue for more complex source mixing involving three or more sources. The current data demonstrate that although the Itasy and Ankaratra volcanic

  10. Volcanic rocks of the eastern and northern parts of the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard B.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Ulrich, George E.

    1976-01-01

    The eastern and northern parts of the San Francisco volcanic field, between San Francisco Mountain and the Little Colorado River, contain about 175 cinder cones, many with one or more associated lava flows, and one center of silicic volcanism, O'Leary Peak. Basaltic flows and cones are divided into five groups, primarily on the bases of stratigraphic and physiographic relations, degree of weathering and erosion, K-Ar and tree-ring age determinations, and, in part, chemical and petrographic data:

  11. A Detection of Milankovitch Periodocity in Records of Global Arc Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegen, M. D.; Kutterolf, S.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Kwasnitschka, T.; Freundt, A.; Huybers, P.

    2010-12-01

    The intervals between volcanic activity varies on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, from less than a year in single volcanic systems to timescales of 10^6 years and longer in global volcanism. The causes of these timescales are poorly understood although the long-term global variations are likely linked to plate-tectonic processes. Here we present evidence for temporal changes in eruption frequencies at an intermediate timescale (10 000 years). In particular we use the Pleistocene to Recent records of widespread tephras of sub-Plinian to Plinian, and occasionally co-ignimbrite origin, along the Pacific Ring of Fire, which accounts for about half of the global length of 44,000 km of active subduction. Eruptions at arc volcanoes tend to be highly explosive and the well-preserved tephra records from the ocean floor can be assumed to be representative of how eruption frequencies varied with time. We show that volcanic activity along the Pacific Ring of Fire evolved through alternating intervals of high and low activity; although there are regional differences, these variations in activity have a statistically significant periodicity of approximately 41 ka that matches the temporal variation in the Earth's obliquity. This suggests that the timescale of volcanic activity is controlled by effects of global climate changes which result in redistribution of water masses between oceans and polar ice caps. While our statistical correlations suggest that the timescale of volcanic activity is controlled by effects of global climate changes, the physical nature of these effects is presently investigated.

  12. Basin classification and tectonic framework of the Nam Pat Group, Uttaradit Province, Thailand: Implications for the Nan Suture Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritsada Moonpa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nam Pat Group of the Nam Pat Basin, Uttaradit Province, Thailand is situated in the Nan Suture Zone. Two contrasting tectonic framework models of the Nan Suture have previously been proposed: as a main Paleo-Tethyan suture and as a remnant of a closed back-arc basin. The goal of this study is to analyze the tectonic framework of the Nan Suture and reevaluate the existing tectonic models. This research infers the tectonic setting of the basin based on basin-filled lithofacies distributions, provenance, and paleocurrents. Three facies groups are identified. Facies A, B, and C are polymictic conglomerate, interbedded sandstone and mudstone, and mudstone with thin-bedded sandstone, respectively. Generally, the strata strike NE-SW, steeply dip NW, and fine toward the SE. Petrographic results of sandstone samples show that the majority of lithic fragments are volcanic rocks with lesser amount of metamorphic rocks and sedimentary rocks. The modal compositions of sandstones are analyzed on QFL, QmFLt, QmPK, LmLvLs, and QpLvmLsm ternary diagrams. The plots indicate that the sandstones of the Nam Pat Group have high proportions of volcanic-arc detritus. Paleocurrents, determined from the orientation of clast imbrications and cross-stratification, are toward the SE. The results suggest that large quantities of sediment traveled southeastward from a nearby volcanic arc into the basin. The Nam Pat Group stratigraphically overlies the Pak Pat Volcanics. The chemical features of the Pak Pat Volcanics, located to the west of the basin, show that they are andesitic volcanic rocks formed as a magmatic arc. Thus, the nearby Pak Pat Volcanics are the main sediment source of the Nam Pat Group, and the basin is best interpreted as back-arc basin rather than as a forearc basin.

  13. Basin classification and tectonic framework of the Nam Pat Group, Uttaradit Province, Thailand: Implications for the Nan Suture Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonpa, Kritsada; Motanated, Kannipa

    2018-01-01

    The Nam Pat Group of the Nam Pat Basin, Uttaradit Province, Thailand is situated in the Nan Suture Zone. Two contrasting tectonic framework models of the Nan Suture have previously been proposed: as a main Paleo-Tethyan suture and as a remnant of a closed back-arc basin. The goal of this study is to analyze the tectonic framework of the Nan Suture and reevaluate the existing tectonic models. This research infers the tectonic setting of the basin based on basin-filled lithofacies distributions, provenance, and paleocurrents. Three facies groups are identified. Facies A, B, and C are polymictic conglomerate, interbedded sandstone and mudstone, and mudstone with thin-bedded sandstone, respectively. Generally, the strata strike NE-SW, steeply dip NW, and fine toward the SE. Petrographic results of sandstone samples show that the majority of lithic fragments are volcanic rocks with lesser amount of metamorphic rocks and sedimentary rocks. The modal compositions of sandstones are analyzed on QFL, QmFLt, QmPK, LmLvLs, and QpLvmLsm ternary diagrams. The plots indicate that the sandstones of the Nam Pat Group have high proportions of volcanic-arc detritus. Paleocurrents, determined from the orientation of clast imbrications and cross-stratification, are toward the SE. The results suggest that large quantities of sediment traveled southeastward from a nearby volcanic arc into the basin. The Nam Pat Group stratigraphically overlies the Pak Pat Volcanics. The chemical features of the Pak Pat Volcanics, located to the west of the basin, show that they are andesitic volcanic rocks formed as a magmatic arc. Thus, the nearby Pak Pat Volcanics are the main sediment source of the Nam Pat Group, and the basin is best interpreted as back-arc basin rather than as a forearc basin.

  14. La Purísima volcanic field, Baja California Sur (Mexico): Miocene to Quaternary volcanism related to subduction and opening of an asthenospheric window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Hervé; Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Calmus, Thierry; Maury, René C.; Bourgois, Jacques; Cotten, Joseph

    2006-04-01

    Geological mapping and geochemical analyses combined with 40K- 40Ar ages for lavas from the Late Miocene to Quaternary La Purísima volcanic field (Baja California Sur) provide evidence for five volcanic events. These, in turn, may reflect plate interactions in the region. The oldest event (event 1), prior to 11 Ma, corresponds to the emission of normal to K-rich calc-alkaline lavas, exposed as large mesas in the eastern part of the studied area and as pyroclastic breccias and volcaniclastic sediments to the west. It is associated with the end of the Comondú arc activity resulting from subduction of the Farallon and Guadalupe plates. Between 10.6 and 8.8 Ma (event 2), magnesian andesites and tholeiites were emplaced. At 5.5 Ma (event 3) and 2.5 Ma (event 4) small volumes of magnesian andesites erupted in the central and southern parts of the volcanic field. Finally, between 1.2 Ma and Holocene (event 5), numerous basaltic and magnesian andesitic fissural and central emissions resulted in the formation of strombolian cones and associated lava flows, mainly distributed within a NNW-SSE trending graben located SE of the town of La Purísima. Magmatic events 2 to 5 occurred well after the supposed end of the subduction event. Their geochemical characteristics are still typical of subduction-modified sources and possibly indicate partial melting of hot slab and formation of an asthenospheric window due to a slab rupture event which followed ridge-trench collision, prior to the continental breakup of the Gulf of California extensional province.

  15. K-Ar ages, paleomagnetism, and geochemistry of the South Auckland volcanic field, North Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.M.; Okada, T.; Itaya, T.; Shibuya, H.; Smith, I.E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The South Auckland volcanic field is one of the Pliocene-Quaternary intraplate basaltic fields in northern North Island. It consists of at least 97 monogenetic volcanic centres covering an area of c. 300 km 2 , 38 km south of Auckland. Fifty-nine of the volcanic centres are characterised by mainly magmatic or effusive activity that constructed scoria cones and lava flows, while 38 are mainly phreatomagmatic or explosive that produced tuff rings and maars. Rock types consist of basanites, hawaiites, nepheline hawaiites, transitional basalts, and ol-tholeiitic basalts, with relatively minor amounts of nephelinites, alkali basalts, Q-tholeiitic basalts, and nepheline mugearites. Forty-three new K-Ar ages are presented, which range from 0.51 to 1.59 Ma, and show two peaks of activity at 0.6 and 1.3 Ma. Paleomagnetic determinations at 26 selected sites agree well with the paleomagnetic reversal time scale and support the K-Ar age data. Age data from each of the volcanic fields of Okete, Ngatutura, South Auckland, and Auckland, which constitute the Auckland intraplate basaltic province, show that they have developed within a time span of 0.3-1.1 Ma. After activity ceased in any particular field, a new field then developed 35-38 km to the north. These consistent time/space patterns indicate the possibility of a mantle source migrating northwards at c. 5 cm/yr. There is no correlation of rock composition with time, which is consistent with observations in the Northland intraplate province, but is not consistent with the formerly invoked rising diapir model. (author). 30 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  16. The Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM: a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Marrero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions are among the most awesome and powerful displays of nature's force, constituting a major natural hazard for society (a single eruption can claim thousands of lives in an instant. Consequently, assessment and management of volcanic risk have become critically important goals of modern volcanology. Over recent years, numerous tools have been developed to evaluate volcanic risk and support volcanic crisis management: probabilistic analysis of future eruptions, hazard and risk maps, event trees, etc. However, there has been little improvement in the tools that may help Civil Defense officials to prepare Emergency Plans. Here we present a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crisis: the Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM. The main objective of the VSEM software is to optimize the evacuation process of Emergency Plans during volcanic crisis. For this, the VSEM allows the simulation of an evacuation considering different strategies depending on diverse impact scenarios. VSEM is able to calculate the required time for the complete evacuation taking into account diverse evacuation scenarios (number and type of population, infrastructure, road network, etc. and to detect high-risk or "blackspots" of the road network. The program is versatile and can work at different scales, thus being capable of simulating the evacuation of small villages as well as huge cities.

  17. Temporal variations of flux and altitude of sulfur dioxide emissions during volcanic eruptions: implications for long-range dispersal of volcanic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boichu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-rich degassing, which is mostly composed of sulfur dioxide (SO2, plays a major role in the overall impact of volcanism on the atmosphere and climate. The accurate assessment of this impact is currently hampered by the poor knowledge of volcanic SO2 emissions. Here, using an inversion procedure, we show how assimilating snapshots of the volcanic SO2 load derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI allows for reconstructing both the flux and altitude of the SO2 emissions with an hourly resolution. For this purpose, the regional chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to describe the dispersion of SO2 when released in the atmosphere. As proof of concept, we study the 10 April 2011 eruption of the Etna volcano (Italy, which represents one of the few volcanoes instrumented on the ground for the continuous monitoring of SO2 degassing. We find that the SO2 flux time-series retrieved from satellite imagery using the inverse scheme is in agreement with ground observations during ash-poor phases of the eruption. However, large discrepancies are observed during the ash-rich paroxysmal phase as a result of enhanced plume opacity affecting ground-based ultraviolet (UV spectroscopic retrievals. As a consequence, the SO2 emission rate derived from the ground is underestimated by almost one order of magnitude. Altitudes of the SO2 emissions predicted by the inverse scheme are validated against an RGB image of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS capturing the near-source atmospheric pathways followed by Etna plumes, in combination with forward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model. At a large distance from the source, modelled SO2 altitudes are compared with independent information on the volcanic cloud height. We find that the altitude predicted by the inverse scheme is in agreement with snapshots of the SO2 height retrieved from recent algorithms

  18. Affluence of Data on Volcanism in The Gulf of Cadiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wulff-Barreiro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the recent progress on mud volcanism data accumulation in the case of the Gulf of Cadiz area. The discovery of giant mud volcanoes, deep coral reefs, and gas hydrates in 1999, from the Guadalquivir Diapiric Ridge to the Larache Moroccan margin, launched a dynamic expansion of new projects (GeNesis, MoundForce, HERMES and international oceanographic campaigns (R/V Sonne, Marion-Dufresne. The present monitoring of this Ibero-Moroccan oceanic zone is in need of a comprehensive database available in one site to make online search possible from a single interface. The database would constitute a reference point for a focused full scope collection.

  19. An interdisciplinary approach to volcanic risk reduction under conditions of uncertainty: a case study of Tristan da Cunha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A.; Barclay, J.; Simmons, P.; Loughlin, S.

    2014-07-01

    The uncertainty brought about by intermittent volcanic activity is fairly common at volcanoes worldwide. While better knowledge of any one volcano's behavioural characteristics has the potential to reduce this uncertainty, the subsequent reduction of risk from volcanic threats is only realised if that knowledge is pertinent to stakeholders and effectively communicated to inform good decision making. Success requires integration of methods, skills and expertise across disciplinary boundaries. This research project develops and trials a novel interdisciplinary approach to volcanic risk reduction on the remote volcanic island of Tristan da Cunha (South Atlantic). For the first time, volcanological techniques, probabilistic decision support and social scientific methods were integrated in a single study. New data were produced that (1) established no spatio-temporal pattern to recent volcanic activity; (2) quantified the high degree of scientific uncertainty around future eruptive scenarios; (3) analysed the physical vulnerability of the community as a consequence of their geographical isolation and exposure to volcanic hazards; (4) evaluated social and cultural influences on vulnerability and resilience; and (5) evaluated the effectiveness of a scenario planning approach, both as a method for integrating the different strands of the research and as a way of enabling on-island decision makers to take ownership of risk identification and management, and capacity building within their community. The paper provides empirical evidence of the value of an innovative interdisciplinary framework for reducing volcanic risk. It also provides evidence for the strength that comes from integrating social and physical sciences with the development of effective, tailored engagement and communication strategies in volcanic risk reduction.

  20. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-01-01

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill

  1. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  2. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  3. Field-trip guide to a volcanic transect of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Dennis; Wolff, John; Harpp, Karen

    2017-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest region of the United States provides world-class and historically important examples of a wide variety of volcanic features. This guide is designed to give a broad overview of the region’s diverse volcanism rather than focusing on the results of detailed studies; the reader should consult the reference list for more detailed information on each of the sites, and we have done our best to recognize previous field trip leaders who have written the pioneering guides. This trip derives from one offered as a component of the joint University of Idaho- Washington State University volcanology class taught from 1995 through 2014, and it borrows in theme from the classic field guide of Johnston and Donnelly-Nolan (1981). For readers interested in using this field guide as an educational tool, we have included an appendix with supplemental references to resources that provide useful background information on relevant topics, as well as a few suggestions for field-based exercises that could be useful when bringing students to these locations in the future. The 4-day trip begins with an examination of lava flow structures of the Columbia River Basalt, enormous lava fields that were emplaced during one of the largest eruptive episodes in Earth’s recent history. On the second day, the trip turns to the High Lava Plains, a bimodal volcanic province that transgressed from southeast to northwest from the Miocene through the Holocene, at the northern margin of the Basin and Range Province. This volcanic field provides excellent examples of welded ignimbrite, silicic lavas and domes, monogenetic basaltic lava fields, and hydrovolcanic features. The third day is devoted to a circumnavigation of Crater Lake, the result of one of the world’s best-documented caldera-forming eruptions. The caldera walls also expose the anatomy of Mount Mazama, a stratovolcano of the Cascade Range. The last day is spent at Newberry Volcano, a back-arc shield volcano topped by a

  4. The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland and its relationships to volcanic deposits at Olduvai Gorge and East African Rift volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollel, Godwin F; Swisher, Carl C

    2012-08-01

    The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH), situated adjacent and to the east of Olduvai Gorge in northern Tanzania, is the source of the immense quantities of lava, ignimbrite, air fall ash, and volcaniclastic debris that occur interbedded in the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary deposits in the Laetoli and Olduvai areas. These volcanics have proven crucial to unraveling stratigraphic correlations, the age of these successions, the archaeological and paleontological remains, as well as the source materials from which the bulk of the stone tools were manufactured. The NVH towers some 2,000 m above the Olduvai and Laetoli landscapes, affecting local climate, run-off, and providing varying elevation - climate controlled ecosystem, habitats, and riparian corridors extending into the Olduvai and Laetoli lowlands. The NVH also plays a crucial role in addressing the genesis and history of East African Rift (EAR) magmatism in northern Tanzania. In this contribution, we provide age and petrochemical compositions of the major NVH centers: Lemagurut, basalt to benmorite, 2.4-2.2 Ma; Satiman, tephrite to phonolite, 4.6-3.5 Ma; Oldeani, basalt to trachyandesite, 1.6-1.5 Ma; Ngorongoro, basalt to rhyolite, 2.3-2.0 Ma; Olmoti, basalt to trachyte, 2.0-1.8 Ma; Embagai, nephelinite to phonolite, 1.2-0.6 Ma; and Engelosin, phonolite, 3-2.7 Ma. We then discuss how these correlate in time and composition with volcanics preserved at Olduvai Gorge. Finally, we place this into context with our current understanding as to the eruptive history of the NVH and relationship to East African Rift volcanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Earth's Largest Terrestrial Landslide (The Markagunt Gravity Slide of Southwest Utah): Insights from the Catastrophic Collapse of a Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, D. B.; Biek, R. F.; Rowley, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered Miocene Markagunt gravity slide (MGS; Utah, USA) represents the largest volcanic landslide structure on Earth. Recent geologic mapping of the MGS indicates that it was a large contiguous volcanic sheet of allochthonous andesitic mudflow breccias and lava flows, volcaniclastic rocks, and intertonguing regional ash-flow tuffs that blanketed an area of at least 5000 km2 with an estimated volume of ~3000 km3. From its breakaway zone in the Tushar and Mineral Mountains to its southern limits, the MGS is over 95 km long and at least 65 km wide. The MGS consists of four distinct structural segments: 1) a high-angle breakaway segment, 2) a bedding-plane segment, ~60 km long and ~65 km wide, typically located within the volcaniclastic Eocene-Oligocene Brian Head Formation, 3) a ramp segment ~1-2 km wide where the slide cuts upsection, and 4) a former land surface segment where the upper-plate moved at least 35 km over the Miocene landscape. The presence of basal and lateral cataclastic breccias, clastic dikes, jigsaw puzzle fracturing, internal shears, pseudotachylytes, and the overall geometry of the MGS show that it represents a single catastrophic emplacement event. The MGS represents gravitationally induced collapse of the southwest sector of the Oligocene to Miocene Marysvale volcanic field. We suggest that continuous growth of the Marysvale volcanic field, loading more volcanic rocks on a structurally weak Brian Head basement, created conditions necessary for gravity sliding. In addition, inflation of the volcanic pile due to multiple magmatic intrusions tilted the strata gently southward, inducing lateral spreading of the sub-volcanic rocks prior to failure. Although similar smaller-scale failures have been recognized from individual volcanoes, the MGS represents a new class of low frequency but high impact hazards associated with catastrophic sector collapse of large volcanic fields containing multiple volcanoes. The relationship of the MGS to

  6. Conceptual model of volcanism and volcanic hazards of the region of Ararat valley, Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Connor, Charles; Savov, Ivan; Connor, Laura; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Manucharyan, Davit; Ghukasyan, Yura; Gevorgyan, Hripsime

    2015-04-01

    Armenia and the adjacent volcanically active regions in Iran, Turkey and Georgia are located in the collision zone between the Arabian and Eurasian lithospheric plates. The majority of studies of regional collision related volcanism use the model proposed by Keskin, (2003) where volcanism is driven by Neo-Tethyan slab break-off. In Armenia, >500 Quaternary-Holocene volcanoes from the Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic fields are hosted within pull-apart structures formed by active faults and their segments (Karakhanyan et al., 2002), while tectonic position of the large in volume basalt-dacite Aragats volcano and periphery volcanic plateaus is different and its position away from major fault lines necessitates more complex volcano-tectonic setup. Our detailed volcanological, petrological and geochemical studies provide insight into the nature of such volcanic activity in the region of Ararat Valley. Most magmas, such as those erupted in Armenia are volatile-poor and erupt fairly hot. Here we report newly discovered tephra sequences in Ararat valley, that were erupted from historically active Ararat stratovolcano and provide evidence for explosive eruption of young, mid K2O calc-alkaline and volatile-rich (>4.6 wt% H2O; amph-bearing) magmas. Such young eruptions, in addition to the ignimbrite and lava flow hazards from Gegham and Aragats, present a threat to the >1.4 million people (~ ½ of the population of Armenia). We will report numerical simulations of potential volcanic hazards for the region of Ararat valley near Yerevan that will include including tephra fallout, lava flows and opening of new vents. Connor et al. (2012) J. Applied Volcanology 1:3, 1-19; Karakhanian et al. (2002), JVGR, 113, 319-344; Keskin, M. (2003) Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 24, 8046.

  7. Volcanic Gases and Hot Spring Water to Evaluate the Volcanic Activity of the Mt. Baekdusan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S. H.; Lee, S.; Chang, C.

    2017-12-01

    This study performed the analysis on the volcanic gases and hot spring waters from the Julong hot spring at Mt. Baekdu, also known as Changbaishan on the North Korea(DPRK)-China border, during the period from July 2015 to August 2016. Also, we confirmed the errors that HCO3- concentrations of hot spring waters in the previous study (Lee et al. 2014) and tried to improve the problem. Dissolved CO2 in hot spring waters was analyzed using gas chromatograph in Lee et al.(2014). Improving this, from 2015, we used TOC-IC to analysis dissolved CO2. Also, we analyzed the Na2CO3 standard solutions of different concentrations using GC, and confirmed the correlation between the analytical concentrations and the real concentrations. However, because the analytical results of the Julong hot spring water were in discord with the estimated values based on this correlation, we can't estimate the HCO3-concentrations of 2014 samples. During the period of study, CO2/CH4 ratios in volcanic gases are gradually decreased, and this can be interpreted in two different ways. The first interpretation is that the conditions inside the volcanic edifice are changing into more reduction condition, and carbon in volcanic gases become more favorable to distribute into CH4 or CO than CO2. The second interpretation is that the interaction between volcanic gases and water becomes greater than past, and the concentrations of CO2which have much higher solubility in water decreased, relatively. In general, the effect of scrubbing of volcanic gas is strengthened during the quiet periods of volcanic activity rather than active periods. Meanwhile, the analysis of hot spring waters was done on the anion of acidic gases species, the major cations, and some trace elements (As, Cd, Re).This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under Grant KMIPA 2015-3060.

  8. Prebiotic Synthesis in Volcanic Discharges: Exposing Ash to Volcanic/Primordial Gas Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.; Bada, J.; Chalmers, J. H.; Burton, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Few topics in natural science are as heavily debated as context for the emergence of life on Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago. The spark discharge experiments by Miller (1953) are widely recognized as the first efficient abiotic synthesis of organic compounds under simulated primitive Earth conditions; however, since then our understanding of conditions on the early Earth have significantly advanced. Still, considerable uncertainty remains regarding when, where and how the raw materials needed for prebiotic reactions and molecular evolution originated. Recently volcanic lightning has been successfully reproduced in rapid decompression experiments, showing a direct relation between amount of electrical discharges and the abundance of finer ash ejected. This correlation suggests that efficient fragmentation and particle clustering in the plume provide favorable conditions for charge generation and discharge. In the context of the origin of life, volcanic lightning is of special interest because within volcanic plumes the volcanic gases will mix with the primordial atmosphere, widening the possible gas spectrum. Here we present a first study on volcanic discharges generated from the energetic ejection of volcanic ash into different controlled atmospheres. Ash from Sakurajima volcano (Japan), well known for the electrical activity associated with its frequent explosive eruptions, was loaded in our experimental volcano (a shock-tube-based apparatus), slowly pressurized and ejected into atmospheres of various compositions (N2, CH4, NH3, CO2). We monitored ash ejection as well as charge generation and discharges. The recollected ash was analyzed for interesting prebiotic compounds. Analyses indicated that simple amino acids such as glycine were synthesized in the experiments as long as there was a reduced gas (either ammonia or methane) present. We are now carrying out a systematic series of analyses to determine whether essential prebiotic reagents are generated

  9. Combining probabilistic hazard assessment with cost-benefit analysis to support decision making in a volcanic crisis from the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Laura; Jolly, Gill; Lindsay, Jan; Howe, Tracy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2010-05-01

    One of the main challenges of modern volcanology is to provide the public with robust and useful information for decision-making in land-use planning and in emergency management. From the scientific point of view, this translates into reliable and quantitative long- and short-term volcanic hazard assessment and eruption forecasting. Because of the complexity in characterizing volcanic events, and of the natural variability of volcanic processes, a probabilistic approach is more suitable than deterministic modeling. In recent years, two probabilistic codes have been developed for quantitative short- and long-term eruption forecasting (BET_EF) and volcanic hazard assessment (BET_VH). Both of them are based on a Bayesian Event Tree, in which volcanic events are seen as a chain of logical steps of increasing detail. At each node of the tree, the probability is computed by taking into account different sources of information, such as geological and volcanological models, past occurrences, expert opinion and numerical modeling of volcanic phenomena. Since it is a Bayesian tool, the output probability is not a single number, but a probability distribution accounting for aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. In this study, we apply BET_VH in order to quantify the long-term volcanic hazard due to base surge invasion in the region around Auckland, New Zealand's most populous city. Here, small basaltic eruptions from monogenetic cones pose a considerable risk to the city in case of phreatomagmatic activity: evidence for base surges are not uncommon in deposits from past events. Currently, we are particularly focussing on the scenario simulated during Exercise Ruaumoko, a national disaster exercise based on the build-up to an eruption in the Auckland Volcanic Field. Based on recent papers by Marzocchi and Woo, we suggest a possible quantitative strategy to link probabilistic scientific output and Boolean decision making. It is based on cost-benefit analysis, in which all costs

  10. Evolution of the Red Sea volcanic margin, western Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Martin; Baker, Joel; Chazot, Gilles; Al'Kadasi, Mohamed

    The temporal relationships between rifting processes associated with the breakup of the Afro-Arabian Plate and the opening of the Red Sea have been studied on the uplifted volcanic margin in western Yemen. Excellent exposure allows for the application of absolute and relative dating techniques. Magmatism: 40Ar/39Ar dating of feldspars in the volcanic rocks indicates that (a) volcanism began at 29-31 Ma, (b) a change from basic to silicic volcanism occurred at ca. 29 Ma, (c) large volume volcanism lasted until 26.5 Ma, and (d) eruption rates decreased with time. Exhumation: fission track (FT) analyses of apatites from basement metamorphic and sedimentary rocks reveal that the volcanic margin was rapidly and deeply exhumed, at the earliest, in the Oligo-Miocene. This result is consistent with a major erosional break in the volcanic stratigraphy, bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dating as having formed between 26 and 19 Ma. Extension: field evidence indicates that extension was largely post-volcanic because the volcanic stratigraphy is devoid of major faults. In highly extended terranes 40Ar/39Ar ages of "hanging wall" volcanic rocks and apatite FT ages of "footwall" basement rocks demonstrate that extension occurred in the late Oligocene-early Miocene. Surface uplift: field evidence for surface uplift may exist in the change from marine to continental sedimentation found in the pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks (>31 Ma). Exhumation, the presumed response to surface uplift, occurred some 6 m.y. later, allowing that amount of time for the volcanic margin to be uplifted by >2-3 km. Integration of field and laboratory data reveals that the Red Sea volcanic margin evolved in response to contemporaneous surface uplift and volcanism that predated extension and exhumation by as much as 5 m.y.

  11. [Effects of volcanic eruptions on human health in Iceland. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Larsen, Guðrun

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are common in Iceland and have caused health problems ever since the settlement of Iceland. Here we describe volcanic activity and the effects of volcanic gases and ash on human health in Iceland. Volcanic gases expelled during eruptions can be highly toxic for humans if their concentrations are high, irritating the mucus membranes of the eyes and upper respiratory tract at lower concentrations. They can also be very irritating to the skin. Volcanic ash is also irritating for the mucus membranes of the eyes and upper respiratory tract. The smalles particles of volcanic ash can reach the alveoli of the lungs. Described are four examples of volcanic eruptions that have affected the health of Icelanders. The eruption of Laki volcanic fissure in 1783-1784 is the volcanic eruption that has caused the highest mortality and had the greatest effects on the well-being of Icelanders. Despite multiple volcanic eruptions during the last decades in Iceland mortality has been low and effects on human health have been limited, although studies on longterm effects are lacking. Studies on the effects of the Eyjafjallajökul eruption in 2010 on human health showed increased physical and mental symptoms, especially in those having respiratory disorders. The Directorate of Health in Iceland and other services have responded promptly to recurrent volcanic eruptions over the last few years and given detailed instructions on how to minimize the effects on the public health. Key words: volcanic eruptions, Iceland, volcanic ash, volcanic gases, health effects, mortality. Correspondence: Gunnar Guðmundsson, ggudmund@landspitali.is.

  12. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  13. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  14. Transamazonic foundation from Borborema Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackpacher, P.C.; Dantas, E.L.; Van Schums, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    Geochronological data obtained in plutonic rocks of the Sao Vicente/Caico Groups present U/Pb values around 2.15 Ga. These rocks may have involved from an initial mantle or lower crust melting and fractionation process by 2.62-2.65 Ga., that is evidenced from Sm/Nd model ages. Relation betwen TTG-sequence and tectonic setting of the area and other localities in NE-Brazil suggest that the Transamazonic orogeny was the main crust-forming episode of the Borborema Province. (author)

  15. Skywave Radar Detectability of Volcanic Aersols

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    ash and gas ; (v) gases released explosively from the silicate liquid in the erupted magma ; and 4 "(vi) gases released explosively from the silicate...stratosphere by an erupting volcano on Java. This paper presents some theoretical estimates of the detectability of such clouds usingskyi:ave radar...prior to eruption ; (b) pumice - a rock froth formed by the rapid quenching of magma , composed . - -...-. of volcanic glass, crystals of several

  16. Volcanic disasters and incidents: A new database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new database on human mortality and morbidity, and civil evacuations arising from volcanic activity is presented. The aim is to quantify the human impacts of volcanic phenomena during the 20th Century. Data include numbers of deaths, injuries, evacuees and people made homeless, and the nature of the associated volcanic phenomena. The database has been compiled from a wide range of sources, and discrepancies between these are indicated where they arise. The quality of the data varies according to the source and the impacts reported. Data for homelessness are particularly poor and effects from ashfall and injuries appear to be under-reported. Of the 491 events included in the database, ˜53% resulted in deaths, although the total death toll of 91,724 is dominated by the disasters at Mt Pelée and Nevado del Ruiz. Pyroclastic density currents account for the largest proportion of deaths, and lahars for the most injuries incurred. The Philippines, Indonesia, and Southeast Asia, as a region, were the worst affected, and middle-income countries experienced greater human impacts than low or high-income countries. Compilation of the database has highlighted a number of problems with the completeness and accuracy of the existing CRED EM-DAT disaster database that includes volcanic events. This database is used by a range of organisations involved with risk management. The new database is intended as a resource for future analysis and will be made available via the Internet. It is hoped that it will be maintained and expanded.

  17. Herpetofauna, Coastal Dunes, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Kacoliris, Federico; Horlent, Nathalie; Williams, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Coastal dunes habitats at Buenos Aires province are in a fragmentation and habitat loss process due to related human activities. Knowledge on the herpetofauna of Buenos Aires province coast habitats is plentiful for some species of lizards and scarce for most amphibians and snakes. With the aim to present a list on the amphibians and reptiles of the coastal dune habitats in Buenos Aires province we recorded species coming from field work, cited in literature, and vouchers specimens deposited ...

  18. Geothermal and volcanism in west Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, I.; Indarto, S.; Sudarsono; Fauzi I, A.; Yuliyanti, A.; Lintjewas, L.; Alkausar, A.; Jakah

    2018-02-01

    Indonesian active volcanoes extend from Sumatra, Jawa, Bali, Lombok, Flores, North Sulawesi, and Halmahera. The volcanic arc hosts 276 volcanoes with 29 GWe of geothermal resources. Considering a wide distribution of geothermal potency, geothermal research is very important to be carried out especially to tackle high energy demand in Indonesia as an alternative energy sources aside from fossil fuel. Geothermal potency associated with volcanoes-hosted in West Java can be found in the West Java segment of Sunda Arc that is parallel with the subduction. The subduction of Indo-Australian oceanic plate beneath the Eurasian continental plate results in various volcanic products in a wide range of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics. The geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of volcanic and magmatic rocks associated with geothermal systems are ill-defined. Comprehensive study of geochemical signatures, mineralogical properties, and isotopes analysis might lead to the understanding of how large geothermal fields are found in West Java compared to ones in Central and East Java. The result can also provoke some valuable impacts on Java tectonic evolution and can suggest the key information for geothermal exploration enhancement.

  19. Volcanic alert system (VAS) developed during the 2011-2014 El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alicia; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, José M.; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-06-01

    The 2011 volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island illustrated the need for a Volcanic Alert System (VAS) specifically designed for the management of volcanic crises developing after long repose periods. The VAS comprises the monitoring network, the software tools for analysis of the monitoring parameters, the Volcanic Activity Level (VAL) management, and the assessment of hazard. The VAS presented here focuses on phenomena related to moderate eruptions, and on potentially destructive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides. We introduce a set of new data analysis tools, aimed to detect data trend changes, as well as spurious signals related to instrumental failure. When data-trend changes and/or malfunctions are detected, a watchdog is triggered, issuing a watch-out warning (WOW) to the Monitoring Scientific Team (MST). The changes in data patterns are then translated by the MST into a VAL that is easy to use and understand by scientists, technicians, and decision-makers. Although the VAS was designed specifically for the unrest episodes at El Hierro, the methodologies may prove useful at other volcanic systems.

  20. Palaeomagnetism of Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks from Cabo de Sto. Agostinho, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schult, A.; Guerreiro, S. D. C.

    1980-10-01

    One hundred samples from nine sites in Upper Cretaceous volcanics (K/Ar age 85-99 m.y.) of the magmatic province of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, Pernambuco (8.4°S, 35.0°W) yield a mean direction of magnetization D = 0.4°, I = -20.6°withα 95 = 4.8°, k = 114 after AF cleaning. All sites have normal polarity with a mean pole, named SAK 10, at 87.6°N, 135°E with A 95 = 4.5° which is close to other Upper Cretaceous poles for South America. These poles are compared with Upper Cretaceous poles of Africa for various reconstructions of the two continents.

  1. Petrology of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths from the Cima Volcanic Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshire, H.G.; McGuire, A.V.; Noller, J.S.; Turrin, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    Basaltic rocks of the Cima Volcanic Field in the southern Basin and Range province contain abundant gabbro, pyroxenite, and peridotite xenoliths. Composite xenoliths containing two or more rock types show that upper-mantle spinel peridotite was enriched by multiple dike intrusions in at least three episodes; the mantle was further enriched by intergranular and shear-zone melt infiltration in at least two episodes. Because of their high densities, the gabbros and pyroxenites can occupy the zone immediately above the present Moho (modeled on seismic data as 10-13 km thick, with Vp 6.8 km/s) only if their seismic velocities are reduced by the joints, partial melts, and fluid inclusions that occur in them. Alternatively, these xenoliths may have been derived entirely from beneath the Moho, in which case the Moho is not the local crust-mantle boundary. -from Authors

  2. Heterogeneity in Subducting Slab Influences Fluid Properties, Plate Coupling and Volcanism: Hikurangi Subduction Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Reyners, M.; Bannister, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity distribution and 3-D models of P- and S-attenuation (1/Q) in the Hikurangi subduction zone, in the North Island of New Zealand, show large variation along-arc in the fluid properties of the subducting slab. Volcanism is also non-uniform, with extremely productive rhyolitic volcanism localized to the central Taupo Volcanic zone, and subduction without volcanism in the southern North Island. Plate coupling varies with heterogeneous slip deficit in the northern section, low slip deficit in the central section, and high slip deficit (strong coupling) in the south. Heterogeneous initial hydration and varied dehydration history both are inferred to play roles. The Hikurangi Plateau (large igneous province) has been subducted beneath New Zealand twice - firstly at ca. 105-100 Ma during north-south convergence with Gondwana, and currently during east-west convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates along the Hikurangi subduction zone. It has an uneven downdip edge which has produced spatially and temporally localized stalls in subduction rate. The mantle wedge under the rhyolitic section has a very low Q feature centred at 50-125 km depth, which directly overlies a 150-km long zone of dense seismicity. This seismicity occurs below a sharp transition in the downdip extent of the Hikurangi Plateau, where difficulty subducting the buoyant plateau would have created a zone of increased faulting and hydration that spent a longer time in the outer-rise yielding zone, compared with areas to the north and south. At shallow depths this section has unusually high fracture permeability from the two episodes of bending, but it did not experience dehydration during Gondwana subduction. This central section at plate interface depths less than 50-km has low Q in the slab crust, showing that it is extremely fluid rich, and it exhibits weak plate coupling with both deep and shallow slow-slip events. In contrast in the southern section, where there is a large deficit in

  3. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  4. Geophysical expression of caldera related volcanism, structures and mineralization in the McDermitt volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Blakely, R. J.; Moring, B.; Miller, R.

    2013-12-01

    The High Rock, Lake Owyhee, and McDermitt volcanic fields, consisting of regionally extensive ash flow tuffs and associated calderas, developed in NW Nevada and SE Oregon following eruption of the ca. 16.7 Ma Steens flood basalt. The first ash flow, the Tuff of Oregon Canyon, erupted from the McDermitt volcanic field at 16.5Ma. It is chemically zoned from peralkaline rhyolite to dacite with trace element ratios that distinguish it from other ash flow tuffs. The source caldera, based on tuff distribution, thickness, and size of lithic fragments, is in the area in which the McDermitt caldera (16.3 Ma) subsequently formed. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with some but not all of the calderas. The White Horse caldera (15.6 Ma), the youngest caldera in the McDermitt volcanic field has the best geophysical expression, with both aeromagnetic and gravity lows coinciding with the caldera. Detailed aeromagnetic and gravity surveys of the McDermitt caldera, combined with geology and radiometric surveys, provides insight into the complexities of caldera collapse, resurgence, post collapse volcanism, and hydrothermal mineralization. The McDermitt caldera is among the most mineralized calderas in the world, whereas other calderas in these three Mid Miocene volcanic fields do not contain important hydrothermal ore deposits, despite having similar age and chemistry. The McDermitt caldera is host to Hg, U, and Li deposits and potentially significant resources of Ga, Sb, and REE. The geophysical data indicate that post-caldera collapse intrusions were important in formation of the hydrothermal systems. An aeromagnetic low along the E caldera margin reflects an intrusion at a depth of 2 km associated with the near-surface McDermitt-hot-spring-type Hg-Sb deposit, and the deeper level, high-sulfidation Ga-REE occurrence. The Li deposits on the W side of the caldera are associated with a series of low amplitude, small diameter aeromagnetic anomalies that form a continuous

  5. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  6. Wind potential assessment of Quebec Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilinca, A.; Chaumel, J.-L.; Retiveau, J.-L.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a comprehensive wind atlas of the Province of Quebec. This study differs from previous studies by 1) use of a standard classification index to categorize the wind resource, 2) extensive review of surface and upper air data available for the Province to define the wind resource, and 3) integration of available wind data with the topography of the Province. The wind resource in the Province of Quebec is classified using the scheme proposed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The Battelle-PNL classification is a numerical one which includes rankings from Wind Power Class 1 (lowest) to Wind Power Class 7 (highest). Associated with each numerical classification is a range of wind power and associated mean wind speed at 10 m and 50 m above ground level. For this study, a classification for 30 m above ground level was interpolated and used. A significant amount of wind data was gathered for the Province. These data were obtained from Atmospheric Environment Service (AES), Canada, from wind project developers, and from climatological summaries of surface and upper air data. A total of 35 primary data sites were selected in the Province. Although a number of wind data sites in the Province were identified and used in the analysis, large areas of the Province lacked any specific wind information. The Province was divided into grid blocks having dimensions of 1/4 o latitude by 1/3 o longitude. Each grid block is assigned a numerical Wind Power Class value ranging from 1 to 7. This value is based on the integration of the available wind data and the topography within the square. The majority of the Province was classified as 1 or 2. Coastal locations and topographic features in the interior of the Province typically have Wind Power Class 3 or higher. (author)

  7. Sills of the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial populations, such as Mexico City, Auckland, and Portland, are built within or near monogenetic fields, so it is important to understand both eruption precursors and magma plumbing systems in such areas. Directly observing the plumbing systems of this rarely witnessed eruption style provides valuable insight into the nature of magmatic transport and storage within the shallow crust, as well as the associated monogenetic eruptive processes. Within the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah is an exposed Pliocene complex of approximately 2000 mapped dikes, 12 sills, and 60 conduits eroded to a depth of 800 m below the paleosurface. A combination of airborne LiDAR (ALS), provided by NCALM, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) surveys are used to map the dip of 5 major sills within a 35 sq km area. The ALS provides a 1 m aerial resolution of exposed volcanic features and the TLS gives vertical measurements to cm accuracy. From these data we determine that the 5-25 m thick sills in this area dip approximately 1 to 6 degrees. Field observations show that steps in sills and related fabrics indicate flow direction in sills during emplacement and that sills normally propagate down dip in the Entrada sandstone host rock away from apparent feeder dikes and conduits. Some sills have foundered roofs, especially near conduits, suggesting that nearly neutrally buoyant magmas emplaced into sills along bed partings in the Entrada, differentiated, and in some cases flowed back into conduits. By volume, at 800 m depth in the San Rafael, nearly all igneous rock (approximately 90 percent) is located in sills rather than in dikes or conduits. These observations are consistent with geochemical models that suggest differentiation in shallow sills explains geochemical trends observed in single monogenetic volcanoes in some active fields. Deformation associated with sill inflation and deflation may be a significant precursor to eruptive activity in monogenetic volcanic fields.

  8. The effect of offset on fracture permeability of rocks from the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, P.; Wang, G.; Mitchell, T. M.; Meredith, P. G.; Nara, Y.; Sarkar, V.; Cembrano, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) represents one of the largest undeveloped geothermal provinces in the world. Development of the geothermal potential requires a detailed understanding of fluid transport properties of its main lithologies. The permeability of SVZ rocks is altered by the presence of fracture damage zones produced by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). We have therefore measured the permeability of four representative lithologies from the volcanic basement in this area: crystalline tuff, andesitic dike, altered andesite and granodiorite. For comparative purposes, we have also measured the permeability of samples of Seljadalur basalt, an Icelandic rock with widely studied and reported hydraulic properties. Specifically, we present the results of a systematic study of the effect of fractures and fracture offsets on permeability as a function of increasing effective pressure. Baseline measurements on intact samples of SVZ rocks show that the granodiorite has a permeability (10-18 m2), two orders of magnitude higher than that of the volcanic rocks (10-20 m2). The presence of throughgoing mated macro-fractures increases permeability by between four and six orders of magnitude, with the highest permeability recorded for the crystalline tuff. Increasing fracture offset to produce unmated fractures results in large increases in permeability up to some characteristic value of offset, beyond which permeability changes only marginally. The increase in permeability with offset appears to depend on fracture roughness and aperture, and these are different for each lithology. Overall, fractured SVZ rocks with finite offsets record permeability values consistent with those commonly found in geothermal reservoirs (>10-16 m2), which potentially allow convective/advective flow to develop. Hence, our results demonstrate that the fracture damage zones developed within the SVZ produce permeable regions, especially within the

  9. Rift-related volcanism and karst geohydrology of the southern Ozark Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Weary, David J.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Repetski, John E.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Lowell, Gary R.; Evans, Kevin R.; Aber, James S.

    2010-01-01

    This field trip examines the geology and geohydrology of a dissected part of the Salem Plateau in the Ozark Plateaus province of south-central Missouri. Rocks exposed in this area include karstified, flat-lying, lower Paleozoic carbonate platform rocks deposited on Mesoproterozoic basement. The latter is exposed as an uplift located about 40 mi southwest of the St. Francois Mountains and form the core of the Ozark dome. On day 1, participants will examine and explore major karst features developed in Paleozoic carbonate strata on the Current River; this will include Devil's Well and Round Spring Cavern as well as Montauk, Round, Alley, and Big Springs. The average discharge of the latter is 276 × 106 gpd and is rated in the top 20 springs in the world. Another, Alley Spring, is equally spectacular with an average discharge of 81 × 106 gpd. Both are major contributors to the Current and Eleven Point River drainage system which includes about 50 Mesoproterozoic volcanic knobs and two granite outcrops. These knobs are mainly caldera-erupted ignimbrites with a total thickness of 7–8 km. They are overlain by post-collapse lavas and intruded by domes dated at 1470 Ma. Volcaniclastic sediment and air-fall lapilli tuff are widely distributed along this synvolcanic unconformity. On day 2, the group will examine the most important volcanic features and the southernmost granite exposure in Missouri. The trip concludes with a discussion of the Missouri Gravity Low, the Eminence caldera, and the volcanic history of southern Missouri as well as a discussion of geologic controls on regional groundwater flow through this part of the Ozark aquifer.

  10. Is Kasei Valles (Mars) the largest volcanic channel in the solar system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverington, David W.

    2018-02-01

    With a length of more than 2000 km and widths of up to several hundred kilometers, Kasei Valles is the largest outflow system on Mars. Superficially, the scabland-like character of Kasei Valles is evocative of terrestrial systems carved by catastrophic aqueous floods, and the system is widely interpreted as a product of outbursts from aquifers. However, as at other Martian outflow channels, clear examples of fluvial sedimentary deposits have proven difficult to identify here. Though Kasei Valles lacks several key properties expected of aqueous systems, its basic morphological and contextual properties are aligned with those of ancient volcanic channels on Venus, the Moon, Mercury, and Earth. There is abundant evidence that voluminous effusions of low-viscosity magmas occurred at the head of Kasei Valles, the channel system acted as a conduit for associated flows, and mare-style volcanic plains developed within its terminal basin. Combined mechanical and thermal incision rates of at least several meters per day are estimated to have been readily achieved at Kasei Valles by 20-m-deep magmas flowing with viscosities of 1 Pa s across low topographic slopes underlain by bedrock. If Kasei Valles formed through incision by magma, it would be the largest known volcanic channel in the solar system. The total volume of magma erupted at Kasei Valles is estimated here to have possibly reached or exceeded ∼5 × 106 km3, a volume comparable in magnitude to those that characterize individual Large Igneous Provinces on Earth. Development of other large outflow systems on Mars is expected to have similarly involved eruption of up to millions of cubic kilometers of magma.

  11. Deuterium Values from Hydrated Volcanic Glass: A Paleoelevation Proxy for Oregon's Cascade Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, T. B.; Bershaw, J. T.; Cassel, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Deuterium ratios (δD) of hydrated volcanic glass have been used to reconstruct Cenozoic paleoenvironments. However, the reliability and proper sample preparation protocol have been debated. The Cascades are an excellent location to study the validity of hydrated volcanic glass as a paleoelevation proxy for several reasons. Moisture is largely derived from a single oceanic source and falls as orographic precipitation in the Cascades, leading to a characteristic altitude effect, or inverse relationship between elevation and the isotopic composition of meteoric water (δD). Additionally, past studies have inferred uplift of the Cascades since the Miocene based on changing fossil assemblages, tectonic models, and other isotopic proxies including soil carbonates and fossil teeth. In this study, hydrated volcanic ash samples from the lee of the Cascades were rinsed with hydrochloric acid and sonicated before glass shards were hand-selected and analyzed for δD and wt. % water. These preliminary results exhibited δD values becoming enriched with time, a trend opposite of other paleowater proxy studies in the area. A possible explanation for this trend is contamination due to inadequate removal of materials adhered to shard surfaces that can readily exchange with environmental water. Recent research asserts that hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching during sample preparation is necessary to accurately measure δD values of syndepositional water. Volcanic ash samples were reanalyzed after preparation using HF abrasion and heavy liquid separation. The data from these two subsets are interpreted in the context of modern water across the range, as well as other paleowater proxy and geologic studies to determine the implications of volcanic glass as a paleoelevation proxy in the Pacific Northwest.

  12. Evidence for sub-lacustrine volcanic activity in Lake Bolsena (central Italy) revealed by high resolution seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Wagner, Bernd; Schuerer, Anke

    2017-06-01

    the Campanian Volcanic Province occurring as the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Our new geophysical data set is a valuable record with a potential to constrain the sedimentary and volcanic evolution of the Vulsini Volcanic District in areas that have not been assessed previously due to logistical challenges of conducting surveys in water-filled settings.

  13. Los volcanes del Sistema Volcánico Transversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Yarza de la Torre

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Si hizo la selección de textos referentes a algunos de los volcanes que integran el Sistema Volcánico Transversal. Publicado en: Yarza de De la Torre, E. (1992, "Los volcanes del Sistema Volcánico Transversal", Volcanes de México, 4a ed. corregida y aumentada, Instituto de Geografía, UNAM, México, pp. 82-83, 89-136.

  14. Los volcanes del Sistema Volcánico Transversal

    OpenAIRE

    Esperanza Yarza de De la Torre

    2003-01-01

    Si hizo la selección de textos referentes a algunos de los volcanes que integran el Sistema Volcánico Transversal. Publicado en: Yarza de De la Torre, E. (1992), "Los volcanes del Sistema Volcánico Transversal", Volcanes de México, 4a ed. corregida y aumentada, Instituto de Geografía, UNAM, México, pp. 82-83, 89-136.

  15. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, Bruce M.; Perry, Frank V.; Valentine, Greg A.; Bowker, Lynn M.

    1998-01-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt ( than about 7 x 10 -8 events yr -1 . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain sit

  16. Customary Homicides in Diyarbakir Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Eyyup; Canturk, Nergis; Erkol, Zerrin; Kumral, Bahadir; Okumus, Ali M

    2015-09-01

    This study presents an analysis of the causes of so-called honor killings in the context of "customary homicide" and a discussion of preventive measures. Finalized case files of customary homicide between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were retrospectively examined in Diyarbakir Province, Turkey. Of a total of 28 case victims, 17 (60.7%) were females and 11 (39.3%) were males. All perpetrators were male. There was a significant difference between male and female victims in terms of economic independence (p=0.000). A direct blood relationship or relationship by marriage (such as brother-in-law) was found to have a significant association with the gender of the victim (psociety, replacement of patriarchal models with more modern attitudes, and encouragement of individuality may represent effective strategies that may help reduce the number of customary homicide, which represents a multifaceted problem. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Aves, province of Guizhou, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report our inventories of birds observed and collected at three field sites from the province of Guizhou,southeastern China. Our findings detailed herein complement our previous ornithological surveys from Guangxiprovince, as part of a comprehensive biotic survey of the region. Of 153 total bird species recorded, 17 were new for theprovince, among which several taxa of conservational importance, such as: Golden Pheasant Crysolophus pictus,Tawny Fish-Owl Ketupa flavipes, Black-breasted Thrush Turdus dissimilis, Fujian Flycatcher Niltava davidii, RedtailedLaughingthrush Garrulax milnei, and Slaty Bunting Latoucheornis siemsseni. These records provide the mostrecent insight into the current status of the habitats and the avian biodiversity of an important, yet sparsely surveyed andreported biogeographic region.

  18. Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; hide

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  20. Identification, distribution and significance of lunar volcanic domes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    Over 300 previously unrecognized volcanic domes were identified on Lunar Orbiter photographs using the following criteria: (1) the recognition of land forms on the Moon similar in morphology to terrestrial volcanic domes, (2) structural control, (3) geomorphic discordance, and (4) the recognition of land forms modified by dome-like swellings. Many terrestrial volcanic domes are similar in morphology to lunar domes. This analogy suggests that some lunar hills are in fact extrusive volcanic domes. Many of the domes identified in this paper seem to be related to basins and craters, and with the exception of local tectonic grid control few domes are related to any observable Moon-wide pattern.

  1. Effect of volcanic tuff on the characteristics of cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehad Al-Zou'by

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how Jordanian volcanic tuff aggregates affect the characteristics of cement mortar. Five mortar mixes were prepared by replacing normal aggregate (standard sand with volcanic tuff aggregate in ratios of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% (M1 to M5, respectively. Compressive strength, flexural strength, and unit weight were tested at mortar ages of 3, 7, 28, and 56 days. The results revealed improved compressive and flexural strength, which were maximal for the M3 sample. Unit weight decreased as the ratio of volcanic tuff increased. Based on these results, adding Jordanian volcanic tuff in the appropriate ratio will improve these mortar characteristics.

  2. Mud volcanism of South-Caspian depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliyev, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text : South-Caspian depression is presented by area of large warping with thick (more than 25 km) sedimentary series and with wide development of mud volcanism. This depression is unique according to its number of mud volcanoes and intensity of their eruptions. There are about 400 mud volcanoes in this area, which is more than than a half of all volcanoes of the planet. Among them - 220 are continental, more 170 are marine, defined by different methods in the South-Caspian aquatorium. As a result of mudvolcanic activity islands, banks, shoals and underwater ridges are formed in marine conditions. Depths of underwater volcanoes vary from few meters to 900 m as the height of cones are different too. Marine mud volcanoes in geological history of Caspian sea evolution and in its recent history had and important significance. Activity of mud volcanoes in sea conditions lead to the formation of positive elements of relief. Products of ejection take part in the formation of microrelief of surrounding areas of sea bottom influence upon its dynamics and composition of bottom sediments. The carried out comparative analysis of mud volcanism manifestation both onshore and offshore showed the basic differences and similarities in morphology of volcanoes and geology-geochemical peculiarities of eruption products. New data on tectonics of mud volcanism development has been obtained over recent years. Mud volcanoes of South-Caspian depression are studied for assessment and oil-gas content of deep-seated deposits. Geochemical method of search of oil and gas deposits in mudvolcanic areas had been worked out.

  3. VOLCANIC RISK ASSESSMENT - PROBABILITY AND CONSEQUENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.A. Valentine; F.V. Perry; S. Dartevelle

    2005-01-01

    Risk is the product of the probability and consequences of an event. Both of these must be based upon sound science that integrates field data, experiments, and modeling, but must also be useful to decision makers who likely do not understand all aspects of the underlying science. We review a decision framework used in many fields such as performance assessment for hazardous and/or radioactive waste disposal sites that can serve to guide the volcanological community towards integrated risk assessment. In this framework the underlying scientific understanding of processes that affect probability and consequences drive the decision-level results, but in turn these results can drive focused research in areas that cause the greatest level of uncertainty at the decision level. We review two examples of the determination of volcanic event probability: (1) probability of a new volcano forming at the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, and (2) probability that a subsurface repository in Japan would be affected by the nearby formation of a new stratovolcano. We also provide examples of work on consequences of explosive eruptions, within the framework mentioned above. These include field-based studies aimed at providing data for ''closure'' of wall rock erosion terms in a conduit flow model, predictions of dynamic pressure and other variables related to damage by pyroclastic flow into underground structures, and vulnerability criteria for structures subjected to conditions of explosive eruption. Process models (e.g., multiphase flow) are important for testing the validity or relative importance of possible scenarios in a volcanic risk assessment. We show how time-dependent multiphase modeling of explosive ''eruption'' of basaltic magma into an open tunnel (drift) at the Yucca Mountain repository provides insight into proposed scenarios that include the development of secondary pathways to the Earth's surface. Addressing volcanic risk within a decision

  4. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through the plume and is

  5. Slab dehydration in Cascadia and its relationship to volcanism, seismicity, and non-volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delph, J. R.; Levander, A.; Niu, F.

    2017-12-01

    The characteristics of subduction beneath the Pacific Northwest (Cascadia) are variable along strike, leading to the segmentation of Cascadia into 3 general zones: Klamath, Siletzia, and Wrangelia. These zones show marked differences in tremor density, earthquake density, seismicity rates, and the locus and amount of volcanism in the subduction-related volcanic arc. To better understand what controls these variations, we have constructed a 3D shear-wave velocity model of the upper 80 km along the Cascadia margin from the joint inversion of CCP-derived receiver functions and ambient noise surface wave data using 900 temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations. With this model, we can investigate variations in the seismic structure of the downgoing oceanic lithosphere and overlying mantle wedge, the character of the crust-mantle transition beneath the volcanic arc, and local to regional variations in crustal structure. From these results, we infer the presence and distribution of fluids released from the subducting slab and how they affect the seismic structure of the overriding lithosphere. In the Klamath and Wrangelia zones, high seismicity rates in the subducting plate and high tremor density correlate with low shear velocities in the overriding plate's forearc and relatively little arc volcanism. While the cause of tremor is debated, intermediate depth earthquakes are generally thought to be due to metamorphic dehydration reactions resulting from the dewatering of the downgoing slab. Thus, the seismic characteristics of these zones combined with rather sparse arc volcanism may indicate that the slab has largely dewatered by the time it reaches sub-arc depths. Some of the water released during earthquakes (and possibly tremor) may percolate into the overriding plate, leading to slow seismic velocities in the forearc. In contrast, Siletzia shows relatively low seismicity rates and tremor density, with relatively higher shear velocities in the forearc

  6. Modelling ground deformation patterns associated with volcanic processes at the Okataina Volcanic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, L.; Cas, R.; Fournier, N.; Ailleres, L.

    2017-09-01

    The Okataina Volcanic Centre (OVC) is one of two large active rhyolite centres in the modern Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in the North Island of New Zealand. It is located in a complex section of the Taupo rift, a tectonically active section of the TVZ. The most recent volcanic unrest at the OVC includes the 1315 CE Kaharoa and 1886 Tarawera eruptions. Current monitoring activity at the OVC includes the use of continuous GPS receivers (cGPS), lake levelling and seismographs. The ground deformation patterns preceding volcanic activity the OVC are poorly constrained and restricted to predictions from basic modelling and comparison to other volcanoes worldwide. A better understanding of the deformation patterns preceding renewed volcanic activity is essential to determine if observed deformation is related to volcanic, tectonic or hydrothermal processes. Such an understanding also means that the ability of the present day cGPS network to detect these deformation patterns can also be assessed. The research presented here uses the finite element (FE) modelling technique to investigate ground deformation patterns associated with magma accumulation and diking processes at the OVC in greater detail. A number of FE models are produced and tested using Pylith software and incorporate characteristics of the 1315 CE Kaharoa and 1886 Tarawera eruptions, summarised from the existing body of research literature. The influence of a simple ring fault structure at the OVC on the modelled deformation is evaluated. The ability of the present-day continuous GPS (cGPS) GeoNet monitoring network to detect or observe the modelled deformation is also considered. The results show the modelled horizontal and vertical displacement fields have a number of key features, which include prominent lobe based regions extending northwest and southeast of the OVC. The results also show that the ring fault structure increases the magnitude of the displacements inside the caldera, in particular in the

  7. Laboratory simulations of volcanic ash charging and conditions for volcanic lightning on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, Martin; Warriner-Bacon, Elliot; Aplin, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Lightning may be important in the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere, as significant chemical reactions occur in the superheated region around the lightning channel. This, combined with the availability of phosphates in volcanic clouds, suggests that volcanic lightning could have been the catalyst for the formation of biological compounds on the early Earth [1]. In addition to meteorological lightning, volcanic activity also generates electrical discharges within charged ash plumes, which can be a significant contributor to atmospheric electricity on geologically active planets. The physical properties of other planetary atmospheres, such as that of Venus, have an effect on the processes that lead to the generation of volcanic lightning. Volcanism is known to have occurred on Venus in the past, and recent observations made by ESA's Venus Express satellite have provided evidence for currently active volcanism [2-4], and lightning discharges [e.g. 5]. Venusian lightning could potentially be volcanic in origin, since no meteorological mechanisms are known to separate charge effectively in its clouds [6]. The hunt for further evidence for lightning at Venus is ongoing, for example by means of the Lightning and Airglow Camera (LAC) [7] on Akatsuki, the current JAXA mission at Venus. Our laboratory experiments simulate ash generation and measure electrical charging of the ash under typical atmospheric conditions on Earth and Venus. The study uses a 1 litre chamber, which, when pressurised and heated, can simulate the high-pressure, high-temperature, carbon dioxide-dominated atmosphere of Venus at 10 km altitude ( 5 MPa, 650 K). A key finding of previous work [8] is that ash plume-forming eruptions are more likely to occur at higher altitudes such as these on Venus. The chamber contains temperature/pressure monitoring and logging equipment, a rock collision apparatus (based on [9]) to generate the charged rock fragments, and charge measurement electrodes connected

  8. Some Environmental Consequences of Large Igneous Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, M. F.

    2009-12-01

    The formation of large igneous provinces (LIPs)—continental flood basalts, ‘volcanic’ margins, and oceanic plateaus—may impact the atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere by rapidly releasing huge amounts of particulates, magmatic volatiles (CO2, SO2, Cl, F, etc.), and potentially volatiles (CO2, CH4, SO2, etc.) from intruded sediments (e.g., carbonates, organic-rich shales, evaporites). A key factor affecting the magnitude of volatile release is whether eruptions are subaerial or marine; hydrostatic pressure inhibits vesiculation and degassing of relatively soluble volatile components (H2O, S, Cl, F) in deep water submarine eruptions, although low solubility components (CO2, noble gases) are mostly degassed even at abyssal depths. Directly or indirectly, such injections may cause changes in the atmosphere/ocean system that can lead to perturbations of atmosphere/ocean chemistry, circulation, ecology, and biological productivity. These changes can be global in extent, particularly if environmental conditions were at or near a threshold state or tipping point. LIPs may have been responsible for some of the most dramatic and rapid changes in the global environment. For example, between ~145 and ~50 Ma, the global ocean was characterized by chemical and isotopic variations (especially in C and Sr isotope ratios, trace metal concentrations, and biocalcification), relatively high temperatures, high relative sea level, episodic deposition of black shales (oceanic anoxic events), high production of hydrocarbons, mass extinctions of marine organisms, and radiations of marine flora and fauna. Temporal correlations between the intense pulses of igneous activity associated with LIP formation and environmental changes suggest more than pure coincidence. The 1783-84 eruption of Laki on Iceland provides the only historical record of the type of volcanism that constructs transient LIPs. Although Laki produced a basaltic lava flow representing only ~1% of the volume of a typical

  9. Inversion of SAR data in active volcanic areas by optimization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nunnari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The inversion problem concerns the identification of parameters of a volcanic source causing observable changes in ground deformation data recorded in volcanic areas. In particular, this paper deals with the inversion of ground deformation measured by using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry and an inversion approach formulated in terms of an optimization problem is proposed. Based on this inversion scheme, it is shown that the problem of inverting ground deformation data in terms of a single source, of Mogi or Okada type, is numerically well conditioned. In the paper, two case studies of inverting actual SAR data recorded on Mt. Etna during eruptions occurring in 1998 and 2001 are investigated, showing the suitability of the proposed technique.

  10. Polychronous Zirconology of Navysh Volcanics of the Ai Formation (Southern Urals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnobaev, A. A.; Puchkov, V. N.; Sergeeva, N. D.

    2018-01-01

    In order to resolve the age of Navysh volcanics (NV), which is usually attributed to the Lower Riphean of the Ai Formation, we have used geochronological, petrologic, and mineralogical methods of zirconology, apart from the SHRIMP isotopic data of single zircon grains. Moreover, TIMS isotope age analyses have been conducted, the results of which can be regarded as both controlling and providing the most correct information. The TIMS and SHRIMP data make it possible to suggest a polychronous character of the NV, which include not only Riphean, but also Paleozoic groups of volcanics. In this situation, an assessment of the scales of such polychroneity of NV and, correspondingly, of the Ai Formation as a whole becomes urgent.

  11. From initiation to termination: a petrostratigraphic tour of the Ethiopian Low-Ti Flood Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, S. R.; Rooney, T. O.; Kappelman, J.; Yirgu, G.; Ayalew, D.

    2018-05-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFBs), thought to preserve the magmatic record of an impinging mantle plume head, offer spatial and temporal insights into melt generation processes in large igneous provinces (LIPs). Despite the utility of CFBs in probing mantle plume composition, these basalts typically erupt fractionated compositions, suggestive of significant residence time in the continental lithosphere. The location and duration of residence within the lithosphere provide additional insights into the flux of plume-related magmas. The NW Ethiopian plateau offers a well-preserved stratigraphic sequence from flood basalt initiation to termination, and is thus an important target for study of CFBs. This study examines modal observations within a stratigraphic framework and places these observations within the context of the magmatic evolution of the Ethiopian CFB province. Data demonstrate multiple pulses of magma recharge punctuated by brief shut-down events, with initial flows fed by magmas that experienced deeper fractionation (lower crust). Broad changes in modal mineralogy and flow cyclicity are consistent with fluctuating changes in magmatic flux through a complex plumbing system, indicating pulsed magma flux and an overall shallowing of the magmatic plumbing system over time. The composition of plagioclase megacrysts suggests a constant replenishing of new primitive magma recharging the shallow plumbing system during the main phase of volcanism, reaching an apex prior to flood basalt termination. The petrostratigraphic data sets presented in this paper provide new insight into the evolution of a magma plumbing system in a CFB province.

  12. The Anatahan Felsic Province in the Mariana Arc System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. J.; Hargrove, U. S.

    2003-12-01

    The May 2003 plinian eruption of Anatahan was a surprise for the residents of the Northern Mariana Mariana Comonwealth (USA). From a petrologic perspective, this eruption of siliceous andesite was also atypical for the Mariana arc, which elsewhere mostly erupts fractionated basalts and basaltic andesites. However, felsic eruptions are not unusual for Anatahan which has previously erupted a wide range of lavas, from basalts through dacites. The reasons and significance of the intermittently felsic nature of Anatahan lavas may reflect either development of a mature magma chamber localized beneath Anatahan or perhaps the presence of an areally-extensive pool of felsic magma in the middle crust, similar to that inferred for the Izu arc to the north. Anatahan lies at the southern end of the Mariana Central Island Province and just north of the Southern Seamount Province, but it has never been clear whether these morphological subdivisions reflect different magma fluxes along the arc or are due to the island volcanoes being older than the seamounts. Synthesis of existing data for Anatahan and data for surrounding seamounts collected during the 2001 Cook 7 expedition and earlier cruises indicates that Anatahan is situated near the middle of an arc segment with an unusually high proportion of felsic lavas compared to typical Mariana Arc magmatic products. The 115 km-long arc segment from E. Diamante seamount East Diamante seamount (15° 55'N) to a seamount NW of Zealandia Bank (17° N) define the Anatahan Felsic Province (AFP). Seven edifices within this region, including Anatahan, have erupted felsic lavas, often interspersed with more mafic lavas. Volcano size does not seem important in controlling the abundance of felsic lavas within the AFP; the volcanic island of Sarigan does not contain felsic lavas, whereas small parasitic cones NE of Anatahan and SW of E. Diamante erupt lavas with 65% and 72% SiO2, respectively. This region also contains two suspected hydrothermal

  13. Actinobacterial diversity in volcanic caves and associated geomicrobiological interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eRiquelme

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic caves are filled with colorful microbial mats on the walls and ceilings. These volcanic caves are found worldwide, and studies are finding vast bacteria diversity within these caves. One group of bacteria that can be abundant in volcanic caves, as well as other caves, is Actinobacteria. As Actinobacteria are valued for their ability to produce a variety of secondary metabolites, rare and novel Actinobacteria are being sought in underexplored environments. The abundance of novel Actinobacteria in volcanic caves makes this environment an excellent location to study these bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM from several volcanic caves worldwide revealed diversity in the morphologies present. Spores, coccoid and filamentous cells, many with hair-like or knobby extensions, were some of the microbial structures observed within the microbial mat samples. In addition, the SEM study pointed out that these features figure prominently in both constructive and destructive mineral processes. To further investigate this diversity, we conducted both Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of the Actinobacteria in volcanic caves from four locations, two islands in the Azores, Portugal and Hawai`i and New Mexico, USA. This comparison represents one of the largest sequencing efforts of Actinobacteria in volcanic caves to date. The diversity was shown to be dominated by Actinomycetales, but also included several newly described orders, such as Euzebyales, and Gaiellales. Sixty-two percent of the clones from the four locations shared less than 97% similarity to known sequences, and nearly 71% of the clones were singletons, supporting the commonly held belief that volcanic caves are an untapped resource for novel and rare Actinobacteria. The amplicon libraries depicted a wider view of the microbial diversity in Azorean volcanic caves revealing three additional orders, Rubrobacterales, Solirubrobacterales and Coriobacteriales. Studies of microbial

  14. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L N; Miller, Ana Z; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic caves are filled with colorful microbial mats on the walls and ceilings. These volcanic caves are found worldwide, and studies are finding vast bacteria diversity within these caves. One group of bacteria that can be abundant in volcanic caves, as well as other caves, is Actinobacteria. As Actinobacteria are valued for their ability to produce a variety of secondary metabolites, rare and novel Actinobacteria are being sought in underexplored environments. The abundance of novel Actinobacteria in volcanic caves makes this environment an excellent location to study these bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) from several volcanic caves worldwide revealed diversity in the morphologies present. Spores, coccoid, and filamentous cells, many with hair-like or knobby extensions, were some of the microbial structures observed within the microbial mat samples. In addition, the SEM study pointed out that these features figure prominently in both constructive and destructive mineral processes. To further investigate this diversity, we conducted both Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of the Actinobacteria in volcanic caves from four locations, two islands in the Azores, Portugal, and Hawai'i and New Mexico, USA. This comparison represents one of the largest sequencing efforts of Actinobacteria in volcanic caves to date. The diversity was shown to be dominated by Actinomycetales, but also included several newly described orders, such as Euzebyales, and Gaiellales. Sixty-two percent of the clones from the four locations shared less than 97% similarity to known sequences, and nearly 71% of the clones were singletons, supporting the commonly held belief that volcanic caves are an untapped resource for novel and rare Actinobacteria. The amplicon libraries depicted a wider view of the microbial diversity in Azorean volcanic caves revealing three additional orders, Rubrobacterales, Solirubrobacterales, and Coriobacteriales. Studies of microbial ecology in

  15. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  16. [Epidemiology of caprine and ovine brucellosis in Formosa province, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ana M; Mancebo, Orlando A; Monzón, Carlos M; Gait, Juan J; Casco, Rubén D; Torioni de Echaide, Susana M

    2016-01-01

    An epidemiological study of brucellosis was carried out in 516 goats and mixed flocks (goat/sheep) from the three agro-ecological regions of Formosa province, Argentina. Serum samples from a total of 25401 goats and 2453 sheeps were analyzed using buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT) and complement fixation test (CFT). Bacteriological and PCR analyses on milk samples from goats in three flocks with a history of brucellosis and recent abortions were also performed. Brucellosis was detected in four of the nine departments of the province with an overall prevalence of 2% and an intra-flock prevalence ranging between 1% and 40%. The proportion of infected flocks was 3.6%, 12% and 36% for the eastern, central and western regions, respectively. Brucella melitensis bv. 1 was isolated efrom goats for the first time in the province. The expected fragments of 827bp from the omp2ab gene (Brucella spp.) and 731bp from the insert IS711 (B. melitensis) were amplified by PCR. Detection of antibodies by BPAT and FCT in sheep cohabiting with goats suggests that infections could have been caused by B. melitensis, posing an additional risk to public health. Control and eradication programs for brucellosis should consider mixed flocks as a single epidemiological unit. The results indicate that brucellosis by B. melitensis bv1 is highly endemic in the central and western regions of Formosa province. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Explosive mafic volcanism on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1993-01-01

    Deposits within Amazonia Planitia, Mars, have been interpreted as ignimbrite plains on the basis of their erosional characteristics. The western flank of Hecates Tholus appears to be mantled by an airfall deposit, which was produced through magma-water interactions or exsolution of magmatic volatiles. Morphologic studies, along with numerical and analytical modeling of Martian plinian columns and pyroclastic flows, suggest that shield materials of Tyrrhena and Hadriaca paterae are composed of welded pyroclastic flows. Terrestrial pyroclastic flows, ignimbrites, and airfall deposits are typically associated with silicic volcanism. Because it is unlikely that large volumes of silicic lavas have been produced on Mars, we seek terrestrial analogs of explosives, mafic volcanism. Plinian basaltic airfall deposits have been well-documented at Masaya, Nicaragua, and basaltic ignimbrite and surge deposits also have been recognized there. Ambrym and Yasour, both in Vanuatu, are mafic stratovolcanioes with large central calderas, and are composed of interbedded basaltic pyrocalstic deposits and lava flows. Zavaritzki, a mafic stratovolcano in the Kurile Islands, may have also produced pyroclastic deposits, although the exact nature of these deposits in unknown. Masaya, Ambrym and Yasour are known to be located above tensional zones. Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae may also be located above zones of tension, resulting from the formation and evolution of Hellas basin, and, thus, may be directly analogous to these terrestrial mafic, explosive volcanoes.

  18. Reduced cooling following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Kandlbauer, Jessy; Valdes, Paul J.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    2017-11-01

    Volcanic eruptions are an important influence on decadal to centennial climate variability. Large eruptions lead to the formation of a stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer which can cause short-term global cooling. This response is modulated by feedback processes in the earth system, but the influence from future warming has not been assessed before. Using earth system model simulations we find that the eruption-induced cooling is significantly weaker in the future state. This is predominantly due to an increase in planetary albedo caused by increased tropospheric aerosol loading with a contribution from associated changes in cloud properties. The increased albedo of the troposphere reduces the effective volcanic aerosol radiative forcing. Reduced sea-ice coverage and hence feedbacks also contribute over high-latitudes, and an enhanced winter warming signal emerges in the future eruption ensemble. These findings show that the eruption response is a complex function of the environmental conditions, which has implications for the role of eruptions in climate variability in the future and potentially in the past.

  19. Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Tvashtar Catena (63 N, 120 W) is one of the most interesting features on Io. This chain of large paterae (caldera-like depressions) has exhibited highly variable volcanic activity in a series of observations. Tvashtar is the type example of a style of volcanism seen only at high latitudes, with short-lived Pele-type plumes and short-lived by intense thermal events. Evidence for a hot spot at Tvashtar was first detected in an eclipse observation in April 1997 (orbit G7) by the Solid State Imager (SSI) on the Galileo Spacecraft. Tvashtar was originally targeted for observation at higher resolution in the close flyby in November 1999 (I25) because of its interesting large-scale topography. There are relatively few but generally larger paterae at high latitudes on Io. I25 images revealed a 25 km long, 1-2 km high lava curtain via a pattern of saturation and bleeding in the CCD image, which requires very high temperatures.

  20. F, Cl, and S contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in mafic dikes and the environmental impact of flood volcanism in the Paraná-Etendeka LIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Linda; Trumbull, Robert; Keiding, Jakob; Veksler, Ilya; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor; Wiedenbeck, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) have been proposed to trigger mass-extinction events by the release of large quantities of volcanic gases which results in major climatic perturbations causing worldwide ecological stress and collapse. A prerequisite for understanding the proposed link between LIP volcanism and biological crisis is reliable information about the total gas emissions during these events. We present the first estimations of total F, Cl and S emissions from the Paraná-Etendeka LIP in the South Atlantic. Data from this province are of special interest because it is among the world's largest LIPs but is not associated to a mass extinction event. We have determined pre-eruption concentrations of F, Cl and S by in-situ analysis of melt inclusions preserved in olivine phenocrysts from basaltic dikes in the Etendeka province of NW Namibia. The melt inclusions have Mg-rich basaltic bulk compositions with about 8 to 18 wt.% MgO, overlapping the compositional range of the host rocks. A major feature of the melt inclusions is their wide variation in major and minor element concentrations, including F, Cl and S. This is attributed to trapping of variably-mixed melt fractions during crystallization of olivine in the roots of the dike system. Fluorine concentrations vary from about 190 to 450 ppm, Cl from destruction of the ozone layer.

  1. Potential uranium provinces in some arabian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This work represents an attempt to delineate potential uranium provinces in some Arabian countries using various related recognition criteria. Definition of these provinces is based on the available geologic and tectonic setting beside geochronological sequence and some geochemical characteristics. This trial would be of a great help for interchanging the ideas and necessary data for the development in the fields of uranium exploration and production. As a result of this study, a number of promising potential uranium provinces are recommended in some arabian countries. 5 figs

  2. Waning Miocene subduction and arc volcanism in Baja California: the San Luis Gonzaga volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Arturo; Fletcher, John M.; López-Martínez, Margarita; Mendoza-Borunda, Ramón

    2000-03-01

    Subduction of the Guadalupe-Magdalena microplate beneath Baja California ended in the middle Miocene, and the last volcanic events in the frontal arc extinguished along the present-day eastern margin of the Baja California peninsula. The San Luis Gonzaga area in the north-central Gulf coast contains one of the younger arc-related volcanic centers in northern Baja California. The volcanic succession contains three sequences. The basal sequence (Group 1) is composed of stratified pyroclastic deposits, up to 500 m thick, and subordinate lava flows. The near-vent facies crop out in tilted fault blocks along the present shoreline, whereas the distal facies are exposed across ˜12 km toward the west and includes epiclastic deposits and at least three ash flow tuffs. This sequence is internally concordant and overlies smooth paleosurface developed on granitic basement, and pinches out across the Gulf escarpment. The Potrero Andesite (Group 2) is a series of dacite to basaltic-andesite lava flows from a shield volcano located ˜15 km west of today's coastline; similar source vents also occurs further south of the San Luis Gonzaga area. A sequence of dacite domes (Group 3) intrudes the near-vent facies of Group 1 and contains subordinate volcanic breccia and minor lava flows that overlie Group 1 sequence. Cross-cutting relationships and the abundance of volcanic breccia associated with the domes suggest that these domes were emplaced as semi-rigid intrusions (spines) with low explosive activity. The San Luis Gonzaga volcanic suite ranges in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite with predominant plagioclase and pyroxene and variable amounts of hornblende. Trace-element patterns indicate calc-alkaline to mildly alkaline magmas with high Ba and low Nb contents. Incompatible-element ratios and mineralogical characteristics suggest different magma batches and/or different amount of crustal assimilation for the three sequences that produced contrasting eruptive styles. A

  3. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope variability across and along the Ecuadorian volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Samaniego, Pablo; Vlastélic, Ivan; Nauret, François; Gannoun, Mouhcine; Hidalgo, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Determining the contribution of different potential sources in arc magma genesis is of paramount importance for discriminating the role of deep-seated processes at work in the slab and mantle wedge, as well as the process occurring during the magma ascent through the arc crust. The Ecuadorian volcanic arc (2°S - 1°N) results from the subduction of the oceanic Nazca plate below the continental south-American plate. This volcanic province, developed in front of the subducting Carnegie ridge, is characterized by at least 50-60 volcanic centres of Pleistocene-Holocene age, which are distributed along the Western and Eastern Cordilleras and in the back-arc region. Previous studies on this province focused on two main issues: (1) the role of the deep-seated process occurring at the level of the subducting slab and the mantle wedge ([1], [2]), and (2) the role of crustal process ([3]). In this work, we use existing and new (57 samples from 36 volcanoes of the whole Ecuadorian arc) major-trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data to resolve precisely magma compositional changes occurring across and along the volcanic arc and to precise the role of the heterogeneous crust underlying this arc segment. In the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb diagram, most of Western Cordillera volcanic centres and Back arc volcanoes display a flat trend characterized by a large variation in 206Pb/204Pb (18.5 - 19.15), with little variation in 207Pb/204Pb (15.54-15.62). Along this trend, back arc volcanoes tend towards unradiogenic compositions with Reventador as end-member whereas western cordilleras volcanoes generally show more radiogenic compositions (Pilavo, Imbabura). In contrast, the Eastern cordillera volcanoes display more radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb (15.60 - 15.70) or 208Pb/204Pb (38.7 - 39) at a given 206Pb/204Pb compared to the Western cordillera with similar variation in 206Pb/204Pb (18.85 - 19.05). Extreme compositions are observed at Tungurahua and Antisana volcanoes. Several volcanoes of

  4. Compositional Differences between Felsic Volcanic rocks from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks suggest that fractional crystallization from differing basic parents accompanied by a limited assimilation (AFC) was the dominant process controlling the genesis of the MER felsic volcanic rocks. Keywords: Ethiopia; Northern Main Ethiopian Rift; Bimodal ...

  5. Monitoring gas emissions can help forecast volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Maarten de Moor,; Bo Galle,

    2015-01-01

    As magma ascends in active volcanoes, dissolved volatiles partition from melt into a gas phase, rise, and are released into the atmosphere from volcanic vents. The major components of high-temperature volcanic gas are typically water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. 

  6. Mylonitic volcanics near Puging, Upper Siang district, Arunachal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Abor volcanics of the continental flood basalt affinity are extensively exposed in different parts of the Siang valley. These are associated with Yinkiong Group of rocks of Paleocene–Eocene age and represent syn-sedimentary volcanism in a rift setting. Subsequent folding and thrusting of the Siyom and Rikor sequences ...

  7. Geology and petrology of the Vulsinian volcanic area (Latium, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Vulsinian volcanic area is situated in Latium, west central Italy. This quarternary volcanic complex consists of a series of layered tuffs, lava flows, ignimbrites, and many small cinder and ash cones. A steep central edifice is lacking due to the relatively large amount of pyroclastic deposits.

  8. Interpretation of magnetic fabrics in the Dalma volcanic rocks and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    70

    The generations of the Fe-Ti oxides are different in the meta-sediments and volcanics, the former .... distribution of the volcanic rocks at Chandil (north of Dalma) and the absence of 1500-1600. Ma old charnockites ..... But according to petrography the quartzites are not that rich in primary titano-magnetite which can define a.

  9. Mylonitic volcanics near Puging, Upper Siang district, Arunachal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 6. Mylonitic volcanics near ... This paper provides field evidence proving that the compression due the Burmese plate made oblique slip thrusting and zones of mylonitised volcanics possible and associated metasediments were formed. The kinematic ...

  10. Xenoliths from Bunyaruguru volcanic field: Some insights into lithology of East African Rift upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyeva, N. S.; Senin, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    The mineral composition of mantle xenoliths from kamafugites of the Bunyaruguru volcanic field has been determined. The major and some trace elements (Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, La, Ce, Nd, Nb) has been analyzed in olivine, clinopyroxene, phlogopite, Cr-spinel, titanomagnetite, perovskite and carbonates of xenoliths and their host lavas. Bunyaruguru is one of three (Katwe-Kikorongo, Fort Portal and Bunyaruguru) volcanic fields included in the Toro-Ankole province located on the North end of the West Branch of the East African Rift. The xenoliths from three craters within the Bunyaruguru volcanic field revealed the different character of metasomatic alteration, reflecting the heterogeneity of the mantle on the kilometer scale. The most unusual finding was composite glimmerite-wehrlite xenolith from the crater Kazimiro, which contains the fresh primary high-Mg olivine with inclusions of Cr-spinel that had not been previously identified in this area. The different composition of phenocryst and xenolith minerals indicates that the studied xenoliths are not сumulus of enclosing magma, but the composition of xenoliths characterizes the lithology of the upper mantle of the area. The carbonate melt inclusions in olivine Fo90 demonstrate the existence of primary carbonatitic magmas in Bunyaruguru upper mantle. The results of texture and chemical investigation of the xenolith minerals indicate the time sequence of metasomatic alteration of Bunyaruguru upper mantle: MARID metasomatism at the first stage followed by carbonate metasomatism. The abundances of REE in perovskites from kamafugite are 2-4 times higher than similar values for xenolith. Therefore the kamafugite magma was been generated from a more enriched mantle source than the source of the xenoliths. The evaluation of P-T conditions formation of clinopyroxene xenolith revealed the range of pressure 20-65 kbar and the temperatures range 830-1040 °C. The pressure of clinopyroxene phenocryst

  11. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  12. Correlating geochemistry, tectonics, and volcanic volume along the Central American volcanic front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolge, Louise L.; Carr, Michael J.; Milidakis, Katherine I.; Lindsay, Fara N.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    2009-12-01

    The Central American volcanic front consists of several distinct volcanic lineaments or segments, separated by right steps and/or changes in strike. Each volcanic line is rotated slightly counterclockwise from the strike of the inclined seismic zone. Right stepping volcanic lines, oblique to the strike of the slab, create a sawtooth pattern in the depth to the slab. Zr/Nb is the first geochemical signature with consistent large offsets at the right steps in the volcanic front. Moreover, Zr/Nb mirrors the sawtooth variation in depth to the slab; within a segment it increases from SE to NW, and at the right steps, separating segments, it abruptly decreases. Unfortunately, there is no simple negative correlation between Zr/Nb and depth to the slab because Zr/Nb also has a regional variation, similar to previously documented regional variations in slab tracers in Central America (e.g., Ba/La, U/Th, and 87Sr/86Sr). Within a segment, Zr/Nb decreases with increasing depth to slab. This can be explained in two ways: a Nb retaining mineral, e.g., amphibole, in the subducting slab is breaking down gradually with increasing depth causing more Nb to be released and consequently a smaller Nb depletion in deeper melts; alternatively, all melts have the same initial Nb depletion which is then diluted by acquiring Nb from the surrounding mantle wedge as melts rise and react. Deeper melts have longer paths and therefore more reaction with the mantle wedge diluting the initial Nb depletion. Within each volcanic segment there is variation in eruptive volume. The largest volcanoes generally occur in the middle of the segments, and the smaller volcanoes tend to be located at the ends. Connecting the largest volcanoes in each segment suggests an axis of maximum productivity. This is likely the surface projection of the center of the melt aggregation zone. The largest volcanoes tap the entire melt zone. Those with shallow depths to the slab tap just the front part of the melt zone and

  13. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  14. A Strongly Calc-alkaline Suite in the Midst of the Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province: Implications for Generating the Calc-alkaline Trend Without Subduction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-Miocene lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics (SV), distributed over 3,400 km2 in NE Oregon, comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The volcanic suite is mainly composed of calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, yet tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The SV lies in the heart of nearly coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province of the Pacific Northwest. The unique combination of strongly CA rocks of the SV in a non-subduction setting provide an excellent opportunity to study controls on inducing CA evolution in the midst of a TH province and independent of processes taking places at an active subduction zone. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate CA basaltic andesites to andesites of the SV erupted at least from 14.78±0.13 Ma to 12.44±0.12 Ma demonstrating that CA magmatism of the SV was ongoing during the eruptions of the tholeiitic Wanapum Basalt member of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). This range will likely be extended to even older ages in the future because existent age dates did not include samples from near the base of the SV. Thickness of intermediate lavas flows of the SV range from 15 m to as thin as 2 m and lavas are characterized by mostly phenocryst poor lithologies. When phenocrysts are abundant they are very small suggesting growth late during eruption. Single lava flow sections can include on the order of 30 conformable flows, testifying to a vigorous eruption history. The thickest andesitic sections are located in the glacially carved mountains of the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness (i.e. Strawberry Mountain, High Lake, and Slide Lake) where several vent complexes are exposed, which are delineated by dikes and plugs with finely interlocking plutonic textures, cross-cutting SV lava flows. Dikes generally strike NW-SE. Subtle variations in major and trace element compositions exist between TH and CA lavas of the SV. The CA lavas of the SV are

  15. Distinguishing high surf from volcanic long-period earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John; Haney, Matt; Fee, David; Paskievitch, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Repeating long-period (LP) earthquakes are observed at active volcanoes worldwide and are typically attributed to unsteady pressure fluctuations associated with fluid migration through the volcanic plumbing system. Nonvolcanic sources of LP signals include ice movement and glacial outburst floods, and the waveform characteristics and frequency content of these events often make them difficult to distinguish from volcanic LP events. We analyze seismic and infrasound data from an LP swarm recorded at Pagan volcano on 12–14 October 2013 and compare the results to ocean wave data from a nearby buoy. We demonstrate that although the events show strong similarity to volcanic LP signals, the events are not volcanic but due to intense surf generated by a passing typhoon. Seismo-acoustic methods allow for rapid distinction of volcanic LP signals from those generated by large surf and other sources, a critical task for volcano monitoring.

  16. Assessment of volcanic hazards, vulnerability, risk and uncertainty (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    A volcanic hazard is any phenomenon that threatens communities . These hazards include volcanic events like pyroclastic flows, explosions, ash fall and lavas, and secondary effects such as lahars and landslides. Volcanic hazards are described by the physical characteristics of the phenomena, by the assessment of the areas that they are likely to affect and by the magnitude-dependent return period of events. Volcanic hazard maps are generated by mapping past volcanic events and by modelling the hazardous processes. Both these methods have their strengths and limitations and a robust map should use both approaches in combination. Past records, studied through stratigraphy, the distribution of deposits and age dating, are typically incomplete and may be biased. Very significant volcanic hazards, such as surge clouds and volcanic blasts, are not well-preserved in the geological record for example. Models of volcanic processes are very useful to help identify hazardous areas that do not have any geological evidence. They are, however, limited by simplifications and incomplete understanding of the physics. Many practical volcanic hazards mapping tools are also very empirical. Hazards maps are typically abstracted into hazards zones maps, which are some times called threat or risk maps. Their aim is to identify areas at high levels of threat and the boundaries between zones may take account of other factors such as roads, escape routes during evacuation, infrastructure. These boundaries may change with time due to new knowledge on the hazards or changes in volcanic activity levels. Alternatively they may remain static but implications of the zones may change as volcanic activity changes. Zone maps are used for planning purposes and for management of volcanic crises. Volcanic hazards maps are depictions of the likelihood of future volcanic phenomena affecting places and people. Volcanic phenomena are naturally variable, often complex and not fully understood. There are

  17. Nature and Role of Traditional Forms of Counselling in Zambia: A Case of Lusaka Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiboola, Hector; Munsaka, Sody M.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the nature and role of traditional forms of counselling and the scope of common problems presented to traditional counsellors in Lusaka province. It used a qualitative research methodology and deployed a holistic single-case study design with multiple embedded units of analysis. The sample consisted of 80…

  18. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  19. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  20. Magnetic signature of the Sicily Channel volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodolo, E.; Civile, D.; Zanolla, C.; Geletti, R.

    2012-03-01

    Widespread Late Miocene to Quaternary volcanic activity is know to have occurred in the Sicily Channel continuing up to historical time. New magnetic anomaly data acquired in the Pantelleria Graben, one of the three main tectonic depressions forming the WNW-trending Sicily Channel rift system, integrated with available profiles, are used to identify and map volcanic bodies in this sector of the northern African margin. Some of these manifestations, both outcropping at the sea-floor or buried beneath a variable thickness of Plio-Quaternary sedimentary cover, have been imaged by seismic reflection profiles. Three main positive magnetic anomalies have been found: to the S-E of the Pantelleria Island, the largest emerged caldera of the Sicily Channel, along the eastern margin of the Nameless Bank, and at the north-western termination of the Linosa Graben. Only the anomaly located off the south-eastern coast of the Pantelleria Island, associated with a large outcropping body gradually buried beneath a substantially undisturbed Upper Pliocene-Quaternary sediments, aligns with the trend of the tectonic depression. 2-D geophysical models produced along seismic transects perpendicularly crossing the Pantelleria Graben have allowed to derive its deep crustal structure, and detect the presence of buried magmatic bodies which generate the anomalies. Marginal faults seem to have played a major role in focussing magma emplacement in this sector of the Sicily Channel. The other anomalies represent off-axis volcanic episodes and generally do not show evident magmatic manifestations at the sea-floor. These magnetic maxima seem to follow a NNE-SSW-trending belt extending from Linosa Island to the Nameless Bank, where pre-existing crustal anisotropies may have conditioned magma emplacement both at deep and shallow crustal levels. In general, data analysis has shown that there is a structural control on magma emplacement, with the major magmatic features located in specific locations

  1. Intracanyon basalt lavas of the Debed River (northern Armenia), part of a Pliocene-Pleistocene continental flood basalt province in the South Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Israyelyan, Arsen; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-03-01

    Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (~ 3.25-2.05 Ma), 200-400 m thick basalt lavas outcrop in the South Caucasus region, including the Kars-Erzurum Plateau (northeastern Turkey), the Javakheti Plateau (Georgia-Armenia), and the Lori Plateau (northern Armenia). These fissure-fed, rapidly erupted fluid lavas filled pre-existing river valleys over many tens of kilometres. The basalts exposed in the Debed River canyon, northern Armenia, are ~ 200 m thick and of three morphological types: (1) basal pillow basalts and hyaloclastites, overlain by (2) columnar-jointed pahoehoe sheet flows, in turn overlain by (3) slabby pahoehoe and rubbly pahoehoe flows. The lower and middle lavas show evidence for damming of river drainage, like many lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province, Scotland, Ireland, and Iceland. There is also evidence for syn-volcanic faulting of the early lavas. Related basalts also outcrop in the Gegham Uplands and the Hrazdan River basin in Armenia. This 3.25-2.05 Ma South Caucasus basalt province, covering parts of Turkey, Georgia and Armenia, has an estimated areal extent of ~ 15,000 km2 and volume of ~ 2250 km3. Because its main geological features are remarkably like those of many continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces, we consider it a true, albeit small, CFB province. It is the smallest and youngest CFB in the world. An analogue closely similar in major features is the Late Miocene Altos de Jalisco CFB province in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Both provinces formed during lithospheric pull-apart and transtensional faulting. Their broader significance is in showing flood basalt size distribution to be a continuum without natural breaks, with implications for geodynamic models.

  2. Real Time Volcanic Cloud Products and Predictions for Aviation Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Habib, Shahid; da Silva, Arlindo; Hughes, Eric; Yang, Kai; Brentzel, Kelvin; Seftor, Colin; Li, Jason Y.; Schneider, David; Guffanti, Marianne; hide

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and volcanic ash into the atmosphere, posing a substantial risk to aviation safety. Ingesting near-real time and Direct Readout satellite volcanic cloud data is vital for improving reliability of volcanic ash forecasts and mitigating the effects of volcanic eruptions on aviation and the economy. NASA volcanic products from the Ozone Monitoring Insrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite have been incorporated into Decision Support Systems of many operational agencies. With the Aura mission approaching its 10th anniversary, there is an urgent need to replace OMI data with those from the next generation operational NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The data provided from these instruments are being incorporated into forecasting models to provide quantitative ash forecasts for air traffic management. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the volcanic near-real time and Direct Readout data products from the new Ozone Monitoring and Profiling Suite (OMPS) ultraviolet sensor onboard SNPP for monitoring and forecasting volcanic clouds. The transition of NASA data production to our operational partners is outlined. Satellite observations are used to constrain volcanic cloud simulations and improve estimates of eruption parameters, resulting in more accurate forecasts. This is demonstrated for the 2012 eruption of Copahue. Volcanic eruptions are modeled using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol and Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. A hindcast of the disruptive eruption from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull is used to estimate aviation re-routing costs using Metron Aviation's ATM Tools.

  3. Dating and source determination of volcanic rocks from Khunik area (South of Birjand, South Khorasan using Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Samiee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Khunik area is located in the south of Birjand, Khorasan province, in the eastern margin of Lut block. Tertiary volcanic rocks have andesite to trachy-andesite composition. Dating analyzing by Rb-Sr method on plagioclase and hornblende as well as whole-rock isochron method was performed on pyroxene-hornblende andesite rock unit. On this basis the emplacement age is Upper Paleocene (58±11 Ma. These rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr and εNd 0.7046-0.7049 and 2.16-3.12, respectively. According to isotopic data, volcanic rocks originated from depleted mantle and have the least crust contamination while it was fractionated. Geochemically, Khunik volcanic rocks have features typical of calk-alkaline to shoshonite and are metaluminous. Enrichment in LILEs and typical negative anomalies of Nb and Ti are evidences that the volcanic rocks formed in a subduction zone and active continental margin. Modeling suggests that these rocks were derived dominantly from 1–5% partial melting of a mainly spinel garnet lherzolite mantle source that is metasomatized by slab-derived fluid.

  4. A model for Nb-Zr-REE-Ga enrichment in Lopingian altered alkaline volcanic ashes: Key evidence of H-O isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shifeng; Nechaev, Victor P.; Chekryzhov, Igor Yu.; Zhao, Lixin; Vysotskiy, Sergei V.; Graham, Ian; Ward, Colin R.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.; Velivetskaya, Tatyana A.; Zhao, Lei; French, David; Hower, James C.

    2018-03-01

    Clay-altered volcanic ash with highly-elevated concentrations of Nb(Ta), Zr(Hf), rare earth elements (REE), and Ga, is a new type of critical metal deposit with high commercial prospects that has been discovered in Yunnan Province, southwest China. Previous studies showed that the volcanic ashes had been subjected to hydrothermal fluids, the nature of which, however, is not clear. Here we show that the volcanic ashes were originated from alkaline magmatism, followed by a continuous hydrothermal-weathering process. Heated meteoric waters, which were sourced from acidic rains and mixed with CO2 from degassing of the Emeishan plume, have caused partial, but widespread, acidic leaching of Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, REE, and Ga into ground water and residual enrichment of these elements, along with Al and Ti, in the deeply altered rocks. Subsequent alteration occurring under cooler, neutral or alkaline conditions, caused by water-rock interaction, resulted in precipitation of the leached critical metals in the deposit. Polymetallic mineralization of similar origin may be found in other continental regions subjected to explosive alkaline volcanism associated with deep weathering in humid conditions.

  5. Constraining Silicate Weathering Processes in an Active Volcanic Complex: Implications for the Long-term Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, K.; West, A. J.; Hartmann, J.; Amann, T.; Hosono, T.; Ide, K.

    2017-12-01

    While analyzing geochemical archives and carbon cycle modelling can further our understanding of the role of silicate weathering as a sink in the long-term carbon cycle, it is necessary to study modern weathering processes to inform these efforts. A recent compilation of data from rivers draining basaltic catchments estimates that rock weathering in active volcanic fields (AVFs) consumes atmospheric CO2 approximately three times faster than in inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), suggesting that the eruption and subsequent weathering of large igneous provinces likely played a major role in the carbon cycle in the geologic past [1]. The study demonstrates a significant correlation between catchment mean annual temperature (MAT) and atmospheric CO2 consumption rate for IVFs. However CO2 consumption due to weathering of AVFs is not correlated with MAT as the relationship is complicated by variability in hydrothermal fluxes, reactive surface area, and groundwater flow paths. To investigate the controls on weathering processes in AVFs, we present data for dissolved and solid weathering products from Mount Aso Caldera, Japan. Aso Caldera is an ideal site for studying the how the chemistry of rivers draining an AVF is impacted by high-temperature water/rock interactions, volcanic ash weathering, and varied groundwater flow paths and residence times. Samples were collected over five field seasons from two rivers and their tributaries, cold groundwater springs, and thermal springs. These samples capture the region's temperature and precipitation seasonality. Solid samples of unaltered volcanic rocks, hydrothermally-altered materials, volcanic ash, a soil profile, and suspended and bedload river sediments were also collected. The hydrochemistry of dissolved phases were analyzed at the University of Hamburg, while the mineralogy and geochemical compositions of solid phases were analyzed at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles. This work will be discussed in the context of

  6. Study on Banana Cooperatives in Hainan Province

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huide; Zhang, Wanzhen; Liu, Enping; Zhang, Xizhu

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the distribution, member scale, production and operation of banana cooperatives in Hainan Province, and points out the market risk and natural risk faced by the production of banana cooperatives in Hainan Province. In order to promote the banana cooperatives to form new agricultural management system integrating organization and intensification, this paper puts forth the production and operation recommendations, such as joint production of banana cooperatives, ...

  7. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  8. Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar systematics of Malani volcanic rocks of southwest Rajasthan: evidence for a younger post-crystallization thermal event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, S.S.; Srivastava, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A new Rb-Sr age of 779 ± 10 Ma has been obtained for a suite of andesite-dacite-rhyolite from the Malani igneous province of southwestern Rajasthan, dated earlier at 745 ± 10 Ma by Crawford and Compston (1970). The associated basalts may be slightly younger than the felsic volcanics and have a mantle source. The felsic volcanics on the other hand were most probably derived by fractional crystallization of a crustal magma. 40 Ar- 39 Ar systematics of three samples viz., a basalt, a dacite and a rhyolite show disturbed age spectra indicating a thermal event around 500-550 Ma ago. This secondary thermal event is quite wide-spread and possibly related to the Pan-African thermo-tectonic episode observed in the Himalayas and south India. (author). 38 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Arc-scale observations of volcanic SO2: a case study from Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, B. T.; Edmonds, M.; Mather, T. A.; Carn, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    It is now possible to quantify volcanic arc-scale volcanic gas emissions using satellite-based instruments. We have used the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to measure both the non-explosive and explosive eruption output of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from volcanoes along the Papua New Guinea arc between 2005-2008. Very few estimates of arc-scale volcanic SO2 output exist to date, primarily due to difficulties inherent in ground-based measurements and the high detection limits of previous generations of satellite-based instruments. The high spatial resolution and low detection limits of OMI mean that even low-level passive degassing can be detected, opening up new possibilities for arc-scale observations. These observations are of use for volcano monitoring, hazard assessment (particularly with regard to aviation hazard) and assessment of arc geochemical budgets and are of immense value in remote regions with little ground-based instrumentation, such as Papua New Guinea. We identify Manam, Langila, Ulawun, Rabaul and Bagana as the active sources of volcanic SO2 in Papua New Guinea, with Bagana being the single largest source. Our OMI time series shows that over the four year period, ~1.5 ± 0.5 Mt SO2 was degassed from the arc and the emissions were dominated by major eruption events at Manam (January 2005), Bagana (June 2006) and Rabaul (October 2006). Averaged over the past century however, we find that major explosive eruptions contribute Papua New Guinea's annual volcanic SO2 emissions are similar to those from previously published satellite-based studies of other volcanic arc settings. Ground-based measurements of SO2 at five of Papua New Guinea's volcanoes in 2003 are consistent with our satellite-based observations. Uncertainties in our estimate of arc SO2 output include the effect of in-plume chemical processing of SO2 prior to the satellite overpass and the limitations to OMI's visualisation of low-levels of SO2 emitted into the planetary boundary layer rather

  10. Paleoarchean trace fossils in altered volcanic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, Hubert; Furnes, Harald; DeWit, Maarten

    2015-06-02

    Microbial corrosion textures in volcanic glass from Cenozoic seafloor basalts and the corresponding titanite replacement microtextures in metamorphosed Paleoarchean pillow lavas have been interpreted as evidence for a deep biosphere dating back in time through the earliest periods of preserved life on earth. This interpretation has been recently challenged for Paleoarchean titanite replacement textures based on textural and geochronological data from pillow lavas in the Hooggenoeg Complex of the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We use this controversy to explore the strengths and weaknesses of arguments made in support or rejection of the biogenicity interpretation of bioalteration trace fossils in Cenozoic basalt glasses and their putative equivalents in Paleoarchean greenstones. Our analysis suggests that biogenicity cannot be taken for granted for all titanite-based textures in metamorphosed basalt glass, but a cautious and critical evaluation of evidence suggests that biogenicity remains the most likely interpretation for previously described titanite microtextures in Paleoarchean pillow lavas.

  11. An ethnobotanical survey on hormozgan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Safa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is based on an ethnobotanical research project conducted in Hormozgan province that is located in south of Iran, bordering waters of the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea. This survey was carried out in order to recover the ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal knowledge of the residents of this province. They are using medicinal and functional plants for treating or preventing several diseases. Materials and Methods: Ethnobotanical data sheets were run with the native inhabitants and people of the province by arranging frequent field trips to different parts of the province and direct interviews with them especially those who were more familiar with the plants and their usage.Results: A total of 150 plant species belonging to 53 families were recorded for their ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal uses among the people of province. The records were developed by scientific names, family names, local names, medicinal parts used, different ways of their application, and traditional uses of the plants. There was high compliance in the use of plants in painful disorders, gastrointestinal, and dermatological diseases.Conclusion: This study revealed that the people of Hormozgan province have a rich knowledge of natural resources. The use and consumption of medicinal plants are still important parts of their life. Rational use of native medicinal plants may benefit and improve their living standards and quality of life. The results of this study can be used as a basis for selecting herbs for further pharmacological, phytochemical, and pharmacognostical studies.

  12. Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation - Creede Caldera, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous elastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus ({open_quotes}moat{close_quotes}) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovolcanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for elastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

  13. Gravimetric control of active volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic activity includes phases of magma chamber inflation and deflation, produced by movement of magma and/or hydrothermal processes. Such effects usually leave their imprint as deformation of the ground surfaces which can be recorded by GNSS and other methods, on one hand, and on the other hand they can be modeled as elastic deformation processes, with deformation produced by volcanic masses of finite dimensions such as spheres, ellipsoids and parallelograms. Such volumes are modeled on the basis of inversion (non-linear, numerical solution) of systems of equations relating the unknown dimensions and location of magma sources with observations, currently mostly GNSS and INSAR data. Inversion techniques depend on the misfit between model predictions and observations, but because systems of equations are highly non-linear, and because adopted models for the geometry of magma sources is simple, non-unique solutions can be derived, constrained by local extrema. Assessment of derived magma models can be provided by independent observations and models, such as micro-seismicity distribution and changes in geophysical parameters. In the simplest case magmatic intrusions can be modeled as spheres with diameters of at least a few tens of meters at a depth of a few kilometers; hence they are expected to have a gravimetric signature in permanent recording stations on the ground surface, while larger intrusions may also have an imprint in sensors in orbit around the earth or along precisely defined air paths. Identification of such gravimetric signals and separation of the "true" signal from the measurement and ambient noise requires fine forward modeling of the wider areas based on realistic simulation of the ambient gravimetric field, and then modeling of its possible distortion because of magmatic anomalies. Such results are useful to remove ambiguities in inverse modeling of ground deformation, and also to detect magmatic anomalies offshore.

  14. Bifurcation of volcanic plumes in a crosswind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Gerald G. J.; Davis, John P.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    1994-08-01

    Bent-over buoyant jets distorted by a crosscurrent develop a vortex pair structure and can bifurcate to produce two distinct lobes which diverge from one another downwind. The region downwind of the source between the lobes has relatively low proportions of discharged fluid. Factors invoked by previous workers to cause or enhance bifurcation include buoyancy, release of latent heat at the plume edge by evaporating water droplets, geometry and orientation of the source, and the encounter with a density interface on the rising path of the plume. We suggest that the pressure distribution around the vortex pair of a rising plume may initially trigger bifurcation. We also report new experimental observations confirming that bifurcation becomes stronger for stronger bent-over plumes, identifying that bifurcation can also occur for straight-edged plumes but gradually disappears for stronger plumes which form a gravity current at their final level and spread for a significant distance against the current. Observations from satellites and the ground are reviewed and confirm that volcanic plumes can show bifurcation and a large range of bifurcation angles. Many of the bifurcating plumes spread out at the tropopause level and suggest the tropopause may act on the plumes as a density interface enhancing bifurcation. Even for quite moderate bifurcation angles, the two plume lobes become rapidly separated downwind by distances of tens of kilometers. Such bifurcating plumes drifting apart can only result in bilobate tephra fall deposits. The tephra fall deposit from the 16 km elevation, SE spreading, bifurcating volcanic plume erupted on 15 May 1981 from Mt Pagan was sampled by previous workers and clearly displayed bilobate characteristics. Examples of bilobate tephra fall deposits are reviewed and their origin briefly discussed. Bilobate deposits are common and may result from many causes. Plume bifurcation should be considered one of the possible mechanisms which can account

  15. Electrochemical sensor monitoring of volcanic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Freshwater, Ray; Oppenheimer, Clive; Saffell, John; Jones, Rod; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Mead, Iqbal

    2010-05-01

    Advances in instrumentation have fuelled a recent growth of interest in using portable sensor systems for environmental monitoring of pollution. Developments in wireless technology are enabling such systems to operate remotely and autonomously, generating a wealth of environmental data. We report here on the application of miniature Alphasense electrochemical sensors to the detection and characterisation of gases in volcanic plumes. A highly portable sensor system was developed to operate an array of 6 low cost electrochemical sensors to detect CO, H2, HCl, SO2, H2S and NO2 at 1 Hz. A miniature pump draws air over all sensors simultaneously (i.e. sensors arranged in parallel). The sensor output in these campaigns was logged on PDAs for real-time viewing, and later download (with a view to future data-streaming). The instrument was deployed at a number of volcanoes and was subject to extremely harsh conditions including highly acidic environments, low (Antarctic) temperatures, and transport over rough terrain. Analysis methods are demonstrated that consider calibration, cross-sensitivities of the sensors to multiple gases, differing sensor response times, temperature dependence, and background sensor drift with time. The analysis is applied to a range of plume field-measurements to extract gas concentrations ranging from 100's ppmv to sub-ppmv and to characterise the individual volcano emissions. Applications of similar sensor systems for real-time long-term monitoring of volcanic emissions (which may indicate and ultimately predict eruptive behavior), and UAV and balloon-borne plume sampling are now already being realised. This work focused on demonstrating the application of electrochemical sensors to monitoring of environmental pollution from volcanoes. Other applications for similar sensors include the near-source monitoring of industrial emissions, and of pollutant levels enhanced by traffic emissions in the urban environment.

  16. Deccan Volcanism: a main trigger of environmental changes leading to the KTB mass extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatte, Thierry; Fantasia, Alicia; Samant, Bandana; Mohabey, Dhananjay; Keller, Gerta; Gertsch, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) was the primary mechanism driving the environmental changes that are commonly regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Model results predict that Deccan Traps emplacement was responsible for a strong increase in atmospheric pCO2 accompanied by rapid warming of 4°C that was followed by global cooling. During the warming phase, increased continental weathering of silicates associated with consumption of atmospheric CO2 likely resulted in the drawdown of greenhouse gases that reversed the warming trend leading to global cooling at the end of the Maastrichtian. Massive CO2 input together with massive release of SO2 may thus have triggered the mass extinctions in the marine realm as a result of ocean acidification leading to a carbon crisis and in the terrestrial realms due to acid rains. Global stress conditions related to these climatic changes are well known and documented in planktic foraminifera by a diversity decrease, species dwarfing, dominance of opportunistic species and near disappearance of specialized species. Deccan Traps erupted in three main phases with 6% total Deccan volume in phase-1 (base C30n), 80% in phase-2 (C29r) and 14% in phase-3 (C29n). Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of Deccan trap eruptions (Phase-2) occurred over a relatively short time interval in magnetic polarity C29r, whereas multiproxy studies from central and southeastern India place the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction near the end of this main phase of Deccan volcanism suggesting a cause-and-effect relationship. In India a strong floral response is observed as a direct response to Deccan volcanic phase-2. In Lameta (infratrappean) sediments preceding the volcanic eruptions

  17. The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2015-09-23

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth\\'s natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet\\'s energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.

  18. The epidemiology of extreme hiking injuries in volcanic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W; Heggie, Tracey M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize the epidemiological literature for extreme hikers in volcanic environments and describe the incidence, nature and severity of injuries, the factors contributing to the injuries, and strategies for preventing injuries. Due to the relative newness of extreme hiking in volcanic environments, there are only a small handful of studies addressing the topic. Moreover, these studies are primarily focused on extreme hikers in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. These studies found that the majority of extreme hikers in volcanic environments are inexperienced and unfamiliar with the potential hazards present in volcanic environments. The studies found that upper respiratory irritation resulting from exposure to volcanic gases and dehydration and scrapes, abrasions, lacerations, and thermal burns to the extremities were common injuries. The severity of the injuries ranged from simple on-site treat-and-release incidents to more severe incidents and even death. This review reveals a need for well-designed epidemiologic research from volcanic destinations outside of Hawaii that identify the nature and severity of injuries along with the factors contributing to injury incidents. There is also a demonstrated need for studies identifying preventive measures that reduce both the occurrence and severity of extreme hiking incidents in volcanic environments. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Volcanic hazard studies for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Turrin, B.; Wells, S.; Perry, F.; McFadden, L.; Renault, C.E.; Champion, D.; Harrington, C.

    1989-01-01

    Volcanic hazard studies are ongoing to evaluate the risk of future volcanism with respect to siting of a repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site. Seven Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers are located a minimum distance of 12 km and a maximum distance of 47 km from the outer boundary of the exploration block. The conditional probability of disruption of a repository by future basaltic volcanism is bounded by the range of 10/sup /minus/8/ to 10/sup /minus/10/ yr/sup /minus/1/. These values are currently being reexamined based on new developments in the understanding of the evaluation of small volume, basaltic volcanic centers including: (1) Many, perhaps most, of the volcanic centers exhibit brief periods of eruptive activity separated by longer periods of inactivity. (2) The centers may be active for time spans exceeding 10 5 yrs, (3) There is a decline in the volume of eruptions of the centers through time, and (4) Small volume eruptions occurred at two of the Quaternary centers during latest Pleistocene or Holocene time. We classify the basalt centers as polycyclic, and distinguish them from polygenetic volcanoes. Polycyclic volcanism is characterized by small volume, episodic eruptions of magma of uniform composition over time spans of 10 3 to 10 5 yrs. Magma eruption rates are low and the time between eruptions exceeds the cooling time of the magma volumes. 25 refs., 2 figs

  20. Volcanic gas composition, metal dispersion and deposition during explosive volcanic eruptions on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renggli, C. J.; King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Norman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    The transport of metals in volcanic gases on the Moon differs greatly from their transport on the Earth because metal speciation depends largely on gas composition, temperature, pressure and oxidation state. We present a new thermochemical model for the major and trace element composition of lunar volcanic gas during pyroclastic eruptions of picritic magmas calculated at 200-1500 °C and over 10-9-103 bar. Using published volatile component concentrations in picritic lunar glasses, we have calculated the speciation of major elements (H, O, C, Cl, S and F) in the coexisting volcanic gas as the eruption proceeds. The most abundant gases are CO, H2, H2S, COS and S2, with a transition from predominantly triatomic gases to diatomic gases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures. Hydrogen occurs as H2, H2S, H2S2, HCl, and HF, with H2 making up 0.5-0.8 mol fractions of the total H. Water (H2O) concentrations are at trace levels, which implies that H-species other than H2O need to be considered in lunar melts and estimates of the bulk lunar composition. The Cl and S contents of the gas control metal chloride gas species, and sulfide gas and precipitated solid species. We calculate the speciation of trace metals (Zn, Ga, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe) in the gas phase, and also the pressure and temperature conditions at which solids form from the gas. During initial stages of the eruption, elemental gases are the dominant metal species. As the gas loses heat, chloride and sulfide species become more abundant. Our chemical speciation model is applied to a lunar pyroclastic eruption model with isentropic gas decompression. The relative abundances of the deposited metal-bearing solids with distance from the vent are predicted for slow cooling rates (gas speciation model is compared with the speciation of a H2O-, CO2- and Cl-rich volcanic gas from Erta Ale volcano (Ethiopia) as an analogy for more oxidized planetary eruptions. In the terrestrial Cl-rich gas the metals are

  1. Petrogenesis and geodynamic significance of silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, C. M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco, M. A.; Lopez Martinez, M.

    2012-04-01

    Silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (WTMVB) was defined a Pliocene ignimbrite flare-up associated with the rifting of the Jalisco block from mainland Mexico (Frey et al., 2007; GSAB). With the integration of new and published geochronologic, geochemical, and isotope data we revise this interpretation and propose a new petrogenetic model. The oldest silicic volcanism consists of large silicic domes and minor pyroclastic flows (~370 km3) emplaced to the north of Guadalajara above a thick succession of ~11 to 8.7 Ma basaltic lavas, which yielded Ar-Ar and obsidian FT ages of ~7.5 to 5 Ma. Shortly after (4.9 to 2.9 Ma) large amount of rhyolitic lavas and ash flow tuffs (~500 km3) were emplaced in a WNW-ESE trending belt from Guadalajara to Compostela. Rhyolitic domes and flows (~430 km3) were emplaced also in the Pleistocene mostly between Tequila and Guadalajara with the late Pleistocene La Primavera caldera (~35 km3) as the sole explosive volcanic episodes. As a whole, silicic volcanism occurred from Late Miocene to the Pleistocene, and was dominated by dome and lava flows. Most rhyolites have high LILE/HFSE values and negative spikes at Nb, P and Ti. They also show the same Ba/Nb and K/Rb values and slightly higher Rb/Sr ratios as the 11-8 Ma basalts. Rhyolite Sr isotope data (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70371 - 070598) are only slightly more radiogenic than the 11-8 basalts (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70349-0.70410), whereas Nd isotope ratios are indistinguishable from them. Sr and Nd isotope ratios of the rhyolites are also similar to the crust nearby, indicating that they can be compatible either with fractional crystallization (FC) of basalts or with crust assimilation/melting. However REE contents are too low to be the result of basalt FC. Isotope and REE data can be successfully modelled with an initial crustal melt which subsequently undergone fractional crystallization of feldspar and quartz. Late Miocene slab detachment and subsequent slab rollback

  2. Visualization and comparison of DEM-derived parameters. Application to volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Massimiliano; Fornaciai, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are fruitfully used in volcanology as the topographic base for mapping and quantifying volcanic landforms. The increasing availability of free topographic data on the web, decreasing production costs for high-accuracy data and advances in computer technology, has triggered rapid growth of the number of DEM users in the volcanological community. DEMs are often visualized only as hill-shaded maps, and while this is among the major advantages in using them, the possibility of deriving a very large number of parameters from a single grid of elevation data makes DEMs a powerful tool for morphometric analysis. However, many of these parameters have almost the same informative content, and before starting to elaborate topographic data it is recommended to know a-priori what parameters best visualize the investigated landform, and therefore what is necessary and what is redundant. In this work, we review a number of analytical procedures used to parameterize and represent DEMs. A LIDAR-derived DEM matrix acquired over the Valle del Bove valley, on Mt. Etna, is used as test-case elevation data for deriving the parameters. We first review well known parameters such as hill-shading, slope and aspect, curvature, and roughness, before extending the review to some less common parameters such as Sky View Factor (SVF), openness, and Red Relief Image Maps (RRIM). For each parameter a description is given emphasizing how it can be used for identifying and delimiting specific volcanic elements. The analyzed surface parameters are then cross-compared in order to infer which of them is most uncorrelated, and the results are represented in the form of a correlation matrix. Finally, the reviewed DEM-derived parameters and the correlation matrix are used for analyzing the volcanic landforms of two case studies: Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field and a phonolitic lava flow at the Island of Tenerife.

  3. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  4. California's Vulnerability to Volcanic Hazards: What's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Wood, N. J.; Dinitz, L.

    2015-12-01

    California is a leader in comprehensive planning for devastating earthquakes, landslides, floods, and tsunamis. Far less attention, however, has focused on the potentially devastating impact of volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the State about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have occurred in the past 1,000 years—most recently in northern California (Lassen Peak 1914 to 1917)—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The likelihood of renewed volcanism in California is about one in a few hundred to one in a few thousand annually. Eight young volcanoes, ranked as Moderate to Very High Threat [1] are dispersed throughout the State. Partially molten rock (magma) resides beneath at least seven of these—Medicine Lake Volcano, Mount Shasta, Lassen Volcanic Center, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, Long Valley Volcanic Region, Coso Volcanic Field, and Salton Buttes— causing earthquakes, toxic gas emissions, hydrothermal activity, and (or) ground deformation. Understanding the hazards and identifying what is at risk are the first steps in building community resilience to volcanic disasters. This study, prepared in collaboration with the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Management and the California Geological Survey, provides a broad perspective on the State's exposure to volcano hazards by integrating mapped volcano hazard zones with geospatial data on at-risk populations, infrastructure, and resources. The study reveals that ~ 16 million acres fall within California's volcano hazard zones, along with ~ 190 thousand permanent and 22 million transitory populations. Additionally, far-field disruption to key water delivery systems, agriculture, utilities, and air traffic is likely. Further site- and sector-specific analyses will lead to improved hazard mitigation efforts and more effective disaster response and recovery. [1] "Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities

  5. Lidar detection of carbon dioxide in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Maio, Giovanni; Del Franco, Mario; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Volcanic gases give information on magmatic processes. In particular, anomalous releases of carbon dioxide precede volcanic eruptions. Up to now, this gas has been measured in volcanic plumes with conventional measurements that imply the severe risks of local sampling and can last many hours. For these reasons and for the great advantages of laser sensing, the thorough development of volcanic lidar has been undertaken at the Diagnostics and Metrology Laboratory (UTAPRAD-DIM) of the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA). In fact, lidar profiling allows one to scan remotely volcanic plumes in a fast and continuous way, and with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two differential absorption lidar instruments will be presented in this paper: BILLI (BrIdge voLcanic LIdar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser, double grating dye laser, difference frequency mixing (DFM) and optical parametric amplifier (OPA), and VULLI (VULcamed Lidar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The first one is funded by the ERC (European Research Council) project BRIDGE and the second one by the ERDF (European Regional Development Fund) project VULCAMED. While VULLI has not yet been tested in a volcanic site, BILLI scanned the gas emitted by Pozzuoli Solfatara (Campi Flegrei volcanic area, Naples, Italy) during a field campaign carried out from 13 to 17 October 2014. Carbon dioxide concentration maps were retrieved remotely in few minutes in the crater area. Lidar measurements were in good agreement with well-established techniques, based on different operating principles. To our knowledge, it is the first time that carbon dioxide in a volcanic plume is retrieved by lidar, representing the first direct measurement of this kind ever performed on an active volcano and showing the high potential of laser remote sensing in geophysical research.

  6. Tracing the HIMU component within Pan-African lithosphere beneath northeast Africa: Evidence from Late Cretaceous Natash alkaline volcanics, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Rus, M. A.; Chazot, G.; Vannucci, R.; Paquette, J.-L.

    2018-02-01

    A large late Cretaceous ( 90 Ma) volcanic field (the Natash volcanic province) crops out in southeast Egypt at the northwestern boundary of the Arabian-Nubian shield. The lavas are mainly of alkaline affinity and exhibit a continuous compositional range from alkali olivine basalt (AOB) to trachyte and rhyolite. All basaltic lavas in the province record various extents of fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and spinel. The basaltic lavas show variations in Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic ratios [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7030-0.70286; (143Nd/144Nd)i = 0.512653-0.512761; (206Pb/204Pb)i = 19.28-19.94; (177Hf-176Hf)i = 0.28274-0.28285], that correlate markedly with the major and trace element ratios and abundances. Assimilation of crustal material cannot explain these correlations, and we invoke instead melting of a multicomponent mantle source. We infer the existence of High-μ (HIMU), Enriched mantle type-I (EM-I) and Depleted mantle (DM) domains in the melting source, with a predominant contribution from the HIMU-type. We suggests further that the basaltic lavas originate from low degrees of partial melting (F < 5%) at moderate potential temperatures (TP) 1391-1425 °C and pressures of 2.0-2.6 GPa. The melting pressure estimations imply that melting entirely occurred within lithospheric mantle, most likely in the presence of residual amphibole as presence negative K-anomalies in the primitive mantle-normalized patterns of the fractionation-corrected melts. The presence of amphibole within the lithosphere is a strong evidence that the lithospheric mantle underwent metasomatic enrichment prior to melting in Late Cretaceous. This metasomatic event affected on the Pb isotopic compositions of the Natash volcanics by adding Th and U to the melting source. Time-integrated calculations to remove the decoupling between 206Pb and 207Pb isotopes that most probably resulted from the metasomatic event indicate a tentative link between the metasomatism occurring in the

  7. Subaqueous early eruptive phase of the late Aptian Rajmahal volcanism, India: Evidence from volcaniclastic rocks, bentonite, black shales, and oolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh C. Ghose

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The late Aptian (118–115 Ma continental flood basalts of the Rajmahal Volcanic Province (RVP are part of the Kerguelen Large Igneous Province, and constitute the uppermost part of the Gondwana Supergroup on the eastern Indian shield margin. The lower one-third of the Rajmahal volcanic succession contains thin layers of plant fossil-rich inter-trappean sedimentary rocks with pyroclasts, bentonite, grey and black shale/mudstone and oolite, whereas the upper two-thirds consist of sub-aerial fine-grained aphyric basalts with no inter-trappean material. At the eastern margin and the north-central sector of the RVP, the volcanics in the lower part include rhyolites and dacites overlain by enstatite-bearing basalts and enstatite-andesites. The pyroclastic rocks are largely felsic in composition, and comprise ignimbrite as well as coarse-grained tuff with lithic clasts, and tuff breccia with bombs, lapilli and ash that indicate explosive eruption of viscous rhyolitic magma. The rhyolites/dacites (>68 wt.% are separated from the andesites (<60 wt.% by a gap in silica content indicating their formation through upper crustal anatexis with only heat supplied by the basaltic magma. On the other hand, partially melted siltstone xenoliths in enstatite-bearing basalts suggest that the enstatite-andesites originated through mixing of the upper crust with basaltic magma, crystallizing orthopyroxene at a pressure-temperature of ∼3 kb/1150 °C. In contrast, the northwestern sector of the RVP is devoid of felsic-intermediate rocks, and the volcaniclastic rocks are predominantly mafic (basaltic in composition. Here, the presence of fine-grained tuffs, tuff breccia containing sideromelane shards and quenched texture, welded tuff breccia, peperite, shale/mudstone and oolite substantiates a subaqueous environment. Based on these observations, we conclude that the early phase of Rajmahal volcanism occurred under predominantly subaqueous conditions. The presence

  8. Fossilization History of Fossil Resin from Jambi Province (Sumatra, Indonesia Based on Physico-Chemical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Naglik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A unique specimen of fossil resin originating from the Dipterocarpaceae tree family found in Miocene brown coal deposits in Jambi Province (Sumatra, Indonesia was investigated via microscopic observations, microhardness testing and infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods. Its form is rare in nature, being an aggregate of three varieties of resin differing in colour, transparency and internal structure. This suggests the formation of the resins at different stages. Further alteration processes, including fossilization and maturation of the resin in a swamp environment resulted in stepwise aromatization of the cyclohexane ring in steroids and cross-linking through formation of ester bonds as well as carbon–carbon bonds between steroid molecules. The various environmental and geological conditions affecting the formation processes of the resins were recorded in their physico-chemical properties. Additionally, heating conditions accelerated by volcanism were proposed as a factor determining the maturation grade of the resin.

  9. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secor, D.T. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    This report reviews the geology of the Piedmont Province of South Carolina with the aim of designating rock units favorable for field exploration for a potential underground repository for the storage of radioactive waste. Most of the rocks in the South Carolina Piedmont are metamorphosed sedimentary volcanic or igneous rocks that have experienced at least one episode of strong deformation. As a consequence of this deformation, they have irregular shapes, making it difficult to predict their subsurface extent. In evaluating the suitability of the rock units for radioactive waste storage, certain criteria were found to be particularly useful. The requirements that the storage site be located in a large volume of homogeneous, impermeable, relatively unfractured rock was the most important criteria in eliminating most of the Piedmont rock units for consideration as field study areas. Six large late- to post-tectonic igneous plutons (Winnsboro, Liberty Hill, Ogden, Newberry, Lowrys, and Bald Rock) are recommended as field study areas

  10. Current perspectives on energy and mass fluxes in volcanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, William; Davidson, Jon; Fischer, Tobias; Grunder, Anita; Reagan, Mark; Streck, Martin

    Volcanoes of the Pacific Ring of Fire and other convergent margins worldwide are familiar manifestations of nature's energy, account for about 25% of global volcanic outputs, dominate volcanic gas emissions to the atmosphere, and pose significant physical threats to a large human population. Yet the processes behind this prolific activity remain poorly understood.An international “State of the Arc” (SOTA) conference was held in August on the slopes of Mt. Hood, Oregon, to address current views on the energy and mass fluxes in volcanic arcs. This meeting brought together some 90 leading experts and students of subduction zones and their related magmatism.

  11. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time strongly suggests a connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  12. Flood basalt volcanism on the Moon and Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, K.

    1979-01-01

    Comparative studies of the surfaces of the terrestrial planets reveal that processes of flood basalt volcanism were common to all of them, irrespective of their stages of evolution either primitive, intermediate or progressive. On the Moon manifestations of flood basalt volcanism have been recognized in basins (maria); on the planet Mars both in basins (planitiae) and in higher topographic (continental) levels. The mare-epoch of the less developed planets led to significant changes in their relief and in the crustal structure. Examples of volcanic flows from the lunar and martian surface are introduced. Some crustal uplifts on Mars can be interpreted in terms of Van Bemmelen's undations. (Auth.)

  13. Hydrogeology of the Azores volcanic archipelago (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J.; Coutinho, R.; Antunes, P.; Freire, P.

    2009-04-01

    The archipelago of the Azores is made of nine islands of volcanic origin located in the North Atlantic Ocean, with an area of 2333 km2 and approximately 237500 inhabitants, which are 98% dependant from groundwater sources for their water consumption. Therefore, groundwater is a resource that plays a vital role as drinking water source and as ecosystem support matrix. Nevertheless, besides the environmental, social and economical value of groundwater, this resource is subject to an increase pressure and in several islands water quality deterioration is shown by monitoring data. This pressure is also shown by the 42.7% increase expected for domestic use until the year 2020 at the Azores, with higher groundwater abstraction. The Azores climate can be considered as marine temperate, which is reflected by the low thermal amplitude and high precipitation. A well-established difference between a dry season and a colder and wet season occurs, as from October to March about 75% of the annual precipitation is registered. The average annual precipitation at the Azores is 1930 mm, exceeding by far the average annual actual evapotranspiration, which is 581 mm. Recharge rates range from 8.5% to 62.1%, and the highest values are observed at Pico, Terceira, Faial, São Miguel and Graciosa islands, especially in areas where the terrain is covered by recent basaltic lava flows and the soil cover is sparse. Groundwater resources estimates point to a total volume of about 1600x106 m3/yr. Values above the recharge median, equal to 101.3x106 m3/yr. were estimated for the São Miguel, São Jorge, Terceira and Flores islands. Despite differences in the islands growth, as a result of successive volcanic eruptions of various types, groundwater occurrence can be described in function of two main aquifers systems: (1) the basal aquifer system, which corresponds to fresh-water lenses floating on underlying salt water, and (2) perched-water bodies, which are usually drained by springs spread in

  14. Multiple edifice-collapse events in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt: The role of sloping substrate and implications for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo; Diaz-Castellon, Rodolfo; Siebert, L.; Hubbard, B.; Sheridan, M.F.; Rodriguez, Sergio R.

    2006-01-01

    The Citlalte??petl-Cofre de Perote volcanic chain forms an important physiographic barrier that separates the Central Altiplano (2500??masl) from the Gulf Coastal Plain (GCP) (1300??masl). The abrupt eastward drop in relief between these provinces gives rise to unstable conditions and consequent gravitational collapse of large volcanic edifices built at the edge of the Altiplano. Eastward sloping substrate, caused by the irregular configuration of the basement rocks, is the dominant factor that controls the direction of collapsing sectors in all major volcanoes in the region to be preferentially towards the GCP. These collapses produced voluminous debris avalanches and lahars that inundated the well-developed drainages and clastic aprons that characterize the Coastal Plain. Large catastrophic collapses from Citlalte??petl, Las Cumbres, and Cofre de Perote volcanoes are well documented in the geologic record. Some of the avalanches and transformed flows have exceptionally long runouts and reach the Gulf of Mexico traveling more than 120??km from their source. So far, no direct evidence has been found for magmatic activity associated with the initiation of these catastrophic flank-collapses. Apparently, instability of the volcanic edifices has been strongly favored by very intense hydrothermal alteration, abrupt topographic change, and intense fracturing. In addition to the eastward slope of the substrate, the reactivation of pre-volcanic basement structures during the Late Tertiary, and the E-W to ENE-SSW oriented regional stress regimes may have played an important role in the preferential movement direction of the avalanches and flows. In addition to magmatic-hydrothermal processes, high amounts of rainfall in the area is another factor that enhances alteration and eventually weakens the rocks. It is very likely that seismic activity may be the principal triggering mechanism that caused the flank collapse of large volcanic edifices in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic

  15. Defining the Tristan-Gough Hotspot: High-Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanism at Tristan da Cunha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Explaining the spatial distribution of intra-plate volcanism is an important geologic problem. The Walvis Ridge is a uniquely-shaped hotspot trail in the South Atlantic that is not fully explained by the prevailing mantle plume paradigm. About halfway through its 130 Myr history, Walvis shows a morphological shift from a continuous ridge to a diffuse region of guyots arranged in two volcanic tracks. Recent volcanism at both Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island suggests these tracks are produced by two hotspots sourced from a single plume. However, the islands are located more than 400 km apart, which does not conform to our understanding of plumes as narrow, semi-stationary upwellings. It remains unclear which of the two islands better represents the current plume position. New ages from previously unstudied seamounts show that Tristan is younger than surrounding volcanism, whereas Gough appears to fit the local age progression (Schnur et al. 2014). Modern radiometric ages suggest the main island of Tristan may have been active for up to 1.3 ± 0.2 Myr (O'Connor and le Roex 1992). However, the seemingly older Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands have yet to be reliably dated and could be up to 18 ± 4 Ma based on K-Ar ages (Miller in Baker et al. 1964). In order to confidently delineate the duration of volcanism at Tristan, we present the results of 29 new 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on biotite, hornblende, plagioclase and groundmass separates from rocks collected on Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands. Our results show that volcanism on all three islands is young, in most cases interpretations of plume dynamics. These results also show that magma was being supplied simultaneously to both Tristan and Gough over recent geologic time. Two possible explanations for this are that (1) there is a broad plume underlying the area, with focus points at Tristan and Gough or (2) hotspot magma is being focused at Tristan due to the nearby fracture zone

  16. Eruptive dynamics and hazards associated with obsidian bearing ignimbrites of the Geghama Volcanic Highland, Central Armenia: a textural insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Zoe; Manning, Christina J.

    2017-04-01

    The Geghama Volcanic highland in central Armenia is an ideal setting to study the young ( 750-25 ka [1]) volcanism that characterises the Lesser Caucasus region. The volcanism in the area is bimodal in composition: the eastern highlands are dominated by numerous monogenetic scoria cones, whilst the west shows more evolved volcanism centered on two obsidian bearing, polygenetic domes (Hatis and Gutanasar) [2]. Activity at Hatis and Gutanasar is thought to have spanned 550ka-200ka [3] and produced a range of products including obsidian flows, ignimbrites and basaltic scoria cones, consistent with long lived and complex magma storage systems. During a similar time period there is evidence for the presence of hominin groups in the surrounding region [3] and it is likely that at least some of the volcanic activity at Hatis and Gutanasar impacted on their distribution [4]. A better understanding of the eruptive behaviour of these volcanoes during this period could therefore shed light on the effect of volcanic activity on the dispersal of man through this period. Whilst large regional studies have striven to better understand the timing and source of volcanism in Armenia, there have been few detailed studies on single volcanoes. Obsidian is ubiquitous within the volcanic material of both Gutanasar and Hatis as lava flows, dome deposits and within ignimbrites. This study aims to better understand the eruptive history of Gutanasar, with specific focus upon the determination of the petrogenetic history of obsidian lenses observed within the ignimbrite deposits. Identification of these obsidians as the result of welding or in-situ melting will help constrain eruptive volumes and flow thickness, important for the reconstruction of palaeo-volcanic hazards. In order to interpret how this obsidian was deposited, macro textural analysis is combined with micro textural measurements of microlite crystals. Quantitative measurements of microlites in obsidian can provide significant

  17. Application of Clinopyroxene Chemistry to Interpret the Physical Conditions of Ascending Magma, a Case Study of Eocene Volcanic Rocks in the Ghohrud Area (North of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Volcanic rocks with a porphyritic texture have experienced two crystallization stages. The first is slow, resulting in phenocrysts, and the second, which took place at, or near the surface, or during intrusion into a cooler body of rock, result in a groundmass of glass, or fine crystals. The pressure and temperature history of a magma during crystallization is recorded in the chemical composition of the phenocrysts during both stages. These phenocrysts provide valuable data about the physicochemical conditions of the parent magma during the process of crystallization. The composition of clinopyroxene (cpx reflects not only the chemical condition and therefore the magmatic series, but also the physical conditions, i.e., temperature and pressure of a magma at the time when clinopyroxene crystallized. The Ghohrud area lies in the middle part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Arc , which is part of a much larger magmatic province extending in a vast region of convergence between Arabia and Eurasia north of the Zagros-Bitlis suture zone (Dilek et al., 2010. In the Ghohrud area, north of Isfahan, exposed Eocene volcanic rocks belong to the first pulse of Cenozoic volcanism of Iran (Sayari, 2015, ranging in composition from andesitic basalt to basalt. The basaltic rocks of the Ghohrud area are composed mainly of plagioclase phenocrysts surrounded by smaller crystals of clinopyroxene in a groundmass of microlites, glass and opaques. In this study, the clinopyroxene and plagioclase of these rocks were analyzed in order to estimate the physicochemical conditions of the parent magmas. Results Clinopyroxene and plagioclase phenocrysts of nineteen samples were analyzed with the electron microprobe. The chemical compositions of the clinopyroxenes were used to estimate both the chemical evolution and temperature and pressure conditions of the magmas during crystallization, using SCG, a specialized software for clinopyroxene thermobarometry (Sayari

  18. Towards a Comprehensive Catalog of Volcanic Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G.

    2014-12-01

    Catalogs of earthquakes located using differential travel-time techniques are a core product of volcano observatories, and while vital, they represent an incomplete perspective of volcanic seismicity. Many (often most) earthquakes are too small to locate accurately, and are omitted from available catalogs. Low frequency events, tremor and signals related to rockfalls, pyroclastic flows and lahars are not systematically catalogued, and yet from a hazard management perspective are exceedingly important. Because STA/LTA detection schemes break down in the presence of high amplitude tremor, swarms or dome collapses, catalogs may suggest low seismicity when seismicity peaks. We propose to develop a workflow and underlying software toolbox that can be applied to near-real-time and offline waveform data to produce comprehensive catalogs of volcanic seismicity. Existing tools to detect and locate phaseless signals will be adapted to fit within this framework. For this proof of concept the toolbox will be developed in MATLAB, extending the existing GISMO toolbox (an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for seismic data analysis). Existing database schemas such as the CSS 3.0 will need to be extended to describe this wider range of volcano-seismic signals. WOVOdat may already incorporate many of the additional tables needed. Thus our framework may act as an interface between volcano observatories (or campaign-style research projects) and WOVOdat. We aim to take the further step of reducing volcano-seismic catalogs to sets of continuous metrics that are useful for recognizing data trends, and for feeding alarm systems and forecasting techniques. Previous experience has shown that frequency index, peak frequency, mean frequency, mean event rate, median event rate, and cumulative magnitude (or energy) are potentially useful metrics to generate for all catalogs at a 1-minute sample rate (directly comparable with RSAM and similar metrics derived from continuous data). Our framework

  19. Variational data assimilation of satellite observations to estimate volcanic ash emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of volcanic ash, which can pose hazard to human and animal health, land transportation, and aviation safety. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) models are critical tools to provide advisory information and timely volcanic ash forecasts. Due to the

  20. eVADE: Volcanic Ash Detection Raman LIDAR, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aircraft engine and electronics and has caused damage to unwary aircraft and disrupted air travel for thousands of travelers,...

  1. Volcanic Ash Detection Using Raman LIDAR: "VADER", Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aircraft engine and electronics and has caused damage to unwary aircraft and disrupted air travel for thousands of travelers,...

  2. Young volcanic deposits in the Valles Marineris, Mars?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1990-01-01

    The emplacement of a sequence of deposits covering the chasma floors of the central Valles Marineris of Mars, ranging from thin dust to several km in thickness, appears to have been the last major formational event. These deposits fall into the categories of (1) dark patches lying along faults, (2) light-colored deposits locally associated with craters, and (3) mottled, rugged deposits. It is presently suggested that these materials may be of volcanic origin, in view of their low albedo, their association with faults and possible volcanic features, and their embayment relations and lobate margins. If the suggestion is true, then the occasionally explosive volcanism in question was associated with rifting in the Valles Marineris, and may be as young as the late Tharsis volcanism. 41 refs

  3. Geologic Mapping of Volcanic and Sedimentary Terrains, Northeast Hellas, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. A.; Michalski, J.; Chuang, F. C.; Price Blount, K.; Bleamaster, L. F.

    2017-06-01

    We are using image, topographic, and spectral data to map the geology along the northeast rim of Hellas basin, Mars. The region displays mantled highlands, explosive and effusive volcanic materials, eroded sedimentary plains, and Dao and Niger Valles.

  4. Airborne stratospheric observations of major volcanic eruptions: past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A.; Aquila, V.; Colarco, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Major volcanic eruptions (e.g. the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo) lead to a surface cooling and disruptions of the chemistry of the stratosphere. In this presentation, we will show model simulations of Mt. Pinatubo that can be used to devise a strategy for answering specific science questions. In particular, what is the initial mass injection, how is the cloud spreading, how are the stratospheric aerosols evolving, what is the impact on stratospheric chemistry, and how will climate be affected? We will also review previous stratospheric airborne observations of volcanic clouds using NASA sub-orbital assets, and discuss our present capabilities to observe the evolution of a stratospheric volcanic plume. These capabilities include aircraft such as the NASA ER-2, WB-57f, and Global Hawk. In addition, the NASA DC-8 and P-3 can be used to perform remote sensing. Balloon assets have also been employed, and new instrumentation is now available for volcanic work.

  5. Solid State Multiwavelength LIDAR for Volcanic Ash Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to develop a compact, multiwavelength LIDAR with polarization analysis capability that will be able to identify volcanic ash clouds...

  6. Global Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database, 4360 BC to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database is a global listing of over 600 eruptions from 4360 BC to the present. A significant eruption is classified as one that...

  7. Influence of Private Forest Land to Farmers Welfare in Yogyakarta Special Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ritohardoyo

    2004-01-01

    The research shows that in general people forest land use has been sucessfully implemented in the province. It is important to note that a more successfull implementation of people forest land use is found in the private rather than government initiated forest. In the less accessible areas people forest land use activities are much more successfull than in the accessible ones. Social forestry land use in the volcanic slope physiography is much better than that in either undulating or karst areas. Among important factors affecting the success of people forest land use are land ownership, education level, technology, land accessibility and percentage of plant growth. It is also confirmed that accessibility is the most important factor affecting the success of an people forest land use. The research also reveals that people forest land use has been very important in improving the farmers welfare. A composite indicator shows that the welfare of farmers is much improved after the adoption of people forest land use, with the highest achievement is obtained by farmers in the volcanic slopes.

  8. Structural control and origin of volcanism in the Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. W.

    1990-08-01

    Taupor volcanic zone (TVZ) is the currently active volcanic arc and back-arc basin of the Taupo-Hikurangi arc-trench system, North Island, New Zealand. The volcanic arc is best developed at the southern (Tongariro volcanic centre) end of the TVZ, while on the eastern side of the TVZ it is represented mainly by dacite volcanoes, and in the Bay of Plenty andesite/dacite volcanoes occur on either side of the Whakatane graben. The back-arc basin is best developed in the central part of the TVZ and comprises bimodal rhyolite and high-alumina basalt volcanism. Widespread ignimbrite eruptions have occurred from this area in the past 0.6 Ma. Normal faults occur in both arc and back-arc basin. They are generally steeply dipping (>40°) and strike between 040° and 080°. In the back-arc basin, fault zones are en echelon and have the same trend as alignments of rhyolite domes and basalt vents. Open fissures have formed during historic earthquakes along some of the faults, and geodetic measurements on the north side of Lake Taupo suggest extension of 14±4 mm/year. In the Bay of Plenty and ML=6.3 earthquake occurred on 2 March 1987. Modelling of known structure in the area together with data derived from this earthquake suggests block faulting with faults dipping 45°±10° NW and a similar dip is suggested by seismic profiling of faults offshore of the Bay of Plenty where extension is estimated to be 5±2 mm/year. To the east of the TVZ, the North Island shear belt (NISB) is a zone of reverse-dextral, strike-slip faults, the surface expression of which terminates at the eastern end of the TVZ. On the opposite side of the TVZ in the offshore western Bay of Plenty and on line with the NISB is the Mayor Island fault belt. If the two fault belts were once continuous, as seems likely, strike-slip faults probably extend through the basement of the TVZ. When extension associated with the arc and back-arc basin is combined with these strike-slip faults, the resulting transtension

  9. Using Infrasound and Machine Learning for Monitoring Plinian Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, F. M.; Iyengar, I.; Hambebo, B. M.; Garces, M. A.; Deaton, J.; Perttu, A.; Williams, B.

    2012-12-01

    Large plinian volcanic eruptions can inject a substantial amount of volcanic gas and ash into the stratosphere. This can present a severe hazard to commercial air traffic. A hazardous Icelandic volcanic ash-eruption was reported on April 14, 2010. This resulted in London's aviation authority to issue an alert that an ash plume was moving from an eruption in Iceland towards northwestern Europe. This eruption resulted in the closure of large areas of European airspace. Large plinian volcanic eruptions radiate infrasonic signals that can be detected by a global infrasound array network. To reduce potential hazards for commercial aviation from volcanic ash, these infrasound sensor arrays have been used to detect infrasonic signals released by sustained volcanic eruptions that can inject ash into the stratosphere at aircraft's cruising altitudes, typically in the order of 10km. A system that is capable of near, real-time eruption detection and discrimination of plinian eruptions from other natural phenomena that can produce infrasound with overlapping spectral content (0.01 to 0.1 Hz) is highly desirable to provide ash-monitoring for commercial aviation. In the initial study, cepstral features were extracted from plinian volcanic eruptions and mountain associated wave infrasound signals. These feature vectors were then used to train and test a two-module neural network classifier (radial basis function neural networks were used for each module). One module is dedicated to classifying plinian volcanic eruptions, the other mountain associated waves. Using an independent validation dataset, the classifier's correct classification rate was 91.5%. Then a different two-module neural network classifier was designed to discriminate between plinian volcanic eruptions and a collection of infrasound signals that are not-of-interest but have spectral content that overlaps with the volcano signals. One module is again dedicated to classifying plinian volcanic eruptions, however, in

  10. Volcanic sulfur degassing and the role of sulfides in controlling volcanic metal emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Liu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes emit prodigious quantities of sulfur and metals, their behaviour inextricably linked through pre-eruptive sulfide systematics and through degassing and speciation in the volcanic plume. Fundamental differences exist in the metal output of ocean island versus arc volcanoes, with volcanoes in Hawaii and Iceland outgassing large fluxes of gaseous and particulate chalcophiles; and arc volcanoes' plumes, in contrast, enriched in Zn, Cu, Tl and Pb. Metals and metalloids partition into a magmatic vapor phase from silicate melt at crustal pressures. Their abundance in magmatic vapor is influenced strongly by sulfide saturation and by the composition of the magmatic vapor phase, particularly with respect to chloride. These factors are highly dependent on tectonic setting. Metal outgassing is controlled by magma water content and redox: deep saturation in vapor and minimal sulfide in arc basalts yields metal-rich vapor; shallow degassing and resorption of sulfides feeds the metal content of volcanic gas in ocean islands. We present a detailed study of the sulfide systematics of the products of the 2014-2015 Holuhraun basaltic fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) to illustrate the interplay between late water and sulfur outgassing; sulfide saturation and breakdown; and metal partitioning into a vapor phase. Sulfide globules, representing quenched droplets of an immiscible sulfide liquid, are preserved within erupted tephra. Sulfide globules in rapidly quenched tephra are preserved within both matrix glass and as inclusions in crystals. The stereologically-corrected 3D size distribution of sulfide globules ranges from eruption and co-existed with an immiscible sulfide liquid throughout much of ol-cpx-plag crystallisation. Individual globules are associated with locally elevated dissolved sulfur concentrations, with concentration gradients away from sulfides preserved over distances of 10-40 µm from the melt-sulfide interfaces. We discuss the

  11. Ash aggregation in explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on particle size, collisional energy and atmospheric water vapor. These relationships can be integrated into large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of atmospheric water vapor. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  12. Aggregation of volcanic ash in explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on impact velocity and atmospheric conditions (water vapor and atmospheric pressure). The probabilistic relationship can be integrated, in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column, and then can be readily incorporated in large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior. We also conduct detailed Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations at the scale of our experiment as a test of the ash aggregation relationship. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of ‘atmospheric’ conditions. The tank can be depressurized as needed, using the gas inlet and the attached vacuum pump, and the ambient humidity can be altered by adjusting the gas mixture at the inlet. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  13. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-02-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  14. Excitation of atmospheric oscillations by volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Hiroo; Mori, Jim; Harkrider, David G.

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the mechanism of atmospheric oscillations with periods of about 300 s which were observed for the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1982 El Chichon eruptions. Two distinct spectral peaks, at T = 270 and 230 s for the Pinatubo eruption and at T = 195 and 266 s for the El Chichon eruptions, have been reported. We found similar oscillations for the 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 1883 Krakatoa eruptions. To explain these observations, we investigated excitation problems for two types of idealized sources, 'mass injection' and 'energy injection' sources, placed in an isothermal atmosphere. In general, two modes of oscillations, 'acoustic' and 'gravity' modes, can be excited. For realistic atmospheric parameters, the acoustic and gravity modes have a period of 275 and 304 s, respectively. For a realistic time history of eruption, atmospheric oscillations with an amplitude of 50 to 100 Pa (0.5 to 1 mbar) can be excited by an energy injection source with a total energy of 10(exp 17) J. This result is consistent with the observations and provides a physical basis for interpretation of atmospheric oscillations excited by volcanic eruptions.

  15. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M. R.; Arzilli, F.; Chiarugi, A.; Marliyani, G. I.; Anggara, F.; Harijoko, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back‐arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid‐dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s−1 (117 t d−1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d−1, comparable with the expected back‐arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man‐portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom‐up quantification of CO2 fluxes. PMID:28944134

  16. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queißer, M.; Burton, M. R.; Arzilli, F.; Chiarugi, A.; Marliyani, G. I.; Anggara, F.; Harijoko, A.

    2017-06-01

    Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back-arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid-dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s-1 (117 t d-1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d-1, comparable with the expected back-arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man-portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom-up quantification of CO2 fluxes.

  17. Volcanic hazard assessment in western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, David K.; Dibben, Christopher J. L.; Duncan, Angus M.

    2002-06-01

    Volcanology has been in the past and in many respects remains a subject dominated by pure research grounded in the earth sciences. Over the past 30 years a paradigm shift has occurred in hazard assessment which has been aided by significant changes in the social theory of natural hazards and the first-hand experience gained in the 1990s by volcanologists working on projects conceived during the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR). Today much greater stress is placed on human vulnerability, the potential for marginalisation of disadvantaged individuals and social groups, and the requirement to make applied volcanology sensitive to the characteristics of local demography, economy, culture and politics. During the IDNDR a methodology, broadly similar to environmental impact analysis, has emerged as the preferred method for studying human vulnerability and risk assessment in volcanically active regions. The characteristics of this new methodology are discussed and the progress which has been made in innovating it on the European Union laboratory volcanoes located in western Europe is reviewed. Furnas (São Miguel, Azores) and Vesuvius in Italy are used as detailed case studies.

  18. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  19. Modern and past volcanic degassing of iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Auzende, A.-L.; Marocchi, M.; Raepsaet, C.; Munsch, P.; Testemale, D.; Mézouar, M.; Kubsky, S.; Carrière, M.; Ricolleau, A.; Fiquet, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have monitored iodine degassing from a melt to a water vapor during decompression (i.e. magma ascent). Experiments have been performed by combining diamond anvil cells experiments with synchrotron X-rays fluorescence analysis. Partition coefficients DIfluid/melt measured for a pressure and temperature range of 0.1-1.8 GPa and 500-900 °C, range from 41 to 1.92, values for room conditions DIfluid/glass (quenched samples) are equal to or higher than 350. We show that iodine degassing with water is earlier and much more efficient than for lighter halogen elements, Cl and Br. Iodine is totally degassed from the silicate melt at room conditions. By applying these results to modern volcanology, we calculate an annual iodine flux for subduction related volcanism of 0.16-2.4 kt yr-1. We suggest that the natural iodine degassing may be underestimated, having possible consequences on the Earth's ozone destruction cycle. By applying this results to the Early Earth, we propose a process that may explain the contrasted signature of I, Br and Cl, strongly depleted in the bulk silicate Earth, the most depleted being iodine, whereas fluorine is almost enriched. The Earth may have lost heavy halogen elements during an early water degassing process from the magma ocean.

  20. Uranium provinces and the exploration industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.; Michie, U.McL.

    1988-01-01

    There is little doubt that exploration by mining companies in established districts or 'provinces' has led to the discovery of substantial additional ore reserves. However, the competition for, and expenses of, land acquisitions in these known districts often prompts companies to search further afield. In some cases, new discoveries can merely be regarded as extensions of known provinces while others are located in completely new areas. Whether the explorers utilized concepts of metallogenic provinces in the course of such discoveries is questionable; rather, they would have sought the particular combinations of geological circumstances required by the model. Once a new deposit is found, however, the concept of a province, whether correct in that situation or not, is usually responsible for stimulating further activity. Recent examples of such behaviour are the Arizona Strip and NE Nebraska (USA) in provincial extensions and Roxby Downs, Lone Gull (NW Territories, Australia) and Lagoa Real (Brazil) in new areas. More routine and scientific application of metallogenic province theory by the uranium exploration industry would require evidence that not only the bulk of the world's uranium reserves but also the majority of the individual world-class deposits fall into geologically definable provinces. Such evidence should include the demonstration that particular areas of the Earth's crust had been enriched in uranium (with or without related elements) and that this enrichment had persisted through periods of crustal reworking and been responsible for concentrations of the metal ore deposits. The evidence described in the volume is critically reviewed in this context. (author). Refs, 4 figs

  1. Mantle enrichment by volatiles as the Nazca plate subducts beneath the Payenia backarc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frederik Ejvang

    , minerals, fluid and melt inclusions from the Payenia backarc province of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone. Major emphasis has been on olivine hosted melt inclusions. The study gives evidence for the role of fluids in the metasomatism of the backarc mantle, and outlines the trend of the variation...... of the metasomatism in Payenia, which is also characterized by a variation in oxidation state and other geochemical parameters of the melt inclusions, and is moreover related to mantle lithological variations. The mantle metasomatism by melts of subducted crust and fluid-borne enrichment is quantitatively modelled......, the origin of Chlorine is explained via slab-derived fluids, and the contrast between backarc and frontal arc magmas is discussed. These results add to the understanding of the origin of the complexities in the mantle wedge under arc-backarc in a subduction zone which has transition to flat slab conditions...

  2. Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum triggered by Volcanism revealed by Mercury anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozyem, Hassan; Adatte, Thierry; Mbabi Bitchong, André; Chevalier, Yoann; Keller, Gerta

    2017-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.8±0.2 Ma) is marked by a global drop of 2-6‰ in 13C values and rapid warming of 4-5°C in tropical surface waters and 4-8°C in high latitudes. Climate warming persisted for several tens of thousands of years and resulted in rapid diversification in terrestrial mammals and marine planktic foraminifera. Deep-water bathyal benthic foraminifera suffered a mass extinction ( 40% species) but no significant extinctions occurred shallow shelf environments. Benthic extinctions are commonly explained as the effects of the initial stage of climate warming due to North Atlantic Volcanic Province volcanism (NAVP), which triggered methane release from ocean sediments causing global warming and ocean acidification. But the relationship between NAPV and the PETM events are not clearly demonstrated. Several studies [1-4] demonstrated the relationship between Hg anomalies in sediments and LIP activity associated with mass extinctions. We investigated the mercury (Hg) content of several sections located in deep bathyal (Zumaya, Trabakua, N-Spain) and outer shelf environments (Dababiya GSSP, Duwi, Egypt). At Zumaya the PETM is marked by a red clayey and marly interval poor in organic matter and coincident with a pronounced ∂13C negative shift. A comparable clay interval with low TOC content is also present in the Dababyia section in the lower part of the negative ∂13C shift, whereas the upper part of is enriched in TOC, reflecting increased productivity. A significant but unique Hg enrichment is observed at the onset of the PETM just below the carbone isotope shift in Spain as well as in Egypt. This increase, which is not correlated with clay or total organic carbon contents, suggests the Hg anomaly resulted from higher atmospheric Hg input into the marine realm, rather than organic matter scavenging and/or increased run-off. This Hg anomaly at the onset of the PETM provides the first direct evidence that volcanism played a

  3. Volcanic-Plutonic Connection in the Tilzapotla Caldera Ignimbrites in Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, B. M.; Moran Zenteno, D. J.; Roberge, J.; Zuñiga-Lagunes, L.; Flores-Huerta, D.; Solari, L.; Lopez-Martinez, M.

    2011-12-01

    Age and compositional similarities in broad exposures of volcanic and plutonic rocks in the central sector of the late Eocene-early Oligocene silicic volcanic province in southern Mexico provide an excellent opportunity for studying the genetic connection between the volcanic and plutonic realms. The Taxco-Tilzapotla sector is of particular interest given the presence of a NW-SE oriented elliptical dome structure (50 x 35 km) that encloses the Tilzapotla caldera, three medium-grained plutons one of which contains mafic magmatic enclaves, hypabyssal intrusive bodies, rhyolitic domes, and voluminous ignimbrites. North-south trending Laramide folds in Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks were disrupted when late Eocene magmas intruded into the upper crust, forming the dome and producing opposite plunges in pre-dome fold axes north and south of the elliptical structure. We have obtained LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb and Ar-Ar mineral ages as well as electron microscope analyses of different magmatic facies in order to: better understand the chronology of magmatic evolution in the area; examine the possible genetic relationship between the plutonic rocks and the principal ignimbritic units, in particular the crystal-rich units; and determine possible compositional differences that might suggest the injection of different batches of magma. U-Pb crystallization ages of 37-36 Ma were determined on zircons from different facies of the Coxcatlan granodiorite. Slightly younger zircon U-Pb crystallization ages were obtained for ignimbrites from the Tilzapotla caldera (36-35 Ma) and for the more mafic Chiautle pluton (34.6 Ma) that is exposed near the southern boundary of the dome structure. Earlier work by our group established caldera collapse and extrusion of the Tilzapotla ignimbrite at 34.3 Ma. Ar-Ar dating gives cooling ages of 33 Ma in sanidine for an intracaldera ignimbrite and some late stage silicic and intermediate magmas yielded mainly between 33-32 Ma. The new and previous

  4. Rare-earth elements enrichment of Pacific seafloor sediments: the view from volcanic islands of Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleton, Jérémie; Tuduri, Johann; Pourret, Olivier; Bailly, Laurent; Gisbert, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    crack that cross-cut the calcite filling the vesicles or the volcanic glass. They are also closely associated with Ni-Mg bearing phyllosilicates, which appear to nucleate from alteration of olivine and clinopyroxenes. Further investigations are done to evidence and confirm an anterior magmatic enrichment. On the basis of these observations, we believe that the anomalous enrichment observed in seafloor sediments could derive from abnormally-rich provinces corresponding to aerial basaltic formations from oceanic islands primarily enriched during weathering processes (Melleton et al., 2014). Melleton et al. (2014). Rare-earth elements enrichment of Pacific sea-floor sediments: the view from volcanic islands of Polynesia. In preparation.

  5. The volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Lousal deposit, Iberian Pyrite Belt (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carlos; Rosa, Diogo; Matos, Joao; Relvas, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) is a massive sulfide province that is located in the south of Portugal and Spain, and hosts more than 90 massive sulfide deposits that amount to more than 1850 million metric tonnes of sulfide ore (Tornos, 2006). The ore deposits size, vary from ~1Mt to >100Mt (e.g. Neves Corvo and Aljustrel in Portugal, and Rio Tinto and Tharsis in Spain). The ore deposits are hosted by a submarine sedimentary and volcanic, felsic dominated, succession that constitutes the Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous Volcanic and Sedimentary Complex (VSC). The VSC ranges in thickness from approximately 600 to 1300 m (Tornos 2006). The VSC overlies the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQ) (Upper Devonian, base unknown) and is overlain by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (Lower to Upper Carboniferous). The Lousal massive sulfide deposit is located in the western part of the IPB and occurs mostly interbedded with black mudstone. The VSC sequence at Lousal mine consists of a mudstone and quartzite sequence (PQ Group) in the lower part of the succession, over which a thick sequence of rhyolitic lavas (>300 m) occurs. Above the rhyolitic lavas there is a thick sequence of black and grey mudstone that hosts the massive sulfide ore bodies, and a rhyolitic sill. The upper part of the VSC sequence consists of a thick mudstone interval that hosts two thick basaltic units, locally with pillows. The rhyolites have small coherent cores, locally with flow bands, that grade to surrounding massive clastic intervals, with large lateral extent. The clasts show jigsaw-fit arrangement in many places and have planar or curviplanar margins and locally are perlitic at the margin. The top contact of these units is in most locations not exposed, which makes difficult to interpret the mode of emplacement. However, the thick clastic intervals, above described, are in accordance with quenching of volcanic glass with abundant water and therefore indicate that quenching of the rhyolites was the

  6. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  7. Feedback between deglaciation and volcanism in arc settings: the example of the Mount Mazama volcanic system, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branecky, C.; Farner, M. J.; Keller, T.; Lanza, F.; Siravo, G.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Manga, M.; van der Wal, W.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have found correlations between glacial cycles and volcanism. Any such feedback mechanisms could have important implications for climate through variations in volcanic outgassing. Although decompression melting has been established as a cause for increased volcanism during deglaciation at mid-ocean ridge systems (Jull and McKenzie, 1996), it has not been determined how changes in glacial loading affect other settings such as volcanic arcs. We examine the Mount Mazama volcanic system, Oregon, where pulses of volcanism have been suggested to follow major deglaciations (Bacon et al. 2006). A statistical test regarding the timing of eruptions is first developed, and its application to eruption dates demonstrates statistically significant clustering of eruptions following deglaciation. To explore potential causes for the identified changes in probability of eruptions, the effects of glacial unloading on melt production are computed using a 1D mantle melting model, and the effect of ice unloading on shallow crustal stress conditions is tested with a viscoelastic stress model. Combining these effects into a simple eruption model, we propose that variations in melt supply rates from the mantle and changing stress conditions around a shallow crustal magma reservoir modulate eruption probability during glacial cycles. This model illustrates the physical plausibility of glacial variability causing the identified changes in eruption rates at Mt Mazama.

  8. Volcanic unrest and hazard communication in Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of volcanic unrest in Long Valley Caldera, California, in 1980 and the subsequent fluctuations in unrest levels through May 2016 illustrate: (1) the evolving relations between scientists monitoring the unrest and studying the underlying tectonic/magmatic processes and their implications for geologic hazards, and (2) the challenges in communicating the significance of the hazards to the public and civil authorities in a mountain resort setting. Circumstances special to this case include (1) the sensitivity of an isolated resort area to media hype of potential high-impact volcanic and earthquake hazards and its impact on potential recreational visitors and the local economy, (2) a small permanent population (~8000), which facilitates face-to-face communication between scientists monitoring the hazard, civil authorities, and the public, and (3) the relatively frequent turnover of people in positions of civil authority, which requires a continuing education effort on the nature of caldera unrest and related hazards. Because of delays associated with communication protocols between the State and Federal governments during the onset of unrest, local civil authorities and the public first learned that the U.S. Geological Survey was about to release a notice of potential volcanic hazards associated with earthquake activity and 25-cm uplift of the resurgent dome in the center of the caldera through an article in the Los Angeles Times published in May 1982. The immediate reaction was outrage and denial. Gradual acceptance that the hazard was real required over a decade of frequent meetings between scientists and civil authorities together with public presentations underscored by frequently felt earthquakes and the onset of magmatic CO2 emissions in 1990 following a 11-month long earthquake swarm beneath Mammoth Mountain on the southwest rim of the caldera. Four fatalities, one on 24 May 1998 and three on 6 April 2006, underscored the hazard posed by the CO2

  9. Decompression Melting beneath the Indonesian Volcanic Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K. A.; Colabella, A.; Sisson, T. W.; Hauri, E. H.; Sigurdsson, H.

    2006-12-01

    Subduction zone magmas are typically characterized by high concentrations of dissolved H2O (up to 6-7 wt%), presumably derived from the subducted plate and ultimately responsible for melt generation in this tectonic setting. Pressure-release melting from upward mantle flow, however, is increasingly cited as a secondary driver of mantle wedge melting. Here we report new SIMS volatile and LA-ICP-MS trace element data for olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Galunggung (GG) and Tambora (TB) volcanoes in the Indonesian subduction zone to evaluate the relative importance of decompression vs. H2O-flux melting beneath arc volcanoes. Prior studies of melt inclusions from Galunggung showed unusually low primary H2O concentrations (~0.5 wt%), implicating decompression as a significant mechanism of mantle melting beneath this volcano (Sisson &Bronto, 1998). Our new data from a larger suite of Galunggung melt inclusions show a bimodal distribution of H2O concentrations: a dominant population with ~0.5 wt% H2O, and a small group with 1.5-2.5 wt% H2O, indicating that a small amount of H2O addition from the slab may also contribute to mantle melting here. New volatile data from Tambora melt inclusions also indicate low primary H2O contents (1-2 wt%), suggesting that decompression melting may be a large-scale characteristic of the Indonesian volcanic front. Our new trace element data show both volcanoes are LREE enriched relative to MORB, but Tambora melts show greater LREE enrichment (La/Sm=1.7-2.7[GG]; 6.0- 9.5[TB]). Galunggung melts have Nb/Y in the range of NMORB (0.1-0.2), whereas Tambora Nb/Y is similar to EMORB (0.3-0.5). Most Tambora melt inclusions also have H2O/Y (Y (200-1000) and H2O/Ce (100-1400) relative to NMORB, suggesting a larger influence from slab-derived H2O despite having lower average H2O concentrations than Tambora. The range of H2O/Y and H2O/Ce at Galunggung, however, is largely within the range of back-arc basin basalts and does not preclude a major

  10. Two classes of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 images of the south polar region of Io has revealed that a major volcanic eruption occured there during the period between the two spacecraft encounters. An annular deposit ???1400 km in diameter formed around the Aten Patera caldera (311??W, 48??S), the floor of which changed from orange to red-black. The characteristics of this eruption are remarkably similar to those described earlier for an eruption centered on Surt caldera (338??W, 45??N) that occured during the same period, also at high latitude, but in the north. Both volcanic centers were evidently inactive during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters but were active sometime between the two. The geometric and colorimetric characteristics, as well as scale of the two annular deposits, are virtually identical; both resemble the surface features formed by the eruption of Pele (255??W, 18??S). These three very large plume eruptions suggest a class of eruption distinct from that of six smaller plumes observed to be continously active by both Voyagers 1 and 2. The smaller plumes, of which Prometheus is the type example, are longer-lived, deposit bright, whitish material, erupt at velocities of ???0.5 km sec-1, and are concentrated at low latitudes in an equatorial belt around the satellite. The very large Pele-type plumes, on the other hand, are relatively short-lived, deposit darker red materials, erupt at ???1.0 km sec-1, and (rather than restricted to a latitudinal band) are restricted in longitude from 240?? to 360??W. Both direct thermal infrared temperature measurements and the implied color temperatures for quenched liquid sulfur suggest that hot spot temperatures of ???650??K are associated with the large plumes and temperatures 650??K), sulfur is a low-viscosity fluid (orange and black, respectively); at other temperatures it is either solid or has a high viscosity. As a result, there will be two zones in Io's crust in which liquid sulfur will flow freely: a shallow zone

  11. Magma wagging and whirling in volcanic conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yang; Bercovici, David; Jellinek, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Seismic tremor characterized by 0.5-7 Hz ground oscillations commonly occur before and during eruptions at silicic volcanoes with widely ranging vent geometries and edifice structures. The ubiquitous characteristics of this tremor imply that its causes are potentially common to silicic volcanoes. Here we revisit and extend to three dimensions the magma-wagging model for tremor (Jellinek and Bercovici, 2011; Bercovici et al., 2013), wherein a stiff magma column rising in a vertical conduit oscillates against a surrounding foamy annulus of bubbly magma, giving rise to tremor. While prior studies were restricted to two-dimensional lateral oscillations, here we explore three-dimensional motion and additional modes of oscillations. In the absence of viscous damping, the magma column undergoes 'whirling' motion: the center of each horizontal section of the column traces an elliptical trajectory. In the presence of viscous effect we identify new 'coiling' and 'uncoiling' column bending shapes with relatively higher and comparable rates of dissipation to the original two-dimensional magma wagging model. We also calculate the seismic P-wave response of the crustal material around the volcanic conduit to the new whirling motions and propose seismic diagnostics for different wagging patterns using the time-lag between seismic stations. We test our model by analyzing pre-eruptive seismic data from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. In addition to suggesting that the occurrence of elliptical whirling motion more than 1 week before the eruption, our analysis of seismic time-lags also implies that the 2009 eruption was accompanied by qualitative changes in the magma wagging behavior including fluctuations in eccentricity and a reversal in the direction of elliptical whirling motion when the eruption was immediately impending.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of distributed volcanic source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed algorithm (Camacho et al., 2011) claims to rapidly estimate magmatic sources from surface geodetic data without any a priori assumption about source geometry. The algorithm takes the advantages of fast calculation from the analytical models and adds the capability to model free-shape distributed sources. Assuming homogenous elastic conditions, the approach can determine general geometrical configurations of pressured and/or density source and/or sliding structures corresponding to prescribed values of anomalous density, pressure and slip. These source bodies are described as aggregation of elemental point sources for pressure, density and slip, and they fit the whole data (keeping some 3D regularity conditions). Although some examples and applications have been already presented to demonstrate the ability of the algorithm in reconstructing a magma pressure source (e.g. Camacho et al., 2011,Cannavò et al., 2015), a systematic analysis of sensitivity and reliability of the algorithm is still lacking. In this explorative work we present results from a large statistical test designed to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the methodology by assessing its sensitivity to the free and constrained parameters involved in inversions. In particular, besides the source parameters, we focused on the ground deformation network topology, and noise in measurements. The proposed analysis can be used for a better interpretation of the algorithm results in real-case applications. Camacho, A. G., González, P. J., Fernández, J. & Berrino, G. (2011) Simultaneous inversion of surface deformation and gravity changes by means of extended bodies with a free geometry: Application to deforming calderas. J. Geophys. Res. 116. Cannavò F., Camacho A.G., González P.J., Mattia M., Puglisi G., Fernández J. (2015) Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises, Scientific Reports, 5 (10970) doi:10.1038/srep

  13. Stochastic Modelling of Past Volcanic Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Gordon

    2017-04-01

    It is customary to have continuous monitoring of volcanoes showing signs of unrest that might lead to an eruption threatening local populations. Despite scientific progress in estimating the probability of an eruption occurring, the concept of continuously tracking eruption probability remains a future aspiration for volcano risk analysts. During some recent major volcanic crises, attempts have been made to estimate the eruption probability in real time to support government decision-making. These include the possibility of an eruption of Katla linked with the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, and the Santorini crisis of 2011-2012. However, once a crisis fades, interest in analyzing the probability that there might have been an eruption tends to wane. There is an inherent outcome bias well known to psychologists: if disaster was avoided, there is perceived to be little purpose in exploring scenarios where a disaster might have happened. Yet the better that previous periods of unrest are understood and modelled, the better that the risk associated with future periods of unrest will be quantified. Scenarios are counterfactual histories of the future. The task of quantifying the probability of an eruption for a past period of unrest should not be merely a statistical calculation, but should serve to elucidate and refine geophysical models of the eruptive processes. This is achieved by using a Bayesian Belief Network approach, in which monitoring observations are used to draw inferences on the underlying causal factors. Specifically, risk analysts are interested in identifying what dynamical perturbations might have tipped an unrest period in history over towards an eruption, and assessing what was the likelihood of such perturbations. Furthermore, in what ways might a historical volcano crisis have turned for the worse? Such important counterfactual questions are addressed in this paper.

  14. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  15. Cogeneration opportunities in the maritime provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    With the arrival of natural gas in New Brunswick in November 1999, the province will be faced with new power generation development opportunities in four different categories of power projects. These include industrial self generation (including cogeneration), merchant power plants, power projects to replace aging facilities, and power projects to help meet future environmental needs. New Brunswick's competitive advantage in harnessing the power generation development opportunities lies in the fact that it is close to major electricity markets in Quebec and New England. It also has many available generation sites. The province's many pulp and paper plants with large process steam needs are also ideal candidates for cogeneration. Some of the major competitive advantages of natural gas over coal are its lower operation and maintenance costs, it is thermally more efficient, produces lower emissions to the environment and prices are competitive. One of the suggestions in New Brunswick Power's new restructuring proposal is to unbundle electricity service in the province into generation and transmission and distribution services. Three gas-fired projects have already been proposed for the province. The 284 MW Bayside Power Project at the Courtenay Bay Generating Station is the most advanced

  16. Policing powers, Politics, Pragmatism and the Provinces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The draft Western Cape Community Safety Bill, introduced in the provincial legislature in February 2012, is part of a broader provincial government initiative to tackle issues of safety in the province. The Bill sets out to concretise the powers allocated to provincial governments by the Constitution. Specific provisions reflect the ...

  17. [Factors influencing infant mortality. Havana Province, 1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell-florit Serrate, P; Portuondo Dustet, N; Suarez Rosas, L; Ovies Garcia, A; Alvarez Fernandez, R; Lima Perez, M T

    1986-01-01

    Questionnaires intended to determine the factors involved in deaths in infants under 1 year have been completed in the province of Havana, Cuba, since 1980. The questionnaires are completed by obstetricians and pediatricians of the municipal health areas and analyzed at the secondary care level. This work examines the factors present in the 133 infant deaths occurring in Havana Province in 1983. The infant mortality rate in the province in 1983 was 14.1/1000 live births, the lowest ever recorded in the province. 74 of the deaths occurred in the early neonatal period, 13 in the late neonatal, and 46 in the postneonatal period. 22 of the early neonatal deaths were due to intrapartum anoxia, 15 to hyaline membrane disease, 10 to prematurity, 7 to bronchoaspiration, 3 to sepsis, 1 to bronchial pneumonia, and 13 to malformations. In the late neonatal and postneonatal periods, 11 deaths were attributed to acute diarrheal disease, 6 to meningitis, and 5 to accidents. 8 of the mothers were under 17 years old, 30 were 18-20, 57 were 21-30, and 16 were 31 or over. Maternal age was unknown for 22. 22 of the mothers were overweight, 29 were malnourished, 55 were of normal nutritional status, and the status of 27 was unknown. 67.7% of the early neonatal deaths were in low birth weight babies. Low educational level and rural residence were social factors in infant mortality.

  18. Human rabies in Zhejiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangping Ren

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The majority of rabies cases occurred among 40–65-year-old male residents of northern, mid-west, and southeast Zhejiang Province. Further health education is needed to increase the coverage of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP in people exposed to possible rabid animals and rabies vaccine use in household animals.

  19. Sedimentary rocks Uranium in Cerro Largo Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaron, P.; Garau Tous, M.

    1976-01-01

    With the aim of the uranium minerals exploration has been carried out several studies by UTE technicians in Cerro Largo Province from 1968 to 1969. In uranium concentration has been found pyrite, phosphate, iron oxides and manganese in uranium. Furthermore in La Divisa Ore were studied concentration Uranium enrichment has been studied in La Divisa ore

  20. Presence of soil gas and indoor Radon in volcanic areas located in Latium and Campania Regions, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buccheri, G.; Addonizio, P.; Rinaldini, A.

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, radon highest concentrations concern all Tyrrhenian belt. The abundant distribution of the radioactive elements in Latium and in Campania, often accompanied by emissions of endogenic gas (CO 2 , CO and H 2 S), is strictly related to quaternary alkali-potassic volcanism. This article reports about connection between Radon presence and geology (which also influences the most used building materials) within two active areas in Latium and Campania Regions (Italy). Colli Albani are located in Latium. This area is considered as a quiescent volcano, whose last eruptive phase dates back to 41-36 kya, with deposition of Peperino di Albano, a lithoid granular tuff that Romans commonly used as a building and decorative material (lapis albanus). Campania is the second Region of Italy as for population (and more than 50 % of its 6 million of inhabitants are concentrated in the Province of Naples), and volcanism is mainly connected there to the presence of a deep and large volcanic complex, related to a mantle anomaly. INAIL is busy in research activity for evaluation and management of risk for health at workplaces, connected to exposure to indoor radon, taking into account of active laws. Starting from knowledge about geologic activity in Latium and in Campania, the aim of INAIL research activity is estimation of hazard, because of Rn, CO 2 and other endogenic toxic gases, at workplaces located in both Regions. In order to estimate risk from Radon, INAIL carried out soil gas measurements in Alban Hills area, and one more series of Radon measurements has been planned downtown in Naples, where many commercial and artisanal activities are located underground (mainly in tuffaceous buildings). According to the indications provided by the Directive 2013/59/Euratom, INAIL measurements will be aimed to realize Radon Potential Maps (RPM), that may help Italian Institutions to identify hazard areas, realize an effective territorial plan and to assess health risk. (authors)

  1. Aggregation in particle rich environments: a textural study of examples from volcanic eruptions, meteorite impacts, and fluidized bed processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Huber, Matthew S; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Poesges, Gisela; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Dingwell, Donald B

    2018-01-01

    Aggregation is a common process occurring in many diverse particulate gas mixtures (e.g. those derived from explosive volcanic eruptions, meteorite impact events, and fluid bed processing). It results from the collision and sticking of particles suspended in turbulent gas/air. To date, there is no generalized model of the underlying physical processes. Here, we investigate aggregates from 18 natural deposits (16 volcanic deposits and two meteorite impact deposits) as well as aggregates produced experimentally via fluidized bed techniques. All aggregates were analyzed for their size, internal structuring, and constituent particle size distribution. Commonalities and differences between the aggregate types are then used to infer salient features of the aggregation process. Average core to rim ratios of internally structured aggregates (accretionary lapilli) is found to be similar for artificial and volcanic aggregates but up to an order of magnitude different than impact-related aggregates. Rim structures of artificial and volcanic aggregates appear to be physically similar (single, sub-spherical, regularly-shaped rims) whereas impact-related aggregates more often show multiple or irregularly shaped rims. The particle size distributions (PSDs) of all three aggregate types are similar (< 200 μm). This proves that in all three environments, aggregation occurs under broadly similar conditions despite the significant differences in source conditions (particle volume fraction, particle size distribution, particle composition, temperature), residence times, plume conditions (e.g., humidity and temperature), and dynamics of fallout and deposition. Impact-generated and volcanic aggregates share many similarities, and in some cases may be indistinguishable without their stratigraphic context.

  2. Aggregation in particle rich environments: a textural study of examples from volcanic eruptions, meteorite impacts, and fluidized bed processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Huber, Matthew S.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Poesges, Gisela; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2018-04-01

    Aggregation is a common process occurring in many diverse particulate gas mixtures (e.g. those derived from explosive volcanic eruptions, meteorite impact events, and fluid bed processing). It results from the collision and sticking of particles suspended in turbulent gas/air. To date, there is no generalized model of the underlying physical processes. Here, we investigate aggregates from 18 natural deposits (16 volcanic deposits and two meteorite impact deposits) as well as aggregates produced experimentally via fluidized bed techniques. All aggregates were analyzed for their size, internal structuring, and constituent particle size distribution. Commonalities and differences between the aggregate types are then used to infer salient features of the aggregation process. Average core to rim ratios of internally structured aggregates (accretionary lapilli) is found to be similar for artificial and volcanic aggregates but up to an order of magnitude different than impact-related aggregates. Rim structures of artificial and volcanic aggregates appear to be physically similar (single, sub-spherical, regularly-shaped rims) whereas impact-related aggregates more often show multiple or irregularly shaped rims. The particle size distributions (PSDs) of all three aggregate types are similar (< 200 μm). This proves that in all three environments, aggregation occurs under broadly similar conditions despite the significant differences in source conditions (particle volume fraction, particle size distribution, particle composition, temperature), residence times, plume conditions (e.g., humidity and temperature), and dynamics of fallout and deposition. Impact-generated and volcanic aggregates share many similarities, and in some cases may be indistinguishable without their stratigraphic context.

  3. Influences on the variability of eruption sequences and style transitions in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Procter, Jonathan; Agustín-Flores, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanism is characterised by a complex array of eruptive behaviours, reflecting spatial and temporal variability of the magmatic properties (e.g. composition, eruptive volume, magma flux) as well as environmental factors at the vent site (e.g. availability of water, country rock geology, faulting). These combine to produce changes in eruption style over brief periods (minutes to days) in many eruption episodes. Monogenetic eruptions in some volcanic fields often start with a phreatomagmatic vent-opening phase that later transforms into "dry" magmatic explosive or effusive activity, with a strong variation in the duration and importance of this first phase. Such an eruption sequence pattern occurred in 83% of the known eruption in the 0.25 My-old Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. In this investigation, the eruptive volumes were compared with the sequences of eruption styles preserved in the pyroclastic record at each volcano of the AVF, as well as environmental influencing factors, such as distribution and thickness of water-saturated semi- to unconsolidated sediments, topographic position, distances from known fault lines. The AVF showed that there is no correlation between ejecta ring volumes and environmental influencing factors that is valid for the entire AVF. In contrary, using a set of comparisons of single volcanoes with well-known and documented sequences, resultant eruption sequences could be explained by predominant patterns of the environment in which these volcanoes were erupted. Based on the spatial variability of these environmental factors, a first-order susceptibility hazard map was constructed for the AVF that forecasts areas of largest likelihood for phreatomagmatic eruptions by overlaying topographical and shallow geological information. Combining detailed phase-by-phase breakdowns of eruptive volumes and the event sequences of the AVF, along with the new susceptibility map, more realistic eruption scenarios can be

  4. Injection of gases into the stratosphere by explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Christiane; Graf, Hans-F.; Herzog, Michael; Oberhuber, J. M.

    2003-10-01

    Explosive eruptions can inject large amounts of volcanic gases into the stratosphere. These gases may be scavenged by hydrometeors within the eruption column, and high uncertainties remain regarding the proportion of volcanic gases, which eventually reach the stratosphere. These are caused by the difficulties of directly sampling explosive volcanic eruption columns and by the lack of laboratory studies in the extreme parameter regime characterizing them. Using the nonhydrostatic nonsteady state plume model Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), we simulated an explosive volcanic eruption. We examined the scavenging efficiency for the climatically relevant gases within the eruption column. The low concentration of water in the plume results in the formation of relatively dry aggregates. More than 99% of these are frozen because of their fast ascent to low-temperature regions. Consideration of the salinity effect increases the amount of liquid water by one order of magnitude, but the ice phase is still highly dominant. Consequently, the scavenging efficiency for HCl is very low, and only 1% is dissolved in liquid water. However, scavenging by ice particles via direct gas incorporation during diffusional growth is a significant process. The salinity effect increases the total scavenging efficiency for HCl from about 50% to about 90%. The sulfur-containing gases SO2 and H2S are only slightly soluble in liquid water; however, these gases are incorporated into ice particles with an efficiency of 10 to 30%. Despite scavenging, more than 25% of the HCl and 80% of the sulfur gases reach the stratosphere because most of the particles containing these species are lifted there. Sedimentation of the particles would remove the volcanic gases from the stratosphere. Hence the final quantity of volcanic gases injected in a particular eruption depends on the fate of the particles containing them, which is in turn dependent on the volcanic and environmental

  5. Regional importance of post-6 M.Y. old vocanism in the southern Great Basin: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes our activities during the period July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1988. Our goal was to develop an understanding of late-Miocene and Pliocene volcanism in the Great Basin by studying late-Tertiary volcanic rocks to the north and south of the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). We especially concentrated on detailed stratigraphic studies and geochemistry to determine the nature of chemical changes during the lifetime of a volcanic field, and on structural studies to determine the nature of the structures that control vent location. Also, K-Ar age dating provided important new information on the duration of activity at a single volcanic center. Geologic studies were concentrated in the Fortification basalt field in southern Nevada and in the Reveille Range in central Nevada. Our studies provide three important conclusions that have implications for volcanism about the proposed Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain. There are no easily recognized geochemical characteristics that signify the termination of volcanism. The location of vent areas of basaltic volcanoes are not necessarily controlled by pre-existing structures. Volcanism at an individual basaltic center may last as long as 500,000 years. 32 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Petrography, geochemistry and tectonic setting of Salmabad Tertiary volcanic rocks, southeast of Sarbisheh, eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Goodarzi

    2014-10-01

    is attributed to the mantle source, presumably metasomatized by the Sistan ocean subduction. The trace element features are consistent with the roles played by subducted sediments and fluid released from the subducted slab in magma genesis. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank reviewers for the constructive comments which greatly contributed to the improvement of the manuscript. References Berberian, F., Muir, I.D., Pankhurst, R.J. and Berberian, M., 1982. Late Cretaceous and early Miocene Andean type plutonic activity in northern Makran and Central Iran. Journal of the Geological Society, 139(5: 605-614. Camp, V.E. and Griffis, R., 1982. Character, genesis and tectonic setting of igneous rocks in the Sistan suture zone, eastern Iran. Lithos, 15(3: 221-239. Gill, R., 2010. Igneous rocks and processes. Wiley-Blackwell, Malaysia, 428 pp. Harangi, S., Downes, H., Thirlwall, M., Gmeling, K., 2007. Geochemistry, Petrogenesis and Geodynamic Relationships of Miocene Calc-alkalineVolcanic Rocks in the Western Carpathian arc, Eastern Central Europe. Journal of petrology, 48(12: 2261-2287. Jung, D., Keller, J., Khorasani, R., Marcks, Chr., Baumann, A. and Horn, P., 1983. Petrology of the Tertiary magmatic activity the northern Lut area, East of Iran. Ministry of mines and metals, Geological survey of Iran, geodynamic project (geotraverse in Iran, Tehran, Report 51, pp. 285-336. Karimpour, M.H., Stern, C.R., Farmer, L., Saadat, S. and Malekezadeh, A., 2011. Review of age, Rb-Sr geochemistry and petrogenesis of Jurassic to Quaternary igneous rocks in Lut Block, Eastern Iran. Geopersia, 1(1:19-36. Kuscu, G.G. and Geneli, F., 2010. Review of post-collisional volcanism in the central Anatolian volcanic province(Turkey, with special reference to the Tepekoy volcanic complex. International Journal of Earth Sciences, 99(3: 593-621. Richards, J.P., Spell, T., Rameh, E., Razique, A. and Fletcher T., 2012. High Sr/Y Magmas Reflect Arc Maturity,High Magmatic Water Content, and

  7. The onset of the volcanism in the Ciomadul Volcanic Dome Complex (Eastern Carpathians): Eruption chronology and magma type variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Kata; Harangi, Szabolcs; Lukács, Réka; Dunkl, István; Schmitt, Axel K.; Kiss, Balázs; Garamhegyi, Tamás; Seghedi, Ioan

    2018-04-01

    Combined zircon U-Th-Pb and (U-Th)/He dating was applied to refine the eruption chronology of the last 2 Myr for the andesitic and dacitic Pilişca volcano and Ciomadul Volcanic Dome Complex (CVDC), the youngest volcanic area of the Carpathian-Pannonian region, located in the southernmost Harghita, eastern-central Europe. The proposed eruption ages, which are supported also by the youngest zircon crystallization ages, are much younger than the previously determined K/Ar ages. By dating every known eruption center in the CVDC, repose times between eruptive events were also accurately determined. Eruption of the andesite at Murgul Mare (1865 ± 87 ka) and dacite of the Pilişca volcanic complex (1640 ± 37 ka) terminated an earlier pulse of volcanic activity within the southernmost Harghita region, west of the Olt valley. This was followed by the onset of the volcanism in the CVDC, which occurred after several 100s kyr of eruptive quiescence. At ca. 1 Ma a significant change in the composition of erupted magma occurred from medium-K calc-alkaline compositions to high-K dacitic (Baba-Laposa dome at 942 ± 65 ka) and shoshonitic magmas (Malnaş and Bixad domes; 964 ± 46 ka and 907 ± 66 ka, respectively). Noteworthy, eruptions of magmas with distinct chemical compositions occurred within a restricted area, a few km from one another. These oldest lava domes of the CVDC form a NNE-SSW striking tectonic lineament along the Olt valley. Following a brief (ca. 100 kyr) hiatus, extrusion of high-K andesitic magma continued at Dealul Mare (842 ± 53 ka). After another ca. 200 kyr period of quiescence two high-K dacitic lava domes extruded (Puturosul: 642 ± 44 ka and Balvanyos: 583 ± 30 ka). The Turnul Apor lava extrusion occurred after a ca. 200 kyr repose time (at 344 ± 33 ka), whereas formation of the Haramul Mic lava dome (154 ± 16 ka) represents the onset of the development of the prominent Ciomadul volcano. The accurate determination of eruption dates shows that the

  8. Requirements and Implementation Feasibility for a CubeSat Thermal Infrared Imaging System to Monitor the Structure of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, D.; Carroll, R.; Webley, P.; Hawkins, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland caused the cancellation of approximately 108,000 flights over an 8-day period, disrupted air traffic worldwide, and cost the airline industry more than $400 million per day. The inconvenience and economic impact of this and similar events, such as Puyehue-Cordon-Caulle in 2011, have heightened the interest in developing improved satellite remote sensing techniques for monitoring volcanic plumes and drifting clouds. For aviation safety, the operational/research community has started to move towards classifying the concentrations within volcanic plumes and clouds. Additionally, volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are often used for forecasting ash cloud locations and they require knowledge of the structure of the erupting column to improve their ash simulations and also downwind 3-D maps of the ash cloud to calibrate/validate their modeling output. Existing remote sensing satellites utilize a brightness temperature method with thermal infrared (TIR) measurements from 10 - 12 μm to determine mass loading of volcanic ash along a single line of sight, but they have infrequent revisit times and they cannot resolve the three-dimensional structure of the ash clouds. A cluster of CubeSats dedicated to the monitoring of volcanic ash and plumes could provide both more frequent updates and the multi-aspect images needed to resolve the density structure of volcanic ash clouds and plumes. In this presentation, we discuss the feasibility and requirements for a CubeSat TIR imaging system and the associated on-board image processing that would be required to monitor the structure of volcanic ash clouds from Low Earth Orbit.

  9. Multi-criteria correlation of tephra deposits to source centres applied in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jenni L.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Leonard, Graham S.; Timm, Christian; McGee, Lucy E.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Smith, Euan G. C.

    2017-07-01

    Linking tephras back to their source centre(s) in volcanic fields is crucial not only to reconstruct the eruptive history of the volcanic field but also to understand tephra dispersal patterns and thus the potential hazards posed by a future eruption. Here we present a multi-disciplinary approach to correlate distal basaltic tephra deposits from the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) to their source centres using proximal whole-rock geochemical signatures. In order to achieve these correlations, major and trace element tephra-derived glass compositions are compared with published and newly obtained whole-rock geochemical data for the entire field. The results show that incompatible trace element ratios (e.g. (Gd/Yb)N, (La/Yb)N, (Zr/Yb)N) vary widely across the AVF (e.g. (La/Yb)N = 5 to 40) but show a more restricted range within samples from a single volcanic centre (e.g. (La/Yb)N = 5 to 10). These ratios are also the least affected by fractional crystallisation and are therefore the most appropriate geochemical tools for correlation between tephra and whole-rock samples. However, findings for the AVF suggest that each volcanic centre does not have a unique geochemical signature in the field as a whole, thus preventing unambiguous correlation of tephras to source centre using geochemistry alone. A number of additional criteria are therefore combined to further constrain the source centres of the distal tephras including age, eruption scale, and location (of centres, and sites where tephra were sampled). The combination of tephrostratigraphy, 40Ar/39Ar dating and morphostratigraphic constraints allow, for the first time, the relative and absolute ordering of 48 of 53 volcanic centres of the Auckland Volcanic Field to be resolved. Eruption frequencies are shown to vary between 0.13 and 1.5 eruptions/kyr and repose periods between individual eruptions vary from <0.1 to 13 kyr, with 23 of the 48 centres shown to have pre-eruptive repose periods of <1000 years. No spatial

  10. Syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes in the Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia, Russia, and implications for the emplacement of South African-style kimberlite pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurszlaukis, S.; Mahotkin, I.; Rotman, A. Y.; Kolesnikov, G. V.; Makovchuk, I. V.

    2009-11-01

    The Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, with a surface area of 59 ha, is one of the largest pipes in the Yakutian kimberlite province. The Devonian pipe was emplaced under structural control into Lower Paleozoic karstic limestone. The pipe complex consists of several smaller precursor pipes which are cut by the large, round Main pipe. While the precursor pipes show many features typical for root zones, Main pipe is younger, cuts into the precursor pipes and exposes well-bedded volcaniclastic sediments. The maximum estimated erosion since emplacement is 250 m. Open pit mapping of a 180 m thick kimberlite sequence documents the waning phases of the volcanic activity in the kimberlite pipe and the onset of its crater infill by resedimentation. Three volcanic lithofacies types can be differentiated. The deepest and oldest facies type is a massive volcaniclastic rock ("AKB") only accessible in drill core. It is equivalent to Tuffisitic Kimberlite in South African pipes and thought to be related to the main volcanic phase which was characterized by violent explosions. The overlying lithofacies type comprises primary and resedimented volcaniclastic sediments as well as rock avalanche deposits sourced from the exposed maar crater collar. It represents the onset of sedimentation onto the crater floor during the waning phase of volcanic eruptions, where primary pyroclastic deposition was contemporaneous with resedimentation from the tephra wall and the widening maar crater. Ongoing volcanic activity is also testified by the presence of a vertical feeder conduit marking the area of the last volcanic eruption clouds piercing through the diatreme. This feeder conduit is overlain by the third and youngest lithofacies type which consists mainly of resedimented volcaniclastic material and lake beds. During the sedimentation of this facies, primary volcanic activity was only minor and finally absent and resedimentation processes dominated the crater infill. The Yubileinaya pipe complex

  11. Women in Poverty: Experience from Limpopo Province, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Indexed African Journals Online: www.ajol.info. Poverty rating by province (table 1) suggests that Limpopo province occupies the ninth position in the country with poverty rating of 77%. The province accounts for about 832 200 households, with a ration of 5.4 people per household, 4.0 people per shack and about 34 700 ...

  12. Characteristics and origin of Continental and Oceanic Intraplate Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. I.; Conrad, C. P.; Johnsen, R. L.; Tibbetts, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Intraplate volcanism not clearly associated with plate margin tectonics or mantle plumes occurs in both continental and oceanic environments. A compilation of intraplate volcanic fields indicates several common traits: (1) volcanoes are predominately alkali basalt although tholeiitic, bimodal rhyolite basalt and calc-alkaline magma types occur in the Basin and Range and Utah Transition Zone in the western US; (2) volcanoes are monogenetic and occur in separate volcanic fields that rarely display time migration; (3) intraplate continental volcanic fields form by repeated episodic eruptions over a long period of time (10 m.y. or longer) in a limited geographic area; (4) extended or fractured intraplate areas tend to localize volcanism and (5) in oceanic environments, intraplate volcanism may produce island chains, but chains lack the time progression expected in plume related volcanism. Although intraplate volcanoes have been studied for decades there is little agreement on a mechanism that explains their formation. A selection of recently proposed mechanisms include “hot fingers or mini plumes” (eastern Australia), melting of fertile lithospheric mantle (Jordan, Basin and Range USA), mantle diapirs and crustal extension (Calatrava Spain), “petit spot” volcanoes formed along fractures related to plate flexure (northwestern Pacific Plate), hot line or tectono-magmatic alignment (Cameroon west Africa), upwelling of hot asthenosphere associated with deep subduction and a stagnant slab (Changbai volcano China), rifting of foreland uplifts associated with distant subduction (Rhine Graben), mantle plumes (Eifel Germany), small scale sublithospheric convection (SSC) (Gilbert and Pukapuka ridges Pacific Plate) and shear driven asthenospheric upwelling (SDU) (Basin and Range USA). Although all of these mechanisms have their merits, few explain the longevity of intraplate volcanism and repeated eruptions in the same geographic area. SSC [1] invokes the slow replacement

  13. Firewaves: introducing a platform for modelling volcanic tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël; Ulvrova, Martina; Kelfoun, Karim; Giachetti, Thomas; Switzer, Adam

    2014-05-01

    When embracing all tsunamis generated by eruptive processes, rapid ground deformation and slope instability at volcanoes, "volcanic tsunamis" represent around 5 % of all tsunamis listed for the last four centuries (>130 events since 1600 AD). About 20-25 % of all fatalities directly attributable to volcanoes during the last 250 years have been caused by volcanic tsunamis (e.g. Krakatau 1883, Mayuyama 1792). Up to eight mechanisms are implied in the generation of volcanic tsunamis: underwater explosions, pyroclastic flows and lahars entering the water, earthquake preceding or during a volcanic eruption, and flank failure, collapse of coastal lava bench, caldera collapse, and shock wave produced by large explosion. It is unlikely that shock waves, lahars and collapses of lava bench can give birth to tsunamis with wave heights of more than 3 m. Pyroclastic flows, flank failures and caldera subsidence are the only source mechanisms likely to imply volumes larger than 1 km³. Volcanic tsunamis are characterised by short-period waves and greater dispersion compared to earthquake-generated tsunamis. With the exceptions of the 1888 Ritter Island and 1883 Krakatau tsunamis, 100 % of the victims of volcanic tsunamis in Southeast Asia were less than 20 km from the volcano. Travel time of the waves from the volcano to a distance of 20 km is typically less than 15 minutes (Paris et al. 2014). In this setting, priority are (1) to improve population's preparedness around highlighted volcanoes, (2) to monitor sea / lake around volcanoes, (3) and to build a database of numerical simulations based on different eruptive scenarios. The Firewaves platform, hosted at Magmas & Volcans laboratory in Clermont-Ferrand (FRance) is a numerical solution for modelling volcanic tsunamis of different sources. Tsunamis generated by volcanic mass flows (including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches etc.) are simulated using VolcFlow code (Kelfoun et al. 2010), and underwater explosions and caldera

  14. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2014, using CESM1(WACCM): VOLCANIC AEROSOLS DERIVED FROM EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Michael J. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Schmidt, Anja [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Easter, Richard [Atmospheric Sciences and Glob